22 Burst results for "Twenty Twenty Nobel"

"twenty twenty nobel" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

05:33 min | 3 months ago

"twenty twenty nobel" Discussed on Short Wave

"Twenty twenty was a year like no other especially for science during twenty twenty alone have been more papers written about covid nineteen than the have been on many other diseases that we've known about for a much longer time. Things like polio and ebola. And that astonishing ed young is a staff writer for the atlantic and in recent peace he explores the massive shift. The pandemic has caused in scientific research in a. We have only known about this disease for a year or so and yet it has totally consumed the attention of the world. Scientists many many scientists have pivoted from whatever they were previously focused on to study covid. Nineteen he says. Take jennifer dowden for example. She's twenty twenty nobel prize winner and a pioneer of crisper gene editing technology. And she told me about how in february she was on a plane headed to a conference crammed into the middle seat and she realized like this is. This is crazy. This doesn't feel safe and this is probably the last time on going to travel for a while like she had the sense for her life was about to change and change. It did the next month. Her university shutdown her son's school closed jennifer and her colleagues realized the wanted to switch focus so they started testing in their own institution to serve the local community because they realized that testing wasn't sufficient they developed new ways of diagnosing the virus using crisper. And this is a clear example. I think of a scientist moved to studying covid nineteen because she saw this massive pressing. Societal need for science to rise to the occasion but in view goodwill pivots like the one that down to made. Don't tell the whole story about what changed in twenty twenty scientists not just a march towards the greater good to very human endeavor and as a human endeavor it has both good and bad sides at its best. Scientists are self-correcting march towards greater knowledge for the betterment of humanity but at its worst it is a self interested pursuit of greater prestige at the cost of truth and rigor and both sides of science were very much on display this year so today on the show we talk with ed young about some of the ways cope with nineteen could change science forever. I'm mattie safai in this is short way from npr this message comes from npr sponsor. Bank of america. You finally decided to learn how to ice skate. So you ordered the essentials. Every ice skater needs a pair of blades. And you helmet and a good set of kneepads and you used your bank of america. Cash rewards credit card choosing to earn three percent cash back online shopping rewards that you put towards the cost of an essential piece of plo skating recovery. A heating pad visit bank of america dot com slash more warding to apply now copyright twenty twenty bank of america corporation. This message comes from. Npr sponsor ibm a smarter. Hybrid cloud approach with ibm telcos. Rollout innovations with watson. Ai without losing speed. The world going hybrid with ibm visit ibm dot com slash breed cloud. Okay so today. We're talking about how the pandemic changed scientific research. Let's let's start with one of the core foundations of science publishing data. Something that in my experience doesn't traditionally happen very quickly. Yeah so traditionally <hes>. The process of publishing is often very slow. It takes a lot of time for scientists to write up the results for that results to then pass through gone through. The peer review process can take many months. Is ill suited to a crisis. That is as fast moving as the covy pandemic has been but for many years now. Biomedical researchers have pushed for innovations that will speed up the process of science so they have started increasingly using pre-printed servers where they can upload early drafts of the papers so that their peers can discuss and build upon those results even before it goes through the peer review. Gauntlets and it really took off in the middle of the pandemic p- reprints were a major part of how science was disseminated over the course of this year and i think for both good and they meant that as intended. The pace of science was much quicker but in an environment where the entire world was hungry for more information about this new disease. A lot of very bad reprints were also circulated very quickly gained international attention and led to the spreading of misleading information. That hindered the controller cove. Nineteen rather

jennifer dowden ed young ebola npr polio atlantic jennifer
How COVID-19 Has Changed Science

Short Wave

05:33 min | 3 months ago

How COVID-19 Has Changed Science

"Twenty twenty was a year like no other especially for science during twenty twenty alone have been more papers written about covid nineteen than the have been on many other diseases that we've known about for a much longer time. Things like polio and ebola. And that astonishing ed young is a staff writer for the atlantic and in recent peace he explores the massive shift. The pandemic has caused in scientific research in a. We have only known about this disease for a year or so and yet it has totally consumed the attention of the world. Scientists many many scientists have pivoted from whatever they were previously focused on to study covid. Nineteen he says. Take jennifer dowden for example. She's twenty twenty nobel prize winner and a pioneer of crisper gene editing technology. And she told me about how in february she was on a plane headed to a conference crammed into the middle seat and she realized like this is. This is crazy. This doesn't feel safe and this is probably the last time on going to travel for a while like she had the sense for her life was about to change and change. It did the next month. Her university shutdown her son's school closed jennifer and her colleagues realized the wanted to switch focus so they started testing in their own institution to serve the local community because they realized that testing wasn't sufficient they developed new ways of diagnosing the virus using crisper. And this is a clear example. I think of a scientist moved to studying covid nineteen because she saw this massive pressing. Societal need for science to rise to the occasion but in view goodwill pivots like the one that down to made. Don't tell the whole story about what changed in twenty twenty scientists not just a march towards the greater good to very human endeavor and as a human endeavor it has both good and bad sides at its best. Scientists are self-correcting march towards greater knowledge for the betterment of humanity but at its worst it is a self interested pursuit of greater prestige at the cost of truth and rigor and both sides of science were very much on display this year so today on the show we talk with ed young about some of the ways cope with nineteen could change science forever. I'm mattie safai in this is short way from npr this message comes from npr sponsor. Bank of america. You finally decided to learn how to ice skate. So you ordered the essentials. Every ice skater needs a pair of blades. And you helmet and a good set of kneepads and you used your bank of america. Cash rewards credit card choosing to earn three percent cash back online shopping rewards that you put towards the cost of an essential piece of plo skating recovery. A heating pad visit bank of america dot com slash more warding to apply now copyright twenty twenty bank of america corporation. This message comes from. Npr sponsor ibm a smarter. Hybrid cloud approach with ibm telcos. Rollout innovations with watson. Ai without losing speed. The world going hybrid with ibm visit ibm dot com slash breed cloud. Okay so today. We're talking about how the pandemic changed scientific research. Let's let's start with one of the core foundations of science publishing data. Something that in my experience doesn't traditionally happen very quickly. Yeah so traditionally The process of publishing is often very slow. It takes a lot of time for scientists to write up the results for that results to then pass through gone through. The peer review process can take many months. Is ill suited to a crisis. That is as fast moving as the covy pandemic has been but for many years now. Biomedical researchers have pushed for innovations that will speed up the process of science so they have started increasingly using pre-printed servers where they can upload early drafts of the papers so that their peers can discuss and build upon those results even before it goes through the peer review. Gauntlets and it really took off in the middle of the pandemic p- reprints were a major part of how science was disseminated over the course of this year and i think for both good and they meant that as intended. The pace of science was much quicker but in an environment where the entire world was hungry for more information about this new disease. A lot of very bad reprints were also circulated very quickly gained international attention and led to the spreading of misleading information. That hindered the controller cove. Nineteen rather

Ed Young Jennifer Dowden Ebola IBM Mattie Safai Polio Bank Of America Twenty Twenty Bank Of America Atlantic Jennifer NPR Watson
"twenty twenty nobel" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

02:54 min | 3 months ago

"twenty twenty nobel" Discussed on Short Wave

"You're listening to shortwave from npr. Twenty twenty was a year like no other especially for science during twenty twenty alone have been more papers written about covid nineteen than the have been on many other diseases that we've known about for a much longer time. Things like polio and ebola. And that astonishing ed young is a staff writer for the atlantic and in recent peace he explores the massive shift. The pandemic has caused in scientific research in a. We have only known about this disease for a year or so and yet it has totally consumed the attention of the world. Scientists many many scientists have pivoted from whatever they were previously focused on to study covid. Nineteen he says. Take jennifer dowden for example. She's twenty twenty nobel prize winner and a pioneer of crisper gene editing technology. And she told me about how in february she was on a plane headed to a conference crammed into the middle seat and she realized like this is. This is crazy. This doesn't feel safe and this is probably the last time on going to travel for a while like she had the sense for her life was about to change and change. It did the next month. Her university shutdown her son's school closed jennifer and her colleagues realized the wanted to switch focus so they started testing in their own institution to serve the local community because they realized that testing wasn't sufficient they developed new ways of diagnosing the virus using crisper. And this is a clear example. I think of a scientist moved to studying covid nineteen because she saw this massive pressing. Societal need for science to rise to the occasion but in view goodwill pivots like the one that down to made. Don't tell the whole story about what changed in twenty twenty scientists not just a march towards the greater good to very human endeavor and as a human endeavor it has both good and bad sides at its best. Scientists are self-correcting march towards greater knowledge for the betterment of humanity but at its worst it is a self interested pursuit of greater prestige at the cost of truth and rigor and both sides of science were very much on display this year so today on the show.

jennifer dowden ed young ebola npr polio atlantic jennifer
"twenty twenty nobel" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

05:08 min | 4 months ago

"twenty twenty nobel" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Tells your stories for our show tomorrow on poverty in america today we are talking about all that science in this year of the pandemic and what it might have lost in the process as well. Ed young joins us. He is science writer at the atlantic. Call him america's science wider the science writer for the united states and jennifer dowden joins us as well. She's a professor of chemistry at the university of california berkeley and one the twenty twenty nobel prize in chemistry for her groundbreaking research on crisper gene. Editing technology There's a before we fully leave behind the issue of that torrent of studies that have come out tens of thousands of chris. Sorry kovic related studies. Ed something that you point out in your piece of their warranted to talk about for just a second about how how. Science one of the ways in which science meets the public mind. Okay because in the in in all of those studies you point out that there were many many many shoddy studies or studies that were too small to be statistically significant about treatments such as hydrochloric quinn right and yet the instant any one of those studies made into preprinted even full blown publication in any journal because of the you know mainstream media and social media it immediately oh like a virus itself went through the sort of informational ecosystem. Here talk talk about that. Because because the misinformation scientific misinformation quickly went into the public consciousness and it made it even harder to fight the pandemic. Did you know a small lifetime ago. Easter writes about cancer and there would always be joke. That people would say. Oh one one month. Scientists are saying this thing causes cancer and the next month. They're saying that accused cancer. And it's basically the same here except rather than one month to the next. Those studies coming up on monday and tuesday and You know we're getting this week. Kept on getting this very erratic Gibbering pitcher about Covid nineteen as treating covid nineteen and to some extent that is just a the scientific process happening. There's this sort of fiction that signs. Is this clean easy march towards truth a process of facts whereas actually it's this very a meandering erratic stumbled words gradually less uncertainty. We saw that here I do think that there wasn't an issue about a lack of coordination of studies Especially on the treatment fronts. We talked about historical examples. Are there in this interview in world. War two The federal agencies did an amazing job of coordinating research into things like a flu vaccines in to malaria into mass producing antibiotics and because of that incredible efficiency a huge amount was done in a virtual amount of time. We didn't really have that hit least in the us. Some really good trials were done in britain. Here things were kind of meandering for for the For the initial parts of the pandemic. And i think that came into a lot of a wasted time and effort Well i want to talk more deeply. About how the act of doing science for scientists themselves has changed. And so listen along with me. Ed and professor dowden if you might from it To to michael minna epidemiologist at the harvard. T h chance school of public health. He's been on our program several times this year to discuss cove rapid testing. You might have heard him for example on the hour that we did when we called a gathering of our own on point cova task force not that long ago now all of that time spent on shows like this well minna. Says it's just one example of how his work has changed since two thousand nineteen. We found that just talking frequently with the media is one of the most important voices that academics can have to really get their science across. It does come with risks. Of course reporters are not scientists and most articles have something that's wrong but at the same time getting the point out there driving the discussion forward in a pandemic like this has been one of the most important pieces. Minna is also collaborating. More with policymakers and private companies. This is just kind of supercharged. Experience of recognizing how important is to engage in the broader industry experience in the industry. People who really have the money to push things forward quicker like developing a whole new class of rapid antigen tests in eight months. You know that would have taken a very long time in academia to really do that and so this is generally showed me. Just how. I think. Just how important. It is to not.

