24 Burst results for "Two Hundred Fifty Years"

Historical Costuming with Dr. Christine Millar of Sewstine

Dressed: The History of Fashion

08:08 min | 6 months ago

Historical Costuming with Dr. Christine Millar of Sewstine

"Climb christine. I go on the internet as so steam. And i am a lot of things really. I am historical costumer who focuses on digital embroidery and extremely detailed trim. But i'm also a physician by trade. So i do work in a hospitals as anesthesiologist through this pandemic and i also do a god. I also have a youtube channel. Where i talk about how to create these things and really. I also focused on instagram. And so i just wanna take a moment and again. Thank you for being here. Because i do not know how you do all these things. You're also a mother of an adorable. I think he's too now toddler so i just want to thank you for taking the time to be here especially with everything you have going on. Oh my god. I can't believe. I forgot to mention the family. Yes mother and game. So i just want to kind of learn a little bit more about you. Do you have an earliest memory of clothing. That might have stuck with you over the years. Did you first realize the transformative power of clothing. I love to ask people this question. Oh my okay. So i was born in korea and i came to the united states when i was three and a half so i have a lot of memories of sitting in korea watching american disney movies like the little mermaid as well as There's an anime cult candy candy. I don't know if you've ever heard of it. But it's basically a yellow haired american girl who wears fluffy roughly dresses all over the place. And i was so obsessed with pink ruffled gowns especially after areas pink dress in little mermaid that my aunt actually got me a nine petty bridesmaid dress for like a little four year old girl and i was so big on me and i remember wearing it for the first time and it was the most happy moment of my childhood and from there on i think i just became obsessed with drawing in trying to capture addresses and the older i got i the more i realized what i really wanted to do was not just draw these dresses but actually had to wear these dresses. Yeah and i'd love to hear a little bit more about that. Because i think everyone probably has their own unique origin story about how they came to historical costuming. How did it all start for you. I believe you kind of started in caused play to if i'm not incorrect. That's exactly it. I initially started in. 'cause play. I noticed i was doing a lot of costuming for some of my favorite power. Females like the tana princess leia. you know Firefly characters and that's where i started end but the real one that i really want to make was katrina from sleepy hollow particularly that black and white striped dress that she works for about fifteen seconds in the end. I initially made it in college end to turn out right but you know i loved it enough that it. I just realized that my favorite movie costumes were all historically based and once. I realized that it was really easy to just kind of focus on that i kind of went. The steam punk route and did a lot of eighties bustle dresses. One of which. I got into the new york times style section when i was in college and that gave me the like the positive energy boost i needed to religious focus all my energies into historical. And that's not to say. I still don't do 'cause play in fact i'm working on a cost play right now for another power female a sister of battle for more than forty k which seems like a completely turnaround but to me. It's just you know more of the same like you know detailed female power stuff and i'm not cost player or historical costumer of but i come from a career as a costume supervisor in a costume designer i started in theater and then i got into film and tv but i have this just incredible appreciation and fascination with these communities both the 'cause play community and historical costuming community. They're not necessarily mutually exclusive as you attest to you. Know they are really quite intermingled. A lot of the times. Even though. I don't participate in these communities. I really really anxious. I just think it's so cool do so for those who may not know. Can you please tell us a little bit more about this worldwide historical costume community and cause play community and maybe just kind of start by defining those things. 'cause i don't think everyone may know the difference. That's a really good point. So i say cost play his costumer like everybody knows but so cost player. Is someone who makes costumes for movies. Tv shows games sort of like established Ip already out there. So you know someone who's a cost player making a princess leia costume versus on historical customer may take a museum piece or a picture from say like an old fashioned panel and try to recreate those so it's different goals so the cost player tends to try to make things as screen accurate as possible or take their own spin on a two degree while the historical customer is all about trying to get things to look historically accurate or correct the historical time period. But these are vague goals. You know everybody has their own specific goals when it comes to costuming which is really one of the most delicious parts of it. Yeah and i think just seeing how many all these people all around the world who have been introduced to through instagram. That's how i became familiar with you and a lot of your peers was just through instagram. And the para social media but admits so many wonderful people and so many people who have incredibly different approaches to as you mentioned these same historical or cause play approaches so just so cool so you yourself have built this incredible online presence for yourself you instagram and youtube as you mentioned at so steen is your handle. And you're really just showing all of these various historical dress projects that you've created at your in home studio which is just incredible. I love you can tell us a little bit about your selection process. What is your inspiration between starting these different projects so omen inspiration from everywhere and think. There's always about fifteen different projects night years going through my head at any point in time so a lot of times. What'll happen is i will learn something about or i will be able to actually procure a certain fabric. So for instance right now. I'm working on the dressed. That marie antoinette whereas in the two thousand and six the couple of film marie-antoinette in the chapel or the church which has the strawberries on it. This particular fabric is woven in italy. It's based off of seventeen eighties. Waistcoat in a museum collection. Somewhere in this particular fabric was actually used in about three different films including the original dangerous liaisons movie and it is so hard to get if you can even buy it. It usually runs about three hundred euros a meter so for me. That is like you know. I might be a doctor but i can't. I can't spend that much right on top of it. It wasn't even like procurable. Until very recently i was able to actually buy it because Not the original. But some other company on oetzi started making a knockoff of it. And i don't know how legal his is but on the other hand. It's based off of original waistcoat. And the you know the trademark on run out like two hundred fifty years ago so the fact is you know this. Other companies started offering. It was very similar. The colors are almost identical slightly. Different here and there but it was so close and the fact that they were able to offer it at a significant discount from the original price meant that it went from being pipedream in the back of my head to something. I could actually do now so a lot of times. It'll be that i finally find. The fabric actually comes available or in the case of the strawberry dress which i turn into which is strawberry regency dress. I always want to make address. But i really didn't like the roses on the original inventory. Not because i dislike roses. Or i think it's ugly. I've just digitized so many roses but then suddenly the strawberry gus went. I like i can just turn those roses and strawberries. And no one's gonna care or mind. So i was able to do that as well. So it's all about what becomes available to.

Tana Princess Leia Korea Instagram Youtube Christine Disney Katrina The New York Times United States Oetzi Marie Antoinette Antoinette Italy
A California tribe has land to call its own for the first time in more than two centuries

Native America Calling

04:00 min | 1 year ago

A California tribe has land to call its own for the first time in more than two centuries

"This is national news I'm Hughes Infrared Antonio Gonzales. The Navajo nation is laying off hundreds of gaming employees. The Navajo Times reports notices started going out over the weekend for more than nine hundred employees. Another one hundred forty workers will remain through this week. The nation's four casinos have been closed since March. Nearly twelve hundred employees remained on the payroll since that time gaming executive Brian Parish warns last week. Cash reserves are depleted, and the operation would not be able to sustain keeping the workers any longer. The trump administration announced the start of an effort to tackle cases of missing and murdered native people. Department of Interior and justice officials announced the opening of the missing and murdered native Americans, cold-case office in Minnesota's twin cities, it is scheduled to be the first of seven offices dedicated to reviewing some fourteen hundred unresolved native missing persons cases in the country. The efforts stems from President Trump's executive order last year in a written statement assistant secretary of Indian Affairs Tara Sweeney, said cold cases in Indian country will be addressed the determination and the understanding that the victims in these cases will be accorded some measure of dignity and compassion. Democrats on the House Natural Resources Committee are exploring a range of options for how to deal with healthcare woes that were plaguing Indian country before the pandemic hit Matt Laszlo has the story from Washington as native communities continued to face high corona virus infection rates, longstanding struggles with healthcare access are being seen under a new light under the current system. Many native American veterans are forced to leave their communities to get treatments. However, during pandemic, leaving tribal communities introduces new risks for Native Veterans Acting Chairman of the national. Indian Health Board is William Smith told lawmakers the marine bursts for travel through the Indian health services aren't workable during a pandemic in Alaska. The behind did converse Indian. Health Service. mitric anchorage to say by Dr Up there they'll pay for transportation. They won't pay very housing because they think it's. My back, but with coq nineteen going on, you can't fly out, so you have to do a drive up three hundred six miles to anchorage and out of pocket you'd have to spend the night. Smith says of the sixteen billion dollars earmarked for veterans and cove relief, only one billion was given to the native health service that's left. Native communities underfunded once again besides veterans, lawmakers are also working on the coverage for urban Indian Health Providers Act. It would make it so. So individual clinics no longer have to use their own funds to purchase liability coverage at could save some clinics up to two hundred and fifty thousand dollars annually, which some officials want to go directly to patient Care Robin Sunday Allen is Vice President of the National Council of Urban Indian health. She says tribes need any extra funds they can find now. Insurance has increased fourteen percent over the past five years so becoming increasingly more burdensome for us to carve out that money. Money that we wish could go back to direct patient care. All the coronavirus pandemic brought these health issues in Indian country to the forefront. They're persistent problems. Tribal leaders are hoping we'll finally get a permanent solution for National Native News I'm Matt Lies Low in Washington a California tribe has completed purchase of twelve hundred acres of land for four and a half million dollars. The San Jose Mercury News reports. It's the first land acquisition for the excellent tribe of Monterey. County in. In nearly two hundred fifty years, Esselin chairman Tom Little. Bear Nason told the paper. He is elated by the purchase saying the land is the tribes homeland and the origin of their creation. The mercury news reports tribal leaders expect to use the land to reinvigorate tribal culture conduct, traditional ceremonies, and inform the general public about their culture and history, the tribes, traditional culture and language were nearly wiped out by Spanish missionaries backed by the military starting in the late seventeen hundreds. With national native news I'm Art Hughes.

Executive Washington Indian Health Board William Smith Bear Nason National Council Of Urban Indi Navajo Times Antonio Gonzales President Trump San Jose Mercury News Art Hughes Health Service. Acting Chairman Department Of Interior Chairman Matt Laszlo Minnesota Monterey
Capital Allocation with Blair Silverberg and Chris Olivares

