35 Burst results for "Two Centuries"

"two centuries" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

In Defense of Plants Podcast

05:06 min | 5 d ago

"two centuries" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

"So yeah, it's a really fun project. And I got a shout out, Bill mcclane, again, this retired botanist and just the quotes that he came. He found. We're just like, they're just, I mean, if you go back and if you all want to go back and read this paper, it is just so much fun to hear what the heck was happening out there on the landscape. It was so interesting. Yeah, it's really red. And I mean, we're buddies, right? And I know you and I really respect the work you do, but even if I didn't know all this about you, I don't think I would Bach at saying this is a really amazing paper that takes a lot of interesting historical social sciences and combines it with hard ecology to almost show you sort of a, I hesitate to say prescription for what the landscape should be in this region, but it gives you a better idea of what was going on and what you sort of moving forward, what we can kind of think about in terms of how these ecosystems change and our influence by our actions. But as someone who's done the research and literature reviews and spent hours agonizing over data, how do you take quotes and letters and all of these very anecdotal sort of data points, so to speak and turn them into data that's usable in this context. I mean, what was that process like for you? Was it a learning curve? Or was it something that's kind of like, oh no, we'll just kind of code it as X, Y, and Z and go from there. Well, here's another familiar pet peeve of yours and mine with research is that you're probably not going to go into it thinking I'm going to spend 20 years in a library or I'm going to get ten year or I'm going to get a grant based on this. So you have to have some patience and flexibility, which the modern research world will not allow you for a type of thing. But turning that into data in this particular thing was like it was kind of question driven based on a lot of a couple of debates that were happening with our modern sort of management world. Specifically, I can talk about when is the best time of the year to burn? When did things burn historically? And one of the most tangible results we said is that the burn season historically was October and November in a part of the world. After first freeze, you'd kill back the annual, the vegetation dried out and you get a little dry period. And that primarily wouldn't burn. So you can talk all you want about late summer burns in this part of the world or spring burns. They probably did happen, but they were probably much much rare and much smaller in scale, most likely. So there are a couple of small things like that. Okay, where do we have? We threw out actually a lot of the accounts. We got because they didn't have a tangible variables that we could use. What time of the year was it, you know, what direction was the wind blowing? Where was the fire in the country? What day of the year was it? How big of an area did burn? Was it just, you know, small or was it a huge area? So we sort of said, okay, let's take those data points and try to make something interesting and useful out of those. Lightning. What was the cost? So that was another big thing. You know, you saw a clear trend going from this is exclusively Native American fire for hunting. Then it became Native American fire for I got a bunch of white people on my trail, tracking me in the military, and I'm literally burning to cover up my tracks so they can't track me, you know? Yeah, yeah, right. Or like I'm trying to actually keep these Europeans out of here, and I'm burning because I know they freak out by fire and we know how to manage fire. We know how to deal with fire, right? And then it turned into the source was, you know, all the things we talked about Europeans escaping from their campsite or something like that or it burned over a fire line. And then it became really, really huge source was locomotives like when there was steam powered coal locomotives were going through their little spark and then boom, you know? So that was kind of a fun thing to be able to track that data and say, what was the source? Of fires too. Wow. I mean, you're catching Succession in a lot of different ways. Culturally, historically, actual ecologically, so to speak. And I'm sure landscape context plays a big role in this. And so did you have to kind of also factor in how much the landscape was changing because of European settlement in the context of like you said, when you let a fire today goes two acres and then it Peters out when it hits an industrial cornfield, but historically that could have raged on for thousands of acres. Yeah, that's a great question. And we weren't able to fact that into the fire necessarily what was happening in real time. But it became apparent in some of the quotes like you could just tell, you know, you're talking about grass fires and then you're talking about wheat stubble, or people talking about, well, I just planted these acres of cool season grasses poa and brome around my house to keep the fires away, you know, as much as I can. But then they would talk about this came up over and over and over again was..

Bill mcclane Bach Peters
"two centuries" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

In Defense of Plants Podcast

05:51 min | 5 d ago

"two centuries" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

"When it hits the next cornfield. Exactly. Exactly. Right? So, you know, yeah, if everybody's using fire to burn their to heat their home or to do whatever there's going to be a lot of escaping whatever. So there was still some scariness, let's say around there was a lot of fire out. They're still being used for 1830 to 1850 in my part of the Midwest. A lot of it was escaped. But they were starting to use it. Okay, I'm going to burn off my crops so that I can plow it more easily or I can get my planting in. I'm going to burn off my hay field to increase some productivity and release some nutrients to the soil. I'm going to burn out my cattle pasture or my wood lot just so that I can get more grass in the understory. I'm going to put in a firebreak here around my house. You know, I'm sick of these, you know, snakes. These damn snakes. Yeah. So it changed, and eventually they got good at it. They were still burning into the 19th century. You know, up into the smoky mountain. People were burning a lot. There was a real culture of fire, but it was, you know, if in my little lot here, I want to use fire as a tool, and they learn how to use it. And sort of responsibly. It's really interesting to me. There was a paper that came out about ten years ago. And it was using modus satellite technology, which I don't understand. I don't know anything about it. But they basically yeah, yeah. Some satellite in the computer space world algorithms. They're right. You know, satellites flying over and every time they spotted a fire in North America, they'd be able to pinpoint it and market it down. And so it was like a ten year dot map of every landscape sort of ish fire across North America. And you see these incredibly clear patterns, places that bright up today that are still being burned regularly. And it's very much a cultural thing. And the Ozark mountains, those mountains are being burned constantly. Then they were for a service went back and interviewed every fire escape fire that they could find and every land manager they could finally say, what caused this fire? What's that fire? And it was cultural. All culture. It's like I just learned how to burn my back 40 acres for my grandfather and I've been doing it forever. Or the number one source was arson and feud. I had a feud with this guy. And so I was faster on fire. I swear to God. This was the number one source of fire in the forest service region. Our beef. Yeah. That's not a joke. That is literally I couldn't believe it when I read. It was like 70% for a given year of fires like that. And then when you look at the other place that tend to let up would be like the northern great plains with the weight wheat fields, and that was very much an agricultural. Burn off the stubble, easier to plant and to plow in the future. And, you know, I'm not worried about it escaping because it's an agricultural landscape or in the Flint hills of Kansas. It's like I'm going to burn my cattle pasture because I, you know, I want to do this that in this. And to some extent in the southeast, you know, there's still some kind of a history or a cultural legacy of fire. So it's interesting to me. A lot of people like us who live in cities, you know, we don't have that perspective. What are you talking about? But a lot of the rural folk like if you're a hunter, if you're a fisherman, you know, you got a little acreage, like there's way more of a culture and they have a better relationship with these types of things. That's interesting. You brought that up because I'm thinking now back to my childhood and my uncle, they lived in New Jersey and he would go over and burn his lawn. And I remember being like, what are you doing? And it was one of those things. He's like, ah, the grass is just healthier that way and I just put out of mine. Oh, yeah, okay, whatever. But it's so interesting to hear that perspective over time because yeah, if you grew up again in the northeast like I did, you don't think about this as a regular thing because no one's going out and doing it or if there's a fire set and it gets away, that's a big deal. I mean, that is like local news channels are coming out for that kind of stuff. So it rings true when you hear the cultural elements that kind of drive or don't drive it. But backing up a little bit to like what motivated this search because this is a huge can of worms to try to open. And really get a good grasp on. So what a made you pursue it and B, how did you even start to define the scope of sort of how far you want to kind of look and how far back you want to go with fire history? Yeah, so the last study I was involved in, I have to say was originated by my colleague, Bill mcclane, who was just a cool guy. Like a really old school sort of meat and potatoes. He's almost like a historian. He just loves to lock himself in some weird archival room for days and days with no clear goal of reaping the benefits of this work. Just saying, I'm curious and I want to know more about the settlement and the Native Americans fire and I'm just going to see what's out there. So he actually had been for 20 years probably a retired botanist and going through these archival materials. Like I said, going back as far as he could get 1600s, it was as many written records and accounts as he could find to just sort of create a bibliography of as much information about fire. And a part of the world where we basically did not know very much about what was happening firewall. Like you said, you mentioned earlier, we had these sort of weird anecdotes, but it was less of a, as settlement happened by Europeans further east to west. We actually have a really good record of Native American fire use when you get out to the west because by then people were writing down these anthropogenic account Native Americans, ethnic historians were writing down everything they heard and they wanted to hear how we're using fire and what they were doing and they were a real interest in documenting these tribes what they were doing. But when it came to our part of the country, that hadn't that culture wasn't.

North America Ozark mountains Midwest Flint hills Bill mcclane Kansas New Jersey
Author Raymond Arroyo Explains the Origins of Christmas Tinsel

Mike Gallagher Podcast

02:01 min | 3 weeks ago

Author Raymond Arroyo Explains the Origins of Christmas Tinsel

"Had a chance to talk to my pal Raymond Arroyo, who lighten the mood a little bit for a couple of minutes. But he also has a great ability to shine a spotlight on some of these crazy issues in some of the insanity we're facing in America. Here's my chat with Raymond Arroyo, Fox News channel. Tell us what the genesis of this book. How did it come into being? Well, you know, Mike, years ago, when I was a young reporter traveling in Eastern Europe, there are trees or decked out with tinsel from top to bottom. I mean, it looks like the front of a Trump Tower or something. You know, it's old glitter and tinsel. And if you look in the bows of those trees, there are little spider ornaments jeweled spiders. And I couldn't figure every house I went to every business. They had this same setup. Well, I guess I didn't pay much attention to it. I thought they were recycling stuff from Halloween or I didn't know what they were doing. Years later, I came across a footnote during research for another book. And it says there is a legend from the second century of Mary Joseph and Jesus running into a cave on their way to Egypt. And they meet a spider who performs a special service for them. Well, it turns out that spider and this story is the origin of tinsel. I always thought tinsel was to replicate bicycles on a tree. No, it is a testament and a homage to this tale of a spider who spun a web perform this amazing service for the holy family. And you know, at the heart of the story, and the reason I think it's resonated with people so deeply in the last year and again this year is because as Mary says of the spider at one point in all of us, all are here for a reason. And no matter how small your gift, no matter how the world ignores you or tells you, you're not good enough or get over in the shadows or we don't want to see you anymore. That gift that service may be of the utmost importance. Not only to you and yours but to all of

Raymond Arroyo Fox News Channel Trump Tower Mary Joseph Eastern Europe Mike America Egypt Jesus Mary
Liz Harrington Explains the Significance of Trump Winning the 2016 Election

