35 Burst results for "Two Hundred Mile"

North Carolina dog owner reunited with pet after 1 year

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 5 months ago

North Carolina dog owner reunited with pet after 1 year

"A North Carolina woman gets her lost dog back after more than a year and two hundred miles Kendall Federico with Guilford county animal services says in November they got the dog it was adopted but didn't get along with the family's cats they re posted a picture online that's when the owner's daughter in New York sought we commented on her picture and send it back Hey that's my dog here picture of him he was missing for a year Federico says the five year old town makes is lucky to be reunited read the story and honestly probably something of a miracle that it would be even able to happen given the circumstances she says the dog had a microchip the information wasn't current and reminds people keep it updated I'm Julie Walker

Kendall Federico Guilford County Animal Service North Carolina Federico New York Julie Walker
Powerful Earthquake Near Mexico's Acapulco Kills at Least 1

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

Powerful Earthquake Near Mexico's Acapulco Kills at Least 1

"A powerful earthquake struck near the Pacific resort city of Acapulco killing at least one person and causing buildings to rock and sway in Mexico City nearly two hundred miles away people rushed into the capital's streets following the quake the trip was causing power outages in many parts of the city the epicenter was close to Acapulco striking at a depth of around six miles according to the U. S. tsunami warning system a tsunami was possible in that region of the Pacific coast the entire west coast of the American continent he's on the so called Pacific ring of fire which is known for seismic activity I'm Charles de Ledesma

Acapulco Pacific Resort Earthquake Mexico City Tsunami Pacific Coast Charles De Ledesma
Strong Earthquake Hits Near Acapulco, Mexico

NPR News Now

00:18 sec | 1 year ago

Strong Earthquake Hits Near Acapulco, Mexico

"Mexico. A magnitude seven earthquake stricken area near acapulco causing damage to several buildings. The quake was felt over two hundred miles away. In mexico. city prompting some frightened residents there to flee to safety power outages were reported in some parts of the city.

Earthquake Stricken Mexico Acapulco
The Tesla Model S Has Gone Plaid

The 3:59

01:18 min | 1 year ago

The Tesla Model S Has Gone Plaid

"So tesla unveiled the model plaid. Addition what are you getting for that Very bargain-basement one hundred thirty one thousand dollar price. This incredibly affordable tesla is basically. What musk is trying to do is say that these are the best car. That's kind of what they've always been trying to do what they really want to do with this flat dishes show that they can be the quickest fast cars while so what we've got here is a super duper edition of the model s. with three electric motors allowed to go from the to sixty in sierra under two seconds. Although there's a big asterisk which get into minute cover the quarter mile in about nine point. Two seconds three hundred ninety miles of range at top speed around two hundred miles an hour so definitely the speed is the main talking point. But they've also made some other improve on the interior and everything else to well. Wanna get into all that but before we get to details of the car at the ask. Plaid edition is that that is baseball. Reference yes yeah. We've definitely seen a number of space while references over the years It remains to be seen exactly where we're gonna go to from here but yes we have gone. Plaid tesla had promised to plaid plus edition. That was also supposed to launch this week But musk actually just went ahead and cancelled that. He said they don't actually need that anymore. But i'm a little bit skeptical then

Tesla Electric Motors Sierra Plaid Tesla Baseball
95% of bull kelp forests have vanished from portion of California coast

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 1 year ago

95% of bull kelp forests have vanished from portion of California coast

"Until recently giants seaweed called bull kelp formed lush underwater forest in northern california's coastal waters. These kelp forests have long provide critical habitat for many species like salmon crabs and jellyfish. But now just a. Few patches of bulk help remain. It's very desolate looking. That's meredith mcpherson. Nephew see santa cruz. She was part of a team that studied satellite images of about two hundred miles of california coastline. They found that starting in twenty fourteen. The area covered by kelp dropped by more than ninety five percent. She says the die off was driven in part by an underwater heat wave which depleted nutrients in the water and made it harder for the kelp grow compounding. The problem populations of purple sea urchins which eat kelp have exploded in the region in coming decades. More marine heat waves are expected. We know that these types of events these warm water events and stronger el nino's going to become more common and frequent with climate change so mcpherson says warming waters and hungry urchins will make it harder for these kelp forest to survive.

Lush Underwater Forest Meredith Mcpherson Northern California California Coastline Santa Cruz El Nino Mcpherson
A Telsa Model S Refresh?

Waveform: The MKBHD Podcast

09:15 min | 1 year ago

A Telsa Model S Refresh?

"You've been telling me about why. I think there's going to be a model as an ex refresh. Yeah and there was like it was really hard to test drive them. There were like upping the sales out of everything they were. You couldn't see them in showrooms anymore night. This big list of rumors as to why we thought it might happen and then like an hour ago. It just all unveiled so well. So there's a there's a lead up to it the the model s. design is it's like ten plus years old at this point like fundamentally. The design of the car is unchanged since the beginning rate. So there's one small outside refresh her where the front grill nose cone. that was an exterior. Like look change. Is that what you call a nosecone nosecone. Yeah i've always just called at the grill. But obviously it's not. It isn't enact plastic nosecone two more metal okay but The autopilot versions changed. But really fundamentally the inside has always been that vertical screen and it's always been the same doors. Same door handles same shape so they've never really changed the model s. in car years. That's a long time let alone tech years that's forever. Yeah so. The rumors have been building for a long time. And we kind of were like. I think that this earnings call on wednesday were according to one night. Just say you know yeah have plans to possibly make video about all this. But we're recording on wednesday night and during the earnings call. They update the site. They give the over all the stuff and dropped a new model lesson ex and yet it's something is there's a lot to it. I guess we'll just. I'm just going to go down the list. This obviously isn't a video podcast yet. But i do have a lot to say about the aesthetics and the things that they've changed right. Yeah maybe i'll use this template as like a guide for the video. What i make it. We'll see i almost debated telling you throw camera up here and just take the clips out and turn it into the youtube video also. Yeah so right off. The bat outside changes are pretty small. They turned all the chrome black kind of like they did with model three and model. I every single car company do that. Please stop with the chrome. I think toyota has been doing it. A bunch with just maybe not even like their door handles and window trim but they've been doing it with their emblems and like the wording and names on the back and they looked so good on every single caller romo terrible. Please stop. Yeah feel old. Basically starting to feel a little bit outdated so it's gone from the car. I think maybe just the logo the last chrome piece. but that's that's pretty sweet and then There's a little bit of a different shape up front a little bit of a more simple grill at the bottom. For the front splitter and different fog i think i read people were saying it looks like the air like in vents are a little bigger probably to help battery cooling yup the better battery performance and i think that leads us beautifully into the new specs before i talk about the interior. So it's just going to be three models model s. and i'm going to focus on model s even a model x. Got this refresh it. Basically doesn't exist tesla like they still make it kind of because they have to nightmare. Yeah there's not a lot of attention around the x this is about the s. I'm just talking about this. Yeah i'm just trying to think of. Who's the i feel like the x. Still gets a lot like in the blogger community. A couple david dobric jake paul logo on it. There's jailers very her. Jalen smith jr jada jason. What's his son's name. Now you've got me thinking. Smith i don jaden has one. There's some there's small market for the ex. Yeah but the model s. is where it's at so there's really just three versions now. And by the way. I'm gonna say overarching for this. Whole thing is simplicity. Dustless manufacturing simplifying line vehicles. So there's three there's a long range model s a plaid model s and a plaid plus model s. so model s long range has four hundred twelve mile range zero to sixteen three point one seconds dual motors and it's. It's a pretty standard. Look that's like what probably most people getting a model less would get then. The performance version is your plaid model s. which goes directly to triple motors. It drops a little bit range three hundred ninety miles but it goes two hundred mile an hour. Top speed and zero to sixty in one point nine nine seconds. I'm gonna say that one more time just in case you didn't hear it this. Several thousand pound four door family car. Hatchback does zero to sixty in one point. Nine nine seconds like you need to like take a an advanced driver's test in order to get something that can go under two seconds to pilot this thing. Yeah yeah every time. I think about like performance cars on the street. I'm like i icy regular people driving cars poorly all the time and i just get a little bit worried about giving them that much power. There's a whole youtube rabbit hole of great like mustang arm beats of people just like wrecking it into the median pulling out yet i mean i guess the good thing is this is all wheel. Drive is the safest car on the world. This is a car that's tries really hard not to crash itself but yeah lot power here but just so you know that's starting at one hundred twelve thousand nine ninety which has ten thousand more than the previous model and then plaid plus is eleven hundred horsepower versus that one thousand twenty of plaid zero to sixty. There are a little more vague with this under one point nine nine seconds. So it'll be faster. We don't know how much faster it's still trip promoters. And it'll do the quarter mile in less than nine seconds which would make it. The quickest zero to sixty and the quickest quarter-mile acceleration in any production car. Ever and again. this is not yet the roadster. This is just a speck. Yeah but the most interesting spec to me of plaid plus is it still triple motor. There's new battery info but it goes five hundred twenty plus miles on a charge. So what was the long range again. Four sixty long-range was four. Twelve for twelve plaid was down to three ninety and then plaid plus was five twenty so this leads me to believe that. Plaid plus is a different battery technology. Do you think it's the one. Because that's sounds around the specs of the roadster was supposed to have right exactly roadsters. Got us six twenty plus quoted mile range and on top of that. This is the one other thing that's really interesting. I'll just touch on the x for a second. I don't think this is happening the x. Because if you go to the model x. site you can see you have the long range version which has a three hundred sixty mile range and the plaid version which has a three hundred forty mile range. So there's no plaid. Plus so whatever's happening with plaid. Plus is i guess this ultra high end security premium powertrain and battery system that only the high end model s. And i guess eventually roadster star gonna get it. Sounds like it's just a roadster with a model spotty it's a four door roadster four door to door. Yeah no it's it's a it's a crazy it's crazy car i. I'm prefacing all this with like. I don't need it. I'm not gonna get it. I'm gonna wait till the roadster but also this is absolutely insane. What they've done now really. The the most important part is the inside of the car that they've updated so like i said simplicity's sake finally switched to the horizontal touchscreen inside which i think looks pretty good. It's like a little more well integrated with the car doesn't stick out as much as three. Yeah i think what i like. I like that. But i liked that. They kept the screen in front of you. Like a regular odometer like they have in the model s. already because like three and y. I'm fine with that screen. There i only thing is. It's a little weird that you have to look over seer odometer but the fact that you have a better spot there and you still have your regular like driving odometer with a high acid and speaking of that steering wheel hobo this is this is the interesting went and i think this is where a lot of people are polarized because this interior looks very similar minus steering wheel if you look on their site. It's a yoke style steering wheel and it's almost kinda squared off. So it's like the bottom half of a square steering wheel and then there's a bunch of buttons on the steering wheel itself and there are no blinker stocks. No windshield wiper stocks. Nothing behind the wheel. No paddles no nothing yeah. Let's paint a picture here though. Because i've never heard the term yoke style and i only understand it because i saw the picture right before so picture fighter jet handles like that. Yoke style top trying to top office doing rectangle and doesn't have a top part. So yeah i'm just like i was just trying to think about using it. In general it seems so cool for like straight line in like minor turns on a highway but exactly turning around in a parking lot or like a tight driveway or something seems miserable on it. Yeah i this is one of those things where i'm imagining it and i'm imagining it really poorly and i think i'm just going to have to try it because as of right now i don't even think this is legal to ship yet. I think you technically have to have enclosed steering wheel and then people earliest you have to ship it with one and the people can modify it later. I think that's technically the rule here in the us. I don't know the rules internationally. But i've never seen a car actually ship with a yoke steering wheel before so again. This is all tb will see it happens. But i think i'm going to have to give it a shot because it's really weird.

David Dobric Jake Paul Jalen Smith Jr Jada Jason Don Jaden Triple Motors Youtube Romo Tesla Toyota Motors Smith TB United States
COVID In New York: 3 Additional Cases Of UK Strain Detected, Including 1 On Long Island

NPR News Now

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

COVID In New York: 3 Additional Cases Of UK Strain Detected, Including 1 On Long Island

"Cases of the variant corona virus. Originally identified in england has gone up in the us to an estimated fifty. Five charles lane of member station w. s. h. e. reports. Three more cases are confirmed in new york to of the new faster spreading strains of the were found in saratoga and are related to the first case that was found earlier this week but the other new case was discovered two hundred miles away on long island governor. Andrew cuomo says this brings the state's total to four and We believe that it is more widespread than that number would suggest testing for the new variant is still limited compared to overall testing new york tested. Almost two million people this week only four hundred of those tests were for the uk strain

Saratoga England Andrew Cuomo New York Long Island United States UK
Trump Rule Allows Natural Gas Transport By Rail In Dense Areas

Environment: NPR

03:33 min | 1 year ago

Trump Rule Allows Natural Gas Transport By Rail In Dense Areas

"The us produces so much shale gas it needs to find new markets overseas. The trump administration has approved moving a liquefied form of the gas by rail. But some say that is too dangerous. Susan phillips of member station. whyy reports on a route. That would be one of the longest in the country. The guests will go first to a new plant in northeast. pennsylvania where refrigeration units will chill it too negative two hundred and sixty degrees fahrenheit. That's how it goes from a guest to a liquid. The part of the plan that scares a lot of people is the transport two hundred miles by truck or rail through some of the most densely populated areas of the east coast to a planned export terminal in new jersey. Vanessa keegan lives nearby with her family including three year old. Theo thank you want to take a picture. Okay you gotta get mommy ipad. We take another picture right. Era go railcars. Full of highly flammable liquefied natural gas or lng would roll about a block and a half away from keegan's home a daycare center sits right at the company gate so they want special permits to transport them right there. That train track. You could skip on down to in about a minute and a half and that terrifies me. This project is part of a larger push to export natural gas last summer. The trump administration changed long-standing federal policy to allow rail transport of ellen g anywhere in the country fifteen states including pennsylvania and new jersey challenged the move saying it puts people's lives at risk in this rust belt reason of new jersey. The export project does have support from building trade unions and powerful state lawmakers including assemblyman. John bursa kelly. He says grandfather worked at a former dupont plant on the site of the planned export terminal. That's will create jobs as it once did contribute to tax base as wants to be an important economic driver for people to make a living in fear families. I says safety issues should be raised and addressed but he says railcars carry much more hazardous materials through the region every day. Ray mentzer is a chemical engineer at purdue university who spent his career on ellen g projects for exxon mobil he says specially designed containers have a good safety record but he says transporting the guests through densely populated areas increases the risk if there's a leak. It's not flammable until it's vaporized but it's going to bait rise pretty damn quickly and then it's going to seek an ignition source. Believe me it will find an ignition source. Pretty darn readily mentor says. A vapor cloud would definitely catch fire. If i was at a town meeting and i lived there i would want to know. Just what routes are you going to us right now. The exact roots are unclear. Multiple attempts to reach the developers of the project. New fortress energy went on answered if the overseas export terminal gets built. None of the guests will go to power new jersey homes instead the state is planning a large coastal wind farm off atlantic city to help new jersey reach the goal of all clean energy by twenty fifty

