35 Burst results for "Twenty Year"

Interview With Showtime's Desus and Mero

Fresh Air

01:58 min | 1 d ago

Interview With Showtime's Desus and Mero

"Mira. Welcome to fresh air. It's such a pleasure to have you on our show so before you started working together you you both had a bunch of jobs before becoming like tv and audio people so you had like legal illegal semi-legal kind of jobs. Tell us about some of the most interesting. Well ones that you've had these. You wanna start. Oh yeah. I've had a million jobs. But i think the most interesting jobs. I was working at the new york public library. Because i worked there. I worked every job. I've had pretty much worked my way through the ranks and so i started as a computer page at the library and i worked my way all the way up to almost a programmer for the near public library and as a matter of years so that just looking back at that That was as well. Because i was like okay. Maybe this could be like my job for the rest of my life because you know thinking back in the day like people have a job for twenty years company but it didn't work out that way and you know that was one of the better jobs i've had terrible does at one job. I had to collect dead rats at auto body shop job like a professional rat catcher. Yeah if you wanna say professional if you mean like a fifteen year old vicks vapor robot has that's because the person came the week before and they put down a bait but no one stopped to think okay the they're going to eat the bait and die and now there's going to be this terrible smell inside the building and key to the story. New york was in the middle of a heat wave so it was about one hundred degrees. Every day is working and only steel. I had was used my nose. Smell the dead rat which was usually under under a car or like behind. Something used the shoveled scruple. The there you put it into a compound bucket and you dump the compound bucket into the barrel of used oil from Oil changes dagga picked up at the end of the week. I lasted two weeks at that job.

Mira New York Public Library New York
Interview With Brad Stone, Author of Amazon Unbound

The Voicebot Podcast

02:04 min | 2 d ago

Interview With Brad Stone, Author of Amazon Unbound

"Brad stone. Welcome to the voice podcast hybrid. Thanks for having me all right. So i'm excited to talk to you about the topic of the day alexa and that story. Which is in your newest book amazon unbound but before we get into that you probably talk about what you do because being an amazon chronicler is sort of a side job for you. Why don't you introduce yourself to the audience and let them know what your day to day job is and maybe how lead you to this. Nice little side gig side-hustle For amazon yeah I my day. Job is running the technology team at bloomberg Were about sixty technology. Journalists around the world covering the big tech companies startups venture capitalists cybersecurity companies and hacks and. I've covered silicon valley for about twenty years and And that is how i. I can't cover amazon To become a bazo solid gist as i. I sort of feel like increasingly discipline. All of its own studying the the wealth and the power and the and the moves of jeff bezos. I was covering amazon for the new york. Jeff bezos the astronaut. Exactly right his the app Was covering amazon for the new york times in the mid two thousand. And that's when well actually even before that. I was covering amazon for newsweek magazine. In the late ninety s and that's when i first interviewed basis and then and then covered the company for the new york times and that led me into the first book. The everything store data you go back all the way to the henry. Blodget era talking about amazon at four hundred That sanctions against him for. I believe it was that it might have been one of his other reports but It turned out to be a significant Understatement that's right. Yeah even even the bull cases for amazon back then were were corrected just took a very long time for them to be realized.

Amazon Brad Stone Jeff Bezos Newsweek Magazine Bloomberg The New York Times Blodget New York
Northwestern Band of Shoshone Sues Idaho Over Hunting Rights

Native America Calling

01:07 min | 6 d ago

Northwestern Band of Shoshone Sues Idaho Over Hunting Rights

"Tribe in utah. Suing the state of idaho for the right to hunt off reservation. The mountain west news bureaus savannah maher explains twice in the last twenty years citizens of the northwestern band of the shoshoni nation have been cited for illegal hunting on traditional shoshoni territory in idaho in federal lawsuit filed this week. The tribe argued those citizens. Actions weren't illegal at all but that they were exercising their treaty rights to hunt on the quote unoccupied lands of the united states. That language comes from the eighteen. Sixty eight four birger treaty. George governor is the northwestern bands executive director. He says the tribe is suing to be acknowledged as a on that treaty because tenant of that treaty. And that i've signed it. In good faith. The united states of america the eastern shawnee and shoshoni bannock tribes are already acknowledged as signatories. The suit comes two years after the. Us supreme court upheld crow tribal citizens off reservation hunting rights which are derived from identical treaty language but the state of wyoming is still fighting to block kortrijk hunters from exercising that right for national native news. I'm savannah

Savannah Maher Idaho Utah Shoshoni Bannock United States Of America George Us Supreme Court Wyoming Savannah
Data Ethics, Then and Now With Kinesso's Sheila Colclasure

AdExchanger Talks

02:14 min | 6 d ago

Data Ethics, Then and Now With Kinesso's Sheila Colclasure

"So similar to the brood x cicadas hatch of two thousand twenty one. The eruption of privacy related news has been in the works for a long time incubating underground for something like oh seventeen or twenty years before crawling out into the open air and swarming the earth in the form of privacy laws and tracking restrictions from the browsers and from tech platforms The companies that ultimately control advertisers access to consumer data at scale. There's insects everywhere. My guest today is sheila. Kaul closure sheila is the global chief digital responsibility and public policy officer at knesset. Oh previously she spent twenty one years at axiom and at live ramp prior to the acquisition of axiom by interpol group after that acquisition canessa was set up as a standalone brand housing. All of the axiom Sort of data services offerings As her retitled suggests. Sheila is intensively focused on understanding the privacy landscape which is increasingly an ethical as as a legal quagmire. I'm delighted to have her on the podcast. She loved welcome. Thank you zachary. I am delighted to be here and delighted to talk about this fabulous topic. And i love. The insect analogy couldn't resist so before we jump in. Just tell us. How did you get into this data ethics and governance game going back twenty. One years at axiom great question. well. I started my career in the united states senate and after the senate i moved what they say is off hill and i went to work for the fabulous and very sexy american institute of certified public accountants were managed congressional and political affairs and that led me really into the policy realm as a deep policy. Wonk how do you navigate. Hit the difference between good policy and good politics. And then i had the very good fortune to have an extra at axiom and i brought my expertise and good policy and good politics and then my executive team at the time said you know I think we need to build a program around this help us in there. I began my journey

Sheila Interpol Group Canessa Kaul American Institute Of Certifie Zachary Senate United States
Southern Baptists' New Leader: Long Career as Bridge Builder

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | Last week

Southern Baptists' New Leader: Long Career as Bridge Builder

"Southern Baptist pick a president who work for racial unity the Southern Baptist Convention tamp down a push from the right at its largest meeting in decades electing a new president who has worked to bridge racial divides in the church for the fifteen thousand delegates in attendance picked at Lytton as their next leader he's a white pastor from Alabama with a long record of hard work promoting racial reconciliation during his campaign Clinton identified unity and diversity as two of his top priorities he noted that blacks Hispanics and Asian Americans increase their presence in the U. S. B. C. over the past twenty years even as white membership declined I Walter Ratliff

Southern Baptist Convention Lytton Alabama Clinton S. B. C. U. Walter Ratliff
Self-Objectification and Becoming More Than a Body With Dr. Lindsay Kite

Real Talk with Dana | Nutrition, Health

01:53 min | Last week

Self-Objectification and Becoming More Than a Body With Dr. Lindsay Kite

"You mentioned a couple of times self objectification and so for those people who haven't read your book can't please go read it but for them for those. Who haven't could you describe what you mean by self objectifications. Everyone's on the same page. Yeah so self objectification we feel like is really the missing piece of the puzzle in these body image conversations that people have been having for the last twenty years or so self objectification is the practice of envisioning your body from the outside. You're really just monitoring it for how it looks imagining how it appears to other people even when you're by yourself so part of women's mental energy is consistently dedicated to monitoring how we appear and then we view an evaluate and value ourselves outweigh to yuli from an outsider's perspective so self objectification. It takes this holistic sense of self where you are in your body. Of course you're visible person. With an appearance that matters to other and their perception has an impact on you but it makes that the only focus and it splits us from ourselves so it takes us from inside. Our bodies is our home as carefree kids without awareness of how other people see us without that self judgment really seeping in and preventing us from really living our fullest lives and being home in our bodies and it splits us so that we are then watching our bodies from the outside making sure they look right that were closed in the right ways wearing the right things and this splits identities into from a whole person to the person who is really fixated on appearance. Where part of your mental energy is just sapped. It's distracted your physical energy also distracted when you're adjusting your clothes. All the time when he tried to sit in the most flattering position or walking away. That you know you're keeping your gut sucked any of your up. So the double chin isn't showing this self objectification is what keeps us. Trapped in our bodies as prisoners instead of our bodies as our homes

Yuli
Carry A Wallet (MM #3738)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last week

Carry A Wallet (MM #3738)

"The Maison with Kevin Nation. Sometimes it's not important things that make way around the internet yesterday. Silly stupid. I don't even know how you'd refuse young but the big burning question going around the internet. Yesterday was, do you still carry a wallet and this was specifically aimed at men, basketball player now, broadcaster Charles Barkley was visiting a Chipotle and forgot his wallet left. It there, somebody foiled got ahold of TNT and got the wallet back to him. So now everybody's making fun of Charles Barkley because he still carries a good old-fashioned. Men's rear pocket wallet and everybody's like, how can you still carry a wallet today? I understand I carry a front pocket wallet, really more money clip with spaces for six credit cards. So it's a front pocket wallet. I've been doing that for ten fifteen, probably twenty years now only because the way to the wall, I might behind was too much. Most people don't even do that, they base wage a couple of credit cards, or driver's license, and some cash with a rubber band around it with the cell phone. Now we can attach credit cards. And driver's license has a little pockets on the back and we don't necessarily need a wallet per se, but I can't imagine going fully without something in my front pocket, dead.

Kevin Nation Charles Barkley TNT Basketball
Carry A Wallet (MM #3738)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last week

Carry A Wallet (MM #3738)

"The Maison with Kevin Nation. Sometimes it's not important things that make way around the internet yesterday. Silly stupid. I don't even know how you'd refuse young but the big burning question going around the internet. Yesterday was, do you still carry a wallet and this was specifically aimed at men, basketball player now, broadcaster Charles Barkley was visiting a Chipotle and forgot his wallet left. It there, somebody foiled got ahold of TNT and got the wallet back to him. So now everybody's making fun of Charles Barkley because he still carries a good old-fashioned. Men's rear pocket wallet and everybody's like, how can you still carry a wallet today? I understand I carry a front pocket wallet, really more money clip with spaces for six credit cards. So it's a front pocket wallet. I've been doing that for ten fifteen, probably twenty years now only because the way to the wall, I might behind was too much. Most people don't even do that, they base wage a couple of credit cards, or driver's license, and some cash with a rubber band around it with the cell phone. Now we can attach credit cards. And driver's license has a little pockets on the back and we don't necessarily need a wallet per se, but I can't imagine going fully without something in my front pocket, dead.