jennifer dowden university of california berke america Ed young cancer Ed atlantic quinn professor dowden michael minna h chance school of public heal chris malaria flu britain minna harvard Minna
"twenty twenty nobel" Discussed on The Daily Article

The Daily Article

07:39 min | 6 months ago

"twenty twenty nobel" Discussed on The Daily Article

"This is the daily Article podcast published by Denison Forum or Culture Changing Christians to receive the daily article directly to your email inbox each weekday morning visit the daily Article Dot Com. Now, here's Today's news discerned differently. I'm pleased to announce the release of our twenty twenty advent devotional. It's called our Christmas stories twenty-six reflections to enrich or Christmas season. My Wife Jennifer, Denison compiled twenty six stories from her friends family and readers about their fund memories of past Christmases, and for each reflection Janet wrote an insightful encouraging and biblical devotional designed to be read each day from December first. Through, December twenty, sixth hour, Christmas stories is an advent devotional that may provide you with new Christmas traditions. While still reminding you of the reason, we celebrate Christmas the good news of great joy of Jesus's birth, and since jets advent devotional is consistently our most sought. After book each year I encourage you to request your copy today at the daily Article Dot Org. Let's begin with some surprising good news politicians can agree and get along I'm not referring to last night's presidential debate, which we'll get to in a moment but to video tweeted from the governor's race in Utah, which has gone viral Democrat, Chris Peterson and Republican Spencer Cox Appear Side By side those distanced the introduce themselves and tell us we should vote for them. Then they take turns making statements that are counter, cultural and refreshing. There are some things we both agree on. We can debate issues without degrading each other's character we can disagree without hating each other win or. Lose in Utah, we work together their video has three point, three million views as of this morning meanwhile, president trump and former vice president. Joe. Biden met last night at Belmont. University in Nashville for the final presidential debate before the November third election. The discussion was less belligerent than the first debate. Once again, who won depends on your partisan perspective conservative John Potter it's says the president had the debate of his life while CNN's Chris. Eliza writes that Joe Biden managed to land the best lines of the night. How has our culture becomes? So divisive let's consider to surprising factors. On this day in Nineteen, sixty to the quarantine of Cuba began in response to the discovery that the Soviet Union was building medium range missile sites there the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library, and Museum website notes that during what became known as the Cuban missile crisis. The world waited seemingly on the brink of nuclear war, a diplomatic resolution was eventually reached but during the crisis, this was far from certain in a recent podcast. With my son Craig I noted that generations of Americans found unity in our common enemies World War One the Great Depression World War Two, and the Cold War forced us to work together to counter threats to our lives and our future since the fall of the Soviet Union with faced no unifying external threat, our military engagements in Vietnam the war on terror deeply divided us and lacking a common enemy we have become the enemy. Digital media makes incivility worse for reasons that may literally not be obvious to us the director of national. Intelligence and the FBI director announced Wednesday that Iran and Russia have obtained US voter registration information in an attempt to interfere with the election. For example, Iran posed as the far right group proud boys descend intimidating emails to voters they could do so because email and social media enabled content creators to be anonymous or to masquerade is someone they're not. This is a massive problem in our culture geopolitical analyst George Friedman observes the bill of rights. Does guarantee free speech, but it did not anticipate the notion of total anonymity. Free speech assumes that the speaker is known that what is said depends on who the speaker is and what the speaker has said in the past that is the character of the speaker. All that is impossible through these new media. The founders did not expect speech to be divorced from responsibility social media specializes in it. Such anonymity encourages bad faith actors to use the media and leaves the reader with no way to measure the credibility of the statement or the speaker. Amid the divisiveness in negativity of our day, let's close with three biblical reminders. One crisis is a call to faith Max lucado points to the time Jesus, walked the disciples and the Stormy Sea of Galilee in John Six, and then quotes Verse Twenty One. They were glad to take Jesus into their boat and immediately the boat was at the land to which they were going. Then Lucado ads follow the example of the disciples. Welcome Jesus into the midst of this turbulent time. Don't let the. Storm. Turn you inward. Let it turn you upward to faith is a call to Action James testified I will show you my faith with my works CS Lewis observed I have received no assurance. That anything we can do will eradicate suffering I. Think the best results are obtained by people who were quietly away at limited objectives such as the abolition of the slave trade or prison reform or factory acts or to burke yellows not by those who think they can achieve universal justice or health or Piece I. Think the art of life consists of tackling each immediate evil well as we can three action is a call to resilience Galicians six nine states. Let us not grow weary of doing good for in due season we will reap if we do not give up when we turn to God in the crisis, then turned to others with compassion we need to stand firm in the moment trusting that God is using our challenges to mold us into his best for US Louise. GLUCK winner of. The Twenty Twenty Nobel Prize for literature writes in her poem Elms All day I tried to distinguish need from desire. Now, in the dark I, feel only bitter sadness for us the builders the planners of would because I have been looking steadily at these elms and seen the process that creates the writhing stationary tree is to rent and have understood, it will make no forms but twisted forms however, the more twisted the tree, the stronger it's would, why is this fact good news for you today? To subscribe to the daily article via email breed daily article, you may have missed this week or use any of our resources. Please visit diesen forum dot. Org Thank you for listening to the daily Article podcast today..

Joe Biden Twenty Twenty Nobel Utah president US Denison Forum John F. Kennedy Presidential L Soviet Union Iran Nashville Cuba Janet Jennifer director Chris Peterson
"twenty twenty nobel" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

09:55 min | 6 months ago

"twenty twenty nobel" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"For Twenty Twenty I've been announced this week among the winning discoveries the virus that causes significant liver disease the gene editing technique could crisper and a supermassive black hole. You always need a supermassive black hole we give official tour of the NOBELS. Is BBC science correspondent Victoria. Gill. Victoria welcome to the program. Hello. Chris. How're you very well, thank you and thanks for joining us to give us his tour of the nobels. Let's begin with Monday the Nobel Assembly has today decided to ward the twenty twenty Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine jointly to Harvey J alter Michael Houghton and Charles M. Rice for the discovery of hepatitis. C virus. So Victor did these men do what if they actually discovered? A. Beautiful. That wise theories of discoveries of hepatitis at the discovery of Hepatitis C. and also how to detect it. That's led to protests that led to treatments and cures, and the possibility that the potentially lethal virus could be whiteout the three types of hepatitis and hepatitis C. up until the seventies was unknown but it was found that patients got blood transfusions would getting this unknown cause of hepatitis. So alternates colleagues showed that blood from the. Hepatitis. In fact, he patients could transmit the disease to chimpanzees. So he sort of showed this disease causing agents, Ineffective People's bloods. Then Houghton took that a step further by painstakingly isolating and collecting DNA records from bees, infected chimpanzees. So he he founded the code of the virus and then rice took it even further to show that it was actually this virus alone by itself that Kacoos Hepatitis Inflammation of the liver which can kill you so. This this lovely step by step from the seventeenth to the nineteenth that Scotus from just unknown cause of lethal liver inflammation to a point where we know exactly what's causing that is the so close and now we have a way of potentially wiping out virus. We can set me test for it very rapidly tracing cure it did you foresee HEP C. Making a no bill this year Theo. I wish I could say so but I did read a prediction of it because I believe the scientists involved had received some of seen as the precursor prizes so they were certainly on the slate. Is An important problem now, isn't it? The the anticipated burden of disease caused by one hundred, seventy, million people around the world an it's a direct cause of liver cancer and disease. So it's pretty important as a pathogen the we now identified it and radical not even that I think is a prize weller and Disney absolutely, and it's sort of best comparison when we're all rather obsessed. With one particular virus at the moment, how long it used to take to identify the virus causing a particular problem and then prove the virus was the calls and we have taken for granted that a new virus that emerged in China late last year, we can already identify know that it's causing disease with great certainty and you know we will hope that we can vaccinate against pretty soon. Lee There's some suggestion, a number of years old now this suggestion. But when you compare the genetic makeup of Z and the genetic makeup of a certain group of viruses that infect dogs some people suggested that in fact, dogs gave us Hepatitis C.. And it would have been the very close proximity between. US domesticating dogs on those dog owners initially that perhaps enabled that jump to happen in a bit of a striking parallel. Theo's talk about the fact that we've identified. Kovic in record time. But the fact that we we could actually have virus that jumped out of Batson into be because covid. We've got a virus that jumped out at bats in out out of dogs people to cause hepatitis. c. a what do you think about that as scientists progress so incredibly particularly over the last decade, you know we're going to be able to test that question and we're not far from being able to do that. We have from the archaeological record in some genetic record. You know we've domesticated dogs inside the last thirty thousand years and as we begin to get ancient DNA, we should be able to clock that and and Tessie idea you know. which came first the hepatitis C. or dog domestication. Well, we've onto the Nobel Prize for physics, which is also come out this week. One half to Roger Penrose. For the discovery that black hole formation is a robust prediction of the general theory of relativity. And the other have jointly to Andrea gears and reinhard cancel for the discovery of the supermassive compact object at the center of our galaxy. That's one way of putting the supermassive compact object at the center of Galaxy. There was actually a lovely quote vic from Christopher. Berry who's a physicist at northwestern university and resonated with me because he said, black holes capture anything that gets too close for them. This is equally true about our fascination. Once you start learning about black holes, they can be no escape. So Watch out if you report on them too much you get sucked in. At three. Really Nice. I think my favorite response to the physics. Nobel came from another physicist Cox Invested Cambridge who tweeted that. Wooding the physics Nobel first massive chasm of infinite dark necessary twenty, twenty we. Really, hit the nail on that. This was a fascinating one and it was a wonderful British scientists, eighteen years. Old Roger Penrose gets off this prize and then the other hawkish between reinhard cancel and under gets here is only the fourth woman to win a physics ninety miles that. Relates a lot of day you know intrinsic problematic with the byles in this ongoing issue with the patch. Be problematic academic hierarchical system that the nobels is kind of famous for but it's also just this real celebration of absolutely fundamental science. What Roger Penrose Dede's is suitable I mean to me him sort of applying general relativity to come up with entirely new calculations. The fact that a black hole can be a real thing can actually form in the universe is kind of another level of thinking for me. Well. Let's move straight onto chemistry because that was the third and final prize that was announced this week. Emmanuel shop to you and Jennifer Dowd now for the development of a method for genome editing. This is, of course, the technique otherwise known as crisper. Did you see that one coming Theo? This one looked very likely at some point because the crisper cast nine technique has so revolutionized the way that. Researchers can edit DNA including the fact that we believe that someone actually used it. Illegally and ethically to edit the DNA in unborn children but it's clearly something that has changed. The whole way that let Kabbage is down and in contrast to that hepatitis C. from the nineteen seventies nine, hundred, Ninety S, and which by the way to three men, this prize has gone to two women for work done in the past decade and that's exciting on both counts. I think by studying basic biology they've come up with what is a tool that has changed. Basic Science already, and is likely to change medicine as well. The Countess crisper actually work. What does it involve? What will enable us to do? It's actually the ancient immune system of a bacteria which essentially has this component could trace RNA, which cleaves it. Snip sounds a bit of DNA from whatever is attacking it. So it's basically kills what is attacking its immune system has this pair of genetic scissors what these two amazing scientists have done and they collaborated together to kind of bring together the genetic knowledge in the molecular biology. This is the real kind of chemistry of life stuff. They got together to figure out how to simplify that bacterial immune system this cleavage into a pair of much simpler molecular. Genetic diseases that can be used anywhere essentially, you can just as if you were editing a piece of tape and you can sniff out and then stick it back together you can do that with a genetic code. So you can just imagine the actually the Swedish Academy themselves said that it's only imagination that holds that the limitations of what we can do with this technology I. Think Canoga important postscript to that is that our morals and ethics is also going to play a big role in terms of what humans will do with this technology because the possibilities. Molecular are boundless. Victoria. Thank you very much. That's Victoria Gill. She is the BBC's science correspondent. Thanks to the pandemic we're entering a world that's more online and thanks to what many are calling the fourth industrial revolution. It's world that's much more automated and data driven. Jim guzzled director of the Institute for Continuing Education at the University of Cambridge and has been very much at the forefront in the front line of having to respond educationally to the challenges thrown away by Covid he's with us now Jim. Jim We've seen in the news stories of universities which have got huge outbreaks of covid among their students. Now, we hope that Cambridge University isn't going to join their ranks but just before we get into the educational side of things, do you think it was the right decision to get young people back into university?.

