36 Burst results for "Twenty Seven Years"

Italian Wine and Music

Travel with Rick Steves

04:11 min | Last week

Italian Wine and Music

"To start. I thought we could all use a touch of the simple pleasures of life has enjoyed in italy. Aband- from or veto has fun with the popular songs. People like to request in italy. And just a bit. Let's warm up with virtual sip of the great types of wine. They've been producing for centuries. Our guides are francesco clunky. He's a licensed so may from tuscany. and alberto. Batak specializes in farm and food tours in the companion region around naples francesco. Alfredo benvenuti run journal. Nice to have you guys hear clearly. Alfredo italian wine and vineyards earn an important part of the tradition of italy. And you're making your own wine now and you've got tour groups that come in and and experienced the wine. How do you teach an appreciation of italian wine. Well actually i'm just implanted my vineyard only two years ago so we are not yet at the stage of producing and also having groups arriving back in the future i plan to do so and i am not the only one who's Starting a new vineyard region which is compound yeah and Precisely maybe near is in the area of europeana which is close to a sexually between avellino benevento and It's a process that many young people in companion starting to do again like going back to the land. That families said abandoned for many years when they moved to the cities to work there now. Many people are thinking it's a good idea to restart producing implanting nervion yards but being not a professional of this sector economic implant to limit it a quantity which is called italy personal use quantity. I know this sounds something. How many bottles is personal use. It's not in terms of bottles in surface you can you can. It's like actually One thousand square meters maximum. That quite small. It's all it's like nine thousand square feet and how many bottles you produce in a you can produce out of that probably Seven hundred hundred bottles sending like that depending on the year and the quick enough for you and your friends exactly. That's the idea. There's a blended personal use. That's a lot of energy. You're putting into y. You must really love wine. I love wine and does so actually starting in the same plot which is bigger. I started with the olive trees and planted to one hundred twenty seven years ago and then i told that wine and olive oil is a good commission. That's nice but you work all of this. Put all this energy all this money into that. You make seven hundred bottles. What if the winds not good and you love wine i. It'd be a pity to to drink mediocre wine when you've got great wine all around new well that's said it's a little bit of a challenge and also i'm not making my note may own and i'm gonna get people didn't make really expert help i. I'd love to hear how that goes in. When will you pop up your first bottle. I'm gonna start probably really producing in a couple of years from now all right and when we think of italian wine what makes it talion special compared to french or spanish wine. Well i i will say a french. And italian can be comparable in terms of the variety and quality and is actually what happens every year. This fighting between italy and france to be the best one for the year and in terms of production quality and varieties. The spanish winds are getting better and better. I used to live close to spin for a while in the nineties. I was into will go often over the border and drink some good spanish winds. They're improving. But i will not say that varies as much variety and as much quality. They'll be having these two countries italy and france and as Talking from the point of view Really a lot of variety like everything else in italy. One is regional specific varieties which are with aversive personality. Exactly and also in each region you can go through the different levels of quality and for example in my region panya we have five top winds which audio cg once and most of them are white but we also tout out to one name to you before.

Italy Francesco Clunky Alfredo Benvenuti Avellino Benevento New Vineyard Francesco Alberto Tuscany Naples France
Fresh update on "twenty seven years" discussed on Reveal

Reveal

00:42 min | 14 hrs ago

Fresh update on "twenty seven years" discussed on Reveal

"The centers for disease control and prevention estimates that around seven hundred women die from pregnancy related complications. Each year and that the majority of those deaths could be prevented. The rate of deaths for black moms is three to four times higher than the rate for white bombs. I talked to joy career perry an obgyn and founder of the national birth equity collaborative. We know that the united states has the worst outcomes for maternal health in any industrialized country in the world. I have a black. Darter is more likely to die in childbirth. Than i was when i had her twenty seven years ago. She told me that what. Bruce shared has heartbreaking similarities to the story. She's heard from so many families of women who died in childbirth. She advocated very much so for her own health. She was worried about not being heard not being listened to an ultimately she died in childbirth. And when we look about the different medical reasons that women are dying in childbirth things like hypertension high blood pressure or having a blood clot or having a heart attack. Despite income education and wait black women are still more likely to die. So it's not because we're not getting prenatal care. It's not because we are too obese or we don't listen when you control for all those things. We are still more likely to die so what happens. The difference is how they are treated and.

Centers For Disease Control An National Birth Equity Collabor Bruce Shared Obgyn Darter Perry Hypertension High Blood Pressu United States Heart Attack
Fox News, family of slain DNC staffer Seth Rich settle suit

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | Last week

Fox News, family of slain DNC staffer Seth Rich settle suit

"Fox news will have to pay a settlement to the family of a slain Democratic National Committee employee authorities in Washington DC say twenty seven year old Seth rich was shot to death in twenty sixteen and what they called a botched robbery attempt but that wasn't the news that fox news followers were getting rich's parents Joel and Mary sued over a fox article in commentary that their son had leaked DNC emails to wikileaks a lower court threw out the case but an appeals court reinstated it and in the end fox settled details on how much of a settlement weren't disclosed in a statement rich's parents say they hope the settlement will make the media more careful in the future I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Seth Rich Fox News DNC DC Washington Joel Mary FOX Rich Oscar Wells Gabriel
David Dinkins, New York's first Black mayor, dies at 93