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:56 min | 2 months ago

Liz Harrington Explains the Significance of Trump Winning the 2016 Election

"And way back with liz harrington okay. Let's wind the clock back. liz. I think some of the obstacle to the gop establishment. Doing the right thing is that to this very day. They don't understand what really happened in. Two thousand sixteen My friend my former colleague. General flynn coordinate peaceful revolution. What is your understanding of. Why for the first time in american history. We elected a president. Who wasn't a retired. General wasn't a politician. Because that that's a very you know that sixty four million people saying stop. We're not doing what we've done for two centuries plus what how do you explain what what is the significance of two thousand sixteen. Oh it's it's huge. It was the common man taking back their agency and having a choice that wasn't accepted by either party right but the establishment which it business as usual. What's destroying our country and now attitude of. Oh we'll just the way we've been doing it well. And what happened in two thousand sixteen because it was supposed to be bush versus clinton right it was gonna be. Oh this is the fight that the media wants. This is the fight that the party bosses want the people the one big problem that people didn't want it they want bush. They had they didn't want another bush an exclamation point neighbor. Now it's time to clap guys. W president trump did he defied this system. The status quo. And why the people were ready for it is because they said finally someone is talking straight with me

Liz Harrington General Flynn LIZ GOP Bush Clinton President Trump
"two centuries" Discussed on The Purple Principle

The Purple Principle

03:36 min | 2 months ago

"two centuries" Discussed on The Purple Principle

"That was dr. Omar ali historian and author of in the balance of power independent black politics and third party movements in the united states really informative book and with all due respect to other historians refreshingly lee easy to read that's absolutely to jillian dr ali rights says he speaks authoritative but accessible and he's raised awareness of some really important movements in issues for indie minded americans of all races i and most importantly the insight that the civil rights movement of the twentieth century was an independent mobilization outside the two party system and that the two major parties so constantly ignored racial issues throughout early history that black-americans felt they had no choice but to form other groups and parties this fourth of july yours not mine we saw democracy feeling in america. You can impersonate what you do. The heaven lifting take the boss the late to drop the two party system and go independent with a passion for those. Who'd like more on this topic. We'll be posting a longer length interview with dr omar ali available for patriot supporters. Stay tuned for more on that but next time on the purple principal. We're going to journey. If only microphone to the great state of kentucky home to world renown whiskey horse races and the hugely successful podcast pantsuit. Politics were smart spiritual in respectful conversation. Even about things political. I mean we really formulated the greville political conversations as a subtitle to our book and we were trying to capture the environment. We'd built over years at pantsuit politics where we do use the word grace. Allot in what we were trying to do. Is put the focus on the connection that we hold with one another But grace's often about giving it when you don't receive it and so we try really hard to say. This is an exercise not to convince everyone to agree with us or even to adopt our style but to set an expectation for ourselves in terms of what values we bring into our political conversations. We'll be speaking with creators and hosts of that show sarah stewart holland and beth silvers who put forth over five hundred episodes and written a few books in spare time that you wouldn't even think they'd have including think you're wrong but i'm listening right or wrong. We hope you'll listen to that episode. Look for patriotic. Page coming soon. Connect with us via our website and social media and stay indie minded in these polarized times. This has been robert peas jillian youngblood for the purple principal. Team allison burn producer. Kevin kline senior audio engineer. Emily holloway digital strategy dom scarlet and grant sharat research associates. Emma trujillo audio associate original music composed and created by ryan dare rooney. The purple principle is a fluent knowledge production..

Omar ali jillian dr ali dr omar ali america lee sarah stewart holland beth silvers kentucky grace robert peas jillian youngblood allison burn Emily holloway dom scarlet grant sharat research associat Kevin kline Emma trujillo ryan dare rooney
"two centuries" Discussed on The Purple Principle

The Purple Principle

03:22 min | 2 months ago

"two centuries" Discussed on The Purple Principle

"People want change in america and of course. He wasn't allowed presidential debate stage but she may have very well laid the groundwork for perot's bigger success for years later when he gets nineteen percent of the vote. so tell us about nor of alani. And how you know she kind of laid. The groundwork not only for a third party run but possibly for obama and other candidates. Yeah i mean fulani was part of that sort of that. Tradition were expression independent black leadership. That goes back to frederick douglass and do boys and an harold washington which was to again create something independent of the two major parties and do that by bringing people together. Her voice was a is one of a progressive sort of politics. But it's also one that includes space for people who only want to agree on. Maybe that the process needs to be opened up. So interestingly when we think about the american revolution was a revolution that was talking about political process. Which is not something that we talk about today in politics today. We talk about really. Where do people stand on education. Where do they stand on law enforce where they stand the different things like these policy positions but not the process itself but she was saying no. I have a progressive sort of outlook on the world. But i will work with anyone who wants to challenge the the limitations of our electoral process you to make it more inclusive. that's great. Maybe we should end with a felony quote. I'm not sure if i'm getting this right. And maybe you can add a little bit of context to it. But i believe after her campaign she was asked. Was it toughest to be a black female. Yeah i love that quote. I love that. Says she said that. Basically yeah right after you know. She was asked by you know. Was it more difficult. Dr flying to run as a as an african american is a black candidate whereas a woman she thought she responded actually being independent because admissions incredible right and the reason why is because the laws have been designed to exclude independence regardless of color race. Whatever but it's the overall culture that again to go to the political scientists has been buttressed by the political science establishment with few exceptions to make. It seem like the only way you can function politically in. This world is through parties and through ideology. But it's challenging time culturally in america beyond the economic sort of hardships that many people are going through and but we have to push back on that To be more philosophical to be more playful to be more open to working with people who don't agree with on many issues but we might agree with on the issues of process and inclusion. That's an important thing. And that's the founding of this country no taxation without representation as a call to arms around political process. Not just around the narrow idea of taxation. It's about the representation and inclusion..

alani fulani perot harold washington frederick douglass Dr flying america obama
"two centuries" Discussed on The Purple Principle

The Purple Principle

06:17 min | 2 months ago

"two centuries" Discussed on The Purple Principle

"That's our special guest today. Historian dr omar ali author of in the balance of power. And there's an important point in there that really bears repeating the liberty and free soil parties. Which many of us didn't hear much about in school. They really pave the way. For the anti-slavery republican party formed in eighteen. Fifty four which then overwhelms the whigs that have been a major party for decades. So there's this ebb and flow in our party politics overtime or at least at that time it does seem like the major parties are so much more deeply entrenched today but there have been independent minded black politicians who challenged that dominance not too long ago such as presidential candidate lenora felony and chicago mayor. Harold washington washington managed to defeat the democratic machine that kept the richard daily dynasty in the chicago. Mayor's office for get this not two or three terms but between the father and the son eleven. Count them eleven terms totaling over four decades. So let's talk about three of the more modern campaigns by either black independent candidates or in one case an insurgent democratic candidate harold washington. Democracy is not a goal. it's not so many pounds of this rousers that democracy is a process which is designed to bring out. The broad is possible spectrum of opinion for the purpose of making public policy decisions. And so in. Chicago's nineteen eighty-three democratic primary. For the mayor's office. Harold washington was somehow able to defeat the very powerful democratic party that controlled chicago politics for decades. Tell us how washington was able to do that. Well i think it all comes down to base building. And i think that sometimes base building can only take you so far but he was a great organizing the people around him really had built an independent base of support mostly among african americans but among other groups of people as well and he was saying things that challenged the established partisan system in chicago and was able to pull this off and was seen as sort of like a model for something that could possibly be done on the national level enforcing he died and that effort was carried on in part by the work of a new generation of independent black leaders namely dr lenora salani who had been working with jesse jackson to try to urge him to go the course of independence in running the democratic party primary. But then if you didn't get the nomination goes independent ultimately. He stayed with the democratic party and she said well if he's not doing that. Let me run as an independent so we can build a movement that would bring together not just african americans. You know to not get have them be so dependent on the democratic party but people from across america. Yeah well the jesse jackson campaign in eighty eight. I think a lot of people may have forgotten. How competitive he was as candidate. How electrifying his speeches were at that time and remember. Most poor. People are not on welfare. They work day. They do the heavy lifting. Take the boss. They work the late shift. Most poor people anita brown black white the female their yom invisible. But they'll all god's children less how a one big certainly obama credited him later on but twenty years before obama. You know here is a national figure. Competing very successfully. Why do you think he decided not to run as an independent and do you think. In hindsight he might have had some success. I don't know if you would have had some success. But he would have helped to build the movement of independence. I think that he got would back into the full the democratic party in some ways. There's a parallel where. I think that he thought that he was. He was more powerful than than was the case. And i'll say this about president obama who had built an independent base among americans and literally. His database made up of democrats obviously but some republicans disaffected republicans and independents but he essentially gave over his entire database to the democratic party. Because he thought that his if you will his obama the magic obama the extraordinariness of this person. His abilities would be able to sort of maintain itself beyond the party but the parties are very powerful. Very very powerful not only economically but culturally basically three roads were being sort of carved out with one was stick with the democratic party because at that point they had gotten some black elected officials and office form a an all black political party or form a multi-racial third party and ultimately jackson spoke vehemently sort of about the importance of a black party but he would ultimately side with the democratic party again very powerful forces you mean many of the great heroes like john lewis and many others had who had been independence on the streets they were the civil rights movement was not a democratic party movement or republican movement. It was an independent movement. That's what it was and it was effectively coughed by the democratic party. Well let's talk then a little bit about lenora falani. It's really remarkable and i. I'm not sure again. Our young listeners know that she was able to get on the ballot in all fifty states. And i think the biggest issue in this year's race is the vote for independence. I think we need to drop the two party system and go independent with a passion if.

harold washington democratic party dr omar ali chicago jesse jackson dr lenora salani lenora washington republican party anita brown obama Mayor richard Chicago america president obama john lewis lenora falani jackson
"two centuries" Discussed on The Purple Principle