hepatitis Nobel Prize Theo NOBELS Roger Penrose BBC Twenty Twenty Michael Houghton liver disease Charles M. Rice Jim guzzled physicist reinhard Nobel Assembly Victoria Nobel Covid
"twenty twenty nobel" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

05:02 min | 6 months ago

"twenty twenty nobel" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

"This marketplace podcast is supported by transfer wise. The smart new way to send and receive money internationally transfer wise gives you the real exchange rate every time you send money abroad you can even get an account that holds up to fifty four currencies at once and convert between them anytime join over eight million customers in more than eighty countries who are already saving. Try them out for free at transfer wise dot com slash marketplace, or download the APP. The Twenty Twenty Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences has been awarded to Paul Are Milgram and Robert B Wilson for improvements to auction theory and inventions of new auction formats marketplace senior economic contributor, Chris Fail joins us now good Morning Chris Good Morning. Okay. So auction theory I mean I think I know what an auction is but what is auction theory and in how did they improve it? So what Wilson's contribution was that he showed how rational bidders if you think about companies and CFO's and the CEO's rational bidders, but they tended to place bids that were below their own estimate of common values, the reason was. Fear about the winner's curse that they were going to over hey, and then professor milgram he's behind it much more general theory of auctions that allowed for calculating common values and private values that vary from bitter bitter and what they were able to do design auctions that allow for multiple bids L. for a period of time. So how has that played out in the real world would have been the practical implications. Well, there's an article by Paul Milgram it's in the hill from two thousand seventeen and he says that collectively. Greatest auction in history delivered more than sixty billion for the federal government. Since the early one, thousand, nine, hundred, Ninety S, and these auctions of radio frequencies to telecom operators and other auctions. You really have been critical to creating this robust wireless communications network that we enjoy today. Chris Farrell. Contributor here at marketplace. Thank you as always. Thanks a lot. Lourdes. France is a popular pilgrimage site for Catholics the world over it is struggling during the pandemic. It was completely closed for two months and now even with France outta lockdown pilgrims returning in tiny numbers compared with the six million a year who usually come. John. Lawrenson reports from. Lords. The Bells ring out a trumpet sounds thousands of pilgrims, hold up candles and sing the night procession for the Feast of the assumption is impressive even with the numbers limited to five thousand, it's usually twenty. February holy has come here from Normandy, with her husband and three children she had after several miscarriages and many prayers to marry. Football. Sundays. MD crowds there were the other years and usually we walked behind the statue of the Virgin as she's carried around. But this year we have to stand in roped off areas and around town, a lot of the hotels are closed. Pilgrims have been coming here for over century seeking healing to bathe in what many believed to be holy spring water or now with Cova Nineteen, just a splash it on their faces. Lured Rector Olivier Reba do Dumas says almost all group pilgrimages have been canceled leaving a big financial gap absol the billionaires young as if? The Addison's overnight pilgrimages has left us a large deficit. Will probably be about nine and a half million dollars by the end of the summer. To Lean Obama shows me her bestselling rosary beads. She heads the Union of one hundred and thirty stores selling what the French call objects of piety. on. Sunday July things were Joan. Eighty percents August two. I was burn in Luder better. I have never seen anything like it. Back at the century, morale is high for this group of students who walked four days to get here singing along the way. But Lord has received a real economic shock as pilgrim Fabio holy puts it. There's a lot to pray for. In Lourdes France. This is John some for marketplace. In. New York I'm Sabrina sure with the marketplace morning report. From APM American public media..

professor milgram Twenty Twenty Nobel Robert B Wilson France Dumas John Economic Sciences Chris Fail Lourdes France Chris Farrell MD Normandy New York Paul Cova Football Obama Olivier Reba
"twenty twenty nobel" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

04:36 min | 6 months ago

"twenty twenty nobel" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Live from NPR news in Washington I'm Windsor Johnston opening statements are underway in the Senate confirmation hearings of president. Trump's nominee to the US Supreme Court Judge Amy Coney Barrett is appearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee in his opening remarks committee chairman Lindsey Graham said Barrett is more than qualified to succeed the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in my view, the person appearing before this committee. Isn't a category. Of Excellence. Something the country should be proud of judge Barrett is expected to explain her judicial philosophy including her belief that courts are vital to enforcing the law and political branches of the government are intended to be the policymakers. President trump is returning to the campaign trail less than two weeks after he tested positive for the coronavirus is scheduled to rally supporters in the key state of Florida tonight NPR's Alison. Aubrey reports White House doctors say he's no longer contagious infectious disease experts say the evidence is sufficient that the president is no longer contagious doctor says there's no longer evidence of active virus in his body. Also, the president said in an interview that it seems he's immune to the virus infectious disease. Physician Russia Linski of Massachusetts General Hospital says it's reasonable that the president would have some unity at this point it is the case that most people develop antibodies after about seven to ten days. So he may very well have a robust antibody response right now but how long this immunity holds up for the president or anyone who's recovering from covid nineteen is not clear Allison Aubrey NPR news stocks opened higher this morning while the bond market is closed for the Columbus Day Day. NPR's Scott horsely reports the Dow Jones Industrial Average. Rose about one hundred thirty points in early trading investors are hoping to build on last week's rally which saw the biggest weekly gain in stocks in three months and pushed down into positive territory for the year hopes of a new pandemic relief package from Congress sparked the run-up though an actual agreement between Democrats and Republicans still seems like a long shot. Asian stocks were mixed overnight indexes in Hong Kong. Shanghai and South Korea saw gains while Japan's Nikkei index fell here in the US. Gasoline prices have also dipped despite weather disruptions in the Gulf of Mexico that idled some offshore production. The pandemic is limiting demand for gasoline. The average price of the pump nationwide is below two, twenty, five, a gallon. Scott horsely, NPR news Washington stocks continue to trade higher on Wall Street at this hour. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is one, hundred, fifty, two points the Nasdaq composite also trading higher up one, forty, eight, the SNP up twenty-nine, you're listening to NPR news in Washington. To American economists have been awarded the Twenty Twenty Nobel Prize in Economics Paul. MILGRAM and Robert Wilson are being recognized for their contributions to auction theory. The wrote professors at Stanford University, the prize was announced in Stockholm this morning. The European Union is calling on Armenia and Azerbaijan to begin negotiations over the nagorno-karabakh Flav as hopes for Ceasefire Fade Teri Schultz reports. The conflict will be discussed at a meeting of e you foreign ministers today where the blocks relations with Russia are high on the agenda E foreign policy chief. Joseph Burrell says the block views with. Concern that military activity continues including against civilian targets despite an agreement for a temporary humanitarian cease fire a stabilities have flared recently over the nagorno-karabakh enclave which lies inside Azerbaijan but is populated mostly by ethnic Armenians Russia backs Armenia while Turkey supports other by John Burrell urges the sides to begin substantive negotiations at their meeting EU. Foreign ministers will also discuss the. Poisoning of Alexia volney widely attributed to the Kremlin and continued unrest in Belarus for NPR news I'm Teri Schultz. The French government says it's not ruling out new lockdown orders amid fresh outbreaks of the coronavirus public health officials say the country is facing a strong second wave of new infections. The number of cases in France hit a record level over the weekend. I'm Windsor. Johnston NPR news in.

