32 Burst results for "Two Hundred Kilometers"

Breaking Down the Science Behind OneWeb's Planned Constellation

Daily Tech Headlines

01:39 min | 1 year ago

Breaking Down the Science Behind OneWeb's Planned Constellation

"On monday we talked about the successful deployment of thirty four internet satellites by uk. Communications company one web bringing their total network to two hundred eighty eight satellites. Their goal is to reach six hundred and forty eight satellites by twenty twenty two. But how in the world does the internet come all the way down from space satellites straight down into your ears right. Now let's take a closer look at some far out satellite science one. Web satellites is a joint venture with airbus. They aim to deploy a constellation of up to nine hundred. Low earth orbit satellites at around one thousand two hundred kilometers altitude to provide high speed internet. These efforts intend to compete with spacex. His starling system which currently has one thousand seven hundred internet satellites orbiting the earth at five hundred fifty kilometers altitude amazon also has plans to launch internet satellites for its project copier constellation. All of these companies are aiming towards providing low latency internet from space. But how does it work rather than sending internet signals through electric cables satellite internet beams information through the vacuum of space or it travels forty seven percent faster than fiber optic cable. This is particularly interesting for remote locations where laying electric cables is complicated in order to transfer a signal. You i need to emit one. So i and internet signal is delivered to a large antenna or earth station on the ground and this station then sends radio waves up into space targeting a specific satellite which is around the size of a large table.

Airbus Spacex UK Amazon
What Happens to All the Stuff We Send Into Space?

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

02:35 min | 1 year ago

What Happens to All the Stuff We Send Into Space?

"Since the launch of sputnik in nineteen fifty seven humans have been sending all sorts of things into space stuff like the serious eight and new satellite just launched by stitchers parent company or cargo space craft bringing supplies to space station's not to mention the most prising stuff like golden records or read tesla's an estimated thirty five thousand bits of Incentives right up to objects at the size of double decker buses up to of course international space station which is said to be the size of american football fields or five bedroom house. That's dr alice. Gorman associate professor at flinders university in south australia and one of the world's leading space archaeologists she studies all sorts of ways. Humans have engaged with space including these tens of thousands of objects rocketing around in earth orbit. And that's just stuff four inches and bigger there's believed to be millions of objects anything smaller than that. They distributed from lois little bit which is about two hundred kilometers above the surface of the us up to maybe about one thousand two thousand kilometers then. You have raged. That's just cold middle or medium business and then you get into. The high as obits. Miss includes Stationary orbit which is where bust of telecommunications satellites used to think of these orbits kind of like three lanes of a running track with satellites and spacecraft as the runners zipping around and around in their respective lanes. But note that for this analogy to work the track would be really really big and runners relatively teeny if we go out there and look at these might only say one object within your field. You so that impression. We have a stuff's closely packed together. Just together that's actually luck. Absolute worst case scenario. Which we're not at yet. There's growing concern about what will happen over. The next few decades as there are a lot of plans to launch way more stuff into orbit. And here's the thing. The vast vast majority of objects orbiting the planet is considered space junk.

Dr Alice Flinders University Tesla Gorman South Australia Lois Football United States
Automatically Generate Your Unit Tests From Scratch With Pynguin

The Python Podcast.__init__

01:46 min | 1 year ago

Automatically Generate Your Unit Tests From Scratch With Pynguin

"I'm stefan i'm phd. Student university of pulse. Also small town like two hundred kilometers east of munich. Germany between germany australia the czech republic. I used to do my studies. Their computer science a bachelor master's degree in Doing a phd and the project we are talking about. Tingling is my main research project here. Do you remember how you first got introduced a python. I thought about that actually. I cannot really narrow that down. I played around with it before i started my studies. Which around like twenty ten or something. But i really got introduced it during my bachelor studies usa quite lot. Although our programming experience basically many java background from this talton study curriculum but used pies pizon their lot of finesse started my phd. I focused a lot on and shifted my main focus basically In that area and there's no in terms of the penguin project you mentioned that some of the focus of your current research with your hd program. I'm wondering if you can just give a description about what it is that you're building and some of the story behind how you came on this particular problem space to work through and some of the interesting areas of research that it's uncovering as you go through your program one of the things to note here. Is that my supervisor. Professor gordon fraser. He's an expert in testing software and developed a tool for job of unitas generation. Called every sweet. Some of you might have heard that name somewhere around when you're interested in testing and so we were discussing a lot of opportunities.

Student University Of Pulse Germany Stefan Munich Czech Republic Australia USA Professor Gordon Fraser
Israel Independence War Era Weapons Cache Discovered in Tel Aviv

The Promised Podcast

02:35 min | 1 year ago

Israel Independence War Era Weapons Cache Discovered in Tel Aviv

"The day before yesterday as we record a gardener found underneath a bush at number twenty two cream as street a cache of world war two vintage bullets artillery shells and grenades which ordinance was stowed under a bush three quarters of a century ago by members of the haganah jewish militia to keep british soldiers and centuries from finding it such a hiding place for weapons was called a sleek from the hebrew root some lama couth to make rid of and in the one thousand nine hundred eighty s there were hundreds of maybe thousands all around the country though most of them were dismantled as soon as the brits left palestinian nineteen forty eight. But you know how it is. You put your grenades and your artillery shells in your bulletin a whole under bush in your yard and then you get busy ensure the brits go home but you tell yourself you'll empty the gun whole tomorrow and if it's not one thing it's another before you know it seventy odd years of pass that is just life in the big city so this week. The police bomb squad piloted remote control. Sapper robots under the tree and they exploded some of the grenades shells and bullets. And they neutralize the rest and sent them to the tel aviv. Forensics lab for further investigation. And for those of you wondering and who isn't wondering isaac jacob adolf. Crimea was the french jewish attorney who in eighteen. Forty along with sir. Moses montefiore made the trip to alexandria egypt to plead before Dive mohammed ali for the release of jews arrested in damascus blood. Libel that rocked the jewish world that year and crimea and montefiore secured freedom for nine of the thirteen syrian. Jews accused of killing christians for their blood. The other four having already died while being tortured after that chromium became minister of justice of france under the second republic in eighteen forty eight and he later founded the 'alliance eastern elite universal in paris in eighteen. Sixty one gathers that isaac jacob adolf creamier would probably not himself have hidden guns in tel aviv in nineteen forty eight but he probably would have understood the sentiment and arguably nothing captures the haphazard semi history city of this forever new and yet never really new city. We love so al tel aviv. Alto better than a gardener. Finding an old bag of old bullets and such tucked under a shrub to shield it from the prying eyes of the brits on a street named for a man who one hundred years before that sailed with an english financier to alexandria a city. Just four hundred fifty kilometers. Southwest of tel-aviv. In order to gain the release of wrongly residues in damascus a city just two hundred kilometers northeast of tel

Haganah Jewish Militia Bush Lama Couth Isaac Jacob Adolf Moses Montefiore Aviv Mohammed Ali Crimea Alexandria Damascus Egypt Al Tel Tel Aviv France Paris TEL
Going old Turkey: a regional power spreads

The Economist: The Intelligence

06:49 min | 2 years ago

Going old Turkey: a regional power spreads

"A decade ago, Turkey's Foreign Minister Audit of Attalou used to boast his country was on good terms with everyone police fantasia want. less confrontation, less tense attitude. Especially, in the region, he spoke at the Council on foreign, relations with the will of the principal. In. Two thousand three. Zero problems with our neighbors. And the made a huge progress. All, that now seems a distant memory Turkey is growing its international influence and not always with a light touch. The country has been backing Libya's government in its civil war. Last month. The Turkish Defence Minister landed in Libya to inspect his troops and opposition warlord warned them to get out or else. Turkey prompted an angry statement from Egypt last week by allegedly planning gas exploration and Egyptian waters. And yesterday Turkish officials railed against an American company for its dealings with ethnic Kurds in neighboring Syria. That Turkey believes to be terrorists. To some, all this adventurism is reminiscent of past chapter of the country's history when the Ottoman Empire ruled all of Syria and far beyond. Turkey, has been playing an especially prominent role in Syria since protests spread into a full blown civil war. Turkey has really become a meshed in Syria since the start of the our spring, the uprisings that took place in two thousand eleven across the Middle East it back. The Islamist. Movements that initially took to the streets and then took up arms. Nicholas Pelham is our Middle East correspondent. But as those fighters were false back towards its border, it's really stepped into try and protect its southern border, stop any more refugees coming into the country and to provide some sort of safe zone for the proteges, and it's also very nervous about the current state law that emotion the northeast of the country. It feels very threatened by the emergence of Kurdish power on the southern borders, and is it reasonable for Turkey to think that those Kurdish forces are really a threat historic? The have been links between the PK, the cuts down Workers Party, which has been waging a thirty five year a war for. Autonomy and separatism inside Turkey. Many of those fighters did flee sought refuge in Iraq and in Syria, and so Turkey is worried about what it sees very much kind of PKK influenced state emerging on its southern borders. So this year it's been launching pretty heavy attacks inside Iraq, it's been sending tanks across the border. It's established positions inside northern Iraq. It's been carrying out drone bombardments, such two hundred kilometers from its border in Saint, John More, Kurds all the way along its southern border inside Syria inside. Iraq see a new Turkish assault, which is pushing deep into their territory and not just unsettling. Kurdish aspirations for sovereignty in Iraq and Syria, and this is also unnerving Arab leaders as well. Who Turkey pushing deep into territory, which was part of the Turkish Republic predecessor. The Ottoman Empire, which ruled the Middle East centuries until its dissolution about a century ago, which is to say that Turkey is expanding its influence is doing this adventurism beyond Iraq and Syria all over the Middle East of the moment. There's a this year has seen the new intervention of the Turkish, Army. Libya. They came to the rescue of the besieged government of National Accord. In Tripoli, which has been fighting a civil war against a renegade general. Khalifa. After Turkish forces established at base on the borders of Tunisia, we're seeing it's frigates make a bid for control of looking coastline and even ward off French frigates. We're really seeing a substantive increase in Turkish. Power across the Middle East and it's not just happening in Liberia. It's happening in Gaza, which is an ally of Turkey. Turkish forces there have tried to help. Cut Break Its blockade by Saudi Arabia they're. A. Few hundred to a few thousand Turkish forces that are they're wasting more Turkish interested in Yemen civil war. We're seeing interest in a Sudanese port and actually Turkey's largest overseas basis in the point of Africa. So really this is a massive increase in Turkey spread across the middle, East and do you believe that the the the Ottoman history plays into that as a return to former glories? In some way? It's very much the in the rhetoric certainly saw Mr. Osman tropes at the at the height of the Arab spring wanted to appear to be the leader of the Muslim world. He was promoting his version of governance across the region hoping to clone the Turkish model across the Middle East. But since the collapse of Islamist movement since its as from power in Egypt and the retreat of many of its forces, he's really kind of played much more on Turkey's national interests. He's ally domestically with what had been his nationals opposition. He seems to be much more concerned on trying to maximize Turkey's economic claims in the. The Mediterranean this since much more about promoting Turkey's national interests than flying it systems colors. This is really an exercise in in hard power and trying to exploit the weakness of others, the retreat of Europe and America from the Middle East. The policies of many Arab governments, and try and push Turkey to fill what seems to be a vacuum of power across the Middle East, and so is that push to serve Turkey's national interests working is, is it benefiting from this from this expansionism? If you're trying to put together a balance sheet of profit balance sheet? Sheet Turkey has benefited from Khatri investment cutters, loans, and investments have helped prop up the Turkish lira. It may be that country's also hoping to fund part of its military costs in Libya Turkeys, keen to promote its companies when it comes to eventual reconstruction of war-torn Libya, which after all is energy rich state, and so long term, there may be benefits, his critics home highlight, the cost it's estimated that Turkish operations in Syria have cost anything up to about thirty billion dollars, and of course, there is a threat that you're going to see a major escalation. Escalation in the Middle East, which could embroil Turkey. It's not just Turkey is entering the middle, East enforce. It's also Russia. Many Arab states are trying to gain Russian support to push back Turkey, not just Syria Egypt the United Arab Emirates looking to Russian support in Libya, and Egypt is sending its tanks to the Libyan borders. The UN warned that the risk of a of a regional war focused on Libya and beyond that that risk was huge. So this is a massive gamble and it looks as if the stakes are going to be increasingly hyphen