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

04:36 min | Last week

David Dinkins, New York's first Black mayor, dies at 93

"Former new york city mayor. David dinkins passed away last night at the age of ninety three. Join now but the reverend al sharpton president the next action network and host of politics nation. Right here on. Msnbc and rev. i've met david dinkins in person because you. I met him through you. I think he was here to do at thirty rock to do an interview for your show. And i'm so excited to meet him. He was such a great man. What are you remember. most about David dinkins well. I knew david dinkins. Since i was a teenager when i was sixteen and started my national youth movement group. He was the lawyer that incorporated us and down through the years. We maintain the relationship. And sometimes i would argue would on call them names and one hundred be more strident and it took time to understand that. He had such grace even under the most tumultuous circumstances and i felt he should be more strident. He said al. You have to learn how to get the job done. Keep your eye on the prize. But i most remember. Is that when we were facing a police. Killing of a young man named ahmadou diablo. Who in the hell of forty one bullets was killed. Nine thousand nine hundred bullets for only gone in his debut. Stick in a key in the door and the police thought. They said they thought he had a weapon. He was just going home. They were looking for someone else and david dinkins. When we started protests every day we would go down to the police headquarters. The main one in new york and sit in and hundreds would be arrested. He called me one. One is at what time y'all have. The demonstrations was a former. I said ten in the morning. he's coming down. I said but we're getting arrested. He's out seeing the morning and he came down and went to one police plaza where he had been mayor and got on a knee way before colin cabinet. He took a knee and was arrested and had them cuffed him with congressman. Charlie rangel and himself and me and we went to jail fighting police reform that he started with that civilian complaint review board. He never left the struggle. He was not wanting to be loud and boisterous but he was firm and made real change happen. Yeah absolutely you know. We started off and we could see charlie rangel and james brown. Lots of people in the photos that are that. I don't know if you can see them. That are coming up as as you're talking and you know we started off by talking about the way that dinkins was taken out of office by rudy. Giuliani this rage. That giuliani stoked already. There in the police against what mayor dinkins wanted to do which was changed policing. I feel like we're kind of having a rerun of that conversation about black lives matter about whether or not police should be free to kill it will in black communities. He tried to do something about it. Wouldn't you take from that fight. Is it dispiriting to think that after great men like this have tried after. You've tried after we've had all of these movements. We're still fighting about this were you. Were you fight you win. You don't fight to say the fight is over in a certain amount of rows. This is not pro boxing wrestling. You fight to you win and every struggle has had long struggles. I remember when nelson mandela gain which you mentioned then david dinkins had me as potted group. That went to the un with him. And just jackson. All of us. And when i thought about it took nelson mandela being jailed. Twenty seven years after fighting many decades around the pon-tae. How can we complain about fighting. We fight to. We win knowing that the victory is certain. And that's what they dickens would always say and as i want more national from new york activism. He said you still fighting. Now keep fighting. He come down national action network rallies. In fact he was there just a few months ago. We had his ninetieth birthday there and we never forgot this. Gentle giant had a had a spine of steel. And he didn't need to be boisterous he just needed to be effective and he was the one that broke that ceiling and made people know you could be the ceo of the biggest city in the world and perform. He revitalized times square. He started this whole community policing and in many ways you are more than correct. Joy is almost like to study donald trump. You have to study rudy giuliani. They took credit for things then get predecessor did and they used race to try and rev up a political career that ended up embarrassing them at the end. Indeed amen. thank you reverend now. It's always great to talk with you. Revenue sharpen. Thank you very much. I

David Dinkins Charlie Rangel Ahmadou Diablo Reverend Al Sharpton Dinkins Msnbc New York City Nelson Mandela James Brown AL Colin New York Giuliani Rudy Boxing Wrestling UN Dickens
How Will Smith and Janet Hubert settle their decades-long feud on 'The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air Reunion'

Daily Pop

04:59 min | 2 weeks ago

How Will Smith and Janet Hubert settle their decades-long feud on 'The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air Reunion'