The Purple Principle

09:08 min | 2 months ago

"two centuries" Discussed on The Purple Principle

"The first one being sort of at the time of the american republic formation and so the liberty party was created as a tactic to engage the political establishment. I think that they did not have any illusions of necessarily winning. Although you know in some cases they were close but they were trying to create public conversation around the issue slavery. Even though a person like thomas. Jefferson did confide some of his fellow planners that if there is a just god. We're in for it. Because he star that there was a morality to slavery as well so it wasn't like people are completely clueless but it wasn't a public issue yet and so the had to make it a public issue so a way to make it a public issue was to form third party caller liberty party and try to advocate for an anti slavery platform so the liberty party competes in several elections. I believe eighteen forty eighteen forty four but then things get a little complicated seemingly when the free soil party is formed as more of like a a moderate or an incremental or more pragmatic approach. So tell us about the formation of the free soil party and their position which wasn't fully for abolition. It was for as i understand it anti extension or the extension of slavery to new states. Yeah the free soil party. Like you're saying was not an outright abolitionist. Party was in some ways. I mean i think people sought as a way of increasing the size of the camp of people who could be ultimately could undermine the system of slavery and so the idea was to not allow the new territories that would come into the republic to become states that allowed for slavery and they advocated for this position which at the time was quite radical Relative to everything and many people who weren't willing to abolish slavery outright or see it abolished believe that there is something fundamentally wrong with it. And the argument brought people who were not anti-slavery but didn't like the idea of their free labor that is paid labor to be degraded by having people who worked alongside them who were slaves and so it was an interesting mix of a coalition as politics. Oftentimes brings strange bedfellows. So both to liberty and the free soil. Party's you know work extremely hard. But i do not really have electoral success and yet kind of amazingly as we look back. The republican party is formed as the anti slavery party in eighteen fifty. Four and six years later it wins the white house so what was the contribution of the liberty and free soil parties to the rather rapid success of not an outright abolition party but certainly anti-slavery party. Yeah i mean it's Some ways you can think of the free soil and liberty parties as having to develop and then cultivate a network which would grow in time and create a movement which would lead to the formation of the republican party. I mean it's all about movement formation building networks and so the republican party was the beneficiary of those who've been working ten fifteen years prior to that to establish sort this idea of a third party. That was either directly depending on the wing of the party against slavery or certainly was not going to try to extend it so in some ways it was a continuation of the same phenomena. So it's remarkable to look back now at how quickly a third party became a major party. It's almost inconceivable now that that that could happen in the same way. So i guess. The two parties have had a lot of time to entrench their power absolute post civil war and reconstruction. There's another interesting party that you talk about that. Maybe a lot of people are not so familiar with the greenback labor party. Yeah so this is a movement that kind of continues this idea of the sanctity in the importance of free labor that this is something that all people should have the right to to exercise their own labor under their own agency and so it's part of that early labor movement and now we're talking about people that are more in urban centers even though a lot of their base is actually rural still so this is a shift towards will you know networks that will be given expression in the form of the knights of labor and and other labor associations so again. Another party is formed in eighteen nineties. The people's party. This is a time when democrats in the south. Are you know really suppressing disenfranchising. Black voters turnout is going down and yet somehow the people's party is able to have some success in local elections in south carolina and texas. Yeah so we look at african americans in particular. You have emancipation. You have reconstruction which really begins in eighteen. Sixty three so two years before the civil war ends. It's beginning the reconstructing of the rebuilding of the infrastructure in the northern part of the south where the union is in control and also the political institutions and reconstruction will will be enforced till about eighteen. Seventy seven when it comes to collapses under pressure of democratic party interests in its in this period where you have african americans trying to figure out what to do they don't just sort of save call it quits. Because they can't they're not in that privileged position to do so they have to keep figuring out ways to keep pushing for again basic civil political economic rights and so they formed through the church's a leadership that will take the form of various agricultural associations. And you have white farmers doing something similarly and so you have organizations that are like call the granges and other groups that will come together in the eighteen eighties. And as far as african americans concerned the umbrella organization was called the cover farmers alliance which started in texas but really spread throughout the south and so they decide to go into the electoral arena and so together with white who were not happy with democratic party in the south and which was the dominant party in the south. It was the party of white supremacy. They come together they form. What's called the people's party or the populists and they feel candidates and it's in this period of time that you actually have this. Coalition made up of african americans were many of them had been actually slaves just years prior coming together with white southerners many of whom had been confederate soldiers and they take over they actually take over parts of the south and you see a rise a pushback by the paramilitary organizations that are tied to the democratic party. Most famously the ku klux klan. And you see a rise of lynchings and a terrorism in the black community but also directed towards white sympathizers and that movement will come to an end by eighteen ninety eight in north carolina with the wilmington riots but across the south by nineteen hundred. Let's talk a little bit about the progressive era and it's always hard to summarize in era but it does seem looking back that from civil rights standpoint. It's disappointing i mean you have these kind of broad-minded. Progressive individuals like robert. Lefevre lead teddy. And you know. They're approached by the leaders of the african american community like w e b was and he's kind of rebuffed by the progressives. Yeah it's true. It seems like dumb at nina. I'm just saying. I think that racism is so deeply entrenched in the american psyche. That i think it was hard for labor leaders to in some ways african-americans fully as their brothers and sisters. If you will and in some ways the analysis well will just going to organize all workers and not attend to this issue of race. They didn't attend also to issues.

liberty party republican party people's party greenback labor party Jefferson democratic party thomas white house cover farmers alliance texas south carolina umbrella organization wilmington Lefevre north carolina robert nina
"two centuries" Discussed on The Purple Principle

The Purple Principle

06:05 min | 2 months ago

"two centuries" Discussed on The Purple Principle

"Other major figures in the story of independent viewpoint and mobilization include. Wep deblaze malcolm x. herald washington and north alani the. Let's start by getting acquainted with dr omar ali author of in the balance of power. Well let me first of all say thank you for inviting me to be on this podcast and creating a space like this where people can have conversations that are not over determined by the two party framework so i deeply appreciate the name of the podcast. And what you've are providing folks a space to do with the book basically does is it. It tells a story of the ways in which african americans have had to effectively insert themselves in to the dominant structures political structures of society by creating independent political organizations associations networks and a parties in some instances to advance civil political economic rights of african americans and joined at times porn working white people and other groups of people to advance democracy in america. Let's start with some of the major figures familiar to most of our listeners. He briefly mentioned federick. Douglas he had a remarkable transformation from looking at slavery as kind of a religious or spiritual issue and then became more and more involved in politics. So tell us about the transformation of federick. Douglas i think like all leaders with deep and abiding commitment to the people in this case. I think douglas identified most obviously closely with african americans. But i think he was pro people in general he evolved because he saw some of the limitations of whatever tactic he was deploying like he moved from the idea of moral suasion. Which was the idea that you could basically through teaching one's own story and that of others who had been enslaved and relying on religious doctrine you could morally swayed people to do the right thing and that you know that he saw as limited ultimately took armed revolution in the form of the civil war for slavery to be overthrown. And so yes there were some people who saw the light if you will and decided to free their own slaves but they were just handfuls of people. The vast majority of slave owners did not want that to go way. Tell us a little bit. More about. W e b boys who obviously embraced several different ideologies as a means towards perhaps some progress on civil rights perhaps didn't see the success in his lifetime that came soon. Afterwards all propaganda we saw democracy fading. In america fewer and fewer people went to the pool it was increasingly difficult to know. For whom or one was voting. But he certainly a fascinating figure you tell us about his journey in this. Yeah i mean like douglas. I mean he began to see some of the limitations of his organizing which went from effectively using the pen and to tell the stories of tragedies and document the lives of black people to joining major parties a wing or forming coalitions that ultimately would create challenges to depart is is what i want to say and then effectively abandoning a and saying well. The two party system isn't going to work and nor are these third parties and he left ultimately but he laid the groundwork for many others to understand some of the broader history. Y'all let's jump ahead to the civil rights era and you talk about the famous speech by malcolm x. I believe it's called the ballot or bullet speech in despite the fact that you are in a position to be the determining factor. What do you get out of it. All the democrats have been in washington. Dc only because of the negro vote. They've been down there for years and all other legislation. They wanted to bring up. They've brought up and getting it out of the way and now they bring up and now bring up you. Impersonate put you last. And so malcolm x. is expressing their concern over dependence on the democratic party which is a theme throughout your book if you want real political leverage. You don't wanna be so loyal to party that they don't do anything for you. Yeah absolutely yeah in his famous the ballot or the bullet speech he talks about. How any kind of dependency is problematic. And billy identifies both parties as limitations on the freedom of african americans and so he was a critical early voice. That's our special guest today. Dr omar ali prolific author on the african diaspora. He's discussing some of the most notable independent black intellectuals in us history frederick douglass wbz boys malcolm x. and others which makes us wonder about the broader forces at work here the movements behind these leaders that represented hundreds of thousands of americans and eventually millions in this part of the interview. Dig deeper into that movement history. Beginning with the abolitionist liberty party. The played a spoiler role in the eighteen forty four elections but also spawned the anti-slavery republican party that was formed only a few years before bringing abraham.

north alani dr omar ali Douglas douglas herald washington america malcolm Dr omar ali wbz democratic party billy frederick douglass abolitionist liberty party republican party abraham
"two centuries" Discussed on The Purple Principle

The Purple Principle

01:33 min | 2 months ago

"two centuries" Discussed on The Purple Principle

"Hey there are purple. Principal headsets ear buds and eardrums robert. Ps here and jillian youngblood with quick reminder before the episode starts about our newsletter purple principal. Imprint we'd love to email you. This curated roundup of articles issues and news on the perils of political and social polarization and as groups and individuals. Working to bridge the red blue divide published every two weeks p p imprint allows you to share the in depth research. We do here at the purple principle and it takes you down. Interesting paths not fully explored on the podcast. Recent topics have included the filibuster presidents from film and tv and the politics industry. Not a simple thing as polarization click lincoln our show notes to subscribe..

The Democrat Party Turned Their Backs on You

Mark Levin

02:00 min | 6 months ago

The Democrat Party Turned Their Backs on You

"In fact, Have you also noticed how the Democrat Party has made an affirmative decision? To turn its back on all the people that used to claim to represent from Franklin Roosevelt actually earlier than that, in the turn of that Two centuries ago to now. They used to reach out. To quote unquote, the white working class to quote unquote, the blue collar White union member. But now they have decided because they are very diabolical in the way they treat human beings and the way they treat individuals and the way they group people and and try and pull together constituent groups and even create constituent groups. They've decided. They want permanent power. They noticed that since Ronald Reagan some of these white blue collar union voters, white blue collar nonunion voters Wait a minute. They're starting to vote for Republicans. Reagan won them by a large margin. Donald Trump won them by a large margin. So the Democrat party has now turned on. These people turned on many of you. You're now white supremacists your night near now, Deplorables. I'm telling you the truth. So they have Jennifer elected. Now they want open borders where they used to oppose open borders because it undermined unions, including the United Farm Workers union. Now they want open borders. Now they want as many people to come into this country as possible, preferably not white people, which is why you hear them talking the way they talk with their racist talk and the racist propaganda in our schools and so forth. Now I'm not supposed to talk about this because they try and demean people like me and silence. People like me. I'm not going anywhere. If I had to take a damn soap box and put it in my backyard, I'm not going anywhere.