NPR president Trump Allison Aubrey Johnston NPR Physician Russia Linski Judge Amy Coney Barrett Twenty Twenty Nobel Senate Judiciary Committee Teri Schultz Washington Scott horsely Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Russia Azerbaijan judge Barrett US Supreme Court European Union
"twenty twenty nobel" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

09:12 min | 6 months ago

"twenty twenty nobel" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"By the FDA this product is not intended to diagnose treat cure or prevent any disease. Equatorial Launch Australia's you'll be the middle of next year now before NASA begins launching rockets from its new aced amland facility restrictions imposed by the covid nineteen pandemic forced NASA to delay its Northern Territory Launch Program, which should have been underway by now the site named Nolan. Boy Some seventy kilometers southeast of Darwin launch at least four Black Brad sounding rockets carrying scientific payloads on sub orbital ballistic missions. The payload will include spectrometers the study light from the. Office Tori triple star system looking for atmospheres, EXO planets, and to detect interstellar gas. So as to better understand the structure and evolution of galaxies equitorial launch, Australia, which operates the site as secure a contract with the American Space Agency for an initial three launches. Next year being just twelve degrees south of the equator. The launch complex is located in equatorial sweet spot for launching payloads into space. In fact, only the European Space Agency's curse spaceport in French. Bet is situated at just five degrees from the equator you see being on on the equator provides launch vehicles with extra Delta v Velocity when launching to the east that comes about because th- rotation entered immense to additional four point five kilometers per second compared to launches at high latitudes. Now, all that additional boost translates into extra payload for the same amount of fuel compared to launches from facilities such as Cape, Canaveral Vandenburg bike and all or any of the launch complexes in Russia India China Japan this space time. And time now to take a brief look at some of the other stories making news in science this week with science report an estimated one in ten people worldwide. That's ten percent of all humans have now been infected with the COVID nineteen corona virus. The new is by the World Health. Organization means the real level of infection now stands at close to. Eight hundred million people globally compared to the other thirty seven million officially diagnosed in the eleven months since the deadly virus first originated in Wuhan. China. More than a million people have died from the infection, but a report in the journal Nature says scientists warned that that figure probably also vastly underestimates the actual number of people who have died from covid nineteen. Were still epidemiologist with the University of Washington's Institute for Health metrics and evaluation in Seattle estimate that if current trends continue more than two and a half million people will have died from the corona virus by the end of this year but they say that figure could be cut to one point eight million if every country universal mask wearing. The Twenty Twenty Nobel Prize in physics has been awarded to Roger Penrose Reinheid Gonzo and Andrea Gates for their research into black holes penrose used ingenious mathematical methods. Proof that black holes are a direct consequence of Albert Einstein's nine hundred and fifteen general theory of relativity interestingly, Einstein himself didn't believe that black holes really exist meanwhile gins Elon gets h led a group of astronomers that since the early nineteen nineties have focused on a region. Known as secretaries a star at the center of our own galaxy the Milky Way they studied the orbits of Bright Stars closest to the center of the Galaxy and concluded that the stars based on the Velocity in orbit suggests they must be circling objects smaller than our solar system but with as much mass as four point, three, million sons, they concluded that the only possible explanation is that secretaries a star is a supermassive black hole. The Twenty Twenty Nobel Prize in chemistry has been awarded to Emmanuel petty and Jennifer Dowden for their development of crisper cast nine the genetic scissors genome editing crisp cast nine has revolutionized gene thing allowing scientists to change the DNA of animals, plants, and microorganisms with extreme precision. This technology has had a major impact on all life sciences. It's contributing to new cancer therapies and may ultimately make the dream of curing inherited diseases. Come true. Me Well Havi. Alter Michael. Houston and Charles Rice being awarded the Twenty Twenty Nobel Prize in medicine for their discovery of the Hepatitis C virus. Taste of transmission of hepatitis from blood transfusions. Previous studies had already identified the Hepatitis A and B viruses. Show that a third borne viral pathogen, hepatitis? C.. Could also transmit the Disease Heaton identified the virus use infected genetic material showing that it was a new kind of irony virus belong to the flavor virus family rising colleagues then use genetic engineering to characterize a portion of the hepatitis C. Genome responsible for our replication demonstrating its role in liver disease. Okay. Let's go from the sublime to the ridiculous and. Linking five G. Cell phone technology with the COVID nineteen corona virus has been slammed as unscientific and possibly the worst paper of twenty twenty. It makes claims which capi supported using figures which around provable, and he's based on claim facts that simply aren't real and which have been described as bad as crazy yet somehow this paper managed to get it. So published in the journal, biological regulators and Hemion static agents, which is published by buyer life. The Journal has retracted the paper, but they've not properly explained how it passed this. So called Peer Review Process or even if it was properly peer reviewed at all t minimum from a strain skeptic says the authors of the paper clearly have a problem with five G. and with mass and when you think about it got a problem with science as well. There's guys this. is researched on various grips put together Italy. US and Russia this with the researchers came from what bay supposedly found was that five G. waves could be absorbed by the math logic sills acting like antennas transferred to other cells and play the main role in producing around the viruses in biological cells. So that raises a lot of rigs flex for stuff. So he got producing. Rather. Than catching a bus but their whole range of different things that really made it look very strange because cancers any one of the many problems tried causes seven, hundred and twenty five. Different diseases and human beings and can kill everything that leaves except some forms of micro organisms people looked at it and fifteen hundred, twenty factor. We always probably I think it's actually more molecules than the right of the year pretty in fact, any disease it's going to take those any Beth thing thousand diseases up. Recognized are they claiming hello as has been there are people so say meant that bad and so the whole range of different things about this paper that made a dodgy journalists they say their peer reviewed that this I'm supposedly snuck through when persons called the worst paper of twenty twenty, an organization Code Retraction Watch which looks at scientific papers and see which ones withdrawn my suffocation that they'd like to provide the fact that they could do wanna pay. Looked at it and he asked the publishes why did this happen? What was the price Stj? Peer Review and the response was that to me papers. Have a chance to look at the mall. So it wasn't. Well, I think. They really published because it was only online. Pre prestigious. Yeah. Yeah. prefacing but I think it's still supposedly have been peer reviewed and just it's some papers can just slip through the net with is not a very good thing for peer review. The interesting thing is they response like this retraction what's got didn't come from the editor of the publisher actually came from someone from the accounts of Bob. I. Should write I probably the first time they got from. Parliament Organization. Attention. Is By Life Hafiza magazine I g nine actually probably wouldn't like to say in politics. Is being withdrawal him so A lot of people make fun of it and they said Oh and I took a ban and try to make material factors possibilities out of people. They pay the price of that's t Mendham from Australian skeptics. Your prostate waking you up more often than your alarm clock. The fact is the older. You get the more likely. You'll have prostate problems which can affect your everyday life. That's where prostate complete by real health comes in prostate. Complete is the result of twenty years of experience as a leader in men's health. The powerful formula in prostate complete supports natural prostate function and reduced urinary urges for a better quality of life available at Walmart Visit Prostateoneperday, dot com for special offers. These statements have not been evaluated by FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose treat.

Twenty Twenty Nobel twenty twenty American Space Agency Peer Review FDA hepatitis Equatorial Launch Australia The Journal Albert Einstein Australia European Space Agency covid Tori Canaveral Vandenburg cure Nolan Bet Wuhan
"twenty twenty nobel" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

06:12 min | 6 months ago

"twenty twenty nobel" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Essential. By Sierra nugent the UN's world. Food. Program was awarded the Twenty Twenty Nobel Peace Prize on Friday with the Norwegian Nobel, committee praising the agencies quote impressive ability to intensify its efforts during the covid nineteen pandemic. The WFP is world's largest -Tarian Agency focused on hunger it seeks to tackle both chronic food insecurity the long-term lack of access to enough food suffered by six hundred, ninety million people in the world and acute insecurity periods of extreme hunger over a defined period of time earlier this year, the agency warned that the number of people facing acute food insecurity is likely. To double from one, hundred, thirty, five, million to two, hundred, sixty, five, million in two, thousand, twenty in large part because of the covid nineteen pandemic the pandemic has compounded the impacts of conflicts, poverty and climate related shocks that had already been driving up both chronic and acute hunger for the five years preceding twenty twenty Ashworth, Hussein chief economist at the WFP tells time we were already in a bad state. He says, but covid nineteen has created a kind of economic quicksand under people's feed. If we don't pull them out quickly, it takes people years if not decades to recover. Here's what to know how hunger has worsened in the world in twenty twenty. How has the pandemic affected global food? Security. Overall, the world has enough food to feed the global population in twenty twenty. The problem is getting it from where it's produced to where it's needed and the pandemic made that more complicated the sudden implementation of lockdowns caused unprecedented fractures of supply chains. Right across the board says, Jesuit, sings FRY CO chair the University of Cambridge's Interdisciplinary Research Center on Global Food Security. You had a shock to the system in terms of supply problems in harvesting food and a loss of income and ability to purchase in developed countries like Australia travel bans during the pandemic man migrant workers were unable to participate in harvests leaving food rotting on the vine. A reliance on imported food in countries like the U K coupled with panic buying at the start of the pandemic caused by fear of disruption left grocery store shelves, Bare. But the pandemics most severe impact on food security has been felt in developing countries the loss of jobs and releases. Ince's from their citizens living abroad have made people less able to afford food. The price of food has risen in some places such as Sudan due to economic disruption and inflation from a supply chain. Point of view shrine says the extreme fragmentation of markets in developing countries with trae generally divided among many retailers has made it harder to combat the disruption. What areas are most affected. Countries that have been destabilized by conflict are generally also the worst hit by hunger according to the WFP in Yemen before the pandemic began a five year long civil war had driven more than half the population into was state of food crisis emergency or catastrophe two, million Yemeni children. Five suffered acute malnourishment in two thousand, nineteen in South Sudan with a twenty eighteen end of a civil war didn't and a severe economic crisis six in ten people are facing a food crisis or emergency. Other countries facing some of the world's worst food crises include the Democratic Republic of the Congo Afghanistan Venezuela, Ethiopia Syria, Sudetan Nigeria, and Haiti. What are the worries for Food Security going forward? As well as further economic impacts and supply chain disruptions caused by the pandemic try says, the world faces a perfect storm for food security over the coming months in years made up of conflict trade disputes over utilization of natural resources and an increase in extreme weather events driven by climate change climate change is the greatest term threat to global food. Security says Mario Herrero chief research scientist in agriculture and food at Australia's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation the average annual number of extreme weather events such as droughts and unusual floods has more than doubled since the early nineteen nineties to more than two hundred meanwhile, cultural seasons are becoming destabilized or shortened. If we think covert is bad climate change is really really a lot worse especially when we start getting the impact in a couple of decades, Herrero says for Hussein, the WFP's chief economist funding is also a worry donors and U N member states have been very generous so far with contributions to the program, but it's possible. He warns that the economic crisis deepening in countries around the world could lead the government to cut their humanitarian funding the Nobel. Committee. Statement included a warning that quote the world is in danger of experiencing a hunger crisis of inconceivable proportions. The World Food Program, and other food assistance organizations do not received financial support they have requested. Such cuts would be a major mistake and lead to greater problems for both developed and developing countries down the Line Hussein says he cites the economic and political fallout of events like. Twenty fifteen refugee crisis and other forced displacements driven by conflict and insecurity. We live in a very interconnected world. So if we don't address these problems wherever they happen later, they come back to bite us he said. Worth reporting by Aria Chen..