"So we'll and the first vibe. Janet hubert made amends during the fresh prince of bel-air reunion which just premiered on. hbo maximum. They both admitted in hard time for them over the years then genuine deep into just how much the feud cost her. When i left the show. I have this new baby and no one. Family disowned me. Hollywood disowned me. What you didn't realize either. That i was going through a lot at home right. You can no no very abusive marriage. You know i have. Children been divorced and second marriage and i can see now the level of pain and the level of struggle. But you know those words calling a black woman. Difficult in hollywood is to kiss of death death in your baskin back. When the president i wanna be is someone who protects you not someone at unleashes dodds. Wow so that was pretty deep. Why do you guys think it took them so long to finally have this heart to heart conversation. I'm actually surprised that didn't happen sooner off camera surprise at all that it didn't happen sooner. You know when you're in a feud with samadi and it's fresh and it hurts and then after a few months after a year five years goes by you. Just have a hard place for that person. You're not mad at them but you just don't wish them well. I think they got so use of that. Feeling of anger towards one another that just became a part of their lives and they probably for a long time. Didn't even realize and god what that feud was even a bout because it had been twenty seven years. Oh i disagree see. I don't think she's forgotten. What that feud is about for one second. I first of all. I started watching this last night and then stopped watching before this part. Of course those excited rundown this morning. This is some serious stuff. I mean obviously watching the fresh prince growing up realizing that and had been switched out with no. I realized that and i don't even remember how old we were. We were young. But i mean for things have gotten as bad as they did will smith and one of his co stars and we kind of nowhere to be this lovable likable hilarious guy. Like i was really surprised and for her to say you know to label the dark skinned black woman. Difficult in hollywood like as somebody that i was working with somebody that i was supposed to be family with has derailed my career for thirty years so little. It's a little too little too late. And i'm a huge will smith fan but once i kind of read what was going on between the two of them. It still isn't actually clear as to why he had such a problem with her. Yeah it's just really isn't too clear to me either. Besides the fact that she was able to work with but people are difficult all the time and the exactly you know it felt like a red table talk situation like taking a note from his wife jada. he's now opening up and having these heart to hearts. But being the will smith that we see and we know when we love now i. I'm surprised he wouldn't have this revelation. Sooner right over the years. I totally give being young. And he midst like your egos in the way you you you kind of. Who's on top of the world. He was really feeling himself. And and there was you know a little chip monir shoulder right and they typically goes away after a little while. I mean he took a long time. I mean they forced. You're i mean not. i don't want to say. They forced her out but they gave her such as she could thank you. They divorced her out by just giving her such a bad deal. I just don't understand. I think i would. I would have a clear to us where to get understanding what happened if i kind of knew what really started all of this but i just feel like this woman's career has really stalled because what what happened. I don't think that that's right but hold on the shoulders of will united because if sounds like the whole team may have thought because i thought yeah just like you know have only beef with will but i think it's like a family like if from this and both of you don't are both of us. Don't stand up or say something you're mad at the whole family because somebody was supposed to have your back. I think what happened. The situation was yes we do know will smith as in light one. The one who's connected but leaders get that way until about five ten years ago in in state like he was. This was a sitcom that was obviously very successful. I think for me to wrap it up in a bow. There's a disconnect as to why the tension was caused in the first place and back to justice point words. It's functional little family. If you guys made in my life difficult every day at seven months pregnant. I don't know how i would go to

Janet Hubert Samadi Smith Hollywood HBO Jada
interview With Father Gregory Boyle of Homeboy Industries

How I Built This

05:05 min | 2 weeks ago

interview With Father Gregory Boyle of Homeboy Industries

"Hey everyone. Welcome to how. I built this resilience edition from npr on these episodes. We talk with entrepreneurs and change makers how they're meeting today's challenges with new strategies and ideas and today we're going to hear from father gregory boyle. He's the founder of homeboy industries. Father greg founded homeboy industries after years of serving as a jesuit priest and later as a pastor at dolores mission church in east. La forty saw the devastating effects of gang related violence on his community after operating for over thirty years. Homeboy industries has become one of the largest gang intervention rehabilitation and re entry programs in the world. About fifteen thousand folks year walk through our doors trying to reimagine their lives. We were begun in nineteen eight. Just end my paris. Which was the poorest in the city but had had the highest concentration of gang activity. We had eight gangs at war with each other and i started to bury kids. I buried my two hundred and eighty third last week. Not all from that community. Obviously but i know a lot of gang members. So i get asked and and so we just started. Things started to school than we started the jobs program trying to find felony friendly employers then that was not so forthcoming so we started businesses. A bakery was the first in ninety two and now we have nine social enterprises but also a program of healing you know. Sluggers tattoo removal. There's therapy case management classes. It's an amazing series of programs. And as you mentioned i mean things like tattoo removal or just helping people kind of reenter society after being gangs or being incarcerated obviously while it's changing many employers still reluctant to hire people with felony records and in response to that you create your own businesses aside from the bakery which is probably the best known because it has locations in los angeles tummy a little bit more about some of the other social enterprises that homeboy industries has launched so at our headquarters. We have homeboy bakery homegirl. Cafe and homeboy homegirl marchandise. And then we have the restaurant at the airport a city hall. We have homeboy diner. The only place to get food at city hall. We have a thing called homeboy grocery where we sell chips salsa and guacamole and a variety of grocery stores boy recycling which is recycling. You waste which quite an extensive of business and growing amboise silkscreen and embroidery. That's been around for twenty seven years. Lap boesky nine in there so That's a lot. that's a lot. I was telling you earlier before we went live that i saw you profile and sixty minutes in. I think in the late eighties early nineties and i grew up in in los angeles. You're such a legendary figure there. I'm you've been awarded the california peace prize. And i mean you're a priest at the end of the day like your priest you do. Mass obviously socially distant for people who are incarcerated. But you're also an entrepreneur. Did you consider yourself as an entrepreneur when you founded this organization. Do you think of yourself that way. Now why board would never sign on the notion that i know anything about business so i don't really see it that way but we're always responding if tattoos had become a an obstacle in gang members. One of them off. We started that even in terms of our businesses. They were kind of haphazard you. There was no business plan. There was an abandoned bakery across the street from our school. Our parochial school in a movie producer. Ray stark after the unrest in ninety two wanted to help and i said well okay. I don't know by this bakery. It has ovens they don't work. You could fix them. We could put hairnets on enemy rival gang members. Well that was the entirety of my business plan. So i think i think everything else kind of operated in the same way. There was a couple from the parish who wanted to start rodriguez silk screening. And i said well. Don't start homeboys screening in. So that's how that was born so you know it wasn't like go some big master plan and it was all kind of accidental. You know we have a thing called the global homeboy network. Which is you know. Three hundred programs in the country outside kind of modeled on methodology. You know they all want to start a social enterprise and they all want to do food. Which i always say don't but you know because food is hard. Yeah restaurants are really hard sex in us to a bakery cafe and it's hard to talk people out of this. But i was tell do silk screening. That's recession proof. Everybody wants a shirt their family reunion or they're five k. race. And they'll go with you even if it's more expensive because it's kind of the. Paul newman feel good. You know it's like yeah. It's cost more but it helps employees