Blue Collar White Union White Blue Collar Union Democrat Party Franklin Roosevelt Ronald Reagan United Farm Workers Union Donald Trump Reagan Jennifer
Kim Kardashian Named in Federal Complaint Over Alleged 'Smuggled' Roman Statue

Donna and Steve

00:56 sec | 7 months ago

Kim Kardashian Named in Federal Complaint Over Alleged 'Smuggled' Roman Statue

"Kind of interesting to me. Ah, federal case involving agent art effects, looting and smuggling is linked to Kim Kardashian guys. Case involves an agent Roman statue dating back to the second century, which was part of a shipment of historic artifacts purchased by the Kardashian by Excuse me by Kim Kardashian in 2016. Now federal prosecutors say that the statue was looted, smuggled and illegally exported from Italy, and it needs to be returned Cardiac. Kim is not accused of any wrongdoing in the case and does not appear to have been aware of the situation, but she definitely has herself tied up in some Indiana Jones type stuff here. Yeah, It's weird. You know, I don't know. You gotta gotta pay attention to what you're buying. You know, I'll tell you. What if I saw that thing, like at a Coliseum or something, I throw it in my purse. If I thought, you know what is kind of need, it just looks like a little pillar. I haven't seen it yet. So after I definitely wouldn't buy it, I would not pay money for that.

Kim Kardashian Kardashian Italy KIM Indiana
What We Know About the Deadly Stampede in Israel

Here & Now

01:59 min | 7 months ago

What We Know About the Deadly Stampede in Israel

"And we're following the tragedy in Israel. Today, more than 40 people were killed in a stampede at a religious festival more than 100. Others were hurt. NPR's Daniel Estrin joins us from Jerusalem. Daniel, You've been covering this since it happened. What more do we know about the stampede? What might have triggered it. Well, just to describe the scene. This is a popular Jewish pilgrimage site. It's the tomb of a revered rabbi and an estimated 100,000 people were there overnight. They were going into the site coming out. There was a huge mass of people pushing against each other, trying to move through it. Zaveri rickety complex. There are passageways and stares and flimsy railings. Police had put up barriers try to do crowd control. But there was one passageway that was a slight downhill. The metal floor was slippery. And there are videos where you see row. Just a row of people in this mass just dropped to the floor. You see a hand reach up in the air for help on Ben. The next row of people fall on top, and it's just it was this pile up. Eye. Witnesses say that medics and police at the scene were trying to pull people out and untangle them and it was. It was just chaos. People were screaming people were crying out the Shama prayer, which devout Jews are meant to say before their death. It's a harrowing scene, to say the least. Daniel tell us more about the festival that people were attending. What was what was this supposed to be? Well, this is the Jewish Festival of Lager Bohmer. This is a pilgrimage festival. First of all Jews celebrated around the world around Israel with bonfires. It's the anniversary of the death of a second century rabbi and mystic. Sheiman Barrio high. That Rabbi is a central figure in Kabbalah and Jewish mysticism. So every every year there's a pilgrimage to his tomb, which is located in the Galilee in the north of Israel. It's a It's a very old tradition to visit that tomb and in Israel, it is Thebes biggest annual public gathering that there is

Daniel Estrin Daniel NPR Israel Jerusalem Lager Bohmer BEN Sheiman Barrio Rabbi Galilee Thebes
Crush at Israeli Religious Festival Kills 44

BBC World Service

00:54 sec | 7 months ago

Crush at Israeli Religious Festival Kills 44

"Workers in Israel. See it least 44 people have been killed on more than 100 injured in a crash at a Jewish festival. Tens of thousands of Hasidic Jews had gathered at the foot of Mount Meron in the north of the country. Sean Bateman reports from Jerusalem. That were huge crowds to the event where tens of thousands of mostly ultra Orthodox Jewish pilgrims head to the gravesite of a second century rabbi marking the festival of Lag before mayor a concert was taking place with packed stands. Initial reports suggested part of the structure collapsed. The paramedics say the tragedy was caused by a crush after people slipped in an overcrowded walk wave eye witnesses described chaotic scenes. With rescue workers struggling to reach those trapped Children separated from missing parents under a communications blackout is the mobile phone network collapsed. The

Mount Meron Sean Bateman Israel Jerusalem
No Pain, No Gain (MM #3674)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 8 months ago

No Pain, No Gain (MM #3674)

"The minute with kevin mason. I've never considered myself a lucky person. Everything i've gotten. I've worked hard for and that's where the mantra of no pain. No gain comes in. I was thinking about that the other day. I've never had anything just handed to me. Not that lucky. But i was wondering to myself. Where does this phrase no pain. No gain come from so of course. I decided to look into it most famous in the nineteen eighties. It became an exercise. Mantra thanks to jane. Fonda used to always talk about no pain no gain energy and fonda tapes but of course it actually predates that it goes back to the second century in hebrew literature. In fact benjamin. Franklin talked about no pain no gain his way of saying it in poor. Richard's almanac there are no gains without pains and there some days. That's frustrating by the way today happens to be one of those days just had one of those two steps forward three steps back kind of weeks. It's not a bad thing. It just frustrating. Can i get something. I probably don't deserve just because i deserve it. Just ask it.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Franklin Nineteen Eighties Jane Today Two Steps Richard Hebrew Fonda ONE Three Steps Second Century Benjamin
No Pain, No Gain (MM #3674)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 8 months ago

No Pain, No Gain (MM #3674)

"The minute with kevin mason. I've never considered myself a lucky person. Everything i've gotten. I've worked hard for and that's where the mantra of no pain. No gain comes in. I was thinking about that the other day. I've never had anything just handed to me. Not that lucky. But i was wondering to myself. Where does this phrase no pain. No gain come from so of course. I decided to look into it most famous in the nineteen eighties. It became an exercise. Mantra thanks to jane. Fonda used to always talk about no pain no gain energy and fonda tapes but of course it actually predates that it goes back to the second century in hebrew literature. In fact benjamin. Franklin talked about no pain no gain his way of saying it in poor. Richard's almanac there are no gains without pains and there some days. That's frustrating by the way today happens to be one of those days just had one of those two steps forward three steps back kind of weeks. It's not a bad thing. It just frustrating. Can i get something. I probably don't deserve just because i deserve it. Just ask it.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Franklin Nineteen Eighties Jane Today Two Steps Richard Hebrew Fonda ONE Three Steps Second Century Benjamin
Israeli experts announce discovery of new Dead Sea scrolls

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 9 months ago

Israeli experts announce discovery of new Dead Sea scrolls

"Israeli experts have announced the discovery of new dead sea scrolls the Israel antiquities authority says the fragments of parchment deadlines of Greek text and have been radiocarbon dated to the second century AD they were found in a desert cave believed hidden during a Jewish revolt against Rome nearly nineteen hundred years ago the scientist known as the cave of horror named for the faulty human skeletons found that during excavations in the nineteen sixties that also that the Greek rendition of the twelve minor prophets the cave is located in a remote canyon in the G. Dan desert south of Jerusalem I'm Charles the last month

Israel Antiquities Authority Rome Jerusalem Charles
What Deb Haaland's historic confirmation means to Native Americans

AP 24 Hour News

00:35 sec | 9 months ago

What Deb Haaland's historic confirmation means to Native Americans

"40 vote confirms to Mexico congresswoman Deb Holland as interior secretary, making her the first Native American to lead a Cabinet department and the first to lead the federal agency that is wielded influence over the nations tribes for nearly two centuries. Democrats and tribal groups hailed her confirmation as historic, saying the selection means that indigenous people will for the first time see a Native American lead the powerful department. Interior also oversees a host of other issues, including energy development on public lands and waters, national parks and endangered species. Two

Deb Holland Cabinet Department Mexico
McConnell says Trump was "practically and morally responsible" for Washington, DC riot after voting not guilty

WTOP 24 Hour News

03:33 min | 10 months ago

McConnell says Trump was "practically and morally responsible" for Washington, DC riot after voting not guilty

"Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell delivered a scalding denunciation of former President Trump calling him morally responsible for the attack on the U. S Capitol. But before that, of course, he voted not guilty in the president's impeachment trial. Joining us for more is Ken Walsh, White House and political analyst for U. S News and World Report. Can it looks like that High wire act continues for many Republicans and their relationship with the former president. Well, it does. And you know, this basically is a rebuke to President Trump because It was 57 to 43 vote to find him guilty of inciting the insurrection, But it failed to reach the 67 votes two thirds needed to convict. So it was a majority vote, including seven Republicans. Of course, what it is basically, it's it's sort of an outcome without a conclusion and It's um there's still a special congressional commission that's going to proceed to look at the events of January 6th when the capital was invaded. At the state level their investigations of President Trump's conduct and trying to overturn the election in Georgia and in New York. So This really has not resolved very much, And there's a lot of sense of disappointment really around Washington as to how this has all come out. Wasn't worth doing. And, of course, this such a ferocious partisanship in the air that, um, the House managers and the Democrats who pushed this field was worth doing because President Trump needed to be rebuked. But of course, he was not convicted. And so a ZAY say there's just the sense that this is, um This does not really resolve anything and that we're just as polarized as we had been with President Trump with the center of that of former President Trump in the center of that. And, um, we're gonna be talking about this, Uh, for well into the future. Did you find it interesting, though, that McConnell pointed specifically to criminal courts is a possible future forum for this kind of thing for the president. The former president? Yes. Yes, he did, And he sure almost invited that to happen. On But, you know, they're just step back and look a historically, um, in our first um, really two centuries we have one impeachment of Andrew Johnson 18 68. Ah, then, 130 years later, we had, um The beginning of appeared where we had three Bill Clinton. In 1998 and then Donald Trump twice in 2019 2021. So what's happened is that I think, partly because the presidency has gotten so powerful, and there's an effort in Congress to rein it in. And partly because we have become so partisan on polarized as a country, impeachment has become not the rare process that the founders envisioned, but something that's used as a As a weapon by both parties really against the sitting president. So we've had three impeachments now since 1998. And that's a really a remarkable historical development that impeachment has become. More of a regular eyes thing in our country. And as I say, three of them since

President Trump Ken Walsh U. S News And World Report Congressional Commission Mitch Mcconnell Donald Trump U. Senate White House UM Georgia Mcconnell Washington New York Andrew Johnson House Bill Clinton Congress
In Depth With Carlo Rovelli