Susan Phillips Ellen G Vanessa Keegan New Jersey Whyy Pennsylvania John Bursa Kelly Theo Keegan East Coast Ray Mentzer Dupont United States Exxon Mobil Purdue University Atlantic City
Ex-Energy Secretary Says Fixing Climate Change Is Tough, There's No Vaccine

Environment: NPR

06:32 min | 1 year ago

Ex-Energy Secretary Says Fixing Climate Change Is Tough, There's No Vaccine

"President-elect biden plans to change. us climate policies or rather. Pick up where they left off. Resuming efforts disrupted under the trump administration biden talks of the united states generating all its electricity by twenty. Thirty five without emitting carbon into the atmosphere. He wants the whole economy to run on clean energy by twenty fifty. If that can be done at all it will demand changes in technology so we called someone who knows the technology well. Steven chu was a recipient of a nobel prize in physics. He was also secretary of energy in president obama's administration and he says climate change makes the pandemic look simple. There will be no vaccine magical shot for climate change and it's going to have a more profound impact on the world at large if you can imagine that than what we're going through today. Steven chu says. Markets are moving in favor of cleaner energy. President trump's administration loosened fuel economy standards for cars and promoted coal but the coal industry kept dying on. Its own and car companies. Say they are ready to go back to stricter standards. Renewable energy like wind and solar is getting cheaper while oil companies are contemplating a different future. We've been interested by the news that some oil companies are forecasting peak demand Not that their production would peak but that the demand for oil is plateauing or declining in the next few years. Yes i would say it's more plateauing will be a long plateau which is not what they would have said ten years ago. It's in part due to the fact that they are into spain. Electric vehicles will become better and better and they will as they look towards the future. I think the more forward leaning oil companies are saying well essentially by twenty seventy twenty seven five. Whatever we need to be a very different business you're going to actually use oil or natural. Gas is then. The carbon can't be released into the atmosphere in past business cycles. The market has sometimes worked against renewable energy oil prices go up wind and solar lamar attractive by comparison but then oil gets very cheap as it absolutely has been during the pandemic and oil becomes much more attractive. Is there any reason to think that cycle would be broken this time. Yeah the technology is getting better. I go back to something like electric vehicles. Which for personal transportation you can imagine those at twenty twenty five thousand dollar car. That has a three hundred fifty mile range as four times less expensive to own and operate in terms of fuel and maintenance and pretend you can charge two hundred miles in five minutes. Six minutes and means the car batteries last longer than the human bladder. Which is the key criteria. I hadn't thought about that. People are going to stop for that reason. Okay go on. Yes and so. These type of batteries will be deployed so it makes much more sense. People will gravitate towards naturally. That's why the oil companies are looking towards other uses for oil natural gas particularly chemicals plastics. What they really love is if you could use that material to make construction materials that begin to displace cement or seal or at least supplement them in and lower the carbon footprint of those things. Oh because there's a big carbon footprint with those materials does construction materials as well. Oh absolutely cement. For example is responsible. Just cement is responsible for about eight percent of the entire carbon emissions so given the changes in technology and the changes in the marketplace is the biden administration which is set these relatively ambitious climate goals for twenty thirty five and twenty fifty. Are they pushing on an open door. Then no not really because in the end to get rule acceptance is got to be better cheaper and there's a nurse and so if you look at how you make these major shifts in infrastructure. These are half a century investments. How the lifetime of a coal plant. The lives of a national as planned. Lifetime of an automobile is fifteen. Two going on twenty years now. You can retire things before their natural lifetime. But then there's a lot of resistance to do that So the question for the government is how did give this a shove. How did they move things a little faster than they might naturally move on their own. That's right the real question is what will help people make electric vehicle choice. We'll first thing would be. The technology gets so instead of keeping your old car. You really want to have something. That's just better. But how do you retire things before. The national lifetime is initially now. You have to demonstrate that this change is going to be good for not only health but the economy and everything else. It has to be cost effective and cost effective e e. Could incorporate the cost of cumin house. Hopefully the american public will have no trouble trying to understand that when it comes to your own your family your children's health. It's worthwhile one of the reasons i wanted to call you. Was that you were in the obama administration when it was attempting to get climate legislation through congress. And it didn't happen. There was tremendous political resistance. Do you think the political landscape may have changed in a way that will allow more serious investment in fighting climate change. Yes in fact. I would go further and say i think some oil companies you know. I'm on a advisory group to royal dutch. Shell and i truly believe that the company wants to see itself in a completely new business that they cannot be a carbon company that emits carbon into the atmosphere and so there's also growing awareness as the public than companies themselves in. This is a problem. We have to be part of the solution. Even if it means that. We've got to have to completely reinvent ourselves steven chu. It's a pleasure talking with you. Thank you so much. Okay my pleasure.

Steven Chu Trump Administration Biden Nobel Prize United States Biden Administration Barack Obama Spain Obama Administration Government Congress Shell
Nutrition for Gravel Cycling with Kristen Arnold

The Gravel Ride. A cycling podcast

05:22 min | 1 year ago

Nutrition for Gravel Cycling with Kristen Arnold

"This week on podcast. We've got sports nutritionists and professional cyclists. Kristen arnold kirsten has a masters degree in science and human nutrition from ohio. State university is a usa level to cycling coach with source endurance. End racist professionally with the butcher box racing team. I've always got a million questions about nutrition and it certainly a topic. That's coming up in the new ridership for them. Kirsten helps us break down. What to think about eating the week before an event during an event and after an event i thought it'd be useful to think about it in that context just because a lot of us these big events. One hundred miler. That's a big unusual ride for us. We're not doing that every month in are cycling career. We're just kind of peaking for something. That is really extreme in terms of what our body is used to. So it's important to kind of think about that not only in your physical preparation but also nutrition and hydration. Christine does a great job of breaking down the things you should be thinking about before the event during the event to give yourself the best chance for success. She's got some fantastic takeaways for us. All and a few little tricks that i hadn't thought about so. I hope you enjoyed this episode. Let's jump right in kristen. Welcome to the show. Thanks for having me craig. I'm excited to get into the topic of nutrition with you. But i always like to set the stage for the listener to get a little bit more of an understanding about your background. Since you've got a background both professionally. Nutritionist but also as a professional cyclist once you give us a little bit of both okay So i kind of make my living in three different ways right now and I went to school for nutrition. So i have an undergraduate degree and dietetic and then got my registered dietitian or credential Ended up getting my masters of science and human nutrition then became a certified specialist sports dietetic. So i was in school for eight years Nutrition and So open my private practice. Sports died headaches. Company in twenty fourteen and then started coaching Cycling in sixteen hour with source endurance. And i've been reading on the professional road circuit and twenty sixteen and now rethink for butcher. Box pro cycling. Wow that keeps you busy. Yeah we've had a couple episodes recently where we've touched on things that i would fall in the realm of nutrition and i was excited when we connected just to bring you on board and talk from the athlete's perspective about how my listeners might improve their overall nutrition nutrition and such because such a massive field and something that everybody needs to spend time thinking about and integrating into their lives. I thought we would just think about it from the perspective of an athlete. Who may be only doing a handful of events a year so not a professional cyclist by any means but someone who's peaking for an event that may be way out of the ordinary for them so think about like a two hundred mile gravel race an sp t gravel or amid south gravel event. So let's try to break down the conversation by starting. You know if you have one of those big peaks senior year. How should you be approaching it. Nutritionally in the week leading up. And then how should you be approaching your nutrition during the event. Okay all right so we're gonna talk about the week before and the day of a big event There is some research to show that what people call carb loading is effective. And what this means is that you are eating High proportion of your calories up to seven to ten grams per kilogram body weight of carbohydrates per day. and what's that doing. it is super saturating or glycogen stores so for endurance athletes especially cyclists with these long gravel event Even though a lot of the time you'll be below threshold the majority of the type of effort. You're going to be doing it. Relies on glycogen and so the main goal with Going into the event to make sure that those lijun thursday or as full as possible if not fuller than they normally are And then that also goes for hydration so ulta making sure that we have adequate hydration stores and meeting knows with fluid and electrolyte so short version of that is to Continuously e carbohydrate rich foods throughout the day for up to a week before the event and then also making sure to hydrate well with electrolytes every day consistently throughout the day.

Kristen Arnold Kirsten Kirsten State University Ohio Christine Kristen USA Craig Headaches
Prayers in Kamala Harris's ancestral village in India

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Prayers in Kamala Harris's ancestral village in India

"Hindu devotees in a village in southern India a praying for vice president candidate Kamilla Harris head of the US presidential elections villages before ceremonial prayers completions in the small settlement over two hundred miles from the coastal city of Chennai the best green village is the home town of Harris's maternal grandfather who migrated from that decades ago the press organizer hopes Harris will visit the village if she becomes vice president he says it will be a matter of immense pride for us Congress has really delved into her Indian heritage but that's not stopped Indians from claiming her as one of their own I'm Charles the last month

Kamilla Harris Best Green Village India Chennai Harris United States Congress Charles
Slab City - The Last Free Place In America

Talk, Tales and Trivia

06:29 min | 1 year ago

Slab City - The Last Free Place In America

"Hello, this is Stephanie. And this is cocktails and trivia the show. I talked about Society culture pop culture and a little bit of trivia so that you can have an enlightening conversation. Listen. I am a med researcher when it comes to be doing the research on the topics that you find interesting and giving you that trivia so that you can be intelligent look at Myton and stump your family and friends all at the same time here. We're coming up on the holiday season. So you want to have something to talk about at that dinner table and this is perfect for you. Today. We are talking about something that is really intriguing and interesting and something that's kind of like what I talked about last week when I talked about the Kowloon walled City in Hong Kong this time. I'm talking about a city job. That's in California and the United States of America sit back relax and listen and enjoy my tail about Slab City. I hope that you enjoy it said well, what is Slab City? Where does it all about? It is the last free place on Earth among the desert of Southern California. You will find Slab City Los Feliz.com wrote about it two hundred miles from LA and 150 miles from San Diego in the margins of a county that has the second highest unemployment rate in the country. You are free to resist, but you must adapt on Wikipedia. I found that prior to the United States official entry into World War Two the Marine Corps made a decision to cite a training ground for field and anti-aircraft artillery units to create the training base. 631 Acres were obtained after a construction was completed Camp Dunlap dead. Was commissioned on October 15th. Nineteen forty-two the camp had fully functioning buildings water roads and sewage collections. The base was used for three years during the war but by 1949 military operations at Camp Dunlap had been greatly reduced but a skeleton crew continued on until the base was dismantled and by 1956. Well, all buildings had been dismantled though. They're concrete foundations remained and that is where they got the name Slab City. It was determined. The land was no longer required and the deed did not contain any restrictions. All of the former. Camp Dunlap buildings had been removed. The remaining slaves were not proposed for removal and the Washington Post. I find that since the 1950s Slab City has drawn a variety of people such as anarchists artists drug addicts home. Centrex outcasts retirees and the impoverished that's practically everybody in the whole world and it is a sad truth that the very addictive drug met is fairly common and accounts for much of the crime in Slab City interesting but not altogether that surprising after doing that episode on the Kowloon walled City I learned so much and it is the same type of situation here in Slab City not unlike the Kowloon walled City at all slash city is Lawless talk dirty with crime and Anarchy. It's not pretty and it doesn't bring to it the best elements of society, but it is home year-round for less than 300. No mad, but life is hard rough and scary and the desert campers and old RVs are living quarters for these squatters that don't pay to live on the barren land. That's right. Yep. It is government land that the residents don't have to pay for Slab City is a town with shops and a culture of like-minded people will for the most part and it has the internet cafe where you can charge your electronic devices and sit and have a cup of coffee with your neighbors. This Cafe is the only place around with it. And it's run by solar panels from the same man that runs the internet cafe a tenant of Slab City can watch TV play video games and have a way of the world outside of this desert city up until two hours before the sun sets. That's when the solar panels stop working each tenant as it is with any homeless person and much money in Walled City must find ways to pay for food laundry clothes drinking water and anything for their own Comfort. It doesn't have the modern conveniences that most Americans dead. For granted and the one shower is owned by a man named George the one person in the slabs who has a water tank that he turns on when Neighbors come to take a shower. He charges $3 per person despite not having government officials watching over it. There are helicopters that are really border patrol flying over the city every so often took an eye on the occupants. You see Slab City being only 50 miles away from the Mexican border. That is why they need border patrol. Why would anyone want to live this way though? You say that's all it takes a thick skin to be able to handle the desert life. One of the slabs of the occupants say that it has been amazing living there. When you see Slab City on the videos or pictures of Psalm City. It's hard to imagine anyone living an amazing life there. But these are people that have finally found acceptance and in otherwise cruel world some have had trouble with the law. In prison or can't cope with the outside world. And what about the children of this Lawless City? There are children the few children do attend school and that's their life, but not a lot of investment for them and in the summer at night the occupants get a taste of the world around them. There is great music singing and dancing and the small businesses are open out for the tourists to come by and the tourists are upwards of two thousand people and the summer that want to see and experience a bit of the Lawless ungoverned lifestyle and there is so much to see