Turkey Middle East Syria Libya Iraq Sheet Turkey Egypt Turkish Republic Principal Nicholas Pelham Workers Party Attalou Saudi Arabia John More Russia Tunisia UN Tripoli
North Korea fires two projectiles into sea

BBC World Service

00:26 sec | 2 years ago

North Korea fires two projectiles into sea

"News South Korea says the north has fired what appeared to be too short range ballistic missiles into the sea off its east coast Yonhap news agency quoted the military joint chiefs of staff is saying the projectiles were launched from the coastal city of one son the flu more than two hundred kilometers towards the sea of Japan is the fourth in a series of launches this month by North Korea Seoul describes the tense fighting as very

South Korea FLU Japan North Korea
The Future of 5G with Paul Scanlan CTO Huawei Carrier Business Group

The Practical Futurist Podcast

10:42 min | 2 years ago

The Future of 5G with Paul Scanlan CTO Huawei Carrier Business Group

"Welcome Paul thanks very much under now. I've just been very fortunate to sit around a round table with a bunch of influences. And you're quite candid about you know the challenges that you face in the industry but this podcast is about the future of and I wanted to talk about the future of Five G. Sofa my listeners out there that may be in markets where five gs and live or just been launch. How WOULD YOU DESCRIBE FIVE G? And why's it better than four g you know Andrew it's This is probably the most misunderstood technology. It's been bandied around as being everything from the you know the evil of the world to To the savior of the world right and I think the answer probably leaning towards the latter. Which is you know. It's something that really will transfer so I like to think of I five as a platform for transformation. Went talk about it as a speed thing or this thing or that thing. I'll just terrific platform for transformation. Everybody says you know five G. It's faster it's this that and everything else when we talk about them. Do you operate four G. And how do you operate five G? When we operate forgery generally we designed it for this thing called twenty megahertz of spectrum because in three G it was five Megahertz Chunks of spectrum. And therefore more megahertz means you get more spectrum. Generally you get more bang for your buck when we talk about five Jay. We're talking with starting with one. Hundred doesn't mean account. Wigan Eighty or seventy six fifty or ten yep but it was originally thought of. Let's try it for for for one hundred MiG. One hundred twenty two one mistake now. Of course you've got the up link in the downlink say have maybe it's about two or three to one put it in called a spider spider. So you have about two times or three times more spectrum so you're really not comparing for and five Jay in like for like we learnt Andrew many years ago five years ago in doing you think Oh. Wtt X. Wireless to the something. We learnt that we could provide wireless communication as a sort of an alternative center. A Better Time. To market than fiber by deploying wireless buys technologies to provide home-based broadband solutions. Because you build an anti put an antenna and you can sell it so cash and carry you. Get Five Mega. Hit megabits per second team. Maybe one hundred right now. This fixed product is competing with the mobile product. The second one is the bane with these not there so you don't really have enough resources but we learned very quickly that if we were able to put more antennas in we call the massive. Mimo. Then you end up with a better better result. Suddenly you can offer not three hundred customers. Ten makes you could offer three thousand customers teen makes and the more customers more Abu more money simple. It's all about money so now comes five G. so five G. The first thing we do so we've already got some empirical evidence about how much more efficient having one hundred megahertz of spectrum is in this. Wimax area. We're using two point. Three two point five. We've picked a different spectrum. Three point five GIG which means three point two to three point. Six three point eight. Maybe four point two to four point six just relishes the higher the frequency the more efficient it can be she can get more bandwidth through the high frequencies. Would you get you get larger amount of contiguous ECKSTROM? Yes and understand a little bit about how breaking spectrum up into blocks become very inefficient but if you have a big block of spectrum absolutely right and that's why the millimeter wave even higher stuff is even far more beneficial because you have a clear one gigahertz and suddenly war instead of five megs of got one GIG. Simple physics tells you you're GonNa get more bang for your buck. Yeah so five. G. Comes along with starting the premises. One Hundred Megahertz Huge leap ahead of four G and we've got these improvements inefficiencies. So that's what Linda lend lend itself to the high throughput but wait. There's more right and the more big comes to about things like lighten city and massive connections. So we could already see that the challenge is always the always the latency at the air interface and the reason for that is because you could imagine from a base station probably in developed countries. You can have five back to the cornet work for the back to the corner. Work five milliseconds into into the top rate Japan. Top to bottom ten roughly these sort of rough guidances of how how much delay you have across these areas. But if you want to do things that are more interesting like connected car. You don't need five Jay for car but You know if you want autonomous driving. It's one of the options. Yes you could use other methods. But that's not the the most important but if you take a robot right if you've ever shook the hand of a of a rebel with articulated digits but the first thing is if you want one hundred kilos of metalwork comes toward you put something out the first step back of course when you put your hand out and you grab it if the latency is not really shop. Then by the time it gets feedback in squeezing your hand it's probably to light my crusher hand. You got it so we need latency so there's a practical example. Yes but you have more certainly connected car within a couple of meters. The shorter duration robotics interaction. Let's talk about the medical profession if you wanted to do telemedicine remote medicine. Yes so between a practitioner. Highly capable person. Let's take a simple like it's not really simple. Let's take ultra ultrasounds. So you have an expert a technician. The journey woman sitting there with a couple of hundred grants with equipment. What about the village? That's you know two hundred dollars or three hundred kilometers wide. So we just discussed about this thing called latency. What about if I wanted this person to do some remote monitoring of a man or a woman or somebody on the on the I and we've got these tactile feedback devices now? Yes but the person is a couple of hundred Roy. So you imagine. There's a basic person. Triage a stripping. His thing to your body for a couple of thousand dollars which is cost effective. And you got the expert with brain paranoid analytics copy with scopes and everything and now. He presses and two hundred kilometers lighter. It's pressing on you. And then by the time he gets the feedback. He's got to realize that I shouldn't push too far because it's the robot prom you don't want to crush the got it so this this problem. So this is lighten savings on. He's a couple of industries and a couple of sectors that where you can feel that latency. We important robots inside the factory today factory in factories. Andrew haven't changed in one hundred fifty years. Everything is serial from the day we industrialized in the UK. Right I give you the material you do your bit. You Pass it to him. He passes it to her. She personally what happens today? Robotic PLANT ROAD. I does this positive robot. By-pass Robert C. So let's suppose this boardroom. Were nail which vacant and a couple of hours is the Knicks factory from twelve six income the robots willing themselves around connected with five G. They're from different companies. Kawasaki. Ibb ETC. And they're all connected to the cloud by five. G. So the latency is really small. And of course if you take beyond this. This is not thing of few connections to multiple connections per person to devices everywhere. Lamppost ties dresses salt pepper. Shakers everything the cup of tea bags or connected and they will be. You might think it's stupid but you know today it'll get down to something you know a third the size you now. Then everything's connected. If you have that competition of connectivity things in a cell a mobile cell with people you have come back to the first. Problem fixed wireless existing and with mobile paging competing for resources. And it's signaling resources. Yeah and you won't have a few thousand people per sale. You might have hundreds of thousands but the thing with it is. You don't need the speed because some of these things are transmit low data rate but if you've got millions of them in the same spot they all want to compete for radio spectrum to say. Hey I want you to get your data you got it and so you're quite right after that. The data rates are pretty small and listen to a couple of K. kilobytes. But you have a lot of them and it's a signal you know. I've got to wake up not communicate to the end so it's a bit like ceiling overhead traffic. It's it's competing for this. Some of the data so there's a lot of optimization bottomline so affected that in so that's why you have speed latency and throughput as the three key components of five G. But what nobody ever talks about is the social impact five g. and the social impact directly about energy. So you know. Today we're at the product and solution launch of lawyer and we announced that we have a five G. product. That is now. It went one year ago. Forty kilos to twenty five. From two hundred Megahertz bandwith to four hundred megahertz bandwidth but also consumes about the same amount of energy as four J. site. So you've just gone for something that's twenty to one hundred times better for the same amount of energy so some of the analysis that's been boy very specifically by a company called steel partners a consulting company here in the UK. And they've done some analysis based on you know while always products in an older competitor's products looking at all the networks around the world and their energy consumption and a very simple tagline is if you keep building four g networks you double the carbon footprint the planet but if he's five g. It flattens out and it starts to reduce in five years. That's not a bad reason for deploying five G. above the other I think you're great storytellers. It'll just had the opportunity to spend an hour and a half in the room and you. You mentioned the point about your station equipment. Going down in White told a great story about why wife now people know about while we for all different reasons but I love the story about how the thing dropped in. Share that story so I was at a meeting in headquarters and the CEO is sitting at a table with with a number of US including the product and they director in the product. Our Day director was showing the new version of the first five G. Base station that we're going to be launching in a few months and the white was forty five kilos Andrea and he said left on the table. What do you mean forty five kilos? Don't you understand occupational all health and Safety in Europe? It's forty kilos. Everybody looked at him. What does that mean and he said you need a crane. If you need a crane to install this. Do you know how expensive it'll be for our customers? They want. And how the time delay plus the expense and everything. Everything's the wrong wrong targets. You know the capital equipment costs too high. Three months later are endangered. Came back in forty kilos right. Thank you very much forty kilos. We launched now with twenty five kilos and he just on stage and said. Do you know why it's twenty kilos because a person is allowed to carry a twenty kilo product and install it and you know so we're always thinking about how do we improve person the customer's business. It's not about. We've got a great product you want to buy it or you buy this product because it's got these features we're always thinking about from the customer's perspective and generally everybody has the same. Kpi therefore KPI's it's called Revenue Prophet brand market share. You want all of those things. That's what you want right. That's the key metrics so we always think about those components whenever we building products or solutions or focusing on customers. And things like

