11 Burst results for "Two Hundred Fifty Thousand Tons"

"two hundred fifty thousand tons" Discussed on Designing Next: Achieving growth through transformation and innovation

Designing Next: Achieving growth through transformation and innovation

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"two hundred fifty thousand tons" Discussed on Designing Next: Achieving growth through transformation and innovation

"You know we're talking about doing this. Of course like a forty minute meeting. So i figured it was onto something that was one of those things a felt i needed to share and now the books been downloaded. I also give away was on amazon. If you've got forty nine ninety five or the company's paying but i made it sharable as a pediatrics. One hundred ninety six pages so it's not exactly a new epoch and there's a lot in there but it's been downloaded that a quarter million times two hundred fifty thousand tonnes. It's really cool. That's an awesome that you have available and and we'll we'll share that link in the show notes to make sure that the wanted to get a look at it read it and Learn more about the matrix. Because i think i love the idea of you know how it really promotes. Collaboration promotes that holistic view of those. We serve our customers our audience. Whatever it might be and then and making sure that everybody's thinking about it the same way working together because at the end of the day. That's that's worth. The challenge is often lie that the siloed way which many organisations were a joke high. Not just to to connect on the huge huge joe pine stand my appreciation for his work actually goes back to before the customer economy it written mass customisation and mass customization was it. There's a hammer book part of that. But there was this whole movement about what's going to happen as technology becomes more capable than i'm unable to personalize and customize each product. I have which now it's morphed into each experience. And then i think the product and the the experience are all also in morphine as well and joe actually did a the early read on the on customer worthy. When i was putting together i was also very influenced by by the customer economy and then infinite possibilities. I referenced just about at least every day. The hall metaphors concept. I won't give people a headache about that. Great we love it when we can connect our guests across episodes in that. That's really cool. Love joe and From those who haven't listened. That's in a previous episode episode ten great interview with joe pine about the experience economy to michael blitz. Customer worthy and the matrix has has been around for a few years. But it's it's timeless. It's been it value in. Simplicity and focus has been shown. But we're in this space right. We're recording this. Mid december twenty twenty. Where at the end of a tumultuous year and as we speak the first vaccines for covid nineteen have been in a few people have gotten the pokes in that's gonna move us into a different world. We don't know exactly what that is in twenty twenty one but it's it's Hopefully we get some points of consistency. But how do you advise. Customer experience in marketing leaders As we transition from this pandemic era of uncertainty to the post pandemic era. But what would you recommend people really look at yet it's Yeah i mean this. Obviously this all unprecedented right. it's and the change. That took place took place so immediately when ovid started and People really without those told. Oh you can't go office tomorrow. And frankly was a science fiction movie that nobody would believe whatever release could happen. You can't go into your office but you still have to work on by the way if you have school age children..

joe pine michael blitz amazon joe headache
"two hundred fifty thousand tons" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred fifty thousand tons" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Tiny amount that's fine amount but then I was the first step for man but that's a that's a truck that trying to tent that first step into a giant leap that by a fuel supply at B. P. the aviation all of the oil company that commercial development manager is Tom Parsons today there are only ready to commercial produces and that both using waist and rested you oils to make the S. instead of an aviation fuel costs in order to reach that target than a fifty percent reduction in aviation emissions by twenty fifty how many refineries do you think would need to be built taking a very broad assumption for how much capacity that might be Pat Papa say two hundred fifty thousand tons that would mean potentially eight hundred new production facilities required in that time frame and that could be in the range of at least five hundred billion dollars of capital investment which is significant but in the context of what the the overall energy industry invests achievable to take their enough people working in this space to build a hundred blogs today no but over time as the right policies are in place to incentivize those investments than I think absolutely the best there is the potential for us to get at the expense of bi fuel presents a conundrum Adelines refuting in Norway the ones who have to pay for it the solution that Scandinavian Airlines has come up with is to us the customers to chip in my name is slow from the city etcetera have over a sustainability and SAS with I'm hopeful for the possibility to have a big number of customers that wants to buy this product so what you've done is rather than raise the cost of tickets across the board you put a little auction next to choose your seats when your customers checkin giving passengers the option in the hope that a significant number of them will choose to pay the extra that will probably calls it means that you're not having to raise your ticket prices when you pass this on exactly in my position I would love to have it the integrated into the price but I do realize that if we are ten twenty thirty percent more expensive than our competitors that'll be a problem for a possibility but I would also hope that our competitors would have the same ambitions as we have in order to reduce emissions you say you hope they will but you think they will I hope that with and.

Flooding and Climate Change

The Sustainable Futures Report

02:47 min | 3 years ago

Flooding and Climate Change

"Large parts of the the United Kingdom recently headquartered a lot of rain when I look out my window to the river who's is that the riverside path is under about a meter of water and the river is about four times as normal width by the color of the water. It looks as though even more topsoil is being flushed out into the no see more heavy rain is forecast all cost for this weekend as Hurricane Lorenzo weakens and makes its way across the Atlantic generally whether in the UK is an inconvenience lenience elsewhere can be far more serious. We have to be very careful not to say that these weather extremes prove the climate change is happening. We we can certainly say that. If climate change predictions are correct these adjusted sort of weather events which we would expect experts have warned that a a section of the poem. Paseo glossier on my block is at risk of collapsing according to the Safe Mountain Foundation two hundred in fifty thousand cubic meters of ice must be about two hundred fifty thousand tonnes could break from the rest of the glassy. If this volume of ice fell down it would reach the valley floor in eighty seconds Stefan Barrichello a public work council of the AILSA Valley Aljazeera these phenomena once again show that the mountain goes through phase of strong changes due to climate factors Stefanina MS rookie the man of the nearby city of Coal Maya said in a statement that'll it is particularly vulnerable in India. One hundred people have died in Freddie in the states of Bihar an Qadesh with vast areas be inundated by delayed monsoon rains in talk for dish ninety. Three people have died due to the incessant. Rains is which caused hubs to collapse and led to an increase in snake bites dozens of people have also died in behind where boy boats have been deployed to rescue skew strategy residents experts blame a lack of planning and poor drainage systems which have been unable to cope with sudden an incessant rains range of the recent days Onnell Sean of the India Meteorological Department said Bihar and experienced a deficit of monsoon rains until into last week. When heavy rains returned levels to normal a major cause of the flooding was the lack of natural drainage affected areas? He explained not actual drainage has been destroyed. Not Repulsive being destroyed people have built the houses on the flood plains these other problems because once you destroy the natural drainage water doesn't to find a place to go out it leads the flooding he had warnings continue