After The Fact

06:41 min | 1 year ago

In Depth With Carlo Rovelli

"Carlo Ravelli thank you so much for being with us today. Thank you for having me you. are a physicist who I must say writes like a poet and your book the seven brief lessons on physics has has sold Is If something like forty languages around the world and it ends with this most amazing line that I would like to to start our conversation with if you don't mind you say on the edge of what we know in contact with the oceans of the unknown. Shines the mystery and beauty of the world. Is that science is that the pursuit of science for you? Yes. Definitely. because science. Starts I think both historically and in the life of each scientists a with a wonder and with the mystery. And in fact, I think the nature of science is to realize that we do not know things and therefore we're curious to go and try to. Find out and the nature of of scientists also the based on the discovery that we can find out things. We can discover things that we did not know there is a methodology to to science, but the scientific method is both something that leads us forward but also makes I. Pause makes us go take two steps back, reevaluate its science it seems despite methodology. Is Not Linear people talk about the scientific method. But I would say those less of a scientific method. Than what one usually think? It's like painting. Of course, there is a method painting you go to school and they teach you how to paint. But then the painter is the guy who does does not follow what is being taught to invent something else. and. In fact, in science, it has happened all over again. In the in the history of science that what was considered the the good mattered before it turned out to be insufficient and new things were found found out. Of course, there are many aspect of science which are. Pretty stable and that give it strength. Checking. Not Trusting ideas unless you find a way to confirm them. Try To base your information on actual data and and looking at the world observing measuring checking. Putting in doubt not believing the things you you believe him there's a beautiful line in by actor Galileo in the play in which a at the end in which in the play there's Galileo the one of the inventors of science so to say. With one of his young assistant and they got an idea in the assistant says. Now. Let's do everything possible to show. That is right and Galileo says, no, no no, let's do it. Everything possible to show that it is wrong. And if it is survives, we start believing it. fascinate yes. So you know. We are speaking at a time when the world of course is facing this terrible pandemic. And scientific research about this unfolding before our eyes are there lessons for us all in in what we're learning how this is unfolding as you say We we have learned things that we think are right about the virus and then something changes in our we have to we have to adjust our thinking how we can counteract it. It gets it gets up again to the point of Galileo right how do we prove ourselves? Wrong? We sued you tried of where find out where we were right I. Think Yeah. I. Think there are lessons and then and in fact it's it's it's an opportunity seeing how science works the first thing we all notice is that we don't know anything we are in the dark and that's a that's often the starting point of science. The second thing is we're not completely dark. The reason we are. Searching for a way to heal this. Virus and for a vaccines is because we have wasted ill illnesses that are extraordinary effective on the one hand we see the limits of science on the other hand we see the power of signs. Let me put in this way. Few generations ago not many maybe two centuries ago the average expected live the life expectancy of people where several decades decades shorter than today this is because there was a scientific method or some sort to that helped us learn how to deal with with illness and that's what is being used. The second point is that we see that scientists look in different directions, right one search, one methods, another search, another methods, and of course, each scientists of tries to believe or sort of believe be confident in the way he's going, but we don't know a priori who is right. However those convergence and that's the point. There are always being convergence in scientific. Debates in uncertainty so after the debate after the searcher. The knowledge that is acquired is definitely knowledge so it will take time, but it will come out. Perhaps. The last comment is that we all see how science is crucial I. Mean if there's anything that can save us for a lot of pain, the situation is knowledge. I chose science as my. As, the field where I hope I can in my in my info humidity and in my little. Being small contribute to the overall discussion but I have not chosen signs as the only prisoner from which to look at the world I. Think we should. We should use problems. We should look at the world through literature through our to politics too our leaves. So I think it's a coming together of perspectives. I went into sign slater in my life to come directly question only at some point. I stumbled innocence upon science and I fell in love with. It was a non rational choice. It was an emotional choice I started to study at school. Modern physics. Relativity quantum mechanics. All that and I said, wow, this is incredibly beautiful I. WanNa I. WanNa work this and then I realized that I was good in it and so I said okay this is this is what I do in my life.

Galileo Carlo Ravelli Physicist Slater
Ancient Tennessee River floods hold a warning for the future

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 1 year ago

Ancient Tennessee River floods hold a warning for the future

"In eighteen sixty seven after several days of rain the Tennessee River surged over its banks and water rushed in Chattanooga Tennessee. The devastating flood remains the worst in the rivers history since recordkeeping began. But Lisa Davis of the University of Alabama, his digging in the dirt and finding evidence of even larger floods in the more distant past when floodwaters recede, they leave behind minerals, and so we searched for these deposits and we date them and we build a chronology of events and in some cases were actually able to reconstruct with the height or the size of the flood was. Answer Research signed in northern. Alabama. Her team has found evidence of several Tennessee river floods larger than the flood of eighteen, sixty seven and she says, such events could happen again. As the climate warms extreme rainfall is growing more common in the Tennessee River valley. So Davis. Says it's important for planners to understand what they could be up against in the future that information can be used to figure out whether or not dams have been adequately designed has anything happened. That's bigger than what they have imagined not just in the past two centuries but over millennia

Tennessee River Lisa Davis Tennessee River Valley Chattanooga Tennessee Alabama University Of Alabama
"two centuries" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"two centuries" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"By John Lewis is He as much as anyone. In our history. Brought this country a little bit closer. To our highest ideas. Someday when we do finish that long journey towards free. What we do form a more perfect union. Whether it's years from now or decades, or even if it takes another two centuries. Don Luis will be a founding father. Of that fuller fairer Better America. A nice sentiment that founding fathers even in the midst of 200 years of history. You can still be a founding father of sorts. He also talked about you know, John's not here. I don't want to do attempted, sir Gush about what a great speaker Obama is. I don't want to alienate any other listeners who hate that. So I'm not going to say I'm thinking that right now, but I'm not going to say it out loud so Let's not mention that on the air, Okay? I'm glad way talked about this beforehand. OK, so now so to prevent further gushing from Felix Banel, let's hear another clip from Obama talking about what is the most appropriate way to honor John Lewis. It gets a little political here once the Supreme Court weakened. The Voting Rights Act. Some state legislators unleashed a flood of laws designed specifically to make voting harder. Especially by the way state legislators where There's a lot of minority turnout. Population growth. It's not necessarily a mystery or an accident. There's an attack.

John Lewis Obama Don Luis sir Gush Supreme Court Felix Banel
3 former presidents mourn John Lewis at funeral in Atlanta

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

3 former presidents mourn John Lewis at funeral in Atlanta

"John Lewis has been celebrated as a hero at his funeral what a gift John Lewis was Barack Obama was one of three former presidents remembering Lewis inside Atlanta's historic Ebenezer Baptist church he's been called an American Shane joining George W. bush and Bill Clinton and recalling Lewis is a lifelong push for a better America we salute suit up in Marshall Obama called Lewis a man of pure joy and unbreakable perseverance striving until the end to build a more perfect union he says when it eventually happens even if it takes another two centuries John Lewis will be a founding father Sager make ani Washington

John Lewis Atlanta Ebenezer Baptist Church Shane George W. Bush Bill Clinton America Marshall Obama Sager Ani Washington
A California tribe has land to call its own for the first time in more than two centuries

Native America Calling

04:00 min | 1 year ago

A California tribe has land to call its own for the first time in more than two centuries

"This is national news I'm Hughes Infrared Antonio Gonzales. The Navajo nation is laying off hundreds of gaming employees. The Navajo Times reports notices started going out over the weekend for more than nine hundred employees. Another one hundred forty workers will remain through this week. The nation's four casinos have been closed since March. Nearly twelve hundred employees remained on the payroll since that time gaming executive Brian Parish warns last week. Cash reserves are depleted, and the operation would not be able to sustain keeping the workers any longer. The trump administration announced the start of an effort to tackle cases of missing and murdered native people. Department of Interior and justice officials announced the opening of the missing and murdered native Americans, cold-case office in Minnesota's twin cities, it is scheduled to be the first of seven offices dedicated to reviewing some fourteen hundred unresolved native missing persons cases in the country. The efforts stems from President Trump's executive order last year in a written statement assistant secretary of Indian Affairs Tara Sweeney, said cold cases in Indian country will be addressed the determination and the understanding that the victims in these cases will be accorded some measure of dignity and compassion. Democrats on the House Natural Resources Committee are exploring a range of options for how to deal with healthcare woes that were plaguing Indian country before the pandemic hit Matt Laszlo has the story from Washington as native communities continued to face high corona virus infection rates, longstanding struggles with healthcare access are being seen under a new light under the current system. Many native American veterans are forced to leave their communities to get treatments. However, during pandemic, leaving tribal communities introduces new risks for Native Veterans Acting Chairman of the national. Indian Health Board is William Smith told lawmakers the marine bursts for travel through the Indian health services aren't workable during a pandemic in Alaska. The behind did converse Indian. Health Service. mitric anchorage to say by Dr Up there they'll pay for transportation. They won't pay very housing because they think it's. My back, but with coq nineteen going on, you can't fly out, so you have to do a drive up three hundred six miles to anchorage and out of pocket you'd have to spend the night. Smith says of the sixteen billion dollars earmarked for veterans and cove relief, only one billion was given to the native health service that's left. Native communities underfunded once again besides veterans, lawmakers are also working on the coverage for urban Indian Health Providers Act. It would make it so. So individual clinics no longer have to use their own funds to purchase liability coverage at could save some clinics up to two hundred and fifty thousand dollars annually, which some officials want to go directly to patient Care Robin Sunday Allen is Vice President of the National Council of Urban Indian health. She says tribes need any extra funds they can find now. Insurance has increased fourteen percent over the past five years so becoming increasingly more burdensome for us to carve out that money. Money that we wish could go back to direct patient care. All the coronavirus pandemic brought these health issues in Indian country to the forefront. They're persistent problems. Tribal leaders are hoping we'll finally get a permanent solution for National Native News I'm Matt Lies Low in Washington a California tribe has completed purchase of twelve hundred acres of land for four and a half million dollars. The San Jose Mercury News reports. It's the first land acquisition for the excellent tribe of Monterey. County in. In nearly two hundred fifty years, Esselin chairman Tom Little. Bear Nason told the paper. He is elated by the purchase saying the land is the tribes homeland and the origin of their creation. The mercury news reports tribal leaders expect to use the land to reinvigorate tribal culture conduct, traditional ceremonies, and inform the general public about their culture and history, the tribes, traditional culture and language were nearly wiped out by Spanish missionaries backed by the military starting in the late seventeen hundreds. With national native news I'm Art Hughes.