Software Engineering Daily

54:31 min | 1 year ago

Capital Allocation with Blair Silverberg and Chris Olivares

"Blair and Chris Welcome to the show. Thank, you good to be here. We're talking about capital allocation today and I'd like you to start off by describing the problems that you see with modern capital allocation for technology companies. I'm happy happy to start there. So I think it might be helpful to give. The listeners, a little bit of our backgrounds so I was a venture capitalist at draper. Fisher Jurvetson for five years I worked very closely with Steve. Jurvetson and we were financing are very MD intensive. Technology projects that became businesses things like satellite companies companies that were making chips to challenge the GP you new applications of machine learning algorithm so on and so forth and I think the most important thing to recognize is that the vast majority of technology funding does not actually go to those kinds of companies. The venture space is a two hundred fifty billion dollars per year investment space. The vast majority of the capital goes to parts of businesses that are pretty predictable like raising money in in investing that in sales, marketing and inventory or building technologies that have a fairly low technical risk profile, so the vast majority of tech companies find themselves raising money. From a industry that was designed to finance crazy high technology risk projects at a time where that industry because technology so pervasive you know really do the great work of of many entrepreneurs over the past twenty to thirty years, technology is now mainstream, but the financing structure to finance businesses not has not really changed much in that period of time. Yeah, and then I guess I'll talk a little bit. My my background is I came from consumer education sort of background, so direct to consumer, thinking about how you use tools and make tools that ingrained into the lives of teachers, parents students I was down in the junior class dojo before starting capital with Blair. We were working on the Earth thesis He. He was telling me a lot about this. The the date out. There exists to make more data driven in data rich decisions. How do we go software to make that easy to access in self service and sort of servicing the signal from the noise, and we kicked around the idea and I thought that they were just a tremendous opportunity to bring. What Silicon Valley really pioneered which is I think making software that is easy to use in agreeing to your live into kind of old industry fund raising capital Haitian. The kinds of capital allocation that exist there's. And debt, financing and different flavors of these. Of these things say more about the different classes of fundraising in how they are typically appropriated two different kinds of businesses. So. You have the main the main groups you know. Absolutely correct, so there's. Equity means you sell part of your business forever to a group of people and as Business Rosen succeeds. They'll get a share in that. Success and ultimately income forever. Debt means you temporarily borrow money from somebody you pay them money, and then at some point in time that money's paid back and you all future income for your business, so equities permanent, not permanent. If you think about how companies are finance like. Let's take the P five hundred. About thirty percents of the capital that S&P five hundred companies use to run. Businesses comes from debt. In the venture world that's remarkably just two percent. And the thing that's crazy is this is two percent with early stage seed companies, also two percent with public venture, backed companies in places like the best cloud index, which is like a one trillion dollar index of publicly traded technology companies started their life, and in with injure backing many of them SAS companies, these companies, also just two percent finance with debt, but nonetheless within these these classes, the reason it's obviously economically much better for a business and pretty much every case to finance itself with debt because it's not. Not It's not permanent, and it can be paid back. It's much much cheaper to use debt. That's why you buy a house with a mortgage show. You know you don't sell twenty percent of your future income forever to your bank help you buy a house, but the reason that people use equity comes back to the risk profile so just like. If you lose your job and you can't pay off your mortgage. The bank owns your home. Same exact thing happens with debt in so restorick Louis, if there's very low. Certainty around the outcome in typically early stage investment you're you're doing a lot of brand new are indeed you have no idea if it's GonNa work you cope. You know over time that you'll be successful, but there's really quite a bit of uncertainty equities a great tool because you're. You'RE NOT GONNA lose a business, you know everybody can basically react to a failed. Are Indeed project. Decide what to do next had saints. Equity is kind of the continent tool for high technical risk, high uncertainty investments, and then debt is basically the tool for everything else, and it can be used as most companies do for. Ninety percent of The places that businesses are investing so if you're spending money on sales and marketing, and you know what you're doing and you've been running campaigns before. That were successful, very. Little reason you should use equity for that if you're buying inventory if you are a big business that's. Reach a level of success that on. Means you have a bunch of diversified cashless. Coming in businesses might take out dead on business kind of overall, so it's less important what specifically you're using the money for, but it's important to recognize that most companies are financed roughly fifty fifty equity versus dead, just just intra back companies that. That are kind of uniquely Equity Finance. Scaling a sequel cluster has historically been a difficult task cockroach. DB Makes Scaling your relational database much easier. COCKROACH! DVD's a distributed sequel database that makes it simple to build resilient scalable applications quickly. COCKROACH DB is post grass compatible giving the same familiar sequel interface that database developers have used for years. But unlike databases scaling with Cockroach DB's handled within the database itself, so you don't need to manage shards from your client application. And because the data is distributed, you won't lose data if a machine or data center goes down. cockroach D is resilient and adaptable to any environment. You can hosted on Prem. You can run in a hybrid cloud, and you can even deploy across multiple clouds. Some of the world's largest banks and massive online retailers and gaming platforms and developers from companies of all sizes, trust cockroach DB with their most critical data. Sign up for a free thirty day trial and get a free t shirt at cockroach labs dot com slash save daily thanks to coach labs for being a sponsor and nice work with cockroach DB. The capital that is being steered towards a recipient. It's often originating in a large source, a sovereign wealth fund or family office in it's being routed through something like capital allocators cater like a venture capital firm for example or a bank. How does this capital get allocated to these smaller sources? What is the supply chain of capital in the traditional sense? You know it's kind of funny to think about capital and things like the stock market in the form of a supply supply chain, but this is exactly how we think about it so at the end of the day. Capital originate. In somebody savings, basically society savings right you. You have a retirement account or your population like you know in in Singapore and Norway with a lot of capital, it sort of accumulated from. From the population and these sovereign wealth funds, or you're an endowment that's you know managing donations of accumulated over many many years, and ultimately you're trying to invest capital to earn a return and pay for something pay for your retirement pay for the university's operation so on so forth so that's Capitol starts, and it basically flows through the economy in theory. To all of the economic projects that are most profitable, inefficient for society, and so, if you step back, and you think about like how how is it that the American dream or the Chinese Miracle Happen? You know in in both of those cases different points of the last hundred years. Why is it that society basically stagnated? You know the world was a pretty scary. Scary place to live in up until about seventeen fifty, the industrial revolution started. Why is it that you know basically for all of human history? People fought each other for food and died at the age of thirty or forty, and over the last two hundred fifty years that it's totally changed. It's because we have an economic system that converts capital from its original owners. Diverts it to the most productive projects. which if they're successful, replace some old more expensive way of doing something with newer better way and so I think when when I described that like you know I, think most people can step back and say yeah, okay I. kind of see how capital flows through the system, it goes automatically to someone making an investment decision like a venture capital firm ultimately gets into the hands of the company company decides to invest in creating some great product that people love. Let's. Let's say like Amazon and then everybody switches from you know buying goods at some store that may or may not be out of you know may or may not being stock to the world's best selection of anything you'd never wanted. The most efficient price that's society gets wealthier basically through these these kind of steps in these transformations, but it's asking if you step back and think about it like nobody actually thinks it's processes as efficient as it could be like. We asked people all the time. People were interviewing journalists companies. We work with sewn. So how efficient do you think world's capital allocation is? I've never met a person that says it's pretty good. You know we're like ninety percent of the way there. In fact, most people think it's pretty inefficient. They think of companies like you know we work, and some of the more famous cases lately of of Silicon. Valley back businesses that that totally. underwhelmed disappointed. Their initial expectations and I think most people admit that the efficiency of capital allocation is either broken or nowhere close to achieving its potential, and so we basically we'll talk more about our technology and how we do we do. We basically think of this problem our problem to solve. There's an incredible amount of Apache inefficiency in how data that goes from a project or a company, ultimately funneling up to an investor flows, and so you know it's hard to place blame because there's so many people in the supply chain, but. But I think it super clear that if it's difficult to measure whether or not a project or a business is good at converting capital into value in wealth, and you know products that people want, it's nearly impossible for society to become really good and efficient at allocating its capital, so we're we're here basically to make the data gathering data transformation visualization communication of what's actually going on under the out of business as efficient as possible and you know from that, we thank some great things are going to happen to the economy. Goes a little bit deeper on the role that a bank typically plays in capital allocation. If you think about our bank works like let's take. Let's take a consumer bank that most people think about you gotTA checking account. Right, now you've got some money in that checking account. That account actually takes your money or dot and most people know this your dollars sitting in that account. You know just waiting around. You'd withdraw them. Your dollars are actually rolling up into the bank's treasury. There's somebody at the bank working with the regulators to say hey, how much of this money can we actually put into things like mortgages, commercial loans, all of the the uses of capital that society. Has In some some effort to. To, move the world forward and make the economy efficient, and so those deposits basically roll up into a big investment fund, and there's ratios that regulators set globally that say those dollars needed to be kept in reserve, versus how many are actually able to be invested, but with the portion that's able to be invested. It's there to fun. You know building a house to fund a business back -Tory to fund sales and marketing or inventory procurement for some other business, and so a bank was was basically the original investment fund, and a bank has unlike venture funds and other sources of. We typically think private capital. The bank has tricky. Problem were any moment all of the depositors holding the checking accounts could show up and say hey. I want my money back and so that's why banks have to deal with reserving capital predicting the amount of withdraw and classically everybody wants her money at once at the worst possible time, and so banks have to deal with quite a bit of volatility now if you take an investment fund on the other hand. Totally totally different structure, so your typical venture fund will have money available to it for a period of ten years from you know typically these larger pools of capital. We talked we talked about so very rarely. Individuals are investing retirement savings in venture funds, typically sovereign wealth funds down that's. Basically pools of that individuals capable. Win One of these funds makes a commitment to a venture fund. It'll say you've got the capital for ten years. You've gotta pay back. You know as investments exit, but other than that will check in ten years from now. We hope that we have more than we gave you the star with and there there's no liquidity problem because the fun has effectively carte blanche to keep the money invested until some set of businesses grow and succeed and go public and make distributions so one thing that's fascinating. The Tappan in the last twenty five years is private capital capital in the format of these kinds of funds. Have just grown tremendously and so today. There's a little over five trillion dollars. Of private capital being allocated in this way to think like buyout funds venture funds so on and so forth. Funds don't have the liquidity problems of banks. They can make much longer term for looking investments. This is created tremendous potential to make the economy more more efficient by taking out the time spectrum. You know this is why venture investors can do things like finance spacex or Tesla. Really. Build fundamental technologies in the way that a bank never could so this is an amazing thing it. However leads to a very long. You DAK cycle, so the incentive goes down when you take out the time line over which investment needs to pay back. To carefully monitor and understand what's going on in the business day today, so it's pretty interesting thing about the different pools of capital. There's not not to. Make it sound too confusing, but I think everybody will admit that the financial markets are incredibly diverse complicated we track basically about fifteen different kinds of capital, and they're sort of pros and cons with each one, but you know a bank is one. A private fund is wanted insurance companies balancing as another. You've got things like ETF and public vehicles that hold capital so there's quite a bit of complexity and the the structure of the financial markets. All right well. That's maybe the supply side of Capitol on. All kinds of middlemen and all kinds of different arrangements, but ultimately there is also the demand side of Capitol, at least from the point of view of companies getting started which is. Startups or computer in later stage with the maybe they're not exactly considered startup anymore, but they're mature. These companies have models for how they are predicting. They're going to grow, but oftentimes these companies are very. Lumpy in terms of how their their revenues come in how closely their predictions can track reality. So how do technology companies even model their finances? Is there a way to model their finances? That actually has some meaningful trajectory. Sure so first. Companies you know need need a base think of all the places that they're spending our money and. We're pretty. We Do I. Think a pretty good job of organizing this and making it simple so when we look at companies and we can, we can talk more about how the the cabinet machine operates, but when we look at companies, we basically think they're only a handful of places of money. Get spent you spend money on. Short term projects that you hope proficient things, sales and marketing. Houston money on paying for your sources of financing like paying interest on debt, making distributions to your investors, and then you spend money on everything else and everything else can be designing software building products on, and so forth, and so if you break the demand for capital down into just those three buckets. And look at them that way. Some pretty interesting things happen. The first is for the short term investments that you hope productive. You can track pretty granular nearly whether or not they are, and we'll come back to that. For paying back your investors, you sort of know exactly how much you're paying your investors so a pretty easy thing to track, and then for the operating costs you know most people will help us. Apax, that you're paying to keep the lights on things like Renton the your accountants, the CEO salaries on and so forth these are these are table stakes expenditures. You need to stay in business and so. Amongst each of those three things, there's different things that you wanna do to optimize and I'm happy to go into more detail sort of go through each one. If you think that'd be useful. Yeah Bliss a little bit more about about how these companies should be a modeling, their revenues are that is meaningful to model their revenue so that you can potentially think of them as targets for for capital allocation so. If we think about. Understanding what company might be a viable recipient of capital? How can you accurately predict the trajectory of that company, or or do they? Would they present a model? Would they develop a model good through a little more detail? How a company would serve justify? It's need for capital. So typically what what most companies do and this is not terribly useful or accurate, but I'll tell you what most people do I mean by the way like how central the entire economy predicts, predicts demand for capital works like this. Companies take. Their income statement on their. Balance Sheet historically. And they they basically have this excel file got a bunch of you know, rose and have different things like my revenue, my you revenue that sort of linked or my expenses that are linked revenue Mukasey could sold so on and so forth, and they grow each of those rose by some number that they hope to hit so if you want your revenue to double next year, you'll say my revenue one hundred dollars today I wanted to be two hundred. Hundred dollars twelve months from now I'm just GONNA draw a line between those two points and every month. There will be some number that's on that line, and that's why monthly revenue I want my expenses. You know everyone knows. Expenses are going to have to go up if my revenue goes up but I don't want them to go up as much as my revenue, so I'm going to draw a line. That's you know somewhere less than a doubling. and. You pull these lines together on one big excel file and there's your you know they're your corporate projections. In general, this is true for big companies small companies, but that's not actually how. Company revenue works because if you go back to the three categories, we talked about before, and you just focus on the one that talks about the short term investments. The. Way Company Revenue Actually Works is a company this month. Let's say they spend one hundred dollars on sales marketing. Well. They're hoping to get a return on that sales marketing, and so they're hoping that in the next you know six months. That's paid back. Twelve months that's paid back. You can actually track every time they spend money on sales and marketing. how quickly it gets paid back so it's that level of precision that can accurately predict revenue, and so what we do is we basically just get a list of every time? Money was spent on one of these short-term investments, so you sales and marketing for for an example, and then we get a list of all of the revenue that was ever earned. And we attribute between both of those lists causing effect. And we do that using a bunch of techniques that are pretty commonplace in your typical data, company or machine learning company. We use some math things like factor graphs. We use simple kind of correlations. We have You know a whole kind of financial framework to. Guess. What attribution should be because you learn a lot as you see different businesses and you see a bunch of different different patterns, which you can basically cluster on, but it is this linkage between spending on something like sales and marketing emceeing seeing revenue, go up or down, but makes or breaks a business, and you want to look at it and I is. Not a bundled. Entirety which is how financial projections are typically built? Okay, well! Let's talk a little bit more about what you actually do so if you're talking about early stage technology companies. Describe how you are modeling, those companies and how you are making decisions as to whether they should receive capital. When a company comes to capital they they come to our website. They sign up for this system that we built which which we've called the capital machine. And the first thing that they do is they connect their accounting system their payment processor typically, so think like a strike, and then sometimes they'll provide other things like a pitch deck or a data room, or whatever other information they have prepared. The system pulls down. All of the date in the accounting system and the the payment processor, and we look at other systems to these are the two key ones that all all dive into detail, and so, what ends up happening is from the accounting system. We get a list of all the times. Businesses spend money on these things like sales and marketing that we were talking about before. From the payment processor we get a list of all the revenue transactions in crucially we get it at. The level of each. Each customer payment, and so you know we scrub I all we really care about is having a customer ID, but once we have data at that level. We can start to do this linkage and say all right look. You know this business spent. A million dollars on sales and marketing and March of two thousand eighteen in April of twenty eighteen, and we saw revenue grow by twenty percent. That was a pretty substantial chain. You know what actually happened here. You can typically identify the subcategories of sales and marketing and start to do this link between these two, and this is really the you know the magic behind our our data science in our team pairing with our engineering team to figure out this problem and solve away that is, that's robust. Bud once we have these two data feeds, and the system goes through, and does all of these attribution. Populations were able to present that back to accompany a pretty clear picture of what's going on, and so we'll say things like hey. Your Business is pretty seasonal, and in the summer is when you're typically more more efficient at converting your sales and marketing dollars into growth so I, you want to finance growth in the summer. The second thing is only about eighty percent of your businesses financeable. There's twenty percent where you might not know it because you're not looking at this level of detail, you're busy building your business, which is exactly exactly what you should be doing, but Twenty percent of your businesses, not efficient. You're spending money on on your sales and marketing categories, product lines, and CETERA that just shouldn't exist and so if you get rid of those. If you double down on the part of Your Business, it is efficient. Then we predict your revenue will be act fifty percent higher, and we'll tell you exactly how much money you need to invest to raise money to to raise the revenue by fifty percent. We give you a bunch of charts that allow you to see how history and projections merged together and dig down. Inspect how we do that linkage to make sure you agree, but. This is what the capital machine does at its core. It Converts Company data into a fully audited completely transparent picture of. How business works where it sufficient where it's not efficient. And then that's where our technology stops, and where balanced she comes in, and so we then take this information, and we