JAY Andrew UK Forgery Paul Director IBB Knicks Wigan Europe ABU Linda Kawasaki Japan Technician Robert C.
A Mountain Bike Adventure Through Greenland

The World Nomads Podcast

08:00 min | 2 years ago

A Mountain Bike Adventure Through Greenland

"Our first guest is Chris Wing. He's the owner of big mountain bike adventures based in Whistler Canada and he's just launched a mountain biking tripping greenland inspired by his photographer. Friend been hanging. What are you laughing at? My insurance coverage along a guy who's solo traverse the route said Proxima two hundred kilometer trail trail. And it's all self supported very remote and he did this on his own and And then you know we spoke about it and I'm a I'm a tour operator amount by tour operator and have been almost twenty years and I thought it was an interesting idea to go there with you know with a small group of people and consider launching a you know a guided trip The first ever actually agreement. So yeah so. It was Benn's initial reconnaissance trip. And then we you know he was the the very first person to have ever mountain biking greenland there have been You know people going there in the wintertime and and snowbiking but In terms the traditional mountain biking. He was the first and then we went over this past September a few months ago with a group of five and checked it out. I I I can imagine that the favorite of logistics involved in Making show this is a safe journey as well. It some it's truly. You know I've been. I've been in this business for almost twenty years. I've never never been to such a remote destination as as greenland and you know. It's one of those. It's one of those trips that you you know. It's it's an adventure. It's a trip but it's really truly an expedition where you need to plan for For possibilities where things could would go from comfortable and fairly exposed to very exposed quickly. You know if you had a You you know if the weather turned or or an injury or even a simple mechanical problems your bike you know getting somebody evacuated in that part of the world is you know it's a is is quite an ordeal so Yeah it was. It was definitely required. Some very careful planning and you know the right group of people that need to come together to do this trip. It looks amazing. Unlike the downhill beat the buy. Yes yes no doubt. Two hundred and fifty as it's not easy easy there is some challenging aspects to it. Yeah no it's it's true in. It's it's a bike packing trip also and which is kind of a a a- An emerging style of mountain biking It's become quite popular in you know in recent years and and basically it's like going on hiking trip but with your mountain bike where you're you know you've got very very light wage setup. That's that's fixed on your bike. So they've developed. You know really cool bags that fit onto your bike. In such a way that don't inhibit. The you know the the writer from from peddling and maneuvering a new ring the bike so it's not like traditional paint gays but these are small bags it kind of fit in various places on your bike and as I said has to be very very lightweight late light lightweight they've developed ten specifically per byte by packing. And so you're you know you're riding. You're pushing your bike From point to appoint in camping during the night. So it's It's really definitely an acquired experience. Not everyone yeah. I hang on light white and called called by doesn't seem to get to be old. That's Oh yeah you're hundred percent correct like I. I consider myself to be someone that's experienced quite a few ooh difficult situations and hardships. And and I you know I I love I love being out in the elements But on this trip I was. It's you're you're you're exactly correct where you know. You need to pack as lightly as possible in almost that kind of scenario where your cut your toothbrush. Notice Shave a few grams Type of thing and and your food everything has to be really calculated every Calorie But when we arrived camps he'd been writing approximately eight to ten hours a day in you pull into a you know the place where you're GonNa camp for the night and then all of a sudden you know your body is cooling down and MM attempt is cooling down considerably and The nights that we're you know we're there. Your I was basically every single layer of clothing that I had in my sleeping bag while sleeping so it was Yeah it was a little bit you know it was on the verge of being like okay. This is a little bit. Almost you know Berry exposed where you know that if you've got every single layer on clothing in your sleeping bag through the night that You know there's no margin. There's very little margin. Farrah Garad for for comfort. That say you'd say you're writing details today but that must be because you have to keep stopping and looking at the amazing reviews. Some you know it's it's it's an amazing place really I mean. The Arctic is is unique and appreciated just the vast remote nature of Greenland. Just you know there wasn't you'd stop. Stop Riding and look around and it was you know completely dead silent you know. We saw a reindeer couple of eagles GREENLANDIC. Eagles would come and check us out and men That was that was pretty much yet terms of wildlife and you know just a few other hikers here and there that we encounter. I had that feeling feeling. We all did where you're just so so remote and so exposed to the elements that it was a little unnerving at times where you felt like h you know it was kind of another level of exposure. We can greenland but very cool all and memorable. That's for sure we spot device that allowed us to send a text if we you know in an emergency I find when you're when you go to places like like Greenland that haven't seen a lot of tourism you're you gain this kind of really deep appreciation for nature Because it seems like a planet is becoming more traveled and places cases are more busier than they've ever been and so to go to a place that has few humans is is quite quite special and you really feel like you want to do your best protect Greenland of course and then everywhere else you go. We are essentially a travel insurance company at the end. Yes no ask you some questions about how you did. Some preparations reparations because yeah in providing travel insurance in Suchai remote like we've got some problems as you say it's hot get somebody evacuated. It's expensive. There's a problem for us because we provide the service that we like to promise that we can't because it's impossible because it just doesn't exist for that reason why not sell policies cease to North Korea because we can't do job that did you have any special resources. Did you hook up with a evacuation company. How did you will nice thank you well? It's it's a very good question because we're you know we're we're of course boldly going to be selling packages to to greenland to to those. That have the experience and the The ability first and foremost on if we needed to be evacuated we would have to be calling in a helicopter. OPT from from nook. which is the you know the capital? It's a horribly expensive operation. You know we just are very transparent of course swith participants in that if if it's if it's required you know it's something that one is going to have to You know to foot the bill folks for obviously we do we do have the contact in place if it was needed and dob we we do everything we possibly can to to avoid. You know having to get enough in evacuating

Greenland Big Mountain Eagles Chris Wing Benn Whistler Canada North Korea Writer Farrah Garad Suchai Berry Arctic Twenty Years Two Hundred Kilometer Hundred Percent Ten Hours
"two hundred kilometers" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred kilometers" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The vessel was simply engulfed in flames very very difficult for those people to escape from those conditions he should I use the Bahamas has been bested by hurricane Dorian which brought with it massive flooding torrential rain and winds of more than two hundred kilometers an hour thousands of people have lost their homes and five people have been killed he is the prime minister of the Bahamas he bit menace we are in the midst of a star tragedy. balance of northern Bahamas. our mission and focus now. search rescue and recovery I strongly urge to read ends of grand Bahama. to remain indoors and be as safe as possible the hurricane is expected to head for the southeastern coast of the U. S. next hurricane Dorian is the second most powerful storms ever recorded in the Atlantic in fact it's part of an increasingly strong storms around the world so is climate change to blame our environment analyst Roger Herbin ripples hurricanes form when the water temperature reaches twenty six degrees Celsius so a warming world means there's more energy available to generate extreme storms it was previously thought that climate change would increase the number and severity of hurricanes there's no clear evidence of the quantity is reason but the intensity of storms is reported to have increased that's especially true for the most dangerous hurricanes storms of a hundred twenty five miles an hour I said to have more than doubled in number and those of a hundred and fifty miles an hour to have more than tripled other factors are at play tropical storms in moving more slowly that's bad news for people living in the pulse of the major storm because of the huge volumes of rain then the rain and wind a compounded when a combination of low pressure high wind and tidal conditions drives a wave of sea water on to the land is known as a storm surge these are made even worse because sea levels are rising as the world overheats experts projecting worse hurricanes to come but the met office says there's so much natural variability in her reckons that certainty.

Bahamas hurricane Dorian Bahamas. grand Bahama. Atlantic analyst Roger Herbin twenty six degrees Celsius two hundred kilometers
"two hundred kilometers" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred kilometers" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

"End up being and in jeopardy of of loss of life but no evacuation yes they have been ordered it yet more from reporter Harry Horton forecasters say hurricane Dorian has the potential to be the biggest storm to hates Americans east coast in decades it's predicted to grow to a category four hurricane over the weekend with sustained winds of more than two hundred kilometers per hour model show it hitting the states of Florida late so on Monday early cheese steak the national hurricane center warns of life threatening flash floods and dangerous storm surge Harry horse in Washington those Florida prepares for another hurricane a new poll shows a majority of registered voters nationwide say climate change is an emergency rose brown reports a hurricane bearing down on Florida and massive fires in the Amazon rain forest are stark reminders about the changing climate but a new poll shows party affiliation plays a large role in whether Americans think climate change is an emergency pulling analyst Mary snow says fifty six percent of registered voters nationwide believe climate change is an emergency and sixty seven percent think the US should be doing more to address the issue not everyone though is feeling the sense of urgency Democrats eighty four percent say it's an emergency independence sixty three but eighty one percent of Republicans say it's not an emergency still says almost three quarters of young people ages eighteen to thirty four told pollsters they believed climate change is an emergency the poll was released on the same day president Donald Trump announced plans to roll back regulations on the emissions of methane a major contributor to climate change the poll also asked Americans about gun laws and mass shootings snow says almost three quarters of US voters think Congress should do more to reduce gun violence including ninety three percent of Democrats three quarters of independents and fifty percent.