Executive Washington Indian Health Board William Smith Bear Nason National Council Of Urban Indi Navajo Times Antonio Gonzales President Trump San Jose Mercury News Art Hughes Health Service. Acting Chairman Department Of Interior Chairman Matt Laszlo Minnesota Monterey
The Year Without a Summer

Coronavirus Daily Briefing

06:24 min | 1 year ago

The Year Without a Summer

"The heat of summer is well and truly here in the Northern Hemisphere, the hot humid days just won't let up and living in new. York City I continue to be frustrated that central air conditioning is not as ubiquitous in homes and businesses, as it is in most parts of the southern United States where I grew up. Then, of course, it's always been substantially hotter in those southern states, although with climate change, the northeast is heating up more and more, but that does make me think sometimes. How the heck did people survive before? Joining especially in those very hot climates, farmers ALMANAC A few insights nothing to mind blowing people would take day trips to swing holes or up. To cooler weather, they kept windows and doors shut at midday to keep out hot air and delayed cooking or baking. Until the evening they ate refreshing. Cool treats and was available in homes, blue fans across blocks of ice, the biggest factor most likely however was it simply wasn't as hot as it is now at least in terms of extremes, quoting farmers, Almanac, the extra ordinarily hot summers that are commonplace today were virtually unheard of fifty to one hundred years ago in fact, seven of the top ten coolest, US summers on record occurred nineteen, hundred and nineteen fifty and quotes. There was one year however over two centuries ago now that it was a lot cooler. Eighteen Sixteen Aka the year without a summer quoting farmers. ALMANAC referred to by many names, including the poverty year and eighteen hundred and froze to death, the year eighteen sixteen was literally a year without a summer across much of the northern hemisphere throughout not only North America, but also northern Europe and parts of Asia in exceptionally cold summer, featuring killing frosts in July in August crippled food production crop failures in food shortages were. Were so widespread that rioting and looting became common in the United Kingdom and France on this side of the Atlantic. Many residents of New England and the Canadian Maritimes froze to death, starved, or suffered from severe malnutrition, as storms, bringing foot, or more of snow, hit hard during May and June. Many others from the region pulled up stakes and move to western New York in the Mid West where the cold was less severe. In fact, the year without a summer is now believed to have been one major catalyst in the westward expansion of the United States and quotes Nicole may have been less severe in the southern and Western us, but it was still highly unusual on July fourth eighteen sixteen. It was forty six degrees Fahrenheit in Savannah Georgia. For the record this year on July fourth and Savannah, it was ninety degrees. So. Why did this happen? It was due to one of the largest volcanic eruptions in recorded history Indonesia's Tamboura. The volcano erupted on April Fifth Eighteen fifteen, continuing to up for a week and killing nearly all of the twelve thousand residents of Tim, Bora as well as almost all plants in animal life on the island, quoting the Paris review, countless tons of volcanic. Volcanic ash circulated in the upper atmosphere for years after the events blocked out sunlight and lowering average surface temperatures globally in parts, of North, America Europe temperatures dropped by more than eighteen degrees. Fahrenheit there was snow in New England July and dark rain clouds swept over Europe throughout the summer months in Hungary reports of Brown snowfall, tainted by volcanic ash and quotes. Understandably many thought the world was ending that the sun was dying. It's really fascinating. Though is some of the cultural ripples that this massive event caused. You may be familiar with the story of how Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley was inspired to write Frankenstein as part of a spooky storytelling challenge when she percy shelley and Lord Byron and friends were holed up in a villa in Geneva. One stormy summer turns out. It was this dark, thunderous apocalyptic. Apocalyptic summer of eighteen sixteen. The crew had gone to Geneva, both to ride out the unusually rainy summer, but also to escape their various dramas in England, being stuck indoors for so much of their trip Lord. Byron challenged them all to write ghost stories to entertain one. Another Mary Shelley wrote Frankenstein which would set the stage for all of science fiction to come? Also among the Geneva Villa guests was Lord Byron's personal physician Dr John Polidori. Who wrote short story for the challenge called the vampire, and this story is often credited with the birth of the Modern Vampire Romance. But those genre defining publications aren't the only cultural institutions to come out of the summer last year of Eighteen, sixteen among the mini shortages across Europe was a crucial shortage of oats which led to the starvation and deaths of countless humans and livestock, including at least ten thousand horses, not counting how many were also slaughtered to save money or become dinner German? Baron Carl Dreyer's and inventor in student of mathematics started trying to design a man powered form of transportation, while historians agree that he was inspired by the weather based os shortage. He also saw a need for an alternative to horses as crucial for war. Quoting the Paris review his first designs for human powered transportation involved complex conveyor belt, driven four wheeled vehicles, but raises breakthrough came when he turned his thoughts to balance drawing on his experiences, skating on ice ponds drains, put his faith in the power momentum and front wheel, steering to keep a two wheel vehicle rate. This idea became his love, machine or running machine and quotes, and this running machine would become the modern day bicycle. All of this makes me think about how many things will change or be invented from this moment that we're living through. And of course there's a lot of things we're already seen, and we're likely to continue to see some big cultural shift, but like who, out there is writing the next genre defining novel that people will still be reading two centuries later. Who's inventing something that will be innovated on for decades before becoming a ubiquitous ordinary mode of transportation. Maybe won't be those types of things specifically, but there are surely ideas happening and things being created that we won't realize the impact of for decades

Europe United States Lord Byron Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley Paris Review Geneva New England Frankenstein Savannah Savannah Georgia Baron Carl Dreyer New York Geneva Villa Mid West Indonesia North America Atlantic United Kingdom
First leap second added to UTC - June 30, 1972

This Day in History Class

04:05 min | 1 year ago

First leap second added to UTC - June 30, 1972

"Today June thirtieth twenty twenty. The Day was June thirtieth nineteen seventy-two. At eleven fifty nine PM. In sixty seconds, a leap second was added to coordinate universal time to synchronize clocks with earth decelerating rotation. The second has been defied many different ways over the years at one point, it was defined as one eighty, six, thousand, four, hundred of the mean, solar day, but more precise measurement was needed because the length of day varies depending on many factors like seasonal daily weather variations as well as. In atmosphere tides. By nineteen, sixty seven, the second was defined as and I quote the duration of nine, billion, one, hundred, ninety, two, million, six, hundred, thirty, one, thousand, seven, hundred and seventy periods of the radiation, corresponding to the transition between the two hyper fine levels of the ground state of the Caesium went thirty three atom. This was the measurement that the international system of units or as I used since thin. The wording of the official definition has been updated slightly. Atomic clocks keep time with. Precision on atomic clocks, a day is exactly eighty six thousand four hundred PSI seconds. International Atomic time is a timescale that is computed by taking the weighted average of more than four hundred atomic clocks around the world. It's not connected to any astronomical observations. Universal time on the other hand is a time standard that is based on earth, rotation and astronomical observations coordinated universal time or ut is under the umbrella of universal time, which also includes ut zero ut, wine, ut, when our and ut to unlike other versions of Universal Time Utd is determined by International Atomic time. Though the practice of ut was already being coordinated internationally. The International Astronomical Union didn't adopt the name coordinated universal time until nineteen sixty seven. Coordinated. Universal time is the primary standard by which the world regulates time. But Earth's rotation as measured by UT, one is gradually slowing so that the length of a rotational day is about two milliseconds longer than the eighty six thousand four hundred seconds. It was two centuries ago. That means that there's a discrepancy between ut. See in ut wine. Scientists determined that Ut. To count for the difference between the definition of the second Earth's rotation, this keeps ut in line with the apparent position of the Sun and Stars in other words, a second would need to be added to or removed from clocks to realign them with patient occasionally. Scientists specified that you TC shows deviate more than nine tenths of a second from ut one so on June thirtieth nineteen, seventy, two. The I league second was added to ut. The international earth rotation in reference. System Service decides went at a leap. Second one is typically added either on June, thirtieth or December thirty first. From nine hundred seventy to one thousand, nine hundred nine leap seconds per at it at a rate of about one per year after that they've been added less frequently, there have been twenty-seven leap seconds since nineteen seventy two, the most recent leaf second was added on December Thirty First Twenty sixteen. Many people have called for the elimination of leaks, seconds, and the replacement of ut see with a new system leap seconds have caused problems for some computer systems since they're not that predictable can't be anticipated far in advance. And they'll need to be added more frequently as Earth's rotation continues to slow down. Some people who support abolishing leap seconds argue that it doesn't matter whether our perception of time changes along with the rotation of earth since that would happen over a long time anyway.

UT International Astronomical Uni International Atomic Caesium Official UTD
Tales From the Dark Web

Feedback with EarBuds

03:58 min | 1 year ago

Tales From the Dark Web

"This week's theme comes to us from Daniel Ocho and is called tales from the dark web. Here's why Daniel chose this theme. He says the Internet has a dark side hidden. Just below the surface, these podcasts will guide listeners through stories from the Internet's dark side where crime, drugs and murder are the currency of choice. Here are they episodes chosen by Daniel for this week's theme along with short descriptions of each episode. The first episode comes to us from the missing Crypto, Queen and called Dr Rusia. It's twenty three minutes long. Dr Rouge promised financial financial, revolution and then two years ago, she disappeared. Why. The missing crypto clean is an eight part series from BBC sounds. The next episode comes to us from reply all and is called the snapchat thief it sixty nine minutes long. This week, a super tech support after Lizzie snapchat gets hacked. Things Start Getting Really Creepy Alex investigates. The next episode comes to us from case file, and it's called the Silk Road part, one and two. The first episode is eighty four minutes long, and the second is eighty minutes long. The Silk Road was an ancient network of trade routes that started in China in the second century BC via a combination of roads and sea routes goods like silk, paper, and spices transported from the producers in Asia to the markets in Europe. Eventually, it wasn't just goods that were traded. They're also ideas, customs, religions, and even diseases. The next episode comes to us from Lizard people is called Bitcoin was created by a rogue ai with Sam Baltar it sixty minutes long. Bitcoin is one of the great mysteries of the Internet. Age who exactly created it? Where's it going? How did it blow up so fast? What the fudge is a blockchain, and why don't I have won the delightful Sam Baltar of the equally delightful podcast? Weird work joins to talk about cryptocurrency and the possibility that the J. Cryptic coin was created by. Get this artificial intelligence. The next episode comes to us from breach and is called. Caution falling rocks. It's forty seven minutes long. The Yahoo data breach left three billion users private information vulnerable for three years before the public learned about it. How did it happen? And what can we learn from the greatest known data breach in history? Those are the episodes chosen by Daniel. Ocho for this week's theme tales from the Dark Web, follow along with the discussion of this week's podcast episodes by using the Hashtag dark web pods. Now for some podcast industry news from the inside podcasting newsletter. As always, thank you to Sky Pillsbury. Who writes the inside podcasting newsletter for allowing us to share it with our ear? Buddies on this podcast will share the top stories from this week's issue of the newsletter. I story. Sky Interviews James Kim on her podcast the inside podcasting podcast. James is the creator of the fiction podcast moon face a show. Time magazine named one of the best ten twenty nineteen. In Moon face a young Korean American man named Paul wants to tell his mom that he's gay, but they don't speak. The same language Paul Story is loosely based on James Kim's real life experiences. Next story layoffs public radio suffered a heartbreaking number of layoffs this week. Here are the details Minnesota public radio slash American public media has laid off twenty eight employees. APM has also stop production of live from here and the hilarious world of depression. Chicago public media has let go of twelve employees and has ceased production on sound opinions. Next Story. She. PODCASTS founder Jessica. Cup for men and Elsie Escobar have decided to postpone their organizations. Second Annual Conference until October twenty twenty one. It was originally scheduled to take place in Arizona later this year.