make balancing investments directly in companies, and so primarily at this point we lend money to technology companies that we see from their data are eligible for non dilutive funding. We make capital available to them directly. We basically allow them to access it through the capital machine. We use one system to communicate changes to the business. No keep both sides and form so on and so forth, but this is the kind of analytics layer that's essential to making these capital allocation decisions more efficient, and so I think you could imagine a day at least for us in the not too distant future when it's not just US using our balance sheet in this tool to make investments, but in fact, just like excel, every investor can benefit from a similar level of analytics and transparency, as can companies by getting more accurately priced faster access to capital less friction so on and so forth. Get Lab commit, is! Get labs inaugural community event. Get Lab is changing how people think about tools and engineering best practices and get lab commit in Brooklyn is a place for people to learn about the newest practices in devops, and how tools and processes come together to improve the software development life cycle. Get Lab commit is the official conference. Forget lab. It's coming to Brooklyn new. York September Seventeenth Twenty nineteen. If you can make it to Brooklyn, on September Seventeenth Mark Your calendar, forget lab, commit and go to software engineering daily dot, com slash commit. You can sign up with code commit s E. D.. That's COM MIT S. E. D.. And Save thirty percent on. Conference passes. If you're working in devops, and you can make it to New York. It's a great opportunity to take a day away from the office. Your company will probably pay for it, and you get thirty percent off if you sign up with code, commit S, e. There a great speakers from Delta. Airlines Goldman. Sachs northwestern, mutual, T, mobile and more. Check it out at software engineering daily Dot Com slash, commit and use code. Commit S. E. D.. Thank you to get lab for being sponsor. The inputs specifically if you think about a model for determining whether or not, a company should should be eligible to receive capital. I'd like to know how the the models are built. The the data science models that you're building are constructed from the point of view of the inputs. So how are you determining or how do you like company comes to you? How do you turn that company into some structured form of data that you could put into your models and determine whether it's worthy of capital. Yeah I mean it comes down to what what the data is your down so when we talk to a system like striper transaction records system, you know that that's the revenue of the company now where things get interesting when we connect to balance sheets in penalizing, it's of accompanying really onto understanding. Weighing. What exactly these numbers mean, and that sort of where we made our pipelines were built from the ground up to give us that granular. Of A company's cash family revolutions. Where's the money going where they allocating? And it's savable greenway or you once. What do you understand that data through that Lens? That let's build pretty sophisticated financial models Linda. And you know as soon as you have the picture of Company You can really do a lot of flexible analysis on the back leg distributed computation. Come stuff that you would never be able to excel and quite frankly a lot of these companies don't have the stacking internally or really the tools to understand for themselves, so you'd be surprised it you know when we surface this analysis back to the company by virtue of just being transparent on how we're making decision how it is perceived their business, the signals that were uncovering. These operators the CEO's the CFO's that are really focused on building company. Really surprising. They're really making these insights really transforming. How they think they should have capital. Should invest growing business. Are there any? Sources of Third Party data that you can gather to improve decision making. There are at a macro economic sense, and so it's actually quite useful to look at public company performance and say hey. SAS businesses in general. Most people notice, but facilities in general are seasonal in the fourth quarter. Budgets basically expire and people come in, and they buy a bunch of SAS. Software and so to take concepts like that basically shapes of curves, signals and apply them to private company. Financials is useful. Crucially though there is no private company. Data repository of any kind like it just doesn't exist, and you know notoriously even even with small businesses. It's actually quite quite difficult to get access to any sort of meaningful credit data, and so, what ends up happening is these aw. These businesses. Give you a picture of their business directly as an investor and you have to interpret it directly, and that's basically how this works totally unlike consumer credit, there's no credit bureau that people paying so most investors are analyzing the state and excel. Excel notoriously breaks when there's about a million cells worth of data, and so we've got this great visualization showing our data pipeline, and it's basically a bunch of boxes, and there's a little tiny. Tiny box in the bottom of corner that's excel, and there's a bunch of other boxes across the entire rest of the page that are nodes in our in our distributed computations, but accelerate very very limited, and so it makes it impossible to actually understand what's going on in business from the source data, and it's at the source that you see this variability in this linkage between profitable capital allocation decisions in unprofitable capital allocation decisions. Describing more detail, the workflow so a company comes to you and they're going to put their inputs into the. Would you call the capital machine? What does that workflow look like in a little bit more depth? Yes when they come to the website, they creighton count much like you would on. Twitter facebook account. When your details your email, you terrify your email, and then you on what's recalling like the capital portable on there? You have et CETERA. Tools to connect your sins record and these are typical offload. So you know people are very familiar with you. You know you say hey, let's connect by quickbooks you in your credentials and sort of be as secure way, and you click okay and the system checkmark by your quickbooks in the system start pulling that data out of regular cadence and. Depending on what system you're connecting you of the characteristics of that's not go systems of record, and how much data you have you know. The data's available anywhere from ten minutes to a couple of hours later and you know once we have Dr. System, we run that through our partake analysis pipeline in the users as a company. You get you get charged. In Tableau kind of call it, the insight Saban's these refused that we think would be helpful for you as an operator company understanding about Your Business in separately. We also get views of that data that are useful to our our internal investment team. Whoever is looking to capitalization systems? Are there certain business categories that are a better fit for modeling in better fit for the kind of. Predictable capital returns that you can, you can expect with the investments that you're making so like you ride sharing or Gig economy businesses or some businesses. What are the categories that are the best fit? Say Very few categories don't shit from the from the perspective of of linkages, but they're certainly models at their easier to think through and easier to understand, but our our system can underwrite today A. Lease on a commercial aircraft, a fleet of ships and Insurance Agency ask company the most important. Thing about our system is that the financial theory that underlies it is very general, just like p. e. rate is very general, and so that's kind of sounds crazy like. A lot of. A. Lot of people say what what businesses the best fit for your your system and you know it's kind of like asking what businesses the best for Warren Buffett like Warren. Buffett is a generalist. In any business, and he has a framework in his own head to figure out how to make ship comparable to American Express our assistant has a very similar framework. It just operates at the level of transactions instead of at the level of financial statements, but certainly within. That framework there's some examples that are just easier describes I think like you know thinking through the fishing of sales and marketing something. That's a lot more obvious than thinking through like the stability in refurbishment of commercial aircraft parts, which is a key question you know. Pricing pricing refurbished parts, which is a key question if your financing commercial aircraft and Our team, the ambassadors that use the capital machine internally which we primarily do internally do a little bit of partnering with without the groups to to use this as well. These people are all specialists in some particular area, but it's crucial to understand. They're looking at the exact same chance as all the other specialists and all the other areas, so it's like literally the the Fast Company and a commercial aircraft will have the same series of charts at investors. Are there two two draw their conclusion? Is the question for Chris. Can you describe the stack of technologies that you built in more detail? Yeah Yeah. Of course on the front, we are react type script, xjs, you know everything is on aws, and in the back, and we're. We're all python, and in really the reason for that is if you're doing any serious machine, learning or data science today can't really get away in python stack, so we're all python them back in. We have flasks. As a as our API late here and That's the that's a high level. And get a little bit more detail about how the data science layer works. Yeah, yeah, yeah, of course, so we put on the dea into basically a data lake the that goes down into Ardito pipeline in that's all air orchestrated on top of each called airflow, and we use a technology called desk for are distributed computation, and I think that this is a good choice. Choice for us at this moment you know I see us doing a lot of work on. You know using a spark in other distributed technologies in the future and his team and it turns out that when we pull this data down organizing the data was really important to us as we build a lot of attractions to make accessing that data, really easy for quantitative analysts. Important central to our whole technology is that we're able to do a lot of different financials experiment very quickly on top of this so the the implications of that really cascade down all the way into. You know what technologies where choosing how we structure our delayed. Even even how strokes are teams, so it really is brought up locations across all product. How is it when you're analyzing company that you have enough data that it warrants a spark cluster because I can imagine? The financial data around the company. How can there really be that much data to analyze how you do surprised in a lot of these transactions systems taking up the companies have been around a couple of years and their direct to consumer. These data sets can be can be pretty large. You know we're talking about in the millions and millions and millions of transactions that were pulling down and storing. Storing and that just on a per company basis. You know that's not even talking about if we wanted to. Benchmarks Cross companies, and also if we want to do scenario analysis, so you know one of the things we was part of a pipeline is take this data, and through like nine ninety nine hundred thousand simulations to understand the sensitivity of different variables on the performance of Your Business and If, you're starting out with starting that already large. Sort of a multiplying effect. On how much data the system is the old process? is you go through those different stages? And, can you tell me a little more detail? What would a typical spark job? Look like for a company that you're assessing. Yes, so first episode is ribbon. Our our financial didn't ingestion parts, so we download something on the order of you know forty fifty bytes of Tim's action data for for a company. We have to do all the work to interpret and understand what that means in reorganized that data in a way that are downstream analysis and primitives can. Make sense of and use for useful analysis so really the first step at this point job is is transformed the datum some it's useful, and then there's all the work on what are the clusters in order to machines and analysis in the computational. Resources needed to run simulations. You know not not just say local computer locally owned of fall over the only about thirty to sixty four gigabytes of Ram what league, so that's where workflow comes in creating easier faces into data, clusters and being. Should you know when you run a job? You know when it fails. You know it's done. You know when the team can't okay. This part of analysis done I had intermediate date asset to do more analysis on now get back to work is a lot of the time we spend developing internal tools to make. One other thing that'll mentioned that I think's important is. A lot of the underlying technology in our data pipeline it's no different than like what a tableau or you need. Traditional BI business would have access to, but what's fascinating when you have a vertically specific domain so financial data in our case you can make a lot of interpretations about the date of the let you do much more intelligent things, and so for example we. Don't have to make your own charts as a user of the capital machine. We make all the charts for you can of course. As a business we work with. Give us ideas for charts. You can mock up your own. We we basically have an interface for for business. The I team's to to write some code if they if they want to bought when you have clients who are thinking about financial risk, financial attribution across all of the companies that we see distilling that down into a series of indicators that are detailed, but generalize -able, and then publishing that back to all of the companies that use the capital machine to run their own capital, allocation, decisions and access, external fundraising and capital. Some pretty amazing things happen in so it's only with a vertical view. You actually having these we, we call our data scientists Kwan's, but but actually having these people who you know typically are graduate level economists, thinking for the first time about using transaction level data in their analysis, which is notoriously not not available to to normal economists that you get the kinds of insights and analysis the actionable for businesses, and then in terms of the data pipeline that then means we actually store a bunch of intermediate data that's opinionated in that way, and that makes it much faster to access much easier to benchmark much more useful across a network of companies, versus just that isolated excel model that. Explains only one business. One thing I'd like to ask you about. Capital intensity so there are kinds of businesses that are capital intensive for example where you have to pay upfront for a lot of ridesharing rides, and you know as Uber or lift. His has known in much detail. You allocate all this capital two things to subsidize rise because you try to win a market, there's all kinds of other capital intensive businesses. How does capital intensity change? What makes sense with regard to the equity financing the debt financing that you are shepherding for these companies? That is a great question and be because of where you focus in your audience. You totally get the most financiers don't so. The first point exactly like you said. Capital intensity means a business consumes a lot of capital. It doesn't mean a business has a physical factory or plant or railcars, so it is absolutely true exactly like you said that there are a lot of tech businesses that are incredibly capital intensive. If you are capital intensive business that means UNI especially if you're growing, you need to raise a lot of external capital, and so it is even more important that your capital or a big portion of your capital base is not dilutive. That's that's just essential. Table stakes because what you see with these businesses, the ride sharing companies are great. Example is by the time one of these things actually goes public the early owners in the business on a very very very miniscule. KEESA that business, still if you contrast that to company like Viva Systems which I think is one of the most capital capitol efficient businesses in venture history, I think that this race something like twelve or fifteen million dollars total before it went public in a at a multi billion dollar market cap. So capital intensity. Is a synonym for dilution your own way less. Than you think when you exit entities even more important that you figure out a way to raise capital non ludicrously upfront. Some broader questions zooming out in in getting your perspective. Do a thesis for what is going on in the economy right now where you look at. The fact that We have. Obvious pressures to. Reducing the size of the economy through the lack of tourism, the lack of social gatherings while the stock market climbs higher and higher, and it appears that the technology side of things is almost unaffected by Corona virus is there. Is there a thesis that you've arrived at or or their set of theses that through conversations with other people, you've found most compelling. Sure the most important thing to realize about the stock market is that it discounts all cash flows from all businesses in the stock market to infinity, and so the value, the stock market about eighty percent of the value. The stock market is. Pretty far into the future like more than three years from now, and so if you believe that the current economic crisis and this is why there's always a. At least in the Western, world, last two hundred fifty years after an economic crisis. If you believe the crisis will eventually revert, and there will be a recovery, then it only makes sense discount stock market assets by anywhere between ten and twenty five percent. If you believe businesses fundamentally going to go out of business because of this crisis, that's a different story, but that explains why something as terrible as Kobe nineteen and a pandemic. Only discount the stock market by by roughly thirty thirty five percent in a in March, but that's not what's actually going on today as you mentioned and so stock market prices now have completely recovered. That is something that we think is a little bit of out of sync with reality but I. I mention you know we're not. We don't spend too much time about the stock market beyond that we just look at you. Know Private Company fundamentals. We try to understand what's actually going on in individual businesses across all businesses that are network to see what you know what we can understand, and you know what kind of conclusions we can draw, and so if you take that Lens and you actually look at what's happening to businesses due to Cova nineteen, it's fascinating. Some businesses like think the food delivery space have gotten a lot more efficient, so those businesses lot like ridesharing businesses back twelve months ago, there was sort of a bloodbath between bunch of companies competing in local markets to acquire customers all all fighting Google and facebook console, and so forth you subsidies drivers, etc.. That's essentially stopped. These businesses incredibly profitable, the cost acquire customers has fallen by more than half a lot of cases. The channels were slot less competitive, and so if you're running one of those businesses. Now is a great time to be aggressively expanding. Weird things like commercial construction businesses. They're actually a handful businesses that we've seen do things like install windows and doors and commercial buildings whose businesses have accelerated because all of these buildings are closed down. Construction project timelines have gotten pulled up. All of these orders are coming. Do in they're you know sort of rapidly doing it solutions? There's obviously a bunch of other businesses have been that have been hurt by by the pandemic, but our general thesis are we've studied. Pretty detailed way the Spanish flu in nineteen eighteen, you know. These things eventually go away. There will be a vaccine. Economy will get back to normal, and as long as we can stay focused on working through this as as a society and of maintain our our fabric of of kind of economic progress then. DESAGUADERO values today will eventually make sense just sort of a question of of win for the stock market, and then if you're if you're actually running business in thinking about your own performance in isolation, really being clear about is now the time to invest and grow my business now the time to be very careful with my expenses interest, get through this for the next year or however long it takes for there to be a vaccine. So the way to think about your company, if I understand correctly if I was to to put in a nutshell, is that. I think of you as a data science middleman between large capital allocators, and and start ups deserving of capital, so the the sovereign wealth funds the banks the I guess. Funds of funds. These kinds of sources are essentially looking to you for guidance on where to direct the capital, and you're on the on the other side, absorbing data and creating opportunities from these startups to source the good directions of that capital. Just wrap up. Would you put any more color around that description or or refining anyway. Yeah I mean I. think that at the core of what capital is is where the. Core Technology Ambler of sort of. The private market if you think about public markets today, you've clearing-houses like the New York Stock Exchange, and you have companies that provide analysis on top of that like Bloomberg, you know we see a tremendous opportunity to shift the paradigm where you know the place where all the financial transactions happen. is also the place that collects the data improvise information for those making these decisions and yeah, so I think capitals really at the center of making a transparent technologically enabled financial marketplace. Guys. Thank you so much for coming on the show and discussing capital, and I guess one last question is. Do you have any predictions for how capital allocation for startups will look differently in five ten years? Sure so! The first prediction. And this is happening now. I mean the the infrastructure is. In place both within. And others. Most startups fairly early in their life. Think is equity only way to do this and. So. That's a cultural shift. That's that's already happened. People are starting to ask that question. The second prediction is. Seed and series a funding will be entirely unchanged. After series. There'll be a bifurcation between businesses that. Are Really. Capital intensive gigantic rnd projects think like SPACEX. The series, B. C. d. e. enough are really about building and launching a rocket. Those businesses will by and large not. Turn outside of equity to finance themselves, but there's very few of those businesses. Pretty much every other business businesses that you see raising a series B. Serie C. Will like any normal business in the entire rest of the economy raise maybe half of that capital nine allegedly either in the form of debt. Royalty financing factoring all of the other instruments that normal companies use to finance themselves in the void delusion that will happen roughly three years her. Now that'll that'll kind of we'll see obvious obvious signs of that from very early very early base, and then the final the final thing is. Steve Case talks a lot about this. With the rise of the rest, he's got this great venture fund that invests explicitly outside the coast, so kind of the rest of America and we've seen that there's there's a pretty dramatic distinction between being a coastal business non-coastal business from capital access perspective, but there's no distinction from an actual performance perspective, and so we'll start to see some of the regional. Differences in bias sees around where capital flows, go away. And so I would maybe put that on a five year timeline like raising capital is actually much more predictable, much less biased, and that's great back to the beginning of our conversation. That's great for the economy I mean every project or business that can convert capital, two products and services that people love should get finance. No questions asked doesn't mean it doesn't matter what the color of your skin is. What background you have whether you went to college didn't go to. College doesn't matter. You have a business with data that can prove whether people love it