Dorian Florida Washington Mary snow US president Donald Trump Congress reporter Harry Horton analyst three quarters two hundred kilometers per hou ninety three percent eighty four percent sixty seven percent eighty one percent fifty six percent
Earth's Last Magnetic Pole Flip Happened Much More Slowly Than Previously Thought

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

06:33 min | 3 years ago

Earth's Last Magnetic Pole Flip Happened Much More Slowly Than Previously Thought

"Any study suggests earth's magnetic poles may take far longer to flip than previously. I thought a new analysis reported in the journal science advances shows. The process may take up to twenty two thousand years to complete. That's more than twice as long as the nine thousand years. He's previously estimated this growing evidence that earth's magnetic poles are about to flip the north magnetic pole will become south and the south magnetic pole will become north last time. This happened with some seven hundred and seventy thousand years ago when it does happen. It'll be the first magnetic field polarity reversal in modern times times and that raises some serious questions about how today's technology with coq with the change to us me mortals on the surface of this revolving planet around the sun first magnetic field seemed steady and true reliable enough to navigate by your largely hidden from daily life less your pilot. The magnetic field drifts waxes awesome wayne's constantly when i'm flying one of the first things i do when i get in the cockpit of an aircraft is to readjust the cockpits compass to the latest readings for true north both for years. The magnetic north pole was wandering around pats of northern canada but more recently it's been careering towards siberia which recently forced the global positioning positioning system which underlies old model navigation updated software sooner than expected to account for the shift on average the magnetic pole shifts and reverses versus. That's polarity roughly every hundred and fifty thousand years or so that with the last one occurring some seven hundred and seventy thousand years ago with long jude for the knicks flip and there are some early signs that a possible paul reversal may be about to occur the accelerating movement of the north magnetic pole is one sign another other is something known as the south atlantic anomaly a weed pad of the south atlantic ocean between brazil and africa compass needles go nuts pointing south instead of north north and it's not just compass needles affected the south atlantic anomaly region causes earth ina van allen radiation belt to move closer to the earth surface dipping down onto just two hundred kilometers in altitude this results in an increase flocks of energetic particles in this region exposing orbiting spacecraft the high than usual levels of radiation listen effect the international space station required extra shielding just deal with this problem nashes reported that modern laptops of crushed aboard space shuttle flights as they a pass through the anomaly and the hubble space telescope doesn't do any observations while it's passing through the anomaly whether or not the south atlantic anomaly really does mean a polls colds are about the flip polarity is yet to be saying the problem is scientists have only a very limited understanding as to exactly why the film reversals occur or how they happen now new research by university of wisconsin madison geologist brad singer suggests the most recent short reversal seven hundred and seventy thousand years ago took at least twenty the two thousand years to complete that several times longer than previously thought and the results further color the question some controversial findings that some polar reversals could occur within inhuman lifetime than you analysis is based on advances in measurement capabilities at a global survey of lava flows ocean sediment at arctic ice coast rose providing a more detailed look at a turbulent time for earth's magnetic field of a millennia. The planet's magnetic food weakened partly shifted stabilized the game and then finally reversed for good to the orientation we know today. The new results provide a clearer m._o. Nuanced picture of reversals at a time when some scientists believe we may maybe experiencing the early stages of paul reversal and you other researchers dispute the very notion of a present day. Paul reversal singer says unless you have the complete accurate accurate in high resolution record of water filled reversal really's like it would be difficult to discuss the mechanics of generating one. We know that earth's magnetic field is produced by the planet's molten alton liquid metallic out of core as it spins around the solid. I and inigo generating powerful electromagnetic currents. What's coda jet dynamo this year dynamic in a creative field. That's most stable going through roughly the geographic north and south poles but the field shifts in weakened significantly during reversals. We know this because <unk> asni rocks formed typically other volcanic lava flows or a sediments being deposited on the sea floor they leave a record the magnetic field the time they were created and geologists can survey this global record piecing together. The history of magnetic fields going back millions of years. Their record is clearest for the most recent reversal that one seven hundred seventy thousand years ago for the current analysis singer and colleagues looked at lava flows from chile to haiti hawaii the caribbean and the canary islands and they collected samples from these latter flows of several field seasons lava flows are ideal records of the magnetic field they have lots of iron bearing ring minerals and as cool and solidify they lock in the direction of the planet's magnetic field the research is combined magnetic field readings and radio acid type dating samples from seven lava flow sequences to recreate the magnetic field over a span of seventy thousand years centered on las reversal they found the final reverse was quite quick by geological standards less than four thousand years but it had been preceded by an extended period of instability included excursions which are temporary partial reversals the polls stretching back another eighteen thousand years. That's more than twice as long as suggested by other studies which claimed reversals wrap up within about nine thousand years the lava flow the data was corroborated by magnetic readings from the seafloor which provided more continuous but less precise source of data than lab iraq's single and colleagues also used at arctic ice core samples apples to track the deposition of beryllium which is produced by cosmic radiation colliding with molecules in the atmosphere. You say when the magnetic reversing weakens allowing more radiation in from space to hit the atmosphere producing more beryllium since humanity began recording the strength of the earth's magnetic field. It's actually decrease in strength by about five percent century century and his records like singing shows. A weakening field seems to be a precursor to an eventual field reversal although it's far from clear that a reversal is imminent reversing planetary magnetic food would significantly affect navigation as well as satellite and terrestrial communications but if the current studies right it means society would have many generations to adapt to what would be a lengthy period of magnetic instability stewart gary. You're

Paul South Atlantic Knicks Canada Wayne Siberia Brazil Caribbean Brad Singer Geologist University Of Wisconsin Madiso Chile Iraq Haiti Seventy Thousand Years Nine Thousand Years One Seven Hundred Seventy Thou Twenty Two Thousand Years Eighteen Thousand Years Two Hundred Kilometers
Powerful Typhoon Bypasses Taiwan and Heads Toward China

BBC World Service

00:27 sec | 3 years ago

Powerful Typhoon Bypasses Taiwan and Heads Toward China

"China is on red alert for a powerful typhoon that's heading for its eastern coast typhoon Lakey ma is focus to make landfall nonsense today with warnings of torrential rain and flooding thousands of residents further up the coast in Shanghai have been told to prepare to evacuate the typhoon has been ripping through the north of Taiwan at speeds of nearly two hundred kilometers an hour leaving about forty thousand people without power

Lakey Ma Shanghai Taiwan Two Hundred Kilometers
"two hundred kilometers" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred kilometers" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Of these runners were coming across the finish line which is home plate they are beyond thrilled because this is a personal life time for a lot of these runners being able to not only be able to get on the field a family park what's across home plate and that's when I talk to all the runners after they crossed the finish line Inc came inside to Fenway Park they were all just beaming with excitement they're all really excited and the and they just mention how cool was too when you the last the last leg of the race you you run out out of center field you get around the warning track runner run along the green monster then you finish a home plate a lot of people just so thrilled but the other thing too is that a lot of the runners were so inspired to run for such a great because of the red Sox foundation and Boston Jr also I put on hold for the whole base program reporting live at Fenway Park Avenue golden WBZ Boston's newsradio thank you Kevin it is ten twenty one and now to the northern Philippines where at least eight people were killed early today after two very strong earthquakes dozens of others were severely injured the B. B. C.'s Howard Johnson reports from Manila today's earthquake affected many of the island's renown Spanish colonial era buildings including the bell tower of the Catholic Santa Maria church photos posted on social media showed locals helping to clear rubble from affected buildings it by act is the Philippines northernmost inhabited island is marine outs in the Philippines see two hundred kilometers away from neighboring Taiwan two hundred kilometers that's at just about a hundred and twenty four miles Hong Kong police are firing tear gas at protesters who defied police warnings not to March.

Fenway Park red Sox foundation Boston Jr Boston Kevin northern Philippines Howard Johnson Manila line Inc Catholic Santa Maria church Philippines Taiwan Hong Kong two hundred kilometers
"two hundred kilometers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:43 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred kilometers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Thirty three year olds Welshman the defending champion the other was a twenty two year old Colombian whiz kid but now he said he's gonna research so that second serve I literally seems to be digging deeper everyday is a former soldier and he's extremely so really affable straight talking the things you do on this on fire the question of the people really easy just gonna rampage the server great for the border dashes for the finishing line and he succeeded clear quartz under everybody's talking about him and then there was another Frenchman who is one of the favorites to win the race tells about him that's right people paying over a difference a very emotional mind when he fell into a trap if you days ago and lost a bit of time we still is still in with a very big shock so he's vowed to fight back on Saturday and may well get back into a position people penal is about twenty eight twenty nine years old young who raised here for a while you can racing initially he really is a very very popular man and he does with that sort of trance he will be the most popular one in France now as we said at the race's just passed its halfway point and a Frenchman has not won the tour de France in thirty four years so what's the attitude and sentiment like among people in the small French towns where the cyclists are whizzing past a great opportunity just yesterday the fight to cover the two hundred kilometers stage on the back of a motorbike I mean the road side you just packed is a very popular sporting event with no pay you don't explain the stadium stadium is the country itself the day of the finish on the went on to the finish line when we arrived at the finish child there was about four kilometers four five D. towards the finishing line three hours before the guys writes that while drinking and singing on families grandparents because of the school holidays here do French people seem particularly attuned to the possibility of a French cyclist possibly winning it are doing you know at least where in the hell of asked for it for days on end well very soon very French course no no they don't care what I think the cat the cat deeply but you're skeptical because I haven't worn it since burn out his old one is fixed in nineteen eight chief Klein the French people don't believe this is actually there year they're not allowing themselves to hope well Julian I was really is in the yellow Jersey but starting to believe that may be he he can he can take it down to maybe the last three days we don't have much we can concentrate on the way that they're not sure can come straight to emotional Damien the call is a reporter with national sponsor press thank you for joining us thank you very much bye bye you're listening to.