Kevin Nation Charles Barkley TNT Basketball
Paying Attention to the Subtle With AdaPia D'Errico

The Addicted Mind Podcast

01:58 min | Last week

Paying Attention to the Subtle With AdaPia D'Errico

"Hello everyone welcome to the addicted. Mind my guest. Today is to rico and we are going to talk about intuition and and your book productive intuition but i i love to hear your story and how this all evolved. Yeah thanks so much joining such a pleasure to be here when we were kinda speaking prerecording. I was saying that you know this book and even me being here and talking about it has so much to do with a time in my life. one of many but Specially point in time in my life where i was so completely lost where i essentially went through with. A lot of people would call a spiritual crisis. It was out it. Was this time in my life. Where the person that i thought i was successfully especially around career. I've always been like really career driven. I'm going to get things done. I'm in business. I wanna like do things in the world. They want to be a human doing instead of a human being. Right right link. Everything i knew how to do was not working. And i completely lost my marbles because i was like i can't be effective can't make money. I can't do anything. And then i didn't know who to talk to. I didn't have anybody to talk to you. Because i sounded in my own crazy person. How how how do i explain to people that this basically at that point is twenty year career that i had worked so hard to build up. I typically walked away from it with this idea that i was going to use a purposeful work and i was gonna you know i was gonna make really meaningful more meaningful than what i was doing so i was prejudging myself before even going into something into something new and instead what life or the universe or god delivered to me was just failure

Rico
U.S., EU Suspend Airbus-Boeing Trade Fight

WSJ What's News

02:08 min | Last week

U.S., EU Suspend Airbus-Boeing Trade Fight

"After a seventeen year battle the longest and most costly in the history of the world trade organization the us and the eu have agreed to suspend their trade fight over government. Subsidies to boeing and airbus the resolution is part of a broader effort to improve transatlantic relations. And it may allow the allies to shift their attention instead to a common competitor china. Joining me now with more is our aerospace reporter. Cameron highs on. Thanks for being here. Pay glad to be here so doug before we get to the new agreement. Can you remind us how this all started. How did boeing and airbus become wrapped up in this while the legal disputes date. Back to two thousand four. The friction between the two parties actually dates back. The best part of their two years boeing used to be the dominant producer of commercial jets. Airbus with european government support started and chipped away at that market. So that kinda made the the. Us concerned about high. That government age was the starting in. There is the market that then brought in the manufacturer's who've been trading blows for the best part of twenty years now so over the course of many years this has really been a battle between the us and the eu. And it's cost importers a lot of money. Can you give us a sense of the scope of this battle. Well that's right. And it spread beyond aircraft to any number of industries high-profile wise whiskey and bourbon and cheese and close all told the calculation is something in the region of eleven billion dollars of tariffs have been imposed on companies on both sides of the atlantic and only a small fraction of that is actually applied to aircraft. So what made the conditions. Now more amenable to reaching agreement the best way to describe this is a truce. We have a new administration in the us. Which is trying to improve. Its trade relations just with the eu but obviously notably china so abroad environment which is looking for better. Trade

Airbus Boeing European Government EU United States Cameron Doug China Atlantic
Mitochondrial Optimization, Circadian Rhythm, Light and Melatonin With Ari Whitten

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

02:07 min | Last week

Mitochondrial Optimization, Circadian Rhythm, Light and Melatonin With Ari Whitten

"At guys will welcome to the podcast really excited about today's topic. We're gonna talk about adrenal fatigue. We're gonna talk about maya contrel dysfunction. We hear this term adrenal fatigue all the time in the natural health world. Does it really exist. is a really scientific evidence for it. We're to talk about the metal contra. You guys like hearing about meadow country. I i talk a lot about it. We're renegade. do a deep dive on that. We're gonna talk about sleep optimization as well and red light therapy so let a really good topics and we got ari whitten on here. He is the owner of the energy. Blueprint he could check out his website. The energy blueprint dot dotcoms expert. When it comes to the teague an energy and he has a great podcast. Energy blueprint podcasts. And he's a best selling author of the ultimate guide. Red light therapy and forever fat loss. And he's coming to us from costa rica where he's surfing out there and spend time with his family. Ra welcome to the podcast and so much for having me to pleasure beyond absolutely well. I know you've done a lot of work. In area of energy fatigue and an adrenal fatigue in particular which is really hot topic that in the natural health world people talk about and have been talking about now for many years i originally got into natural health about twenty years ago and You know it was diagnosed with adrenal fatigue. Just like probably everybody at some point And did things that i thought were supporting. My my adrenals an improved my health right. I did get better. I improve my health but you know more research is coming out really looking at this idea of fatigue and does it really exist. And i know you've done a lot of work in this area so let's start with that. What are your thoughts on that idea of adrenal fatigue. It's a big topic okay. So we're gonna we're gonna jump right in so i've done pretty much. What what i believe is the most extensive analysis of the literature on this topic as done by anyone at any point And the primary reason that. I did this ironically as i was actually trying to prove that adrenal fatigue was real.

Maya Contrel Ari Whitten Adrenal Fatigue Teague Rica Costa
Bragi CEO Nikolaj Hviid on the Next Frontier in Personalization

VOICE Global 2021

01:47 min | Last week

Bragi CEO Nikolaj Hviid on the Next Frontier in Personalization

"Looking back at the time fifteen twenty years ago when we had newspapers of radio and and the way that we consumed if nation was absolutely not personal like dissociation. Boss have fast. I'm flipping through the newspaper at the age of of nokia of having a single app. That does everything like snake. Was the only game you ever needed. So it's a logical process in the missiles space. You have created personal station. You go to google you search for something you'd be presented with outcome you're being presented with us -ment with things might like and the same process what happened for audio obviously so rather than just having snake of course people to have more games more services more steaming soon as more information and they also want to have information. It's always talk radio. They want the information that they really want to hear. I want to hear about by munich. But i'm not the only one wants to hear about by munich. But it's very limited in the predation wants to about by munich. Someone wants the about chelsea. Someone wants to out american football. And which i don't particularly fancy because i just don't get it and i think that's very mutual football sarah south ables bass anyways but but having a personalized information just means that that it becomes more useful to me and and the same same step from newspaper to personalized information on smartphone will happen from talk radio to order bruce implying. Tom

Munich Nokia Google Football Chelsea Bruce TOM
A Nuanced Approach to Insider Threats

Recorded Future - Inside Threat Intelligence for Cyber Security

02:01 min | Last week

A Nuanced Approach to Insider Threats

"Joining us. This week is john. Ford managing director of global government services and insider threat risk solutions at mandy and our conversation centers on his experience with effective insider threat programs from both the technical and human perspective with twenty years of experience in the fbi before joining mandate john ford gained extensive knowledge from bringing to justice some of the world's most notorious cybercriminals knowledge which informs his approach to solving today's most pressing security issues. Stay with us. My career started almost twenty eight years ago. I was a police officer by career. Starting law enforcement in austin texas and in nineteen ninety eight. I joined The fbi and through that time as you imagine we went through everything you can imagine with nine. Eleven and the changes that evolved within the bureau. I went to cyber and i was one of the first agents out there to really start. Cyber task forces in the bureau moved to headquarters where worked in what was called the special technologies and applications office. so that's where we were looking at horizon technologies and horizon events that we might need to plan and prepare for. In in the event that those would come to fruition promoted again when out to san antonio was a cyber supervisor out here and then promoted again and was leading our four deployed operations in informed space with our our country partners overseas so specifically working at cyber again so and then at some point decided to make the jump to the private sector. Yeah retired in two thousand eighteen and joined mandate came over director working in government solutions and actually actually see on both sides actually selling the commercial and the government side of the

Global Government Services FBI John Ford Mandy Horizon Technologies Ford John Austin Texas San Antonio
Buddhism and Atheism With Ajahn Brahmavamso

Buddhist Society of Western Australia

02:02 min | Last week

Buddhism and Atheism With Ajahn Brahmavamso

"But this evening's talk. I'm going to be talking about a subject. i hope i never thought about before. That's unlikely sings. I've been speaking here for over twenty years and it's come up in the newspapers recently and Few people have been discussing this on the email because apparently just before easter time there was an atheist conference over in sydney and that really upsets some people in the churches in sydney and because they were talking about eighty s and it affects them. Bickers is put this an atheist religion. Does it believe in god. If it doesn't why does support his position about this and so the first part of this talk no maybe just a bit of information about the stand on a garden some interesting things which many of you may not know for the most important part of this talk is That actually as far as buddhism is concerned is better reform does not believe in a supernatural being because there some very very grave consequences such a belief in your ordinary lives. I'm going to put this view and pointed point out that actually that you can become a wiser more compassionate person without such beliefs which sometimes obstruct no one's feeling of what's right and what's compassionate. Bullets go from the very beginning. Sometimes people ask is put some an atheist religion. What is a buddhist. Take on a guard but i vote is to go to the ancient scriptures twenty five hundred years ago when the border was around and of course you mentioned just the idea of god was very common at that time as far as the buddha was concerned. It wasn't just a theory but because of these great house which you can get through meditation you understand how the universe works.

Bickers Sydney
Art Show (MM #3734)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last week

Art Show (MM #3734)

"The Maison with Kevin Nation. I'm sure if I look back at my life, there are a lot of things I've done over the course of say just even the last decade that if you'd asked me my twenties, if I would ever do that sometime in the future, I would have laughed and said, there's no way one thing in particular because I'm doing it. Tonight is going to an art show. One of my least favorite classes in both high school and college was often depreciation. Yet, I'd become a huge fan of art. Now, with that said, I've seen all the classics. I've been to the major art museums in Chicago, in New York, and Washington DC. And they were fine, but I like quirky or stuff off more unique stuff. I can just go stand and stare at art for hours at a time, and it's not the fancy kind of art, it's not the hybrid kind of art. That's what they made a study back in high school and college. I love going to art shows Tonight. Show from one of my favorite local artist who's been doing it for twenty years, in this town who's also respectable businessman. He does street art as a hobby now. I can't wait to go see it. But if you told me twenty years ago, thirty years ago, I was going to an art show, I would have laughed dead.