Slab City Slab City Los Feliz.Com Walled City Camp Dunlap Psalm City United States Stephanie Hong Kong Society Researcher Myton Washington Post California Southern California San Diego
Power Shut-Offs Become A Way Of Life For Many Californians

Environment: NPR

02:59 min | 1 year ago

Power Shut-Offs Become A Way Of Life For Many Californians

"Two new wildfires are raging in the Grassy hills of southern California and tens of thousands of people are under evacuate under evacuation orders. One of the fires the Silverado fire may have been sparked by a piece of debris hitting a power line according to a spokesperson for southern California. Edison. Meanwhile in Northern California, the utility pge shut down parts of it system to prevent its own power lines from sparking fires during strong winds and dry weather that has left hundreds of thousands of people there waiting for the lights to come back on after two days in the dark. These sorts of widespread power shut offs have become a way of life for many Californians and as. Lilly Jamali reports residents aren't happy in the tiny community of CON- cow about three hours northeast of San Francisco Jesse. Olsen and her family have lived through PG, and E. Power Shut offs not once. But twice in the last week, that's not easy it's like you're just recovering from one power outage and then you're preparing for the next one, a portable generator has helped them stay warm keep soanes charged for the kids at least try to do school. Online real. We also have a farm with livestock. So we have to keep the antibiotics refrigerated. The Olson's survived California's deadliest and most destructive fire, the two thousand, eighteen campfire but it burned down their home. It was sparked by old poorly maintained equipment belonging to pg knee online's that stayed active during peak conditions, and now we're all living in an RV. Olsen adopted her boys out of foster care. They'd been homeless before that I never wanted them to have to. Deal with homelessness ever again, you know they were supposed to have a forever home someplace where they felt safe for the rest of their lives, and now that's Gone Olsen calls PG needs power shut offs a necessary evil. Two hundred miles southeast Terry McBride has also suffered the consequences of fire and power shut offs. Her home in the community of mountain ranch was hit by a PG and caused fire five years ago. Twenty Four Hundred Square Foot House to a two hundred, fifty score for camping trailer. Just telling you if you didn't laugh, you'd cry she surviving PG needs power shut offs in her trailer. It's like when camping, you know my mom's got electricity and dress. So I was able to put my frozen stuff in her freezer so they don't go bad it's been tough, and while some PG fire survivors feel relief that the company is proactively cutting power McBride is frustrated at the utility for neglecting its lines for years. My feeling is why didn't you do your job in the first place? Why are we having to go through this? Now PG has promised to make long-term fixes to its lines. So power outages like these aren't permanent way of life for NPR news I'm Lily Jamali in San Francisco.

PG Northern California Olsen Terry Mcbride San Francisco Edison Lilly Jamali NPR Lily Jamali Olson
Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