Steve Case Business Rosen Fisher Jurvetson New York Chris Welcome Blair Silicon Valley CEO Restorick Louis Spacex Facebook Singapore
"two hundred fifty years" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"two hundred fifty years" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Week two hundred fifty years if that works well I think we're two hundred twenty six years old and we made mistakes yeah but nothing like they have a court date had more time to make them stop what we have achieved I mean not picking on ourselves try to clean up the mess we've made get down there the fabulous world out there to embrace to try to help you know like the pipeline what are we going to do about the pipeline when are we going to do about the lower energy and wind energy they seem like answers but are they really I don't know I mean the wind kills all the birds that darn windmills and I look at that and say well you know okay if we could quote clean on quote that we got we got big issues but they tend to be pragmatic and that you know like okay how do you get food on the table how do you get energy those kind of issues it's not like well you know what we've got that marines offshore and there are which is what I had to deal with exactly exactly so we could have a lot worse so learn to grass and definitely get a ball so hope for him if we pick up a copy of the book it's another exciting mystery murder it has some great insight in the ears hot topics that are by should be aware of the characters were always geniuses always to remain other great job than with the book everybody go out pick up a copy of homework hand your great joy it thoroughly and you may even learn something you never now. could it be that that you know the other thing is happy thanksgiving what a wonderful holiday it's not commercial yeah yeah yeah exactly well happy thanksgiving to you to work it's hard to believe you know it's funny when our I'm sure you can agree with me on this when we were young and our parents were telling us that time flies by and it gets shorter and shorter every day we kind of scoffed at a but now I've seen that more because there's no way that thanksgiving so. yeah I don't know where it goes but if you do I will go get them and bring it back yes exactly we need to slow it down a little bit because I. it is just summer of a just a couple weeks ago so. everybody could pick up a copy the book is hope for him Rita Mae brown you're going to love it it's a great part of the continued series and that neither super job in your thanks for joining us tonight on animal rights a pet life radio relay thank him and one last thing if I could ask your listeners to please just band even five dollars to their local cat shelter you go we're all for that we're all involved in rescue Sagat go out there and I don't need a little bit of money special coming into the holidays donate your time and your talents so that's always it's a good okay all right.

two hundred twenty six years two hundred fifty years five dollars
"two hundred fifty years" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"two hundred fifty years" Discussed on KOMO

"Over two hundred fifty years. the trail Blazers turn fifty next year they're commemorating the milestone in part with a limited release adult timeline. is this really. time and place. the anniversary is also. what exactly should you expect from a wine designed for a basketball team surprise says the wine maker. we don't really have we have a four. whatever. version of this one. apparently basketball and wine go together very well as one of the four varietals is already sold out Brian Kelberg komo news it's three fourteen an update on como Tripoli traffic every ten minutes on the force let's start in liquid marina yes we have a problem now southbound I. five right near state route five twelve the right lane is blocked the collision and it is definitely causing a slowdown southbound I. five is quite heavy from highway eighteen to fifty fourth and five really seeing a struggle south on one six seven leaving for a five in Renton down past the five sixteen interchanging campus just bumper to bumper so is southbound I. five through the dorms curves down to two hundred this slow on the east side in Bellevue south bound for five from five twenty all the way into new castle southbound I. five quite heavy through the U. district and it's a tough one into ever northbound I. five from the Boeing freeway up house marine view drive your next how much traffic at three twenty four and this update sponsored by Papa Murphy's on five ninety nine Friday's a Papa Murphy's get a large cheese sausage or pepperoni pizza on thin crust for just five ninety nine take.

