35 Burst results for "Two Decades"

"two decades" Discussed on QA Selling Online

QA Selling Online

05:16 min | Last week

"two decades" Discussed on QA Selling Online

"On the surface right now that may mean you need to dig in. But again, you've you're now narrowing down possibility for failure. Now that's a it's an important difference and this is Faith drive. Everyone nuts people have consulted with me over the years. I've got kind of a standard disclaimer. I start with failure points not with success points and I learned that on the trading desk, you know start with how much money you can make you start with how much you're willing to lose. In fact as a professional Trader if you don't have a risk management system, you don't have a job. So it's always starting with how much you willing to lose. What's the risk? What can go wrong? Where can this thing fail deal with that first? Cuz again going back to I use a lot of trading analogies. If you're going to buy say IBM stock, whether if you make money off nothing to do with you being a genius it has to do with other people coming in and buying IBM stock and IBM stock going up. It's like, what does that have to do with your bloody trading system like zero, right? So in business, it's the same. If you understand where your risk is if you understand where you can have some failure points, you reduce it down to a point where you're not going to go broke immediately. There's not going to be you know, an easy to see catastrophic failure. Then you have a greater likelihood of success now, we'll give a warning that also means you're going to discover really how bad your ideas are. So that's the hard part is the next phase and please don't underestimate that we love our ideas man. I mean, it's like we want to put them up on a wall. We like talking about him and you know because look you get a dopamine release right? It's feels good long talk about what you think is a good idea. So don't underestimate your brain fighting for the life of that idea. You've really gotta get into that logical spreadsheet frame of mind and this is actually some of why consultancy is a somewhat of a good idea if you can't like if you just can't separate from your idea get somebody else get somebody who, you know can run a spreadsheet have them. You know run through a few questions you can you know, Google how do I build a profitable funnel for crying out loud? In fact, I probably have some of my YouTube channel by now, but do the math game where you have to start because by the time you actually get to like Perl Mike launching, you know, your drive-thru coffee joint, you know relatively speaking whether or not you're going to be successful and here's the punchline you're going to know where you're off track. So often entrepreneurs bury themselves. It's not that the business buried them is that they they fell in love with their idea off and they kept at it. I have seen yes. There's a I'll use one from your your your neck of the woods amaranth trading in Canada one Trader three billion dollars one dude in a week. I've seen people with billions and billions of dollars. Just give it all away because they had an idea and they stuck with it. So the key to success is paradoxically found in finding failure first. But I love your idea of doing the math and that's one of my favorite points. And there's a lot of people to do. I don't know if that's correct term but biased math. Oh they look at home. You know what you're seven billion people if I'm going to get 1% right right and like what do you mean you're going to get 1% That's a guess you're not going to get 1% And if that one person age of seven billion people they're going to convert to my okay, that's wishful thinking of course people want your stuff. It's like, oh my gosh. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. So am I going to say, oh, there's so much we can talk about we could and I maybe we got to do this again another day for now for the people who want to know more and if they want to connect with them and connect and hear more about connects you that is that the healthcare system that we talked about earlier? Yep, where do they go? Where do they find you? Yeah, so connect to you, Let's see. Xxi a that's kind of my whole SEO blood coming out and wanted a name that was somewhat memorable. But also unique and if they want to care with me personally, of course my sale jordan.com, you know, I'm one of a few months of Jordans in the world. So if you throw that into Google you're going to find me I will warn you you also going to find one mugshot which we can discuss on a private call them know you can get on my YouTube. I've got a series of vehicle behind the paywall where you know, all this stuff that guys I know sell for ten twelve $15,000. I just give it away cuz look it's not everybody wants to believe that the secret is in some course. It's really not all of that. That's the commodity that commodity is the information the real juice the stuff that's worth. Something is knowing how much of that stuff is actually worthwhile and how much if it's worthwhile for your specific situation. That's why I just give it away. Awesome. Thank you so much my say oh, like I said, we'll have to do this again wage. For everybody listening. I'll have my sales links on the show notes, so you guys can check them out and again big pleasure. Yeah, great. Nice. Quit appreciate it. Thank you..

YouTube Google IBM dopamine Canada
Pete Hines (SVP Global Marketing & Communications, Bethesda Softworks) Discusses Bethesda's Purchase by Microsoft

The Business of Esports

07:31 min | Last week

Pete Hines (SVP Global Marketing & Communications, Bethesda Softworks) Discusses Bethesda's Purchase by Microsoft

"To say we have. Worked closely. With Microsoft, for pretty much my entire time at them, the FESDAY, it's a company we know well They were the ones who really gave us the incentive to change from just being a PC only developer which we were when I started back in ninety nine we we developed and made games only on the PC and decided to make the leap for a game called the eldest group elder scrolls, three more wind for the original xbox and honestly in in part because at their urging, hey, this this console could could handle could do the kind of games that you all make an RPG like yours. Could do pretty well on our system and that was sort of the early days of what has become no a two decade relationship between ourselves and a lot of folks over there who we very much like and respect to chief amongst them obviously being Phil, Spencer and. In terms of his vision how how he sees the the future of Microsoft how we fit in that future? and how this this acquisition can lead to. A future for for both of us, that is sort of win win win. In that we get support and resources that allow us to make even bigger and better games with their help. You know if I've I've worked with I've worked as a publisher who is a third party publisher and developers who have all had to be third party developers for very long time. The opportunity of join somebody and essentially be treated as a first party. Developer publisher is pretty darn appealing in terms of. Access to resources or the conversations you get to have not just in like what are you need to make the? Game better but like from console support standpoint from a systems level standpoint are there things you need us to do, and again we've been in this industry a long time, and so we hear the stories behind the scene about first party games. They get a certain features or special support from Sony or Microsoft Nintendo to lower a first party game to do something particular and you know you talked our developers that's pretty appealing I. Think it's Great for Microsoft as well because I think we bring a lot of additional pedigree to an already very strong lineup and stable of developers look I believe in walking softly and carrying a big stick but. I've been doing this for a long time like we're pretty good catch like we make a lot of really good games. We've made a lot of game of the year stuff and bestseller stuff and in a variety of different. Genres and if I step it, take my Bethesda hat off for a minute. were pretty good get and I, think we ultimately make them better as a company to be a part of what they're doing. And the other one is I think this will ultimately be a win for fans and for gamers because at the end of the day, the thing that we have always believed first and foremost is look making games as a pain in the ass it's hard. It's a lot of work over a lot of years on a lot of people. Spent big chunks of their lives working on these games, and we spent a lot of money making them, and at the end of the day, we want as many people as possible to be able to play what what it is. We make and Microsoft is very much in the same camp of we want to help you get your games to the widest audience possible which. Means that you people are going to be able to play our games you know all over the place you know not just on a specific console, not just on your PC, but what they do with X. God streaming, and now streaming being something that we as a company have looked into and worked on some some things there in terms of moving that forward as viable. Technology that you know. Sure. I'll I'll have people playing sky rim doom fallout fill in number here on his many devices as we can, and so at the end of the day I think it is a good cultural fit at think it's a good philosophical fit and I think it's a good fit where our strengths play welded their strengths and advisers. Yeah. So so just falling because there's another question was sort of desperate Ted to ask in S, which is so you said you know protest is a good gap ripe and totally agree I mean they're assuming credible brands in the portfolio that s to has, but also you guys weren't cheap. You know the acquisition is William. It's worth mentioning your benchmark right as we as a benchmark on the. Might might benchmarked requisitions is Star Wars Disney bought star wars that was like two billion dollars, right? That's kind of my benchmark. So I large acquisitions I value in multiple. Multiple. Star. Wars. Yeah. But then. Again, I mean three point, five star wars like that is a lot of. A lot of stars that's actually more star wars than actually art films, in stores, mainland. So Seriously, though like just. Valuation, obviously, you know Microsoft sophisticated buyer you know you guys must've deserved it. But where is that value coming from? Is it the IP juicy? The value in elder scrolls fall out things like that is at the studios in the talent is it something else like if Microsoft we're gonNA say there were seven billion dollars for X. Y. and Z. What are the buckets that value is getting created We'll. Certainly it's the things that you mentioned we we do have a lot of pretty strong IP's. Elder scrolls a massive brand for US fallout doom Wolfenstein. We've we've got a lot of stuff that has value and legacy right and not stuff that we just came up with five years ago right? Doom started and Wolfenstein started the popularity of were the existence of first person shooters a really long time ago so whether it's RPG's or first person shooters I do think we have very strong piece I also believe we have really good pedigree in our studios in terms of every studio that we have. That is part of our company that we've shipped a game with has won at least one game of the year award for what they've made a except for one developer and that's pretty impressive. When you talk about a whole wide variety of studios different locations, very different genres, actions you know first person send stuff, really bloody violent kill Nazi stuff kill demons post apocalyptic fantasy. We do a lot of different stuff. So I do think there's a lot of talent I also think that and I've I've heard Phil talk about this is he had a lot of respect for the fact that it's Not just that we have talent but that were willing to take chances and try and push things forward and break ground right? We didn't just participate in Vr like we were you know primary catalyst for VR

Microsoft Developer Phil Publisher Bethesda Disney Spencer TED William Sony
Politician, Cardiss Collins

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:40 min | Last week

Politician, Cardiss Collins

"Today's politician was one of the longest serving women of color in the US Congress. She spent several of her over two decades of service being the only black woman in the chamber. Let's talk about Cardis Collins. CARDIS. Robertson. Was Born on September twenty fourth nineteen thirty one in Saint Louis Missouri. When cardis turned ten, her family moved to Detroit where she attended high school. After graduation, cardis moved to Chicago to live with her grandmother and find a job. She worked in a mattress factory before joining the Illinois Department of Labor as a stenographer. At the same time, she also studied accounting at Northwestern University. In. Nineteen fifty eight Cardis Mary George W Collins. The couple had a son Kevin the following year. After graduating from college in Nineteen, Sixty, seven, Cardis was promoted to secretary then became an accountant and auditor for the Illinois Department of Revenue. All the while she supported her husband's campaigns, for Alderman, committee men and US representative. Cardis also gained her first direct political experience as Committee Woman of the Twenty Fourth Ward Democratic Organization. In nineteen seventy George won seat in the US House representing the predominantly African American west side of Chicago. He was elected following the death of his predecessor. He served two terms and was particularly passionate about improving the lives of black people serving in the military. Shortly, after winning election to serve another term George died in a plane crash. Carts was devastated by the loss of her husband. Through her grief. She announced her candidacy to fill her husband's congressional seat. She was supported by the city mayor and won the nomination with eighty four percent of the vote. She then won the election on June Fifth Nineteen, seventy-three with ninety, two percent of the vote that made Cardis the first black woman to represent Illinois in Congress. Transition into her new congressional role wasn't easy. She was politically inexperienced and wasn't confident enough to voice all of her opinions right away. She relied on her colleagues to show her the ropes and she later said once people learned I had something to say I gained confidence. Hardest is main goal is a representative was to improve life for the on Chicago's West Side. Along with other low income communities and people of color across the country. She always kept the well being of her constituents as her main focus. Spending eight days a month in her district to remain accessible. Because of the attention, she paid her voters she went back her seat comfortable margins for two straight decades. Throughout her tenure, she would serve on several committees including the influential committee on Energy and Commerce. She started serving on the committee on government operations. She participated in two different subcommittees later, working to tighten regulations on the transportation of toxic materials and improve air travel safety. In nineteen seventy nine. Cardis was elected president of the Congressional Black Caucus. She was only the second woman to earn this honor. She openly criticized President Jimmy Carter's record on civil rights, as well as his failure to make Dr Martin Luther King Junior's birthday a national holiday. Cards spent much of her time in Congress defending affirmative action programs and ensuring equal funding and attention to women and people of Color. Curtis staunchly advocated Breast Cancer Awareness. In nineteen ninety, she wrote a law expanding Medicare coverage for elderly and disabled women to receive. Mammograms. She also designated October as national breast cancer awareness month. In nineteen ninety-seven after twelve consecutive terms cardis decided not to run for re election she returned to Chicago and later decided to move to Alexandria Virginia. She passed away on February third twenty thirteen. She was eighty one years old. Cars Collins overcame grief and hesitation to speak up and make a positive difference for people in her district and across the country.