twenty eight twenty nine years two hundred kilometers Thirty three year thirty four years four kilometers twenty two year three hours three days
"two hundred kilometers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:17 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred kilometers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of Congo has spread to the eastern city of Goma where one person's been diagnosed now this is a city of about a million people it sits right on the shores of Lake even on the border with rounder a Congolese official said the man was coming from the city of but Tembo traveling on a bus the epidemic which began almost a year ago is infected two and a half thousand people and killed one thousand six hundred so far we're going to talk to you microbiologist pizza planet who helped discover the abode of our S. forty years ago thank you so much for being with us on the study so what do you make of this news that's it's now spread to such a lone city is going well this was about to it to happen that's what everybody feared and this epidemic is not over by any means it's you know as you mentioned nearly seventeen hundred people have died and just on Saturday there were ten deaths from Ebola and I think this cross through the streets to see one is that people travel so that's how we going to spread said let's hope that there are no secondary cases in Goma I'm from there the rest of the R. C. and rest of Rhonda is also exposed but secondly also how was infected he laid hands on patients with the ball out in the in the temple and dept illustrates the the role of culture religious believes in the spread of sars you know all the boulder now he's been sent back to the temple they're back to two hundred kilometers Sir higher up north we grow more I'm not sure that does that make sense because that could increase the risk of further that sounds mission of course of business of the could the cultural reasons that you'll a losing so you might make it difficult to prevent prayer the laying of hands on someone who's ill but you don't then have to get on a bus and travel hundreds of kilometers to a massive city with the risk that entails no absolutely no and he gave a Pat on the different identities to to escape the the the road blocks because there is now a massive effort and I must say this Sir local groups are international groups there the Congolese are doing everything they can but this is an extraordinarily complex epidemic with in security the militias with their mistrusting government and so I think we need to really to reset this Sir the strategy because this is been going on for nearly a year in August there will be a year so we need to involve Farmall community listen to people but also deploy everything behind that means not just one vaccine that's being used the murder tracks in but there is a second vaccine available the Johnson Johnson vaccine which as about one and a half million doses and that should be deployed now also in a massive are in a way and I sing the casing go my should be a wake up call that we really need to reset the economics of response just looking at what's how and from a more positive point of view the response in terms of identifying the Paul stood despite his attempts to conceal his identity dealing with him identifying everyone else was on the bus vaccinating them has been pretty good and that's a you know that's the good news but there there will be cases will cases like that because people are desperate and they will go to big cities because they think they can get better healthcare so that's why we need also to anticipate and have a gun what the Congolese Cole a curtain around the epidemic area where we can protect people by fax knitting them so there is a need for redoubling the efforts but also re Cinco strategy I'm in the epidemic song there are daily ten AM more tests clearing and you in section so it's clear enough fully working as we as as being in in other epidemics is it boneless something's gonna keep rearing its head and popping up in in different parts of different countries around the continent well the Ebola virus lives happily in some types of box and the is so it's unavoidable that are brakes start that some people and get infected as was the case in West Africa but also let's not forget this is the second people outbreak in in Congo in in one year so what's not avoidable is there it will pop up however what's affordable is that this develops into a big epidemic as is the case now in in the aisle seat in Q. one the jury and that's why we need better epidemic preparedness but also making sure there are enough resources and deployment also of both sexes thank you very much indeed for being with a sense of peace upon the mark of all ages to discover the abode of ours in nineteen seventy six all new study more about the outbreak in the DLC at B. B. C. dot com slash noose I'm.

Congo Goma two hundred kilometers forty years one year
"two hundred kilometers" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

05:17 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred kilometers" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"To be escalating situation when these protesters testers confronted the people there for the pride event you're the chair of the police services board oversight body for police do you understand why people in the community might be up that enough to show up at your house a i don't think there's ever a rationale for people showing up at my house on trading that kind of discord man that's that's additional rationale for that a in terms of the police presence you know i'll i'll never disagree with police in the sense sense that they were originally asked a heavy police presence at the gay pride events gage park and so not withstanding that he and the police actually ask for eight recruitment both at the gate cried the event at gage park a both of those both of those were denied a butler standing that the police had a presence there ready to respond and whether they responded quickly enough a that's a that's a matter for police extermination but this notion that they stood back and let people get it get injured in that they did take part in the fray is just not true and since then arrests have been made you've invited members have biaggi bt community to meet with you next month why do you want a fan of them come to the table with a desire to get onto the next steps in terms of improving the relationship and improving conditions for those that are up potentially targeted any transcript community a none of us want any that's what happened then we need to work together collectively with says the police and the city to ensure that we provide a safe space for all people that are maryland burger thank you thank you says hi fred and burger is the mayor of hamilton which is where we reached him when drew husking emily young visited alberto last fall for vacation with heavily snowing which isn't surprising also not surprising that the couple's car got stuck in the snow for hours behind a bus accident near jasper national park but then finally a surprise and extremely unpleasant one couple of got out of the car taking some risks canadian air and ms young promptly lost her wedding ring now much later with a little help from some canadians mr husky has recovered the ring enterprise his wife we reached drew husky in saint louis missouri drew husky can you describe your wife's wedding ring 'em yes it is eighty three quarter carat center stone it's eighty double halo with a total of seventy three diamonds it was right about the ten thousand range pretty valuable those yeah close to ten thousand is close enough can you tell me what happened how how did the ring can't be missing so we were stuck in kind of a traffic jam on ninety three steals parkway and she had gotten out to go to the bathroom in the snow was up to her like pastor he's and she would go brush the snow off and what's her hands me in this cold is they were they shriveled up and that's whenever the ring was really loose and she went to rush and that's when randy moss and what what's it like when you had to get back into that car knowing that you were going to leave without the ring it was a pretty tense moment i'm she was heartbroken but she didn't want her her parents feel bad genuine made it feel bad so we basically just kind of quietly moved done so how did you had this plan of your to to recover the ring as as soon as we said we were leaving i stood there for a quick minute in looked at the position of thursday trail still had sign is supposed to bathrooms and then it ninety degree a difference if you look over there was eight speed limit signs so basically made two points intersecting i told myself i will be back when the big saw the summer thought happened well at that point that with several months away so what did you do while you were waiting for this no timeouts when i when i came home back to saint louis missouri i had came up with this idea that you know i'm going to learn how metal detectors doctors work get one go back to the area and start looking and at first i was planning to do this all by myself but i co worker her name's lolita she was working here at the time and she heard about my issue and she she had me on facebook for a place called the ring binders and i looked it up and there was a guy that was about two hundred kilometers east you said he only does forty five kilometer radius and i.

two hundred kilometers eighty three quarter forty five kilometer ninety degree
"two hundred kilometers" Discussed on THEMOVE

THEMOVE

03:16 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred kilometers" Discussed on THEMOVE

"Almost twelve minutes on the second best rider, then was who was Gino Bartali was another company symbol, and, and so that that's definitely in cycling history, and especially talian cycling history. That's a stage which is very, very mythical. And so today was in honor of, of him yesterday was through his region. And today was the, the stage the famous stage he won in nineteen forty nine. One last thing about today is non start of Caleb. Yes, I did see that we didn't know that he had chosen to pull out but he didn't start today. So anyway, it's fine. That's, that's good for Akron going into. The last week. Yeah. I mean, it's, it's it looks like there's, you know, there's already a big difference. So it's, it's going to be a battle between Ackerman and, and the mar- anyway for the for the points. Jersey. Okay. Looking ahead to await? Sorry. Let's give trona the day, but thrown of the day patrol of the day. Yeah, that's the difficult. I know top of my head. I had no idea who you would choose. Yeah. I don't want to sound like a broken record. You know, we almost have to give it through the to chaser Benedetti, especially because, you know, loyalty made somewhat you always thinks about his theme before anything else, the fact that, you know, at thirty one he's able to win his first race as a professional indoor with the. We've given it quite a few times, already to this to a writer of, of his team for Hans grow. But, you know, I think we should give it again. We should give it to him. Otherwise, you know, we could we could say UK Landau Lopez, but the more or less equal. Let's I mean my paternal today for today's going to be said, says that been at D from Boorda hunt. Suto. Are looking ahead to tomorrow. It's states thirteen and this is where we really start climbing. Yes. Yes. So today if you look at the hey, you could say this radio, only a warm up, just to test, your legs to see how the body has adopted two smaller gears and. Climbing in, in the small chain. Ring D'amoto is a longer stage. Also almost two hundred kilometers one hundred ninety eight I think three three big climbs. A two I got degrees in a in a second category. And yeah, I think we can expect more of the same, especially because today until today, I would say that the whole peleton was more or less. How would I say accepting the security of, of Wrocklage now today as I said, blitz has been writing smart. But you know we've seen that his team has shown weaknesses that doesn't necessarily mean that rug leashes week. So, you know, but in order to defeat somebody who's very, very dominant you would have to. I is late him out teammates. And then try now.

Gino Bartali Ackerman Caleb Boorda hunt Akron Landau Lopez Benedetti UK Wrocklage writer Hans two hundred kilometers twelve minutes
"two hundred kilometers" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred kilometers" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"So I had the misery Maderas created with the Russians and Cubans help. Fox's Steve Harrigan is in Caracas Venezuela. And those protesters keep trying to get soldiers there to switch sides of car Lada airbase, that's where why and the opposition launched a military uprising. They were able to knock down some of the gates set. Some fires throw a lot of rocks. But it's. Simply didn't happen after few hours that uprising was put down by the disputed, president nNcholas Maduro and his regime massive demonstrations underway at military bases in Venezuela, again today secretary palm Heo meeting with the rest of the president's national security team to discuss Venezuela and this provocative move by North Korea. North Korea fired several short range missiles off the east coast beginning just after nine AM local time today, according to the latest from the South Korean government, these missiles originated from one sawn coastal town, just east of Pyong Yang the Japanese government confirms the missiles, flew seventy two hundred kilometers before landing in the between, North Korea and Japan. Fox's Jillian Turner the NTSB now at the scene of a splash landing at the naval air station. Jacksonville, Florida nearly one hundred fifty people on route from one Tano Bay Cuba. Cuba were on. A chartered seven thirty seven that skidded off a runway during a storm and into the Saint John's river, they're all okay. A muddy track. For today's Kentucky Derby, the winner is maximum.