Scientific Sense

59:58 min | 2 years ago

Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods, leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society. And help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense. Dot. com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense. Dot Com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen. Dot Info. My guests today's facade John. WHO's professor of Law and society at Griffith University in Brisbane Australia. He's also adjunct professor of law at Queensland University of Technology and Research Associated University College Under Center for Blockchain Technologies, he who suggests on the Bloomberg professional globalization of law and the technology in law. But come John. Hello. Thank you. Sure. Yeah. So I want to start with one of your recent people, professions and expertise hog machine learning, and blockchain redesigning the landscape of professional knowledge and organization. In invite you say machine learning has entered the world of the professions. The different impacts automation will have huge impacts on the nature of work and society. Engineering architecture and medicine or early and enthusiastic adopters. Other professions especially law at late you say at in some cases with leptons adopters. could you talk about you know sort of the landscape all? Of Law, profession and. They today in terms of opting these technologies. Certainly Louis interesting because it's a very old profession is. Often considered one of the. Original traditional professions along with medicine and the church. And in a sense law has used different kinds of technology might say I mean does it? Based around writing. And then the printing press and So on yet that. It's always being based on a craft. A skill which the individual person is that enables them to do, whatever is quote if you like and. said, there's never been a lot of room for any kind of automation. Certainly, the has been space for using. A people who are not fully qualified as low as about as paralegals, people like that, who will do a lot of repetitive work document checking and things like that and so on. But what will get into now is the situation where automation through machine learning. There's other kinds of artificial intelligence. is able to start constructing documents example contracts. Check dollop a documents for particular clauses and things like that mature they're up to date and this incense is. Replacing now, the kind of work that noise will do. So I think in some ways more more of of the profession of law is gonNA be subject to automation, but distinction I would many because I think it's quite important here is that A lot of what lawyers do. Is actually quite. Active that that that that the drafting contracts overtime or or they're reviewing documents to some sort or another or they're getting through particular. Negotiation. And so you know a lot of it is the same, but they build up the expertise through doing these same kinds of were over and over again and What we're now finding is that instead of having young lawyers coming in and doing what you might call the grunt work of checking documents and going through discovery applications where he goes through the size boxes of evidence to decide. which are the appropriate documents you want the emails, the invoices order, this sort of stuff that is the kind of work which is lending itself to automation. And, and so that his taking away a lot of the work which is used for trading purposes with young lawyers and is just doing it much quicker. will quickly I mean More efficiently in many ways and probably expensive much much expensive a Lotta. This work is being outsourced to you know legal process outsourcing India or Philippines South Africa places like that. So yeah, that's that's right and so in some ways, the group of lawyers who do the work which requires the skill, the judgment. Is Reducing in some ways. That pool is getting smaller. Yeah Yeah it's it's interesting. The the distinction that you make between automation. And in my job and let's call it decision making right which is you know a lot of work in the business side of this. So for example. in the nineties in large pharmaceutical company So you think about you know rnd. People might think it has really complex selection of programs that design of them, portfolio management, risk management, all those decisions. Genuine companies be say well, senior managers with lots of experience and intuition make those decisions really well right and so that's statement would automatically implied that machines can really do much there. But what we find in the mid nineties says that is systematic analysis of data make those decisions. Don't better. Actually, I've Tom to humans humans. Always seem to make decisions. These are typically bonding the decision. So if you go back and look at it, alternative experiment has not been wrong. So we have no date to say it was a good decision at typically. So human scaffold, fifty percents of making good decisions So do you know just throwing a coin or letting monkey make those decisions so? Yup We found that even complex decision making that humans hold. you know close to their you know kind of domain I'm not necessarily. So we have machines That could do that much better than I. Don't know there's an analog of that in in law I I. Think The may be actually I mean Two three years ago the royal. Society in England decided to arrange a working party on machine learning. One of the things that they put together a a roundtable on machine learning professions resolved to talk about that night and I talked about the history of professions in technology and. and. I think one of the peculiar things that came out to in relation to law is that law. Has always been a sort of on its own. If you think about medicine, for example, medicines always had the teacher hospital institution that sort of straddles the academic quilt and the practice walls and brings those people together and as a result. INCORPORATES loss of, scientific, work. Engineering work as well computing work and things like that. And that's been the first teaching hospital king into existence in in the French revolution in Seventeen eighty-nine. A long history of that. If you look at law, there was nothing equivalent to that whatsoever and there is in fact, actually a big gap between what academy does on what the practitioners in your do so that As a result as before law has come to this a quite late but what we are. Finding I think is that Certainly the management consultancy finding is that because of the nature of a lot of what goes on in legal office a remarkable amount of it can be automated. So what we are getting now is companies setting themselves up to do this automated work. So. We have companies which do nothing but contract our instruction formation sort of company. The typical lawyer would would say to a client Do you WANNA contract classes. Yes I want this for this. And loyal galway draft contract back with it, and then in the con- comes back against as I need another contract, you go through the same process. which is good for the lawyer but not necessarily good kind. What we're finding now is the company's not can think of a few of them that will, in fact, go into the company's show order contracts. Let's see the entire. Corpus of contracts you've got there and they will analyze them. And basically say, all right. We can create a new contract in automated way fairly easily it may need some modification according to special circumstances but on the whole, it's fairly standard and and they can do that INNOVA systematic world meaning the contracts are reviewed that checked. If they're going to expire marketing, you want an unable just the system will cope with that if you're. Yeah. So yeah. No No. No so I was just going to say yes. So that the distinction you make, you know in terms education sort of systematic graduate level education that because as you say, it is low in one sense of soft proficient. You say in called professions like made it to text reengineering this team has a strong concern ensuring that expertise applied in the public interest when as low little bit different from from bad and economics in some sense sort of in the same same vein we have now made economics at really odd. of mathematics you know north of analytics there. Whether they are actually useful from policy making perspective is left to debate but at least it has been an attempt to make this make economic video hard. So so I don't know A. Fascination has been in in law I very much that will happen in law. Oh there things are beginning to happen I mean let me just boob. At. One example I learned in that workshop that I mentioned the Royal Society held. With somebody from the engineering profession talking about. The difference in skills between people who above forty I'm below forty he said. If he he was about Forty Years Austin design an aeroplane, takeout pen and paper Pencil, and paper and. I don't know anyone under forty could do that would know how to do that go onto a computer program undecided there. So you can see that the incorporation of technology into the academy through to the actual. Occupation. Than phones and things is is already a standard and they're in law. It isn't law. As you said, it's still very much a soft skill although I will argue that there is a difference between the way nor is viewed in different parts of the world. So in the United States A law is I think more tilted towards the sciences. So low in economics is one of the big things in the. US. So you got a lot of people working in the of lower economics who might go onto antitrust work no competition work and things like that which across a lot of economics, mathematics and Statistics and so on. In, say a Europe Australia and so on. Law is more allied towards the humanities. And the classics. So it doesn't have that kind of scientific underpinning in that way. So anything that's going to change in these parts if you like is going to be something that's going to be imported from outside. And is going to have a very dramatic impact when whether it does An and I think that's yet to happen. I don't think there's been sort of Cambrian explosion. If you like in in law, the will be one I'm sure but but law has an advantage over engineering economics or the other areas you might. That's With the nature of the rule of law and absent justice is since law as a a way of ordering society is absolutely crucial to everything else. Then, Law and lawyers will say will look you know we have a special status here is different amid leave engineer. We certainly want to make sure bridges stay up. We don't want down but we can design different kinds of bridges. We can design different kinds of legal bills, but they're also the fundamental rules If you want to you know if you're an engineering company and you want to build a bridge in a different country, you're going to have to do it on the basis of the legal rules, which will be just vise by the lawyers according to the country's there in so on. So in in that was what? I might put in a special category if you live. Yea. Yea. Let me let me push NBA John. So. The. The conference that you mentioned you know the Internet is under forty and engineers at. So so one could argue you know from an engineering perspective could argue e- It sexually dangerous. To not use machines to build aircraft the goes you know all the technology that cap today actually help us make the trap lot safer. granted. If you sit down with a blank sheet of paper and Pencil, you might get the principal right. But, but the technology has advanced so much that you really have to use. Technology to do so in some sense, engineering is pushed back. that. I argue this myself then they were naive engineering school. I had a V exposed at my daughter bent to school. She used the same physics book. Twenty, five. meter. I argue that that is sort of backward because data speed no need for an engineer to really learn Newtonian physics anymore because it is prescriptive, it's deterministic can make machines, learn it very quickly and so why spend all? Right. So so then you know if you think about the the law field. I wonder if there is a senior argument that is to say Dan and tape really good lawyer casts lot of intuitions dot expedients to crap something Contract or a discourse, but then maybe the machine scan actually do it even better We haven't really tested that hypothesis yet. Right be almost have this idea that humans are always dominant. Or machines but that the not be true as technology lancers. So what do you think about that in the in the? It's a very important point actually because the. American bosses. being modifying its ethical rules recently to say that lawyers have a duty and obligation to keep up to date with technology. So we already know the technology is now a an important part and I have to say when when I say the word technology, I mean this at all kinds of levels from what you can do with Microsoft word for example, it strays plug ins all the way up to artificial intelligence IBM, Watson, or something like that So that if if lawyers become. A. Uses of technology whether this small firms or big firms or what have you a under the Aba now they they actually have an obligation to make sure that they are up to date. They can't just say we didn't know what we were doing. So I think in that respect, there is a there was a move. The other move that is taking place is actually the push from from the clients. Now, this you have to look into ways one is with corporate clients. The corporation seen US lawyers have to use noise if you'd like want their work done. PHILOS- money on Chiba they wanted to more efficiently They don't want the best piece of work every time they want something that works and they want officiant. UTA A and so on. So it was interesting I think a few years ago. The General Counsel Cisco. Actually made a speech. Saying that he expected his. Lawyers Law firms who worked for the company to be reducing their fees year on year. Now, that's the opposite of what lawyers normally do, which is to raise them year on year. So say that that's one push which is. Very profound push now, coming from the client himselves who are using the beginning to use their procurement departments in in the companies and things like that to help purchase legal services the other aspects which is just as important in this is if you look at the role of lawyers and individuals. So if you is what access to to legal services, it's expensive lawyers are not cheap they charge our money We don't know how to judge the quality of their work and so on. because. There was a credence which we just know that So. On this is where technology can begin to step in and provide services which are. Efficient and often quite. what very well for the individual saying that this. Technology can be seen to be improving access to justice a Lotta people. Yeah. Yeah yes. I want to come back to this. John. I think this is a very important point. So bent on put has a lot of uncertainty. Uncertainty maybe not not the right term, but it's called deterministic. It shows beatty ability and so the determination of quality it's not as easy as hard media India nearing or. Right business economics legal all sorts of well foreign that category and the application of technology sort of a different different meaning there but I want to touch on one of the things that you say in the paper, and that is you mentioned this before and that's about training training the next generation. So you savior regulating bodies professions are involved in the collection and reproduction of knowledge intended to be used by the entire body professionals, and so there was an expectation here that you know seeing it professionals. Is Providing the wisdom that knowledge mission to train the next generation now in a technology driven. regime. discuss vacations right. Our expert is going to be a computer engineer in the future. And so so how does that work from from cleaning and knowledge Asian will I think this is This is a crucial issue in it's one which the profession hasn't. Really. Got To grips with yet I think because you think of technology in terms of Predictive analytics a document review and things like this most law schools are not preparing students for this they may be a a a a causal to on some aspect of technology, but it's not something which lawyers themselves are learning. So I think what is going to happen is we're going to find a blending of skills occurring. So law firms will be sense having to bring in a range of technologists who perhaps have. A scales a straddle, both sides of the lines, the lawyers like this too I think I think we're going to find an avangard Who will begin to develop skills that allow them to talk to both sides of the line, the tech people and? Below people if you likes and there will be people who will acquire develop these skills as well but that's that's still some way down the line I didn't think we're anywhere near there yet, and part of the reason for that I think is that you know law is still a very highly regulated profession and and the regulators themselves are in the same situation they are unsure about what is going to happen and they also feel they have an obligation to. Not only ensure that. Customers clients and consumers are protected but in some ways, the profession is protected to if you like so. You know it's it's a it's a fine balancing. There I. Think. It's a fight balancing act and you'd say if the changing changing things. So going back, you know you care as an individual eighteen status of expert. Some form of encapsulation of knowledge and analysis occurs enabling professional experts, derived diagnoses, decisions, and conclusion wrapped late. and you make some distinctions. Type of learning that. Human? Beings. That the distinction between doing drive and become a gift and laster Yes yes. Yes I think that's important. So the the the the principle behind this is that Individuals can acquire a lot of knowledge in in various areas. So as I say learning how to drive a car, you learn how to change gear you though with the speeds. Braking different rates, conditions, and things like that. So. If you WANNA take that further and become a formula one drive or something like that. Then you have to undergo a very different kind of training and that kind of thing becomes a lot more collective rather than individual because you start to you're you're going to be in a group that is gonna be doing a particular kind of our driving. If you like everybody in the group has to understand what each other is doing that group, you can't have people going right a racetrack at two hundred miles an hour or thinking individually feel like they have to have a collective consciousness. About. How to drive in that situation? That's nothing like how? You and I might drive. I'm not saying we bad drivers just saying spreading very different. So I think professional work is not. That different from this in a way. So once you you can go through school and you can do your law degree and you can learn your low. We can learn you engineering's this applies to or professions really. But in order to become a professional in order to become somebody who can operate function within that. Group if you like you then have yourself have to develop collective consciousness and and one way of thinking about it is that we we can kind of tacit knowledge. This assorted knowledge you learn on the job from people, which is not always articulated in a precise formulate kind way but it's something you pick up from the way. Somebody does something you just recognize aw that that's how they've done that might not be. Written down anywhere or anything like that. But you know that's different from now exiting differently from the way that wise doing I think X.'s doing it better I and you and you just, and you can absorb that. That's what I mean by this kind of tacit knowledge and that comes about from the professional context. As how the professional context develops becomes absolutely crucial to how you introduce new ways of doing things new my daddy's new skills new outlooks if you like and I. Think this is where we're on the cost of of this beginning to develop I mean we we know it's got to be done quite how it's going to be done. is yet to be. So. So let me make a statement John and I want I want your reaction to it so eat in hard sciences eight years against again medicine. Expertise has about a consistent happy of remorse. Whereas enor- economics and business in general, let's say expertise is not about the ability to apply rules but to deal with. and at and if that is true, it has lot of implications rate. It has implications as to how we might divide work. Between. And machine in the future. And the skills that universities need to impart on on on new graduates are also quite different. So I always argued in the business. engineering contexts that universities having changed the dog they get mentioned before they're using the same. Using the same. Out Thirty four years without asking the question are those skills relevant, anymore or more importantly watch. Really relevant for a human being in the future rate. do you agree with that that expertise assert more about dealing exceptions apply? Putting it actually. I. I can see the logic behind what you. Saying I think what distinguishes? A good professional whether it's a good engineer good architect or good lawyer or doctor is is somebody who has a certain? This may sound strange but it's the. Imagination. Creativity. about. Kind of flare that allows them to function on the nausea they they've got and developed over the years and the experience. Gathered from Nova pitching what they'd be doing over the years and so on, and it allows them to see around things in ways which they perhaps would. I can give you an example if you like a law. So I'm in in Germany and some other countries. For example, there's a particular way of bundling together mortgage securities I I won't go to detail about this, but this statute that enables you do it. And then you can sell these securities and get money. In certain countries, the UK, the US, and so on. This, NICI. So in a sense to put this kind of a a deal together it. Couldn't be done if you live. So a bank came to one of the large English law firms and said, look we wanted we want to replicate this in in the UK, want to set a market this we're not the statues off there. What can you do and what was interesting was that the law firm then went back to first principles lawyers who were looking at this went back I suppose they looked at some vape basic areas of law matter your trust. And contract from what have you? I'm from that they constructed elite supplement that looked very much like the one in Germany, but without stat sheet and they tested it and it worked. Out To be credibly successful. So much so that the German government started German legal profession started to complain because they said. You can only do this by statute and these we find a way of doing it three. I suppose using law and there it is an they were vowed shops by but that was a particular example if you like of of what you were talking about, they took the exceptions they went back to first principles and said you know or How would we get? This is where we gotta get to, and this is a way right at the beginning what are the steps we need to take and and? And that's what a good loyal will do if you. Right right? Yeah. So that's very important point. So you in your paper dawn as the DREYFUSS and rice note that the proficient performer immersed in the world of skillful activities sees what needs to be done. But decides how to do it. So as we move into a and other technologies, I think it's important point it is. Right from Dad benefactor culture we have been using humans as you mentioned before in lots of with meted activities big not designed for humans I would I would contend enjoy doing things over and over again, and if you had thought of doing that, yeah, because they have to do it for living right and so so we should be moving to word It would where anything that is with pita on delegated to the machine at automation in the bottom of that and Appealed autonation you can have intelligent automation you can have you know reinforcement learning those types of things you have some aspects of intelligence into the into the two. And deploy humans Don't Miss. They're really good at in some case. I'm. So you know we've been studying the green for ages be our no close. It feels to understand mother. Heck it does You know it's not neat learning it. Oh, BBC of. thirty years ago as see that person again, you could see you could you could have a feeling. Then you've seen that before and and what the brain has done actually not only as he that pattern but also age that matter intuitively for thirty years and say, yes, that face I, guess before. and. So there are some superpowers the brain has reaped have been applying the all all. So for a technology might allow. Look I. Think Technology will allow us to incredibly complex things without having to think about too much I. Mean if you look at the way a port functions, for example, any major port these days they've got millions of containers and ships going through them all the time. So there's a lot of paper going through the you those charter parties, bills of lading guarantees. So the lot of legal work that's being done it, it's all quite standard stuff. I mean everybody. KNOWS, what needs to be done and so on. Now, some people are beginning to think while the best way to handle a port if you like I for everybody should know is to put everything that's going on in the poor into a blockchain so that you can see the whole supply chain. You see when something comes in, you can determine when the goods are being offloaded. When they're being shipped, you can stop making the payments as a result of the. Operation of the smart contracts if you like, and the whole thing would be just one quite seamless. In some ways without that much human intervention really just need oversight Some bits of coordination so on. But at the moment is still a a lot of humans are vote in that shipping people, law people, all sorts of things which is. I think insane. That's a waste of resources. We know that there are people who have all kinds of problems that require that creative flair she like as so why waste money on the routine stuff when you could develop skills to the the real need if you like in that way? Yeah Yeah. So I, want that some that bit that John Blockchain, for example, as you mentioned. So so one reason especially in the professions like law and business humans have an advantage justice dimension of trust. and you know at least our generation we don't really. At eighty level, right. So so having that. Human human touch is still extremely important for us. Now, technologies like Blockchain, for example, actually allows that trust to be tensely decoupled, right? Yeah, and I think I think you're right. Look I. Think I mean one of the reasons we make contracts is because We, don't trust each other. So we we devised these documents with all the conditions in them. Something goes wrong. This is what will happen things like that and so on. What are the interesting things? You know people really rely on contracts are met you. You draw up a contract. And the to business people stick him in the drawer I never look at again less something really really fundamental goes wrong but they know sumit doesn't that never look at that again. So you say value of the contract, what did it actually do if you look at some of the Asian countries say like Taiwan or parts of China, you have a assistant coach Guanxi, which is where people developed effective relationships by knowing each other over a period of time around business that allows them to develop trust it. So You know there are different ways of of handling trust, but we we seem to spend a lot of time on trying to minimize something You know which we don't really do a lot of if you like. So I think one of the advantages of of blockchain is that it just it removes a lot of this from from the equation if there's certain things you know that can happen. as a result off if this thing that systems. Lead happened And you know. As, long as you've got oversight and you can see what's going on than. You don't need to be too concerned about it. It will just do what it needs to do in that way and So. Again. That's still very much in the early stages, but we are seeing situations where supply chains A shipping goods from one country to another can actually be done under smart contracts through a blockchain. Technology if you live. That that is now happening I associate goodful dealing with things like gum counterfeiting if you're. Producing. Particular high-quality could site move our phones or particular pharmaceutical products and so on you know it's one way of guaranteeing the quality of the product is you couldn't I say look you can examine the whole supply chain or the data is there. And you know his Eq- code look at it and you get the whole thing going all the way back The. Again, issues around that if you're dealing with the digital. Is Much easier once you start dealing with physical products then you have. A question of how do you get that first initial digitization of the physical if you'd like to goes on so though some people I know here in Australia who? Run A company called Beef Ledger, which is trying to export beef straight beef to China using the blockchain supply chain, which will. Guarantee the security, and the quality of the goods to the Chinese consumer APP because having problems with this before. But I will tell you now do doing something like that does require that the people you are dealing with. You're going to set this up with You have to have a trusting relationship with you before you can set up a technology that will do away with the So we're still in that. That's really early days. I think another a lot of time way to go right Yeah, but the technology works it. Clean potential one could argue contracts exist because they probably known performance if you have a technology that drives that probably the of non-performance zero, then you can actually get rid of for contract. Yeah limit. It is. Not. Goes back to that earlier point I made that. Most most contracts are fairly standard. You know a routine things they're there to. Record a series of transactions payments that have gone on between people without the to do much. If you like you know once you you're you're doing the business, the contract just kind of records that in perpetuity. So the small contract just takes that into a different area and an an actually does the whole implementation and execution without people to be involved in that too much and there's something goes wrong. But if it if it all goes right then back it is done you need to you don't you think about it Right. Yeah. Hasn't been jumping to another are forthcoming people globalization law at. A time of crisis in the? Global Lawyer and so in the say Nikolai Condom Nieve a Russian economists in the nineteen thirties believed the worst economy operates long sixty year cycles Then he called K. Braves. And you safeguarding coronavirus analysis, the fifth psycho young's from nineteen eighty to twenty thirty. It's you save twenty, nineteen forthcoming John You might have. I think so I think say because I, tell you off the what's happening this year I thought my good I couldn't My God. I was just. Owners because you know a contract device these waves up into into what he calls four seasons spring summer or winter at, and we're in the winter off this fifth cycle if you like this is. All the bad stuff happens and he's news war. Famine Disease I think wait a minute that sounds Yes yes. That's exactly right. A. But one of the interesting things about contractors was that you know he he a because he's A. Solid economists are installing a dip executed. By the way you know he he got fed up ninety that was the end of Nikolai unfortunately but he. He said instead of know if you like the ownership of the means of production are being the determinate for changeover from system system, he said it's it's technology and and that the technology will drive you out of the downswing of the last cycle into the upswing of the new cycle, and and the way that works is the win. You're in this kind of winter period because of the kind of economic. Gloom pervades if you like people tend to hold back in subsurface vestment in terms of technological innovation of what have you and so a lot of energy resources, resources, money capital if you like builds up to a second point when people say we're GONNA go for this is this is it? And that's when if you like technology comes to the fall on, really drives it forward. So from that perspective, what he's saying is that you know come right about twenty thirty. If. Things are going slowly now regarding technology they're going to speed up. In. This period and that's when it will. You know really also take take off and people have looked back over our preceding cycles and they've you know it works if you like not just their. Fantasy theory there are also the people who do Cleo dynamics in history these the quantitative historians and they've done a similar kind of analysis of historical periods and said, yeah, you know there are all these citrical. Processes that take place even revolutions occur and big upset occurs and what have you and and. One of their Perspectives which I find quite interesting is that they say one of the reasons for revolutions come about is caused a lease beginning to compete with each other and and an an I look at say trump in in America and I look at the Democrats and I I I would say Modine, India I look she in China and different groups of elites who are engaged really profound struggle for the future of their countries if you live. Out which again is leading to this kind of potential eruption of activity and a new ways of doing things. Yeah. It makes a lot of intuitive sense gone. So one way to think about this also. There are a lot of excesses. So innovating go good their excesses in the system people to believe that invincible they changed assumptions about. because they don't see any. and. Financial markets to right. So these cycles and real real mass that uniquely talking about you can see the. Happening in the financial markets more clearly. But what he's saying is that he happens mortgage and you ask in this paper in two thousand, nineteen for in many ways go. Crystallization off the settling ketone economic forces lost throat ear Kublai doomed as populous. Separates nationalism and lead clients and I think they have that we have probably the answer to that. But you see I think. One of the points I was trying to make an in in this paper walls that Global Law. If you like is is, is the a kind of synthesis off chaos? How do we bring some kind of order to chaos now once you start seeing the undermining? Of his global institutions, you see trump was withdrawn from the W. H. O.. He's he's are criticized NATO he he won't have the do with the International, Criminal Court and so we've got this kind of real life tension now between a an international legal order that's being built up since the Second World War both Ekit economic and legal order is Global And so we can't just a radical globalization I mean even even with covert, we can't eradicate mobilize ation we've got to. Handle covert the Kobe pandemic on a global basis. Otherwise, we'll. We're lost it retreats to a national. Approach is not gonNA. Work? We'll be defeated in that race is going to be global. Might. Be One of my questions in in paper was will who are the people who are going to be doing this? Kind of bringing the the order to chaos if you like and that made argument that it's got to be the global lawyer. And this is a person who not only understand their national legal system but also able to communicate with lawyers and officials. From around the world if you like. To be able to develop a kind of common. Language common discourse that enables them to stop putting these things together are, and it's not just a simple massa of saying mathematically, it works this way or not. It requires the kind of pulling together of people, but it requires that sort of common understanding which. Comes out of what I was saying about this idea of testing knowledge you know as you got this kind of professional consciousness you know how people ought to behave and how they will interact with you, and then that enables you to be out of bizarre to predict how you can do things and so on and so on. That basis I think we can operate kind of global order. It had a a below the institutional level if you're not kind of private. As opposed to the public according and that will put three. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah you know I the limit John I don't know if you think this way I limit one could as. Want to stay need for. Countries what does the need for legal system differentials? We set this up with the premise that it's easier to manage small chunks. one could also argue with Edmund Affect. -nology that you don't need to segment this debate that we have done. which might make these types of issues you know. See where you're coming from and I'm going to say yes or no? Yes, I think the home range of of questions that can be handled by the technology the ones we got pay I don't chain, etc. I don't I didn't see any issues there but there are a lot of decisions that needs to be made a book in terms of putting things together and resolve disputes that can only function at a human level because it's not. These are not decisions that are simple binary decisions. If you'd like, it's yes or no it's it's often a lot more nuance than complex about I mean, one of the resources in the World Kiva Zero System, the world amendment which is being fought over if you like is water, a water is probably one of the most valuable resources anywhere and it's you often find that rivers and things like that sort of flow between countries, they form borders. And and you are you know people if you look at the Nile, ESL start stopping in Sudan throwaway down to the Mediterranean. So he goes to countries all three countries, east European and then into Egypt's and so unwell well, who has the right to put it dime at a particular place and things like that all of that has to be cooled in act. You see a not going to be done at a human level that that's what caused the skills in negotiation judgment interpretation understanding if you like of the other people, no machine can do that I got. Yes before we conclude, I want to touch on one other thing So in the paper, you say as technology and culture intersect more and more. Ethical conundrums will intensify these raising questions about the rights and obligations of robots. And go beyond as moves. Three laws of robotics in two issues of rights of all moon. Algorithm, stem serves. So this is this is an area that be Kevin babies even even really form some notions allowed rights of all modes at rights of a are. Sai, gets more sophisticated. Yes. Yes. I do. I, mean I think this is one of the issues we already know some of the problems with algorithms and and you know can we can be are they transplanted from you see what's going on the ethical issues around the construction and implementation of algorithms and things like that. But I I I think looking into the future we all going to rely on things like robots. And various kinds of machines so much more so that if you look at a country like Japan, which is a a an aging population such that it doesn't have sufficient younger people to look after the people who need looking often. So machines, I'll be part of that, and that means people will stop forming real relationships with machines and and so that's when I would say. Okay. So let's think about how we View a potential rights of machine that we give. We give rise to humans. Yes. We know that we give rights to animals. Now we've also given rights to viz in forest in some countries as well as so machines I think our. Next logical step you know do we do we treat them with respect Let me give you one. Very classic example yet the production of. Robots for sex if you like is a major industry at the moment, some manufacturers say they want to program them say that people can act out rape fantasies will do we want that I? Mean you know should we be at first of all? You know? We should be having people behave in this particular kind of way, but even an uncertain if you do it against another human being, you'll be punished for it and you say we'll a machine is a piece of property you should be you should be doing that but I'm getting to think that maybe a machines should be treated with dignity say that we are treat ourselves with. Dixie. This a kind of reflexive situation here what we? Do to machines we do to each other, and they may again due to US depending on how they evolve and and move forward in that way is a very contentious issue. A lot of people would reject that right out of hand I agree I think we've got to stop thinking about stop dining forward because I. think we're going to at some point again. I. Don't know when. But at some point we will be having to deal with that. It's a it's a very important point. Joan. So if I understand you correctly, you know that the rights to animals the rights to inanimate. INANIMATE things like Lubers The recent those exist is because of its effects on humans and can see video a clear link in the future we would see a very clear link between a algorithms and robots ended affects on human. So this is not me You know each not fantasy in the sense that yeah, robots should have rights, but rather it's a more conceptual question. Any fraud did not have rights each going to cabin negative I I think that's absolutely true. I mean just to highlight that if you like this firm called Boston Dynamics that produces. Robots and they produced these videos of these. Now, these robots are resistant being pushed over and things like that, and it was quite interesting because a lot of people say all you can't treat them in this way. This is awful and so what I mean that that's the answer for more fighting to to the extreme extent. But it I think you know on the basis what you're saying, you know how we Oakland. Hold human beings accountable to each other in an increasingly complex world machines have become part of that. We can't just have them all sitting on the edge as though they're not part of who we are, what we are and how we do things. Right. So. Incursion Johnny fuel sort of look forward five years. At. The intersection of law and technology. But you think people see sort of the biggest. I. Think you'll see it two wins. On the you know for the individual The individual, you're going to see a lot of them just interacting. With artificial Tennessee, say lost questions about what my rights for this how do I deal with a tendency agreement? How do I complain against a producer company or something like that or that's going to be automated? is fairly straightforward to do and and it will only need A. Minimal. Amount of human inside of. An intervention if you like. At the other end at the. In I think we're GONNA see more and more technology coming in because as those basic functions that are. Being, carried out by junior people or or paralegals or things like that are the ones which are going to be increasing, automating creasing. I'm. We will replace the humans and just let machines do that because there's no point in wasting human resources on that whether that means we need fuel or more lawyers That's an open question I think it will that we need different kinds of lawyers We will need Roy Moore to logically aware much more sophisticated. They don't it's be programmers or odors or anything like that, but they need to have a quite a a a a strong understanding and gross what's going on in technology in that way if you like so. Yeah. We can definitely see an. Yeah, so I, think you mentioned the so from a structure perspective in all forum DC law firm sprucing to word. It a group of equity partners. Around it by machine so to speak well, I. Think. I was in that paper or another one I. I'm S-. Forecast. Law. Firms. Being. Distributed decentralized we'll tournaments organizations running on a blockchain with with the various people. into setting when they will no I. Think the law firm is still a very strong and powerful is Shutian, that's not gonNA disappear straight away. But certainly the numbers of partners who control things will shrink. They'll that will get smarter as proportion and yes, they will be surrounded by machines and they surrounded by people who are servicing those machines. Your excellent. Yeah. Thanks for doing this weekend. John really enjoyed the conversation. Thank you very much. It's been great fun and very