Rains Bihar Hurricane Lorenzo Ailsa Valley Aljazeera Atlantic United Kingdom Paseo Glossier Stefan Barrichello Safe Mountain Foundation India Meteorological Departmen UK India Freddie Coal Maya Onnell Sean Two Hundred Fifty Thousand Ton Eighty Seconds
"two hundred fifty thousand tons" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:05 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred fifty thousand tons" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The United States is to send a thousand more troops to Poland. and Donald Trump said the extra soldiers will likely be moved from other bases in Europe Washington currently has four and a half thousand soldiers in Poland on a rotational basis. trump says the enhanced military presence there is not to count to Russia. Moscow's annexation of Crimea in twenty fourteen and alleged involvement in the war in eastern Ukraine this call is just as in Poland which is a member of NATO. the US has about thirty five thousand troops stationed in Germany and there's been speculation that some of those could be moved to Poland. right wing extremist groups in Europe and trying to recruit military and police members that's according to a confidential report by the east police agency which has been cited by German media. the Europos document says these groups are attempting to winnow the members of the military and security services in order to learn the expertise in combat readiness and surveillance and the report warns that extremist groups are increasingly popular among younger and better educated people you're a poll has urged more international cooperation to tackle the problem. experts have warned that a massive glacier in the Mormon brawl mountain region is melting at hand xcelerated rate the section of the glaze you're concerned lies in Italy and weighs around two hundred fifty thousand tons the authorities say this he's intense summer heat of course the glacier to meld as an average of thirty five centimeters a date. access in road traffic to the region as being restricted but local officials say the melting process doesn't pose a threat to the nearby town of cool made. the part of the place you could break away and crash into the valley below. and finally an elderly lady in France got a bit of a shock when she decided to get a painting valued three years it had been hanging over her stove and she was under the impression it was simply an old icon it isn't the paintings been identified as a thirteenth century masterpiece but the Florentine page her shima boo eight and it's estimated to be worth as much as six million euros on six both believe it's a panel from a work dating back to twelve eighty the painting will be auctioned in France later next month hello see me with the European use random. I'm Keith Walker in Bonn you're listening to inside Europe Boris Johnson during the week accused lawmakers of trying to stop the country from leaving the European Union saying parliament have become quite realized the British prime minister appeared in the house of Commons for the first time since the Supreme Court rules he had acted unlawfully in advising the queen to suspend parliament following somewhat turbulent events force in London as journalist and political commentator part to Christie's hello Patrick hello okay busy week in parliament yes really really busy and after the the highest court in the land all see preen cold decided that it was in little full for Boris Johnson too or try to Perot parliament full what would have been an additional four days longer than normal and peace uses opportunity to shout to each other and to parades each other it's behave front wheel all the time a little bit logs they wanted was out today it was a bit of a state I think all round from the Tories labor on the let downs ready I was a bit of a stain on on British democracy and Sam as a clip here from from from Barry Sherman isolate Bram pay and this this really just sum it up..

Europe Poland. Boris Johnson Donald Trump United States France Keith Walker Europos Crimea Washington Moscow Russia European Union Bonn Ukraine prime minister Germany Supreme Court London
Massive Mont Blanc Glacier in Danger of Collapsing Soon, Experts Warn

Inside Europe

00:37 sec | 3 years ago

Massive Mont Blanc Glacier in Danger of Collapsing Soon, Experts Warn

"Experts have warned that a massive glacier in the Mormon brawl mountain region is melting at hand xcelerated rate the section of the glaze you're concerned lies in Italy and weighs around two hundred fifty thousand tons the authorities say this he's intense summer heat of course the glacier to meld as an average of thirty five centimeters a date. access in road traffic to the region as being restricted but local officials say the melting process doesn't pose a threat to the nearby town of cool made. the part of the place you could break away and crash into the valley below.

Italy Two Hundred Fifty Thousand Ton Thirty Five Centimeters
"two hundred fifty thousand tons" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

How'd It Happen Podcast

13:43 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred fifty thousand tons" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