Kevin Nation Washington Dc Chicago New York
Is New Texas Longhorns Coach Chris Beard the Best Hire in 2021?

CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

02:00 min | Last week

Is New Texas Longhorns Coach Chris Beard the Best Hire in 2021?

"It's been a pretty slow week in college basketball. Exactly zero icons have announced their retirement plans. No assistance have been named their schools coach in waiting. But i did talk to texas coach chris beard earlier in the week. So let's talk about that deadline. Let me start by asking you. This most seemed to believe that crispier will in the long term and perhaps in the short term as well but certainly in the long-term proved to be the best hire from two thousand and twenty one. Do you agree with that. I don't know if he'll have not not not explicitly so i think that he's got a really good shot at being very successful. I think his odds are probably the best. But i also think the nature of the job. He's taking the league. he's taking it in even kansas. Gets you know. Dial back here a more than a few notches for a few years. It's still going to be kansas bill. Self has an ideal contract situation going forward so he would not be my pick. He would not be most likely picked to do the best job at this school for the long term. I think he has to objectively be in like the top three of that conversation. Hell he might be your number one. That's part of why you spoke them to begin with but he would not be my pick to be the most successful at the school. Among the hires power conferences in this cycle. Then who would be. Okay i will go with craig smith because i think craig smith has the best chance at both having success and staying at that school. Not that chris. Beard won't like chris beers at texas for the next twenty years and won a national championship. Of course. I could foresee that happening but to me. Correct smith has been really good at south dakota utah state. Now he's going to go to utah. And i think this is a situation. I you know we're all just shooting darts here. But i think that is most likely spot for coach. Have long term success at that

Chris Beard Kansas Basketball Craig Smith Texas Chris Beers Beard Utah Chris South Dakota Smith
Medicare Copays for New Alzheimer's Drug Could Reach $11,500

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | Last week

Medicare Copays for New Alzheimer's Drug Could Reach $11,500

"A new drug it's been shown to reduce clumps of plaque in the brain could become the most costly medication covered by Medicare add your home from drugmaker Biogen is the first new Alzheimer's medication in nearly twenty years the company's price the intravenous medication at fifty six thousand dollars a year a new analysis from the Kaiser family foundation says the cost of the drug would raise Medicare premiums broadly and that some older patients could be looking at co payments of about eleven thousand five hundred dollars annually Medicare hasn't made a formal determination on covering at your home the Kaiser report estimated that it just happened million Medicare recipients are prescribed the drug it'll cost the program nearly twenty nine billion dollars a year the drug has sparked controversy over its price tag and questionable benefits several members of an FDA advisory panel that oppose the drug resigned over the agency's decision to approve it I'm Jennifer king

Drugmaker Biogen Medicare Kaiser Family Foundation Alzheimer Kaiser FDA Jennifer King
Defensins With DefenAge: The Benefits of Retinol Without the Side Effects

Art Beauty

01:49 min | 2 weeks ago

Defensins With DefenAge: The Benefits of Retinol Without the Side Effects

"Has come a long way. You know in the past twenty years. I feel like consumers are more educated about it. There's incredible new technologies behind it has a very unique ingredient. Shelly say defenses. Corrects of this is something Proprietary to death. Can you talk to about what defenses are yes again. That's what really piqued. My interest was the science behind. The branson defense is small. Messenger molecule. that's Released in our body when we have a wound by inflammatory system so it really starts the cascade of healing That you know when you get a cut You have a laser treatment sector. You're giving new fresh skin. That's how you he'll new fresh baby skin. Where does that come from so Defense is unnaturally naturally spire inflammatory system. And its job is to message your stem cells in your body that created all the lineages of your skin. in utera those stem cells go dormant. And they just sit in the hair. Follicle your whole life not doing anything. Until you have a wound they have Receptors basic traction just for defense. And so they're going to go their defense since you're gonna wake up those stem cells to migrate and make brand new basal stem cells which ultimately make new younger skin. So you know all the products that we've had to date in skin care. They're just pushing old skin to turnover And you know your skin assault. You are basically so definition where re tapping into those dormant cells to make brand new younger skin

Shelly
"twenty year" Discussed on Mac Power Users

Mac Power Users

05:45 min | 3 months ago

"twenty year" Discussed on Mac Power Users

"That they do walk things back actually pretty often. Or they're they they are actually really accepting the idea of. Hey this is popular. Let's change it anyways like just because something is working doesn't mean as always gonna be that way and just because something isn't working it doesn't mean it'll be that way forever either and so if there are things in big sur that are weird visually or there's a big question about is touch coming all of those things like we can filter some of that through where they've been and understand that i i really do think. And it's so clear. When you put it on a google doc like this apple is playing a long game with the stuff right lighter really you can see the move to all sixty four bit stuff when they killed carbon sixty four and you can see the move to apple silicon years before it happened in hindsight and so it's not like apple is bumbling around every spring. Saying oh my gosh. We have a mac. Os released in the fall. What are we going to put in it. They know what they're putting in it for years to come. And now i think the way apple is structured being able to share stuff more between ios mac os technology feature application. Whatever layer you pick. I think that's only good for the mac. Because it shows that apple continues to invest in the mac. In mac os. Look if the mac wasn't changing then i'd be worried because it is changing. I'm hopeful for its future. Yeah and really. We talk so often about the hardware. And how apple's hardware is such a driver with a company. I think it makes sales happen. It's one of the things. They are truly amazing at but The software is the foundation of this three story building or twenty story building at this point in this mac. Os ten of last twenty. Years has been the driver of all of their success. Everything from that little thing on your wrist to the you know the big mac pro in steven's office has a similar core software foundation. It's really amazing. And it's it's where you see. Other tech companies struggle right. You see microsoft. They weren't able to succeed in mobile. And i think any future mobile efforts that they do will be indoor base and not windows. Based for the most part you see android itself google who manages it. You see them struggling to get it beyond the phone is not on. The tablet really android wear is pretty much a joke. they have chrome os which isn't android but is related somehow. It's all very confusing apples. Really the only company is able to take a course offer a platform and spread it out over a bunch of different device types and some of those end up being better than others right like. Tv os has issues and audio s and the homepods is weird. There are strengths and weaknesses. But apple's the only company who successful at all and that's really impressive. I would argue that. The foundation of the whole al apple ecosystem is very good and when we see problems. It's not what the foundation it's with in a. How did they add that particular room onto the building. Or how do they decorate room. Yeah some cases but the I feel like what they have is is which nobody else has. Is this remarkable foundational system combined with a remarkable foundational silicon system where they build their own chips and you know even though they've had this amazing run. I don't think they peaked yet. Because even just in the last year we've seen them finally able to combine those two assets silicon in the software to the computer platform. I mean where's this going next. I don't know but it's gonna be fun. I'm truly excited and i. I don't think max going anyway going anywhere anytime soon. So even though we've made this long love letter to mac os ten. We still reserve the right to complain about the software because sometimes the rooms they build on. That foundation aren't so great and will continue to talk about that as we go to the future. But i'm really glad we took a minute here to stop and just appreciate what they've done with macos. Ten over the last twenty years gets a thumbs up from me and you know the other thing to think about. Is we talk about apple as an it when it's really a day. Yeah you know you meet the people that work there and they all were very hard and the whole system is so complex now with multiple platforms and all the stuff. They've gotta make work together in throughout this twenty years we've had the rise of the internet we've had the rise of mobile platforms and that's just didn't magically work across. It took a lot of work and effort by a lot of people at apple. So if you're listening thanks. All right are the power users. Thank you to our sponsors today. Smile sandbox devon. Think and microsoft. I'd like to take a minute and tell people about another show here on relay. Fm they may enjoy and that is robo ism. It's a podcast by our friends. Alex cox cathy campbell. And they explorer. How things like artificial intelligence machine learning and digital assistants affect our culture they explore the humanity behind the bots and Really talk about how quickly the stuff is becoming part of everyday lives. It's it's a fascinating show. I really enjoy it. Check it out at relay dot. Fm robo ism or search. Robo.

microsoft android mac os ten Alex cox apple google mac pro today mac last year steven twenty years google doc two assets twenty story mac. ios three story windows apples
"twenty year" Discussed on Mac Power Users

Mac Power Users

02:01 min | 3 months ago

"twenty year" Discussed on Mac Power Users

"A pf s like some of that real low level underlying stuff. Start showing up kind of in this era Also you get things. Like kernel extensions needing explicit permission to run and finally the writing on the wall in high sierra about thirty two bit apps going away. So there's a lot of modernisation taking place in this era in the same time they are continuing to bring iowa stuff. So get syrian auto. Unlock with the apple. Watch icloud drive and univers- clipboard. All that sort of stuff. Also start showing up. you know. Okay we've got the core apps apple's core apps by this point ronn both platforms and now twenty fifteen twenty. sixteen twenty. Seventeen apple is bringing more of the glue that holds those apps and services together across all their platforms and this is when they're getting good cloud in a mean for so long they were horrible at it. We didn't even discuss the mobile meal launch We we we. We pass that bit of history but by this time apple has got pretty good shops at icloud and they're able to tie a lot of stuff together and to that point you were saying about the underlying low low level stuff in addition to security just kind of a core. You know the fast in the file system. I would argue that. That was the lesson they learned from the beginning of mac. Os ten where they had led the operating system linger in technologically fall behind. Which put them really in a bad spot. It seems like they were taken affirmative steps during this era to make sure that didn't happen again. This episode of the mac power users is brought to you by the interest on from microsoft share point. It's your biweekly conversation in interview. Podcast show point five related tech within microsoft. Three sixty five. I love listening to podcasts. And i'm always looking for good ones to sign up for..

apple microsoft iowa both platforms about thirty two bit mac sixteen icloud kernel extensions Seventeen . Three five twenty fifteen sierra Os ten biweekly sixty twenty point five
"twenty year" Discussed on Mac Power Users