WFP Twenty Twenty Hussein chief economist Australia UN Mario Herrero Aria Chen Sudan South Sudan
"twenty twenty nobel" Discussed on UN News

UN News

06:12 min | 6 months ago

"twenty twenty nobel" Discussed on UN News

"The announcement that the UN. . World. . Food program or W P as one the twenty twenty Nobel Peace Prize is being described as an amazing day for its workers in the field. . Put their lives on the line to help at risk communities. . That's the message from Matthew Lyndale head of the agency's South Sudan operation in these interview with your. . News Johnson. . He's been explaining how the one thousand in two hundred strong humanitarian team there has been helping communities hit by the worst flooding in decades ongoing violence. . So we're thrilled today to have received the Nobel Peace Prize for Twenty Twenty there are a thousand, , two, hundred, , , and fifty will food program start working in south Sudan. . Relieve your hunger for and feed more than five million people a year and clearly south Sudan for the World Food Program is one of the most complex operations. . A country that's face decades of violence. . But it's also having to Manage Economic Downturn Cove nineteen locust infestation <hes> more violence which continues persistently and now more recently floods have affected more than eight hundred, , thousand people. . So for all of WFP in south Sudan a country where we were very hard to <hes> to demonstrate the link between violence and hunger and try and stop that link rake that that relationship so that we can actually change people's lives for the better future for us. . This is just an amazing day. . It is certainly excellent use agency for the more than twelve hundred workers on the ground. . You say, , maybe you could give me some insight into what they're doing not just in terms of the emergency following the devastating flooding that had which has been the worst in decades. . I remember you briefing is just a couple of weeks ago on this, , but also in terms of the development projects on the ground to help. . Resilience for these communities can go home. . So in South Sudan Kaley, , there is a massive emergency failure of work given the enormity of the food insecurity problem that the country faces and only in the last five years we faced thirty one pockets of famine. . It gives you an idea about how significant the problem is here, , but it's not the only problem that we need to face and it's not an emergency response is not the only tool. In . all too. But . obviously what we're also trying to tune in south Sudan is really the poster child for bringing Emergency Response Development activities and this building activities together as warm and part of that obviously is to change the fundamental problems that are faced by so many south Sydney citizen's issues of isolation, , the issues of inequality and yet criti- and marginalization all of which creates the breeding ground or conflict and violence. . So through our programs where we`re Supporting rural farmers to be more productive to have enough food for their own communities. . But more importantly to create a surplus that they can trade with other communities to link those communities together to link farmer's markets and other markets and thereby creating a positive relationship across ethnic divides US Mutiti divides. . Can Act they bring people together these. . These that we want to invest more. . Easily. . Recognized I think in this these fries today and it's not just south Saddam redoing these things but also fundamentally desperately trying to show but those that would manipulate burst the time and have manipulated in the past I held accountable so that this change in south Sudan, , it's a country that frankly we've been in for fifty years too long and we aim to make sure that we are not needed in this country. . We've talked to make those linkages between development aid and is go and obviously we wish you very best to that and your teams in very difficult circumstances millions have been experiencing displacement and conflicts just last week the Human Rights Council highlighted a report that talked about the use of starvation. . As a weapon of war, , we've heard even worse than that soldiers being offered the chance to rape women in communities in you of payment I mean, , you just can't imagine the kind of conditions. . But when you go into a community with the WFP Bana, , what is it that the agency brings? ? What is the agency's added value? ? So in South Sudan because we've built relationships with communities of the decades of presence here because we are, , you know twelve hundred plus strong organization with presence across ten states and a deep relationship with the communities we serve where known entity and we have the logistics tools in our toolbox to be able to access areas. . We the helicopters, , planes, , all-terrain vehicles, , canoes, bogs, , , boats you. . We have an enduring sir. . We're able to meet people's needs when they're the worst, , but we're also able to support organizations other organizations as well as community leaders themselves to make a difference in their communities. . So what we are. . From perspective able to do is anyone really Priam? ? Times as a facilitator to bring you a <hes> organizations to bring communities together that typically have had problems coming together in this country since twenty eleven since its independence country who vicious periods of civil war and has persistent national conflict local conflict walk WFP has is now trying to do is trying to ensure that our food security presence. . Can Be used by other partners because we in this on our own to really facilitate a change in this environment, , a fundamental change in what is causing an enabling violence to contain one

south Sudan Twenty Twenty South Sudan Matthew Lyndale Johnson
Nobel Peace Prize recognition is an amazing day, saysUN food agency

UN News

06:12 min | 6 months ago

Nobel Peace Prize recognition is an amazing day, saysUN food agency

"The announcement that the UN. World. Food program or W P as one the twenty twenty Nobel Peace Prize is being described as an amazing day for its workers in the field. Put their lives on the line to help at risk communities. That's the message from Matthew Lyndale head of the agency's South Sudan operation in these interview with your. News Johnson. He's been explaining how the one thousand in two hundred strong humanitarian team there has been helping communities hit by the worst flooding in decades ongoing violence. So we're thrilled today to have received the Nobel Peace Prize for Twenty Twenty there are a thousand, two, hundred, and fifty will food program start working in south Sudan. Relieve your hunger for and feed more than five million people a year and clearly south Sudan for the World Food Program is one of the most complex operations. A country that's face decades of violence. But it's also having to Manage Economic Downturn Cove nineteen locust infestation more violence which continues persistently and now more recently floods have affected more than eight hundred, thousand people. So for all of WFP in south Sudan a country where we were very hard to to demonstrate the link between violence and hunger and try and stop that link rake that that relationship so that we can actually change people's lives for the better future for us. This is just an amazing day. It is certainly excellent use agency for the more than twelve hundred workers on the ground. You say, maybe you could give me some insight into what they're doing not just in terms of the emergency following the devastating flooding that had which has been the worst in decades. I remember you briefing is just a couple of weeks ago on this, but also in terms of the development projects on the ground to help. Resilience for these communities can go home. So in South Sudan Kaley, there is a massive emergency failure of work given the enormity of the food insecurity problem that the country faces and only in the last five years we faced thirty one pockets of famine. It gives you an idea about how significant the problem is here, but it's not the only problem that we need to face and it's not an emergency response is not the only tool. In all too. But obviously what we're also trying to tune in south Sudan is really the poster child for bringing Emergency Response Development activities and this building activities together as warm and part of that obviously is to change the fundamental problems that are faced by so many south Sydney citizen's issues of isolation, the issues of inequality and yet criti- and marginalization all of which creates the breeding ground or conflict and violence. So through our programs where we`re Supporting rural farmers to be more productive to have enough food for their own communities. But more importantly to create a surplus that they can trade with other communities to link those communities together to link farmer's markets and other markets and thereby creating a positive relationship across ethnic divides US Mutiti divides. Can Act they bring people together these. These that we want to invest more. Easily. Recognized I think in this these fries today and it's not just south Saddam redoing these things but also fundamentally desperately trying to show but those that would manipulate burst the time and have manipulated in the past I held accountable so that this change in south Sudan, it's a country that frankly we've been in for fifty years too long and we aim to make sure that we are not needed in this country. We've talked to make those linkages between development aid and is go and obviously we wish you very best to that and your teams in very difficult circumstances millions have been experiencing displacement and conflicts just last week the Human Rights Council highlighted a report that talked about the use of starvation. As a weapon of war, we've heard even worse than that soldiers being offered the chance to rape women in communities in you of payment I mean, you just can't imagine the kind of conditions. But when you go into a community with the WFP Bana, what is it that the agency brings? What is the agency's added value? So in South Sudan because we've built relationships with communities of the decades of presence here because we are, you know twelve hundred plus strong organization with presence across ten states and a deep relationship with the communities we serve where known entity and we have the logistics tools in our toolbox to be able to access areas. We the helicopters, planes, all-terrain vehicles, canoes, bogs, boats you. We have an enduring sir. We're able to meet people's needs when they're the worst, but we're also able to support organizations other organizations as well as community leaders themselves to make a difference in their communities. So what we are. From perspective able to do is anyone really Priam? Times as a facilitator to bring you a organizations to bring communities together that typically have had problems coming together in this country since twenty eleven since its independence country who vicious periods of civil war and has persistent national conflict local conflict walk WFP has is now trying to do is trying to ensure that our food security presence. Can Be used by other partners because we in this on our own to really facilitate a change in this environment, a fundamental change in what is causing an enabling violence to contain one

South Sudan South Sudan Kaley WFP Twenty Twenty UN Matthew Lyndale United States Human Rights Council Johnson Rape Sydney
"twenty twenty nobel" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

03:15 min | 6 months ago

"twenty twenty nobel" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science I'm Steve Mirsky. On October seventh Jennifer Dowden and Emmanuel Sharpen Ta shared the Twenty Twenty Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the development of the gene editing tool called crisper last April I spoke with Dowden at an event in Washington DC few months ago I was at a talk about wine. And crisper came and it was it was an appropriate thing to bring up what is it like to be in this field right now where everyone is talking about the work that you do and its implications Well I have to say it's very exciting and it's As a scientist wonderful to see all the creative work that's going on with gene editing. It's just a fascinating opportunity to see the innovation people come up with when they have a tool that. So broadly useful across biology. You do a million interviews and you make a lot of public talks. What do people not talk to you about that? You would love to talk about regarding, crisper Well I. Think a lot of the discussion around crisper right now focuses on biomedical applications, which clearly are very exciting i. think something that I don't hear as much although happy to hear that you had this conversation at a wine event. Are the opportunities agriculture I think they're going to be huge and I'm really really excited about the opportunities to use gene editing to create plants that will be drought tolerant. Resistant. Maybe more nutritious Give. Opportunities to go plants in environments where in the past they've been really challenging to grow. It's just the range of applications is just seemingly endless. I think in the wine talk, we were discussing the threats to viniculture from global warming, right, and one of the possible applications there is to get the more heat tolerant organisms to chip in. The Birds Yeah I know you talk about the ethical considerations on. Anything you'd like to discuss. Considerations are incredibly important. People get very excited and and concerned appropriately I think on occasion about opportunities to use gene editing in systems where you know, we really need to be thoughtful about the responsible use where there are great opportunities but also big big challenges. Of course, a very obvious one is in the human germline embryo editing, but also frankly also in microbes and other organisms that could be released into the environment using gene editing to spread genetic traits in a mode called gene drives. So that's another area where there's a lot of discussion about. How careful we need to be, how do we regulate this technology appropriately? Science to advance but do it in a way that's responsible. For Scientific. Americans. Sixty seconds science I'm Steve Mirsky..