Policy Technology Economics Science Blockchain John Gill Eappen Eappen Queensland University Of Techn Blockchain Technologies Australia Griffith University India United States German Government Innova Bloomberg Inflammation Royal Society Brisbane John Blockchain Chiba
Indigenous men cycle through states to promote mental health

Native America Calling

03:46 min | 2 years ago

Indigenous men cycle through states to promote mental health

"This is national native news I mean Antonio Gonzalez. A group of indigenous men are cycling through Wyoming Colorado and New Mexico promoting mental wellness Wyoming public radio's jockey. Hey, black has more identifying as a black man and a member of the Haida nation. Damon Bell Halter has seen firsthand. How men of color often don't seek help for mental illness he says, one barrier is a lack of diversity among mental healthcare providers. Laboratories are working on my purse like my healing. Throughout and I was like getting that match up with my you know. White white people know, but another problem is a cycle of silence and stigma surrounding health. That's why Bell Holter is leading a group of men on this more than eight hundred miles cycling trip. They started on the wind river reservation in Wyoming and finished up in Albuquerque this week along the way they encouraged men of color to speak out about their mental health and seek the help they need. The group is also raising money for mental health initiatives in indigenous communities. For National Native News I'm Jockey Hey Black Nevada lawmakers expanded mail in voting due to cove nineteen, which includes protections for tribal communities of federal judge recently dismissed a lawsuit over the law many homes on reservations have nonstandard mail service and residents have to travel to a postal provider to get mail voting advocates. Say there are also other challenges native voters face Roz. Brown has more Jacqueline de Leon with a native American rights. Fund says, Indigenous People live much farther from polling locations the. Non Natives it much more difficult than the average American can conceive up to vote in Indian country native. American have a decrease in post office hours. They also have their ballots travel further. Dylan adds that fewer transportation options a lack of Internet access and other socio economic factors also play a role in whether indigenous people vote. She says it's not uncommon for native Americans to travel up to two hundred miles to register to vote or reach their polling place in August, Nevada lawmakers expanded mail. In voter laws to address challenges posed by the COVID. Nineteen pandemic. Assembly bill four allows non family members to safely return ballot for one another. In the upcoming election it also provides mechanisms for tribes to request early on reservation polling locations, Deli prior to Nevada's vote by mail primary in June more than ninety percent of the indigenous population voted in person I'm Russ Brown, the vice president of the Navajo Nation Myron liser has expressed his well wishes on social media for president trump and. The first lady after they tested positive for covid nineteen Weiser's outspoken trump supporter wiser took his own covid nineteen tests this week after traveling to Washington DC for a prayer event in a virtual town hall Thursday, Night Liser defended his travel saying he understands concerns the Navajo nation remains under emergency orders including fifty-seven our weekend lockdowns liser says it was a one time thing adding he would do it again to pray for the nation I did go in and get tested because of all the. I guess the. Concern that was out there. But the last week I am not Tuesday I did mention that Diet just returned from the DC area praying for our nation. What time it was to be given that opportunity in the heavy heavy responsibility of praying leuser was seen at the event not wearing a mask or social distancing critics have taken to social media to express their dismay with the Navajo. Nation. Vice? President. I'm Antonio Gonzales.

Damon Bell Halter Lockdowns Liser Wyoming Vice President Antonio Gonzalez Russ Brown Covid Nevada Bell Holter Antonio Gonzales Dylan Albuquerque ROZ Fund President Trump Jacqueline De Leon New Mexico
Trump, Biden spar over economy, workers in Labor Day blitz

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 2 years ago

Trump, Biden spar over economy, workers in Labor Day blitz

"Hi Mike Rossi you're reporting the presidential campaign heated up on Labor Day democratic vice presidential candidate comelec Harris was in Wisconsin Monday but the U. S. senator from California that with the family of Jacob Blake the black man who was shot in the back seven times by a white Kenosha police officer on August twenty third in Milwaukee harassing courage to supporters to vote early right vice president Mike pence was also in Wisconsin some two hundred miles away in lacrosse in Oregon supporters of president Donald Trump staged a vehicle rally in Oregon city some went on to the state capitol in Salem we're writing we're done remaining silent in the United States of America I'm sick and tired of it hi Mike Rossi

Vice President Oregon Kenosha Comelec Harris United States Salem Donald Trump Mike Pence Mike Rossi Milwaukee Officer Jacob Blake California Senator Wisconsin
The Latest: Trump questions Pentagon leaders' motives

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 2 years ago

The Latest: Trump questions Pentagon leaders' motives

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting the presidential campaign heated up on Labor Day democratic vice presidential candidate Kamilla Harris was in Wisconsin Monday or the U. S. senator from California met with the family of James Blake a black man who was shot in the back seven times by a white Canosa police officer on August twenty third in Milwaukee harassing courage supporters to vote early right vice president Mike pence was also in Wisconsin some two hundred miles away in lacrosse it Oregon supporters of president Donald Trump staged a vehicle rally in Oregon city some went on to the state capitol in Salem we're talking we're done remaining silent in the United States of America I'm sick and tired of it hi Mike Rossio

Vice President Oregon Canosa Mike Rossio United States Salem Donald Trump Mike Pence Mike Rossi Milwaukee Officer James Blake California Senator Wisconsin Kamilla Harris
Despite the Pandemic, Airbnb Will Take the Company Public

Business Wars Daily

04:07 min | 2 years ago

Despite the Pandemic, Airbnb Will Take the Company Public

"I'm Elaine Appleton grant and this is business worse daily on this Tuesday August Eighteenth David Brown is on vacation. There's no other way to say, this twenty twenty is a weird year and yeah, that's a whopping understatement particularly for the travel sector, the latest news and the beleaguered lodging industry. It looks like AIRBNB will go public before the end of the year. The multibillion dollar home sharing company has long been eyeing the public markets. Early, this year AIRBNB was planning its IPO even though twenty nineteen. had been a rough year to in the first nine months of that year and the company lost more than three hundred and thirty million dollars growth was slowing competition already rough was increasing from aggressive rival Expedia, which owns short term rental brands. We are be O- and home away as we reported here, last year the entry of Marriott into the luxury home sharing business didn't help either. When the pandemic hit things took a dramatic turn for the worse the company faced a Billion Dollars in cancellations its valuation dropped from thirty one, billion dollars in twenty seventeen to eighteen billion dollars. This April, the next month airbnb laid off. Two, hundred people a quarter of its staff. It also slowed down plans to expand into TV and transportation the verge reported. Things were looking dire enough that even though it had plenty of cash on hand airbnb chose to borrow money and take on new investment to get through the crisis in total. The company raised two billion dollars at what the verge called. The steep interest rate top executives cut their pay and the eight hundred million dollar marketing budget was slashed the New York Times reported. It all seemed like one gigantic headache I say O'Brien Chessy in his crew. And yet AIRBNB still plans to go public by the end of August. AIRBNB could file IPO paperwork with the SEC if it does shares could trade before New Year's. At first glance that sounds crazy. But it actually reflects a little good news for the travel business along with some dramatically new patterns of travel behavior both here and abroad what do I mean? We'll think about it if you were stuck in the middle of a crowded city, this spring or summer working at your dining room table, would you stay put? Beginning in May a certain number of US said Hell? No. They had a Derulo areas where they could rent other people's homes, AIRBNB bookings, both in America and overseas began climbing back from their black hole for the three weeks starting around Memorial Day vacationers reserved twenty percent more homes than they did a year earlier according to Bloomberg business was best far from the madding crowds in. June. Reservations in the countryside jumped twenty five percent hosts in rural areas earned more than two hundred, million dollars in that month alone payments DOT COM reported international travel is virtually impossible and of course many. Of US are still avoiding airplanes so more and more of us are taking vacations within two hundred miles of our homes about one tank of gas in many cases were also staying longer after all many people no longer have to get back by Monday to go to the office we just take our work with us in a meeting in July CEO Chesty expressed amazement at the rebound in bookings. There is something I never would have imagined telling you the New York Times reported a kind of defies logic, but in June reservations also grew at rival Vr be oh, the Motley fool reported. Optimists see these numbers as a sign of life for the travel industry as a whole but predicting the future of travel right now is best left to gambling halls AIRBNB is fortunes could change suddenly depending on the course of