Mac Power Users

05:57 min | 3 months ago

"twenty year" Discussed on Mac Power Users

"To your point. It did make using a mac and an iphone and ipad easier because in this time we get things like messages and apple notes and reminders and air. Play and notification center. Are things that we were used to having on our other devices you could now have on your mac and so to be that. Sometimes i think apple makes this person who moves fluidly between an iphone ipad. Mac like a dozen times a day but this was putting those pieces in place and and now we just kinda come to assume that. When there's a cool feature the mac will get it. That wasn't assumed before. Line a mountain lion but this was the the time that it sort of became the norm. But also i think they think that person is an idiot that moves between them like. Do you really need the leather. On the mac to understand. This is your address book. I mean i don't know. This is also a period of time where the releases of mac. Os were very much tied to features coming out on the iphone. Oh yeah definitely You know if if The iphone or ipad got something. The mac would get it maybe not the same year but maybe the you after that you know think about Sharing extensions or again. We talked about messages notes and stuff. They wanted things to be more seamless. The whole continuity idea comes up you know kind of in this era and things like mavericks and yosemite and el capitain making it easier to move between them. Not that a lot of people do but if you do if you're one of those people apple just wanted to make it as simple as possible and i get that because the iphone was so popular i mean apple had never had a product like the world had never had a product like the iphone so you know that halo effect that raised talk about was real. You buy an iphone say. Wow this is a really nice experience. Maybe i should try one of their computers. I just always felt like that's fine that the reason people like the iphone was the way it worked so well. It wasn't because of the design of the interface and the goal on the mac should be the same thing. Make it work really well. It doesn't matter if has leather nuts anyway. I i think. I've beat this dead origin enough. An apple has returned to the well a little bit or dummy head and time but with big sur. Big sur looks a lot. Like i've had os an i o s. It doesn't have to. I think they've been a better job this time. It still looks more like mac. Os than ios were lining. Outlined movie. went too far. You can start to see that coming back a little bit of apple wanting them to look and work and feel more like each other of course now differences you have apps from this platforms running on the mac and that was not a thing. You know Eight years ago. But also i would argue the big sur definitely desert with more taste. Oh yeah mac. Up still feel like mac apps you know the other thing about this. This is when they ran out of cats they did So ten thirteen was named mavericks. There was this great joke They're going to call it macro with c. Lion this is when craig federico was really rising to power and becoming very funny on stage. Yeah mavericks was a walking back. Those design decisions but it also modernized a lot more stuff so there was a lot of stuff under the hood and mavericks especially for laptop users to have much better battery life and better energy efficiency. And we see i books and maps over from at this point as his icloud keychain so a smaller release but one that kind of i think corrected some of the mistakes of the past two. Yeah i feel like they had the gone too far. And i think as sales disgust with me. explained i think a lot of people inside probably felt the same way. And then you've got these annual releases coming out where the matt returns to being the mac again but gets tighter and some new features and Then starts to look again more. Like a mac yeah yeah We get yosemite which brings the new flatter design which is what we had up until big sur it gets the beginning of dark mode This is also where a lot of mac. Os apps get replaced with new versions. That work better with iowa so you get photos instead of iphoto and an l. cap. You get the notes application which is still fantastic to this day. And they've continued to work on it. But before this note was a bit of a joke on the mac and yeah and it turned notes from like something you did on your iphone. And you did on the mac if you had to like. I could use this full-time and a lot of people do really a big jump up and usability there. There's another thing going on in my mind about this period that has continued through. Today is just underlying security improvements to the mac operating system and locking things down back when we used to go to. wwe dc. I would bump into apple people who tell me like all the stuff they were doing like with apple mail had a plug in architecture. That was really leaky in fix. That safari has a whole new extension system and like apple has over the last several years every year. Been just dialing down the security on the operating system and that's something that often doesn't even make it into the press release but you can see that kind of starting and gaining momentum in these years a hundred percent things like system integrity protection and.

iphone ipad i o s. apple mac Eight years ago Today os icloud el capitain ios Os yosemite iowa a dozen times a day one ten Mac mavericks one of those
"twenty year" Discussed on Mac Power Users

Mac Power Users

02:53 min | 3 months ago

"twenty year" Discussed on Mac Power Users

"Hundred percent the last two ask kind of in this era And we're we're getting to a point where we're gonna talk about them in groups because they start speeding up But that snow leopard and that is a lot of people's favourite version of of moco ascend. Very famously no new features. That wasn't really true because they did add some features including exchange support and some under the hood stuff but snow leopard. We still talk about it today. Right we talk about ios and macos needing a snow leopard year. Take a year off from features. Really just focused on making it better and more stable and faster and smaller Part of this came because apple dropped power. Pc support so is three years after the intel transition was complete. So if this holds up three years after the last intel mac is. We will see mac. Os drop until support. I don't know if they're gonna do that or not but it was three years last time. Can i just say i feel like that. The whole thing about snow. Leopard is one of the biggest marketing snow. Jobs ever a feature. Saying yeah i think i feel like they had no new feature because they had done a bunch of under the hood stuff and somebody sat around marketing room and said well we don't have any new feature so let's make the no new features marketing point. Yeah and i feel like nerds bought into that like oh we need a snow leopard year. Well i really what you mean by that. Is you want them to continue to work on under the hood. Stuff and not spend a lotta time on chrome but snow. Leopard was very different than leopard. I i feel like holdings overrated about people saying that this is the best operating system they ever shipped. You know. yeah i get it. I remember this was the first mcelwain version. I ran the beta and the beta was better than leopard was i was like. Oh this is actually pretty good. But because they cut off power max. Much g four g. Five owners weren't super thrilled and they were stuck on leopard fraternity. But they had to do it at some point and they did it with The snow leopard but a lot of that stuff is still really important today. So making mac os at handling multi core processors like really important today when we're sitting around with four eight ten twelve twenty. Six cores in our max finder was rewritten in cocoa. So again like another blow against carbon. The system apps are written and sixty four bit Apple is very slow in at sixty four. Bit support basically came up from the colonel to frameworks and then the next year come up to system apps and then eventually developers can write with it but all that stuff was important but again.

Apple Six cores mac Hundred percent mac os apple first today intel a year ios one sixty four sixty four bit eight ten twelve twenty g four g. moco ascend three years three years
"twenty year" Discussed on Mac Power Users

Mac Power Users

06:46 min | 3 months ago

"twenty year" Discussed on Mac Power Users

"So you talked earlier about how you know. The initial releases needed work but very quickly apple. Put the gas down. And it wasn't long before clearly they had you could tell they were on the right track. So the next release ten point two jaguar. Let's talk about that one. Yeah this is This is my my one of my fun facts about this. This is the first time the release had been actually called by the cat. Codename like nerds. New puma was apple. Just refer to. It is ten point one. Get a point to. There's a big furry x. on the box that has been rendered by pixar. just fun. I guess picks up an afternoon. Okay can you make a box covered in leopard. For or jaguar. For for me and then they did and it looks awesome. It also is the first version of mac os tend to run on g five but also on a g three so it hardware is getting better. Jaguar oversaw a lot of that It was out in the fall of two thousand two and was place in the fall of two thousand three so You know very active year is where olsen added a lot of stuff that we think about still being in mac s like impact four support and quick time. The address book showed up here Bonjour which is like the networking where you to set up your printer and you don't have to like no it's ip address foul sharing a works in the finder. All that bond. your stuff Came in ten point to it also came with the the very early days of what was called then universal access kind of early days of accessibility features in mac. Os ten. And i think one of the gets overlooked but important. If in the frame of early versions macro assembler slow it came with a faster. Graphics called quartz extreme which meant that apple could use a gpu for rendering stuff and i was the cpu. You didn't have that before but as a different time But they they got that going and a couple of things i chat for instant messaging and handwriting inc. Well but this is where like some some features that we think of in part of the system. They start showing up here at the time. It was just like the march features. every year. they came out with a new version and there were a bunch of new features at it. I mean i. I don't feel like you get that with mac. Os ten or mac os updates today like you did back then but now there were major new features added every year. Oh absolutely and that that continued the next year with panther ten point three. It started dropping support for machines There were people who found the way around that This app called ex post facto. Which when i was in college friends who ran it. Is it going to run a version of. Tim doesn't support and you could. You could have the installer and do all sorts of fun stuff. But tim three definitely brought a lot of new features like you said broad brushed metal. So there's that okay. let's talk about brush mental. What were your thoughts on it. Did you like it at the time. I thought it was cool. But then i thought they overdid it pretty quickly and that made me sad because i was never a fan of the pinstripes. I thought it. I thought it felt a lot more modern but you know again. This is a long time ago. Yeah if you haven't seen this i got to lincoln this show to the finder window and panther and it's a lot of brush medal but what was cool about finder and ten point three. Is that it. Basically barred of good ideas from itunes. So before this like your user fold or you had to dig down to it. And here's like well. Let's just put the stuff you want in the sidebar. Make it customizable. We're used to that today and find her with. That wasn't the case for the entire history of it. And so you could do things like put your favorite things in the sidebar and have live searches Were labels show up. I know a lot of people are fan of that still to this day. This is where they showed up in. Os ten even the classic mac os at had them. It took awhile for apple to implement them in ten so finder really got a big update but then it added a whole bunch of other stuff to font book was added. File volt This is not the file that we love today. This was the bad version of audio. I can call it that it was not good fast user. Switching was here which is great. You know you click your name and the menu bar and log. Another account really quickly expose was here so the first time. They've really tried window management beyond just minimizing things to the dock and Safari shows up. Safari was actually mid cycle between two and three but safari one point zero was named the default browser like apple was all in on safari as panther. I didn't run it in the early days but it was there and it was gaining lava tinted from apple. And there's early days. Yeah well i think they. They saw the writing on the wall. And this is kind of a version of apple's idea that look we need to control our own destiny and one thing you must have in order to have a good operating system at at this time is two thousand three kind of as the internet starting to take off as you have to have your own browser that you control. I think they were smart to do that. Absolutely they were and that continues to be a big thing today. get chat a v. c. audio and video conferencing stuff and to get built in fact support. So if you've got a fax machine or or you need a fact something you don't have one you're contracts it for you. So that's that's cool. That's not there anymore. That's that's gone away the year sense and then in two thousand five we got tiger and And i'll tell you from my experience. At the time i felt like tiger was the once. I started running tiger and mike okay. Apple is no longer in jeopardy. I mean even th- there was a question in my mind throughout the whole period of the you know the arrival of mac. Os ten is like. Can they pull it off. Think a lot of apple fans had this like this feeling the back of her head that the company was constantly on the verge of bankruptcy or windows was so massive at this time but it was like win tiger shipped. I felt like wow. This is really come a long way..