Daniel Ocho James Kim Sam Baltar Dr Rusia Paul Story Murder Lizzie Snapchat BBC Chicago Elsie Escobar China Dr Rouge Sky Pillsbury Time Magazine Arizona APM Alex Founder
"two centuries" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"two centuries" Discussed on KTOK

"Back home they are ready to enter the civilian work force to help wounded warrior project has developed the warriors to work program a career counseling service that helps warriors translate their military experience to the civilian workplace these extraordinary men and women bring proven world class job skills and a unique perspective on team work to the job and to insure the right war your finds the right job wounded warrior project works with employers to find just the right match when you hire a wounded warrior you hire an intelligent talented and committed new employee contact wounded warrior project at finds W. W. P. dot org welcome home the Braves is to fight the struggle to overcome and ultimately for the marine corps it means to there is no alternative it's not just a statement of intent it's a promise to our nation a promise kept for more than two centuries a promise of the we can with it's a great interviews coming up the ridiculous impeachment inquiry hearings.

"two centuries" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

13:21 min | 2 years ago

"two centuries" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"And and of course you can listen on our app whenever you want yeah I just throw money make sure we get the story and president trump late Sunday said he wants to meet the whistle blower who filed the complaint about as July phone call with Ukrainian president and to have the house intelligence committee chairman Adam Schiff question for fraud and treason. discussion was up last week from a Republic in that for trees and we have executions do we continue that or do we just let that go because that's not. like every quote like every American I deserve to meet my accuser especially when the accuser the so called whistle blower represented a perfect conversation with a foreign leader in a totally inaccurate and fraudulent Wade trump tweeted then chef made up what I actually said by lying to Congress. he continued his lies were made in perhaps the most blatant and sinister manner ever seen in the great chamber he wrote down and read the terrible things. then she said it was from the mouth of the president of the United States I want ship question at the highest level for fraud and treason. back at your. I mean that's that's basically what when I saw that over the weekend I might all right that's the president's saying back back after. all right. should we go back in history. sure go back give me no maybe two centuries in in history. should we solve this all with the dole. maybe a water balloon tool. yeah but she applied by the way when you said it was a parody. I hope everybody we we played the audio cut on on Thursday night Friday morning show for you I hope everybody went and and actually looked at the video. because yeah there was no there was no parity there was no smirking. and that's why we have said. what was this all about ing and you made the the case argue said didn't just blow them away when the president released the transcript did they believe that if they could just say. anonymous source and then the president did not release said that they could continue to say this is an anonymous whistle blower and we're not you know look the president won't release what was said in there and therefore we believe our guy and our guy gets the anonymity I'm sorry that I am I'm I'm being gender specific here where I don't know the gender of their you the the the person but is that what they're thinking what is that what they were thinking and then he came out with it and it just blows everything to high heaven once he released the transcript because I haven't met him here's one thing you notice over the weekend did anybody say over the weekend that what the president released was it an accurate transcript. no nobody's challenge that is far as I know no no chance at all. is anybody so is anybody stating that the original allegations of a promise. our true. did anybody notice that the allegations of a quid pro quo now are quietly being dissipated. after we found out that the Ukrainians. didn't even know until a month after the phone call that the United States was considering. suspending the aid. so as we've asked what's the crime. right right yeah where is it. well because again they keep jumping around. the promised then the quid pro quo. I mean it the way the first story read essentially. it was well it's vague we're like okay we don't know what the promise was and was there a quid pro quo well yes there was okay now. the transcript is released. and they've completely gone silent on the promise of the quid pro quo. and again as far as I know no one is in a major way challenged the transcript from the day the transcript was released by the White House there was there was some back and forth about well this was put together and it really wasn't the complete phone call or we want to hear other phone calls. we want to hear we want to see the transcript of other phone calls. but that didn't carry on I mean that was back and forth that day. but that didn't carry on. didn't hear much of that over the week. and so when I was general looking and I said okay the initial allegation came out that the president made a promise to a foreign leader. then we heard there was a quid pro quo when the promise died there was a quid pro quo well that was that was not a. Thomas but a implied threat that the president would deny eight. then that we found out that the the Ukrainians didn't even know that we were considering doing that the administration was considering doing it until a month after the phone call which meant it would be an impossibility for there to be a quid pro quo if both sides didn't know that there was a threat. but there was a possibility of a threat right so that takes that that you know that takes that out of it initially we were told that this was a whistle blower which made us immediately question it and say well wait a minute you can't be a whistle blower because this is a president of the United States and and things that somebody wrote me a letter saying Hey the other side is stating that since it was the intelligence community the transcribed it it is part of of their authority no it is not. no no it is not known it does the law does not the law does not read that way so no that's incorrect if somebody's attempting to tell you that that's incorrect which is why they tried to I think over the weekend you know and and that's when we found out about the and and they're still with so much we don't know about the. the new policy where you don't need to have first hand evidence anymore right and and though the whole background of that which is gonna be fascinating that still doesn't change the original legal context that it has to be something in the intelligence community the president is not part of the intelligence community he is the president of the United States he does not work for the intelligence community they work for him there are department under him yep so that does not apply right so the the fact that then after you know even after you know that gets blown out of the water the next thing you hear is as you said Eric that because the insistence that well this this whistle blower the source name and have to remain anonymous where we're gonna bring him before the the the the the house today to testify this this source but that we're going to keep their anonymity. and M. because their life is in danger and we're like there they go here we keep going it keep the goal posts keep moving all the time and I'm we are all calling B. S. on the life is in danger of the whistle blower yeah. yeah right ability is our goal yes yes yeah well the political life. yeah if there is one but it but again this was very late in the game. if you if you think about it last week it was no but they get the protection of a whistleblower well but it's not a whistleblower so officially. the acting deny says no not does whistleblower doesn't apply. it doesn't matter what you know new rule or or law there is about whistleblower it's still not a whistleblower right. so. then what do you do well the only thing you can do is Mike my life isn't it. and any any time we've heard there the been a couple other instances. I think. with Ford testifying against Cavanaugh I think we heard that a couple of times. I don't know if we heard that before her testimony. there were and there was something else and I forget what it was but basically some something where it was going to be a witness type scenario against the president. well our life is in danger our life is in danger and and they keep using that. over no well we're being threatened were receiving threats well because I think what they're looking at is a look as the story has continued what is just like rushing collusion this story's done the same thing everything keeps crumbling. as the days go by. at everything keeps crumbling so I have to get to the point well this person needs anonymity not because whistle blower anymore that's what we're gonna hear next but because our life is in danger and that they were trying but as far as I'm concerned and ship was trying to head him off at the pass or okay before we lose that battle let's claim that their life is in danger therefore they get anonymity and everybody who fed them him information this source or whistle blower information also gets anonymity so all the allegations of the president our second hand and anonymous that's right and will impeach on that one yeah do that good luck yeah I go I go and do that and then the other thing is of course that we predicted probably the middle of last week when we said you know something here's where this may be going that this really isn't about impeachment. and then when they didn't have a vote and Nancy Pelosi just came out and said well I am I'm endorsing an MP impeachment inquiry and we're like okay but where's the vote nobody wants to go on record where's the vote and then the the the official testimony from the acting D. and I and then the next thing that screaming from Nancy Pelosi on Friday is he's corrupt he's corrupt yeah and it's exactly what we predicted well maybe it's not so much about impeachment maybe it's about okay we we were you know maybe we thought we could get a little bit more if the president had released a transcript but now let's go after the Attorney General because you're turning general's investigation is going to be going on a Russian collusion it's not going to look good for Biden it's not going to look good for Obama it's not going to look good for a ton of people in the Democratic Party including the narrative that has been kept up by people like Adam Schiff and you know the lies that he kept promoting over that time with Russia collusion and spend especially the big lie from Adam ship or he claimed he had evidence of collusion with the the the the Russians to hack and and I'm so glad was a Jim Jordan who actually said that the other day yeah right there the hacked the election and it wasn't true right when you when you see it all the time everything has the same it's the same ma'am all. everything seems to be the same I am from the Democrats and when the allegation comes out it keeps going in the opposite direction just like Russia collusion debt yep yep yep end again. it's if we can't get it to stick can't get this excuse to stick that will move on to the next. yeah. by the way you know the whistle blower life is in danger well how nobody knows who you are. well that's why they keep anonymity right that's the justification granted them at all that's that's the whole point in that well. what are you going to claim. I mean based on what. that people won't like you what was the point of doing that. it was politically motivated against the president. so when it comes back at you I fear that my life could be in danger if I if if I am not anonymous if I'm no. yeah I called B. S. on that well it was because it's it seems like the blanket excuse. yeah I mean it it is it's the ultimate excuse for someone in that situation. and they scrambled last week because they knew that the whistleblower thing wasn't gonna stick. so here they are life is in danger and you don't want someone to die over this eight six six ninety right I tips from JJ Keller and associates.

president United States Adam Schiff fraud Wade trump Congress. chairman dole. White House JJ Keller Thomas B. S. Ford Cavanaugh two centuries
"two centuries" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"two centuries" Discussed on KOMO

"Rick franchise with Alicia Jaffe a man was found dead this afternoon in Green River near Auburn detectives responded this to the scene and the twelve thousand seven hundred block of south east green valley road as we learn more about this developing story the lecture now Washington's Attorney General joining us counterparts in forty seven other states Porter Rico and the district of Columbia opening an investigation into Google com was Charlie harder with the story to be clear this isn't a lawsuit at least not yet professor John Kirkwood teaches antitrust law at Seattle university he says this comes as the federal government investigates Google and other tech companies as well so they opened wider in a fact follow on investigation no cases yet just the beginnings of enquiries so he does go to court he says it's unlikely any of the cases could result in the breaking up of big tech companies but there could be some products spin offs if the if the companies lose the only two states not taking part are California in Alabama Charlie harder colonials the census is just around the corner and soon millions of temporary workers will be out heading door to door more from come most Jeff Partula the constitution mandates that everyone in the U. S. B. counted every ten years among other things the state is used for congressional apportionment and distribution of federal tax money but the decennial enumeration has evolved over two centuries and now includes some other data were asking for for people's for their age for their for their gender for their race and ethnicity the relationship to the householder and question about their house you know how how. the houses and stuff like that but Debbie director Ron German says they will not be asking about immigration status or citizenship Jeff PO to look come on news. well it'll be a tough drive getting to Seattle for a ten day stretch come was Ryan Harris tells us what has to close take down one of the final pieces of the viaduct this section at first in Dearborn will take ten days to remove so south Dearborn closes Thursday morning and it'll stay closed until Sunday the twenty second wanted to re open just in time for the Seahawks game washed out Tom Harkin says there's a lot more to it than just knocking down the remaining sections of the viaduct attracting.