North Korea Venezuela Tano Bay Cuba Fox Lada airbase president Steve Harrigan Caracas nNcholas Maduro Kentucky Derby NTSB naval air station Jacksonville palm Heo Jillian Turner Florida secretary Japan seventy two hundred kilometers
"two hundred kilometers" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred kilometers" Discussed on KTOK

"The misery Maderas created with the Russians and Cubans help. Fox's Steve Harrigan is in Caracas Venezuela. And those protesters keep trying to get soldiers there to switch sides car Lada airbase, that's where one guy and the opposition launched a military uprising. They were able to knock down some of the gates set. Some fires throw a lot of rocks. But it simply didn't happen after few hours that uprising was put down by the disputed, president, nNcholas Maduro and his regime massive demonstrations underway at military bases in Venezuela. Again, today secretary pomp Heo meeting with the rest of the president's national security team. To discuss Venezuela and this provocative move by North Korea. North Korea fired several short range missiles off the east coast beginning just after nine AM local time today, according to the latest from the South Korean government, these missiles originated from one sawn coastal town, just east of Pyongyang's the Japanese government confirms the missiles, flew seventy two hundred kilometers before landing in the sea between North Korea and Japan. Fox's Jillian Turner the NTSB now at the scene of a splash landing at the naval air station in Jacksonville, Florida. Nearly one hundred fifty people on route from one Tana MO Bay Cuba. Cuba were on a chartered seven thirty seven that skidded off a runway during a storm and into the Saint John's river, they're all okay. A muddy track. For today's Kentucky Derby, the winner is maximum.

Venezuela North Korea Tana MO Bay Cuba president Fox Lada airbase Steve Harrigan Caracas nNcholas Maduro pomp Heo Pyongyang Kentucky Derby NTSB secretary Jillian Turner Jacksonville Florida Japan seventy two hundred kilometers
"two hundred kilometers" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred kilometers" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"And so I had the misery Maderas created with the Russians and Cubans help. Fox's Steve Harrigan is in Caracas Venezuela. And those protesters keep trying to get soldiers there to switch sides car Lada airbase, that's where why and the opposition launched a military uprising. They were able to knock down some of the gates set. Some fires throw a lot of rocks. But it simply didn't happen after few hours that uprising was put down by the disputed, president, nNcholas Maduro and his regime massive demonstrations underway at military bases in Venezuela. Again, today secretary pomp Heo meeting with the rest of the president's national security team to just. Thus it in his Walea and this provocative move by North Korea. North Korea fired several short-range missiles off the east coast beginning just after nine AM local time today, according to the latest from the South Korean government, these missiles originated from one son, a coastal town, just east of Pyongyang the Japanese government confirms the missiles, flew seventy two hundred kilometers before landing in the between, North Korea and Japan. Fox's Jillian Turner the NTSB now at the scene of a splash landing at the naval air station in Jacksonville, Florida, nearly one hundred fifty people on route from Montana MO Bay Cuba. Cuba were on a chartered seven thirty seven that skidded off a runway during a storm and into the Saint John's river, they're all okay. A muddy track. For today's Kentucky Derby, the winner is maximum security.

North Korea Montana MO Bay Cuba Venezuela president Fox Lada airbase Steve Harrigan Caracas nNcholas Maduro pomp Heo Walea Pyongyang Kentucky Derby NTSB secretary Jillian Turner Jacksonville Florida Japan seventy two hundred kilometers
"two hundred kilometers" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred kilometers" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The US city of Minneapolis has agreed a record twenty million dollar settlement with the family of an Australian woman shot dead by policemen through. Who's is an unmistakable message to change the Minneapolis. Sweeps department in ways that will help all its communities. I'm the mystery of why Leonardo Davinci left the Mona Lisa. Unfinished may finally be solved. You're listening to the BBC World Service. I news. Hello. I'm Danielle have yet scou- with the BBC news. North Korea is reported to have test fired a number of short-range missiles, South Korean media, quote, the joint chiefs of staff as saying that the missiles flew between seventy and two hundred kilometers. His Laura bicker, South Korea says it monitored what it described as multiple short range projectiles, which were fired from North Korea's east coast. Initial estimates. Claim the missiles flew up to two hundred kilometers and landed in the sea. If confirmed, this will be Pyongyang's, I missile test and over five hundred days it comes amid a diplomatic breakdown between North Korea and the US after Donald Trump walked away from what he described as a bad deal offered by Kim Jong-Un joining their summit in Hanoi in February a series of elaborate rituals, which form part of the coronation of king Maha. What's your on? Corn of Thailand are underway at the Royal palace in Bangkok. Doc, blending, Hindu and British theology. The ceremonies are intended to Mark the transformation of the king into a divine being two and a half years after he ascended the throne the BBC's Jonathan head in Bangkok has this assessment. This is a king.

North Korea BBC Minneapolis South Korea US BBC World Service Bangkok Leonardo Davinci Donald Trump Kim Jong-Un king Maha Laura bicker Mona Lisa Danielle Royal palace Jonathan head Hanoi Thailand Pyongyang two hundred kilometers
"two hundred kilometers" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

10:02 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred kilometers" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"Hanging out in earth's orbit is no easy task you already know satellites and structures, like the international space station have to deal with things like space, debris and cosmic rays and dust and all sorts of stuff. But have you heard of the south Atlantic and nominally, it's an area of our planet. That has a big impact on the delicate electronics we send into space I'll get to that in a minute. But first, let's back up and talk about the radiation belts that actually protect our entire planet. The earth is surrounded by two Donut shaped masses of high energy. Particles called the van Allen belts. Those particles are leftovers of cosmic rays shooting in from outside. Our solar system that became trapped in the earth's magnetic field the exist in that belt configuration because the magnetic field follows a telltale pattern when you know, if you've ever seen iron filings sprinkled around a magnet, the high energy particles would be dangerous on their own. But when they're trapped in the van, Allen belts. They actually shield the earth from any other dangerous particles that might elbow their way in thanks for protecting us van Allen belts. Actually, don't be too grateful. Just yet the polls of earth's magnetic field. Don't lineup perfectly with its polls of rotation. They're actually tilted by eleven degrees. That means the van Allen belts are tilted to. And that means that the inner Donut shaped massive deadly high energy particles dips dangerously low to the earth surface as close as one hundred and twenty four miles or two hundred kilometers at some points over the south Atlantic and. Zil that dip which is called the south Atlantic anomaly is well below the path of a lot of satellites which are forced to pass through the belt and get pummeled by protons. And we're talking pummeled every square centimeter is hit three thousand times per second. That abuse can cause all sorts of problems from data glitches to electron damage. Engineers actually, tell their satellites to power down whenever they pass through the anomaly because they hope that will protect their data. Yeah. It's pretty intense. Anyway, the south Atlantic anomaly could be a symptom of the earth's magnetic fields changing, and you can read more about that on our full right up on this. But suffice it to say if you're heading into space anytime soon, you might wanna check your map to make sure you won't be passing through the south Landik anomaly, or you're gonna have a bad time

Stephanie Moore south Atlantic Allen Ashley Hamer Harvard Medical School engineer lecturer Ken Cody gov overgrowth Westwood One Chicago university of Barcelona university of buffalo two hundred kilometers
The polls of earth's magnetic field. Don't lineup perfectly with its polls of rotation.

Curiosity Daily

02:20 min | 3 years ago

The polls of earth's magnetic field. Don't lineup perfectly with its polls of rotation.

"Hanging out in earth's orbit is no easy task you already know satellites and structures, like the international space station have to deal with things like space, debris and cosmic rays and dust and all sorts of stuff. But have you heard of the south Atlantic and nominally, it's an area of our planet. That has a big impact on the delicate electronics we send into space I'll get to that in a minute. But first, let's back up and talk about the radiation belts that actually protect our entire planet. The earth is surrounded by two Donut shaped masses of high energy. Particles called the van Allen belts. Those particles are leftovers of cosmic rays shooting in from outside. Our solar system that became trapped in the earth's magnetic field the exist in that belt configuration because the magnetic field follows a telltale pattern when you know, if you've ever seen iron filings sprinkled around a magnet, the high energy particles would be dangerous on their own. But when they're trapped in the van, Allen belts. They actually shield the earth from any other dangerous particles that might elbow their way in thanks for protecting us van Allen belts. Actually, don't be too grateful. Just yet the polls of earth's magnetic field. Don't lineup perfectly with its polls of rotation. They're actually tilted by eleven degrees. That means the van Allen belts are tilted to. And that means that the inner Donut shaped massive deadly high energy particles dips dangerously low to the earth surface as close as one hundred and twenty four miles or two hundred kilometers at some points over the south Atlantic and. Zil that dip which is called the south Atlantic anomaly is well below the path of a lot of satellites which are forced to pass through the belt and get pummeled by protons. And we're talking pummeled every square centimeter is hit three thousand times per second. That abuse can cause all sorts of problems from data glitches to electron damage. Engineers actually, tell their satellites to power down whenever they pass through the anomaly because they hope that will protect their data. Yeah. It's pretty intense. Anyway, the south Atlantic anomaly could be a symptom of the earth's magnetic fields changing, and you can read more about that on our full right up on this. But suffice it to say if you're heading into space anytime soon, you might wanna check your map to make sure you won't be passing through the south Landik anomaly, or you're gonna have a bad time

South Atlantic Allen Two Hundred Kilometers Eleven Degrees
"two hundred kilometers" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred kilometers" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Girl who's been trolled online. Ulta come first the update. On the news with the BBC news within the past are huge storm has made landfall in northeast of India. One of the most powerful to hit the region in years. Cyclone Fanis struck the coast near the city of Puri in the state of dish winds of up to two hundred kilometers an hour have been forecast as well. As possible. Storm surge trains in the region have been halted and flights canceled dishes state special relief Commissioner Bishnu parties SETI. So the BBC how they're prepared for the cyclone. Money. Twenty years, but I. Cyclone centers and all that was and all these again. Again, Commodore about the unity within the twelve hours in such a school in getting about the million. Impacted we mentioned in people. Researchers confirmed that people with HIV who are undergoing effective drug treatment cannot pass on the virus to their sexual partners. European study published in the Lancet medical journal studied nearly a thousand gay male couples over eight years, it found no cases of HIV transmission, Alison, Roger is the lead researcher, if you're a Chevy positive neurons suppressive treatment than you sexually non infectious, and this very much supports the message of the.