"Podcast, which was awesome. I screwed up. And ran out of space on my SD card. And then I tried to. Well, we made a valiant effort at trying to capture the rest of the recording on my iphone, but sadly it was not good enough. You can start a new episode called it happens. It. So our this is our first is our first take two Andrew's been so kind as to as to make another hour of his time available to me. So thank you for that rose. Not my basement, this time moved out of that house. And we have an office now that I'm trying out as, as a podcast duty on planning to have two podcasts videos, one here and then wanted my new house, which is on the. Lake country. Nice on the west side. So I can make a convenient more convenient for people to come, but anyway enough about me. Andrew, welcome. It's good to be here. Coming again always happy to be with you. So engineer good friends, we've we've known each other for about sixteen years through I joined the tech group that Andrew was in back in two thousand and six. Tech is short for the executive committee and its group of, of presidency. Owes business owners that get together and they help each other learn from each other's experience and also get exposed to really great ideas and resources from people that come from all over the country in the world. It's part of this digit now for the last couple of years. But, but Andrew, and I know each other quite well as a result of having been together all that time. But I've never besides take one had the chance without alcohol to sit down. Oh I thought we were gonna have alcohol. Oh, well, we could we could see where that goes. You've already seen how I have trouble controlling gear when I'm sober. But anyway, Andrew, I ask everybody the same thing when they come on the show. And that's how did happen for you. That's a great question Michael and happy to be here with you how to happen assumes. It's done. And I'm still on the journey nice, but happy to talk about. That's what happens when you have a chance to think through it again after. I. Yeah. I hope most of it's the same. Yeah. Yeah. But yeah, it's journey. But you know how did we get to where we are right now is, it's a fun thing to reflect on? I'll try not to say, as I mentioned last time. Oh, thank you. So for anyone who didn't hear the beginning never been before brand new. Yeah. So I grew up in Gardner Massachusetts or as they say, gotta it's an hour west of Boston come from a blue collar family, five boys in the family. And when, when you graduate from high school in that in that town, there were some, you know, kids friends of mine that went to college and really did quite well, but a lot of us the options were going to military or work in the gun factory. And in fact, I had two brothers who served was a marine, always a marine, and the other one was in the coastguard and the rest of us all worked in the gun, factory, actually, so at one point, it was my, my dad and, and my oldest brother, Mark rather rock. My brother Matt myself. It was really kinda cool to do that. But I had a guidance counselor in high school who knew me pretty well. He was my soccer coach and, and he gave me some advice in turn out to be some of the best advice, I ever had in my life. He knew that I was good with my hands. He knew my family pretty well. He knew we always worked on our own cars. And, you know, a lot of things like that. But he said, new program had opened up Springfield technical community college. It was a two year degree in heat power and air conditioning with an emphasis on alternative energy solar energy, and earth, sheltered homes and and win. Dennard. What year was that nineteen eighty? Wow. Okay. Yeah. So we're talking about that. I kind of getting started. Although. Okay. Yeah. At that time, it was a little different than it is. Now, the, the teacher of one of the program said had goats on his roof. He was a real. Environmentalists that at his deepest roots. And so he was kind of living in an earth sheltered place. And he was on the leading edge of things, but he had a goat mowing his. Also grass on his building the side of a hill or something or. But at any rate, this guy concert mentioned this new program, and he said, it's kinda combination of working with your hands, and then learning some things in school. And so my dad and I got in the car and drove out there and we look looked at the program. We went out in the shop. And we saw these guys working with, you know, volt ohm meters and instruments to measure oxygen and flew gas and added note, any of that was at the time, but it just seemed fascinating to be. And I remember my father saying to me, I wish they had a program like this. When I was kid, I would love to have done something like this. So I ended up enrolling and, and the annual tuition was five hundred dollars a year. I worked in a gun factory save. That money and I was the first in our family to get a college degree, and that, that two year degree really is the reason why ended up here in Milwaukee, when, when I got through the whole program, I, I wouldn't primarily for alternate energy solar energy, and all these other things, and, and I had to take based courses in. Heat power and air conditioning. So I ended up with a first class, Firemen's license, so I can operate high pressure boilers doesn't come and all that handy any more, but at the time, it seemed like a good idea. And I also got a oil burner technician license from the state of Massachusetts. And that unique program, turn out to be something that was very relevant for a company located here in Milwaukee cleaver Brooks, so clear Brooks, targeted the school and actually went out there and set up interviews and nobody had really signed up. And so our teacher said to me and a few other folks, he said, once you guys sign up and I said, I don't wanna go to Milwaukee, it's cold and dark dirty there and as opposed to gun factory. Exactly right. At the gun factory. I did learn that. I didn't wanna do that. I wanna ask you for a second. What kind of work were you doing in the gun factory, and was it a soup to nuts factory where, where there was a foundry on the on the on the one end machining and whatever on the other we, we, we were? Very vertically integrated, but we did not poor hot metal. Okay. But we did take round sock and bore the holes in it for the shotguns in the twenty twos. And then for all the handguns they're all the machining operations. So in my first summer, there, I, I was in maintenance, and with that meant as I suck the cutting oil out of the bottom of the trays probably stuff that you really, but it was the worst job I ever had that sounds like a. That's a whole nother session, right? But yeah, I mean when, when you when you cut into handgun frames, and, and there would be I forget two hundred and fifty handgun frames on a on a frame, rack all of the drippings, from the cutting solvent or oil would drip, into the bottom of the tray and then you had suck it out. But there were other things in that cutting fluid as you might imagine, that's where people decided to spit, or through other cigars, or do other things just to get guys like us but I that's the vow. And then I helped out maintenance. In fact, I, I helped the plumber, he was a licensed plumber, and they, they let me carry tools around. So I was plumber's assistant for a little while. I learned a lot, and then and then the second year I got to do piece work, and then I worked night shift so I worked for two four. We were working twelve hour shifts at that time were making a lot of guts, okay? And with piece work, I could do pretty well. I could make you know, maybe five dollars and seventy five cents an hour back then that was a lot of money and, and then working that shift. I didn't spend any money. So I was able to save about money to pay for my. My room and board your room aboard. I at I actually stayed at a YMCA when I lived in Springfield, Massachusetts. I did for the first year and then second year I get an apartment. Okay. Yeah. So thanks for the perspective there, because it's important that I think that people know that, you know, how hard you work, you know what you are willing to do. How hard you're willing to work and then the opportunity that presented as a result. Yeah. My whole family in working there. It was a it was a good company Harrington Richard citizen, when the company they started, and I think eighteen seventy one h and our guns and the year that I was there we were making the marksman rifles for the US Olympic team. So they made some nice guns, but they made a lot of guns that were I would call entry level and guns that a beginner gun like my, my first in our family, when you turn sixteen you'd go to the firearm safety, course. And if you've got an a you got a gun for your sixteenth birthday. Okay. So I have a autographed gun with my name on. Some subverts engraved into its for you. Of course. Yeah. So back to the clear bookstore, they targeted the, the school and, and the instructor suggested that, you know, a bunch of sign up and the five ultimately signed up, but I didn't wanna come here because, you know, mock it had this in my mind, this reputation being cold dark integrity, and, and the instructor sit. Well, at least you'll get some experience interviewing, and so I went on the interview and, and out of the group of five I was the only one they were gonna fly out for, for second interview here, wacky, I'll come back to the rest of that story. What happened in between eventually came out and started with the company and had a, a full seventeen year career at cleaver Brooks. And what was interesting is the HR person who made her viewed me, told me, she said, when you come into this company, she said with your background, you're gonna start a shop technician on the floor in research and development, you'll work hand in hand. With an engineer you'll do some practice elements testing that might lead to some travel. So you might be able to go to some field tests. And then after that, maybe a product it's released maybe transfer over to clear Brooks, and working their service department, that could lead topper, -tunities management, or in parts and sales, or even business management is so many pass that you could go down and cleaver Brooks was installing they were selling installing boilers and schools factories apartment buildings. Everything everything short of power generation so everything from about doing this for memory, Michael, I want to say, three million BT us up to maybe two hundred fifty thousand tonnes of statement. Our just some ratings. But the, the big boys would be the size of a two story, colonial house, and, and the small boilers, you could fit through a door jam got it. Yeah. But bigger than a house. Usually a couple of story apartment building or schools. A lot of the schools in this country had cleaver Brooke spoilers. Okay. All right. Thanks. So she had walked through the, you know, the potential career you can have that cleaver Brooks. And I set a goal for myself to, to move to Milwaukee for two years. And then I would move back out east and fascinating in my seventeen years with the company, I held nearly every job that she had walked me through. So I I, I worked in our day, we develop new products. I transferred over to cleaver Brooks. I traveled all over the world, commissioning boilers starting up, and then started going to school nights and was going to school for engineering because I thought, that's what I was really going to be an ever did get my engineering degree another mentor in my life. I you know, like the guidance counselor who really change the trajectory of my life. This, this other mentor had suggested to me. Why, why are you going to school for engineering and I said to be an engineer, and he said, you already are one said no? Not I do not have a degree. I'm not an engineer and he said, no, you, you are one said you should think about, maybe getting a degree in business at that point, I hadn't even thought about business because it's not something that, you know, we did and, and our family and you know, it's interesting reflecting on it. And, and so I decided to do that. And, and I went to school for business while I was moving up in management. So, you know, became an assistant manager and then a manager. And when I was getting my. Undergrad my bachelor's in business administration at cardinal Stritch university. I was running a twenty four million dollar business. So I'd really moved up pretty quickly at cleaver Brooks. So you were getting your degree and your NBA at the same time. No, I got my undergrad. I mean. Oh, yes. Yeah. I was I it was really phenomenal to be able to be an accelerated program. I was one of the first people in the company to do that. In fact, it was a B SPA seven so bachelor of science business administration number seven at cardinal Stritch, and what is the what does that mean number seven with seventh grade class? Yeah oh yeah. They're just watched the program, essentially, and so it was kind of new to the area to have an accelerated degree for adults who, who work. I was married at, at that time, and would which really, you know, when you think about the impact that guidance counselor had I moved to Milwaukee, I come.