Homeboy Industries Gregory Boyle Dolores Mission Church Boesky NPR Greg Los Angeles Paris Ray Stark City Hall Mass California Rodriguez Paul Newman
Diamond Jim Moran

Gangland Wire

06:25 min | 2 weeks ago

Diamond Jim Moran

"Welcome wire-tappers out there here in this video of gang. Lenoir beautiful fall afternoon not on the golf courses afternoon folks in here getting ready to record a podcast for y'all i have the grandson of james diamond. Jim brough cada. His grandson's name is bobby. Bre qatar now bobby. Did i pronounce that close enough. Yes sir okay good. I like to say my northwest missouri nasal hillbilly kind of trying funny. What about that. I just had a comment. Somebody said always seems weird to have a guy with a southern voice. Say the word capco. Now i don't really consider southern voice to you have got northern voice to people up this guy resume shah firm chicago to him. I have a southern boy. So a hewlett you guys. Listen to bobby talk a little bit and you'll hear that salt sweet syrupy south louisiana voice. Our true southern boys right. Yeah it's a little different than new. All has its own unique accent. I've been confused being from boston. New york no. Yeah you know. I hear that now. Wow i do hear that many dollars around the city you know. Talk to different people. You can tell what part of the city from interested in so now. Let's get to the meat of this. You've written a book here recently. Called food for kings. And it's part to crime as part history in his part a recipe book cookbook. If you will food for king diamond jim. A new orleans legend now diamond. Jim mocatta was your grandfather. And there's a really interesting book folks especially if you like to cook. It's got those really great new orleans recipes in it and this guy your grandfather. Your grandpa was one of the most colorful characters in new orleans from what i've read about him. It was unbelievable. Tell us a little bit about yourself and how you got interested in doing this particular book. Okay very first of all. Thank you for having me on your show. appreciate it. earth off a married with two children in military. Over twenty years i retired in two thousand and eight and i've been aircraft mechanic for american airlines and now delta. I picked up this project after my father died and wait basically he motivated me to kind of pick up the torch and carry it. My dad was a dentist for forty years and he always wanted to do a screen. Play or movie per se. He's never do it. I have i did a screenplay originally. But i didn't go anywhere with it so i decided a couple years ago. Put a book together and kind of tell a story about my grandfather while i'm telling. The story basically blended in combination photos and recipes as i journey through his whole life. I start off when he's a childhood and carried on throughout his life until the success of his life until he died. It's a good read. It took me about eight years to go through it and do the research are did get a lot of information from father. My father ahead a manuscript he has deposition that he had put together with a attorney. Back in nineteen seventy seven. So i use all that information and took my tom everything in the book that i've talked about a kind of support it with a document and the article. Either that was given to me handed down to me or maybe that of actually found in the library found a lot of information doing the research about my grandfather in the library his life. It was pretty easy because his life was documented since he was a teenager so every time i tried to fill in the blank. Something in my father didn't pass down to me. I was able to answer all the questions that i wanted to answer about his life. You know interesting. That stuck a little bit about his early life. He fought under the name of jimmy moran which is kind of like no joy hupa in chicago took on an irish name in order to fight. I think more likely it was a lot of prejudice against italians in those days. Especially in new orleans. If you remember we go all the way back to the black hand days and they they killed the chief of police some Supposedly some black hander. Kill the chief of police in of new orleans storm to jail and hung. I dunno must have been six or eight say ends i. I can't remember exactly for sure. How many so. It would have been wise for him to fight on her an irish name. I would imagine tell me about his fight career. Let's get started. Well that was one thing. They kind of treat. My curiosity was widely. Any changes his name in the book. I did find a quote where someone asks them. Same questioned do an interview. He said he did for business reasons. But that was part of it because you gotta realize he didn't get into business opened up first restaurants on nineteen forty nine. He changed his name. I found articles where he had his name change in teens early. Nineteen hundreds. He hung around a couple of friends of his feet. Herman who's an italian pita. Golota was his last name. And the other guy. By the name of powell moran. His name was francis. Paul miranda and all of them were full blooded italian as you know and you listeners. Know that back. Then the titans will kinda frown upon. They weren't considered equal. Maybe to a lot of different even the irish whatever. So i've found out. He had changed his name one. He didn't want his mother was fighting when he was on the fighting card. You know and during the preliminaries in hours fighter. Irish name would draw big crowds for fight. A lot of people don't know new orleans was actually a big boxing city equivalent to chicago and new york but on a smaller scale of course but it was a big boxing town in a drool audit. And that's how he got to meet jack dempsey marciano. You know all those big fights back then because they came to new orleans and then he connected so his first circle of friends will all italians. pete. Herman was abandoned. Champion thinking sixty nine fights from nineteen twelve to nineteen twenty two now as far as my grandfather. He wasn't as big of a boxer as those guys. He did it for my research. Maybe about six years and then he got a little older. He got into referee in and he started refereeing. He did that until about twenty seven years old. Then that's when you up his barber shop in the open up a barber shop with a boxer front of his last name was burke in as when he got an barring after referee