Cyclone Fanis BBC Lancet medical journal Puri Ulta Commissioner India researcher Roger two hundred kilometers Twenty years twelve hours eight years
"two hundred kilometers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:01 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred kilometers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Music was more important than anything. It was more important. I got seats more important than for them more to it was as important. Let's face it. This was one of the most dangerous places in the world at the time who on God's green would be wild. And frankly, reckless enough to do it you already know Bruce Dickinson, the lead singer of iron maiden. And then things happened really quickly because it was only a couple of weeks until you off to Asia about two weeks. After the initial coal the band, I headed to split in Croatia. The neighboring country to Bosnia Herzegovina, we go on the plane, the arneses we were the only people with long have everyone else on the plane was mile six foot tall short cropped tat. And it's quite clear. This was the British army go now there was nobody else going. What are you getting the? Yes, a little bit. But it was also in a row Karol. Biz was drinking through it. I don't think Chris would mind if I said that he and the guys in the band sounded pretty naive at this point. But this was at a time when the internet and information wasn't so readily available, and according to Chris the wool had gone. Pretty quiet in the news, the UN with that they thought perhaps everything was sort of. Okay. Now. This was not the case the scene across the country was chaotic even if the plan was perfectly executed putting on the gig would be a risky business. And the plan was not perfectly executed greeted by Shami officer, and he's very much coming over. But you're not going to be able to get Sarajevo som- account. Counc- safe. Passage was the phrase the band weren't told this, but the helicopter sent to collect them had being shot down. No one had died the pilot managed to land just. About but the band had lost their lift released. Bursting Hinson, however was not going to give up with Johnny by not possible. I started looking Alba overland ways to get to the city Sarajevo was around two hundred kilometers away from split in between a complicated and messy war was being fought. Between three separate Omni's. The frontlines were always moving. The roads were mined shells fired indiscriminately, it was hard country to navigate, but there was one organization who have prepared to give it a go on these people to Sears road trip. Get ox fan and the Red Cross the serious road trip was a different sort of NGO. As story so FIS being soundtrack by rock music. But these guys belong firmly to the rave.

Sarajevo Chris Bosnia Herzegovina Bruce Dickinson Croatia British army UN Red Cross Asia Karol Omni officer Hinson Counc Alba Johnny two hundred kilometers two weeks six foot
Deadly Tropical Cyclone Idai Barrels Towards Mozambique

UN News

01:38 min | 3 years ago

Deadly Tropical Cyclone Idai Barrels Towards Mozambique

"A major aid operation is underway. Way in Mozambique and Malawi to help victims of tropical cyclone it die which has reached the densely populated Mozambican port of better after registering. Maximum wind speeds of nearly two hundred kilometers per hour exceptional rainfall before the cyclone hit has already affected a total of one point five million people in both South African countries and claimed more than one hundred twenty lives. In addition tens of thousands of people have been displaced and homes, roads bridges and crops have been washed away weld food program or WFP spokesperson ever hersal told journalists in Geneva topical areas made landfall and they'd overly populated laws on beacon port city of Beira, which is his compound this took the flooding that radio cured as far inland assault on Malawi and eastern Zimbabwe. We know all the that some people sadly died in the past week in probably doing tonight. We don't have any numerous to communicate for the moment as that number. Is changing constantly the UN agency has already begun to assess the extent of the flood damage and prioritize needs among the most vulnerable. He added satellite imagery shows that Malawi's cheek w-we district has been particularly badly affected by flooding while Mozambique Zambia and teddy provinces have also seen tens of thousands of people displaced and more than one hundred and sixty eight thousand hectares of crops reportedly affected in addition to helicopters already sent by the South African government WFP is sending at least one transport helicopter to conduct emergency era perations in Mozambique.

Malawi WFP Mozambique UN Beira Zambia Geneva Assault Zimbabwe Two Hundred Kilometers Per Hou Sixty Eight Thousand Hectares
"two hundred kilometers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred kilometers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The jury returned with a verdict guilty ethylene eve was then tried. She was acquitted just months later in November nineteen Dr Crippen was hanged at Pentonville prison. It is story remained in the public's consciousness long after he was gone. It was the most famous murder trial for probably forty or fifty years. So it has to do with the strangeness of the case. The state of the body parts found in his cellar, the affair with the Nieve and on top of that. We've had all the forensic science and medicine, and of course, the transatlantic chase and the use of radio the ripper case made headlines on both sides of the Atlantic. But Crippen made headlines all around the world. Dr Cathy Watson was talking to Alex last and remembering the doctor Crippen murder case. Next. We move from Edwardian London to something much more recent to Mexico in the nineteen ninety s and this again is a story striking for its auditing in one thousand nine hundred eighty one reports began to emerge of a well, which produced water with miraculous properties as Marie-Helene. Anonymous now reports the rumors about this strange water from a small village in central Mexico spread across north and South America, causing massive numbers of people to make the journey to visit this remote rural outpost. You don't start it in a village called in the state of Kerala around two hundred kilometers northwest of Mexico City..

Dr Crippen Mexico murder Mexico City Pentonville Dr Cathy Watson Edwardian London Atlantic South America Kerala Alex two hundred kilometers fifty years
"two hundred kilometers" Discussed on Probably Science

Probably Science

03:26 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred kilometers" Discussed on Probably Science

"Pluto shows evidence of changes in atmosphere pressure, possibly poss- presence of running or standing liquid volatile on the surface something seeing Oni elsewhere on earth. Mas and Saturn's moon titan in us. Oh system the lack of additional Pluto satellites beyond what was discovered the the. Lack of additional Pluto satellites beyond. What was discovered before you horizons was unexpected they thought they'd find more satellites five zoos like lot for a little guy and Pluto's atmosphere is blue. So did he get upgraded again to planet? Now. He's still he's still downgraded all seals a little planet. Yeah. Because I think the the the idea was once they discovered at how much there is going on in the Kuyper belt is a case of if Pluto is a planet, then hundreds of these things are also planets. Okay. I see and its diameter is. Once you invite one college frontier wedding. He got all them, exactly. Eventually you just have to grade them ago. These people on friend is people are now friends. They're not planets in France. And the surprising. We blew that. We thought. It's two thousand three hundred seventy six collaborators in diameter, and I forgot how that relates to the moon's diameter, but it has roughly the same suffix area as Russia. Really? That's what it says immediately below in that article the it's about the same day. It was just as cold. Emotionally and corrupt. It's only it's only two hundred kilometers wider than the moon. It's basically moon sized. Yeah. Wow. Interesting and it has its own a bunch of its own moons five. It's just shocking look at the hoarding moons of their. Yeah. I guess it's far enough out of for anyone to notice that you can just get away with gathering moons willy nilly. No one's no moon. Police are out there saying, hey, you got too many moons, man. Hey, how many moons? Yeah. The moon. Police don't go that far out. Yeah. Dangerous. You can get away with anything. You can get anything extra moon. Okay. You'll moon. I got your moon, buddy. I have to correct myself. I was comparing miles to kilometers. No Pluto's a lot smaller than the Mon. A really? Yeah. Oh, wow. There's an apples to apples comparison. Wow. It is planet. Look at that more than our moons. Yeah. Right. Yeah. I got moons bigger than this planet the moon over here. I don't know characterists. But new horizons as we said flew by ultima Thule, which is I didn't realize it was named that. Because those two snowman lobes are called ultimate end fool individually that meant that would make sense. That's how little creativity went into it in the New York Times article with the scientists even admitted to that level of laziness and the to almost vehicle lobes one with about three times the volume of the other to tell them apart. They name the larger one ultimate in this law. Fool wellbeing. Scientists we're not all that creative with words. What would you have done? If like one of the bits was could Andy and the other bit was cooled would. Oh my God. She's I've can you cash out on that? And then people will be like. You would be more present with Andy. And matt. Yeah. We make that happen. Yeah. For to just start calling it that could catch on. Let's say, yeah. Who who decides what it's called? It's it's in how people use the words if they just start saying that we can't stop, right? Yeah. Yeah. It's just like ObamaCare is not the name of the thing. It's the. To the Andy and Matt's Indian met object..

Andy us Oni New York Times matt Russia Thule France two hundred kilometers
"two hundred kilometers" Discussed on The Budget Minded Traveler

The Budget Minded Traveler

03:35 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred kilometers" Discussed on The Budget Minded Traveler

"You just have to wait in line. I know in just wow, it was really overkill overbearing. So this whole over. Tourism theme has stayed with me since then. And it's just kind of like, it's a wake up call. I think the the term was actually coined in two thousand seventeen so not that long ago. You know, we're kind of on the cusp of it of the term over tourism. But you know, we really need to wake up in the industry and travelers alike. Need to wake up in in make make sure that the way you're traveling leaves a positive impact, you know, in that in definitely go off the beaten path kind of try not to over saturate Barcelona in the Venice in the, you know, the the city, of course, there on your list, you know, check them out. But there's ways to check them out. You can go off the beaten path within the city, you know, and just make sure that you go into the local shops and talk to the locals in, you know, higher local guides and all of this stuff that that will help kind of mitigate this problem and go off adventure. You know, like you say, you know, that those two hundred kilometers away from the. How far away you are forty kilometers from a row by train we reported minutes, and we would go north, you know, as far away as and we were already remote, and we just continued to get to dive deeper and just see what we could find. And I mean. Beautiful notorious out there that need tourists. You know, definitely these little villages that have been revamped from medieval times where I went. They definitely need tourists out there. You know? That's what they're they're whole project is about. Yeah. And what an amazing time you had. They're like you're testament today. I'm a testament to that. We both went off the beaten path. This is Tuscany. We're talking about not anyone who listens to this podcast is is not gonna know at Tuscany is like everyone knows Tuscany yet here. We are having these experiences that are pure Tuscany pit nowhere has heard of. And we had such a grand time on both of our experiences. What you know? It was funny because I was traveling with my new friend. She's she was so amazing. But a fun millennial is she's proud of it, you know, for sure. But you know, she told me she's like, well, I came to Italy. And I kinda wanted to like go to Florence not appel out. You know, what am I going to tell my friends back bomb though into Bella? And I said, yes, that's what you have to tell people. You know, that's magic that you went somewhere unique, you know. And that's that's really end. She had an amazing time and brochure. It was passed formation will for her as well. And we just need to understand this concept. You know, be go beyond Florence pretty much. Not not to not not to skip over it. Just go beyond it. Yeah. Also, also, if you're gonna do Florence awesome. But like also go somewhere else, if you're gonna do Rome, please do Rome. Don skip Rome Rome is my favorite city in the world. But then just go beyond as well. Rising sea lion mainly lying through bologna and not into Florence. You know, you you can mitigate like, you're you can really think about your choices when you're making them and think about. This all over tourism. You know, you don't you don't wanna be around all of these crowds. And the the locals the one have to deal with all of these crowds in really can damage in area, you know, a natural area as well as an urban area. Absolutely. Yeah..