Cardis Mary George W Collins Chicago Congress Illinois Department Of Labor Congressional Black Caucus Committee Woman Representative Robertson United States Twenty Fourth Ward Democratic Illinois Department Of Revenue Northwestern University Us House Saint Louis Missouri Detroit Illinois Kevin Breast Cancer Awareness Cardis Energy And Commerce
How the White House is Taking On Remote Work

WSJ Tech News Briefing

05:30 min | 2 weeks ago

How the White House is Taking On Remote Work

"After president trump and several White House staffers tested positive for the corona virus. The West Wing is now doing what many companies have been struggling to do. Since March have lots of workers make a quick shocked to remote work. As we've seen, that's a pretty tall order even without highly classified government information on the line our cybersecurity reporter David Bertie has been looking into what? That shift entails for the White House and he joins us now to explain Dave. Thanks for being here. Thanks for having me. All right. So I don't think any listeners would be surprised to know that the White House had pretty strong digital defenses prior to all this, what their pre pandemic setup look like with the White House has been investing for about two decades particularly since. The September eleventh attacks in just allowing the government to function in the event of an emergency. So a lot of cases that just means along people to work remotely in a normal situation over the last five or ten years in particular more and more staffers who work in the white. House. Have taken advantage of a variety of digital security measures that they have just work at. Nights, weekends it Cetera. So they don't have to go into the office at all times having said that as you might expect, there's a lot of work. The White House does that can't go off site particularly with regard to classified information. So that's where you might have a few hiccups in terms of the workflow and what people might need to actually come on site to do. And how they reacted since the onset of the pandemic. There's been at least one instance since the pandemic began when the administration learning of a positive covid nineteen tests advise certain employees to work from home as a precautionary measure. We saw that again on Friday once a number of these positive tests started coming out there were directives handed out to White House staffers that at least some of them should start working from home as opposed to coming into the office but as to this point is unclear to what extent that's true for the entire staff. So there may be certain staffers within the White House who still have to come in depending on what their job duties entail. Obviously, we have a situation as the case with many companies were there essentially triaging data in different processes? So stuff that is So essential needs an extra layer of defense will come unto. White House grounds were data can be encrypted with additional physical defenses. There's checking points where people have to use cards inside you have that juxtaposed to sort of less sensitive data where people can access the White House office through what you are. I. Might Use such as a VPN virtual private network, which essentially allows you to burrow underneath the defenses of your office space. Dave, this is all happening as we've seen an uptick in hacking attempts we've been talking about on the show bit how does that play in here? Will. There have been an uptick in hacking attempts for pretty much every type of organization out there you have schools. As you discussed last week, you have every type of company under the Sun, and then of course, various government agencies and the electoral process in general. Now, we have a few different aspects with the White House. In particular one being the president's health there have been numerous mixed messages coming out of the White House in recent days as far as how sick president trump has been the mere fact of how sick or healthy he is. Becomes really valuable piece of information. So we spoke to a couple of former White House officials who worked in it and cybersecurity in recent days, and he said not only will the white. House medical team potentially targeted by foreign hackers who want access that information but also the people around medical team that could be people who work with the family dog walkers was an example given to us anyone who sort of in there at that orbit or has devices within those people's orbit could be potential vector for an attacker aside from net you also have. Run of the Mill White House work have you have staffers working in policies that working on communicating with the press and the public and what have you? So each one of those people can also become a target as well whenever you're in a remote work situation and you go outside of your normal offices defenses, you become more vulnerable. It expands what cybersecurity folks called the attack surface. So if You're using a personal device, a personal laptop as opposed to the one that might be government issued that certainly a little bit more dangerous than having haven't been working normal office space and we've been talking a lot about the risks of a more spread out workforce for businesses and other entities. But with this situation with the White, house there really seems to be even more on the line here. I mean it doesn't really get much bigger than this. Right? You have the leader of the free world with a potentially deadly disease a month out from the election during an economic calamity. There's a lot of moving parts here and I think everyone who might want to take advantage of a situation such as this is probably think about it at this point I don't think it gets much bigger than this and as we spoke to a number of former administration officials as well they basically said upshot is the normal day to day business at the White House is going to grind to a halt. It's almost inevitable in a situation as crazy as this. For any organization at company is school, etc. When you're dealing with shocks, just sort of the day to day work of that particular organization to tends to slow down. But I would also say that like if you were to rank of the places in the world, they're the most secure the White House would probably be top of the list so they are. Potentially vulnerable to more threats than anyone else and they're going through the weirdest situation possible on the other hand, they do have the highest walls around. In terms of cyber defence is that pretty much any place in the world could have.

White House Mill White House President Trump Dave Reporter David Bertie Donald Trump
How the White House is Taking On Remote Work

WSJ Tech News Briefing

05:30 min | 2 weeks ago

How the White House is Taking On Remote Work

"After president trump and several White House staffers tested positive for the corona virus. The West Wing is now doing what many companies have been struggling to do. Since March have lots of workers make a quick shocked to remote work. As we've seen, that's a pretty tall order even without highly classified government information on the line our cybersecurity reporter David Bertie has been looking into what? That shift entails for the White House and he joins us now to explain Dave. Thanks for being here. Thanks for having me. All right. So I don't think any listeners would be surprised to know that the White House had pretty strong digital defenses prior to all this, what their pre pandemic setup look like with the White House has been investing for about two decades particularly since. The September eleventh attacks in just allowing the government to function in the event of an emergency. So a lot of cases that just means along people to work remotely in a normal situation over the last five or ten years in particular more and more staffers who work in the white. House. Have taken advantage of a variety of digital security measures that they have just work at. Nights, weekends it Cetera. So they don't have to go into the office at all times having said that as you might expect, there's a lot of work. The White House does that can't go off site particularly with regard to classified information. So that's where you might have a few hiccups in terms of the workflow and what people might need to actually come on site to do. And how they reacted since the onset of the pandemic. There's been at least one instance since the pandemic began when the administration learning of a positive covid nineteen tests advise certain employees to work from home as a precautionary measure. We saw that again on Friday once a number of these positive tests started coming out there were directives handed out to White House staffers that at least some of them should start working from home as opposed to coming into the office but as to this point is unclear to what extent that's true for the entire staff. So there may be certain staffers within the White House who still have to come in depending on what their job duties entail. Obviously, we have a situation as the case with many companies were there essentially triaging data in different processes? So stuff that is So essential needs an extra layer of defense will come unto. White House grounds were data can be encrypted with additional physical defenses. There's checking points where people have to use cards inside you have that juxtaposed to sort of less sensitive data where people can access the White House office through what you are. I. Might Use such as a VPN virtual private network, which essentially allows you to burrow underneath the defenses of your office space. Dave, this is all happening as we've seen an uptick in hacking attempts we've been talking about on the show bit how does that play in here? Will. There have been an uptick in hacking attempts for pretty much every type of organization out there you have schools. As you discussed last week, you have every type of company under the Sun, and then of course, various government agencies and the electoral process in general. Now, we have a few different aspects with the White House. In particular one being the president's health there have been numerous mixed messages coming out of the White House in recent days as far as how sick president trump has been the mere fact of how sick or healthy he is. Becomes really valuable piece of information. So we spoke to a couple of former White House officials who worked in it and cybersecurity in recent days, and he said not only will the white. House medical team potentially targeted by foreign hackers who want access that information but also the people around medical team that could be people who work with the family dog walkers was an example given to us anyone who sort of in there at that orbit or has devices within those people's orbit could be potential vector for an attacker aside from net you also have. Run of the Mill White House work have you have staffers working in policies that working on communicating with the press and the public and what have you? So each one of those people can also become a target as well whenever you're in a remote work situation and you go outside of your normal offices defenses, you become more vulnerable. It expands what cybersecurity folks called the attack surface. So if You're using a personal device, a personal laptop as opposed to the one that might be government issued that certainly a little bit more dangerous than having haven't been working normal office space and we've been talking a lot about the risks of a more spread out workforce for businesses and other entities. But with this situation with the White, house there really seems to be even more on the line here. I mean it doesn't really get much bigger than this. Right? You have the leader of the free world with a potentially deadly disease a month out from the election during an economic calamity. There's a lot of moving parts here and I think everyone who might want to take advantage of a situation such as this is probably think about it at this point I don't think it gets much bigger than this and as we spoke to a number of former administration officials as well they basically said upshot is the normal day to day business at the White House is going to grind to a halt. It's almost inevitable in a situation as crazy as this. For any organization at company is school, etc. When you're dealing with shocks, just sort of the day to day work of that particular organization to tends to slow down. But I would also say that like if you were to rank of the places in the world, they're the most secure the White House would probably be top of the list so they are. Potentially vulnerable to more threats than anyone else and they're going through the weirdest situation possible on the other hand, they do have the highest walls around. In terms of cyber defence is that pretty much any place in the world could have.

White House Mill White House President Trump Dave Reporter David Bertie Donald Trump
Civil Rights Champion, Unita Blackwell

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:24 min | 2 weeks ago

Civil Rights Champion, Unita Blackwell

"Hello for Wonder Media Network, I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia will Manica. Today. We're talking about a key figure in the civil rights movement who risked her life to lift her voice and the voices of other black. Americans. Through violence and abuse she campaigned for equality and became the first black woman to serve as mayor and Mississippi. This is the story of UNITA. UNITA Zelma Blackwell was born he uses brown on March Eighteenth Nineteen thirty three in Lula Mississippi. Her father was a sharecropper and you need a picked cotton in the field alongside her mother until her mother sent her to live with relatives in Arkansas to receive a better education. At that time in Mississippi, black children could only attend school for two years before they were forced to return to the fields. Though you need us mother couldn't read or write. She was determined to give her daughter a better life. You need a chose her own full name after her teacher told her. She couldn't just go by the initials UC. She decided to go with UNITA Zelma. At the age of twelve, you need a left school she returned to picking cotton until she was thirty one years old she married three times but kept the last name of her first husband Jeremiah Blackwell. It was with him. She had her only child Jeremiah Junior. The turning point of UNITA's life came in nineteen, sixty four during the freedom summer. The student nonviolent. Coordinating Committee or Snick was campaigning to raise awareness about registering black citizens to vote you need a signed up to help right away during her attempts to help register black voters across our community. She was arrested more than seventy times. She was also targeted by the K. K. K. members burned crosses in her yard. You need was one of only eight black people in her county who tried to register to vote armed white men threatened you need other brave people trying to vote outside the courthouse and nearly prevented them from entering when they were finally allowed to enter the building they were forced to undergo an unfair literacy tests which all of them failed. You need to realize that despite the fact voting was illegal right society still stacked all the odds against the black community. She was more determined than ever to make her voice heard. So she began to participate in one movement after another to fight the unjust system. In nineteen sixty five UNITA sued her county's board of Education for suspending three hundred students including her own son for wearing freedom pens. She also suit to desegregate the school district. These cases traveled all the way up to federal courts though the pins remained banned, the district was ordered to desegregate. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, six UNITA was elected mayor of mayors spell. which reportedly made her the first black woman to serve as a mayor in Mississippi. When she took office, the five hundred person town had unpaved streets and no sewer system many residents lived in small tin roof shacks with no running water. UNITA immediately set to work on improving conditions serving the town for two decades from a one room. City Hall. She led the way for the town to pave a name. It's roads, install streetlights, built sewers, improve its housing, and even get its first fire truck. In nineteen eighty three UNITA earned a master's degree in regional planning from New Mass Amherst having never previously attended college in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, two, she brought national attention to mayors, Ville, and all rural communities when she won three, hundred, fifty, thousand dollar Macarthur Genius Grant. Throughout her career you traveled internationally she gave speeches advised presidents like Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton a never stopped fighting for civil rights. She was defeated for re election to her position in two thousand one by then she'd long made positive mark on the rural communities of Mississippi and beyond. You need. Blackwell passed away on May, Thirteenth Twenty nineteen she made an enormous difference in Marysville Mississippi enter influence extends far beyond her hometown. She fought for the rights of all Americans and brought attention too often forgotten areas of the country.

Unita Unita Zelma Blackwell Mississippi Unita Zelma Ville Jeremiah Blackwell School District Lula Mississippi Black Community Wonder Media Network Jenny Kaplan Jeremiah Junior Arkansas Thirteenth Twenty K. K. K. Bill Clinton City Hall Marysville Jimmy Carter
New York Times obtains President Trump's tax returns

Safe Money with Bill Carter

02:49 min | 2 weeks ago

New York Times obtains President Trump's tax returns

"Day before the 1st 2020 presidential debate, The New York Times dropped a bombshell report on President Trump's tax returns. ABC News chief White House correspondent Jonathan Karl the American public is getting what's been described as the first detailed look. One of Donald Trump's most closely guarded secrets his tax returns in its blockbuster report. The New York Times Review detailed information on nearly two decades worth of Trump tax returns. The details are startling. Trump paid no federal income taxes at all. In 11 of the 18 years, they reviewed 2016 year he won the White House, Trump reportedly paid only $750. For his first year in office. He again paid just $750.750 dollars is roughly the federal income tax bill of someone who makes $20,000 a year. At the White House, the president insisted The Times report was not accurate. Well, first of all, I paid a lot of capital out of state income tax system, but state and federal income taxes or two different things. The president built his brand and his campaign on being a business genius with the mightiest touch has great business sense. I made a lot of money, and I had great success, so I've had great success, by the way really successful, But the Times reports the Trump businesses Including his golf courses and resorts are actually awash in red ink. His Washington hotel reportedly lost $55.5 million since it opened four years ago. His foreign ventures, according to the Times are among the few that have actually made money since he became president more than $73 million, some of the most profitable in countries with authoritarians leaders, including the Philippines and Turkey. Trump ran for president the first time, he insisted he was loaded with money and had almost no debt whatsoever. Anybody. I don't need that, you know, it's very interesting. I'm so liquid. I don't need that. And if I need that, but the Times reports the president is actually drowning in debt. Including more than $421 million that could come do over the next four years. The paper, noting that if Trump is reelected, quote his lenders could be placed in the unprecedented position of weighing whether to foreclose on a sitting president. The president tweeted. He has very little debt compared to the value of assets. He has repeatedly said his tax returns or under IRS audit. It's underwater. They've been underwater for a long time. The IRS does not treat me well. The newspaper reports. The IRS is in fact investigating a $72.9 million tax refund. The president received in 2010 and whether he took improper deductions. ABC is Jonathan Karl

Donald Trump President Trump Jonathan Karl White House IRS Chief White House Corresponden The New York Times Abc News ABC The New York Times Review Washington Turkey Philippines The Times
Seattle Commercial Office Space Leasing Activity

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

00:07 sec | 2 weeks ago

Seattle Commercial Office Space Leasing Activity

"From the same time last year. Colliers International says leasing activity is at a two decade low as employees