Steve Mirsky Jennifer Dowden Twenty Twenty Nobel Emmanuel Sharpen Ta scientist Washington
"twenty twenty nobel" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

Monocle 24: Midori House

07:15 min | 6 months ago

"twenty twenty nobel" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

"So in the case of abortion and pence well among a very hardcore group of of Republican pro-life Christians the overturning Roe v Wade and state banning. Own Abortions in the state by state basis is very popular. That's not so popular Americans in general and similarly with Harris there's lots of people in the in the Democratic Party who do support opening supreme and potentially introducing a more liberal justices but it is a position which is considered radical by many Americans so it was revealing their evasions were revealing of kind of an interesting disjuncture. Between I, think the backbone of the support of the two major parties and the average American voter and page the tone last night. As I, mentioned couldn't have been more different to me than not that we saw between Joe Biden on Donald Trump last week in Cleveland Ohio there was an attempt to bring level of civility that was absent from the presidential debates last week. Mike Pence. Even at one stage congratulated the Harris Song, the historic nature of her candidacy to the democratic tickets. What did you make? What struck you most about common the Harris's performance in Salt Lake? City. Last night. I. Think Kamala Harris was was certainly more more civil I. Think. Then than I would been up there I think she was very composed of the time and most of her reactions. Sort of you could see the facial expressions there was a lot of eyebrow raising I'm sort of everything bar an I roll. Which I think was a given some of the statements that pence made certainly a well-founded. But you know even in dealing with pencils interruptions of course it the trump biden debate we had biden tell trump to shut up I mean Harris had a more elegant way of saying that and she said, Mr Vice President I'm speaking which is now kind of done the rounds on on twitter and on the Internet as well and Henry was saying. I mean with the reproductive rights specifically, there actually really stood out to me as well and you know even though we had pence a sort of saying I'm pro-life it was really important I think to have come Harris. They're saying very vehemently that she was pro choice it's just think. With everything that's happening around the Supreme Court. The moment there's a lot of people all kind of afraid about rowing weight and afraid about kind of a back rolling on reproductive rights as a have a woman that high up I think implicit who life asserting their definitely gave me a little bit a little bit of of reassurance while next year on the late edition. This was the announcement that was made by the Nobel. Literature Committee in Stockholm this morning. And Literature for Twenty, twenty is awarded to the American poetry's click. For her unmistakable poetic voice that we've austere beauty makes individual existence Universal Matt's mountain the Permanent Secretary of the Swedish Academy announcing that the American poet Louis Glick is the recipient of the Twenty Twenty Nobel Prize in literature page to start with you. Click is a very familiar name in US poetry circles her work as one most of the notable literary prizes in the United States but she might not be a household name too many of the rest of us what do you make of the decision to board the price to her this year? I'll be honest was I'm one of those people who have actually come across her work. But I must say I'm glad that that it's it's a woman the the Nobel prize doesn't have a really great track record of diversity and you know I think given the scandal the unfolded lost. Jarrett's also you know reassuring that she doesn't have any links to to war criminals or anything like that. So I think you know the Nobel Prize have done certainly a better job than than they did in previous years and just kind of a bit of a background on some of her walk. I mean having just had a brief read that it deals a lot with sadness and with isolation which I think is very sort of pressing. Issues the everyone in the world is dealing with right now given everything that's going on And you know hopefully there's there is going to be some change in terms of how. The day will prize kind of goes about a awarding people particularly in terms of diversity of course, it's great that she's a woman but I was just reading that there are more Jones that have won Nobel prizes in the are Africans and so I think there's still a long way to go there and I think a few people were PAPP's a bit disappointed that again, the winner was from kind of North America from Europe and not really branching out So I think those definitely scope the scope for change the and Henry Line in this citation that we heard that little moments ago that licks work makes. The individual experience universal. That might read like Classic Line Sorry for Party of of Literary Work this idea as page touched on that we're told by living in a more individualistic society in many parts of the world at the moment animal tribal wanted to does the Nobel Committee in Sweden seem to have a point there. Would you say by awarding work like Clicks the highest prize in literature this year Thomas be honest with you I couldn't be less qualified to answer that question I. Think he should come back to me when they give it to Russia Hungary for his work on the misdemeanor series, but I will. Use Pages observation about diversity implementation of the prize kind of springboard if you let me. Just to kind of zoom out and look at the prize and the politics of it from from a bird's eye view, which is I think art now more than ever is being judged by political as well as aesthetic standards, and in recent years, major legacy culture institutions have been getting caught up in this left right and center. I think the most recent example from just this month in fact. Last month rather forget we're not Tober is the announcement, the a touring show of the modernist painter Philip Guston's work put together by. Several reiterated from the musicians in both sides of the Atlantic modern in London and the Museum of fine. Arts in Boston is going to be postponed until twenty, twenty four. And the justification for this is they're gonNA, put it off, and I quote until a time at which we think that the powerful message of social and racial injustices that's at the center of Philip Guston's work can be more clearly interpreted. which was decision the. Go, huge backlash from the art world for basically being that committee on the part of these of these institutions and essentially. An active of ducking responsibility for confronting the public with work, which is substantive and speaks to two issues which brought today. I think considering the controversies which the noble prices faced in recent years. One of the writers I think that page mentioned this one of the writers awarded the Literature Prize in two, thousand, nine hundred and was accused of minimizing war crimes committed in the Balkan conflict before that in two thousand.

Kamala Harris Nobel prize Mike Pence Joe Biden Twenty Twenty Nobel Philip Guston Democratic Party Henry Line Nobel Donald Trump Ohio United States Literature Committee Literary Work Cleveland Roe Nobel Committee Boston Supreme Court Salt Lake
"twenty twenty nobel" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

Monocle 24: Midori House

08:12 min | 6 months ago

"twenty twenty nobel" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

"After last night's vice presidential debate in Salt Lake City Donald Trump says that he will not take part in the next presidential debate. If as proposed, it is held virtually poetry. Please the Twenty Twenty Nobel Prize in literature has been awarded to Louise Glick the American poet and presidential pooches should us presidents pets your net terms in the White House Monaco's editors and correspondence take on those stories today here on the Late Edition on Monaco twenty. Four. Jalan under. Very warm. Welcome t to the Late Edition here on monocle twenty four. It is Thursday the eighth of October and I am Thomas. Lewis here in Toronto and joining us today to cost there is across the day's top stories are Henry certain who joins us from New York City monocle twenty, four page Reynolds who's not Midori House in London forest page, Henry, week treating you both so far yeah I. Mean Mine Has Been Pretty Sensational. I've just come back from a from a trip upstate to a small town called Venetia also incorporating a tour of a woodstock of the famous festival of nine, hundred, sixty eight, which now is kind of a caricature of itself. Love weather up there. Lots of hiking. I feel oxygenated the weeks been espionage. Okay. Tomas, I actually have also just come back from my own little trip I made it to I made it to Athens outside of se five So I'm I'm pretty I'm pretty excited feeding revitalized I mean I've come straight back into US kind of presidential election madness but you know all good. Won't be checking my mailbox page fuel Prescott from. Athens, I'll be waiting a coil spring for that page Henry Great Savvy to this on the program today. Well, let's begin in the US where Donald Trump has sides online that the next presidential debate sheduled for next week will be a waste of his time that he won't take part in it following the announcement by the Commission on. Presidential debates that the event scheduled to take place in Miami will be held virtually following the president's positive test for Covid nineteen. This latest spat from the president comes a day off to the vice presidential debate in Salt Lake City in which Mike Pence and Kamala Harris traded contrasting views on subjects ranging from race in the United States healthcare and the future of the US. Supreme. Court. Here is one of the Nice most memorable moments where the moderator USA Today's Washington Bureau Chief Susan Page asked come the Harris about to corona virus vaccine for life to get back to normal Dr, Anthony Fauci and other experts say that most of the people who can be back stated need vaccinated but half of Americans now say they wouldn't take a vaccine if it was released now. If the trump administration improves the vaccine before after the election should Americans take it and would you take it? If the public. Health professionals if Dr. If the doctors tell us that we should take it I'll be the first in line to take it absolutely. But if Donald, trump tells us that we should take it I'm not taking. Hundred Vice President Mike Pence retorted to that comment that Senator Harris should not be shaking the public's confidence in the safety of a potential current virus vaccine which president trump has vowed will be ready by the end of the year but opinion polls on this subject suggests that a majority of those surveyed also expressed suspicion about the safety of oxygene vouched for by Donald Trump alone. Jacob parakeets is a commentator on US affairs at the ideas. Think Tank in London antiques brings to us on the globalist today. Last night's debate gained more attention than usual. I, think in this particular race, it's a bit more significant than usual not least because the president currently has a deadly virus. Now he may very well recover indeed the odds are in favor of him recovering. But what we've seen is that this is a virus that comes out unexpected ways and is particularly dangerous to the elderly men and overweight people all of which described Donald. Trump Joe. Biden is hardly united. He's three years older that Donald Trump and of course mail though I I believe he's more in. Line with normal ranges for obesity. But the point is that they're both demographically vulnerable to this particular pandemic, and despite the precautions that both sides are taking ethic has to be said with varying degrees of seriousness Biden has taken generally much more seriously than trump that they are both you know in in more danger from the ongoing pandemic than the average president in the average election year. So the the vice president as under study is a much more significant possible factor, but there's also the fact that pence. And Harris in different ways service sort of outreach to different parts of the Democratic and Republican coalitions. Pence is I would describe him as a human permission structure for Evangelical Voters to vote for Donald trump the top of the ticket may be thrice-divorced may have had an affair with a porn star and paid hush money to cover it up but below him there pence this very severe of religiously conservative guy that gives evangelical at least some permission to say well, there's someone of faith on the ticket Harris. A democratic coalition, which is increasingly diverse and increasingly speaks for most if not all of the non white parts of the United States Harris, a half black half indian-american Canada and a woman speaks to the sort of the idea of representation of demographic diversity in a way that old white man Joe Biden really doesn't Jacob. Speaking to a little Elliott today Henry, it struck me watching the debates last night that is the tone being totally different the chaos of the first presidential debate last week in. CLEVELAND. Ohio the both the vice presidential comes it's pretty effectively wriggle their way round the questions nonce them if at all on some occasions in the way, exactly they wanted to fit the script of their respective campaigns. That's right I think they were to a they. Are the most revealing one from Harris. On one from Pence Harris came on the question of packing the Supreme Court this idea which is broad in some democratic circles that the number of justices on the Supreme Court should be expanded as a way of combating what they perceive to be a shift right towards of the courts with many justices haven't been appointed by by. Trump most recently following the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg trump now threatening to appoint judge Amy Coney Barrett to will be among the most conservative on on the bench. Now Harris has previously said that she is open to expanding the number of justices on the Supreme Court. But when pressed on that in the debate. She She Didn't go as far as to ESTA endorse position full-throatedly. An pence's part. Addressing the question of whether Eve Roe v Wade was overturned by the Supreme Court. Would he support a ban on all abortions in his home state of Indiana? Asserted that he was pro-life. He's one of the most prominent Pro Christians in American politics he didn't go so far as to say that he would support such a ban on all abortions and I think what connects these two dodges on different issues by different politicians on different sides of the aisle is that it's an example of both of them kind of walking a tight rope on issues which over other positions, which are Paul Pillar within their own parties but less popular among Americans at large..