Florence Tuscany Don skip Rome Rome Rome bologna Venice Barcelona Italy two hundred kilometers forty kilometers
The Hunt for Water Beneath Mars

The Economist: Babbage

04:52 min | 3 years ago

The Hunt for Water Beneath Mars

"In July. A paper was published. I could put an end to the speculation of the existence of water on Mars. Spoiler alert. It's there I spoke with Tim cross the economists science correspondent about it. I guess the first thing we should say is actually there's no shortage of traumas. It's just that it seems to be almost all ice. So there's millions of kilometers of ice on enough to drown the whole planet in one hundred foot deep ocean rule to melt, but what people are really have been wondering about for a long time ever since the eighteen ninety s this whole idea that you could canals on the Martian surface was whether any of it was liquid and up until today. Really when when this was published the best thing, we had was some observations from orbit, which seemed to show that, you know, very occasionally, you'd get these tiny little bubbling XV, briny water and the bottoms of craters, maybe would have been the Martian, some when it was slightly less cold water could exist on the surface, briefly even. That's never quite been conclusively proven. Now, though what we seem to have is underneath the southern polarize. Couple mas. There is liquid water. I'm not just a little bit is a lake about twenty kilometers across buried about one and a half kilometers down beneath the ice is this the sort of finding that is widely accepted or might there. Be a challenge to it. Well, it's early days the papers only just come out. But everyone I spoke to advance of the publication seem to think it was a pretty good piece of science and the technology. They've used to find it is not new it's a similar sort of what we use on earth to look under the ground. Basically just involves radar you send frequency radar waves into the ground. You wait to see the reflections different substances reflect the radio waves different attends. And so you can you can tell what's down there. So the teams three and a half years of data all of it from from all bit around the southern Martian poll, they said Aidid a two hundred kilometers wide, and they go through in the paper various other explanations rule them out in ways. That people who know more about Jody's seem to find pretty convincing. So I think it's hard to say. But I think it seems to be a pretty solid finding and why do we think it's water and not some other liquid is because of the the characteristics of the radar reflections. Like, I said, there's no actual shortage of water on MAs. The thing that was into missing is liquid water, and you can sort of reason by analogy because what this thing looks an awful lot like is things that with me from from earth. So for instance, underneath Antarctica. There are a whole load of subterranean lakes. One of them lake Vostok is one of the biggest lakes in the world. And they kept liquid by combination of the isolating them from the surface. The fact that the temperatures go up as you go deeper underground and on Mars, you've got the pressure of the is it self will affect the lower the melting point of water as also might the presence of the chemicals that we already know exist on the Martian surface in the basically work like antifreeze. So you could get water the liquid temperatures quite a long way below zero. Which is seems to be what we have here. Let's be honest. Nobody really cares about water on Mars. They care about other life on Mars. How does this finding pointed direction of whether life once existed or currently exists on Mars Kenya? Traducing the geologist if the world lots of people care about that is indeed the big questions. So we know you can see from from orbit. Mas was at one point woman wet, and you can see dry river valleys and deltas and so on. So the hope is always been the maybe four billion years ago when the planet was much warmer and much wetter something did of all since then it's been clinging on in some refuge as the rest of the world or the rest of MA's has dried out frozen on the other hand, though, it's being about three point eight billion years as one wreck incense. Mas lost had water on it. And that's an awful long time for a single lake to have survived one of the scientists. I spoke to pointed out as well that MAs Axial tilt has changed since then, which means the Pola cops will have moved all. Over the surface. So the place where the lake is hasn't necessarily always had is on top of it. So whether this lake is really quite so agent. I think has yet to be proven on the other hand it maybe there are more of these things. There are plenty of them on earth, the same basic geological processes apply, and it may well be that MAs is dotted with these things. And who knows perhaps one of them something has managed to cling. And of course, for now, it's all speculation. But I think what this does do is maybe puts MAs sort of back in contention a bit because Nasr's motto when looking for life was always being followed the water, and for that reason, I recently some of the focus has maybe started to shift a bit to the outer solar system to the moons of planets like Jupiter and satin, which which I see seem to have big liquid oceans of water underneath that surface. Now that we know MAs seems to have as well, I think that may be bumps it back up the rankings.

MAS Lake Vostok TIM Kenya Geologist Jody Aidid Nasr MA Two Hundred Kilometers Eight Billion Years Four Billion Years Twenty Kilometers One Hundred Foot
Mars has a vast liquid water lake beneath its southern pole

The Economist Radio

04:51 min | 3 years ago

Mars has a vast liquid water lake beneath its southern pole

"In July. A paper was published. I could put an end to the speculation of the existence of water on Mars. Spoiler alert. It's there I spoke with Tim cross the economists science correspondent about it. I guess the first thing we should say is actually there's no shortage of traumas. It's just that it seems to be almost all ice. So there's millions of kilometers of ice on enough to drown the whole planet in one hundred foot deep ocean rule to melt, but what people are really have been wondering about for a long time ever since the eighteen ninety s this whole idea that you could canals on the Martian surface was whether any of it was liquid and up until today. Really when when this was published the best thing, we had was some observations from orbit, which seemed to show that, you know, very occasionally, you'd get these tiny little bubbling XV, briny water and the bottoms of craters, maybe would have been the Martian, some when it was slightly less cold water could exist on the surface, briefly even. That's never quite been conclusively proven. Now, though what we seem to have is underneath the southern polarize. Couple mas. There is liquid water. I'm not just a little bit is a lake about twenty kilometers across buried about one and a half kilometers down beneath the ice is this the sort of finding that is widely accepted or might there. Be a challenge to it. Well, it's early days the papers only just come out. But everyone I spoke to advance of the publication seem to think it was a pretty good piece of science and the technology. They've used to find it is not new it's a similar sort of what we use on earth to look under the ground. Basically just involves radar you send frequency radar waves into the ground. You wait to see the reflections different substances reflect the radio waves different attends. And so you can you can tell what's down there. So the teams three and a half years of data all of it from from all bit around the southern Martian poll, they said Aidid a two hundred kilometers wide, and they go through in the paper various other explanations rule them out in ways. That people who know more about Jody's seem to find pretty convincing. So I think it's hard to say. But I think it seems to be a pretty solid finding and why do we think it's water and not some other liquid is because of the the characteristics of the radar reflections. Like, I said, there's no actual shortage of water on MAs. The thing that was into missing is liquid water, and you can sort of reason by analogy because what this thing looks an awful lot like is things that with me from from earth. So for instance, underneath Antarctica. There are a whole load of subterranean lakes. One of them lake Vostok is one of the biggest lakes in the world. And they kept liquid by combination of the isolating them from the surface. The fact that the temperatures go up as you go deeper underground and on Mars, you've got the pressure of the is it self will affect the lower the melting point of water as also might the presence of the chemicals that we already know exist on the Martian surface in the basically work like antifreeze. So you could get water the liquid temperatures quite a long way below zero. Which is seems to be what we have here. Let's be honest. Nobody really cares about water on Mars. They care about other life on Mars. How does this finding pointed direction of whether life once existed or currently exists on Mars Kenya? Traducing the geologist if the world lots of people care about that is indeed the big questions. So we know you can see from from orbit. Mas was at one point woman wet, and you can see dry river valleys and deltas and so on. So the hope is always been the maybe four billion years ago when the planet was much warmer and much wetter something did of all since then it's been clinging on in some refuge as the rest of the world or the rest of MA's has dried out frozen on the other hand, though, it's being about three point eight billion years as one wreck incense. Mas lost had water on it. And that's an awful long time for a single lake to have survived one of the scientists. I spoke to pointed out as well that MAs Axial tilt has changed since then, which means the Pola cops will have moved all. Over the surface. So the place where the lake is hasn't necessarily always had is on top of it. So whether this lake is really quite so agent. I think has yet to be proven on the other hand it maybe there are more of these things. There are plenty of them on earth, the same basic geological processes apply, and it may well be that MAs is dotted with these things. And who knows perhaps one of them something has managed to cling. And of course, for now, it's all speculation. But I think what this does do is maybe puts MAs sort of back in contention a bit because Nasr's motto when looking for life was always being followed the water, and for that reason, I recently some of the focus has maybe started to shift a bit to the outer solar system to the moons of planets like Jupiter and satin, which which I see seem to have big liquid oceans of water underneath that surface. Now that we know MAs seems to have as well, I think that may be bumps it back up the

MAS Lake Vostok TIM Kenya Geologist Jody Aidid Nasr MA Two Hundred Kilometers Eight Billion Years Four Billion Years Twenty Kilometers One Hundred Foot
US National Hurricane Center, Hurricane and United States discussed on 24 Hour News

24 Hour News

00:18 sec | 4 years ago

US National Hurricane Center, Hurricane and United States discussed on 24 Hour News

"So the Philippines now, what tens of thousands of people are being vacuous from coastal areas. As a super typhoon heads towards the main island of Luzon schools have been closed and soldiers on full alert in the north typhoon coach which is currently a category. Four hurricane has a stained winds of more than two hundred kilometers an

Us National Hurricane Center Hurricane United States Florence Philippines Massachusetts Two Hundred Kilometers Fifty Kilometer