Colliers International
Dick Johnson Is Dead Movie Review

Filmspotting

04:00 min | 2 weeks ago

Dick Johnson Is Dead Movie Review

"Locum to film spotting a couple of weeks back are overlooked. Oh, tours. Marathon had raving about Shantelle Ackerman's John dieleman movie about a woman who hardly left her home this week we returned to the marathon with Barbara. LODEN WANDA WITH JOSH allows us to wonder what may have happened to John Dieleman if she just walked away and left her good for nothing son to make those. Veal cutlets for himself while there that is a thought experiment though John and Wanda very different people i. don't know if it would have gone down just like this very different people very different films that marathon review of Wanda coming later in the show. But First Kirsten Johnson's Dick Johnson is dead a gift to her father and anyone who has a loved one struggling with dementia. She Kills Me Multiple Times. Resurrected Day. Did that. But now it's. The beginning of his disappearance. A eight most about my memory loss is it hurts people's feelings. Pena that you woke up in the middle of the mate last night. Fully dressed. Remember. Any of that. Yeah. What can we do that? Everybody has sort of prepare because everybody dies watch too much for that. After more than two decades as a prolific cinematographer shooting her share of relatively straightforward documentaries, which isn't to suggests boring inconsequential but more traditionally fly on the wall Kristen has now directed to inventive decidedly unconventional ones. Two Thousand Sixteen camera person was a memoir comprised exclusively of footage shot across the globe eighty six different countries Johnson filmed in I believe is the count the content was, of course, deeply personal, filmed and curated as it was by Johnson though only explicitly. So in home movie clips of her twin toddlers playing with our camera and scenes over mother suffering from dementia. Her latest could be called the act of killing Dick. Johnson due to the way she employs fantasy sequences to tackle tough truths as Joshua Oppenheimer did with his twenty thirteen doc about mass killings in Indonesia during the mid sixties. Johnson, the daughter and filmmaker is more upfront. This time we only hear her voice over we occasionally get to join her inside the closet over New York. City. Apartment she records it on an iphone and she's almost as much an on camera presence as she is a behind the camera one affectionately sometimes quite emotionally interacting with their beloved former psychiatrist father battling dementia like his departed wife before Him Josh. Rated Camera Person One of your top ten films of two thousand sixteen calling it an intensely moving and provocatively personal consideration of what it. Means to carry a camera especially in a world that is seen great suffering. We've established how Dick Johnson is dead is more expressly personal than camera person, but it also might be a more provocative consideration of what it means to carry a camera in a world in a family that has seen great suffering not that Kirsten Johnson necessarily crosses the ethical lines and putting her aging father. Through the ringer staging, sometimes playful, sometimes gruesome death scenes for her own Cathartic Purposes I. think we can probably forgive the time. He soberly complains that shooting in the cold on a Manhattan street while covered in fake blood is even more painful than when he had a heart attack. But how much is this exhausting process actually helping him to process the inevitable and does that even matter? But now it's upon, US Kristen Johnson says in her opening video the beginning of his disappearance, and we are not accepting it as viewers. We can't really ever know whether making this movie Got Dick or Johnson any closer to acceptance, which you can't evaluate Josh is whether experiencing Kirsten's death affirming stunts, brought you any enlightenment or at least enjoyment

Kirsten Johnson Kristen Johnson John Dieleman Loden Wanda Dick Josh Johnson Shantelle Ackerman Barbara Pena Joshua Oppenheimer New York Manhattan Indonesia
Millennials heat up Seattle housing market

Seattle Now

07:41 min | 2 weeks ago

Millennials heat up Seattle housing market

"We've all had a lot more time to assess our living situation since the pandemic and it seems a lot of people are making the move to homeownership but that doesn't mean it's gotten more affordable. In fact, Seattle's real estate market is hotter than ever. We've got the fastest rising house prices of any city in the country after Phoenix prices here jumped seven percent in July since last year despite the pandemic Catherine Shema belong is a real estate reporter at the Seattle Times she's here to explain hi Catherine. Hi Trish. Thanks for having me. It's good to talk to you again. The heat in the real estate market here is surprising to me given what I keep hearing about the economy were you surprised Oh Yeah I was floored I think it's counterintuitive to a lot of people as hundreds of thousands of Washingtonians. Lose their jobs that home prices would continue to go up. Yeah and where is the growth the market coming from this time around? What are people doing here? Well. That's another thing that's really surprising A lot of the growth is coming from first time homebuyers specifically millennials people who aren't normally interested in buying homes but we're in this sort of perfect storm where it's cheaper than it's ever been to own a house because mortgage rates are historically low that's incentivizing a lot of people who might not normally have started their house search to get on the market. It's also incentivizing people who already own homes who might have sold them to hold onto them to refinance to take some cash out of their homes maybe a to better weather what's coming in the pandemic? But inventories. So number of homes that are on the market is very low lower than it's been by some counts in two decades. Simultaneously Demand just keeps ticking up that is a formula for rising house prices right there high demand low inventory, but I want to break this down just a little bit because from what I understand about millennials right? They don't have a ton of money. They are first time homebuyers. About getting into a market where the median home price is around seven, hundred thousand dollars are the overextending themselves. Well, most growth that we're seeing it actually concentrated in the more affordable end of the market. So homes in the Seattle Center prices are going up, but they're more or less where they were about a year ago homes in places like Tacoma Lake Taps Auburn up north in snohomish county. That's where prices are really writing. We're seeing price growth in the double digits for homes that are less than four, hundred, sixty, thousand dollars. That's for the millennials are buying their homes and and that's really affecting affordability for a lot of people in the Seattle Area That's still an awful lot of money to break into a market I. Think if you live in the Seattle area, you just get used to seeing incredibly high housing costs. But again, when a millennial enters into an agreement to buy this large large purchase, are they banking at this point on a market that's going to continue to grow because I've been around long enough that I saw people get underwater really quickly when the market didn't pan out the. Way They thought it was going to a lot of experts that I've talked to think that Seattle's market is destined to keep growing maybe not at the scorching pace that we're seeing right now. But Seattle like San Francisco is afflicted with what we call the curse of the superstar city. There's so much wealth concentrated in industries like the Tech Industry for instance, and that really drives up housing prices that wealth those incomes they're out of set in some. With the cost of living for the rest of the people who live in the Seattle area. You also reported Catherine that people are leaving their apartments in troves. What's driving that? Things are driving that one. We've already talked about the low mortgage rates that's really pulling people out of their apartments but I talked to a couple a couple months ago who said they're both working from home and they said they were just getting sick and tired of stepping all over each other during the day. One of them's working in the bedroom. One of them's working in the living room and they were sharing a bell an apartment, and me just really wanted to see some green. They ended up moving to manage quality of life. They're getting a little more quality of life what about people though who can't get into the market right now? Is there an advantage to renting since so many people are leaving their apartments. There is an advantage to renting. We're seeing that rents in the Seattle area have dropped by nearly ten percent since the start of the pandemic, and that's not even counting the discounts that landlords property managers are offering attendance. Some of them are offering as much as two months free rent. Those are big savings right now. So if you can find an apartment, Dow was a good time to sign a lease, but there are some real. Losers from the current growth even a mortgage rates are lower than they've been any time ever. The ability of people to get a mortgage has become more constricted ben anytime in the past six years, we look at something called the mortgage credit availability index, and that's lower than it has been since March twenty fourteen. What that means is that it's harder for people who don't have corporate credit to get a mortgage and we know that. Black Americans Americans of color are disproportionately likely to have lower credit scores than their white counterparts. What that means is harder for black. Americans. To afford a home now and West before the pandemic right banks are much less willing to give money away at this point to people who don't have perfect credit, which really really leaves a lot of people especially in the Seattle area where it is really hard to live out in the cold. Here do you think that there is a tipping point for the Seattle market where home affordability just becomes too much and people end up like just packing up for the suburbs or for a different state because like I said, we see these housing prices in this area and I look in other parts of the country and I think oh my gosh you know I could do a lot better for myself. I think the answer is yes. Then, it started I realized that I could afford to rent a larger home outside of the city packed up and moved in our north. I think that the pandemic is giving a lot of people the chance to reassess whether living that being said I don't necessarily see price growth slowing down appreciably in Seattle in the near future. We just have so many people with so much wealth in the city and the wealth and poverty gap here are just getting wider. It's becoming more and more obvious that the line between making it and. Not Making it is pretty thin here. What about people who aren't rocking a tech salary in this city? What is the other side of the picture for them? The other side of the picture is getting forced out of neighborhoods they've lived in for a long time because they can't afford riding property taxes and moving out into south King County, Pierce County, snohomish county, or even further outside of the Seattle area. The last time we talked you were downtown in billtown looking out at a pretty empty city Catherine where are you living these days? These days I'm I'm way up north I'm actually Skagit County. Where I can have a house with a yard and a new puppy. So you are an example of what's going on in the city. You're not just a reporter live the life. That's right. I know it's happening because I live it. Catherine Shema belong excellent to talk to you. Thanks so much for your time. Thank you, Victor.

Seattle Catherine Shema Seattle Times Reporter Snohomish County Phoenix Trish Skagit County Billtown Tacoma Lake Victor DOW Troves San Francisco King County Pierce County
Finding Your Authentic Self

Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

05:20 min | 2 weeks ago

Finding Your Authentic Self

"This show is going to be so interesting and I'm hoping that it will open you all up in ways that you haven't. For example, how many days have you felt grateful for your nice home and you're healthy children and your caring husband. But you still feel like a piece of the puzzle is missing you feel like there's a hole somewhere and you think to yourself is this all there is it's because you're Hartfield. For something more if you can relate to that, you're not alone because we couldn't believe how many women share this silence struggle. You're probably thinking you're the only one but listen. Dear Oprah I'm happily married woman and mother of two children. I've been blessed with my health and my financial stability I'm looking for ways to satisfy an unsettling feeling. It's like a void in the center of my soul. Why am I here my spirit keeps telling me there's more to this life. There was something tugging inside something. That's me. You have more to do looking for direction in my life a sense of purpose something that defines who I am want something more just don't know how to get there. I have a good life, good family and good friends. But I still feel like something is missing I have tried to find and fill the void with food money. Sex possessions self groups. Still. Have this feeling that there should be something more. Well I know there are millions of people feel that way men and women it's that undefinable something that Sarah Brenick explorers in her book called something more excavating your authentic. So Sarah of course, is also the author of the bestseller simple abundance which inspired us all to start gratitude journals and to begin to cherish the richness in everyday life, and now Sarah says with something more that joy is our birthright. Now, that's hard for you. All to take in that joy is your birthright, but the path to finding it is seldom clear and never easy. Please welcome back here. have been able to do for women in this country is just amazing. I. Am so proud of you. Out of you and this looks something more is exactly what we needed. Let's talk about why. So many people feel this lack this need for something more. Well something more isn't a million dollars in the bank I think it is. A home and architectural digest fame. Or a love affair with a movie star. And that is what we've bought into in this society is going to be the something more of our life. So something more is that thing that? that. Our soul that that small dread in the middle of the night that undefinable thing that especially when we're so grateful for the things that we have made us feel mildly guilty or downright shameful. We should pray about it and that is what? The miracle is because this desire for something more is divine discontent Oh. Fabulous. The way you described that why was this the hardest book you've ever had to write? Because I had to tell the truth. With, might sound might sound strange. The book that has now out is the fourth version two years I throughout three versions almost three hundred pages. Because I was trying to tell these stories with my mind. And I realized that the soul Longs for communion and connection. And I knew what I wanted to say. I. Did not think I had the courage to say it because I was talking about the three. Secret wounds, our souls, and no one else has talked about that. I thought really do I have to. But these have been things I had been wrestling with my whole life because you say you went into the cavity of your soul in sweated it all on the pages. Yeah. That was the only way I could ride it and the three secret. Wounds self-loathing self loathing self-loathing betrayal. Betrayal in the sense of understanding what betrayal is because we only betray our so can't. Betray ourselves. And finally marital indifference. Nobody. Else's talked about that. Not I wasn't quite sure that I had the courage to and then. Finally I thought this book is going to kill me if I don't write it. So. Let's get down there. You Save died twice in your life already died metaphorically I know that but yes. No Brian the Irish writer says, death comes as much as surprise to us as birth does when I. Say that I died one through my health and then when my marriage of two decades ended and each time months later when I regained consciousness I was a different woman I was a a stronger woman more passionate woman a wiser woman but I was so different from who I had been that it was as if my DNA had changed and when I say my DNA what I mean is my destiny, my nature and my aspirations was complete. Transformation

Sarah Brenick Architectural Digest Self-Loathing Sarah Brian Writer
How Social Media Affects Our Psychology & Why Our Phones Are Becoming Irresistible

The Model Health Show

04:44 min | 2 weeks ago

How Social Media Affects Our Psychology & Why Our Phones Are Becoming Irresistible

"Our guest today is Adam Ulcer and he is an associate professor of marketing at New York University Stern, school of business, and then affiliated professor of Social Psychology Nyu's psychology department, and in two thousand twenty he was voted as professor of the year by the student body and faculty at Nyu Stern School of business. He's a New York, times bestselling author of two books including the book were diving into today irresistible the rise of addictive technology and the business of keeping US hooked his one of the most popular Ted talks. Ever with millions of US talking about this very subject. They were diving into today. He's been featured everywhere from the New York Times to the Atlantic wire popular science and Adam also has a PhD in social psychology from Princeton University where he focused on how people reach the judgments and make the decisions that shaped their lives, and now we're gonNA dive into this awesome powerful important conversation with Adam Alter Adam. Welcome to the model show. Thanks for hanging out with us today. Yeah. Thanks for having me Sean, good to be. So I've got to ask you first and foremost I want to know your superhero origin story because this topic is so palpable. So important but how in the world did you find yourself interested in this domain with tech in how it's kind of relating to our lives? I think the super the Superhero, the super power for an academic is that when we get interested in things that other people get interested in, we can actually studied them and that's what happened with me. I I. Think a lot of people were talking about tech, the encroachment of tech in their lives especially that personalized know I was sitting on the couch next to my wife, we'd spend two hours on our phones. We wouldn't be interacting with each other I remember being on a flight between New York and La, and I don't even remember the flight because I opened a video game on my phone. was an APP plated six hours landed and was like what just happened time melted away. So I think a lot of people probably millions of people who are experiencing some version of that in the roughly two, thousand, thirteen, fourteen, fifteen. But for me it, it was something that I had the capacity to actually study to investigate, and so I did I started to look into it and had a few critical questions like am I the only one experiencing this? The answer was very clearly no What what else is gripping us this way in what should we do about? It is something to be concerned about and that's how I got interested probably six or seven years ago. Yes and it through even through that time. Can you talk about first and foremost for us? Like you said is not you're not alone by a long shot but how has our investment in our time grown from? Prior, you know somebody just here in the studio, one of my guys and he wants to get a flip phone now since the flip phone to now, how is our investment time grown over time to getting on the Internet in in Tech? Yes. So we spent we spent about eighteen minutes touch to phones before the first iphone before two thousand seven. So you gave up like a stood of an hour everyday to your fun, which is not that much time some time but it's not that much time. Now today the average for an adult in the United States and it's very similar across the. Developed world is about four hours. So it's it's increased by a factor of about twelve thirteen fourteen and if you if you imagine that being expanded across the lifespan, we're talking between ten and twenty years of your life depending on whether you're alive or heavy user of the fun. So you're giving up effectively one or two decades of your life to this device. Unbelievable and the thing is even when you say that number I bet so many people like well, that's not me. How can you quantify that because a lot of people feel the same way until they get tracked, they think that they may be fifty percent of the time that they actually do. It's true in two thousand fifteen reached out to this guy who created now colt moment and Marmon was one of the first really sophisticated track is that to what you were doing on your phone how much time he was spending occasionally you get these Ping, sang a you happy with your engagement right now and he he said to me. Before you use it before you install it on your phone and tell me what do you think how long do you think spending on your phone and? He said to me most people have no idea and that was true for me too I guest and so I guess like. I thought an hour but just to be concerned about her I said, how about ninety minutes I'll say ninety minutes a day and I started using this track and was three three and a half hours a day. So I was I was under estimating by more than half and I said to him that's crazy that I have no idea how much time I'm giving up and it's such a lot of the white indict and he said it's totally typical most of us are using twice or even three times more than we think we are.