Brooks Milwaukee engineer Andrew Massachusetts Springfield technician Michael Lake country cardinal Stritch university soccer NBA executive committee Boston Gardner Massachusetts
"two hundred fifty thousand tons" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

KHVH 830AM

09:59 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred fifty thousand tons" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

"My favorite story of the week has to be this human composting story. Washington has become the first in the country to legalize human composting before that, the only acceptable means of disposition of human body was burial or cremation. And now we have this natural organic reduction. The process involves wood chips takes about four weeks. And the yields about two wheel barrows worth of soil everything. It's broken down even the bones Brendan Kiley. He's a reporter for the Seattle times spoke to us about this new alternative to burial or cremation. The first point is at alkaline hydrolysis and natural organic production two separate processes alkaline hydrolysis. They've been trying to legalize that for the past few years in Washington, state, and its leader and some other states as well. But this year, it got tacked on our what got added was natural organic production or colloquially known as human compost. And so this process, I think the easiest way to think about it is like a urban crematorium accepts using the slower. Composting. Decomposition process instead of the faster flame process, we do have green cemeteries in Washington state, where people can be buried without without expensive caskets, and so on. But it's being one site where bodies we go in and human remains come out is totally new the idea and the United States specifically, how does this work. I just seen what chips straw and other material. So what do they do to naturally, decompose the body that way back a little bit a few years back, who something called livestock mortality, composting, which is something farmers? And ranchers began to experiment with researchers as well and found as a efficient and environmentally friendly means of decomposition of large animals and found that one could with the proper mix of starter elements, the right area, managing it for the right temperature. Who'd reduce fifteen hundred pounds steer into totally clean. Usable nutritionally rich soil in about a few months. They ran tests research program. At Washington state university with human remains people who were terminally ill and supported the project and wanted to donate to the research and found that using a similar process. Human bodies could become that kind of clean rich soil in about four weeks. Yeah, it is pretty quick, and that's all it requires again. The right starter elements, the right to keep the microbes happy, and it's relatively speaking, less onerous than people would think the microbes are really happy and working really efficiently. They do their work quickly and they don't produce a lot of that off gas odor that we associate with something because that was one of my questions. What about the bones? Obviously, they're, they're tough to break down. So I didn't know that even in that short of time you know, four weeks. It's pretty quick. The bones. Yeah. Different than just a green burial, where you dig a hole, and lays someone in just a cloth, shroud, or something, you know, that process of decomposition takes longer, because the conditions are different, but temperature right moisture the rate starter elements, the process moves pretty fast. Now traditional ways of disposing of the bodies cremation usually burns to full SUV tanks worth of gas. They say that emits two hundred fifty thousand tonnes of carbon into the atmosphere each year traditional barriers, the body's pumped full of embalming fluid, obviously skits, all of these measures slowly, decomposed the body, and it produces a lot of methane gas, things like that. The traditional ways, environmentally are not necessarily the best was this Bill introduced Pacific to address those issues. It was, and it was one of the founder, Katrina spades main divisions when she grew up in a farm in New Hampshire or -sition mother was a physician's assistant environmental activists. So familiarity with life deaths composting. Thing, new growth, plants and animals all part of childhood coming up. And when she was studying architecture. She's thinking about death modalities what we use to deal with human remains and wondered if something more farm, like might be good both environmentally and two people stays if people don't want to spend a lot of money on tarnished caskets lined with expensive claw, and it'd be embalming process and all that kind of thing. So this is Katrina vision, and state senators and the governor agreed simpler less expensive less complicated. More natural more environmentally friendly auction for people's remains after they pass away Katrina space. So she's the Avella per of the urban death project is she the one behind this recompose company, who's going to be building, these new burial, plots this spayed, nonprofit urban deft project. I think around twenty fourteen and began the process of talking to scientists and attorneys and. Death care experts from around the country, a lot on the west coast and board. And they moved into a four profit model. Small business model to have recompose and now that the legislation passed and the governor signed it the next step is for them to develop the rules, necessary with the department of licensing that kind of stuff and find a site and start building, you know, when people get cremated oftentimes they spread the ashes, maybe their loved ones favorite place. Loved ones are allowed to keep this soil that has made body would create about two wheelbarrows full of soil, and you can take it to a home guard in wherever you want to put it to plant a tree plan vegetables. So that's kind of cool notion to read the life out of somebody's passing as well. Absolutely a case in part of the attraction behind it. Two one older gentleman, who's a big supporter of this from eastern Washington, there's been a career nurse. All this life where he an intensive cardiac care units vision is to have a memorial tree of something that you can hang a swing on, and maybe grandkids, great grandkids down the line could swing on and have his spotty nourishment for that tree itself. It would be a living testament as opposed to, to a headstone in a cemetery. Now, the next step is, I guess, to see if other states will propose similar bills, and see how this takes off across the country. There's some interest bubbling up maybe a little bit Massachusetts. And Michigan Joshua Slocum of a funeral consumers alliance at New England, certainly knows about this following this people are quite interested in this is a simple viable alternative to what we've done Brennan, Kylie reported the Seattle times thank you very much for joining us. Thank you. The other top stories of the week are the increased tensions in Iran. President Trump warned Iran, not to threaten the US again, or it will face it's quote unquote, official end that happened. Shortly after a rocket landed near the US embassy in Baghdad around quickly responded with a hashtag saying, never threaten an Iranian, the US deployed bombers in an aircraft carrier to the area and ran has increased its uranium enrichment production. We spoke to a halt foreign affairs correspondent at politico for more on these rising tensions kind of back and forth right now between the Iranian leaders and President Trump on his Twitter feed, and it's very strange because President Trump recently has been trying to calm down. He has said things like I want you to call me. I just want to talk to them. He has said he does not want to go to war with Iran. And yet he puts out this threat out there. And maybe it's because he was sitting there thinking you know what I need to be tough again. I can't seem like I'm coming across as. But when you say something like this is going to be the official end of Iran loaded statement, and it actually offends, a lot of Iranians including ordinary and that the Trump administration says that they want to support Iran, as a civilization, it's been around for thousands of years, so saying that you're going to officially ended is the claim and I think he might have undercut himself with a lot of ordinary run ins with started all of these tensions, because we heard that there might have been some Americans that were being targeted. That's why the president sent over some bombers carriers to the area. But did all the stem from us being pulled out of the Iran, nuclear deal have really been building up for month to month the United States pulled out of the Iran, nuclear deal impose a ton of these sanctions, damaging your onto Konami and then recently United States, Trump administration announced that it was going to declare a major piece of Iran's military as terrorist group? Now, the Iranians they've kind of been still sticking with a nuclear deal, but recently, they said. They're going to take steps to reduce their commitment to the deal. They also pretty upset about the terrorist nation of one of their major military units. And so this has just been a situation where now they are apparently, making moves that the US feels are threatening. Whereas there is also the argument that the US has making moves that the Iranians feeler threatening and becoming the question of the chicken or the egg, which came first who's threat came first and which one is going to lead to what run into fficials have said that they've quadrupled their uranium enrichment production, there uranium that they would not would still be in rich into that three point six seven percent limit, that's was set under the nuclear deal, but they could go beyond their stockpile limitations pretty soon. How does this figure into the whole discussion hoping to do is given the Europeans and other parties to the deal, like Russia and China couple of months to find ways to ease the economic suffering that they are facing right now? The result of. US sanctions. So they said, look to help us get out of this economic otherwise, we're going to start walking away from the deal and enriching uranium and doing other things that put them in violation of the deal because Iran is look at it as we signed up to the steel saying, we would eliminate our nuclear program, so that you guys would lift economic sanctions that were already earlier. And with our economy would improve. It's become a very one-sided deal. And I just don't see how the Europeans are going to be able to pull together anything that hopefully in the next sixty days I just don't understand how that twenty because European governments cannot force their businesses to do business..