New Orleans Bobby James Diamond Jim Brough Capco King Diamond Jim Jim Mocatta Lenoir Chicago Hewlett Qatar Jimmy Moran Shah Missouri Louisiana American Airlines Golf Boston
US Army identifies 5 soldiers killed in Sinai helicopter crash

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:42 sec | 2 weeks ago

US Army identifies 5 soldiers killed in Sinai helicopter crash

"The united states army announced the identities of five soldiers who were killed in a helicopter accident earlier in the week while serving as part of peacekeeping operations in the middle east and aims at five american soldiers killed in a black hawk. Helicopter crashing egypt's sinai peninsula thursday thirty one year old captain said vana camp from katy texas 34-year-olds w three dallas garza from fayetteville north carolina twenty-seven-year-old. Cw two more gabor for marlboro massachusetts. Thirty five year old staff. Sergeant kyle mckee painesville ohio and twenty three year olds. Sergeant jeremy sherman from what sika one american remains hospitalized in very serious condition is the deadliest crash. The us military this year

Vana Camp United States Army Dallas Garza Sinai Peninsula Middle East Kyle Mckee Katy Egypt Fayetteville Marlboro Jeremy Sherman Painesville North Carolina Texas Massachusetts
Jerry and Melissa Ghionis Discuss How They Grow Their Business

Photofocus Podcast

06:24 min | 3 weeks ago

Jerry and Melissa Ghionis Discuss How They Grow Their Business

"All right so we've got jerry and melissa jonas guy in ice however you want to butcher. His last name really is yoenis hair in the house and they are a power couple. Jerry's a grandmaster wpi. He's a winner of album of the year eight times. I think maybe it's more. And if i have to share all his awards we'll never get to the podcast melissa with her. Incredible focus on customer service organizational skills. And she's an outstanding presenter is another one was a leader in education. They complement each other. So well and their leaders in education and support for an industry that that all of us including all four of us on this podcast loved so dearly. Now i have to admit it's tough for me to do this introduction because i know them both so well and we've shared so much time together over the years and a lot of lass. So let's get to the podcast talk about the challenges of the pandemic working with your spouse growing together as a couple. And i'm willing to bet that even puppies they're gonna come up in the topic to saw jerry. Melissa this is going to be the cue for your lips to actually move here walker business. Thank you for having us. Thank you so much fun. Catching up to you and yeah. I already promised a couple of stories that i wouldn't tell so. This is what happens story disciplines. I love the puppy. Should definitely come into it. The puppies has kept us sane. This year that is for sure your to. Let's kick it off with our favorite first question just in case univer listeners. Don't know who you both are. Tell us how you got started doing what you're doing. Tell us about your background. Ladies first well. I started photography. I in nineteen ninety nine. So it's been a long time and just started as a as a side king while i had a day. Job and photographed weddings on the side and on the weekends and loved it and just started doing it more. And more and then i started continuing. My education was going to workshops and conventions and eventually went full time. And then i had a wedding and portrait studio in boston. That's where i got my start. And that's where i was born and raised and Did that for many years. And then about eleven years after that. After i got started and was all settled. I met this ustralian. Photographer met him. Because i went to a seminar and fell in love with his work and completely changed. My work went to his workshop and he completely changed my business and became our bomber career. My favorite is gillian And it was the first time i had met jerry and so we became friends for many years and i would see him at different conventions like wpi and that kind of thing and then years later we after that we reconnected Because in we had both gotten divorced by then and we're working on our own and We started talking. And then i just sold everything in boston. Moved to australia. Got married and we decided to start working together. And that's what we've been doing. Ever since we talked briefly when we first got together about running you know concurrent businesses. Because i had my business setup. He had his but that quickly went out the window. And i i really loved the business side of it even more than the creative side. And no one's more creative than jerry so we actually fit together like a glove when we got together and It's been ten glorious years. Ever since jerry always get my camera at the edge of fifty my first camera and i excuse me fill in love with the croft. I became obsessed shot every genre. Possibly imagine to work out which direction going I did what. I had to do to pass high school but anew onto photographer so i just had fun and played around and did what i did. After high school. I worked at a few camera shops. There was a four year cost that that wanted to do and after a year. I quit that photography coast because that would teach me what. I call the algebra photography and i prefer street-smart. I'm not. I'm not citius. Books might kind of guy. I just want to learn in the action of doing the work and so i did that. I quit and then i approached the studio that was very popular at the time walked in. I said i'm going to hold your bags. I don't want to get paid. Just let me let me see what you do. And i did that for about a year and a half with no pay And then i work for that company for about three and a half years. I started my business. Ninety seven At the back of charcoal chicken to go foods stool In the in the peak of the recession australia interest rates with twenty eight percent Family we lost family home. I'm going home and now the water got turned off guest. Ten off turned off the car. That was my brother's got repossessed. And here i am. Nineteen year old literally with nothing and but i built this business Literally from a first year doing twenty five weddings Than fifty weddings a year after one hundred weddings and then i convinced the landlord above the building to to actually build a second level above the building. Such may yet convinced him a year to build and then we built this. Probably one of australia's largest studios At my paper was doing a one hundred weddings personally I studio was doing three hundred weddings and countless portraits and built that business. My brother bought into it. Some not ninety-seven. I sold that business. Employees lebron another in two thousand and seven So on basically my twenty seven years shooting professionally teaching professionally For twenty years Moved to the us Met this incredible. Women are probably the most will probably the most beautiful woman i've ever met in my life. We got married about almost ten years ago and life has been critical of a