New York Adam Ulcer United States Nyu Stern School Of Business Professor Of Social Psychology Sean New York Times Associate Professor Of Marketi Professor Marmon School Of Business TED Princeton University LA
Trump, Biden push into crucial first 2020 campaign face-off

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 2 weeks ago

Trump, Biden push into crucial first 2020 campaign face-off

"Both Joe both sides campaigns and Jill are expecting Biden have been trying have a fierce released to one ninety more up the of other their minutes personal in the tonight hours tax at the before presidential returns the just debate debate before in Cleveland tonight's Biden's first release presidential president last debate trump year's tax has told returns advisers the return showing he show will launch the he bidens and a his full reported wife assault paid taxable nearly on Joe income two Biden hundred last eighty year of but about eight some thousand nine aides hundred dollars are forty pushing in four federal him thousand to beat income more dollars tax measured they paid saying that's after nearly in some The three New York ways Times hundred the debates thousand reported are in more president federal about trump taxes the president paid little including versus or himself roughly no two federal hundred then eighty bite income eight tax thousand in several and that he in should recent personal focus years income on selling tax the his trump campaign's record the release and accusing not comes attacking the after Biden The New Biden camp York of asking Times for reported others numerous though president are breaks encouraging trump during paid him the to just debate be seven aggressive hundred and fifty says dollars Biden it backed and federal has out said of income a he search expects tax in both intended twenty personal sixteen to make attacks short and neither twenty arguing candidates seventeen wearing that's an all earpiece and the president nine knows through in which ten how to he do of could the fifteen be fed since answers years he's before not that smart Biden's enough the campaign to president debate called angrily the the facts report denies fake news what Sager he calls but made still Ghani false refuses Washington crazy to release his random tax returns ridiculous Biden's assertions already released Sager two decades made Ghani worth Washington Sager made Donnie Washington

Jill Biden Cleveland President Trump Assault Ghani Washington Sager Donnie Washington JOE New York
Biden releases 2019 tax returns ahead of debate

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 2 weeks ago

Biden releases 2019 tax returns ahead of debate

"Joe and Jill Biden have released more of their personal tax returns just before tonight's first presidential debate the return show the bidens reported taxable income last year of about nine hundred forty four thousand dollars they paid nearly three hundred thousand in federal taxes including roughly two hundred eighty eight thousand in personal income tax the release comes after The New York Times reported president trump paid just seven hundred fifty dollars and federal income tax in both twenty sixteen and twenty seventeen and nine in ten of the fifteen years before that the president called the report fake news but still refuses to release his tax returns Biden's already released two decades worth Sager made Donnie Washington

JOE The New York Times Donald Trump President Trump Sager Donnie Washington Jill Biden
Trump went even further than other uber-rich to shrink taxes

The Takeaway

05:03 min | 2 weeks ago

Trump went even further than other uber-rich to shrink taxes

"On Sunday night the New York Times published the first piece in an investigation detailing President Donald Trump's tax return data from the past two decades according to the Times reporting the president did not pay federal income taxes in eleven of the eighteen years they looked at and he also reportedly just paid seven hundred and fifty dollars federal income taxes in both two, thousand, sixteen and twenty seventeen the revelations about trump's tax records come less than six weeks before the November election and with first presidential debate just hours away some Americans will be. Watching closely to see what more the president has to say on the matter president trump defended his tax record on Monday by saying on twitter that he was quote entitled to Take Advantage of tax loopholes like everyone else for more on this, we turn to Jeffrey Stein White, house economics reporter for The Washington Post Jeff Welcome back to the show. Hey, thanks so much from you backbone. So lot of tax code stuff to get through but let's remind our listeners. Why has the president not voluntarily disclosed his tax records so far? Well I think we're seeing the reason right now the president broke a decades of precedent and refusing as two thousand sixteen presidential candidate truly says tax returns. He has claimed that he cannot do this because he is under audit, but there is nothing that would stop him from say having released all the years of his tax returns prior to the current Audit The irs has not made clear that trump is unable to do this and a lot of the attorneys we've spoken to have said. that it might be difficult on some of the edge cases related to the audit but overall, you know he could do it. So that has been more or less pretty clearly knocked down fallacy at this point you know the the question of why he hasn't released his tax returns became a huge controversial controversy in Congress House Democrats sued for trump's tax returns. Treasury Secretary had to explicitly deny a part of the law that says that Congress that the tax writing committees conjure entitled to the returns and yet of course, now we have them or not in your times house alleged say and so we can see a little bit why trump and his administration were. So resistant a for the public to see these documents and we know the New York Times. Didn't just. Get them yesterday they've been working on getting them are some semblance of them for years. Now, one of the most striking features at least to some Americans was how little the president paid in federal taxes for two, thousand, sixteen and twenty seventeen we're talking seven, hundred, fifty dollars Jeffrey I think I've paid more my own in my own taxes is that How do we even get to that type of the figure? That's a great question. So maybe I can try to explain it a little bit for the listeners. So most people you and I, you know we pay our federal income taxes on our wages and our salaries right? We collect check you know every other week from our employers and then at the end of the year that you know how much we make you go to the tax rate and see for your income bracket how much you pay that's what most people do, and then separately many people most people actually worked for companies and the companies also pay what's called the corporate tax rate most you know many companies are formed. As C. Corp it's called and so they pay a separate corporate tax, which is now twenty one percent. The Republican Tax Law lowered the corporate tax rate from thirty five percents to twenty one percent Donald Trump is actually in neither of those categories the either the personal income tax situation that that I described for wages and salaries or in the corporation corporate business tax, he's formed as a what's called a sole proprietorship or an escort. These are called pass through entities and what a pastor renting means. There's a bunch of different sort of legal former legal structures that constitute pastors, but the upshot is that the business owner. Is His tax on his business and his personal taxes sort of as one combined thing. So that means that his personal income tax obligations is often just reflective of what the businesses doing in trump's case is taking such tremendous losses particularly on his golf courses that he's able to offset his other tax obligations including what we normally think of as your federal income tax obligations trump has a ton of money. He has a ton of assets but what's known as his Agi, his adjusted gross income. which helps determine your federal income tax rate is actually quite low because if you're formed as proprietorship or as an escort Broza pass through your acquiring these assets, they're increasing your net wells but they're not actually leading to your your average income to be that high, and that's why trump's income payments. You know federal income tax payments were only seven, hundred fifty

Donald Trump President Trump New York Times Jeffrey Stein White Twitter Washington Reporter Congress House Business Owner Congress IRS Broza C. Corp
Great Moments in Communication!

The Past and the Curious

06:23 min | 3 weeks ago

Great Moments in Communication!

"Sure is easy today. A quick pair of thumbs can easily send a text to a friend email someone around the globe or place a call to order a pizza. Each time you do any of these things information is being transmitted from one place to another faster than you can say Trans Atlantic cable. Trends stop already there you can stop. But if you have learned anything from this show, you should know that it wasn't always this easy. A device called the Telegraph. Was the first big development in getting information from one point to another. It changed things dramatically because it was the first time information didn't have to be physically carried a letter on horseback a note on a boat, even a message in a bottle. These were a few of the only ways to tell someone in another place something anything. Imagine how different life was and imagine how revolutionary it must have been when an electric pulse could finally travel through a wire and deliver a message to that person much more quickly. British scientists, William Cook, and Charles. Manson created the First Commercial Telegraph. That wasn't all they dabbled in. We'd stint also invented a new kind of Concertina squeezy Reed instrument sort of like an accordion, as well as the stereo scope Victorian Parlor device that looked like a funny pair of binoculars and created three dimensional images out of. Pictures printed onto changeable cards. If you've ever used a view master toy, it was kind of like that. Anyway, their version of the Telegraph used multiple wires to carry electric pulses, which would move needles on the receiving end. These needles would point to the letters on a dial. This would slowly spell out the words of a message letter by letter in one sense, their version was nice because it required. No special. Code or a special understanding from the operator you just had to know how to read but installing the multiple wires was expensive, inconsistent and difficult. So soon, Samuel Morse's single wire telegraph became the international favorite because the message was on a single wire. It could only send one letter at a time and it didn't actually use letters but something to represent letters a required people to use a code known as Morse Code. Operators had to learn a new alphabet of short dots or debts and long dashes or does of the code to get each letter which they would translate. It wasn't immediate telegraphs took time to send and receive as the letter by letter codes had to travel along the wire, but it was still faster than trains, horses or running really really fast almost as soon as Morse's telegraph debuted in the eighteen forties someone was. Like Hey, we should put one of these in the ocean and send messages to Europe at the time to send a letter from New York to London usually took twelve days of sea travel that's not even factoring in the time on land, the letter would need to be carried. So communication took a long time Samuel Morse believed in his creation wanted it to make a difference. So he said great idea. Let me help. Turns out running a wire across the Atlantic. Ocean was a lot harder than you might think. Or. Maybe your a reasonable person and you realized immediately that this was a super difficult thing to do. It was especially. So in the eighteen hundreds either way there was a guy who with Sammy Morris help was going to see that it happened no matter what got in the way. Name was Cyrus field and he got rich in the paper business. It wasn't under Mifflin that he founded but another real and frightening paper company that sold newsprint to the Penny Press tabloid newspapers of New England. The company did so well that he retired at the age of thirty four as one of New York's richest men. With plenty of life. was he dedicated the remainder to the transatlantic cable a wire to stretch across the ocean settled on the bottom deep below the water? This marvel to be would carry electric signals and deliver international messages in Samuel Morse's special code both America and England loved the idea and pledged support and some money he sold stock in his New Telegraph Company to help raise funds but mostly he put up his own sweet sweet paper making money to get the project off the ground or I guess underwater. We'll spare you the super technical details mostly because we are kids, podcasters and not electrical engineers but telegraphic cable had to be over twenty six hundred miles long to stretch from Europe to North America, and every one of the twenty six hundred miles of cable had to be insulated and protected from the rocky bottom corrosion from the salty seawater and any marine life that may cause trouble. So it was coated in latex then tarred hemp and lastly wrapped in heavy iron braids is took months for giant teams to make. In eighteen fifty seven nearly two decades after Morse's Telegraph debut two ships sailed out from the coast of Ireland and started to unspoiled the gigantic telegraph cable to the bottom of the ocean the mood aboard the British ship HMS Agamemnon and the American ship USS Niagara was probably bubbling from excitement. Those aboard watched the first of the cable disappear into the mysterious ocean, they must have known they stood on the threshold of a new frontier ready to connect two continents as never before with the power of one seemingly magical. The VIBRATO. The line you mean the cable we have to stretch across the ocean for the next few months it's only the first day. Broken just flopping around at the bottom of the ocean. Okay. So after just a few miles had been unschooled, the would-be transatlantic cable snapped undeterred. The brave crews used grappling hooks to find the lost

Samuel Morse New York Europe New Telegraph Company Atlantic Sammy Morris New England Cyrus Field Manson William Cook Hms Agamemnon Mifflin Penny Press Charles North America England America Ireland London
Analyzing The NY Times Trump Tax Return Story (In Depth)

Radical Personal Finance

06:12 min | 3 weeks ago

Analyzing The NY Times Trump Tax Return Story (In Depth)