Blazers Renton U. district Papa Murphy Brian Kelberg Tripoli Bellevue Boeing two hundred fifty years ten minutes
Emotional Intelligence in the Workplace

Podcast | Don Rheem

11:08 min | 2 years ago

Emotional Intelligence in the Workplace

"The world economic economic forum released a report dealing with emotional intelligence saying that will be a top skill required for employees by twenty twenty help us understand. How does this report shed light on the importance of emotional intelligence in the workplace and what is it saying about how it has shifted over the years with regards to impacting workplace engagement yeah it's interesting as i as i look back over my career and monitoring emotional intelligence over the past two decades <hes> it it certainly has shifted it did but i want to start off first by defining what it is for our audience often when i ask about emotional intelligence when i'm working with teams. Everybody knows knows. It's a really good thing to have but when i ask what it is <hes> people can start to stumble and so it can be a bit conceptual way. I like to always break it down emotional intelligence intelligence <unk>. I will also refer to as e. Q. which stands for emotional quotient is really defined as the ability to identify assess and control your own own emotions influence the emotions of others and not of groups and so each q. is really about the intelligent use of emotions which influences your decision decision making the quality of your relationships and your ability to be flexible and agile in shifting environments you know when we go back to to the report that you referenced one of the reasons why emotional intelligence is becoming much more of a hot topic and and identified as as a as a critical michael skill going forward. It's actually for a couple reasons and i know don you talk often a lot about the labor shortage so we have that issue going on <hes> leadership is just simply become how much more complex because we're facing several challenges so one of which is the labor shortage also it's the first time in american history that we have five generations in the workforce and that just presents unique challenges because each of the generations has their own unique styles the way they approach work around context with which they look through and then an interesting aspect is that gen-x generation after the boomers represent only twenty eight percent of the population so as boomers starts to leave the workforce. I'm they're actually i'm not gonna be enough. Gen x. individuals to fill the leadership positions that are going to be needed and so what's going to happen is it's going to thrust millennials into leadership positions that they're not ready for or either emotionally or professionally and so researchers are calling it this leadership gap crisis that we're getting ready to hit and then on top of that we're in what researchers his call a buca environment in so vikas an acronym that was coined by the u._s. Military that stands for volatile uncertain complex and ambiguous and so just that type of environment it naturally can trigger a threat in the brain and when we experience these kinds of kinds of conditions are emotional. Intelligence eligible are e. Q. will often drop and that's when we see some counterproductive behavior come out and so it's just been an interesting shift looking at where we're going in the future and then when we kind of take a look backward into history daniel goldman whose essentially the grandfather of emotional intelligence has been tracking king eq- and he reports that i q so our intelligence has increased about twenty four points over the last three decades but the problem is e. Q. has declined klein over that same time. So there's this dangerous paradox that's going on so children are becoming much smarter in their intelligence but their emotional intelligence is on the decline so we're in kind of this interesting environment where the environment is actually demanding more emotional intelligence but emotional intelligence has essentially been on the that decline well. It's interesting carey because i as you know i talk about this issue over the last two or three decades technology has allowed us to to be in touch with people in to reach out and contact people more easily at lower costs than ever before and yet at the same time the number of americans reporting to be pervasively alone and isolated aided in their life has doubled from twenty to forty percent of the population and one former u._s. Surgeon general calls this pandemic of social isolation. Spreading across america's is one of the most severe public health threats that we face and when you combine it's interesting so the technology allows us to get in touch but we're not having this emotional connection that occurs occurs with it and i know the national institutes of health is started a longitudinal study about the impact of technology even of looking at someone on a smartphone art phone even on a facetime where you see their face digitally. There's something about the brain and a two dimensional object. It sees but it doesn't resonate at you. Don't get emotional experience from it so we have a generation and and so we have the millennials and gen z. right behind them anyone who's twenty four years old and younger who are like you say very smart mart very adaptive technology and yet we feel more alone and isolated and less emotionally mature than we ever have before right and so this rise in technology it just kind of creates an interesting conundrum because again at some level. It's it's it's great. You know. We've got a we've got you know. The leaders are getting excited about a._i. Data dating analytics and blockchain and then we've got these great millennials that are coming in with all of these great skills but you're exactly right. They're coming in essentially starved for social. She'll relationships and even with social media. What they're looking at is <hes> yes we are able to connect with more people in we can connect more often but the challenges <hes> a lot of times that connection is often superficial and and it's replacing a face to face time and so that's where you know technology can be used to supplement mint but it shouldn't be used to replace good deep social relationships and what's interesting with gen z. Coming and researchers are starting to see what gen z. They've been so dependent the technology that they're actually coming starting to enter the workforce and they're actually wanting more face to face than millennials simply because they're starved for it. It's it's so interesting and compelling for managers and from a manager's perspective and you mentioned the the increasing complexity in for managers in the workplace nice and historically <hes> in an environment where there's been an abundance of labor for last two hundred fifty years in the american economy. We didn't have to care about these. Things people just showed up and they work because they needed the job but in this new environment where employees actually don't need your job. They can work essentially anywhere they want. <hes> managers do have to be more attuned to this. What are some common. I'm trying to think of some of these common phrases that we've used our whole lives that <hes> demonstrate emotional intelligence and and i think of words like attuned moment and being present an active listening what are some other <hes> familiar terms for managers that that are good signs that one is expressing a high q. One of which is again it's thrown around a lot but the ability to be empathetic <hes> now again empathetic empathy isn't necessarily the need to feel somebody else's feelings <hes> but but to at least have some sort of cognitive perspective to be able to view other people's perspectives and and to include that into your decision making or into the team initiatives and that's one thing with this very very complex environment that is coming out <hes> is that leaders can no longer rely as much on their past experience in what has worked before so it's requiring that managers bring in these additional generations the younger generations and bring in <hes> different perspectives around the team to figure out how to better adapt in us environmental so it's just requiring the ability to take additional perspective taking so i wanna ask you a question. Yesterday i was in denver working with a company <hes> in a workshop. One of the questions that <hes> one of the senior managers asked me was about a disruption in the workplace when someone's kind of a troublemaker. There's drama goes up for a manager who's dealing with either disruption team or disruptive employees. How z q play into that. It plays into it actually pretty significantly. I you know when i talk to leaders when i ask them. What's their biggest challenge. The number one answer there's always the people and so when you know it's great when it's going well but all of a sudden when you have an issue or a disruption it creates a lot of havoc and i typically see <hes> leaders kind of fall in one one or two areas and so they'll either stick their head and has sand and they won't deal with it and eventually it will just start to spin out of control and then people we'll start to come and demand that the leader addresses it or they start doing a lot of blame shifting and they wanna just force the employee out <hes>. I hear a lot if i just need to terminate that employ oy but as you said we have to figure out we don't we don't have a long line of people to replace an employee so we have to figure out how to create the conditions where they can be successful and so one of the issues is really diving into. What's at the root of the disruption when you think of e. Q. as a skill set what what would the top three most important e. q. skills be that a manager should be striving to to learn and demonstrate the number one by far is the ability to to build relationships and deepen those relationships <hes>. That's just the number one <hes> leaders with the highest e. q. Always have you know it's always fascinating for me to watch but they always have groups of people around them that are invested in their success and so i worked with the leader recently and she just has demonstrated such high emotional intelligence and their particular market shifted and it was <hes> it was pretty scary. It shifted much more quickly than what they anticipated the painted a minute created a lot of problems and challenges but what was really <hes> really pretty impressive for me to watch. Was that all all of the groups when i talked to all of her senior leaders around her. They said you know what we probably should be polishing her resume but i can't let her down. I'm here. I'm staying. I'm staying. We're we're gonna figure this out and sure enough they have. They've turned the ship around into me that just a great reflection. She couldn't have done it on her own and had she not had such good quality. Relationships people will would have wanted to have stayed in that type of environment or a couple more and this is an interesting one and i always kind of take issue with some of the <unk> positive psychology <music> out there but the best leaders with the highest emotional intelligence are acutely aware of what their potential derailed are you know we're human beings and were somewhat messy and so certain areas windward triggered that may be certain bad behaviors or less than productive behaviors will come out so if we know that we're not truly really a conflict of water. We know that when issues hit we're not gonna want to run the other way and so i work with leaders on understanding what they're derailing are win. They often get triggered word so that we can develop a script so they don't have to think about it in the moment when they're triggered bit so they can make a better decision and

Twenty Twenty Daniel Goldman Social Isolation Michael DON Carey America Denver Klein Three Decades Two Hundred Fifty Years Twenty Eight Percent Twenty Four Years Forty Percent Two Decades
"two hundred fifty years" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

04:53 min | 2 years ago

"two hundred fifty years" Discussed on KGO 810

"John so this is the John Batchelor show Conrad black sweeping history of America pursuing the development of what the grand strategies that turn a dependent collection of refugees and immigrants in the wonderful box wilderness forest of North America into the world leadership that fight successfully the Cold War flight of the eagle is the book Khan and there's an introduction by Henry Kissinger we're going to get to at just this moment the Westphalian nations pull themselves together this is the in the eighteenth and early nineteenth century but we're looking at the crisis for America that's the civil war Abraham Lincoln's leadership there's much to recommend I want to get to this point you have a quote later on in the book Conrad about Napoleon saying the lies agreed upon that's the nature of of states that are on a where are in denial about their about their weaknesses of their corruption was that American eighteen sixty lies agreed upon slighted in Napoleon said that that was what history was good about all these stories were propagandist and therefore he was being kind to America or was he part of the European opinion that would have regarded America as hypocritical as unlikely to develop no he thought that America would developing you when when the American minister in Paris made overtures to about buying what we probably call Louisiana but of course it really it wasn't just the present state of Louisiana was the whole area served by the Mississippi River and the whole heart of America the central part of America from the Gulf of Mexico to the Great Lakes and the Appalachians almost the Rocky Mountains he he he saw the the the this would not be able to protect that territory from the British had stolen from the king of Spain and the birth and he he didn't have a navy that that could really compete with the British as had been proof before so his plan was to have virtually given to the Americans and and his hope was that America would rise up as it did and challenge the British for leadership of the English speaking world as it did what he did not realize and could not realize was the British would be so kind and when that time came instead of contesting of fighting to their last breath against the upstart Americans they adopted a policy implications of the US in alliance with the impact and sells them from number two adjacent to the Americans and develop the splendid alliance that we saw most famously with Churchill and Roosevelt but then the lifetime of many of your listeners of with the Reagan and Thatcher you right Conrad that the Europeans were awed by the ferocity of the civil war it was on on contested late to my reading just massacre in all directions when they got to the battlefield spot the depredations visited upon the south and in in the in the Virginia were well known the Europeans watched it but at the same time there is this idea of Franklin that they'll develop regardless of how badly they fight this out did America need to go through as Lincoln said in the second inaugural that or deal by fire to pay for the sins of slavery well of course that's a puzzle over which American historian support ever since those days it logically no it didn't have to but you know that the efforts that were made to to emancipated slaves and send them to Liberia and the country was set up by Americans you know the Liberia means free in the capital Monrovia is named after the first of the month insincere and cynical of maneuvers that's what the well I I think they were sincere but they were never going to work you can get millions of you know African Americans in the in the United States to pack up and move back to Africa and and so is the the the issue had to be faced now it is that they have this arrangement of the president Jackson imposed in eighteen thirty two that he would protect slavery about it wouldn't expand north of the Missouri compromise line which is affected with a mystery Arkansas orders extended west and and present whole can underestimated present in my opinion this going bye bye acting Mexican war which the north was represented as just the a patriotic expansion of American manifest as just minutes on red will come back and we'll answer the question about the ordeal by far the book his flight of the eagle this is America and the rise of a world leadership through all of the mistakes and the Felicity as well the felicitous movements of the last two hundred fifty years I'm.