Jerry Melissa Jonas Yoenis Melissa Boston Walker GUY Gillian Australia Lebron United States
Jeffrey Toobin fired from The New Yorker after exposing himself on a Zoom call

Crystal's Nightcap

03:19 min | 3 weeks ago

Jeffrey Toobin fired from The New Yorker after exposing himself on a Zoom call

"Okay. This first story. I think is the funniest story of twenty twenty. I believe they talked about it before. But there's like an update to what happened and is pretty epic. I don't know if you guys remember. But a few months ago the new yorker had to suspend one of their authors and legal analysts. By the name of jeffrey toobin what happened with him. Basically he was on a zoom call. An important call with the new yorker staff and some people from cnn and some people from wnyc radio and during the soom call you guys today soom whatever during the zoom call you guys he with the camera on and with the microphone on was out here controlling himself so not okay like like oh my god so the new yorker not doing with what to do with him at the moment so they had disclosed suspended him but now they did fire him and he did in a tweet today explain. He said i was fired today. By at new yorker after twenty seven years as a staff writer. I will always love. The magazine will miss my colleagues and we'll look forward to reading their work. My question is how the heck do you bounce back from this. This is so embarrassing. Apparently he thought his excuse was that he thought he was on mute and he thought his camera was off. Is like hello sir. When you're on zoom call like you can see your face. They're right now. no. I don't go on too. Many zoom calls me. Maybe i'm on one once a week For the most part. If i've talked to people or do business with people it'll be facetime and for zoom calls like i do do teams meetings sometimes my boss and we do sometimes have like an entire town hall meeting. That's what we call them where it's like. Everyone on staff is part of the meeting. I would be disgusted if one of my coworkers did this on the zoom call. Honestly and i i. It's sewn appropriate like you can't do this on your own time like. Why do you have to do this on company hours your i. Would you want your co worker to get fired over something like this like i definitely think. So that's just so disrespectful to all your other coworkers to everyone's time to your own self like just not okay. Over guys and on top of it wasn't just his co workers like these are other clients on the call. Cnn was on the call. And like i said that news radio so yes. i'm sorry. He deserves to be fired. I don't even know why that was a question. If it was a woman right ladies if it was us like switching out a bra during zoom call an accident you we would be fired. We will be fired. This over here. Exasperating himself and he got suspended for a few weeks and now finally is five. Yeah i'm sorry. Don't way way way too much and just not okay like i would definitely want my coworker fired.

Wnyc Radio New Yorker Jeffrey Toobin CNN
Their Service Entitles Them To Low-Cost Loans. But Veterans Often Pay More.

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:27 min | 3 weeks ago

Their Service Entitles Them To Low-Cost Loans. But Veterans Often Pay More.

"John. Four is a retired marine corps. Colonel he served for twenty seven years. Did you see the big fish jumped for is giving me a virtual tour of his harbourside house in a development in punto gorda florida. He's got a dock and a little powerboat and can you see the pool. Oh yeah oh. That's gorgeous yeah all right. Can you see the kayaks and the dock. Actually four is making me kind of jealous of his house at the start of the year interest rates were falling and he wanted to refinance with the. Va loan that has alone backed by the us. Department of veterans affairs vets and service members are supposed to be able to an extra low interest rate and better terms that way so you started calling around and he says the company loaned depot told him we can do. Va loan for you. But it's going to be at three seven five percent interest and they had a lot of fees in there but it was a lower rate than he had at the time so he says he was just about to do the deal with lump depot when he happened to see an ad for. Va loan to a company. Called own up. He went through them and he says he paid lower fees and got more than a full percentage point lower on the rate on his three hundred and thirty thousand dollar loan. That means about twenty five hundred dollars a year in lower payments. He he says when he went back and told loan depot about the better deal. They then offered him a much lower rate to as a veteran. You expect you're getting something from the government. I i was shocked that they didn't just tell me outright. What the best rate. What's a lot of veterans. Assume the same thing according to patrick boy adji. He's the ceo of own up. It's a new company that helps people find a good deal on home loans through a group of different lenders. He says veterans think. They're supposed to get a really good interest rate on a. Va loan so many. Don't shop around but says while these loans are backed by the va they're made by private companies and he says some will head people with much higher costs and basically a worse deal than they qualify for. And they're veterans the. Sit there and think to yourself that this person who served our country is now going to get taken advantage of. And they had no clue they had no idea so in his company did a study. They're releasing it today. They took the top twenty lenders for va loans and looked at the annual percentage rate that the companies charged borrowers on all the loans they made last year and so when we looked at the spread candidly. We were quite surprised that it was as wide as it. Was that the best lenders. And the worst lenders were so far apart from one another. The study found that navy. Federal credit union offered people. The lowest rates at the other higher cost end of the spectrum was a lender called new day. Usa it's a new day for veterans. Who want to refinance at me as a vet. The company is a sponsor of the army navy. Football game it runs. Tv ads with plenty of american flags. We wanna do whatever is best for the individual service person. The study found that of the top twenty. Va lenders new day charged. The highest interest rates more than a full percentage point higher the navy federal which over the life of three hundred thousand dollar thirty year loan is more than seventy thousand dollars. More in interest payments new day in a statement said that the study has a quote serious flaw. It said that's because the study lumps together different types of va loans. That are not the same but michael. Hoon is skeptical of that explanation. He's the president of the non-profit center for responsible lending. The information from this lender does not explain their borrowers are being charged so much more than other lenders are charging. Their va borrowers as far as loan depot. The company that john four. I talked to the study. Found that during two thousand nineteen. It's rates were about average. The company is also a recent financial supporter of npr biology. With own up says the big takeaway from his study for him is that people need to shop around and find the best rate that they can and negotiate for the best rate. Because if you don't it could be one of the most costly mistakes you make in your financial life that's good advice for. Va loans and other types of mortgages to chris arnold npr