Airbnb New York Times Elaine Appleton David Brown United States Dot Com O'brien Chessy Expedia July CEO Motley SEC Bloomberg Chesty Derulo America
"two hundred mile" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

06:31 min | 2 years ago

"two hundred mile" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Arizona with two hundred miles of wall built good credible large numbers the border just about a record breaking low people will not be able to cross the border the wall itself because we have more to do what we have about two hundred and twelve miles up a wall so that's good add to what's going to be doing a number of other things were going to be regular speech the young people in Arizona we'll be meeting with some of the thank you talk about we've got a very strong last night we stopped in the tack on a great monuments one of the Jackson Lafayette park that is what it thank law enforcement they did a great job we were working very closely with the White House secret service some of our executives it was really they did a great job stop the call rumors people going to jail today people already there but we're looking at long term that is under the act I thought you meant that and we are located at Long this is for the good these days whatever you want the people don't like that language because what they are that bad people they don't love our country I did not take you down I just want to make that clear if you have an executive order I will have an executive order very shortly at all it's really going to do is reinforce what's already there but in a more uniform way that I want if the state government if you see them all over Seattle they're very weak add Minnesota they might need help if they need help the federal government is willing to help them come around these are not protests by the way the user these are others say at this stage can handle it the willing and able to help as we did in Minnesota will we stop after four days they finally called so we did a great job with the National Guard yeah not for that reason because as you probably have heard Bob Saturday night so that's the ultimate goal like that but the ratings on Saturday night with the highest ratings in the history of five which is I guess along with the number one Saturday night in we actually had a nice despite all the warnings and everything else that other network drive despite the fact that we had pretty bad people waiting there waiting maybe some of the same people I just talked about we had a nice crowd hi this is Bob from Saturday night at I heard the record was unbelievable the numbers weren't available I think you probably know that well with the numbers on line you know what you should go with it you should report it I don't tell you let me make it clear we the problem we better than anybody in the world the world and we have the most of them we find more twenty five what does that what one million thank god we did twenty five what any other country for we're going to have more cases by having more cases but actually what it is is finding people many of those maybe I'm grateful but what happens is because of all the is that we we have a very low mortality rate just about the best in the world so that's the advantage that the testing along with other things the reason we have court cases that other countries there's so much other countries this is so we're going to right yes I think they told me twenty five other countries here's what I'd say this is a double in one way in another way you find out where the case is good job we are doing a great job credited for this thing job anywhere in the world we're doing the best your job anywhere in the world without supplying ventilators world nobody else people don't countries don't have ventilators they call the United States we've done a great job we have not been given credit for the other thing the he was incredible warning if you people put out over the crowd was wonderful it was a great with the great but many of them stay home and watch television what happens is on Saturday night the biggest rating in the history of rock of ages thank you very much everybody.

Arizona
"two hundred mile" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

06:29 min | 2 years ago

"two hundred mile" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Over two hundred miles of wall built the numbers on the board you know about a record breaking low people will not be able to cross the border the wall itself because we have more than one well files up a wall so that's going to be doing a number of other things we're going to be the young people in our we will be meeting with some of the to talk about their borders it's very strong we okay great one of thank you all for a great job we will closely with the White House the really they did a great job all today Zacks long term goals of the the whatever you what they are one of my players good morning but executive order very shortly really going to do is reinforce what you already there more uniform way the state all over Seattle every week the federal government is willing to help them by the way but at this stage we're ready willing and able to help after four days they finally called for that reason because as you probably have heard Saturday night the ratings on Saturday night which is I guess one Saturday night in despite all the warnings and everything else people waiting there waiting maybe some of the same Saturday night the record was the numbers weren't available I think you probably know that the numbers on the line you know reporter we this we better than anybody in the world the world warning was yeah one we did twenty five for three four what we yes in the world along with this the reason we we're going to twenty five one way where the case is good job for anywhere in the world anywhere in the world the entire world nobody else the United States we've done a great job we have not been given credit for the other thing warning the warriors many of them watch television on Saturday night rated three thank you very much he.

White House Seattle federal government reporter United States executive
"two hundred mile" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"two hundred mile" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"To the south west on Tuesday to mark the completion of the two hundred miles of border wall construction near Yuma Arizona border with Canada remains closed over concerns about the coronavirus businesses in the United States close to the border say they are suffering because many Canadians come to the U. S. for better deals but harder here is Canada's tourism industry which depends on American customers Steve Overgaard has run Alberta adventures for forty years but he says he may not see forty one I don't open up September forty years of hard work my family is a family run deal is going to be done I'm not lying about this is the way it is Overgaard says ninety percent of his customers are from the United States Jerry bomb Garten fox New York City begin phase two of its re opening on Monday but will evidently be without one of its biggest tourist attractions through the rest of the year several reports indicating the Broadway league will announce as soon as Tuesday Broadway theaters will remain dark until the first of the year but baseball might be back within a month Major League Baseball owners have voted unanimously to proceed with a twenty twenty season under a March agreement with the MLB Players Association now asking the union if athletes can report for training by July first a decision from the MLBPA is expected by five PM eastern Tuesday the league also seeking union approval of health and safety protocols to carry out a regular season and postseason the owners vote now allows MLB commissioner rob Manfred implement schedule is choosing likely between fifty to sixty games after the players you shut down the league sixty game offer Monday by a thirty three to five open the executive.

Canada United States Steve Overgaard New York City MLB Players Association executive Yuma Arizona Alberta Jerry bomb Garten Major League Baseball commissioner rob Manfred
"two hundred mile" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

02:37 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred mile" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Some two hundred miles or heads in low earth orbit to female NASA astronauts have stepped outside the international space station becoming the first ever all female space walk one growing storm system the Gulf of Mexico expected to develop into a tropical storm Nestor now this storm system is moving our general drug direction bought it would likely make landfall up in the panhandle now regrettably we are never rainy stormy weekend as a result eighty percent coverage today and tomorrow but by Sunday it will clear up thanks for listening to Orlando's morning news with Joe Kelly on news ninety six point five W. E. B. O. team coverage of today's top stories be back here at lunch Orlando's news it was Scott and then sixteen now want to land is morning news Frank kill me show that's coming up this morning at nine and of course we'll get our winner here for the payroll pay out in just minutes welcome to sure when Williams so I can get forty percent off paint yes and forty percent off stains you bet hearty down I am yeah party time the color I'd like three gallons in party time please you got it ask Sherwin Williams October eighteen through twenty first and save forty percent on paints and stains with sale prices starting at twenty three oh nine only at your local Sherwin Williams store retail sales only some exclusions apply see store for details Paul is finally here and so is only these big fall sale get thousands of styles from his five Bucks all your fall favorites are on sale now layer up with five dollar teas and ten dollar long sleeve tees for the whole family and stock up on sweaters and dresses for just fifteen dollars plus save even more with up to seventy five percent off clearance styles don't miss out hurry in for thousands of styles from just five Bucks now it'll maybe an old baby dot com valid ten fifteen to ten twenty five select styles online hi I'm Jay Farner CEO of quicken loans thirty percent of Americans who are planning home improvements of five thousand dollars or more will pay for those renovations with a high interest credit card that may not be a great idea a better idea may be to take cash out of your home with the quicken loans thirty year fixed rate mortgage the rate today in our thirty year fixed rate mortgage is three point nine nine percent APR four point zero eight percent call us today at eight hundred quicken or go to rocket mortgage dot com rates of exchange a one point two five percent be receive the discount rate all the concentration in conditions because when it wasn't enough to states and one hundred thirty overwhelmingly saying oh my gosh if if you've never had the flu shot before this is your year to get a flu shot because the the the flu strain is particularly bad and it's a particularly pervasive and make sure you get your flu shot and you know.

"two hundred mile" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred mile" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Threatening condition investigators say the gunman was a white man in his thirties but they have not released the name or a possible motive Democrats in Congress have been calling for stronger background checks since the el Paso in Dayton massacres but the Senate will not vote on that president trump past about pending background check legislation when he returned from camp David for the weekend has it changed anything we're doing a factor we'll see what it's all the bat is coming about right now a lot of people are talking about it the what happened yes there is begin on CBS's face the nation democratic presidential hopeful better will Rorke a former Texas congressman says there's an appetite for change in the country even in Texas we knew relaxed gun laws took effect today universal background checks that close every loophole red flag laws to stop people who have firearms before it is too late if they pose a danger to themselves or someone else ending the sale of weapons of war here fifteen say K. forty seven mo Rourke says he wants to see a gun buy back measures in place now to our other big story this Labor Day weekend hurricane Dorian not what category five hurricane it's made landfall in the northern Bahamas Abaco islands packing sustained winds of a hundred eighty miles an hour with gusts topping out at two hundred miles an hour royal Bahamas police force assistant commissioner Samuel barber urging Bahamian is to stay in a safe place if you do not heed the warning based on our analysis the best experience very hot we know that the end could be fatal ask you the bag you we plead with you to get to a place of safety ABC's Marcus war is it marsh harbour in the Bahamas being in the system and then those one got slight that this storm is and officials that it could lead parts of this area devastated the southeast U. S. coast from northern Florida.

Bahamas U. S. Samuel barber Dorian president Dayton Florida ABC commissioner Congress Bahamas Abaco Rourke Texas congressman CBS David Senate el Paso
"two hundred mile" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred mile" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Surprising testimony at the trial of navy seal Eddie Gallagher in San Diego prosecution witness who was granted immunity, testified that he was the one who actually killed an injured teenage ISIS fighter in Iraq. In two thousand seventeen navy seal Corey Scott testified that special operations chief, Eddie Gallagher stabbed the injured teen in the neck. But then he suffered at the ISIS fighter because he says he knew the teen was going to die Scott said he didn't want the teen. Prosecutors estimate was fifteen years old turned over to Iraqi forces, because he had previously seen them torture rape, and murder prisoners. Gallagher's pleaded not guilty to murder attempted murder charges. His lawyers says Gallagher is the. Victim of lies in a smear campaign by other navy seals clip, Albert NBC News Radio traveled Amazon, a healthcare facility will no longer be allowed to participate in the Medicaid program. The centers for Medicare and Medicaid services says the contract with hacienda healthcare in Phoenix is being canceled because the facility can't meet basic health and safety requirements recently patient, there had maggots on their surgical incision last year and incapacitated patient was raped and gave birth study by an environmental group is recommending building sea walls on the South Carolina coast. The report by the center for climate integrity says spending twenty billion dollars on the seawalls could protect the state's coast for the next twenty years. The state is reporting that over thirty two hundred miles of seawalls being recommended, it would cover the entire coast. The group says the walls, would protect against a six inch rise in sea level and a twenty one inch storm surge. The report says that overall the country needs fifty thousand miles of new seawalls with the price tag of around four hundred sixteen billion dollars. The paper. Reports that building all those walls is unlikely to happen. But that the study was done to show costs coastal communities, face Matt cook, NBC News, Radio and actor kit. Harrington is out of rehab after checking himself in last month reports said he was having a hard time dealing with the end of game of thrones..

Eddie Gallagher Corey Scott murder Harrington Albert NBC Matt cook Iraq NBC News San Diego Medicaid South Carolina rape Amazon Phoenix Medicare four hundred sixteen billion d twenty billion dollars twenty one inch
"two hundred mile" Discussed on The Right Time with Bomani Jones

The Right Time with Bomani Jones

03:26 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred mile" Discussed on The Right Time with Bomani Jones

"Next one? And then we show up when weekend or go to house, when we dad's ain't go buy this car, we'll racist next year. I'm like, okay. And just let's go win another rates another ace. And next thing you know we started getting, you know, we got picked up by Joe Gibbs racing and, and still then I didn't even think of and maybe one day I can drive one of his Cup cars. It was like, okay, what's the opportunity that we have? Now, it's capitalize on that and move on interesting to hear because I know when I first started doing TV. Remember, the first time I got, like a little TV appearance, I was like, man. I'm have a TV show in like a year, and then ten years later, I get on ATV show instantly, and then three years after that I get on TV. So I was wondering, 'cause I know what can be if your expectations are outside into beginning. It can be difficult to realize you're just going along the steps that everybody goes along into here, the for us always just step by step sort of thing. Step by step, and don't get me wrong. I, I like to run wild when my magic potion whether that's in life or with the fats race in, you know, I, I still have those dreams of like just won that race in wake up, and I'm like, oh, man, I was dreaming that, you know, like man dang. So, you know, I still I still get excited over that stuff. But at the same time, I know the, the situation that we are in, and the, the timeframe, it just takes a lot of time, a lot of hard work, determination, and grit to, to get to that next level. And how good did it feel is not winning. But still second place in the Daytona five hundred is no joke. Yeah now for sure. I mean, so those races are for people that don't know if you have a car, and you have a car that, that can run the whole time you have a shot at winning. Just because we're running two hundred miles an hour around there bumper to bumper. It's just like traffic here. New York just two hundred miles an hour. And so one wrong move wipes out could wipe out potentially half the filter cores field. So you start with forty cars have one rec, rec, twenty next thing you know, if you're forty nine twentieth, you get back, going again, another wreck takes out ten next thing, you know, now your tenth. So, you know, we were able to miss four solid wrecks that day in lined up six on that last restart and got a really good run and shove to push the three out there and barely beaten eleven to get second and never thought, you know, I would end up second the five hundred it's not like again, it goes back to man. I'm at the Daytona five hundred and I just finished second. And it was just like, all right. We just finished second. Another race. Awesome. Let's go on to Atlanta. You really were able to keep it. Like that because I would have is deleted, like, all right. Mr. five town, too, right? That would have been where I was after that. Especially like twenty three twenty four. Yeah. No, it was. It was just one of those things like you know, I don't get too caught up in the history of the sport. I didn't watch it. You know, obviously, I know you know where our sport. How our sport was created. And, and the, you know, the foundation of all the legendary drivers and driving for the king. I know all that stuff, but I don't spend too much time thinking, like, oh, man. You know, a lot of people get excited over, you know, we just one you know, the southern five hundred Darlington just think of it as whatever the title sponsor that raises. That's we won that race great on the next one. So it's different for me. I don't wanna sound like I'm downplaying at all. But it's just we, we still got work to do. We back into mid with more with bubble Wallis. But I would you buy a t shirt for fifty dollars? If you knew it only costs seven dollars to make we wouldn't with ever lane. You never overpay for quality clothes ever lane.