Donald Trump Senator Harris Mike Pence president US Joe Biden Vice President Twenty Twenty Nobel Supreme Court Salt Lake City Late Edition Athens Henry London White House Monaco obesity Louise Glick Paul Pillar
"twenty twenty nobel" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

08:05 min | 6 months ago

"twenty twenty nobel" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"With Kellyanne Conway and other infected people. In New Jersey former governor Chris Christie remains hospitalized with covid nineteen with no word on his condition president trump's attorney Rudy Giuliani said, Wednesday. He's taking the Anti Malarial Drug Hydroxy Chloroquine to ward off cove nineteen infection after spending hours last week with President Trump Chris Christie and other officials have since tested positive hydroxy Clarken was once touted by trump is a. Miracle Cure Though clinical studies show it has no effect treating covid nineteen and as potentially lethal side Effects Giuliani is not quarantining and says, he'll take another corona virus test Friday on Tuesday, he appeared mask loss as he addressed a crowd of dozens of people at a gop fundraiser in Manhattan a day earlier, Giuliani his way through an interview on Fox News. The daily beast reports the White House quietly informed a veterans group that family members of fallen soldiers may have been exposed to corona virus at an event hosted by president trump and vice president, Mike Pence at the White House dozens of Gold Star family members many of them elderly pack the East Room on September twenty seventh for the event seeded shoulder to shoulder and not wearing masks across the United States Corona virus cases continue to climb with more than fifty two thousand new infections reported on Wednesday. The death toll is approaching two, hundred, twelve thousand, and nearly half a million US residents have been hospitalized with covid nineteen. Since the start of the pandemic Wisconsin Governor Tony Evers has issued an emergency order limiting indoor gatherings as a massive outbreak in eastern Wisconsin threatened to overwhelm hospitals. Boston officials have suspended the reopening of public schools after a rise in new cases here in New York leaders of the Orthodox Jewish community clashed with Governor, Andrew Cuomo over newly issued corona virus restrictions on houses of worship. In Brooklyn mostly unmasked groups of Orthodox men took to the streets in protests that turned violent lighting fires, waving Donald Trump flags and attacking a Jewish journalist. For the first time and it's two hundred, eight year history. The New England Journal of Medicine. has weighed in on a US election calling on voters to reject Donald Trump. The Journal's editors wrote quote our current political leaders have demonstrated their dangerously incompetent should not have them and enable the deaths of thousands more Americans by allowing them to keep their jobs unquote meanwhile, the former director of the Centers for disease. Control and prevention called on current CDC Director Robert. Field. To orchestrate his own firing in order to expose the trump administration's incompetent handling of the pandemic in a letter dated September twenty third and obtained by USA Today William. Faguy asks Redfield to. To CDC, EMPLOYEES FOR ACQUIESCING TO DONALD TRUMP, and to publicly repudiate his administration. Faguy writes quote the failure of the White House to put the CDC in charge has resulted in the violation of every lesson learned in last seventy five years that made CDC the gold standard for public health and the World Faguy added. When they fire you, this will be a multi week story and you can hold your head high unquote. On the campaign trail Republican candidates for the House and Senate are increasingly distancing themselves from Donald Trump in Arizona. Republican. Senator mark the next Sally who trails Democratic challenger Astronaut Mark Kelly by double digits and recent polls refused to answer a debate moderator night who asked her if she's proud of her support for trump. Senator, the question was are you proud of your support for president trump? I'm proud to be fighting for Arizona every single day. For President. On President Trump's desk. So you're proud of your support for. The legislation we put on his desk gets to cut Arizona tax. It sounds like she is proud of her support. For Arizona. Texas is Supreme. Court has ruled officials. In Harris, county may not send mail in ballot applications to all two point four million registered voters. Harris County is home to Houston and his Texas is most populous region with a far greater proportion of democratic voters and other parts of Texas. In, Northern California, the August complex financial has become the first GIGA fire in California state history consuming more than a million acres across seven counties an area larger than the state of Rhode Island. The San Francisco Bay area has extended a spare. The air alerts through today with the air quality index forecast top one hundred and unhealthy reading to smoke from the nearby glass. Fire. New Climate data show surface air temperatures around the globe set an all time high for the month of September edging out the previous record set last year satellite data show the average extent of Arctic Sea ice was at the second lowest level ever recorded last month carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere climbed to four hundred, ten parts per million far above pre industrial levels. In Greece an Athens court ruled Wednesday, the neo-fascist Party Golden Dawn was a criminal organization tying the party to a series of tax on migrants and left wing activists. The ruling concluded a five year trial that could have implications for the far right throughout Europe The Guardian cold at the biggest trial of fascist since Nuremberg thousands rejoiced at the news. This is Greek prime minister. CARIOCAS midst of Tuchus. For. She to Lucifer to couple up with today's decision by a three member Criminal Court of Appeals on the actions of Golden Dawn. Traumatic Psycho in the public life of the country of comes to a close. It's political dimensions has fortunately been judged is a victory of the Republic which expelled the Nazi formation from parliament. Now, the independent judiciary give its answer. Back. In the US Jacob Blake has left the hospital in Milwaukee more than six weeks after the black father was shot seven times in the back by Kenosha police paralyzing him from the wake down Blake's lawyer said, Wednesday. He's still in recovery to see our interview with his father also named Jacob Blake can go to democracy. Now Dot Org Derek Chovanec the white former Minneapolis police officer who kill George Floyd was released from custody Wednesday after posting a one million dollar bond. And faces a second degree murder charge for pressing his knee into George Floyd's neck for more than nine minutes and video seen around the world Minnesota Governor Tim Walls called out the national guard Wednesday evening as hundreds marched on Minneapolis, fifth police precinct to protest show WTN's release. American poet Louise Quebec has been awarded the Twenty Twenty Nobel Prize in literature on Wednesday, the Nobel Prize in Chemistry, which award to Jennifer, Duda and Emmanuel Carpentier for their work on a gene editing tool called crisper cast nine. It's the first time the award has gone to two women. And in breaking news president, trump has rejected the committee on presidential debates decision to conduct. Next Thursday's debate is a virtual town meeting with the candidates participating from separate remote locations in a video posted to trump's twitter feed. As we went to air trump said quote I'm not going to do a virtual debate with Democratic challenger Biden. President trump is infected with the corona virus and those are some of the headlines. This is democracy. Now, democracy now dot org the quarantine report. When we come back, we'll are excerpts of last night's debate and speak to the Reverend William Barber of the poor people's campaign and a bowl of survivor doctor Craig Spencer Director.

Donald Trump President Trump Chris Christie president trump US Arizona White House Rudy Giuliani CDC Kellyanne Conway vice president Wisconsin Director New Jersey President Tony Evers Texas Chloroquine Fox News
"twenty twenty nobel" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

06:19 min | 6 months ago

"twenty twenty nobel" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

". Welcome to the broken brain podcast where we dive deep. . Into the topics of Neuro Plasticity, , EPA genetics, , mindfulness, , and functional medicine I'm your host droid and each week my team and I bring on a new guest who we think can help you improve your brain health feel better and most importantly live more. . This week's guest is Dr Liu Ignarro. . Dr Narrow is a medical research scientist who was awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine for. . His breakthrough discovery of Nitric Oxide, , N., , O. N., , how it positively impacts health and longevity especially hard health his groundbreaking research on nitric oxide pave the way for among many other innovations Viagra. . A Very well-known medication to a lot of individuals were recently by the way nitric oxide is currently being investigated over the world in hospitals and universities as a possible treatment and intervention for. . COVID, , nineteen Dr Narrow is a distinguished professor emeritus of molecular and medical pharmacology at the University of California Los. . Angeles and he has his PhD in Pharmacology with over thirty years of experience in teaching doctor Dr Welcome to the brokering podcast. . It's an honor to have you here with the honor is all mine drew. . It's great to be here and I really look forward to. . Talking about good health effects. . Absolutely, , in preparation for the interview, , I was listening to pretty much all your content that I could get my hands on online and I've seen you mentioned in numerous. . Speeches and talks about. . Teaching is so central to who you are nothing fires you up more than explaining concept and then seeing a student that light bulb moment where they get it and I just want to say where did that come from before we jump into everything we're doing a passion for teaching come from while I can tell you clearly my passion for teaching, , which is every bit as as large as my passion for a discovery or original research. . My my passion for teaching came early when I was in elementary school and high school and you know why? ? Because I had lousy teachers and I would always sit there and wonder why can't these people explain something better than what I could. . Read in the Damn Book. . You know they're there to teach your up in front of the room teach and impart your information to this edens so that we can understand it and I swore that if ever the day came when I would be a university professor, , I would not do it their way. . I would do it my way and try to become the best teacher I could, , and I've always had this passion for communicating with students <hes> I love that that's incredible and we'll come back to that. . In your origin story. . I want to take a moment to congratulate you because we're coming up on the twenty second anniversary of your Nobel Prize I believe you got the prize. . In October. . Twenty two years ago. . Does that sound right? ? You very good at this very, , very good. . Yes. . I the announcement of my Nobel Prize was an October twelve. . Of One, , thousand nine, , hundred, , Ninety, eight, , , and you know this coming Monday October fifth the Twenty Twenty Nobel Prizes will be announced. . So get ready. . You one thing I don't know who's going to get it. . But I'M NOT GONNA get it a second time. . That one is enough. . One is fantastic. . Especially one as powerful as the one that you've gotten, , we should awe only hope and dream that we can have direction i WanNa talk about your basis of the work for receiving the Nobel Prize for discoveries concerning nitric oxide as a signaling molecule in the cardiovascular system. . Let's start off with the basics what is nitric oxide and how's it so fundamentally related to our health and function. . That's a great question would require a about a week to answer but I will try to do it in a couple of minutes. . Nitric oxide firstly, , I want to remind everyone is not a gas I I mean is not a liquid or solid, , but rather it's a gas. . It's a gaseous substance that only lasts for a few seconds. It's . very unstable. . This is what made it so difficult to find in the <hes> in the human body, , and that's why the discovery came. . So late in the nineteen eighties and so essentially. . What I discovered was that our bodies produce this molecule of nitric oxide which should not be confused with nitrous oxide. . That's laughing gas, , and that's what's used in a dentist office, , for example, , to relieve pain. . Nitric oxide although it sounds the same is a totally different <hes> molecule and. . What we discovered was that our arteries, , our endothelial cells that line the arteries actually make this nitric oxide and what nitric oxide does is phenomenal. . It's Vasil later. . It widens the arteries and when it does that it lowers the blood pressure, , it improves blood flow to different Oregon's was your dilating the arteries and. . In addition, , this nitric oxide can keep the inner lining of the arteries healthy so that blood does not clot a when it's not supposed to in the arteries also prevents cholesterol plaques from depositing in the arteries. . So as long as you keep making nitric oxide in those endothelial cells, , it will keep your vascular system very healthy. . So one of the reasons we make nitric oxide is to protect our cardiovascular systems against high blood pressure. . Stroke and heart attack. .