VA Punto Gorda Patrick Boy Adji Department Of Veterans Affairs Marine Corps Colonel Federal Credit Union John Florida USA Navy Army Navy
FEAR OF FEAR

Big Book Podcast

04:27 min | Last month

FEAR OF FEAR

"This lady was cautious. She decided she wouldn't let herself go and her drinking and she would never never take that morning drink. I didn't think I was an alcoholic. I thought my problem was that I had been married to a drunk for twenty-seven years and when my husband found a a I came to the second meeting with him thought it was wonderful simply marvelous for him but not for me. Then I went to another meeting hand. I still thought it was wonderful for him. But not for me. It was a hot summer night in 1949 down in the Greenwich Village group and there was a little porch out there in the old meeting place on Sullivan Street. And after the meeting I went out on the steps for some are dead in the doorway stood a lovely young girl. Who said are you one of us houses to I said, oh goodness know my husband is he's in there. She told me her name. I said, I know you from somewhere. It turned out that she had been in high school with my daughter. I said Eileen. Are you one of those people and she said oh, yes. Yep. In this as we walk back through the hall. I for the first time in my life said to another human being I'm having trouble with my drinking too. She took me by the hand and introduce them to the girl that I'm very proud to call my sponsor this girl and her husband are both in a a and she said to me oh, but you're not the alcoholic. It's your husband. I said, yes. She said how long have you been married? I said 27 years. She said 27 years to an alcoholic. How did you ever stand it? I thought now here's a nice sympathetic so long, this is for me. I said, well I stood it to keep the home together. And for the children's sake she said, yes, I know. You're just another martyr, aren't you? I walked away from that girl grinding my teeth and cursing under my breath. Fortunately. I didn't say a word to George on the way home, but that night I tried to go to sleep and I thought your some martyr Jane wage. Look at the record and when I looked at it, I knew I was just as much a drunk as George was if not worse. I nudged Jorge the next morning and I said I'm in and he said oh, I knew you'd make it. I started drinking nearly thirty years ago right after I was married my first drinking spree was on corn liquor and I was allergic to it. Believe me. I was deathly sick every time I took a drink but we had to do a lot of entertaining my husband like to have a good time. I was very young and I wanted to have a good time to the only way I knew to do it was to drink right along with him. I got into terrific trouble with my drinking I was afraid and I had made my mind up that I would never get drunk. So I was watchful and careful. We had a small child and I loved her dearly so that held me back quite a bit in my drinking career even so every time I drank I seem to get in trouble. I always wanted to drink too much. So I was watchable always watchful counting my drinks if we were invited to a formal party and I knew they were only going to have one or two drinks. I wouldn't have any I was being very cagey. Because I knew that if I did take one or two, I might want to take five or six or seven or eight. I did stay fairly good for a few years, but I wasn't happy and I didn't ever let myself go in my drinking as my son our second child came along and as he became school age and was away at school. Most of the time something happened. I really started drinking with a bang. I never went to a hospital. I never lost a job. I was never in jail and unlike many others. I never took a drink in the morning. I needed a drink but I was afraid to take a morning drink because I didn't want to be a drunk. I became a drunk anyway, but I was scared to death to take that morning drink. I was accused of it many times when she went to play bridge in the afternoon, but I really never did take a morning drink. I was still woozy from the night before. I should have lost my husband and I think that only the fact that he was an alcoholic to kept us together.

Brad Pitt splits from girlfriend Nicole Poturalski

Naughty But Nice with Rob Shuter

00:55 sec | Last month

Brad Pitt splits from girlfriend Nicole Poturalski

"Breaking exclusive at the top of the show. So Brad Pitt has been dumped dumped by his girlfriend. So we with us to report on this show that things were dramatically cooling down between Brad and his gorgeous model girlfriend call. Now, we can report that the relationship is officially over. So sources tell us more quote the twenty-seven-year-old Nicole she's back with a sixty eight year old has been rolling. After deciding that Brad was just not the man for. So the trying to be friends still. So when people break up, they do try to be friends but it probably never really happens they'll probably just drift apart but there was no big drama. There was no big fight no big scandal no big screaming match here. They said, honestly, she just wasn't really that into him. Romantically Brad is a very nice area, but Nicole likes men or that's a bit of a dig is an