"The president's taxes long concealed records show trump's chronic losses and years of tax avoidance. I'M GONNA go through this story with you in an extremely detailed way I'm going to give you an overview. Tell you what's in the article was not in the article, and then we'll go through it in a an extremely detailed ways that you can get an idea of Some lessons that you can learn and apply to your own life, and I'll talk to you about what's behind the scenes so that you can feel much more competent when discussing this or really any other kind of of article this article in the New York Times is going to read I. Guess I should say, obviously, it's GONNA re differently depending on the political back on that you come. But it's going to be read very differently based upon whether you have any knowledge or familiarity with tax code in general how taxes work in the United States how business works etc or if you don't and. For that reason, it's really fascinating to look at People's responses to this article because the responses dramatically depending on. I guess somebody's exposure to it. So I, let me give you Joshua's summary of the article begin with Lead The New York Times Obtained Donald Trump tax information extending over more than two decades revealing struggling properties vast right offs an audit battle and hundreds of millions in debt coming due in short the New York Times of tained evidently all of trump's tax returns over the last fifteen years or so including returns from the business organizations that he is involved in. They've evidently analyzed those returns and they basically wanted to make a few basic statements number one. There was no evidence of malfeasance uncovered with regard to Russia or other kinds of of basic Allegations that have been been being made the basic arguments that they that they tried to advance in this article or number one that president trump has lost lots and lots of money over the years and I think that's the probably when the authors were riding trying to say, what do we talk about? They were basically trying to say, well, let's prove that. President trump is not a very good businessman because he's lost lots of money that would be number one with regard to potential areas of misdeeds. They talk extensively about a few basic things. Number one is the use of business losses across the organization including a seventy something million dollar tax deduction that had been claimed for and filed for from A. Number of years ago, talking to that number a little in a little bit consulting fees and also deductions whether deductions are are valid or not. Now I think for the anti-trump crowd. Unfortunately, there's no smoking gun in the taxes and this is hard hard to overstate how important this story is in political terms have been many political consultants who for many years been saying well, if we could just get a hold of the tax returns, then we could prove all of these things about president. Trump's crookedness and all the things that he's done wrong and then we'll. We'll be able to make that case as a slam dunk case that does not seem to be the case or at least if that is the case, the New York Times did not choose to profile anything in this initial story as a financial planner story and I said, Yep okay. That makes sense. Yup that makes sense. No surprise there. Yup. That sense that makes sense. That's make sense. Explain all the details of how. How that is but I don't see this is not a bombshell story for a financial planner and so I think that was that's one thing that's worth pointing out most of the techniques and and things discussed here is exactly what I would understand. In fact, much of what I teach radical personal finance. When I teach tax planning, the techniques are just simply a little bit grander in scale than what a lot of people do but there's not really any fundamental difference that I can see from what president trump has. been doing over the years versus what I teach people to do to save on their taxes. So let's begin and I'm going to give you a detailed analysis and I'm doing this just. So you can think about my brain of how I read articles like this I I'm I'm not I don't have a political horse in the race. I'm not trying to make go on where the other, but it is really interesting to read an article like this and think about the challenge of writing it I'm not. I'm not an anti, New York Times Guy I'm not a Pro New York Times guy probably read and and respect newspapers much more than I do many other many other forms of of news and I think that the Arctic the authors of this of this story. Russ boot Suzanne Craig Mike MacIntyre is the story of their lives right where they've been working hard to get it just right and you see that carefulness in the writing, but we'll still analyze A. Little bit of the land is a little bit of the details along the way through as well. So we begin with a with the lead. Donald J, trump paid seven hundred and fifty dollars in federal income taxes the year he won the presidency in his first year in the White House he paid another seven hundred fifty dollars. He had paid no income taxes at all in ten of the previous fifteen years largely because he reported losing much more money than he made. As the president wages reelection campaign that polls say he is in danger of losing his finances are under stress beset by losses and hundreds of millions of dollars in debt are coming do that he has personally guaranteed also hanging over him as a decade-long audit battle with the Internal Revenue Service over the legitimacy of the seventy two point nine, million dollar tax refund that he claimed and received after declaring huge losses, an adverse ruling could cost him more than one hundred, million dollars. Now in that lead, we see these these themes that I've talked about and I just I give you my reactions to what it says here most of this is designed to have a good news hook, which is true, and that's what a new newspaper should do. It's pretty amazing that somebody who is renowned and purported to be a billionaire would only pay seven hundred fifty dollars in income taxes and to the average person. Who doesn't understand taxes that will sound like a shocking reality. A shocking number

Donald Trump President Trump New York Times United States Pro New York Times Internal Revenue Service Russia Joshua Donald J White House Russ Suzanne Craig Mike Macintyre
Interview with Shyamala Prayaga

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

06:46 min | 3 weeks ago

Interview with Shyamala Prayaga

"Hello and welcome to the today podcast. I'm your host, Kathleen Mulch and I'm your host Ronald smells our our guest. Today is Shammala Pro Yoga who is the autonomous digital assistant vision lead at Ford High Shinola. Thank you so much for joining us today on today. Thank you so much. It's my pleasure. Yes. Welcome Chamois, and thanks for joining us. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners and tell them a little bit about your background and your current role at Ford. So. Yeah. I'M GONNA and I'm the frontal known job. You know your aren't complete. So basically, I lead the wishing funded autonomous official assistance the now Newton values cases in what technologies do we need, what kind of experience we need to design, and then bringing it onto the order to find the expedience exempted. So I've been with old saw announced deals. Now on food I will voice box technologies, which is now at all students. On, board with Amazon and that is weird. Mijo. Needed on I will with little up signs once size companies as well. So I've been in the expedience design roller far on mostly two decades now today's about me. Yeah. Well, that's great. Well, you know we do spend a lot of time talking about all these different applications of AI. We call the seven patterns of Ai and we were really excited to have you present. And participate in a panel at our data for a conference which was held live September fourteenth through eighteen, twenty, twenty virtually of course, because everything is virtual but we had you WANNA panel and it was fantastic new shed some really great insights about a especially as it relates to voice assistance and voice and autonomous systems for data, and for those who are listening if you weren't able to attend the event have no worries because. You can still go on and you can access all the content at Data Ai C., O. N. F. DOT COM including chamois panel. So maybe as a preview to encourage those to listen to the whole panel. Chamois, why don't you tell us a little bit about your insights that you have gleaned about using I and the data challenges and some of the other challenges especially in the context of Autonomous Invoice assistance? Yeah. So so basically Voice as. You donate anyone using voices June board noticed agile. The superficial level of poison system is really good. You know when you ask the the assistant to do something, it would answer right. But Dan if you look, there's lot of technologies a lot of different kinds of things going in the background, which kind of makes the assistant waters doing fudd exam. You said play music, veteran recognizing usage music, and understanding the Indian that you meant you want to listen to music who processing eight and then playing the music for you, and then you know natives funding backfield wrist on of these things, acknowledges, and of course, throughout this fish cutting your wise to understand. It to renege does not of data required to understand the national and then of course, you not buying your accounting guide. So there's none of the Dow which needs to be captured throughout when you're designing. Now, I also spoke about like how these voice assistance are limited to. Happy. Use Case is solo voice assistance will officially if you are you know on American with perfect English. But if you know the moment you start having some sort of accident, you know they not as much our diamond, not even the ignites if you how strong accident. So that's another problem. So of course, this dude that challenge they've been handed down from uh specific segment, not the other. Thing especially in the autonomous eighty taints they if you on an automated states is not of background nice but you cannot control. So in those kinds of scenarios, of course, in all the assistance failed ignites, but the users said. So some of the automotive companies they would say instrument the use of Leixoes the window like make sure that business background noise. But then those are not the solutions to simplify the experience of making us Seinfield behalf not of. Their time beyond making improvements everyday. But I still feel like there's more data which is required make expedience use of the US, and that is where you know we spoke about takes and how Imboden is because as we start collecting on all these data than we are getting in, do the tribal seeded as trying to be on those kinds of face? Yeah. You know that's great. I enjoyed that panel so much on the panel we also discussed humanizing privacy Can. You share with our listeners, what this means and Wyatt? So important yeah. Glad you asked him that question also writing a book about this topic, which will come in twenty twenty, one call humanizing privacy so like I mentioned. It takes his on about principle integrity fairness and responsibility dry, and then you know into would be as will. But if you look at these assistance, the biggest challenges you know are great. But then the moment that comes to do is not of issues. For example, you know like it has been so many news at Alex saw Google has been regard late listening to other things. Other reasons they were not supposed to not for pressing for the other reason. So they will those kind of leaks which has happened and even if. You know like when you first buy your device on renewables `integrated. Donate, adopt your device. You would have Johnson conditions and everything in place but then who reads the domes and conditions to know Lakewood did I actually, what do you are starting on what they are using to fulfill specifically quiz no-one really does and that is where the biggest thing is although the companies are trying to cover legally they are covering in a way which is not used as human center and I believe in Ruin ising rival. See because I feel like privacy is the stepping stone towards trust if used those feel lake, this company has the right kind of takes the ad being responsible being the being honest. The Indy Vega behalf dignity than of course, in all people will want to use it in how we do that. So I believe that it's not just the responsibility of legal or you know alike general counsel to design some Johnson conditions concerns on these the. But I believe that business something where you know that it has to be more things we need to be humanizing the entire thing privacy as fake.

Johnson Ford High Shinola Kathleen Mulch Mijo Ronald Ford United States Amazon Official Lakewood General Counsel DAN Seinfield Fudd Wyatt Google Imboden Alex
Interview with Shyamala Prayaga

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

06:46 min | 3 weeks ago

Interview with Shyamala Prayaga

"Hello and welcome to the today podcast. I'm your host, Kathleen Mulch and I'm your host Ronald smells our our guest. Today is Shammala Pro Yoga who is the autonomous digital assistant vision lead at Ford High Shinola. Thank you so much for joining us today on today. Thank you so much. It's my pleasure. Yes. Welcome Chamois, and thanks for joining us. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners and tell them a little bit about your background and your current role at Ford. So. Yeah. I'M GONNA and I'm the frontal known job. You know your aren't complete. So basically, I lead the wishing funded autonomous official assistance the now Newton values cases in what technologies do we need, what kind of experience we need to design, and then bringing it onto the order to find the expedience exempted. So I've been with old saw announced deals. Now on food I will voice box technologies, which is now at all students. On, board with Amazon and that is weird. Mijo. Needed on I will with little up signs once size companies as well. So I've been in the expedience design roller far on mostly two decades now today's about me. Yeah. Well, that's great. Well, you know we do spend a lot of time talking about all these different applications of AI. We call the seven patterns of Ai and we were really excited to have you present. And participate in a panel at our data for a conference which was held live September fourteenth through eighteen, twenty, twenty virtually of course, because everything is virtual but we had you WANNA panel and it was fantastic new shed some really great insights about a especially as it relates to voice assistance and voice and autonomous systems for data, and for those who are listening if you weren't able to attend the event have no worries because. You can still go on and you can access all the content at Data Ai C., O. N. F. DOT COM including chamois panel. So maybe as a preview to encourage those to listen to the whole panel. Chamois, why don't you tell us a little bit about your insights that you have gleaned about using I and the data challenges and some of the other challenges especially in the context of Autonomous Invoice assistance? Yeah. So so basically Voice as. You donate anyone using voices June board noticed agile. The superficial level of poison system is really good. You know when you ask the the assistant to do something, it would answer right. But Dan if you look, there's lot of technologies a lot of different kinds of things going in the background, which kind of makes the assistant waters doing fudd exam. You said play music, veteran recognizing usage music, and understanding the Indian that you meant you want to listen to music who processing eight and then playing the music for you, and then you know natives funding backfield wrist on of these things, acknowledges, and of course, throughout this fish cutting your wise to understand. It to renege does not of data required to understand the national and then of course, you not buying your accounting guide. So there's none of the Dow which needs to be captured throughout when you're designing. Now, I also spoke about like how these voice assistance are limited to. Happy. Use Case is solo voice assistance will officially if you are you know on American with perfect English. But if you know the moment you start having some sort of accident, you know they not as much our diamond, not even the ignites if you how strong accident. So that's another problem. So of course, this dude that challenge they've been handed down from uh specific segment, not the other. Thing especially in the autonomous eighty taints they if you on an automated states is not of background nice but you cannot control. So in those kinds of scenarios, of course, in all the assistance failed ignites, but the users said. So some of the automotive companies they would say instrument the use of Leixoes the window like make sure that business background noise. But then those are not the solutions to simplify the experience of making us Seinfield behalf not of. Their time beyond making improvements everyday. But I still feel like there's more data which is required make expedience use of the US, and that is where you know we spoke about takes and how Imboden is because as we start collecting on all these data than we are getting in, do the tribal seeded as trying to be on those kinds of face? Yeah. You know that's great. I enjoyed that panel so much on the panel we also discussed humanizing privacy Can. You share with our listeners, what this means and Wyatt? So important yeah. Glad you asked him that question also writing a book about this topic, which will come in twenty twenty, one call humanizing privacy so like I mentioned. It takes his on about principle integrity fairness and responsibility dry, and then you know into would be as will. But if you look at these assistance, the biggest challenges you know are great. But then the moment that comes to do is not of issues. For example, you know like it has been so many news at Alex saw Google has been regard late listening to other things. Other reasons they were not supposed to not for pressing for the other reason. So they will those kind of leaks which has happened and even if. You know like when you first buy your device on renewables `integrated. Donate, adopt your device. You would have Johnson conditions and everything in place but then who reads the domes and conditions to know Lakewood did I actually, what do you are starting on what they are using to fulfill specifically quiz no-one really does and that is where the biggest thing is although the companies are trying to cover legally they are covering in a way which is not used as human center and I believe in Ruin ising rival. See because I feel like privacy is the stepping stone towards trust if used those feel lake, this company has the right kind of takes the ad being responsible being the being honest. The Indy Vega behalf dignity than of course, in all people will want to use it in how we do that. So I believe that it's not just the responsibility of legal or you know alike general counsel to design some Johnson conditions concerns on these the. But I believe that business something where you know that it has to be more things we need to be humanizing the entire thing privacy as fake.