John Batchelor America two hundred fifty years
"two hundred fifty years" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

11:42 min | 2 years ago

"two hundred fifty years" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Were talking about how the left always says, you know, a fortune is settled law, but the same group all constantly say, oh, well, the constitution changing. Our we don't need the constitutional electoral college or any other law that doesn't fit their agenda. What laws that are. I mean. What the board decided abortion less than forty less than fifty years ago? Saying that settled loss. Yeah. The constitution electoral college. We've had over two hundred fifty years. That's not settled law. Right. I love how they pick and choose laws that fit their agenda. An absolutely I mean, they really Murray have an actual agenda. They have like, you know, point ABC in D abortion is like a and b you know, this is a veto if they allow for for example, for us to be more mindful of our sexual activity start there like I mean, they don't even want to even allow us to say, maybe we should slow it down a bit. You know, like, you know, they they want us to be, you know, full into our bodies full into, you know, not thinking about consequences. You know, they they want to get the guys off the hook. And then still Vilnai's women. Of course. It's funny thing is this whole time. They're still only focusing on the women has mom would say it takes two to Tango, right? So, you know, their whole agenda is really to destroy the family. You know, 'cause I've heard stories of women, you know, maybe someone did have an abortion later because bad abortion or basa portion. They can no longer have children. Right. There's that generation either. That generation that line is now offer good for that woman. Right. Absolutely. Thank you for calling because you know, I I think a lot of us. We know what we know. And we have to speak up specifically if they're going to say that we aren't women because we're not for abortion backwards. Exactly. Thank you for calling have a great weekend. All right. Same to you. Kathy from laurel. How are you? Hi, good. Thanks, and I met you at least one Republican club function on the blind lady. Wonderful. How are you doing great? Thanks emailed. You once or twice? I'm sorry. I'm here. And I just wanted to say last night. I was watching the fall of the Roman empire. And there was a quote at the very end that said, a civilization cannot be conquered from without less. It destroys itself from within. I mean, it's happening at all levels like well Mariel bowser from DC decriminalized people when they don't pay when they're on the subway. I mean, that's stealing. I mean, basic- let alone some of the other things that we're talking about. And I don't get also how it was is that there's this judicial activism where a judge on some. Court somewhere convinced undermine the president. I don't remember that ever happening. What I was growing up. I don't know how that got started. Yeah. Well, we got started because I was one of their interns back in two thousand five I worked at American constitution society, and their whole premise was make sure that we have a bunch of article three judges, you know, people who will get to stay there for their lifetime lifetime appointments. So that they can literally change the law wherever you are across the country. Even if you don't have congress because they knew that the voters would ultimately have a decision, whether it's the legislative or the executive branch, but the judiciary gets to get to protect them from us. And so they actually have been stacking the benches throughout the country. And once you realize what they're doing. That's why we have to call him out. And that's the reason why we have to vote. And that's the reason why we ought to run for office. The reason why we need to call even though all of our congressman. For what and senators are full on radical leftists. We still need to call them and Email them and visit their offices demand that they represent us. I've been doing that. And so anyways, that's all basically what I wanted to say. Thanks so much. Well, thank you so much and have a great weekend. Thank you so much. You know, she was talking about it. You know, the fall again like talking about being a feminist. There are so many people online that are like, you know, we're still feminist. But we also know that like we appreciate men that don't let commercial for example, where they're talking about. You know, the toxic masculinity. I was like what are you talking about? It is okay. For me. I'm full on woman. You know, like, I'm very feminine. I am very emotional. I'm very passionate. You know? I love it. When there is a guy who like the way that my my life has been always in the driver's seat. But the moment that I can be in the passenger seat. I'm all about it. But then I have to be with a guy a guy who is stronger than me who a guy who is more, you know, like firm in his principles. So that I can trust him in order for him to. Be able to take care of business because I don't want to be driving all the time. I remember one of my ex's, for example, he had to persuade me like fight for me to take my groceries out of my hands. And I was like carrying all these bags up. And he's like, oh my gosh. Can I help, you know, I'm going to help you like, please. Let me help you because growing up in that mentality. We're supposed we're forcing ourselves to do everything, and it is such a relief, and it's such a blessing to have that support. And that and that encouragement because that's how we were built. And and quite frankly, there's there's no sort of, you know, issue there, and we shouldn't have taken issue with it. But can we play the last clip because people were talking about Roe v? Wade. And again, it goes back to it. There was a whole mission in order to push abortion onto the rest of us and not going gonna play the clip, and we're going to talk about it in a second the structure of the argument, the whole structure of the argument was. Based on Larry laters Hewlett. And when you structure, I I personally know as a writer the structure of a book is what persuades and after a while. If once you've written a book with that with the structure, the structure disappears. So the structure is there in Robie Wade? But if you don't know where came from is invisible that is the amazing thing. That's why with over Roe v. Wade for fifteen years all a lot every legal historical sociological and religious assumption in v Wade has been challenged both by liberal and conservative lawyers. But. And it's because it was written based on this propaganda book. So it's just when you think about it. And we gotta get the books. So sue Ellen Browder Browder wrote subverted how I helped the sex revolution hijack the women's movement. My book is going to be coming in tomorrow. I'm going to be reading it for Roche ously but going back to rove v. Wade everybody talks about it. Settle Solano Roe v. Wade in itself row. Totally changed her mind. She didn't even get an abortion. That's the thing. That's so aggravating is like they're forcing us to make constitutional amendments. They wanna push constitutional amendment here in Maryland to protect the women's right to an abortion. But there's no actual fundamental right to kill your offspring. That's actually when you think about what that is. It's that's what it is. And when you go down to the March for life, one of the most powerful moments that we had last year was when you were when you interface with the women who had abortions, and there's the stand right across from the supreme court, and they have like big like pictures of you know, when they had their Boertien and how they read it like their children would have been like thirty years old or forty years old. And they still like lament by the fact that they actually when they realized that they were going to be killing their their young how scarred they were. And on the flip side tomorrow. For example, they're having another you know, what how do you anatomically correct hat. You know, where is how do you call it when they're wearing the hat. To help me out. I can't say, I don't know. What's allowed to be said online? But you can't right. So that's the problem. You got people who told us that we shouldn't be sex objects. Right. Don't think of me as a person think of me as a lawyer think of me as a radio host or whatever don't think about my lady part. But you're gonna have your lady part on your head and dress up one like one head to toe running around on the metro, and I got a force myself like overt my eyes because it's like, it's just so much. And you talk about that. It's like they are purposely destroying the corm. So you gotta blame you're going to say, oh, you know, how can you support Trump for this? Dan, the other. It's like are you seeing yourself in the mirror? You literally put that anatomically. Correct outfit on this morning. And you got on the metro and you have to. To call out our president. For something. He said on a hot, Mike. I'm like what part of that? It makes any sense Mark from Kearney? How are you? Hello. Hi. Yes. Calling in regards to what you're talking about abortion. Yup. First of all before I go any further. I try on the one eight hundred nine two two six six eighty they call working for some reason, I've tried it four times. No. It might have been me. I apologize. Go ahead. Okay. Anyhow. There's a lot of you mentioned about a lot of people think they're mass murderers and all that with abortion. But you obviously mentioned the women women budget in anything about the man. I did. I mean, the man as are some that really software out there, and it's on their conscience of time. Yeah. No, I respect that in gives me goosebumps because that actually happened to one of my friends, actually, I grew up in DC, and I grew up with Marion berry son, Christopher berry and Christopher actually deed in August of two thousand sixteen and it was really tough because he inherited addiction from his father. And he told me that one of his girlfriends several years ago had an abortion and how he couldn't speak. She couldn't say don't have it. You know, have it in our raise it, but technically his entire bloodline ended with that abortion. He knows it blows your mind when you know. Yes. You want to give the the the woman an option, but that option is completely severed by the of. And I'll tell you. I know one person that has told me now, I don't know what denomination. It's a mainstream religion, but their past or told them.

Robie Wade Solano Roe DC president ABC Vilnai Murray American constitution society Ellen Browder Browder congress Maryland Mariel bowser Kathy congressman Larry laters Hewlett laurel Roche ously writer Boertien
"two hundred fifty years" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"two hundred fifty years" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"On our new FM station one oh one point five if you are just joining us, we have been discussing the the events of the week. And boy what a week. It was one thing. I didn't even get to. We learned this week that the incoming attorney general for New York Latisha James announced on I think she said on Wednesday, the cheap plans to launch sweeping investigations into Trump his family, and anyone in his circle who may have violated the law. She said, quote, we will use every area of the law to investigate Donald Trump and his busy. Transactions and that of his family as well, and quote, and this is what is amazing. I talked to Frank always the best. We've had since Reagan. He is a Griffin. I mean, if you've forgotten about Trump university where he ripped people off who were there because they were desperate and needed help turning their lives around. Trump told us instructors to prey on the most vulnerable. He had to pay a twenty five million dollar fine. He scammed his own charity for which he put no money of his own in and used other people's money to spend twenty thousand dollars on a six foot portrait of themselves. Do none of these things register with you Trump butts, and because you've got a bunch of right wing. Yay. Who's creating hell over in France. You think that's a tribute to Trump? What is wrong with you? The guy is a lifelong criminal grip ter- and Syria liar and faith. And you're going to ignore what his own Justice department says like they're part of this deep state. Cu the Frank. Why don't you live in the real world for at least a moment? Read a damn court document take your nose away from Lou frigging dog win win. What some real news. And by the way, it is to your credit that you listen to this show. It is not to your credit that you think somehow everybody's lying to you. Except Donald frigging Trump. This is the attorney general for New York. This is New York they know better than anyone else in this country. What a lifelong criminal Trump is. But now, the his personal cancer has metastasized and spread across this entire nation. New York is gonna do their part to chemotherapy him one sound bite. I want you to listen to before we go back to the phones. Here's one long time friend of Trump and former television host Donny Deutsch. Let me say this unequivocally is a guy who spent most of his career in business in New York in advertising business real estate business of fashion, but it's a small world Donald Trump in the industry of real estate developers, which is kind of a of a slimy. This to begin with was known as the bottom of the bottom of the bottom of the food chain. This is a criminal guy. You have to do a dotted line Latisha Jones attorney general New York came out today and said, oh, we're just starting with his Dacian was starting with the organization Russia, and those stormy Daniels, the least of his problems to your point what he's going to put him in jail. Eventually, what is going to destroy everything is every Bill and his children is a thirty year dishonest criminal enterprise that is what is one thing. We'll take him out of the presidency. The other thing will ruin him forever. And on top of that the political incentive for every US attorney in New York or virginity. Do it is this guy showed up and tried to undo what two hundred fifty years of people dying for in this country. Who you are what we stand for. So there is a more. Imperative rule of law. What we are about what? Well, grandfathers died for democracy. He singlehandedly. He's the first guy in our lifetime that tried to undo that. And he's gonna pay for that.