Daytona Joe Gibbs Cup New York Atlanta Darlington fifty dollars seven dollars three years ten years one day
"two hundred mile" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

03:36 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred mile" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Play. When he breaks his living room in. It's wonderful life. Throws his models and scares his family. You know that's that's. Channeling, you know, and he did that in a lot of his pictures, dark performances after the war that just went there before the war. Well, it's an amazing book mission Jimmy Stewart and the fight for Europe and I encourage people to read, if not only because it's j- James Stuart's birthday, but with Memorial Day coming right up. It's a really good book to remind us of the unbelievable sacrifice that the men and women in uniform face, and the things that like that, that greatest generation didn't talk about really want to. Thank you for being with us. It's been a fascinating conversation. I wish we could talk for hours more about this, but folks are just going to have to read the book. So I wanna thank you Robert Madsen for being with us on first light. Michael. Thank you. All right. That is amazing. It's now seven and a half minutes before the hour. You know, Jimmy Stewart refused. Most entreaties to do public relations for the war effort, but before he was deeply involved in combat. He helped out director, John. Huston narrating a recruiting film. Looks like. Back in the movies, again. As a matter of fact, I like to do some talking right now the greatest mass mobilization in the history of the world play. We're fighting today and tomorrow and the next day until we win. His. The whole world knows that. No. That. St. five thousand fighting planes this year, a hundred thousand fighting next year and keep implying two-million-man. That's where you come in. You're really getting up on the world at the rate of nearly two hundred miles an hour, you're learning how to handle man on how to do that job with a lot of pride. Yeah. About courage to. Time you your training America. We'll have overwhelming superiority on the air, the way the air force it, they're fighting and they're flying for the safety of our people at home are mothers, and fathers, sisters and brothers. And to keep the destruction Poland and Belgium. Homes of good people in London Covent break on main hundreds of women children, Kenyan Perman. Tom. Our home. Freedom. Their wings outstretched in the cause of. Spinning prop. Drones vengeance against those who would destroy our way of life. Somebody's gonna fly. A lot of somebody's got to your place. This is where you'll serve America best. Don't men of America your futures. In the sky, your wings are waiting. Jimmy Stewart in World War. Two telling young men. Join me in the air as we bomb the heck out of Nazi Germany, and boy, he really did flying missions in broad daylight sometime, getting planes shot up barely limping back to the base in England. It is quite a story. He suffered from PTSD, and if you are a veteran and.

Jimmy Stewart America Huston Robert Madsen PTSD James Stuart London Covent Europe Michael Germany Poland Tom John England Belgium
"two hundred mile" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred mile" Discussed on KOMO

"Two hundred miles of towing. Call one eight hundred join AAA or visit AAA dot com. Mostly cloudy, mostly dry today. Our forecast high about sixty two degrees, but later in the day more likely overnight tonight here comes the first of the rain and for tomorrow, rainy and breezy with a high temperature about sixty degrees. It could be heavy rain at times tomorrow night and into Saturday, a wet and windy day Saturday with a high about fifty eight and then sorry to say more rain of Sunday. Forty six degrees in Seattle right now. Stay connected. Stay informed. Komo news coward by triple a roadside assistance. Good morning. Greg Hersholt, MandA is off this morning. Frank Lenzi's at the editor's desk. These are celebrate top stories. The New York Times is reporting that attorney general William bars four page summary of the Muller report. Downplays damaging information about President Trump. The report quotes associates of the special counsel team who say bar failed to adequately portray their extensive findings of the investigation into Russian meddling into the twenty sixteen election. Former vice president Joe Biden is addressing accusations of inappropriate behavior that have been made against him by seven different women over the years. ABC news senior congressional correspondent Mary Bruce has more from Capitol Hill, the former vice president is now acknowledging that his hands on approach made some women uncomfortable. Politics, cold. I've always thought about connecting with people shaking hands on the shoulder encouragement, but for some of the women who say Biden crossed the line. His comments aren't enough one former White House intern telling the post this is not mainly about. Whether Joe Biden has adequate respect for personal space. It's about women deserving. Equal respect in the workplace Biden still has not apologized, but house speaker Nancy Pelosi has suggested he should she's recommending Biden take a different approach on the member the straight armed club. I'm, you know, I'm not straight armor. This just pretend to you have a cold, and I have a cold. Source close to Biden tells us that these allegations are not impacting his decision whether or not to jump into the presidential race. And Biden has now announced his first public event since all of this began he will be speaking to union.

Joe Biden AAA vice president President Trump Seattle Frank Lenzi Greg Hersholt special counsel ABC Mary Bruce The New York Times White House Nancy Pelosi Muller editor intern
"two hundred mile" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred mile" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Than two hundred miles south of the rivet factory in the heart of London barrister Martin house sits in the cloistered column of his chambers and expresses the same enthusiasm for a new deal. Brexit once we leave, and if we leave without a deal on the position vis-a-vis, the EU will be enormously strengthened, how runs a pro Brexit campaign group lawyers for Britain, which on the face of it seems a little old since his practice involves a lot of cases. What is a specialist in e u law doing championing Brexit shooting yourself in the foot? Well, no, I mean, the reason is because I knew so much about the way European operates the more and more uphold our yet he admits that without a deal he could lose access to the European Court and lose business, indeed, dozens of British lawyers have been registering with Irish legal bodies in order to keep their access. But how hasn't he remains totally committed to Brexit for the sake. He says of Brit. Democracy. The essential thing is to get back control over our laws and once again be opponent trademark Crecy where we can truck out if we don't like the laws the past we can Chuck out people responsible. He's electric factory eighty miles south of London, another Brexit tear. Tony also sees Brexit is a bid for freedom and democracy and also has new fear of a new deal exit. You would rather have a no deal Brexit, then a no Brexit at all. Yes. Unequivocally. Now, eight seventy eight bonnet built up electric firm from nothing into a business employing, fifty people and exporting all over the world Brexit, he says, we'll widened the horizons of British business entrepreneurs should not be afraid. Will we as a country in the past? We've been pretty adventurous. We need to bring some of that adventurous spirit back again. He says the spirit emanating from parliament from big business, and from the mainstream business organizations doesn't seem adventurous at all the prevailing mood is fearful in London. I'm Stephen beard for marketplace. Coming up mean aren't magicians just.

Brexit London European Court EU Stephen beard Martin house Britain Chuck Tony
"two hundred mile" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred mile" Discussed on KCRW

"More than two hundred miles south of the river factory in the heart of London. Barrister Martin house sits in the cloistered calm of his chambers. And expresses the same enthusiasm for a new deal. Brexit once we leave, and if we leave without deal on the position vis-a-vis, the EU will be enormously strengthened, how runs a pro Brexit campaign group lawyers for Britain, which on the face of it seems a little odd since his practice involves a lot of cases. What is a specialist in EU law doing championing Brexit onto shooting yourself in the foot? Well, no, I mean, the reason is because I knew of say much about the way European operates the more and more uphold our yet he admits thousand deal he could lose access to the European Court and lose business, indeed, dozens of British lawyers have been registering with Irish legal bodies in order to keep their access. But how hasn't he remains totally committed to Brexit for the sake. He says of Brit. Democracy. The essential thing is to get back control over our laws and once again be opponent trademark proceed where we can truck out if you don't like the laws of the past week, and Chuck out people responsible. Electronics factory eighty miles south of London, another Brexit tear. Tony also sees Brexit as a bid for freedom and democracy. It also has no fear of a new deal exit. You would rather have a no deal Brexit, then a no Brexit at all. Yes. Unequivocally. Now, eight seventy eight bonnet built up his electric firm from nothing into a business employing, fifty people and exporting all over the world Brexit. He says will widen the horizons of British business entrepreneurs should not be afraid. Well, we as a country in the post. We've been pretty adventurous. We need to bring some of the adventurous spirit back again. He says the spirit emanating from parliament from big business, and from the mainstream business organizations.

Brexit EU London Barrister Martin house European Court Chuck Britain Tony
"two hundred mile" Discussed on AP News

AP News

03:10 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred mile" Discussed on AP News

"The special Oprah Winfrey presents after Neverland and it will air simultaneously on both channels Monday at ten pm eastern and Pacific. The networks say the pre taped interview will be with Wade Robson and James. Save Chuck in the film's director, Dan Reed. And it'll be in front of an audience of people affected by sexual abuse. The family and estate of Jackson who died in two thousand nine after now's the documentary and HBO's decision to air it saying it spreads falsehoods about a man that alive to defend himself. The world stirred largest finding of natural gas in the last two years has been discovered off the coast of Cyprus by ExxonMobil. The country's energy ministers said the estimated five to eight trillion cubic feet of gas office hope for more discoveries in waters off the east Mediterranean island nation, which wants to become an alternative energy source for Europe, ExxonMobil will carry out drilling. Most likely next year. Meanwhile, Turkey strongly objects to any guests said she's off Cyprus sang it infringes on its rights as well. As those of Turkish Cypriots in the island's breakaway northern region Turkey, which doesn't recognize Cyprus as a state claims politics cypresses offshore exclusive economic zone and says it will carry out drilling of its own soon air travel between Asia and Europe has been a struggle recently for some travelers AP's Charles de LA desma reports a temporary closure. Of airspace over Pakistan is snarled air traffic Bangkok thousands of travelers stranded and affected headlines. Trying to change their flight palms tie airline says it's rerouting flights to Europe and Malaysia hopes his planes will avoid aspects of the Pakistan and northern India until further notice is them about officials say the country's s base would reopen as of midnight Pakistan time, the move was triggered after Pakistan says its military had shut down to engine warplanes. And catch it applied it escalating tensions between the nuclear armed rivals. I'm Charles Trump back from Vietnam. I'm maguire. The AP news been President Trump is back at the White House after his summit with North Korea's Kim Jong UN and have Hanoi. Trump ended their meetings two hours early after game reportedly demanded an end to US sanctions without the north firmly committed to eliminating its nuclear arsenal Korea expert, Bruce Clinger says Trump was correct. I think the president did the right thing I've been critical of the president's North Korea policy that I think he did the right thing. Three republican. Senators say they will vote for a house resolution overturning President Trump's declaration of a national emergency along the border with Mexico Tennessee's Lamar Alexander hints. He might be the fourth in his floor remarks. Alexander says, the president has an funding to build more than two hundred miles a wall and doesn't need to have such a showdown with congress is unnecessary and unwise determine a border crisis into a constitutional crisis. Trump has threatened to veto the resolution if it passes the Senate, I'm Tim Maguire AP digital news back in a moment. Hi, it's Jamie, progressive's number one number two employee. Leave a message at the hey, Jamie..

President Trump Europe ExxonMobil president North Korea Pakistan Cyprus Oprah Winfrey Wade Robson Dan Reed Turkey Lamar Alexander Jamie Chuck Kim Jong UN Charles de LA desma Tim Maguire HBO director
"two hundred mile" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:37 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred mile" Discussed on AP News

"Progressive casualty insurance company affiliates and other insurance discounts not available in all states or situations between Asia and Europe has been a struggle recently for some travelers AP's Charles de LA desma reports a temporary closure of airspace over Pakistan is snarled air traffic Bangkok thousands of travelers stranded and affected headlines. Trying to change their flight palms tie line says it's rerouting flights to Europe and Malaysia hopes his planes will avoid aspects of the Pakistan and northern India until further notice Islamabad officials say the country's s base would reopen as of midnight Pakistan time, the move was triggered after Pakistan says its military had shut down to engine warplanes and captured a pilot escalating tensions between the nuclear armed rivals. I'm charlesetta. That's my. Actor Luke Perry is in the hospital publicist Arnold Robinson tells the Associated Press that Perry who's fifty two is quote currently under observation teams spending the day in Venice Italy will soon cost a few extra euros for visitors. Who aren't staying overnight Venice? The city council says the visitors tax meant to generate revenue for public services that cost more to provide in the lagoon cities such as trash collection and cleaning public areas starting sometime in May Day trippers will now be charged a daily tax of three euros. That's three dollars forty cents. US the charge will double next year. Trump back from Vietnam. I'm Tim Maguire, the AP news minute. President Trump is back at the White House after his summit with North Korea's Kim Jong UN and have Hanoi. Trump ended their meetings two hours early after game reportedly demanded an end the US sanctions without the north firmly committed to eliminating its nuclear arsenal career expert, Bruce Clinger says Trump was correct. I think the president did the right thing. I've been critical of the. The president's North Korea policy that I think he did the right thing. Three Republican senators say they will vote for a house resolution, overturning President Trump's declaration of a national emergency along the border with Mexico Tennessee's Lamar Alexander hints. He might be the fourth in his floor remarks. Alexander says, the president has an a funding to build more than two hundred miles a wall and doesn't need to have such a showdown with congress is unnecessary and unwise to turn a border crisis into a constitutional crisis. Trump has threatened to veto the resolution if it passes the Senate, I'm Tim Maguire more news right after this with Amazon music of voices. All you need. Alexa,.