Johnson Ford High Shinola Kathleen Mulch Mijo Ronald Ford United States Amazon Official Lakewood General Counsel DAN Seinfield Fudd Wyatt Google Imboden Alex
"two decades" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

POLITICO's Pulse Check

13:41 min | 6 months ago

"two decades" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

"My head so Dan the reason I am asking about. Twenty years ago is that you had this big investigation. Come out this week about how around the same time when you were sitting in your college dorm room playing video games. I was sitting in my basement listening to with my brother. Some officials in the White House were preparing for a serious pandemic. Like we're seeing right now at this exact moment and others in the White House though were ignoring it. I mean I WANNA get into some of this story that you wrote. I. I'm curious. Why did you focus on that chapter of recent history when I mean? There's just so much going on right now. Jeremy I think that a theme of the current reporting is how much of what we are doing to fight this. Pandemic this couvert. Nineteen outbreak has its roots in. What happened twenty years ago? Including all the way back to the Bush administration's efforts to fight bioterror and there are parallels between the country fighting this crisis and the moment in time after the terrorist attacks in two thousand one. We'll take us inside of the Bush. Whitehouse what was going on there at this time. In two thousand one the Bush administration was trying to find its footing. The big issue in the health department across the summer of two thousand. One wasn't pandemics. It was stem cell research. Connie Thompson he was the health secretary at the time. The Alexy's are of two thousand one Tommy Thompson hadn't really done much or had any expertise in emergency preparedness or pandemic flu in fact several former officials and Told me that Secretary Thomson was set to have one of his first pandemic preparedness briefings on the morning of September eleventh. Then everything changed that day. His agenda change the health department's Focus and mission change the country changed almost immediately preparedness bio hazards. Those became top priorities for HHS which recruited new staff like a scientist named D A Henderson. Who had fought smallpox and those fears were worsened days later with the anthrax attacks that were mailed out to news outlets and lawmakers and several people died including a pair of DC postal workers. There were real fears of domestic terrorism. So I mean did these fears lead to any preemptive planning at the time for things beyond bio attacks like for things you know like the pandemic. We're seeing right now so the story gets into this a bit the idea that. Hhs needed a dedicated office to work on emergency preparedness issues and that's where Da Henderson. A bunch of other new hires scientists military experts came into play. They worked on early. Pandemic plans in one. Big Focus across two thousand to two thousand three was the idea of smallpox vaccination this. This was a fear that vice president. Cheney had that there would be an attack using smallpox on America in some way maybe on our soldiers on the frontlines possibly even on the homeland as a follow-up terror attack the administration ramped up a plan to vaccinate some if not all Americans against smallpox and this. This was something that health officials were really worried about. Because if you roll out a massive vaccination campaign you have to be sure that the side effects from those vaccinations aren't GonNa also cause new problems and DA. Henderson was one of the scientists who was really worried that there would be on a massive scale vaccination complications potentially in children so he warned President Bush not to go through with the national plan and it appears president. Bush listened to him and and other scientists and and stood down When with a more limited vaccination plan and then more notably Bush and his team pursued a plan to fight pandemic flu back in two thousand five and officials like Mike. Levitt the health secretary at the time who followed Secretary Thompson and a deputy named Alex as our ended up playing a major role in rolling out. That new plan to fight pandemic influenza. So this is the same Alex as our who's now working for president trump in the Bush administration working on planning for something. That sounds almost exactly like what we're seeing right now. It is one in the same. It is Alex as our who in the Bush administration cut his teeth on these issues before joining department. He was not a healthcare expert but as the top lawyer at the health department for four years and then as the top deputy to the secretary as our took a major role in crafting those plans and learning the lessons of preparedness. One former official told me that he's our had a binder of many tabs. Essentially all the emergency plans. You'd ever need if there was an emergency. This was a guy who really lived the idea of being prepared for whatever was coming around the corner and now that we are in the middle of the pandemic that Asia another's had planned for had warned about those plans in the Bush administration are helping inform but the trump administration is doing today. So I WANNA get more into you know how this leads to what we're seeing right now under the trump administration but I I know you also talked with in the Obama White House who who took over these panic planning efforts after after the Bush administration. What did they do next well? I think it's both what did they do. And what didn't they do? And one thing that the Obama team did right away that might surprise listeners. The Obama team came in and dissolved the White House Office on Healthcare Preparedness and security. This is something that Bush did when his team took over. The White House Clinton had had an office of global security that Bush dissolved. And it's the same decision that trump would get castigated for years later This is a constant theme that a new administration comes in and for whatever reason decides. They know how to do this better. They don't need all the same offices and trappings and staffing that the previous administration did but thinking in. The Obama. White House changed quickly. Because there was a flu there were there was a pandemic the h one n one pandemic flu in two thousand nine into two thousand ten and that taught the Obama team that a preparedness plan wasn't just a necessary feature. It was a needed tactic to fight the pandemic that they were facing each one and one led to a number of investments improvements across the health department some of which came into play later in the Obama administration when the abol outbreak ravaged West Africa in came to the United States the handling of that outbreak. The handling of -able was not seen as perfect even by Obama officials. I talked to a few who admitted. They did not move as quickly as they would have liked to contain that outbreak. Partly because it was unprecedented. Bullet didn't normally move the way that that outbreak did where jumped across country borders normally at burned itself out but the combination of the H. One one fight at the beginning of the administration. The Abol outbreak at the end of the administration led the Obama team to not only have this pandemic preparedness unit inside the White House but they crafted the pandemic playbook which we talked about one hundred previous. Podcast this this step by step guide. That was supposed to help the next president. Whether Trump Hillary Clinton whoever helped the next president avoid all the pitfalls that the Obama administration ran into so then president trump takes office in two thousand seventeen. He's had two presidents before him. Prepare for pandemics. One of them is handing off a playbook of how to deal with pandemics. What happens then? The trump administration has gotten a lot of criticism for getting these handoffs and not doing enough with them. We have some of the big stories here in addition to the pandemic playbook Hall Tuesday Daniel. Lemon I wrote the story. On the trump team getting briefed and a pandemic exercise at the beginning of two thousand Seventeen Moose to those officials ended up leaving the administration and some of the officials. Who Were there like Wilbur? Ross the commerce secretary either were disinterested or some said that Ross fell asleep during that briefing. So it's fair to say that pandemic preparedness was not a top of mind issue for most trump incoming appointees 2017. One official. Who took it very seriously was a guy named Tom Bossert? He was trump's homeland. Security Adviser he had worked on pandemic preparedness during the Bush administration. He'd been a top deputy working on the pandemic flu plan. So bossert was was a big believer that the US had to be prepared for this fight. Unfortunately for Bassir. He was dismissed from the White House. Little over a year later when John Bolton came in as the new national security adviser so by the time of the corona virus outbreak arrived this year some of the officials who are best prepared to fight it had already left and officials like Alex Czar. Who who had taken lessons from his experience in the Bush administration who had warned the president back in January that this was going to be an urgent issue. Alex Azar was also politically weak as listeners of pulse check will know he had fought and lost in battles with the White House. He had fought and been mashed banana. Survival fight with Seema Verma at CMS. So he was not playing The strongest hand when he went to the White House and try to convince trump to take politically risky moves to prepare to fight the corona virus outbreak. But as as things have unfolded the past few months it's pretty clear that as our and his deputies if you're looking at the right side of history for who was trying to warn the president they will be on that side of the ledger. Even though as our in his team also clearly failed on some other things like getting the country ready. It's a complicated story. And and that's why that's why the story from this weekend was fifty seven hundred words long. It's hard to boil down. Who is right who is wrong unpreparedness because doing this kind of work is so fricking hard where you don't know what's coming around the corner and if you warn too loud no one takes you seriously if you don't warn enough then people will die tracing these responses over three administrations over twenty years the past two decades? What do you think we can learn from all of this about the response to the Corona Virus Pandemic? Right now sued. Jeremy I think the shame of it is in the middle of a crisis. There's probably less to learn than either in the build up to a moment like this when officials are sounding alarms or trying to get ready or alternately after when we have a clear picture of what went right what went wrong and how to learn and copy that but it's clear to me after interviewing officials across the past three administrations the value of practice of getting the muscle memory of knowing who to call. What are the decisions we have to make? How many supplies do we have? And who is in charge of ramping that up? Those sorts of things can happen very easily in a down moment and one big frustration that I heard again and again was the United States went through this massive planning exercise two years ago for an emergency. This happens every two years. Fema calls together different government offices. And this isn't just sit in a room and you know pointed a blackboard. And figure out where you'RE GONNA do. Hypothetically this is a role playing scenario where people are scattering around the DC area. They're making calls are kind of acting out what they would need to do what they ended up acting out was a scenario where a hurricane struck. Dc A big hurricane. What would happen? How would you respond to that disaster? The problem was the federal government. Had already done that in real life. It responded to three big hurricanes in two thousand seventeen just a few months beforehand and officials were confused as I think any of us would be. Why are we spending all of our time role playing this hypothetical situation? We have all this real world experience and I talked to officials who said we should have used that time to practice for a possible pandemic. We were overdue and some said. They raised those complaints at the time. The issue being at the bureaucracy had moved so far along on planning this other hypothetical hurricane exercise. But what I have heard again and again is if we have more tabletop exercises just people sitting in a room and deciding. How are we going to allocate ventilators? How are we going to decide when to sound the alarm on pandemics? That would train of those senior leaders to know what to do when the moment arrives..

Trump Hillary Clinton White House Obama President Bush president pandemic influenza United States scientist Obama administration secretary Secretary Thompson Da Henderson HHS smallpox Jeremy Tom Bossert White House Office official
"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

Chat With Traders

01:33 min | 10 months ago

"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

"More about these competitions but just before we do that One of the cool things with the the Tay Interface is that you can trade As you mentioned a little bit earlier directly by clicking on the ladder or the YUP clicking on the price levels think ladder is a is a tatum. That's something you can't do other crypto. Exchanges Right yes. Because you've got you will see some exchanges are coming out. Who are who may have copied not ladder because they know how popular it is and there's one in in in in testing right now but essentially the vast majority almost all don't have ladders and and what's good about ladder is that It's point and click. So you set your default sizes you can see wearing the orderbook. There are gaps so you can place orders or you can directly aggressive. Just take lift offers and you can cancel working orders and move where he orders by. Just dragging your mouse around the order. So you WANNA move it down three ticks you. You don't have to cancel the order like you do on any other exchange and reentry again here you just sort of you click highlights and you just drag it down the ladder itself. So it's very very reforest very easy to use and once you get used to the sort of you know dealing with it What's interesting is a spoke to a couple of our high frequency retail traders recently and they don't even have On their on their gooey anymore. They've just sort of deleted out. All they have is a huge groff fills a massive acid ladder the middle. Yeah I think.

"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

Chat With Traders

01:33 min | 10 months ago

"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

"More about these competitions but just before we do that One of the cool things with the the Tay Interface is that you can trade As you mentioned a little bit earlier directly by clicking on the ladder or the YUP clicking on the price levels think ladder is a is a tatum. That's something you can't do other crypto. Exchanges Right yes. Because you've got you will see some exchanges are coming out. Who are who may have copied not ladder because they know how popular it is and there's one in in in in testing right now but essentially the vast majority almost all don't have ladders and and what's good about ladder is that It's point and click. So you set your default sizes you can see wearing the orderbook. There are gaps so you can place orders or you can directly aggressive. Just take lift offers and you can cancel working orders and move where he orders by. Just dragging your mouse around the order. So you WANNA move it down three ticks you. You don't have to cancel the order like you do on any other exchange and reentry again here you just sort of you click highlights and you just drag it down the ladder itself. So it's very very reforest very easy to use and once you get used to the sort of you know dealing with it What's interesting is a spoke to a couple of our high frequency retail traders recently and they don't even have On their on their gooey anymore. They've just sort of deleted out. All they have is a huge groff fills a massive acid ladder the middle. Yeah I think.

"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

Chat With Traders

01:59 min | 10 months ago

"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

"WHO's an active crypt I try to Consider using the the tape into faces. Spa As opposed to the you know the interface that you see on every other exchange. Yeah No. It's a great question. Continue something around one particular order type that we're sort of doing a lot of fun on in competitions and trading games around and we've called it the bracket competitions and it's It's a TUB and if you're if you're an individual trader right now you would and mental processes. You WanNa buy buy bitcoin here. And then in your mind you would have a take profit level away. said he went doubt. Definitely sell it and you would have stop loss level where it's you know. What if it goes down going to cut this position well? TT bracket orders does both in one go and the beauty about bounties that you have to define the profit and the stop before you enter the order and so what it does is that it teaches you to really really good rhys managed traits. And no one's telling you where to put your stop so take your profits but the point is you have to define it takes motion away from the trade and so we discover T- brackets because we were playing around with ourselves and thought. Oh Wow this is the most disciplined way to trade and so what does is that. We educate crypto traders who trade occasionally or who are a nervous about crypto because of the volatility of it and we take them from that stone to a safe zone where they could actually portrays on and and risk manage it from from a from a loss and profit perspective and these are not brackets. And we've actually started a whole series of competition which star in the next few weeks around breaking competitions partitions and it's basically around our ally and volume and trading brackets and and you know and he said way of basically educating customers onto the platform to say look you. The crypto futures trading are not dangerous as long as you're disciplined and and your you set your your levels up front and I'm curious to know.

rhys
"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

Chat With Traders

02:20 min | 10 months ago

"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

"Based Okay Okay Coke and you touched on Investors just before and that's one of the things I found really it fascinating about coin. Flex is that the high profile investors which he did have on board one of those being Taytay or trading technologies. How did that relationship nations ship come about because it's very interesting? Trading technologies is a software company and the corner pioneers in this space especially in the the the futures and options world. And neither. I've been getting more. And more into Crypto by offering it through the platform etcetera. How come it made sense for them to actually become partner of coin flex? Yeah so for. I think from their perspective they were. They are as you say. The largest fixed income Icefield software vendor in the world. I I read somewhere that a trillion dollars of off a fixed income flow of futures flow goes through that infrastructure on a daily basis and of market leaders. They were looking for a way to sort of differentiate and add to that sort of product offerings and they started investigating crypto will kind of unknown to us at the same time We were looking at launching this exchange. And what we knew we were good at was the matching engine the marketing being the kind of operations the whole exchange running business will What we knew we weren't good front and you know like a lot of crypto after exchanges The front end is his got you log into your system. And he's got a big fat buy and sell button graphing not a lot not a lot else and and so we were looking for a software partner that could fill the fill that space with multiple auditoriums exciting staff and ladders and brackets. Listen all kinds of different ways of managing risk and trading and and We saw having a conversation with t t and soon become became a power in that you. We're going to be great partners because we both take what the other want to do At all wanted to have. And that's how the policy was born. Yeah I think that's really cool that you have linked up with Taytay and you know in my eyes I. It added a lot of credibility to coin flex will win beginning to have those.