Donald Trump New York Reagan attorney Donny Deutsch Latisha James Bill Donald frigging Frank Latisha Jones US attorney Justice department Syria Lou France Daniels
Researchers say they're closing in on Captain Cook's ship

This Morning with Gordon Deal

02:18 min | 3 years ago

Researchers say they're closing in on Captain Cook's ship

"Say they've identified a site off the coast of Rhode Island near Newport, where they think the ship that eighteenth century explorer, captain James, Cook us to sail around the world may be located. They described the site as promising but say, it will take a lot more work and money to identify the ship cook ran aground Australia's Great barrier. Reef during a voyage to the South Pacific nearly two hundred fifty years ago. He used his ship the endeavour to claim Australia for the British during his historic voyage. Would imagine what that was like back then. Oh, I can't minimal navigation skills. Australia. Ship winds up maybe off the coast the Rhode

Australia Rhode Island Rhode Captain James Newport South Pacific Two Hundred Fifty Years
"two hundred fifty years" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

03:22 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred fifty years" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"The perfectionist how precision engineers created the modern world by simon winchester i'm joined by simon winchester and i want to say i loved this book but when i got it i thought it was going to be one of many books that have come out about kind of titans of industry who have developed new things founded great companies but the premise of the book is actually a lot different than that the title is the perfectionist help precision engineers created the modern world and precision really is the focus of the book so could you talk about that specifically why precision in what kind of grabbed you about it the premise was basically to look at the history of this somewhat invisible notion that gem is bit like nettie languages we speak or the we breathe we didn't think about it too much much but his being an essential for two hundred fifty years now since the fest precise device was invented in seventeen seventy six but it's rather more than that i hope i i wanted to question the premise to to question whether precision in the pursuit of precision in the west shape and the reference in the bustle fetish station precision might be an altogether a good thing whether we're losing sight of of craftsmanship in the joy of the imprecise you just talk a lot about important engineers but the book also has a personal story throughout it can you talk about your father in his influence on your interest yes when my father was indeed a position engineer something i must confess during until maybe a decade ago i didn't think too much of he made tiny electric motors mainly for the royal navy for the guidance systems of to appear does once i remember in this remained in my mind since fascinated when he brought home a set of them what ical gauge blocks so joe joe henson blocks and their metal standard steel box of about one hundred of them in decreasing sizes and the thing about them is that the very very precisely made and they can be stacked together in various combinations what he wanted to show me was that even that these blocks were not magnetic because they were made to stand the steel if you stacked one on top of another it was impossible to pull them apart it was as if they were magnetized almost as if the two blocks had become one block knit tends out that that was nearly literally true because they was so impeccably flat when when you put one on top of another that were no sort of aspera is on the surface which would cause add leak in impose weakness that would allow you to pull them apart the only way you could get bob is by sliding them one off the other but i was very impressed that something could be made so flat that the two pieces of metal put one on top of the other could effectively bond together molecule to molecule and that has remained with me ever since as an indication of what real precision is truly all about i'd like to look at some examples in the book i think one story a lot of us are familiar with the hubble space telescope and how it didn't work like it was supposed to you when it was first launched so talk about what was the precision engineering problem there how precise it'd have to be why did it get screwed up and then how did they fix.

two hundred fifty years
"two hundred fifty years" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

03:22 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred fifty years" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"The perfectionist how precision engineers created the modern world by simon winchester i'm joined by simon winchester and i want to say i loved this book but when i got it i thought it was going to be one of many books that have come out about kind of titans of industry who have developed new things founded great companies but the premise of the book is actually a lot different than that the title is the perfectionist help precision engineers created the modern world and precision really is the focus of the book so could you talk about that specifically why precision in what kind of grabbed you about it the premise was basically to look at the history of this somewhat invisible notion that gem is bit like nettie languages we speak or the we breathe we didn't think about it too much much but his being an essential for two hundred fifty years now since the fest precise device was invented in seventeen seventy six but it's rather more than that i hope i i wanted to question the premise to to question whether precision in the pursuit of precision in the west shape and the reference in the bustle fetish station precision might be an altogether a good thing whether we're losing sight of of craftsmanship in the joy of the imprecise you just talk a lot about important engineers but the book also has a personal story throughout it can you talk about your father in his influence on your interest yes when my father was indeed a position engineer something i must confess during until maybe a decade ago i didn't think too much of he made tiny electric motors mainly for the royal navy for the guidance systems of to appear does once i remember in this remained in my mind since fascinated when he brought home a set of them what ical gauge blocks so joe joe henson blocks and their metal standard steel box of about one hundred of them in decreasing sizes and the thing about them is that the very very precisely made and they can be stacked together in various combinations what he wanted to show me was that even that these blocks were not magnetic because they were made to stand the steel if you stacked one on top of another it was impossible to pull them apart it was as if they were magnetized almost as if the two blocks had become one block knit tends out that that was nearly literally true because they was so impeccably flat when when you put one on top of another that were no sort of aspera is on the surface which would cause add leak in impose weakness that would allow you to pull them apart the only way you could get bob is by sliding them one off the other but i was very impressed that something could be made so flat that the two pieces of metal put one on top of the other could effectively bond together molecule to molecule and that has remained with me ever since as an indication of what real precision is truly all about i'd like to look at some examples in the book i think one story a lot of us are familiar with the hubble space telescope and how it didn't work like it was supposed to you when it was first launched so talk about what was the precision engineering problem there how precise it'd have to be why did it get screwed up and then how did they fix.

two hundred fifty years
Colin Kaepernick, NFL quarterback, honored by Amnesty International for inequality protests

All News, Traffic and Weather

02:22 min | 3 years ago

Colin Kaepernick, NFL quarterback, honored by Amnesty International for inequality protests

"News time coming up on five thirty nine an nfl star whose career was sidelined for the way he advocated for better race relations in america is being honored by a leading human rights organization amnesty international giving former nfl quarterback colin kaepernick it's embassador of conscience award for his take any protests of racial injustice that launched a sports movement and might have cost him his job in acceptance speech at amsterdam kapernick calling police killings of blacks and latinos in the united states lawful lynchings adding radicalized depression and dehumanisation is woven into the very fabric of our nation previous recipients of the award include south africa's nelson mandela and young women's education advocate malala yousafzai dave packer abc news program donald trump celebrates nearly two hundred fifty years of us french relations by hosting president emmanuel macron at white house state dinner tuesday the festivities begin monday when the president and the first lady and macron and his wife dine at mount vernon george washington's home along potomac river in virginia tuesday morning the president will formally welcome at role during an elaborate ceremony on the white house south lawn mr trump is the first president in nearly one hundred years to end his first year in office without receiving a foreign leader on a state visit an actress on the tv show smallville about a young superman pleads not guilty to sex trafficking charges wcbs correspondent mike smells reports that allison mack is accused of recruiting women into a self help group and were then forced to have sex with its leader keith ranieri remarry allegedly with the help of mac would handpick women to be a part of a special group that would get direct teachings from rene the admission for getting in was to handover sensitive information about themselves including nude photographs and the rights to their assets prosecutors say those women then ended up as rainier personal sex slaves branded with his initials on their hip mac would allegedly received some type of financial benefit for recruiting the women mack entered her plea in brooklyn federal court a hearing is scheduled for monday wbz news time is five forty one that means it's time for sports with charlie bursar on from the get dot com sports studio good afternoon bill bruins.

MAC Brooklyn Rainier Mike Smells George Washington Mount Vernon White House America NFL Charlie Bursar Rene Colin Kaepernick Keith Ranieri Allison Mack Virginia Potomac River President Trump Emmanuel Macron
"two hundred fifty years" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred fifty years" Discussed on AP News

"First time in two hundred fifty years mount i o spewed smoke into ash high into the sky thursday a no go zone had been set up around the volcanoes crater but japan's meteorological agency expanded the zone to the entire mountain on friday people who live in nearby towns have been warned of possible falling volcanic rocks and ask the volcanoes in japan southern main island of kyushu another volcano nearby also erupted violently in march for the first time in seven years japan says on the pacific ring of fire and has one hundred ten active volcanoes police closing in on italy's most wanted mafia fugitive mateo messina denaro on thursday they arrested twenty one suspected associates in western sicily including family members to whom he'd given leadership roles in the clan messina denaro has been on the run since nineteen ninetythree and is wanted for his role in the bombing assassination of magistrates in the nineteen nineties along with other mafia hits and crimes he's considered a prime successor for the boss of bosses salvatore toto riina who died in november shortly after his death some two hundred agents last december searched the homes of iran twenty alleged math ian trapani province in a bid to ramp up pressure on messina denaro investigators say the trapani mafia was and still is active in extortion and controlling public contracts and often resorted destroying the property of anyone who tried to stand up to it ancient coins and bracelets from the first century that will looted from romania have returned home the treasure trove of gold and silver artifacts stolen between two thousand and two thousand one was presented with romania's national history museum the items were found in austria in twenty fifteen and return following a crossborder investigation the collection includes four hundred and seventy three coins and eighteen bracelets they were taken from archaeological sites in the oddest stare mountains that have been inhabited by dacians who fought against the romans in the early second century the museum said the artifacts may have been an offering that a dacian family made to the gods which was valued.

messina denaro extortion romania austria japan italy mateo messina sicily iran trapani two hundred fifty years seven years
Under the Sun - Motherboard

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:56 sec | 3 years ago

Under the Sun - Motherboard

"Are your world headlines from abc news former un chemical weapons inspector jerry smith says the public needs to be reassured is a perception there as much as the reality of of decontamination and that needs to be money work is underway cleaning up nine locations across the city in an operation that could take months to complete north and south korea have installed a telephone hotline between their leaders as they prepare for a rare summit next week aimed at resolving the nuclear standoff with pyongyang's the polls only international airport has reopened after a passenger plane attempting to take off skidded off the runway forcing a whole to all flights and the volcano in southern japan is erupted for the first time in two hundred fifty years and the thirties have set up a no go zone around the mountain i'm tom rivers at the abc news foreign desk in london komo news time coming up on nine fifty four and other check of your komo.