Apple g three g five itunes Jaguar mac os mac s apple next year Safari Tim two thousand today mac two puma first time safari mac. three
"twenty year" Discussed on Mac Power Users

Mac Power Users

03:04 min | 3 months ago

"twenty year" Discussed on Mac Power Users

"Invited back make your final pitches Apparently this depends on who you read and when you read it say came either unprepared or was a little bit insulted that he had been invited back after they told them no and that he was pitching against jobs. I don't know exactly that's you know. There's a little gray area there in the history. But basically whatever. His situation was apple ended up going up with next and paying four hundred twenty nine million dollars in cash and more than the be acquisition would would have been that money went to the investors in next. You know they did a lot. People of money people had ownership stakes in the company and then Jobs was awarded. One point five million shares of apple No cash for him and he was not. He didn't become ceo in fact for a while he was pretty hands off and eventually came in as a consultant. A few months later is really kinda started kicking off wonder about that. It's like did win the acquisitions made did he look at this. As his opportunity to get back into apple or was that like a colleen came later it has. Has anyone ever documented that. I'm sure that's in some of the stuff. Probably in particular becoming steve jobs which i think is the best bargain on jobs. That haven't read that in a while. I think initially he was hesitant. But i think once he was back he knew that he would be back. Only if you could have control and so you saw him make a bunch of moves to get rid of a bunch of dummies. Go to call them and he installed a bunch of next people. In fact fact really on paper apple bought next but in reality next took over apple. Yeah i mean at the management level and everything else. My my theory on this with no evidence is that steve very much wanted to get back to apple but he wanted them he wanted to play hard to get because just like steven was sane when he came back he demanded that the entire board of directors resigned that this is i mean i do corporate law. This is really weird that you go to say we're going to hire a new ceo and there's this guy we want hire but his condition is that we all quit and they did they signed. They hired him and they reside and he set aboard of his own choosing and that's because he had got pushed out by the board the first time and he decided that was not going to happen again. It it's really kind of a fascinating story but again probably not related today subject. I think he learned a lot of lessons at next and came back with those lessons. You know who's also involved at pixar by this point so he had been in a successful company and saw what it what it took. Yeah but you know we have at this point. We have the genesis of mac. Os.

steven apple today four hundred twenty nine milli first time steve One point five million shares mac. Os A few months later pixar
"twenty year" Discussed on Mac Power Users

Mac Power Users

05:41 min | 3 months ago

"twenty year" Discussed on Mac Power Users

"It definitely wasn't but it was technically more advanced than the mac. Os at this point and that was a big big deal Even for people. Who liked the mac. I think it was. It was the the writing on the wall that something had to give and so apple went out shopping they looked at four different contenders Software to either buy or license. The first one was sun microsystems. There solaire software. This was Basically rejected pretty quickly. And this is what we're talking about ellen. Handcock a name. That is not well known in apple history but i think should be so she was the cto who came in with amelio. She's the one who said look copeland. Never gonna shut if we have to wait for it all at start rolling it out as things are ready and She was real influential in the way that this went talking apple into this now she got Shown the door by you-know-who when he comes back in a little while but she helped this along. I think she deserves credit for that but ruled out. Sun microsystems hilarious. It's it's harder requirements. were just too high. They this they even met with. Bill gates about licensing. The antique colonel like put in t underneath macos that basically went nowhere fast for of reasons. He may imagine it. I would've loved seen that meeting though. I wish there was like a video of that. Yeah it would have been incredible and you know bill gates pretty ruthless guy. You know he would take an apple for a ride that was during his ruthless stage definitely. Oh yeah they also looked at b. B.'s a fascinating company. It's b b computer company. Up the lincoln the show notes episode. Six of flashback Here on real. Fm quinn nelson. And i talk about computer for like an hour and a half very interesting company. It was run by noah. None other than gianluigi say who was a former apple executive he had been. He'd left apple. He built this company. They built no s on top of the power architecture. That apple is using but the box boxes they call. Their computer was miles. Better than most max at the time and be. Os had some really cool stuff with multimedia But they wanna three hundred million dollars from apple to buy them out and b. was not successful like they they weren't making a lot of money and apple basically said thanks but no thanks. That's that's beyond our budget. John louis gas say this great blog. I think it's called monday note. Yes we'll put a link in the show notes. I mean he was there at apple kind of at the beginning he was the head of sales starting in france but then eventually all of europe he really of knows a lot about the the history of apple and he brings context to that with the future. It's one of my favorite blogs to read. It's fantastic at is absolutely fantastic. But then the be because i remember the bee operas as well was really nice and i was personally hoping that. That's where apple would go. I mean this was not a This isn't like windows. nt colonel. This was something that could of worked. Yeah and because it was paradisea native probably not that much work to even get it working but but apple the price tag was too high so it within silicon valley. The be apple was pretty. Well known i get the sense of that. In reading material from the time that people knew this had gone sideways and the also kind of knew. That was apple's last shot and so a next employee reached out to apple behind steve jobs back to set up a meeting. And what happened. Whoever that was but that's bold. Move at this point next. You know it was. It was steve's company. Africa kicked out of apple in the eighties dade been building high. End workstation hardware for like vs and researchers to us but it was too expensive and no one really bought it and so they were out of the hardware game by this point but they were building open step which was the newest version of their operating system for their hardware and it was also a development kit. But what was cool about this missile. Be really important later in the story. It was relatively agnostic. When it came to what processor platform it ran on and so next was basically building a tool kit for people to build apps across a bunch of different platforms at this point and they also had this. os that they were developing They also had like web objects and server side stuff but it really interesting combination of things. And then you add steve jobs to the mexicans even more interesting but next wasn't a particularly successful company. I mean they got in the business to be. You know to compete with apple on the high end you know. They wanted to be a computer company. And by the time this deal comes around next as laid off a lotta people and It is not the company had started out to be definitely not they were. They were not in great shape at this point like how be was like i get the sense that both of these companies kind of needed to be acquired and in fact be computer company. Didn't last very long after this because that no money and you need money to have a company but apple ends up having this like final meeting in december of ninety-six six next is invited b.'s..

bill gates Bill gates december silicon valley france apple europe noah eighties three hundred million dollars ellen. Handcock both one paradisea native b. B. quinn nelson note John louis gas first one .
"twenty year" Discussed on Mac Power Users

Mac Power Users

09:10 min | 3 months ago

"twenty year" Discussed on Mac Power Users

"A lot of computer hardware as it got faster was getting additional support. Like you know. Multi multi the The ability to run multiple apps at a single time which was supported. Much better than the mac and the mac felt creaky at the time. I am i use them and it definitely needed something that it didn't have and there were real technical reasons for that creaky feeling. I mean one who used the classic. Mac os will remember an application crashing and unique to restart your computer right now. Usa used to to run utilities to babysit your ram. Yeah it was like it was like the starship enterprise in like you had to like figure out how much power you're gonna put into your shields in your thrusters and your your lasers because you had to do that with your on the mac or you would. An app could run and check literally crash the system. That's right and the reason for that was really twofold. The real reason for the crash eunice and the having to babysit everything was a lack of protected. Memory so these things these are things are very tentacle. My best effect. I've ripped out of my book. Because i i talked to a bunch of people trying to explain these as simply as possible but in the classic mac. Os say you're running photoshop. Photoshop has its chunk of ram chunk of memory that its using in the other processor application could go into that memory pool and read and write from it and tinker with it and so in this world if an application crashes. It can't help but take down the rest of the system because that ram is all shared between everybody and it's not protected that is a security issue. Of course you don't want application snooping on each other. But it also led to that instability that so many people So often and the second thing is preemptive multitasking and again simplifying. This preemptive multitasking means that an operating system can run multiple occasions multiple services and ensured that they all have access to the cpu basically. The system is the traffic cop right. So macro s is in charge of where all the applications are doing as far as computer resources without this again you run into instability and you're anything blocking each other for instance in classic mac. Os clicking a menu in the menu bar. Basically the rest of the machine would stop until you let go of your mouse. Because the computers whole attention is now watching. What is david going to do with this menu and it can't can't do enough to keep everything else. Everything else running. And this made the mac feel slower than it needed to and again instability at not being a very secure and by the nineties this stuff was around and apple does didn't have it yet. The thing that felt weird at the time kind of looking back. And i'm thinking like late iraq late eighties to early nineties was the ram problem was a constant thing. Like your computer would crash if you weren't careful and i hated that and the the multitasking was great. And none of us were really using it that we're using macs so we saw that was out there but we really just didn't have it so i don't think we missed it as much. The third thing you mentioned was security. And i can tell you having been there. None of us thought anything about security. Nobody cared a lot of these. Computers weren't on the internet. And exactly and the mac was basically a single user machines so when that big of a deal and it's not for trying so by the time system seven comes around apple had tried twice to build an os replacement. One was called pink which is mostly internal Taligent which they worked with some partners on and those are like stories for another time but they just didn't have talent focus and resources to make that happen and so both of those projects died off without any really anything to show for it now. where does copeland fittings. I remember talk of copeland around the same time. Yes so copeland was apple's third. Try to build a a modern operating system This launched in nineteen ninety four and the goal was to ship it quote system. Eight or mac. Os eight in one thousand. Nine hundred. eighty six. The to do list was really long for copland. It needed to support all classic mac applications in the all native for the power. Pc apple's new hardware platform it was going to have an updated user interface. It was going to support open doc. Which again is the story for. Different time but open dock is real sad story where apple basically said instead of applications have content everywhere very strange idea and then it was going to have protected memory and preemptive multitasking apple. Knew this was a problem. It's not that their their heads in the sand but copeland was way too ambitious again. Given apple's resources at the time and i've talked to people who worked on copeland and the company just didn't have what it needed to pull this off in a bunch of different ways and rather unsurprisingly nineteen ninety-six comes and goes and Gil emilio the ceo at the time. Says hey look instead of one big o. s. upgrade We're gonna roll these features out one by one over the course of several updates to mac. Os basically as things are ready. We're going to put them into the release some features like the interface platinum. If you've run. Mac os or macos if you run. Mac os eight or mac os nine. You've seen platinum and better power. Pc support those rolled out. But that was about it. You know mac. Os eight when it finally came about really was just a shell of what copeland was supposed to be. You know that was a watershed moment for me. I guess because when that announcement came down that this was going to be piecemeal and having been dealing at that point. I've been a lawyer for three years and was trying to do legal work on a mac and running into so many problems with compatibility in the whole firm was on windows and they said hey you know we're gonna get this but it's gonna you know one feature at a time. I was thinking this is going to be like five years of misery. And that's when. I started learning how to use a pc. I think a lot of people abandoned ship at that point. I mean i kept my mac but yeah did a lot of work on the pc will. Apple had talked a big game about copeland for a long time and it just it just all fell apart and you know at this point. You've got three dead attempts. I think apple knew that it would need to go. You know what they call them. The business world to an outside hire they needed to go find an operating system they could bring in. Add some sort of mac support to it and that be their new os. I think they knew that they were out of time. The stock market told them. They are out of time. You know this is all in the era of apple having dwindling sales and dwindling cash on hand. You know windows. Ninety five was not very kind to the mac right. A lot of people look at windows. Ninety five. I don't think i don't think mackie's are solid at the time but i think now looking back it's clear that windows ninety five delivered a real hard blow to the mac not that it had all the stuff done perfectly but it was so much better than previous versions of windows that it really showed. That microsoft was serious about making an operating system with a gooey. That was pretty good it will. It was good enough good. I think it would be. And i mean there are so many things about the mac that were better but the underlying problems at the mac again. I i'll stop saying this. But the ram management problem used to drive me crazy and it was a problem and at the time if you put it in. Context windows is on the rise. You know they've they've figured out how to move windows. I mean the first couple versions of windows was terrible and The but they're starting to figure it out while at the same time. Apple's can't seem to get its act together about upgrading. the operating system. And i'll tell you the time. I didn't know if i had to buy computer the time i didn't know what i would deny us the the pc's at work. And i had my back. Yeah but if somebody told me you've got to buy a computer. I'm not sure. I would have given money to apple at the time because i just wasn't sure they were gonna be around a few years and ninety five had that those like core underlying things not that it was perfect..