Iran United States Washington Seattle times president President Trump Brendan Kiley reporter official Washington state university Katrina Trump administration Massachusetts New Hampshire politico
"two hundred fifty thousand tons" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred fifty thousand tons" Discussed on KTOK

"Does this work. I just seen what chips straw and other material. So what do they do to naturally, decompose the body that way, the profits back? A little bit a few years back to sunny, cold, livestock mortality, composting, which is something farmers and ranchers began to experiment with researchers as well and found as a efficient and environmentally friendly means of decomposition of large animals, and found one could with the proper mix of starter elements, the right Asian managing it for the right temperature. Cooed reduce fifteen hundred pounds steer into totally clean. Usable nutritionally rich soil in about a few months. They ran tests research program. At Washington state university with human remains people who were terminally ill and supported the project and wanted to donate their remains to the research and found that using a similar process. Human bodies could become that kind of clean rich soil in about four weeks. Yeah, it is pretty quick, and that's bones and all it requires, again, the right starter elements, the right area to keep the microbes happy. And it's relatively speaking, less onerous than people would think the microbes are really happy, and working really officially, they do their work quickly and they don't produce a lot of that off gas odor that we associate with something because that was one of my questions. What about the bones? Obviously, they're, they're tough to break down. So I didn't know that even in that short of time you know, four weeks. It's pretty quick. The bones. A little different than just a green burial hole and lays someone in just a cloth, shroud, or something that process of decomposition takes longer, because the conditions are different, but the right temperature right. Moisture the rates starter elements the process moves pretty fast. Now traditional ways of disposing of the bodies cremation usually burns to full SUV tanks worth of gas. They say that emits two hundred fifty thousand tonnes of carbon into the atmosphere each year traditional barriers, the body is pumped full of embalming fluid, obviously skits all of these measures slowly decomposed the body, and it produces a lot of methane gas, things like that, the traditional ways, environmentally are not necessarily the best was this Bill introduced specifically to address those issues it was, and it was one of the founder, Katrina, spades main divisions when she grew up in a farm in Hampshire pirates physician physician assistant, environmental activists. So familiarity with. Life death composting.

Katrina Washington state university founder Bill Hampshire four weeks two hundred fifty thousand ton fifteen hundred pounds
"two hundred fifty thousand tons" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

11:15 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred fifty thousand tons" Discussed on 600 WREC