Jerry Smith South Korea Pyongyang Japan Tom Rivers ABC Abc News Komo Two Hundred Fifty Years
"two hundred fifty years" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred fifty years" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"The ideological basis for this country's founding and it's ideological underpinnings for the last two hundred fifty plus years wait no we haven't hit two hundred fifty years yet have we seventeen seventy six zip no no the past two hundred and thirty plus year forty plus years are we at two forty two yeah we are at two forty two man that's going to be a fun one twenty twenty six that is going to be a fun fun time start renting the halls out dan for your party you don't want someone to fourth of july twenty twenty six that is going to be a barn burner how fitting that on national pie day i reveal that i am terrible at math but the point is the ideological underpinnings of american politics and really american life and i defy you to tell me differently i challenge any liberal to tell me that modern day democrats socialism which masquerades as progressivism is more in line with the philosophy of this country the philosophy of the western world over the last two hundred years it's not free market capitalism judeo christian morality and just the the mention of that ticks off the left so they understand that they can't run these far left bernie sanders accolades but does their base realized that will the base instead in primaries elect the kooks we shall see coming up next stephen hawking passed away at seventy six i have a family connection to the illness that hocking had and over the weekend i delivered a speech in which i talked about that i'd like to share that with you next before warren though it is kind of emotional so if you're not if you're not prepared to laugh cry and think maybe tune out but if you are and if you wanna know just what you can do about a truly horrific disease stick around dan donald show is coming right back from sliding framed some i frame louis or freelance class shower doors too heavy all glass custom enclosures that can be built to fit.

bernie sanders stephen hawking hocking warren dan donald two hundred fifty years two hundred years
"two hundred fifty years" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred fifty years" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

"Caitian of smallpox began with a simple clinical observation two hundred fifty years ago in seventeen sixty eight and almost forgotten country doctor made an observation while inoculating a group of farmers against smallpox john few stir and two colleagues discovered that some patients had no response to smallpox inoculation one farmer said i have had the cowpox lately to a violent agree if that's any odds it turned out that the other patients with no response to smallpox inoculation had all had cowpox as well few stir described his observation to his medical society among the members were the ludlow brothers in seventeen sixty jenner was there apprentice he probably heard from them about the phenomenon that would ensure his fame our images in clinical medicine features a seventy six year old woman with a history of dementia and coronary heart disease who is brought to the emergency department after she had been found lying outdoors for an undetermined period her core body temperature was seventy eight point eight degrees fahrenheit at presentation and electrocardiogram showed prominent osborne waves also known as j waves along with prolonged q r s duration and corrected qt interval laboratorytesting revealed a serum potassium level of five point seven million per leader accre creating kindness level of one thousand two hundred thirty units per litre and a serum p h of seven point one nine the serum calcium level was normal hypothermia induces an increase in the activity of the cardiac transient outward potassium current which is more prominent in the epic cardi him than in the endo cardio him this heterogenius distribution of potassium current results in jay waves that are typically observed in the inferior and lateral pre coordial leads as seen in this patient the magnitude of the j waves may generally be associated with the degree of hypothermia in addition to hypothermia jay waves have been associated with conditions that can occur enormous thermie a such as hyper calcium cmea the brew goddess syndrome and neurologic injury after the patient was reward for twelve hours the j waves disappeared and the qte interval and q r s duration normalized.

"two hundred fifty years" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

WDTK The Patriot

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred fifty years" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

"Fm one on one point five am 1410 patriot i am really a much shocked but i'm surprised at the number of people and i have a record number of texts here tonight so far and so let me just going to be a record night with text but the number of people who really want this investigation to go forward and out everybody who's guilty it's the what people watt at least the people who are listening right now the program one guy wants a giant glass tunnel a federal prison giant glass tunnel filled with these miserable antiamerican criminals everyone should be required to visit and tour the facility and see what awaits them if they try to pull this again i go look at it been over two hundred fifty years name you know we've we've had that much time to build up the corruption people who had a chance to get lazy people have had a chance to get confident overconfident and so they're they're they said and we have the choice we go after him and and believe me heads are going to the people you like people you know by curiously through your news reports and so forth people are going to go to jail if they do this because they're felony offenses their jailable offense has some very famous people will go down for this and it will cause let's code havoc your me intelligence circles within our government for awhile but does it need to be done or do we forget about it and move on and there are people who do feel that way although not many of them are listening program tonight eight hundred ninety three 93 85 it's eight hundred nine.

two hundred fifty years
"two hundred fifty years" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

WDTK The Patriot

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred fifty years" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

"Have found one or one point five am 1410 patriot i am really i'm not shocked but i'm surprised at the number of people and and i have a record number of texts here tonight so far and so let me just going to be a record night with text but the number of people who really want this investigation to go forward and out everybody who's guilty it's the what people watt at least the people who are listening right now the program one guy wants a giant glass tunnel a federal prison giant glass tunnel filled with these miserable antiamerican criminals everyone should be required to visit and tour the facility and see what awaits them if they try to pull this again i go look at it been over two hundred fifty years and then you know we've had that much time to build up the corruption people have had a chance to get lazy people have had a chance to get confident overconfident and so they're they're they said and we have the choice we go after him and and believe me heads are going to the people you like people you know up by curiously through deal news reports and so forth people are going to go to jail if they do this because they're felony offenses are jailable offense has some very famous people will go down for this and it will cause let's call the havoc on the intelligence circles within our government for awhile but does it need to be done or do we forget about it and move on and there are people who do feel that way although not many of them are listening program tonight eight hundred ninety three 93 85 it's eight hundred nine ninety three.

two hundred fifty years
"two hundred fifty years" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

02:10 min | 4 years ago

"two hundred fifty years" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Bill that key that we make it for two hundred fifty year than i know of no other industry wisconsin that have to put money aside for financial for two hundred fifty year on a mining company but hey we'll go it we understand people have longterm concerns and so it will go in our current bill but the who provision irrevokable truck the mining moratorium that have been a killer for mining in we've got all right so you're getting rid of the moratorium this is metal mining or is this also involve ironmining is this i mean what what what what specifically what types of mining is it so people call the hard rock mining are nonferrous mining gold copper silver thank and we have it in a bonding in northern gone for those people million with the northern with count you travel on highway eight in the far north vicky from ladysmith in michigan on what people call strata eight right along that built that where there billions of dollars of nonparent mineral that are available better economically viable combine it referred to by geologist at the green don't bill and a shaker you obama uh around the world and we have one of them in northern wisconsin and we have a great opportunity to bring a billion dollar industry to the state of wisconsin some iron mining can have to be something separate this is this is a different these are the different types of medals we're talking about here the the concern of course is that this will wreak environmental devastation across the northern part of the state and the whole purpose of the mining moratorium was because you know there was a mine and ladysmith that violated the clean water act and and and this is just a way to protect the pristine resources of northern wisconsin so let's chat about that because that is essentially what they're saying if we mind for comper if we mine for gold then we are going to wreak havoc on these pristine water ways and and and just completely destroy these these beautiful parts of our state who who are we did picky we had our public hearing for the senate in early september up and lady last successfully operated mine flammable mine on the bank for the flammable river on both of lady and that is crew that we.

wisconsin ladysmith michigan geologist clean water act senate obama two hundred fifty year billion dollar
"two hundred fifty years" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

02:44 min | 4 years ago

"two hundred fifty years" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"The great gentleman on this day an eight in seventeen sixty seven two hundred fifty years ago wow ribbons nixon but i swear unique me man who is below us both uganda jody jordi meeting from northumberland you the g how can the julianne hough loris charles mason jeremiah dixon now see about eighteen seventeen sixty three to seventeen sixty seven trudging through delaware merrill of in pennsylvania luke maye there's a lot going on breaking news but sometimes you gotta remark upon why this country sir great businesses this is one of those things mark knopfler james taylor singing failing to philadelphia fifty years ago the only sad part as they left the pittsburgh in pennsylvania would have drawn a circle around pittsburgh and may be given that the the uruguay welcome america good morning there's a deal in the united states senate on what to do about the collapsing obamacare regime and yesterday in the rose garden president trump said he sort of back to that was on msnbc yesterday afternoon after doing the morning broadcast at the white house and water broadcast i add on vice president pence sarah huckabee the chairman of the council of economic advisers mike gallagher had on the president himself i packed up and left at night o5 the president wanted in at nine fifteen of course nobody told me the probe there was coming over they try not to tell you that but i left gallagher got him now let's begin the show by listening of mike gallagher my colleague talking to the president you heard me mike my vice president pence audio is posted it you you at dot com i can't do that with gallagher's audio but i can play it for you here's mike gallagher of the president for the white house on the salem radio network yesterday and we've got the president of the united states joining us here in the indian treaty room looking no worse for the wear you wouldn't believe that he is the most eyes man in the history of the country in the.

julianne hough salem pence sarah huckabee vice president msnbc obamacare senate uruguay philadelphia james taylor mark knopfler delaware jeremiah dixon northumberland jody jordi uganda mike gallagher president chairman white house trump united states america pennsylvania pittsburgh luke maye seventeen sixty seven two hund fifty years
"two hundred fifty years" Discussed on Dan Carlin's Hardcore History Addendum

Dan Carlin's Hardcore History Addendum

01:38 min | 4 years ago

"two hundred fifty years" Discussed on Dan Carlin's Hardcore History Addendum

"Few said alexander the great armies gonna take on julius caesar romans which were about two hundred fifty years later um you don't automatically say alexander's doomed you bet your money on caesar in the roma's but if you said alexander had a 25 percent chance of winning i don't think that's wrong but that's two hundred and fifty years difference in time by about what would you say the mid nineteenthcentury somewhere that all changes when the pace of change speeds up and all of a sudden if you're a great power you find your battlefield technology thirty thirty five years out of date you're in big trouble and by the 20th century you can see this pace of change acceleration going so fast that the innovations that occur inside of a war can win or lose you the war i think you most clearly see this for the first time in the air war in the first world war were if you get a leap in terms of technological innovation for airplanes ahead of the other side and you get your planes in the air it could be six months of owning the sky before the other side catches up in in certain circumstances that could cost you the war so this technological races getting so fast we end up certainly by the early 20th century with a dynamic that we see all the time not in that were very comfortable with the idea of innovations it happening all the time during the war in the second world war all you second world war buffs i mean how often do you think of which particular variant of this particular plane is this an emmy 109 e or g because it makes a huge difference right why 'cause the pace of change will literally we.

alexander caesar world war julius caesar thirty thirty five years two hundred fifty years fifty years 25 percent six months
"two hundred fifty years" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

The Michael Knowles Show

01:51 min | 4 years ago

"two hundred fifty years" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

"Or that you know we took down nazi statues after world war two when the the allen nineteen forty six the allies ordered the destruction of nazi monuments in nazi statues i think this is a stretch i think it's a stretch to compare world war two and the way that we treated our enemies with the way that we as a nation decided to heal from our civil war to deal with our original sin of slavery an issue that we've been trying to grapple with since the constitutional convention since the declaration of independence you know president lincoln summed up how we were going to treat the southeast said with malice toward none with charity for all we reunited as a country we've treated no soldiers as veterans we treated those rebels as our fellow countrymen another little point to notice as the nazi regime lasted for twelve years the south is a political and cultural entity lasted but by the time of the civil war it it already lasted for two hundred fifty years and at its last one hundred and fifty years since then as well now if both people on the left and a rider getting this issue wrong the mayor of richmond who's had plenty of calls to remove monuments remind him an avenue there the mayor of richmond lavarra stony sums it up pretty well we are of here using these but a whole i was the built only let not your heart our history it ruled off at stake they hate that bilden wages because those are or will because that bush remarks amazon's hearts minds in the way to change parts is that off.

world war civil war president lincoln richmond amazon allen bush two hundred fifty years twelve years fifty years
"two hundred fifty years" Discussed on How to Start a Startup

How to Start a Startup

01:33 min | 6 years ago

"two hundred fifty years" Discussed on How to Start a Startup

"And so i think there are in my mind there are probably are only two broad categories in the entire history the last two hundred fifty years where people had actually come up with new things and made money doing so one is these sort of vertically integrated complex monopolies which people did build in the second industrial revolution at the end of the 19th and started the 20th century and so this is like four it was the vertically integrated oil companies like standard oil on and what these a vertically integrated monopolies a typically required was this very complex coordination you got a lot of pieces to fit together in just the right way when you assembled it you had a a tremendous advantage this is actually done surprisingly little today and so i think this is sort of a business form that on when people can pull it off is very valuable it's typically fairly capital intensive we live sort of an an a culture where it's very hard to get people to buy into anything that's a super complicated and takes very long to build a but i know it when i sort of thing about my colleague ilan must from pay powell success with tesla and spacex i think the key to these companies was the complex vertically integrated monopoly structure they had so if you should look at tests lower spacex us was there sort of a single breakthrough and they certainly innovated on a lob dimensions i don't think there was a single 10x breakthrough and battery storage or you know.

oil companies standard oil ilan tesla powell two hundred fifty years