director Seahawks Debbie Alabama Charlie Porter Rico Attorney Auburn Tom Harkin Dearborn Ryan Harris Seattle Jeff PO Ron German Rick Jeff Partula California Google federal government Seattle university
"two centuries" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

04:47 min | 2 years ago

"two centuries" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Radio he is curly and on your mac eight six six ninety right I. this this site just was going through my mind we were having the discussion and that's you know listening to I say Washington the actors talking about his decision to leave the the the Democratic Party and to me this is even beyond the day to day politics and I think it's something that is. has been has been taught and learned by Americans for over two centuries. and it's sort of what I ate and I've gotten is from friends of mine who live for example in Europe and other parts of the world and one thing they like about the United States and one of the first things. when I talk to people from outside this country is and everybody in this country has an opinion there doesn't seem to be eight the doesn't seem to be a mindset that everybody has. that everybody's at each other's throats but it's part of a very very vibrant vibrant democracy and they like the independent thought that exists. because I do believe that independent thought is something that's been taught that that has been taught in this country for over two hundred years and people eventually get sick of being told what to do in the United States they just do. and maybe you know you have the the the eggs and flows of a for example young people you know being brainwashed and being thrown the propaganda that you must say that a man is a woman when you know what's a man anyone I've talked about on college campuses when all these questions a rack ask and you can tell they're giving just the right answers because why they're they're they're afraid of being oppressed or losing their status are being kicked out of school if they say or do the wrong thing but we'll see if they say the wrong thing correct right. and and I just I wonder if we're to the point almost to the the the tipping point because remember part of trump's popularity was Republicans rejecting where Republicans were going oh yeah yeah I'm not sure I know that's why I'm not going to be part of this mindset that says one thing and does another right I want to be part this guy looks like he's a doer I'm going to go with the do over here right and a ton and a ton of people you a ton of people did that. and and so there's always now by the way this mindset can you just in the right direction many times and the casing could leave us in the wrong direction I'm not saying trump the wrong direction I'm just saying overall it can do that well what we I guess we could say open change was a slogan that lead people to think that Hey I'm an independent new because I'm for hope and change what does that mean it means whatever you wish to mean it to mean for any particular person which was actually the genius of that political slogan was it not right is it could mean anything to anybody yes but I just wonder when America because we're the oppression really comes that you must think something that is absolutely not true that's coming from the Democrats right now in in our time in history Democrats own that big time they own it and it's coming from the college campuses it's coming from the politicians it's coming from people like I said and what do you like it or not Democrats AOC is your representative. and the average person who isn't into the brain washing of and brainwashing goes on his the to the propaganda of your own political party look at her and say she's clueless right she's got in popular culture she is viewed as being clueless. and she's trying to tell people what to do when how to live their life the Democrats held a seven hour thing yesterday about how they're going to transform and force you to change your life completely. well American say enough is enough. ever reach that point now when will the revolt happening campuses or is it happening already it's just a small revolt. but I think that Americans one thing about Americans is are quite independent they don't like being told what to do or how to live their life especially from people that they view was idiots what I think we're at that point right now I think we are and I think the difference is is that in years gone by maybe to some extent still today there are people on the left that believe that the government is only going to tell other people what to do. they're only going to control their lives. the couple with obamacare while we supported obamacare we didn't know we were going to have to pay for right. they they look at it and say well you guys were going to punish the rich you guys were going to do this I think more more they realize the promise is to control you not.

Washington two hundred years two centuries seven hour
"two centuries" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"two centuries" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Over two centuries we have we have exercise we thing cut constitutional powers and responsibilities and that's part of what we celebrate two nights of let let us always remember that it is it is our responsibility to debate and to legislate get results for the American people and the house we call ourselves the people's house and we take that responsibility very seriously so now under cleo's gays and inspired by our proud history move forward the purpose to do the people's work in advance progress for all Americans for you are to all of you madam president Mister chairman we thank you thank you to the US capitol Historical Society of four keeping the flame going I see that and then joined now by my colleague congressman Debbie Dingell welcomed at the time that the women come I'll have a an interesting program tonight and be inspired by the arts by doctor Freeman thank you for allowing me the moment to share some thoughts with you and I can thank you for your on going support of this magnificent institution thank you so much thank you speaker Pelosi we know the.

cleo chairman capitol Historical Society Debbie Dingell doctor Freeman Pelosi president US congressman two centuries
"two centuries" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"two centuries" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"It's been part of our fishing for more than two centuries. And I don't know we should abandon it now, the witnesses if they would they would choose to use the phrase, USA chairman, Mr. Nadler, if any witness objects should not be asked to identify himself. We do not have religious tests for office or anything else. And we should let it go with that. Wow. It's not a religious test. I and people wonder why we are in a world hurt like days. Now, this is just I think congratulations, Democrats. Congratulations on that. That is just unreal. Yeah. One eight abroad, wreck is a complete bats. And we have to talk about her. When we come back, you guys, stay tuned. So how are your power bills way better now than two AC units replace last year by fasttrack? They did a once over on our heating to make sure that everything's running smoothly to I was pretty cranky. When I had to replace those units, but the guys that fasttrack they made everything tolerable. There's some nice of friendly. So hard working best guys in the biz, as you know, no fasttrack is helped me out in so many home plumbing and heating, and AC, binds, I cannot even count now fast. Track is the only company we trust and work with for all of our HVAC needs their salt of the earth, folks who will tell it like it is. And always give it to you straight. They've been so good over the years. Yep. And that's why they're ready today with the BBB. They've got Nate certified tax all know their stuff they vet and senior discounts. And I swear I was talking to Mike ball the owner this past weekend. And I said that all major HVAC emergencies happen on weekends,.

fasttrack Mr. Nadler Mike ball chairman BBB USA Nate two centuries
"two centuries" Discussed on Atheist Nomads

Atheist Nomads

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"two centuries" Discussed on Atheist Nomads

"This was a Jewish sect to start in the second century BC and continued in the first century CE that when they were destroyed by the Romans. That's when they basically vanished in the bible stories, John the Baptist is the description of an Assine. He was a took a vow poverty baptism for a scenes was a daily occurrence. They were ascetic they would wear painful clothing, they would beat themselves. They would fast routinely, and they also had a. Priestly class that was celebrate. There's a number of things with that, you know, baptism asceticism, poverty and priestly celibacy that Christianity. Also has at least in some of its forms and the scenes were a really fascinating group. They had one of the most successful revolts against the Romans. I've been to one of their cities, and you can still see the ramp the Romans were building. Oh, well, it is still there. They took all of the rocks. They could find and they would dig up rocks. If they needed to and they would just bring rocks and pile up rocks until you have a giant ramp where you can just drive right up over the wall and destroy the city interesting. It really was really cool to see they got a bout a quarter of the Wade finished with the ramp when the people in the city were so hungry that they gave up. Because you know, the whole concept of a siege is starved them out..

Wade
"two centuries" Discussed on Gaslit Nation with Andrea Chalupa and Sarah Kendzior

Gaslit Nation with Andrea Chalupa and Sarah Kendzior

04:34 min | 3 years ago

"two centuries" Discussed on Gaslit Nation with Andrea Chalupa and Sarah Kendzior

"I'm Sarah cancer, a maternal scholar of third -tarian states focusing on the former Soviet Union. I'm Andrea Chiluba writer filmmaker activists focused on Ukraine and Russia, and this is gas nation podcast that looks at corruption in the Trump administration and the rise of Cherian ISM around the world, and we are coming back from a two week break because of the holidays and a lot has happened on one week give us wait it it felt like. Trivia, here's. We're coming back from a two century break in Trump ears. A lot of news all of it bad because again Trump ears. But yeah, like the government is gone. We have a lot of people in acting positions now. So we're going to open up by talking about that the original Trump administration of twenty seventeen is no more and those who remain tend to share to traits nepotistic ties and complicity in abroad, international, kleptocratic, plots, just what you want in your government. And of course, those are not mutually exclusive categories. And so I'm gonna give you a rundown of who remains you have the Trump and Christner families with Donald as president and vodka and Jared still in senior adviser positions despite breaking the law and having no particular qualifications. You have relatives of other complicit actors like secretary of transfer. Tation Elaine Chao who is the wife of Mitch McConnell and secretary of education, Betsy DeVos, who's a sister of mercenary, Eric prince, you also see nepotism with more minor players like Sarah Huckabee Sanders, the daughter of former Arkansas governor and general folksy jackass Mike Huckabee, and these corrupt officials are then covered by media figures who are themselves the sons and daughters of other media figures politicians, so just imagine the possibilities Romera if the system of nepotism did not exist. So you had that. But in addition to that, you have cabinet members who've fled lives of white collar crime. And are there for ideal candidates for the Trump camps? Insular illegal schemes who are not related to anybody in the White House at least not by marriage or blood examples of this include secretary of the treasury, Steve Mnuchin secretary of commerce Wilbur Ross secretary of labor, Alex Kosta, who of course, was a key player in the Jeffrey Epstein. Underage rape case vice-president Pence and white supremacist in all around adviser. Stephen Miller Mnuchin Ross are both white collar criminals of ties to networks both in the US and abroad. We're going to talk more about Mnuchin when we discussed the infiltration of the US treasury by Russia Pence is kind of his own category. He's a theocrat religious fanatic. Who of course, also tied to these criminal networks that emerged during the campaign, and we still need to question. Why exactly he was selected for this position? By Manafort Miller is interesting to know that he still there because he's basically the last ideolog left. We no longer have Bannon or sessions or the other open supremacists on board, and he's one of the cruelest participants in this regime. He was brought into the campaign by right wing extremists David Horowitz, he worked under the tutelage of Jeff Sessions and his main goal is the implementation, violent white supremacists. Policies against the most vulnerable people in this country. Especially nonwhite immigrants. Miller is one of the main reasons we have children dying and concentration camps at the Texas border. As it's notable that he has remained you really getting a sense of who is the inner circle of this administration and who's disposable, and they apparently think he's important to have around. So basically what's happened is that a reality show, president has created a bureaucratic survivor wherever the last two years, dozens of officials have been kicked off the island. And now, see what's left the makeup and shakeup of the Trump administration is typical of an autocratic regime. The administration is packed with lackeys who are bound by family ties or by shared guilt bound by kin and bound by complicity, the reason that autocracies are structured in this way is because it makes them easier to control as the inner circle is behold into the leader, this is, of course, also the way that mafias are structured Trump is an aspiring autocrat and like any autocrat. Over time..

Trump vice-president Pence secretary Manafort Miller Bannon US president Stephen Miller Mnuchin Ross Sarah cancer Soviet Union Mike Huckabee Sarah Huckabee Sanders Andrea Chiluba Elaine Chao Ukraine Russia Wilbur Ross Mitch McConnell Betsy DeVos White House