"And we're running down some of the top stories of the week. Don't forget to check out the daily Monday through Friday. For more news without the noise. My favorite story of the week has to be this human composting story. Washington has become the first in the country to legalize human composting before that, the only acceptable means of disposition of human body was burial or cremation. And now we have this natural organic reduction the process involves would chips it takes about four weeks. And the yields about two wheel barrows worth of soil everything. It's broken down even the bones Brendan Kiley. He's a reporter for the Seattle times spoke to us about this new alternative to burial or cremation. The first point is hydrolysis and natural Ganic production, two separate processes alkaline hydrolysis. They've been trying to legalize that past few years in Washington state, and it's legal in some other states as well. This year, it got tacked on our what got added was natural organic production or colloquially known as human compost. And so this process, I think the easiest way to think about it is like a urban crematorium accepts using the. Slower composting decomposition process instead of the faster flame process, we do have green cemeteries in Washington state, where people can be buried without without expensive caskets, and so on. But this being one site where bodies would go in and human remains come out, is totally new the idea in the United States specifically, how does this work. I just seen what chips straw and other material. So what do they do to naturally, decompose the body that way, the process back a little bit a few years back, who something called livestock mortality, composting, which is something farmers? And ranchers began to experiment with researchers as well and found as a fish and environmentally friendly means of decomposition of large animals, and found one could with the proper mix of starter elements, the right area, managing it for the right temperature. Could reduce fifteen hundred pounds steer into totally clean. Usable, nutritionally rich soil. About a few months. They ran tests are research program at Washington state university with human remains people who were terminally ill and supported the project and wanted to donate their Manso the research and found that using a similar process. Human bodies could become that kind of clean rich soil in about four weeks. Yeah, it is pretty quick, and that's bones and all it requires again. The right starter elements, the right area to keep the microbes happy, and it's relatively speaking less odorous than people would think the microbes are really happy and working really efficient. They do their work quickly and they don't produce a lot of that off gas odor that we associate with something Roddick because that was one of my questions. What about the bones? Obviously, they're, they're tough to break down. So I didn't know that even in that short of time you know, four weeks. It's pretty quick. The bone. A little different than just a green burial hole and lays someone in just a cloth, shroud, or something that process of decomposition takes longer, because the conditions are different, but temperature right moisture the rates starter elements the process moves pretty fast. Now traditional ways of disposing of the bodies cremation usually burns to full SUV tanks worth of gas. They say that emits two hundred fifty thousand tons of carbon into the atmosphere each year traditional barriers, the body is pumped full of embalming fluid. Obviously mascots all of these measures slowly decompose the body and it produces a lot of methane gas, things like that the traditional ways environmentally are not necessarily the best was this Bill introduced specifically to address those issues. It was it was one of the founder Katrina spades main divisions when she grew up in a firearm in Hampshire fathers pirates physician physician assistant environmental act. So familiarity with life death composting new growth, plants and animals. That was all part of her childhood coming up. And when she was studying architecture, she was thinking about death modalities what we use to deal with human remains and wondered if something more farm, like might be good both environmentally and two people stays if people don't want to spend a lot of money on tarnished caskets lined with expensive costs and it'd be embalming process and all that kind of thing. So this is Katrina vision, and the state senators, and the governor agreed simpler, less expensive less complicated. More natural more environmentally friendly option for people's remains after they pass away Katrina space. So she's the developer of the urban death project. Is she the one behind this recompose company, who's going to be building kind of these new burial, plots this Katrina Spade? A nonprofit urban death project, I think around twenty fourteen. And began the process of talking to scientists and attorneys and death care experts from around the country, a lot on the west coast and formed a board and they moved into a four profit model. Small business model to have recompose and now that the legislation passed and the governor signed it the next step is for them to develop the rules necessary with a department of licensing that kind of stuff and find a site and start building, you know, when people get cremated oftentimes they spread the ashes, maybe their loved ones favorite place. Loved ones are allowed to keep this soil that is made body would create about two wheelbarrows full of soil, and you can take it to a home guard in wherever you want to put it to plant a tree plan vegetables. So that's kind of a cool notion to read the life out of somebody's passing as well. That's absolutely a case part of the attraction behind it as to one older gentleman. Who's a big supporter of this from eastern Washington has been a career nurse. All this life working an intensive. Cardiac care units vision is to have a memorial tree of something that you can hang a swing on, and maybe grandkids, great grandkids down the line. Could swing on his body come nourishment for that tree itself. It would be a living testament as opposed to, to a headstone cemetery. Now, the next step is, I guess, to see if other states will propose similar bills, and see how this takes off across the country. There's some interest bubbling up maybe a little bit in Massachusetts. And Michigan Joshua Slocum of general consumers alliance at New England, certainly knows about this, and it's following this people are quite interested in this is a relatively simple viable alternative to what we've done Brennan, Kylie reported the Seattle times thank you very much for joining us. Thank you. The other top stories of the week are the increased tensions in Iran. President Trump warned Iran, not to threaten the US again, or it will face it's quote unquote, official end that happened. Shortly after a rocket landed near the US embassy in Baghdad around quickly responded with a hashtag saying, never threaten an Iranian, the US deployed bombers in an aircraft carrier to the area. And Iran is increase its uranium enrichment production. We spoke to the hall Tuesay foreign affairs. Correspondent at politico for more on these rising tensions kind of back and forth right now between the Iranian leaders and President Trump on Twitter feed, and it's very strange because President Trump recently has been trying to calm things down. He has said things like I want you to call me. I just want to talk to them. He has flat out said he does not want to go to war, and yet he puts out there, and maybe it's because he was sitting there thinking, you know what I need to be tough again. I can't. Seem like I'm coming across. This is going to be the official end of Iran. Pretty loaded statement and it actually offends a lot of Iranians, including ordinary that the Trump administration says that they want to support civilization. It's been around for thousands of years, so saying that you're going to officially end it quite the claim and I think he might have under himself with a lot of ordinary. What started all of these tensions, because we heard that there might have been some Americans that were being targeted. That's why the president sent over some bombers carriers to the area. But did all the stem from us being pulled out of the Iran, nuclear deal tensions have really been building up for months and months, the United States pulled out of the Iran, nuclear deal impose a ton of these sanctions, damaging Iran's economy, and then recently United States administration announced that it was going to declare a major piece of Iran's military as a terrorist group. Now, the Iranians, they've kind of been still sticking with the nuclear deal, but recently. They said they are going to take steps to reduce their commitment to the deal. They also pretty upset about the terrorist nation of one of their major military units. And so this has just been a situation where now they are apparently making moves that US feels are threatening. Whereas there's also the argument that the US has making moves that the Iranians feel are threatening. And so it's kind of becoming the question of the chicken or the egg, which came first who's threat came first and which one is going to lead to what running officials have said that they've quadrupled their uranium enrichment production, there uranium that they would not would still be enriched, only to that three point six seven percent. Limit was set under the nuclear deal, but they could go beyond their stockpile limitations pretty soon. How does this figure into the whole discussion what they're hoping to do is they've given the Europeans and other parties to the deal, like Russia and China couple of months to find ways to ease the economic suffering. That they are facing right now. The result of US sanctions. So they said, look, easy to help us get out of this economic otherwise, we're going to start walking away from the deal and enriching uranium and doing other things that puts them in violation of the deal because the way they run is look at it is, look, we signed to this deal, saying, we would eliminate our nuclear program, so that you guys would lift economic sanctions that were already earlier and Connie would improve. It's become a very one-sided deal. And I don't see how the Europeans are going to be able to pull together anything that helps the economy in the next sixty days, I just don't understand how that's going to happen because European cannot force their businesses to do business. What is pointing to help our economy? You're listening to the daily weekend addition, I'm Oscar Ramirez, and we'll be right back. Bucks. Weather update this the urologist, Patrick Pete, another unseasonably warm evening, across the mid south overnight lows fall into the lower seventies with lots of sunshine and forecast for your Sunday. Daytime is warming to the lower nineties with heat. Indices, et ninety five I'm checking higher heat indices extended forecast by not how warm things will feel too. Good morning, Memphis starting at six. Back to the daily dive weekend addition, if the Europeans do come to some sort of deal, some type of agreement where does the US stand on this. I've seen that they're still threatening to sanction companies that import oil from Iran,.

Iran United States Washington President Trump Seattle times president Brendan Kiley Ganic reporter official Oscar Ramirez Katrina Spade Washington state university Katrina Memphis Massachusetts Trump administration
"two hundred fifty thousand tons" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