partner Taytay Icefield
"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

Chat With Traders

02:20 min | 10 months ago

"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

"Based Okay Okay Coke and you touched on Investors just before and that's one of the things I found really it fascinating about coin. Flex is that the high profile investors which he did have on board one of those being Taytay or trading technologies. How did that relationship nations ship come about because it's very interesting? Trading technologies is a software company and the corner pioneers in this space especially in the the the futures and options world. And neither. I've been getting more. And more into Crypto by offering it through the platform etcetera. How come it made sense for them to actually become partner of coin flex? Yeah so for. I think from their perspective they were. They are as you say. The largest fixed income Icefield software vendor in the world. I I read somewhere that a trillion dollars of off a fixed income flow of futures flow goes through that infrastructure on a daily basis and of market leaders. They were looking for a way to sort of differentiate and add to that sort of product offerings and they started investigating crypto will kind of unknown to us at the same time We were looking at launching this exchange. And what we knew we were good at was the matching engine the marketing being the kind of operations the whole exchange running business will What we knew we weren't good front and you know like a lot of crypto after exchanges The front end is his got you log into your system. And he's got a big fat buy and sell button graphing not a lot not a lot else and and so we were looking for a software partner that could fill the fill that space with multiple auditoriums exciting staff and ladders and brackets. Listen all kinds of different ways of managing risk and trading and and We saw having a conversation with t t and soon become became a power in that you. We're going to be great partners because we both take what the other want to do At all wanted to have. And that's how the policy was born. Yeah I think that's really cool that you have linked up with Taytay and you know in my eyes I. It added a lot of credibility to coin flex will win beginning to have those.

partner Taytay Icefield
"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

Chat With Traders

02:20 min | 10 months ago

"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

"Based Okay Okay Coke and you touched on Investors just before and that's one of the things I found really it fascinating about coin. Flex is that the high profile investors which he did have on board one of those being Taytay or trading technologies. How did that relationship nations ship come about because it's very interesting? Trading technologies is a software company and the corner pioneers in this space especially in the the the futures and options world. And neither. I've been getting more. And more into Crypto by offering it through the platform etcetera. How come it made sense for them to actually become partner of coin flex? Yeah so for. I think from their perspective they were. They are as you say. The largest fixed income Icefield software vendor in the world. I I read somewhere that a trillion dollars of off a fixed income flow of futures flow goes through that infrastructure on a daily basis and of market leaders. They were looking for a way to sort of differentiate and add to that sort of product offerings and they started investigating crypto will kind of unknown to us at the same time We were looking at launching this exchange. And what we knew we were good at was the matching engine the marketing being the kind of operations the whole exchange running business will What we knew we weren't good front and you know like a lot of crypto after exchanges The front end is his got you log into your system. And he's got a big fat buy and sell button graphing not a lot not a lot else and and so we were looking for a software partner that could fill the fill that space with multiple auditoriums exciting staff and ladders and brackets. Listen all kinds of different ways of managing risk and trading and and We saw having a conversation with t t and soon become became a power in that you. We're going to be great partners because we both take what the other want to do At all wanted to have. And that's how the policy was born. Yeah I think that's really cool that you have linked up with Taytay and you know in my eyes I. It added a lot of credibility to coin flex will win beginning to have those.

partner Taytay Icefield
"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

Chat With Traders

01:59 min | 10 months ago

"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

"Or take the business to Asia? Yeah because it's it's It became very clear to us and the vast majority of crypto taking a retail business comes out of Asia. Every day you know PSA cryptovest very interesting market in in terms of makers and take his an alternative with. I use those terms in traditional space but I certainly didn't before did a crypto but makes liquidity providers. We tend to be very sort of western Western type based businesses. And then you've got the retail side of it. Who are the takers aggressive? They are very much Asian retail and and but the vast majority of future teaches drew's business comes out on the taking side comes out of China Korea Japan Vietnam Turkey so by moving out to Asia. emend that we can be close to this customer base that we really didn't know much about because always coming out The traditional space. And so you know that these big thumbs trading western trading trading from Saudi our trade crypto. And you could get relationships with them fairly easily but we will sort of scratching your head singing right. How do I get closer to our retail? Take a base to do that. We spoke to his. You know some of shareholders were were crypto guys based out of Asia and they were like look. You know you have to be here. Because the the customers need to know that you committed to that part of the world and that's how we ended up. Yeah Edgy spend any time in Asia just personally before this before the move I had I had done. I personally love the travelling around. Asia lived in Singapore for a while as well in the past but the majority of my life has been in London. But but but a hide hyped flavors of Asia. So I knew from sort of living perspective would be very very simple but but obviously the whole unknown was the business hide. Yeah Okay and the same goes for Marcus I presume of for mark. Actually the opposite. He had no experience of Asia from a living perspective. He is very much the Californian Boston in London.

Asia China Korea Japan Vietnam London emend Marcus drew Singapore Asia.
"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

Chat With Traders

03:16 min | 10 months ago

"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

"I'm not sure where this fits into the timeline bit. I think somewhere round about here which you became introduced to Don Wilson In some listeners. Donelson is be found a and the man behind. DIRW massive project trading firm out of Chicago and now uh-huh has a global presence with like five hundred. Also people tell us a little bit about how that came about. Yeah so one of the interest- interesting transitions nations As the years went by on the floor was that as the American market sort of became very very type from an arbitrage perspective. Some of the bigger American trade traders from these. US houses started coming to Europe themselves. Because previous to this period they would sort of train their Judaism out and then kind of stay back in Chicago. Algo one fine day. This American Jen turned up in the pit and said don't Wilson of DFW and of course you know fifty guys like like looked at him and then cattle and chatting amongst ourselves. Because we've never heard of women didn't really care quite frankly but it soon became apparent that you know this guy was forced to be reckoned. I'm with and and that was my first introduction. As competitors and then towards the end of the full period came off I went to she to you. Work with dot and we actually became flatmates. He was my boss and he was Growing the DR WS European side of the business which shaw which is still hugely as you said a huge global business now in Singapore London an Chicago. What gave it away that he was a force to be reckoned with the sort of size and certainty that he traded with whereas we were we were taught to sort of keep it? Small go for big edge trades the only and Kinda recycle effectively. It's sort of an F. T. type model but in the you know due to do fifty to one hundred small trades make decent money on every one of them a few losing trades. And then you kind of go home flat and happy whereas whereas dawn was very much of the mode of this thing is miss price and I'm going to sell it and I'm going to buy back till it's family priced whereas the way we were trained as you sell something that you know if you if you thought an option was worth ten you would sell at twelve and if someone off their eleven well you know what you've made a tick take it back whereas Donna's like why would I pay Levin. It's worth ten which was very change of real mindset change so in a in a way you a very much a scalp e type of China. Yes everyone was on the floor because it's the way you kind of trained whereas don was calabro trader by around a massive position. Yeah okay okay. And did that influence your trading stall in any way it did actually because when we moved upstairs and I went to work for dawn I started to realize that we were full. For years. We'd left age. Inverted Commas are on on the Independent. And we we should have done so much better than we did but and so you sort of take skills it away and start start learning about the longer term trading which you know don was and still is I guess a master of obviously looking at where.

Don Wilson Chicago Jen Donelson dawn US Europe DFW Singapore London don China Levin Donna
"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

Chat With Traders

03:16 min | 10 months ago

"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

"I'm not sure where this fits into the timeline bit. I think somewhere round about here which you became introduced to Don Wilson In some listeners. Donelson is be found a and the man behind. DIRW massive project trading firm out of Chicago and now uh-huh has a global presence with like five hundred. Also people tell us a little bit about how that came about. Yeah so one of the interest- interesting transitions nations As the years went by on the floor was that as the American market sort of became very very type from an arbitrage perspective. Some of the bigger American trade traders from these. US houses started coming to Europe themselves. Because previous to this period they would sort of train their Judaism out and then kind of stay back in Chicago. Algo one fine day. This American Jen turned up in the pit and said don't Wilson of DFW and of course you know fifty guys like like looked at him and then cattle and chatting amongst ourselves. Because we've never heard of women didn't really care quite frankly but it soon became apparent that you know this guy was forced to be reckoned. I'm with and and that was my first introduction. As competitors and then towards the end of the full period came off I went to she to you. Work with dot and we actually became flatmates. He was my boss and he was Growing the DR WS European side of the business which shaw which is still hugely as you said a huge global business now in Singapore London an Chicago. What gave it away that he was a force to be reckoned with the sort of size and certainty that he traded with whereas we were we were taught to sort of keep it? Small go for big edge trades the only and Kinda recycle effectively. It's sort of an F. T. type model but in the you know due to do fifty to one hundred small trades make decent money on every one of them a few losing trades. And then you kind of go home flat and happy whereas whereas dawn was very much of the mode of this thing is miss price and I'm going to sell it and I'm going to buy back till it's family priced whereas the way we were trained as you sell something that you know if you if you thought an option was worth ten you would sell at twelve and if someone off their eleven well you know what you've made a tick take it back whereas Donna's like why would I pay Levin. It's worth ten which was very change of real mindset change so in a in a way you a very much a scalp e type of China. Yes everyone was on the floor because it's the way you kind of trained whereas don was calabro trader by around a massive position. Yeah okay okay. And did that influence your trading stall in any way it did actually because when we moved upstairs and I went to work for dawn I started to realize that we were full. For years. We'd left age. Inverted Commas are on on the Independent. And we we should have done so much better than we did but and so you sort of take skills it away and start start learning about the longer term trading which you know don was and still is I guess a master of obviously looking at where.

Don Wilson Chicago Jen Donelson dawn US Europe DFW Singapore London don China Levin Donna
"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

Chat With Traders

03:16 min | 10 months ago

"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

"I'm not sure where this fits into the timeline bit. I think somewhere round about here which you became introduced to Don Wilson In some listeners. Donelson is be found a and the man behind. DIRW massive project trading firm out of Chicago and now uh-huh has a global presence with like five hundred. Also people tell us a little bit about how that came about. Yeah so one of the interest- interesting transitions nations As the years went by on the floor was that as the American market sort of became very very type from an arbitrage perspective. Some of the bigger American trade traders from these. US houses started coming to Europe themselves. Because previous to this period they would sort of train their Judaism out and then kind of stay back in Chicago. Algo one fine day. This American Jen turned up in the pit and said don't Wilson of DFW and of course you know fifty guys like like looked at him and then cattle and chatting amongst ourselves. Because we've never heard of women didn't really care quite frankly but it soon became apparent that you know this guy was forced to be reckoned. I'm with and and that was my first introduction. As competitors and then towards the end of the full period came off I went to she to you. Work with dot and we actually became flatmates. He was my boss and he was Growing the DR WS European side of the business which shaw which is still hugely as you said a huge global business now in Singapore London an Chicago. What gave it away that he was a force to be reckoned with the sort of size and certainty that he traded with whereas we were we were taught to sort of keep it? Small go for big edge trades the only and Kinda recycle effectively. It's sort of an F. T. type model but in the you know due to do fifty to one hundred small trades make decent money on every one of them a few losing trades. And then you kind of go home flat and happy whereas whereas dawn was very much of the mode of this thing is miss price and I'm going to sell it and I'm going to buy back till it's family priced whereas the way we were trained as you sell something that you know if you if you thought an option was worth ten you would sell at twelve and if someone off their eleven well you know what you've made a tick take it back whereas Donna's like why would I pay Levin. It's worth ten which was very change of real mindset change so in a in a way you a very much a scalp e type of China. Yes everyone was on the floor because it's the way you kind of trained whereas don was calabro trader by around a massive position. Yeah okay okay. And did that influence your trading stall in any way it did actually because when we moved upstairs and I went to work for dawn I started to realize that we were full. For years. We'd left age. Inverted Commas are on on the Independent. And we we should have done so much better than we did but and so you sort of take skills it away and start start learning about the longer term trading which you know don was and still is I guess a master of obviously looking at where.