Apple three years windows ninety five Photoshop early nineties photoshop Mac os eight one thousand windows apple mac os nine Gil emilio five years late eighties Ninety five Eight microsoft twice both Nine hundred
"twenty year" Discussed on Mac Power Users

Mac Power Users

02:21 min | 3 months ago

"twenty year" Discussed on Mac Power Users

"Users. My name is stephen. Hackett joined his always by my friend in yours. Mr david sparks. Hey steven how are you. Today i'm good. We're gonna talk about the mac and its history. We should probably tell people in advance. How long this. Google doc is going to be a fun ride today. I feel like this is like the episode for stephen. This is this is episode one hundred percent and But it's actually a lot of fun talking about this stuff. I i guess we should start by explaining why we're talking about mac os today. Yeah so on. March twenty four. Th two thousand one apple released mac. Os ten point zero to the public. There were some betas including a public betas before that and you know. We wanted to mark the twentieth anniversary of that. And it's an amazing run and we both think mac. Os now called has long life ahead of it but it seems like a nice time to stop look back at how far the mac has come in two decades. Yeah i mean how much this operating system is responsible for success. I mean i was thinking about this over the weekend as we were prepping for the shows like out in my head he would think like why the i mac is. What saved apple you know. They came out with the cool. Color of li- mac but really everything they have done in these twenty years started with mac os ten even the iphone. Yeah i mean the apple watch has its roots in In this This were an. it'll be only time. I do it to forgive me. I'm gonna plug a book that i wrote Post like four years ago now called aqua and bond i. it's about the basically. You just mentioned the i mac and os ten and how those came about together to release save apple It's on the Apple bookstore and We're gonna talk a lot about what's in this book. Today in fact actually pulled up my pdf of it to to refresh my memory on some of it. But if you like what we're talking about today maybe go check that out. I think you would enjoy it. I mean honestly if you if you like your mac and your apple gear understand that history..

stephen mac os mac os ten iphone Today steven Apple apple mac March twenty four Google doc Hackett four years ago twenty years today i mac david sparks os ten twentieth anniversary two thousand
"twenty year" Discussed on Deconstructed with Mehdi Hasan

Deconstructed with Mehdi Hasan

07:50 min | 4 months ago

"twenty year" Discussed on Deconstructed with Mehdi Hasan

"They were called the texas eleven and they are in many ways the beginning of the story that ended this week with the deadly collapse of the state's electrical grid the two thousand and two midterm elections texas republicans finally gained full control of the state's government. The party immediately moved to redraw congressional and state legislative lies to gerrymander democrats into oblivion. But to approve the redistricting state senate needed a quorum. A corum that eleven democrats could deny simply not showing up and so the texas eleven were born also known bit ridiculously as the killer. D.'s these eleven state senators fled to new mexico and homa out of the reach of the texas rangers. The story became grist for late night. Comedians here stephen colbert then on the daily show. Runaways there are a problem all across the nation and new mexico. Always no exception one such runaway. Who will call rodney. He came here from texas. His story will break your heart. Rodney what did you run away. I'm here a part of effort to break a legislative in the texas legislature. Yes like so many runaways. Rodney is here to break legislative quorum in the texas legislature. Three over that summer. They successfully killed a special legislative session aimed at redistricting in the fall. One of the democrats eventually caved and return to austin in two thousand and two democrats controlled seventeen of thirty congressional districts. Two years later with the state's population growing texas had thirty two members of congress but democrats control just eleven seats. They had gone from a majority to deep in the minority overnight and that's where they would remain over the next twenty years as republicans used their unchecked authority over the state to launch an experiment radical deregulation strip the government down to the boards and then ripped out the boards and sold them for scrap. Here's how rourke described today's republican party to me over the phone. This week you have. People running the government in texas who are in the highest positions of public trust who just fundamentally do not believe in government. Republicans though have found the culprit. It's the green new deal. He's green energy to blame for the power outages in texas. Joe biden and democrats. Better think twice about unleashing the green new deal on the whole country. Just take a look at what's happening in texas. Unbeknownst to most people green new deal came to texas the power grid and the state became totally reliant on windmills. then it got cold and the wind broke. We got massive amount of wind farms out in west texas better frozen up. All of that wind energy was lost. Wind turbines or frozen wind turbines frozen turbines are frozen solid. That's what happens in the green new deal. This is a clash between green dreams and deep-freeze reality the same energy policies that have wrecked texas. This week are going nationwide coming to your state. Is this what. America would look like under the green new deal. This is where the weather meets the green new deal. This is where you pay the price for the climate dreams of the coastal elites. Okay but back to reality. it wasn't as if texas didn't know cold. Winters are possible in nineteen eighty nine. A cold snap crashed below zero and caused a major power. Outages in two thousand eleven happened again. The freeze rolling power blackouts throughout texas including dallas. They were rolling blackouts for on that city because the power plants. Just stop working. New trouble was around the corner especially at intersections with blacked out traffic lights. The super bowl is in dallas on sunday. But it's very cold. it's so cold. There are power outages and rolling blackouts. Oliver texans fact. They're having to import power for mexico with when mexico has to give us electricity. That's what we know. We're in trouble. Experts warned that the state's energy system needed major upgrades instead as we'll talk about later in the show with for ri- director of the university of texas's energy institute deregulation setup incentives for many firms to ignore infrastructure investments. The gambled it wouldn't be their problem and so millions remain out of power and access to water is touch and go. It might seem crass to talk about the political repercussions of this crisis while it still unfolding but politics got us into this mess and only politics is going to get us out. We'll talk with former congressional candidate. Mike segal who last appeared on the show in november to talk about how. This is playing politically but i. I reached out tibedo roar. Who has been hammering governor greg abbott and he's been running a massive phone banking operation to reach out the stranded freezing and starving seniors across the state to see how they can be helped aerobics. Response to the crisis has fueled speculation that he's running for governor and twenty twenty two against abbott. He was asked about that at the end of january by a local radio station. Koa q. And el paso so according to the texas democratic party chairman gil so He says beto. You are Thinking about a challenge to governor. Greg abbott in two thousand twenty two. I don't expect you to make any kind of announcement on a regional radio show but the story here says o'rourke could not be reached for comment. I was thinking. Oh well. I've reached him. Maybe he'll come into my skype number. That's right Someone think about abbott responded by saying promise as a presidential candidates that take assault weapons away from their owners. Wouldn't quote sell well in texas. If roy does run he'll make the election a referendum on republican rule. Here's how he put it to me on thursday. It's not just the current disaster with this severe cold snap in texas and the power blackouts that affected millions and the boil. Water notice that seven million. Texans are are living under right now because of the radical deregulation the failure to require power generators to weatherize their facilities or to connect to the national grid's. We could draw down power when we needed. It's not just that it's it's also the response to covid that has claimed the lives of more than forty thousand of my fellow. Texans this bungled koba vaccine rollout in texas where literally asked each of the two hundred and fifty four counties of texas to figure it out on their own the absolute rejection of science and facts and truth when it comes to climate and other extraordinarily important emergencies that we face and we're also the state that has obviously on the front lines of this you look at hurricane harvey in two thousand seventeen. You look at the severe droughts that we face severe winter weather storms. That are absolutely unprecedented. That this is not just our future. This is happening right now. This is the cost of twenty years of absolute republican control unbroken in texas at literally every significant level of government. And it's the consequence of having people who don't believe in government running the government. That's what we're up against to dig. Deeper into the state's politics were joined by civil rights attorney. Mike segal who ran for congress in texas and twenty twenty. He last appeared on the november episode of deconstructed titled. What happened mike. Segal thank you so much for joining us again on deconstructed accurate so glad to be with you know. I wish it were under better circumstances but we we got actually a ton of feedback and positive feedback from your your last interview. People really found the story of your congressional race to be quite elucidating in the in the wake of november's election..