10:01 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred fifty thousand tons" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Well, we'll we'll we'll tell you my favorite story of the week has to be this human composting story Washington has become the first day in the country to legalize human composting before that, the only acceptable means of disposition of human body was burial or cremation. And now we have this thing called natural organic reduction the process involves wood chips. It takes about four weeks. And the yields about two wheel barrows worth of soil everything. It's broken down even the bones Brendan Kiley. He's a reporter for the Seattle times spoke to us about this new alternative to burial or cremation. The first point is at alkaline hydrolysis and natural organic production two separate processes alkaline hydrolysis. They've been trying to legalize that past few years in Washington state, and its leader and some other states as well. But this year, it got tacked on our what got added was natural organic production or colloquially known as human composting. And so this process, I think the easiest way to think about it is like a urban crematorium except using the slower. Composting. Decomposition process instead of the faster flame process, we do have green cemeteries in Washington state, where people can be buried without bombing without expensive caskets, and so on. But this being one site where bodies would go in and human remains come out is totally new the idea and the United States. Yeah. Specifically, how does this work? I just seen wood, chips, straw, and other material. So what do they do to naturally, decompose the body that way, the process dates back a little bit a few years back to something called livestock mortality, composting, which is something farmers? And ranchers began to experiment with researchers as well and found as a efficient and environmentally friendly means of decomposition of large animals and found that one could with the proper mix of starter elements, the right air Asian managing it for the right temperature. Could reduce fifteen hundred pounds steer into totally clean. Usable nutritionally rich soil in about a few months. They ran tests research program. At Washington state university with human remains people who were terminally ill and supported the project and wanted to donate their remains, so the research and found that using a similar process, human bodies could become that kind of clean rich soil in about four weeks. So the process of. Yeah, it is pretty quick, and that's bones and all it requires, again, the right starter elements of the right air Asian to keep the microbes happy. And it's relatively speaking of less onerous than people would think if the microbes are really happy and working really efficiently, they do their work quickly, and they don't produce a lot of that off gas odor that we associate with something Roddick because that was one of my questions. What about the bones? Obviously, they're, they're tough to break down. So I didn't know that even in that short of time you know, four weeks. It's pretty quick. The bones. Yeah. And again, it's a little different than just a green burial where you dig a hole and lays someone in just a cloth, shroud, or something that process of decomposition takes longer, because the conditions are different, but the right temperature the right moisture the rates starter elements the process moves pretty fast. Now traditional ways of disposing of the bodies cremation usually burns to full SUV tank's worth of gas. They say that emits two hundred fifty thousand tons of carbon into the atmosphere each year traditional barriers, the body is pumped full of embalming fluid, obviously mask. It's all of these measures slowly decomposed the body, and it produces a lot of methane gas, things like that the traditional ways, environmentally are not necessarily the best was this Bill introduced specifically to address some of those issues it was, and it was one of the founder, Katrina spades main divisions when she grew up in a fire in New Hampshire or fathers pirates physician mother was a physician's assistant and mental activist. So familiarity with. Life death composting new growth, plants and animals. And that was all part of childhood coming up. And when she was studying architecture, she was thinking about death modalities what we use to deal with human remains and wondered if something more farm, like might be good both environmentally and two people stays if people don't want to spend a lot of money on tarnished caskets and lying expensive costs and it'd be embalming process and all that kind of thing. So this is Katrina vision, and the state senators, and the governor agreed was simpler, less expensive less complicated. More natural more environmentally friendly option for people's remains after they pass away Katrina, spades. So she's the developer of the urban death project is she the one behind this recompose company, who's going to be building kind of these new burial, plots for this. That's right. Katrina spayed non-profitable urban deft project. I think around twenty fourteen and began the process of talking to scientists. And attorneys and a death care experts from around the country, a lot on the west coast and formed a board and they moved into a four profit model. Small business model to have recompose and now that the legislation passed and the governor assigned signed it the next step is for them to develop rules, necessary with the department of licensing, all that kind of stuff and finding a site and start building, you know, when people get cremated oftentimes they spread the ashes, maybe their loved ones favorite place. Loved ones are allowed to keep this soil that has made body would create about two wheelbarrows full of soil, and you can take it to a home garden, wherever you want to put it to plant a tree plan vegetables. So that's kind of a cool notion to read the life out of somebody's passing as well. Well, it's absolutely a case in part of the attraction behind it as to one older gentleman, who's a big supporter of this from eastern Washington, there's been a career nurse all his life working in intensive cardiac care units. This vision is to have a memorial tree of something that you can. Hang swing on and maybe grandkids, great grandkids down the line could swing on and have his body come nourishment for that tree itself. It would be a living testament him as opposed to, to a headstone in a cemetery. Now, the next step is, I guess, to see if other states will propose similar bills, and see how this takes off across the country. At me, it sounds like there's some interest bubbling up maybe a little bit Massachusetts a little bit. And Michigan Joshua Slocum of a funeral consumers alliance at New England, certainly knows about this, this following this people are quite interested in this is a relatively simple viable alternative to what we've done in the past Brennan, Kylie, reported the Seattle times. Thank you very much for joining us. Thank you. The other top political stories of the week are the increased tensions in Iran. President Trump warned Iran, not to threaten the US again, or will face it's quote unquote, official end that happened shortly after a rocket landed near the US embassy in Baghdad around quickly responded with a hashtag saying, never threaten an Iranian the US deployed bombers in an aircraft carrier to the area and ran is increase its uranium enrichment production. We spoke to Nepal Tuesday, foreign affairs. Correspondent at politico or more on these rising tensions? There's this tends kind of back and forth right now between the Iranian leaders and President Trump on Twitter feed, and it's very strange because President Trump recently has been trying to calm things down. He has said things like I want you to call me. I just want to talk to them. He has flat out said he does not want to go to war with Iran. And yet he puts out this threat out there. And maybe it's because he was sitting there thinking you know what I need to be tough again. I can't seem like I'm coming across as Tucson. But when you say something like this is going to be the official end of Iran. That's a pretty loaded statement. And it actually offends a lot of Iranians, including ordinary Iranians that the Trump administration says that they want to support Iran as a civilization, it's been around for thousands of years, so saying that you're going to officially ended is quite the claim, and I think he might have undercut himself with a lot of ordinary onions, what started all of these tensions, because we heard that there might have been some Americans that were being targeted. That's why the president sent over some bombers mayor calf carriers to the area. But did all the stem from us being pulled out of the Iran nuclear deal? Yeah, I mean, the tensions have really been building up for months and months, the United States pulled out of the Iran, nuclear deal impose a ton of these sanctions, damaging your onto Konami and then recently United States, Trump administration announced that it was going to declare a major piece of Iran's military as a terrorist group. Now, the Iranians they've kind of been still sticking with a nuclear deal, but recently, they said. They're going to take steps to reduce their commitment to the deal. They also pretty upset about the terrorist as it nation of one of their major military units. And so this has just been a situation where now they are apparently, making moves that the US feels are threatening. Whereas there's also the argument that the US has making moves that the Iranians feel are threatening. And so it's kind of becoming the question of like the chicken or the egg, which came first who's threat came first and which one is going to lead to what running officials have said that they've quadrupled their uranium enrichment production, there uranium that they would not would still be enriched, only to that three point six seven percent. Limit that was set under the nuclear deal, but they could go beyond their stockpile, limitations pretty soon. How does this figure into the whole discussion what they're hoping to do is they've given the Europeans and other parties to the deal, like Russia and China couple of months to find ways to ease the economic suffering that they are facing right now as a result of USA? Sanctions? So they said, look is you need to help us get out of the second novel, otherwise, we're going to start walking away from the deal and enriching uranium and doing these other things that puts them in violation of the deal because the way they run is look at it as look, we signed up to this deal, saying, we would eliminate our nuclear program, so that you guys would lift economic sanctions that were already on place earlier, and with our economy would improve. They just feel like it's become a very one-sided deal. And I just don't see how the Europeans are going to be able to pull together anything that helps you wanted to kinda me in the next sixty days. I just don't understand how that's going to happen because European governments cannot force their businesses to do business anyway..

Iran United States Washington Katrina Trump administration the Seattle times President Trump president Brendan Kiley reporter official Washington state university politico Massachusetts Roddick Tucson
"two hundred fifty thousand tons" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