Don Wilson Chicago Jen Donelson dawn US Europe DFW Singapore London don China Levin Donna
"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

Chat With Traders

01:48 min | 10 months ago

"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

"Situations like that. We breached limits There will be took precious. Where the clear changed the margin parameters and then he would say you would have to kind of submit more margin in the morning but but it was minor tweaks around that but put but nothing more nothing too serious no so? How long did this go on for Helen? We you actually trading on the floor. I was trading on the flow offering for about eight years gradually during that period more and more products. We're going to electric trading and the options were very very much lost product Iraq to go to go upstairs because it was all the concerns at the point about how easily you know options with multiple strikes multiple months could get transported two two electric platform. I is that seems like quite a long time to be tried on the floor. Did you enjoy that experience. I absolutely It never even felt like were because you would kind of go there and the buzz of of you know people surrounding you and shouting with you. was incredible and as a trade. It was actually the easiest period to trade because you saw the flow. If you're a trader right now a market maker and electric environment you'll kind of sat in in your little office watching a screen with where there's no real indication of flow Direction size what the focus of working. What are people looking to do? Whereas when you're in the pit everything had to go through that pitzer? If you stood there from morning till noon you would get a really really good feeling for for what the market was doing east to be a profitable Abi to better manage your portfolio because you can sort of how you a lot of looking around there whereas on the electronic well you know you're very very silo D- where you are so in.

pitzer Abi Iraq Helen
"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

Chat With Traders

02:49 min | 10 months ago

"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

"Hundred. It six starting outing out You actually began trading on the floor of the life exchange London. Emma correct. That's correct. Yeah I I studied invested in London and Economics and then one evening I saw an ad for trading derivatives traders and the tea and knowing very little about it I applied right for it and the shift. Matt's questions rapid five or sort of three sets of interviews and next thing I know it was standing in the middle of a lifelong when Sunday morning. So who was that. That which you working for yes so. In the original options trading business was dominated by independent Trading trading businesses and there were three main ones at the time And they were a phone call to O'Connor associates which became Swiss banks. UBS as this derivatives arms there was a phone cold Chicago recession trading which became the derivatives arms of Bank of America and the third one was the firm that I joined Cole Cooper Naff half and associates which became the derives arm of BNP back national. PYRO PA KA and what we trading once he came onto lawf- breath so you start by being a clerk like you do on the called the CME CBOT. And I was a clerk on the gill option guilty. confucious government bond futures pit and then my first trading rose. Junior trader was in the Footsteps Hundred Index options pit. I okay so the index today operating in slightly different ways. I imagine AC- There'd be different nuances between trading bonds and then chiding an equity index wchs. Yeah this is one of the kind of interesting questions and points about options tradings. Actually but I would say about eighty percent of options tradings uniform around around irrespective of the product trait and that's because they're very complex product or trade and handle and manage and so that skill set sits independently handedly off the underlying and I will say the other twenty percent also would be kind of specialised products kill so so if you swapped which affects bombs fixed income equities you. Are you know you are learning about the new on the lying but your fundamental skill set. It's transportable which interestingly Sali's probably the other way around normal futures trading because if you like yourself big equity trader I gave you a a I would say. Hey Ira and he is the you know the list of drop down. Trading connections to fifty largest government bonds are that you'd be like what is this in a way that makes sense to me whereas an option guy can easily pollinate across different asset classes. And what was.

London Ira Matt Emma Junior trader equity trader UBS lawf- breath O'Connor gill Sali Cole Cooper Chicago Bank of America
"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

Chat With Traders

02:49 min | 10 months ago

"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

"Hundred. It six starting outing out You actually began trading on the floor of the life exchange London. Emma correct. That's correct. Yeah I I studied invested in London and Economics and then one evening I saw an ad for trading derivatives traders and the tea and knowing very little about it I applied right for it and the shift. Matt's questions rapid five or sort of three sets of interviews and next thing I know it was standing in the middle of a lifelong when Sunday morning. So who was that. That which you working for yes so. In the original options trading business was dominated by independent Trading trading businesses and there were three main ones at the time And they were a phone call to O'Connor associates which became Swiss banks. UBS as this derivatives arms there was a phone cold Chicago recession trading which became the derivatives arms of Bank of America and the third one was the firm that I joined Cole Cooper Naff half and associates which became the derives arm of BNP back national. PYRO PA KA and what we trading once he came onto lawf- breath so you start by being a clerk like you do on the called the CME CBOT. And I was a clerk on the gill option guilty. confucious government bond futures pit and then my first trading rose. Junior trader was in the Footsteps Hundred Index options pit. I okay so the index today operating in slightly different ways. I imagine AC- There'd be different nuances between trading bonds and then chiding an equity index wchs. Yeah this is one of the kind of interesting questions and points about options tradings. Actually but I would say about eighty percent of options tradings uniform around around irrespective of the product trait and that's because they're very complex product or trade and handle and manage and so that skill set sits independently handedly off the underlying and I will say the other twenty percent also would be kind of specialised products kill so so if you swapped which affects bombs fixed income equities you. Are you know you are learning about the new on the lying but your fundamental skill set. It's transportable which interestingly Sali's probably the other way around normal futures trading because if you like yourself big equity trader I gave you a a I would say. Hey Ira and he is the you know the list of drop down. Trading connections to fifty largest government bonds are that you'd be like what is this in a way that makes sense to me whereas an option guy can easily pollinate across different asset classes. And what was.

London Ira Matt Emma Junior trader equity trader UBS lawf- breath O'Connor gill Sali Cole Cooper Chicago Bank of America
"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

Chat With Traders

02:49 min | 10 months ago

"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

"Hundred. It six starting outing out You actually began trading on the floor of the life exchange London. Emma correct. That's correct. Yeah I I studied invested in London and Economics and then one evening I saw an ad for trading derivatives traders and the tea and knowing very little about it I applied right for it and the shift. Matt's questions rapid five or sort of three sets of interviews and next thing I know it was standing in the middle of a lifelong when Sunday morning. So who was that. That which you working for yes so. In the original options trading business was dominated by independent Trading trading businesses and there were three main ones at the time And they were a phone call to O'Connor associates which became Swiss banks. UBS as this derivatives arms there was a phone cold Chicago recession trading which became the derivatives arms of Bank of America and the third one was the firm that I joined Cole Cooper Naff half and associates which became the derives arm of BNP back national. PYRO PA KA and what we trading once he came onto lawf- breath so you start by being a clerk like you do on the called the CME CBOT. And I was a clerk on the gill option guilty. confucious government bond futures pit and then my first trading rose. Junior trader was in the Footsteps Hundred Index options pit. I okay so the index today operating in slightly different ways. I imagine AC- There'd be different nuances between trading bonds and then chiding an equity index wchs. Yeah this is one of the kind of interesting questions and points about options tradings. Actually but I would say about eighty percent of options tradings uniform around around irrespective of the product trait and that's because they're very complex product or trade and handle and manage and so that skill set sits independently handedly off the underlying and I will say the other twenty percent also would be kind of specialised products kill so so if you swapped which affects bombs fixed income equities you. Are you know you are learning about the new on the lying but your fundamental skill set. It's transportable which interestingly Sali's probably the other way around normal futures trading because if you like yourself big equity trader I gave you a a I would say. Hey Ira and he is the you know the list of drop down. Trading connections to fifty largest government bonds are that you'd be like what is this in a way that makes sense to me whereas an option guy can easily pollinate across different asset classes. And what was.

London Ira Matt Emma Junior trader equity trader UBS lawf- breath O'Connor gill Sali Cole Cooper Chicago Bank of America
"two decades" Discussed on Odd Lots

Odd Lots

10:26 min | 11 months ago

"two decades" Discussed on Odd Lots

"He's the director of research at the Jerome Levy Forecasting Center great voice and great insights on markets and economics six. And today. We're going to be talking a little bit about the Fed. Monetary policy bubbles economic volatility. And things like that. There's a lot of There's a lot of belief out there that the Fed contribute to instability bubbles. But a lot of the thinking is kind of muddled Sort of overly simplistic ideas. There's about a low rate just lead to surgeons speculation SRINIVASA has some more insightful complex ideas about the nature of central banking over the last several decades and how it's contributed to less than ideal outcomes in the economy and I was GonNa talk to him now so Sri thank you very much for joining us. Thank thank you thank you John. Good to be back interesting Before we get into you wrote this paper the recently on inflation targeting but before we get into that it's funny I was looking at a chart recently of just inflation. You can measure it. Obviously several different ways. Try things over the last fifteen years as in prior further about oil prices. It's almost impossible to find any meaningful upper down trend at all even the the economic collapse collapse the boom or whatever it's like there's inch it. It kind of just stays the same flat you read like this always strikes me. They get really excited like gone. Three months annualized rate of change in core. CPI excluding healthcare services is that it's fast level in three years and they get really excited but then you zoom zoom out. It's like inflation hasn't changed dynamics in years. Yeah and we've got used to that. You know that that stability I mean that that even a small teacup in the three months. Begets yes I did. You know how much they can be attributed to fed policy in your view. The fact that inflation trends are so stable. I mean what happens when inflation trends are stable. How much would it be attributed to fed? I think certainly fed has contributed to it. And if you look at the Fed policy in the last twenty twenty thirty years What it has done is implicitly? Not trying to I mean a lot of people are a lot of motives to fan. I just wanted to be careful. Not trying to do anything they are within their mandate now it may be the framework is wrong which is what I believe But what they have tried to do. Who is the TC two things very seriously low and stable? The stable part of it is is a lot more problematic than just a low part. In my opinion it's if if you have low with a little bit of volatility around that would be okay probably. Okay maybe you need to cheat it up a little bit but but you keep the stability that you're pointing out is The is is partly the feds doing. So let's start. You wrote this paper and you took aim at a particular particular approach to monetary policy or framework. I guess maybe long recall it called inflation targeting. What is inflation targeting? When did it start? When did the Fed adopt this current framework? In your view defense. I actually officially started inflation targeting. Only in two thousand twelve but implicitly. If you look back they probably have been doing it since the early ninety s or maybe mid ninety s at least have been doing that. And even before that you know if you look at the Seventies when people really got of course upset about inflation so the original Humphry Kazakh actually called for low and stable inflation inflation to be like zero or eventually they said that two zero is not possible to supercenter over a long period of time So it's been dead implicitly. We have been doing inflation targeting in one form or the other pieces the Mid Ninety S. What what what is it? What ah it's just this idea that it's not enough to just have low inflation but that they should really worry about any sort of volatility and that is what is there Eh? What's the main approach to achieving that goal so demean approach to achieving this goal and this is the tricky part because the mechanism is never really clarified? You know the new OSC monitors so when you ask economists they would tell you. It's also expectations but these expectations channels. I mean if you really look at expected inflation expectations. They have really not changed Macho. They don't seem to have any relation to reality sometimes. So you know. I don't know how that expectation channel works except in textbooks but the basic idea between being the expectations channel is through some magic. I know they would never say magic that we all expect inflation to be low and maybe around two percent percent and if everyone sort of accepts that and if we all accept that the Fed will do whatever it takes to keep it there in that has the effective actually keeping at their right and probably the main way sort of mechanically that the Fed keeps it. There is by being very vigilant raising rates at any sort hint that inflation might be picking up to reinforce this notion among consumers among businesses that they will do it it takes that I that is that is that is clear there signaling aspect of it apart from raising rates. All the talk that goes along with it is one aspect of it to be sure you know I mean of course people to some extent you know. There is a set expectation that prices go up by two percents get revenge wage hikes about two percent. People are happy and you know that's what gets set in the pricing thing mechanism. But it doesn't work through expectations way that a lot of people think it works. But that is that's how they sort of explain it or that is in theory now you they say. Inflation targeting officially only has existed since twenty twelve defacto. It's existed since the mid nineties. Okay so then. And what was the pre the earlier approach. How does that substantively differ? From what the Fed did and sixties or the seventies or the sixties decent seventy S. They were not particularly in the seventies was a little bit different but in the fifties and sixties when they would see economy heating up and inflation starting to pick up. They were just slam the brakes but didn't particularly have an ex specific target in mind. We're not trying to target inflation. But it was also much more From the industrial l. site Much more you know like a German type economy. There were large unions and would be large unit eibar gaining so the price mechanism was a little bit different region. You didn't place mechanism. We don't have that kind of thing. So you know I mean prices were not more closely aligned with wages and productivity okay so they they still fought inflation. They still want to low inflation. And then did you say the Humphrey Hawkins mandate required them to have that. But it wasn't like we have this number number two about two percent and we were going to do what it takes. We just don't want inflation to go up and if it looks like it's going up we're starting to go up we're GONNA fight it. That is I think the the difference Prince in in the post nine thousand nine hundred zero is especially post nine thousand nine hundred ninety. Let's say That's put that as a cutoff is the mandate on on stable inflation and what they think contributes to the inflationary pressures see in the past. They used to have some kind of immune. If you try to recast it into immortal and try to F- Back fit the data. They did some terrible rule kind of thing all through up to nine hundred ninety. They have been doing that ever since as well but they also have an extra emphasis on not just the output gap but on how fast. You're eating output gap. I mean so you'd let's say you have a huge Joe put gap. Let's say not yet for simplicity. Sake night who is five. Percent Unemployment is ten percent is huge right and that night. who made self overstate in an unemployment employment? I mean the the natural rate. But that's a huge gap but let's say you're accelerating should the FBI worried. Right should should economies accident and should be worried because the gap so big but they seem to impact work shows that they seem to be really concerned. You're accelerating very fast. Even if the gap is yeah so even if there's it's clear earlier that all right everyone thinks that ten percent is a very long way from full employment like what we saw obviously in the immediate during the crisis there is almost no oh level if if if we got hot growth. It doesn't matter. How big that gap is that makes fed officials nervous at this right and you? Who've you saw that early in the in the expansion right they were not people? Keep seeing now in hindsight all the Fed should have been more accommodative. They should have said this at that. But you'll like foreign two thousand twenty six years ago when they put put anthem thing. I mean you know when things heat up a little bit they react to the heating up and I kind of knew that isn't new so you did not. Let's see that in the sixties and Seventies. It was a big output gap. If it was clear that there was a lot of people who are left to come back in the workforce they would be they would welcome. Yeah fast-growth because that would get to yes absolute so is that Greenspan who sort of beat was the first I mean in a way I mean. Sometimes it's interesting because Greenspan's legacy I think over the years as I think people deteriorated a little bit too. Sometimes I think he made some interesting choices and was certainly certainly seemed to tolerate the boom a little bit in a way that maybe modern central bankers will be more uncomfortable. Yeah the longer you stay the greater that's under your remit get started on Yeah I mean he did in the one thousand nine hundred eighty two to some extent for sure he led the boom boom run. Yeah and and that's right. I mean there are two aspects to letting the boom ron is is is not necessarily bad but the problem with letting the boom run in backdrop of an inflation framework with the Fed says. It's going to keep inflation. Control leads to build up and leverage and the financial exist. That's the issue right and so this gets to you kind of one of your key points but also sort of what seems like the unspoken or increasingly vocalized problem with all of this. which is is that so far? We've just been talking about this sort of Push pull relationship between unemployment and inflation right. But then there's this added dimension of Financial Leverage and speculation I so we had a very good economy throughout much of the ninety s right but when things are good for a long time people.

Fed director of research SRINIVASA Jerome Levy Forecasting Center Greenspan Sri Humphry Kazakh FBI OSC Humphrey Hawkins ron Joe