Joe biden Greg abbott Rodney Mike segal new mexico Segal stephen colbert seven million dallas twenty years thursday abbott rodney november eleven seats mike two This week congress greg abbott
"twenty year" Discussed on Two Moms Day Drinking

Two Moms Day Drinking

01:50 min | 7 months ago

"twenty year" Discussed on Two Moms Day Drinking

"Phone. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Yeah <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> thank you. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Thank you very much <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> so <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> easy to just <Music> <Advertisement> go through. <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> It's kind <Music> of fun. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> So i know this guy was <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> a freemason. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> I interviewed him <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and his brothers once <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> it was a superficial <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> interview <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> but the one thing i <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> walked away remembering <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> clearly is <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> that they described themselves <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> as an organization <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> that gives good <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> young men <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the opportunity to have <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> access to dozens <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of good older men <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to learn from <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and to model <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> their own behavior after. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> I find myself <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> fascinated <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> by and craving <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> having someone <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> wiser than me <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> wiser through substantial <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> insights <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> not to mention experience <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to reach out to <Music> you. <Speech_Music_Female> I feel like i've found <Speech_Music_Female> that in villa. Mary <Speech_Music_Female> right <Speech_Female> now. The nature of <Speech_Music_Female> interactions tends <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to revolve around delivering <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> an education. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> My two daughters <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> as neither an educator <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> nor an expert <Speech_Music_Female> in any <Speech_Music_Female> i hope <Speech_Music_Female> though the <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> bill and mary will continue <Speech_Music_Female> to be available <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> for check ins even <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> when i'm not trying to teach <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> third grade utterly <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> utterly <Speech_Music_Female> bill. <Speech_Music_Female> Mary are honest <Speech_Music_Female> and insightful. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Funny and adorable. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> And i consider them <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> one of most reliable <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> sources of parenting <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> insight <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> mainly because <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> they'll be the first <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to tell me that they don't <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> know if their thoughts will <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> be of any use to me <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> at all but they're <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> willing to give me thoughtful <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and honest <Speech_Music_Female> feedback. <Speech_Music_Female>

"twenty year" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

06:18 min | 7 months ago

"twenty year" Discussed on The Science Show

"Perth stems where their lowest. Since the first world war and the southeast of the country was on its way to the dryest shania period since recordkeeping began as the bureau of meteorology. Put it at the time. This was the nation's first climate change drought. That observation came hot. On the heels of the third assessment report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change which made headlines around the world with this conclusion that there is new and stronger evidence that most of the global warming observed over the last fifty years is attributable to human activities if suburban households become complacent about the household woody's than the drought was a wakeup call across the nation. Education campaigns and water saving devices joined water restrictions in an effort to ease pressure on limited urban water supplies in melbourne for instance the voluntary target. One five five campaign aimed more than half the daily water consumption of residents by encouraging shorter showers while imposing strict limits on watering gardens washing the car. Brisbane went even further aiming to reduce residential would consumption to one hundred and forty liters of water per person per day. The rain water tank in grey water. Recycling became suburban. Must haves offering the means to keep gardens green in trying conditions as the damn levels so lower and lower state governments turned desalination with perth leading the way in two thousand six a prospect that was unthinkable just a decade earlier other states took notice and before long desalination plants were on the drawing board for the gold coast sydney melbourne and adelaide. But for the most part by the time those projects were completed. The rains had returned to the east coast and the plants built. There were dismissed as wipe elephants journalist. Chris noticed this change in the weather himself as he reflected in the updated edition of his book on the murray darling basin in two thousand and ten browsing through his local bookshop. He'd realized that he's book. The river somehow migrated from the environment and ecology section where. It's just six months ago to a new place on the history shows even so this record linear rainfall that broke the millenium. Drought did not turn back the clock. A drying trend continued across the south of the continent particularly in the southwest. Where winter rains had been in decline since the nineteen seventies julian part to human induced climate change indeed while eastern australia record high levels of rainfall in late twenty ten and in twenty eleven perth and much of southwestern austrailia experienced record dry weather. This is just some of the challenges of planning for both climate variability and climate change on a continent of extremes. It's been looking ahead into the future. That's being one of the ways in which ustralian have long tried to come to terms with this continent of extreme climate variability in twenty eleven. The climate commission released its first report declaring that australia was facing the critical decade back. Then of course. The climate commission was a federal government body established under the gillard government but it was dissolved under the abbott government. Soon after its election in two thousand thirteen the decade to twenty twenty. The climate commission's report argued was critical in terms of meeting the two degrees celsius guardrail by curbing emissions of carbon dioxide in the decade to twenty twenty global emissions had to be well on track to reaching by twenty fifty to limit the planet's warming taking the temperature on the nation's progress towards this goal in twenty seventeen the climate council the independent body that rose from the ashes of the climate commission declared that australia was now known as global climate lagged already the concentration of carbon dioxide emissions had tipped over four hundred parts per million higher than at any other time for millions of us and the planet's temperature was over one degree higher than temperatures before the industrial revolution of the eighteenth century. The report warned that the window of opportunity to limit worsening climate impacts is closing and already climate events were getting worse pointing not only to bush fires and hate waves but also to drought and drying across the south of the continent. Just as the gun. I report of two thousand. Eight and countless other scientific studies had predicted two thousand and nineteen was the driest year since records began in one thousand nine hundred and it was the country's warmest year in fact all these since two thousand thirteen are among the ten warmest on record australia. The impact of climate changes lead to longer more intense fire seasons and an increase in the average number of elevated fire weather days as measured by the forest fire danger index twenty nine thousand nine so the highest cumulated index on record fires have burned before an australian but never like those we saw over the summer. It's called comfort knowing that this disaster was nice surprise after all the two thousand eight garner report warned that fire seasons will start earlier and the slightly lighter and generally be more intense. This effect increases over time but should be directly observable by twenty twenty in another ten to twenty years time 2019 white. Be so unusual. Although this use emissions might be lower thanks to the covid lockdowns and the air might be cleaner. The concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere like carbon dioxide continues to rise and the period two thousand sixteen to twenty twenty looks set to be the warmest five year period on record. Unfortunately a few months of slowing down can't make up for the decades upon decades of greenhouse gas emissions that have accumulated in the atmosphere. He street is weighing heavily on the planet's climate future. Associate professor ruth morgan at the new a former. Abc top five humanities star..

australia Perth bureau of meteorology Brisbane twenty twenty covid lockdowns melbourne gillard government Associate professor murray darling basin Chris abbott government
"twenty year" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

06:35 min | 7 months ago

"twenty year" Discussed on The Science Show

"The year two thousand and twenty was always going to be a tantalizing horizon for future thinkers even at symmetry conjures the clear-sightedness and precision of twenty twenty vision. Too which policymakers in resist manages. Always aspire twenty years ago. Most of southern australia was still in the group of the millenium drought. The dry conditions broke records around the nation. Perth stems where their lowest. Since the first world war and the southeast of the country was on its way to the dryest shania period since recordkeeping began as the bureau of meteorology. Put it at the time. This was the nation's first climate change drought. That observation came hot. On the heels of the third assessment report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change which made headlines around the world with this conclusion that there is new and stronger evidence that most of the global warming observed over the last fifty years is attributable to human activities if suburban households become complacent about the household woody's than the drought was a wakeup call across the nation. Education campaigns and water saving devices joined water restrictions in an effort to ease pressure on limited urban water supplies in melbourne for instance the voluntary target. One five five campaign aimed more than half the daily water consumption of residents by encouraging shorter showers while imposing strict limits on watering gardens washing the car. Brisbane went even further aiming to reduce residential would consumption to one hundred and forty liters of water per person per day. The rain water tank in grey water. Recycling became suburban. Must haves offering the means to keep gardens green in trying conditions as the damn levels so lower and lower state governments turned desalination with perth leading the way in two thousand six a prospect that was unthinkable just a decade earlier other states took notice and before long desalination plants were on the drawing board for the gold coast sydney melbourne and adelaide. But for the most part by the time those projects were completed. The rains had returned to the east coast and the plants built. There were dismissed as wipe elephants journalist. Chris noticed this change in the weather himself as he reflected in the updated edition of his book on the murray darling basin in two thousand and ten browsing through his local bookshop. He'd realized that he's book. The river somehow migrated from the environment and ecology section where. It's just six months ago to a new place on the history shows even so this record linear rainfall that broke the millenium. Drought did not turn back the clock. A drying trend continued across the south of the continent particularly in the southwest. Where winter rains had been in decline since the nineteen seventies julian part to human induced climate change indeed while eastern australia record high levels of rainfall in late twenty ten and in twenty eleven perth and much of southwestern austrailia experienced record dry weather. This is just some of the challenges of planning for both climate variability and climate change on a continent of extremes. It's been looking ahead into the future. That's being one of the ways in which ustralian have long tried to come to terms with this continent of extreme climate variability in twenty eleven. The climate commission released its first report declaring that australia was facing the critical decade back. Then of course. The climate commission was a federal government body established under the gillard government but it was dissolved under the abbott government. Soon after its election in two thousand thirteen the decade to twenty twenty. The climate commission's report argued was critical in terms of meeting the two degrees celsius guardrail by curbing emissions of carbon dioxide in the decade to twenty twenty global emissions had to be well on track to reaching by twenty fifty to limit the planet's warming taking the temperature on the nation's progress towards this goal in twenty seventeen the climate council the independent body that rose from the ashes of the climate commission declared that australia was now known as global climate lagged already the concentration of carbon dioxide emissions had tipped over four hundred parts per million higher than at any other time for millions of us and the planet's temperature was over one degree higher than temperatures before the industrial revolution of the eighteenth century. The report warned that the window of opportunity to limit worsening climate impacts is closing and already climate events were getting worse pointing not only to bush fires and hate waves but also to drought and drying across the south of the continent. Just as the gun. I report of two thousand. Eight and countless other scientific studies had predicted two thousand and nineteen was the driest year since records began in one thousand nine hundred and it was the country's warmest year in fact all these since two thousand thirteen are among the ten warmest on record australia. The impact of climate changes lead to longer more intense fire seasons and an increase in the average number of elevated fire weather days as measured by the forest fire danger index twenty nine thousand nine so the highest cumulated index on record fires have burned before an australian but never like those we saw over the summer. It's called comfort knowing that this disaster was nice surprise after all the two thousand eight garner report warned that fire seasons will start earlier and the slightly lighter and generally be more intense. This effect increases over time but should be directly observable by twenty twenty in another ten to twenty years time 2019 white. Be so unusual. Although this use emissions might be lower thanks to the covid lockdowns and the air might be cleaner. The concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere like carbon dioxide continues to rise and the period two thousand sixteen to twenty twenty looks set to be the warmest five year period on record. Unfortunately a few months of slowing down can't make up for the decades upon decades of greenhouse gas emissions that have accumulated in the atmosphere. He street is weighing heavily on the planet's climate future.

australia Perth bureau of meteorology Brisbane twenty twenty covid lockdowns melbourne gillard government Associate professor murray darling basin Chris abbott government
"twenty year" Discussed on 1A