10:02 min | 3 years ago

"two hundred fifty thousand tons" Discussed on KTOK

"For more news without the noise. My favorite story of the week has to be this human composting story Washington has become the first day in the country to legalize human composting before that, the only acceptable means of disposition of human body was burial or cremation. And now we have this income, natural organic reduction the process involves wood chips. It takes about four weeks and the yields about two wheelbarrows worth of soil everything. It's broken down even the bones Brendan Kiley. He's a reporter for the Seattle times spoke to us about this new alternative to burial or cremation. The first point is at alkaline hydrolysis in natural organic production, two separate processes alkaline hydrolysis. They've been trying to legalize that for the past few years in Washington state, and it's legal in some other states as well. But here, it got tacked on our what got added was natural organic production or colloquially known as human composting. And so this process, I think the easiest way to think about it is like a urban crematorium except using the slower. Composting. Decomposition process instead of the faster flame process, we do have green cemeteries in Washington state, where people can be buried without without expensive caskets, and so on. But this being one site where bodies would go in and human remains come out, is totally new the idea in the United States specifically, how does this work. I just seen what chips straw and other materials. So what do they do to naturally, decompose the body that way? The dates back a little bit a few years back to something called livestock mortality, composting, which is something farmers. And ranchers began to experiment with researchers as well and found as a and environmentally friendly means of decomposition of large animals and found that one could with the proper mix of starter elements, the right area, managing it for the right temperature. Could reduce fifteen hundred pounds steer into totally clean. Usable nutritionally rich soil in about a few months. They ran tests research program at Washington state university with human remains people who were terminally ill and supported the project and wanted to donate to the research and found that using a similar process human bodies could become vet kind of clean. Rich soil in about four weeks. Yeah, it is pretty quick, and that's bones and all it requires, again, the right starter elements, the right to keep the microbes happy, and it's relatively speaking less odorous than people would think if the microbes are really happy and working really officially, they do their work quickly and they don't produce a lot of that off gas odor that we associate with something Roddick because that was one of my questions. What about the bones? Obviously, they're, they're tough to break down. So I didn't know that even in that short of time you know, four weeks. It's pretty quick. The bones. Yeah. And again, it's a little different than just a green burial where you dig a hole and lays someone in just a cloth, shroud, or something that process of decomposition takes longer, because the conditions are different, but the right temperature moisture the rates starter elements the process moves pretty fast. Now traditional ways of disposing of the bodies cremation usually burns to full SUV tank's worth of gas. They say that emits two hundred fifty thousand tons of carbon into the atmosphere each year traditional barriers, the body is pumped full of embalming fluid, obviously skits. All of these measures slowly decompose the body and it produces a lot of methane gas, things like that the traditional ways environmentally are not necessarily the best was this Bill introduced specifically to address those issues it was, and it was one of the founder, Katrina spades main divisions when she grew up in a farm in New Hampshire or fathers pirates physician mother was a physician's assistant environmental activists. So familiarity with. Life death composting new growth, plants and animals. That was all part of childhood coming up. And when she was studying architecture, she was thinking about death modalities what we use to deal with human remains and wondered if something more farm, like might be good both environmentally and two people stays if people don't want to spend a lot of money on tarnished. Caskets blind with expensive cloth and it'd be embalming process and all that kind of thing. So this is Katrina vision, and state senators and the governor agreed was simpler, less expensive less complicated. More natural more environmentally friendly option for people's remains after they pass away Katrina Speights. So she's the developer of the urban death project is she the one behind this recompose company, who's going to be building kind of these new burial, plots for this. Katrina spayed nonprofit called urban death project. I think around twenty fourteen and began the process of talking to scientists and attorneys and death care experts from around the country. A lot lot on the west coast and formed a board and they moved into a four profit model. Small business model to have recompose and now that the legislation passed and the governor has signed it the next step is for them to develop the rules, necessary with the department of licensing, all that kind of stuff and finding a site and start building, you know, when people get cremated oftentimes they spread the ashes, maybe their loved ones favorite place. Loved ones are allowed to keep this soil that has made body would create about two wheelbarrows full of soil, and you can take it to a home guard in wherever you want to put it to plant a tree plan vegetables. So that's kind of a cool notion to read the life out of somebody's passing as well. Well, that's absolutely a case. And part of the attraction behind him as to one older gentleman, who's a big supporter of this from Washington. There's been a career nurse. All his life working in intensive cardiac care units vision is to have a memorial treatment of something that you can hang a swing on, and maybe grandkids, great grandkids down the line could swing on and have his body come nourishment for that tree itself. It would be a living testament him as opposed to, to a headstone in a cemetery. Now, the next step is, I guess, to see if other states will propose similar bills. And, and see how this takes off across the country. At me, it sounds like there's some interest bubbling up maybe a little bit, Massachusetts, and Michigan Joshua Slocum of a funeral consumers alliance at New England certainly knows about this, and this following this people are quite interested in this is a relatively simple viable alternative to what we've done in the past Brennan, Kylie reported the Seattle times thank you very much for joining us. Thank you. The other top political stories of the week are the increased tensions in Iran. President Trump warned Iran, not to threaten the US again, or it will face it's quote unquote, official end that happened. Shortly after a rocket landed near the US embassy in Baghdad around quickly responded with a hashtag saying, never threaten an Iranian, the US deployed bombers in an aircraft carrier to the area. And Iran is increase its uranium enrichment production. We spoke to hall Tuesday, foreign affairs. Correspondent at politico for more on these rising tensions tens kind of back and forth right now between the Iranian leaders and President Trump on Twitter feed, and it's very strange because President Trump recently has been trying to calm things down. He has said things like I want you to call me. I just want to talk to them. He has flat out said he does not want to go to war with Iran. And yet he puts out this threat out there, and maybe it's because he was sitting there thinking you know what I need to be tough again. I can't seem like I'm coming across. But when you say something like this is going to be the official end of Iran. That's a pretty loaded statement. And it actually offends a lot of Iranians, including like ordinary Iranians that the Trump administration says that they want to support Iran is a civilization. It's been around for thousands of years, so saying that you're going to officially end. It is quite the claim and I think he might have undercut himself with a lot of ordinary. What started all of these tensions, because we heard that there might have been some Americans that were being targeted. That's why the president sent over some bombers carriers to the area. But did all the stem from us being pulled out of the Iran nuclear deal? Really been building up for month to month the United States pulled out of the Iran, nuclear deal impose a ton of these sanctions, damaging your aunty Konami, and then recently United States, Trump administration announced it was going to declare a major piece of Iran's military as a terrorist group. Now, the Iranians you know, they've been still sticking with a nuclear deal, but recently, they said, they are going to take steps to reduce their commitment to the deal. They also pretty upset about the terrorist nation of one of their major military units. And so this has just been a situation where now they are apparently, making moves that the US feels are threatening. Whereas there's also the argument that the US has making moves that the Iranian steel are threatening. And so it's kind of becoming the question of the chicken or the egg, which came first threat came first, and which one is going to lead to what running officials have said that they've quadrupled their uranium enrichment production, there uranium that they would not would still be enriched, only to that three point six seven percent. Limit that was set under the nuclear deal, but they could go beyond their stockpile, limitations pretty soon. How does this figure into the whole discussion hoping to do is they've given the Europeans and other parties to the deal, like Russia and China couple of months to find ways to ease the economic suffering that they are facing right now as a result of US sanctions? So they said, look is to help us get out of this economic otherwise, we're going to start walking away from the deal and enriching uranium and doing other things that puts them in violation of the deal because the way they run is look at it is, look, we signed up to the deal, saying, we would eliminate our nuclear program, so that you guys would lift economic sanctions that were already earlier and start economy would improve. It's become a very one-sided deal. And I just don't see how the Europeans are going to be able to pull together anything that helps you wanted to kinda me in the next sixty days. I just don't understand how that's going to happen because European governments cannot force their businesses to do business..

Iran United States Washington Katrina Seattle times president President Trump Brendan Kiley reporter official Katrina Speights Washington state university Trump administration Roddick politico New Hampshire developer