President Trump president Pakistan US Tim Maguire North Korea Lamar Alexander Luke Perry Europe Charles de LA desma Venice Islamabad Bangkok Kim Jong UN Alexa AP Asia Venice Italy
"two hundred mile" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:59 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred mile" Discussed on AP News

"The rebound has come as average thirty year. Mortgage rates have fallen since peaking at nearly five percent. In early November, the pending home sales index improved in the northeast midwest south and west in January air travel between Asia and Europe has been a struggle recently for some travelers AP's Charles de LA desma reports a temporary closure of airspace over Pakistan snarled air, traffic, Bankok, thousands of travelers stranded and affected airlines are trying to change their flight palms tie airline says it's rerouting flights to Europe and Malaysia hopes his planes will avoid aspects of Pakistan and northern India until further notice Islamabad officials say the country's s base would reopen as of midnight Pakistan time. The move was triggered off to Pakistan says its military had shut down to engine warplanes. And catch it applied it escalating tensions between the nuclear armed rivals. I'm charleston. That's my. Multiple weapons and drug charges have been filed against a coastguard officer AP's, my Grasser reports he's accused of being a white supremacist with a politically motivated Hitler US coastguard officer who worked at coast guard headquarters in Washington has been indicted by a federal grand jury on drug and firearms charges. Forty nine year old Christopher Paul Harrison has been in federal custody since February fifteenth the indictment includes charges of illegal possession of firearms by a drug addict, and unlawful user and illegal possession of firearms. Silencers according to prosecutors investigators found fifteen firearms, including seven rifles and over one thousand rounds of ammunition in a search of Hassans apartment in Silver Spring, Maryland in a court filing. Prosecutors said Hasson has espoused extremist views for years. Mike rossier? Washington. Trump back from Vietnam. I'm Tim Maguire with AP news. President Trump is back at the White House after his summit with North Korea's Kim Jong UN and have Hanoi. Trump ended their meetings two hours early after game reportedly demanded an end to US sanctions without the north firmly committing to eliminating its nuclear arsenal Korea expert, Bruce Clinger says Trump was correct. I think the president did the right thing I've been critical of the president's North Korea policy that I think he did the right thing. Three Republican senators say they will vote for a house resolution, overturning President Trump's declaration of a national emergency along the border with Mexico Tennessee's Lamar Alexander hints. He might be the fourth in his floor remarks. Alexander says, the president has an a funding to build more than two hundred miles a wall and doesn't need to have such a showdown with congress is unnecessary and unwise to turn a border crisis into a constitutional crisis. Trump has threatened to veto the resolution if it passes the Senate, I'm. Tim mcguire. More news right after this with Amazon music of voices. All you need. Alexa,.

President Trump Pakistan North Korea president Charles de LA desma US Washington Tim mcguire midwest Europe Islamabad Lamar Alexander Bankok Alexa Malaysia Kim Jong UN Mike rossier Amazon officer Christopher Paul Harrison
"two hundred mile" Discussed on The Steve Austin Show - Unleashed!

The Steve Austin Show - Unleashed!

03:56 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred mile" Discussed on The Steve Austin Show - Unleashed!

"But at that point in constantly that addiction had such a hold on me that I was no good anybody. I couldn't have gone back to work. I I couldn't be a good husband. I couldn't be a good father. I couldn't be a good son. I couldn't use and be a productive citizen. Because of the fact that I was breaking the law or colonies prescriptions, and I was just wallow in the diction on mar life it just out of control. So and when I did have the surgery to repair that traffic ten and I had a staff infection set up after that surgery. They had to go back in and open. My arm back up. I mean, just make a six inch slice on the back of my truck. And they lifted open he give not close it up. He did not stitched up. We want this thing to drain to get that infection out. And we wanted it to heal in just close on his own. And for almost two years. I had an open wound on the back of two years to close all the white. So I was in no shape, mentally, physically, psychologically hours in no shape to do anything. Then what are you doing? When you got a six inch slice gash or vigor. So that thinking he'll like you just said, but what do you do to occupy the time because I'm assuming first of all I probably still have on the pain killers. But you know, as far as working and doing a job. What do you do? What did you do just lay around and take pills all day? Yeah. Pretty much for about a year and a half. I did. I mean, you know, I had it made good money. I'd make good money. Even though I could spend money I had saved money and invested money. And so for almost probably close to two years. I did nothing except more money on pills and drugs, lawyers because I was getting arrested, and you know, you need an attorney to get out of jail the represention court. So I was going I was going through minding money two hundred miles an hour. And I visually had a business opportunity opened up to me. I went into business with another guy. We we had a commercial roofing company, and we did great business in the Columbia area. We had a contract with the CVS for any CVS. It was built in the area. We put the roof on it and maintain that roof. We also did a couple of malls. And we were doing great Disney. But because of my diction because of my habits, and because of not bad decisions that I was making you know, he had to part ways with me. So you know of intially. Yeah. It was just. Had really naked everybody. Because of of the decision was making in the life that I was living. So finally after forging all his prescriptions, the hammer comes down, and you get bust and all of a sudden you've been in a courtroom many many times, but you're able to bond out and go home. But now sudden what what's what's the final piece of the puzzle? That led to you get an eighteen months sentence that you must do time for how did that go down at what were you thinking when that judge handed down that sentence because you had never really been locked up for an extended period time. No, I hadn't in in in just honestly speaking, I think it was probably only because of name recognition in South Carolina into Columbia area. You know, here's a gal that was a local kid played high school football. Here was an all state football player went to South Carolina was an all American, you know, a professional wrestler. I think because of that name recognition. I kept getting opera -tunities at ninety other people wouldn't have gotten. So I would get put on probation and I would break probation. They would extend probation. And I would continue to do what I was doing. I continue getting arrested forging prescriptions said it put me on double secret probation. And you know, I had I had the report to the probation officer free times that week..

South Carolina football Disney officer attorney two years six inch eighteen months
"two hundred mile" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

07:37 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred mile" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Or forty five percent of the wall and blaming the other elements supporters security increase people on the border and increase technology. Making people were silently. Almost done straight. All of that stuff. Really? I think. Wall in the context was ineffective speech for him. And and I think it will. Help them in the polling. Have any impact on the democrat? No. But but I think that it's a very fine job. The democrats. In my opinion, are there they're playing a very cynical game. And it's it's it's politics at its best than at its worst. In other words, I think that they know that your average voter your average American has a short memory people are busy paying their bills working at hard jobs, raising your kids and most Americans don't remember that ten minutes ago a couple of years ago. Many of the Democrats were advocating for something extremely similar to what Trump is is advocating for at this point. And and they're they're playing. Advocating are builds a wall the Clinton administration, they built a two hundred mile long twenty foot high wall on the Mexico, San Diego border, and it absolutely is still bear answers off people coming in California works for like, Sean. Trump is doing then began and then after the wall was built during the democratic administration of Bill Clinton. During the Bush administration of Bill came up funded being extended all the way and Filaret and Schumer both voted yet. The Bill passed. So it's not advocate if if they were heavily on record for it. I remember writing speech for Bill Clinton about have great. The wall was. That's amazing. That is. So I mean, this is why. You know, I often talk about the idea that we as Americans in in order to remain free. And in order for America to remain a bastion of liberty. We have work to do and part of that work is to educate ourselves to be informed citizens. And so we need to know this history. It's one of the reasons I love having you on because you help us remember things that most of us, you know, unless you're studying this issue, you forget that. A long campaign convince people forget about the wall. They built. And the rubric. All don't work is absurd. Israel's war against the West Bank has been absolutely survival. Are they used to be suicide bombings every game day? And I I know that I know that everything now there's none of it because of the wall and. They're still infiltration routes. And they're working on that. But it's very different than just walking of their unprotected Beria and getting pets with guns. What do you think the president's plan is in other words when I was watching yesterday? First of all, I expected it originally to be much longer speed. I expected it to be, you know, an entertaining, Trumpian speech. And instead he decided his they all decided to tack to the presidential side to do something very short. Yeah. And t- tell us about that. In other words, what what do you think he was trying to go ahead? In this situation. You. There is a male liberty. She goes get that Chester on slowing and to make these kinds of issues about Montreal challenges. Good example of that was when I said that he wanted bin Laden dead or alive like western right and women really repelled from what the mission accomplished on the aircraft Kelly. And women and other civilized people. Don't like that. By being presidential laying this out without anything that could be used rabble-rousing or race baiting or anything like that. Really? Was laid out the case very well and very very dignified way. And I wouldn't be surprised to see all within the next few days. If support for the wall rose five or ten point as of the stage. Well, I should remind my listeners that you are a master. Pollster, you know, polls better than than anybody. And it's interesting because what what I'm really asking. Now is what it's one thing to give a speech. The question is is the end game to have the polls change. So that you can use that in further pressuring the Democrats. And in other words, the Democrats don't seem to have budged millimeter. So the question is what was he hoping to accomplish by giving that speech, exactly? I think that he buys faction he buys room from south to be upstairs and strong and determined. Let's remember that the pain of the shutdown really falls on the democrat. The union members who are now losing their paychecks democrat. He's a Democratic Union eight hundred thousand and this is really something where the pressure within the Democratic Party is going to be significant. Okay. This is the first time heard this. And it's why I love to talk to you. I I have not really heard that. That's very interesting. I didn't know that we're talking about such a significant number of of union workers who are not getting their paychecks. That's that's huge eight hundred eight hundred well four. Three hundred and fifty thousand or not working and not going to be paid. And another four hundred and fifty thousand or working and working. Going to be paid at the end of this. But now have missed a paycheck. Eight hundred thousand and it's a huge number and this democratic Democratic Union at the state, and local and federal employees you and the treasury workers union all of these democratic name stays and their members are raising hell, and it is Democrats them from reporting back to work in giving paid. Well, what do you think good? But we'll build on shoe. Is enormous. That is not something that I I heard before. So thank you again, dick, this is it's fascinating to me. To think about the the way these things play out because most of us are wondering what is going to get anybody to move. And we know that the pressure on on Trump to build the wall from his base. It's a campaign promise, he cannot he really has to get some kind of political. We're going we're going to go to break. Forgive me, dick. We'll be right back. Ladies and gentlemen, I'm talking to Dick Morris. The new book is fifty shades of politics..

democrats Democratic Union Bill Clinton Trump Dick Morris bin Laden Clinton administration Democratic Party Israel America president San Diego Beria Trumpian Montreal Chester treasury workers union West Bank
"two hundred mile" Discussed on Don't Keep Your Day Job

Don't Keep Your Day Job

03:26 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred mile" Discussed on Don't Keep Your Day Job

"We get one free two hundred mile to help. And so we call AAA. They come out. They tell us to Coachella. And that is how cool house the end. Love this story. Looking back. You're like every aspect of that story is the most perfect story to tell. It's fun. So what happens you get there? We got to Coachella. And I mean, it was I don't know how to outfit a an old postal van. Like did you get enough? We were you just in the window. Like, it was like melting ticket minimum viable product. Like the truck actually ended up being kind of like the aspirated icon like it was like sitting there next to it. We had a booth because the doors of the truck we couldn't even really open there were two rusty and there were like bars on the windows. It didn't say cool house. We had nothing we have nothing to to spend the had. There was no budget. Like, we spent it all on making some is live inside it. So the truck just was sort of there. I feel like people like charge their phones in maybe someone slept there. I don't know. But like, it would just sort of like, here's what we wanted to bridge in there with well, then there was a booth next door that we scooped from that. We have. Chest freezer, and like a couple tables for the cookies, and it was didn't really need them. It was to show people what we were going for, you know. And I think people then could make the connection posts Coachella way. But minimum viable minimum viable product to the extreme. And that's that was good though. Because people are like, oh, what are you stressed? Or were you like worried and the truth was like, no because it was sort of we had nothing to lose. It was let's say let's see how this pans out. And if it works out great, you know, but if not so so we basically like built kind of a mini cult following at hotel people were excited about what we were doing. And you know, I was cool house already. It was called cool house, and we had we started screaming this wishes to order like we still do on the trucks and in the shops. And it was we would have also friends who had like we traded tickets to the concert to like help us. I don't know what they really did. But they supposedly went to all the. Tents in the camp ground and like trying to sell the sandwiches from little cooler bags. It was I don't really stand by any of this. Starting your start hanging out. Yeah. But I would like they would wake me up at like seven ambulance Natasha. There's a line for the ice cream sandwiches like before I was even awake people wanted them. So it was just the microcosm. We need. It was enough to know. We've got some valid any. Yeah. Exactly. It was it was proof of concept. How'd you get that truck home? So common question. We because we spent so little getting there. We started cash flowing right away. And so we got a real insurance policy, and then we use that to tow truck back. So so we we're trying to truck back coming back to LA. I a friend of mine who wrote for curbed at the time the real estate blog. He said if it goes, well, send me a logo in the details, and I'll do a piece on on cool house. So I was like, yeah. This is we've got the proof of concept to keep going. I'm going to send Dan like an image of a logo shameful for an architect. Not even a vector based file it was like, you know, and the basics. I was like here's the details. And he wrote this piece that was like actually not even flattering and all he was like, you know, if it really bored in L A, and you want something weird. This architecture ice cream truck. Like, maybe if you've time check it out. Thanks, Dan, that's super helpful. But it didn't matter..

Dan LA Natasha