1A

03:55 min | 2 years ago

"twenty year" Discussed on 1A

"So according to a new study that was published in the American journal of medicine nearly thirty nine thousand kids in the US were fatally shot between nineteen ninety nine. An twenty seventeen the authors of that report noted a steep rise in deaths among black children starting in two thousand thirteen. It happens everywhere, and we have to pay attention to it everywhere because it's not just saying Chicago and white suburban areas, it's the United States of America that has a gun issue. That was activists in Denver school board candidate, Tae Anderson. Speaking to K, UNC's Lee Patterson le-, let's zoom out a little bit further before we have to let you go talk about how gun violence has changed in the twenty years since Columbine. I mean, writ large has America got more violent or less violent or stayed the same generally more violent, the number of gun deaths has been rising pretty steadily in the US since Columbine in two thousand seventeen nearly forty thousand people died from gunshot wounds and sixty percent of those deaths were suicides we spent the hour looking at what has changed since Columbine before. We let you go. I'd be interested in knowing your assessment of what has not changed since. Then what are some of the biggest things that remain the same twenty years on well school shootings, still happen gun violence? Still happens case in point this whole incident with a slow pace that unfolded in Colorado this week, I think people. Coming from many, many, many different viewpoints are frustrated they're frustrated that this still happens. They're frustrated that the solutions that they support haven't fully been put in place, and we should be clear, by the way, the story of sold by is still very much open. There are still out of gaps in terms of who she is what motivated her. What exactly the narrative was behind that? Right. Yes. Yes. Of course, this is a developing story, the FBI is still investigating and we are really reporting what we're hearing. And what we're understanding is that comes out a lot of folks who are listening. I think are kind of resigned to the fact that this is a threat anywhere in the country at any time, especially those of us who were young adults when Columbine happened. I think you were in your mid teens when it happened. I was just a new to the university of Miami. And since then the anniversary is also linked to what likely led to sixty percent of Colorado schools being closed this incident with solar by because of a credible gun threat before. I'll let you go. What's your sense based on your reporting of what people can do of what is being done to change the way we deal with violence in schools? Well, what's important to know as that people? With many many different viewpoints are getting involved. We've heard from some of them in this hour. People are voicing their concerns for the need for for things like mental health services programs like safe to tell school districts all over the country are deciding what kinds of physical security measures that they're going to put in place, whether that means hiring armed security personnel, or in some cases, even allowing concealed carry and here in here in Colorado again going back to what happened this week. Some communities are making decisions to keep kids at home. And I would just say that some of the reporting I've done should leave people with some hope because in spite of all of the attention on school shootings, and in spite of have truly terrifying. They are evidence shows that school is one of the. Safest places that your child can be that's K UNC's Lee. Patterson, a reporter with guns and America Lee. We appreciate all your reporting. Thanks very much for joining us. You're welcome. Thanks also to Amanda Andrews at K UNC into the whole guns and America team, you could find more of their work online at guns and America dot bore.

Columbine America Colorado Lee Patterson United States American journal of medicine Denver school America Lee Chicago Tae Anderson university of Miami FBI Amanda Andrews reporter sixty percent twenty years
"twenty year" Discussed on 1A

1A

03:16 min | 2 years ago

"twenty year" Discussed on 1A

"Back, and you can read the New York Times coverage you can read Hitler saying it was America who taught us we should not open our arms equally other nations this week on it's been a minute from NPR. Back now to our conversation with Kay UNC's Lee Patterson about the legacy of the shooting at Columbine high school, it's part of a special collaboration with guns and America a reporting project that explores the relationship between we in the US and our firearms now Lee when it comes to Columbine, how do actual high school students feel about it. Yeah. We had some of our reporters asked the high school kids they interviewed in their communities about Columbine. And a lot of them said something like this. Have you ever heard of Columbine high school? No, I haven't heard of. Yes. I have. Students was at students that basically shot up a school. And they I mean, I'm not sure of the full extent to it. But that's all I pretty much. Are you familiar with with Columbine or or what happened there that school twenty years ago? I might have heard or something, but I could be confusing with something also not one hundred percent, sure. The fact of the matter is Columbine happened before these kids were born even the students who had heard of it really only knew about it through movies. When I watch everything about Columbine. It's all through like a documentary footage or like a news crew filming in all like with parkland. It was like we were seeing Snapchat videos of kids like in the classroom like the Deutz right outside the classroom shooting in. It's like he's still there filming under the desk, what their Snapchat and all that was like I opened. It was like doubt that's us. So let's back up to Columbine itself back before Snapchat before smartphones before all of our lives were so very deeply digital. How did activists back then? Get people to really understand what it was like to live through a mass shooting sue back to the year two thousand it's election night in Denver, one more euro that I know you've all been waiting to hear from tonight. This is a victory party for the passing of a ballot measure called amendment twenty two which close something called the gun show loophole by requiring background checks for firearm purchases at gun shows, honor and a pleasure introduce Tom medicine. You had a big smile on your face, and you got up to the podium. What what was that like for you? All. Is it was heavenly? It really was heavily sweet night. I know some people would say, oh, gee, isn't it bittersweet? You know, you're still just a little more than a year since the tragedy. But now that was that was just one of the great moments that night at the podium. Tom Mauser reaches down and holds up a pair of large white sneakers. And then in Daniel shoes, he says his son shoes, I could say, you know, we did this in in Daniel's name the people of Colorado did it and and he provided the inspiration for. Tom, son. Daniel was one of the twelve students killed at Columbine high school twenty years ago when I interviewed Tom recently at his church..

Columbine high school Columbine Tom Mauser Daniel shoes Lee Patterson US New York Times America NPR Kay UNC Snapchat Hitler Denver Colorado twenty years one hundred percent
"twenty year" Discussed on 1A

1A

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"twenty year" Discussed on 1A

"And we're making the month of April all about women in comedy. We've got grittily and Leslie Hedlund from the Netflix series Russian doll. So beloved Reta from NBC's parks and recreation and many more spread the word. Listen and subscribe now. This is one A. I'm Joshua Johnson. We're talking to k- UNC's Lee Patterson on the twenty year anniversary of Columbine Leah's reporting fellow with guns and America, it's a project that looks at the role of guns in American life Li it's pretty clear that there have been some real policy changes since then. But what does it mean that our policy making is so reactive rather than proactive? Yeah. So I talked to David rupee about that. I am a retired Harvard instructor and an author of books about risk perception, and how worrying too much or too little can get us into trouble rupee says that given the relative rarity of school shootings, we might be overreacting when we let them drive policy. But there's a good reason for it. We are exquisitely afraid of any risks to our kids, which makes sense because to keep the species going our kids are tomorrow's version of the species when a risk is being talked about a lot. What in the media amongst friends amongst parents, sending their kids off to school as Columbine has made school shootings in general. And then another one happens. And then another one happens. It becomes a bigger blip on that risk radar screen, and that alone disproportionately magnifies how scary that risk seems. I see what he's getting lean. But that doesn't mean we should disregard these incidents, right? No, no, not at all Roby explains that it's really more of a question of awareness. We can't not feel terrible hurt and and horror at school shootings. But we can also realize that our fear and our horror can be getting in the way of what's best for our kids. That's why having this conversation matters. They that he means two things number one that it's important not to unnecessarily frightened students about school shootings. And number two, not to let those adult fears distract from other solutions or other bigger problems. School district's across the country are dealing with this as they make decisions on school safety. They can buy things like security cameras chur, but they can also take preventative measures like providing mental health services..

School district Leslie Hedlund Reta Joshua Johnson NBC Netflix Lee Patterson Leah Roby instructor David America twenty year
"twenty year" Discussed on 1A

1A

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"twenty year" Discussed on 1A

"Northern Colorado. She's also reporting fellow with guns and America. This is one A. I'm Joshua Johnson in Washington. Vaccinate everybody. I'm Peter Jennings. At ABC news world headquarters. We want to bring you up to date at the shooting at Columbine high school. They left the library. We just kinda ran for running towards the cop car. They just came in. And they started shooting. Everybody's saying get down get down. Perhaps. Now America would wake up to the dimensions of this challenge. Factually, become part of our language. A Columbine style attack Columbine really gave birth to the modern fear of kids being shot in schools were still struggling to figure out. Why did that happen? Twenty years ago to teenagers murdered a dozen students and one teacher at Columbine high school in Colorado since then more than two hundred twenty thousand students have been exposed to gun violence in schools, and the threat of a school shooting is always there an eighteen year old woman is dead of a self inflicted gunshot wound after threatening violence against Denver schools. Investigators say sold by was infatuated with the Columbine shooting so much so that she flew from Miami to Denver bought a shotgun and hid in the Colorado foothills for nearly two days more than a thousand Denver area schools closed yesterday as police searched for her. She was found dead on mount Evans yesterday afternoon. Joining us from K UNC public radio in Greeley about an hour. From Denver is reporter Lee Patterson. She's part of guns and America a reporting collaborative that focuses on America's relationship with firearms. Lee. Welcome to the program. Hi there. We'll talk about the. Order question of what's changed in America since Columbine? But tell us more about what happened this week. What more do we know about sold by? Sure. So she was an eighteen year old high school student in Miami. As you mentioned earlier this week law enforcement found her dead by suicide an apparent gunshot wound. The whole thing started a couple of days ago pace came to Denver. She landed at Denver International airport, Monday morning. She went and bought a shotgun. The FBI division here in Denver at some point was made aware of her presence, and basically frantically begin searching for her because you know, in their estimation. She had made threats that were credible in the area. She was infatuated with the Columbine high school shooting. Now, the FBI has said the threats were not specific to any particular school. They have also really haven't given out any details on these threats, but it all led to a massive manhunt and hundreds perhaps over a thousand front range schools were closed, and ultimately it all ended in the in the discovery of her body is supposed to have been especially emotional. Colorado, especially because Colorado passed a new red flag law just last Friday. Yes. Yes. Absolutely. I think this. This has been a very emotional thing for Colorado on one hand. Some people have said really an eighteen year old kid can shut down hundreds of schools, and you know, scaring entire metro area. Really? And then on the other hand, if people were terrified, you know, not letting their kids beyond the coldest sack imagining this woman creeping around in their neighborhood, and you know, really just feeling terrified and shake in in the wake of the you know, the twentieth anniversary of the Columbine high school shooting this weekend. It's been very difficult for communities, and a few of the survivors few of the Columbine survivors that I've been talking with and texting to were quite shaken up by this whole thing worth noting. Of course, red flag laws designed to prevent people who seem to be a threat to public safety from acquiring firearms. Let's shift gears to Columbine itself when it comes to that what exactly have you been focusing on? So a couple of months ago. I was listening to a hearing going on at the Colorado state house about a Bill. Will that would allow people to carry guns on school grounds? These types of discussions are going on around the country..

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