Dr Narrow Dr Liu Ignarro Nobel Prize
This Miracle Molecule will Supercharge Your Health with Nobel Prize Winner Dr. Louis Ignarro

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

06:19 min | 6 months ago

This Miracle Molecule will Supercharge Your Health with Nobel Prize Winner Dr. Louis Ignarro

"Welcome to the broken brain podcast where we dive deep. Into the topics of Neuro Plasticity, EPA genetics, mindfulness, and functional medicine I'm your host droid and each week my team and I bring on a new guest who we think can help you improve your brain health feel better and most importantly live more. This week's guest is Dr Liu Ignarro. Dr Narrow is a medical research scientist who was awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine for. His breakthrough discovery of Nitric Oxide, N., O. N., how it positively impacts health and longevity especially hard health his groundbreaking research on nitric oxide pave the way for among many other innovations Viagra. A Very well-known medication to a lot of individuals were recently by the way nitric oxide is currently being investigated over the world in hospitals and universities as a possible treatment and intervention for. COVID, nineteen Dr Narrow is a distinguished professor emeritus of molecular and medical pharmacology at the University of California Los. Angeles and he has his PhD in Pharmacology with over thirty years of experience in teaching doctor Dr Welcome to the brokering podcast. It's an honor to have you here with the honor is all mine drew. It's great to be here and I really look forward to. Talking about good health effects. Absolutely, in preparation for the interview, I was listening to pretty much all your content that I could get my hands on online and I've seen you mentioned in numerous. Speeches and talks about. Teaching is so central to who you are nothing fires you up more than explaining concept and then seeing a student that light bulb moment where they get it and I just want to say where did that come from before we jump into everything we're doing a passion for teaching come from while I can tell you clearly my passion for teaching, which is every bit as as large as my passion for a discovery or original research. My my passion for teaching came early when I was in elementary school and high school and you know why? Because I had lousy teachers and I would always sit there and wonder why can't these people explain something better than what I could. Read in the Damn Book. You know they're there to teach your up in front of the room teach and impart your information to this edens so that we can understand it and I swore that if ever the day came when I would be a university professor, I would not do it their way. I would do it my way and try to become the best teacher I could, and I've always had this passion for communicating with students I love that that's incredible and we'll come back to that. In your origin story. I want to take a moment to congratulate you because we're coming up on the twenty second anniversary of your Nobel Prize I believe you got the prize. In October. Twenty two years ago. Does that sound right? You very good at this very, very good. Yes. I the announcement of my Nobel Prize was an October twelve. Of One, thousand nine, hundred, Ninety, eight, and you know this coming Monday October fifth the Twenty Twenty Nobel Prizes will be announced. So get ready. You one thing I don't know who's going to get it. But I'M NOT GONNA get it a second time. That one is enough. One is fantastic. Especially one as powerful as the one that you've gotten, we should awe only hope and dream that we can have direction i WanNa talk about your basis of the work for receiving the Nobel Prize for discoveries concerning nitric oxide as a signaling molecule in the cardiovascular system. Let's start off with the basics what is nitric oxide and how's it so fundamentally related to our health and function. That's a great question would require a about a week to answer but I will try to do it in a couple of minutes. Nitric oxide firstly, I want to remind everyone is not a gas I I mean is not a liquid or solid, but rather it's a gas. It's a gaseous substance that only lasts for a few seconds. It's very unstable. This is what made it so difficult to find in the in the human body, and that's why the discovery came. So late in the nineteen eighties and so essentially. What I discovered was that our bodies produce this molecule of nitric oxide which should not be confused with nitrous oxide. That's laughing gas, and that's what's used in a dentist office, for example, to relieve pain. Nitric oxide although it sounds the same is a totally different molecule and. What we discovered was that our arteries, our endothelial cells that line the arteries actually make this nitric oxide and what nitric oxide does is phenomenal. It's Vasil later. It widens the arteries and when it does that it lowers the blood pressure, it improves blood flow to different Oregon's was your dilating the arteries and. In addition, this nitric oxide can keep the inner lining of the arteries healthy so that blood does not clot a when it's not supposed to in the arteries also prevents cholesterol plaques from depositing in the arteries. So as long as you keep making nitric oxide in those endothelial cells, it will keep your vascular system very healthy. So one of the reasons we make nitric oxide is to protect our cardiovascular systems against high blood pressure. Stroke and heart attack.

Nobel Prize Twenty Twenty Nobel Nitrous Oxide Dr Liu Ignarro Dr Narrow EPA Research Scientist Viagra Oregon Distinguished Professor Edens O. N. Angeles University Of California Los Professor
"twenty twenty nobel" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

The Economist: Babbage

04:31 min | 6 months ago

"twenty twenty nobel" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

"From Communist radio our weekly podcast on technology and science. I'm Kenneth Cookie a senior editor at the economist, and this week will explore the science that has been recognized in this year's Nobel prizes. We'll hear from some of this year's winners and find out about their groundbreaking work from the identification of an unknown virus to the mysteries of the Cosmos to editing the code of life itself. The prizes were established in the will of Alfred. Nobel a nineteenth century scientist and entrepreneur who among other things was the inventor of dynamite each year three science prizes for medicine or physiology for physics and chemistry are awarded on three consecutive days. Each is worth about a million dollars. I'm joined by the economists signed Senator Jeff Car, and science correspondent Alex Off Welcome Jeff Hello Alec. So Jeff. Let me start by asking part from the cash. What's all the fuss about? Why do people think the no bells are so important why do they matter events? Prizes are hundred years old now at a very long time they were the only prizes on the block there been some new candidates for prizes recently, but Nobel has the cash little good works being rewarded to that way. It's an incumbent, they go through the first. Keeping IT and Alec Disa- Media Hubbub reflect the real importance within the scientific community, for example, compared to the other prizes. That, the awards given by the Nobel Committee deserving of high honor and attention, and so if you look at it that way, then it's it's probably a good thing that turned this attention on quite arcane bits of science. Sometimes, that's not to say that the things that the Nobels award are the only things worth paying attention to you and I think that's one of the criticisms sometimes is that every Nobel winner that wins the Nobel deserves it but not everyone who serves Nobel wins a prize. Let's step back a second and ask ourselves A. Question, which is. Controversy courts the literature and the peace prizes. There's oddities about the signs Nobel's to it's sometimes rewards work that was done fifty years ago and other times work. That was done in the last decade only three people can win each prize and one can only pose the question. Does this really reflect modern science the answer? No. Absolutely not the idea that three people can be awarded for a modern scientific endeavour is you know it's quite laughable actually because. Of Science today is done without the help of hundreds of people sometimes thousand, the NOBELS Kinda stuck. But in a way the fact they've not changed or refuse to change despite all the criticism is partly a factor. The fact that they also respect respected and didn't need to change the still have that cachet other prizes are they're trying to fill the gaps of the break three prizes funded by various tech billionaires give a bit more specific prices on more modern ways of doing science and. They give more of them and that bigger as well. Actually three million dollars each and then as the cavalier prizes which fun things like none of science and astrophysics. So you know other people with money trying to get it on night belfact. So the prices have their quirks but of course, what really matters is the scientific work they put under the spotlight and the first of the science prizes to be announced on Monday morning is always for physiology or medicine the Nobel Assembly at Karolinska Institute. Has. Today decided to ward the twenty twenty Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine jointly to Harvey. J Alter Michael Houghton and Charles Amr is. Speaking at the official press conference the Secretary General of the Nobel Assembly Thomas Perlman noted that he had some trouble reaching them at first. Phone started ringing shells rice one of the new Lords speaking at the media event at Rockefeller University. Initially I was Well,.

Nobel Nobel Prize Nobel Committee Nobel Assembly Senator Jeff Car Alec Disa Kenneth Cookie Nobels Jeff Hello Alec Alfred Alter Michael Houghton senior editor Rockefeller University Thomas Perlman scientist Alex Off Karolinska Institute Charles Amr official
3 scientists win Nobel physics prize for black hole research

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 6 months ago

3 scientists win Nobel physics prize for black hole research

"Three physicists involved in the search for black holes were awarded the Nobel Prize for physics in the nineteen sixties Roger Penrose leaned heavily on Einstein's theory of relativity to prove the likelihood of black holes some thirty years later in the nineteen nineties driven right hard against an American entry again as headed teams of astronomers who located a massive black hole at the center of the Milky Way everything is you have to prove to yourself that you're really seeing what you think you're sitting all three have been honored as a share of the twenty twenty Nobel Prize for physics gaz in astronomy and physics professor at UCLA is just the fourth woman to win the Nobel Prize in physics I'm

Nobel Prize Roger Penrose Einstein Professor Ucla
Virus scales down December Nobel peace prize award ceremony

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 7 months ago

Virus scales down December Nobel peace prize award ceremony

"The awards ceremony for the twenty twenty Nobel Peace Prize usually held at the Oslo city hold on December ten would instead be held in a scaled down form at the city's university because of the corona virus outbreak the director of the Norwegian Nobel institute the body that oversees the Nobel Peace Prize says it's a strange and challenging year in many ways with the need to get things done in a new way as well as the peace prize award scaled down ceremonies for the all the prizes physics chemistry physiology medicine and literature as well as the economics prize will be awarded in Stockholm Sweden on the same day organizes also scheduling smaller ceremonies because of the pandemic I'm Charles the last month

Director Norwegian Nobel Institute Sweden Charles Oslo Stockholm
"twenty twenty nobel" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"twenty twenty nobel" Discussed on AP News

"With Poland in shaping the European Union without Britain following talks in Walsall with Poland's president Akon called for a revival of try natural ties with Germany edging a summit meeting in coming weeks following years of hiatus he said the three countries should resume their role in shaping the use future especially after Britain's departure last week Akon had previously been critical of problems right wing government and its policies of refusing to accept migrants continuing reliance on coal and trying to bring the judiciary on the political control but Khan said he would like his visit to be a turning point in bilateral relations and for any misunderstandings to be cleared up Swedish teenage climate activists credit ten book has been nominated for the twenty twenty Nobel Peace Prize by two lawmakers in her home country the two members of Sweden's left parties said Monday the tune bug had worked hard to make politicians open their eyes to the climate crisis ten beaucoup seventeen has encourage students to skip school to join protests demanding foster action on climate change a movement that has spread beyond Sweden all the European nations around the world the Norwegian Nobel committee doesn't publicly comment on nominations which for twenty twenty had to be submitted by February first the president tweeted out his congrats to the Kansas City Chiefs for their Super Bowl win but as the peas my camp report see fumbled at trump tweeted his congratulations to the cheese for a fantastic comeback he added you represented the great state of Kansas and in fact the entire USA so well our country is proud of you although the Missouri Kansas state line divides metropolitan Kansas city the team itself is based on the Missouri side between has since been deleted but not before going viral and new messages been posted congratulated the team and of the great state of Missouri.

twenty twenty Norwegian Nobel Missouri USA Kansas trump Kansas City Chiefs Poland Sweden Khan Germany Akon president Walsall Britain European Union