Brad Pitt Brad Nicole
Interview with Ann Bingham

The Techy Tony Marketing Podcast

06:00 min | Last month

Interview with Ann Bingham

"Everybody to another exciting Becky Tony marketing podcast. My name is Tony and I am your host for those of you that do not know who I am or what I do. I show home-based business owners how to leverage technology to grow your business online using the power of the internet and social media page. If you have a business and you want more exposure you are in the right spot. We are back with another exciting guessed. Her name is Anne Bingham. She has a couple different businesses and she is here today to talk about those so everybody welcome and Bingham to the show and are you there? I am hi there. Hi Ann. How are you today? I'm great. Thanks for having me. Yeah. Thank you for making wage. Time I know things are kind of crazy they are but you know what? I always love to chatting with you. And so yeah, I'm just really happy to be here. Yeah. I'm excited to have Ian while before we get into the juicy stuff about your business and who you are and all that. I'd like to know what I'm sure the audience would like to know a little bit about you as a person. Can you elaborate a little bit Yeah, so I am I'm a mom. I have two amazing grown children. So yes, those of you who have younger kids and teenagers. I promise you it is every bit worth it is there is life on the outside and and it's pretty spectacular on the other side. I've been married to my husband Rob for twenty-seven years. We've been together for thirty years and we met in college and we've been really dead. Just have the that marriage that you know makes everybody ill we still like to spend time together hold hands and you know, all of those just wonderful things. I don't really know how we do it. But it's it's a great relationship. He's my very best friend in the world. We live in South Saint Louis. We live just a couple of blocks away from Soulard in a historic house a hundred and thirty years old and with our Pitbull our kids are by-and-large moved out. My daughter has a nice place. My son is in his last semester at Rolla and yes, we live with our rescued Pitbull and we lived about a mile and a half or so from the neighborhood that I grew up in. So I think that's my life in a in a snapshot right now outside of work wage. Um, and yeah, then the work side is I'm currently a I guess the easiest way to say it is I am a full-time yoga instructor and freelance Adventurer I guess is the easiest way to say it started doing that when I retired from being a preschool director and teacher I did that for about 30 years and gave that up because of a chronic illness. So that's kind of what landed me where I am now awesome. Well, let's talk a little bit about yoga is yeah some people like to do yoga has some health benefits. I guess. My first question to you man is with covideo around are you offering virtual class? I am yeah, so there's so covid has changed a lot about the way that we exercise and the way that we met a lot of things right and so I do virtual classes, but the way that I do them is a bit different. So I do see two things and one is I do private sessions for for folks individually online. And the other thing that I do is I do a kids class on Thursdays and Fridays because one of the things that we know is that Covetous really hitting our kids in a very really unprecedented Thursday. So the reason that I'm doing online classes like this is because when you're doing a there's lots off Studios out there right now that are doing online classes, but when you're doing that you're in effect watching an instructor and you're not really getting a great deal of feedback from that instructor on how you are holding a pose or how you were moving your body and that can provide some problems. If you're not if you're not doing a pose in the proper form you can end up getting injured you might find yourself in a class. That's maybe not appropriate for you. It might be too easy. It might be too hard and so doing a class with me individually. First of all, there's a little humor to it. Like it's just you and me wage. It's just like two people hanging out and then we personalize absolutely everything to you so that I can actually see what you're doing. And I can say, you know, maybe move your foot a little bit further to the left or to the right or if that feels like it's not feeling good. Then let's use a block or something like that. Maybe make that feel a little bit better for your body and give you what you need. So that's why we're doing those personal sessions rather than kind of group sessions.

Anne Bingham Instructor Becky Tony ANN Tony Rolla Soulard IAN ROB South Saint Louis Director
Front Desk Success with Jerry Durham

The Better

06:06 min | Last month

Front Desk Success with Jerry Durham

"Well, hey Jerry, welcome to show. How are you? I'm very well. How are you doing this beautiful? All day I can't complain. It's a Friday, right? Exactly. All right. So for those who don't know who Jerry Durham the PT is why don't you give us a little background on yourself off? What do we got? We got 27 years in the as a license pts for twenty-seven years in the profession. I early on worked in just about every month in there was except for Pediatrics and neuro rehab for about the first five to six years of my career and then finally went out on my own and then partnered up and down that Journey was about twenty year journey of business running a broad. I mean back up running a practice in a clinic and then running a business and then break out of that about five years ago now. Yeah, I think it's about five years. I get I get lost in the story but about five years ago and now working on basically wage. A game for lack of anything else taking everything I learned in hindsight from those twenty years and going here's the way you here's the way I did it wrong don't do this. And as you age both know and most people listening to this Healthcare tends to focus on the providers primarily and my big takeaway where I am now is this understanding this whole experience of the team roll the team role in patients success the team role and business success, you know, patient experience patient life cycle all those things and that's what I'm doing now. So yeah, it's been a long it's been I mean, it's been a long freaking journeyman twenty-seven years a long time. Yeah. Yeah, you've got a whole bunch of experience and I think it at one point I I found out about you cuz I was listening to a podcast years ago about you've taken your practice which was in network and then pulling into cash and all that and the importance of obviously understanding your patient relationship cycle your patient life cycle, whatever whatever you want to call log. To convert those patients to get them to come in and stay. So tell me a little bit then about your company you run now, it's called the client experience company. Right? Right. So back to what you said just for context for everybody about twelve years ago where and by the way, I don't tell this story as the guy who walked up the hill and snow both ways to school and just for context and I'm not here to say it's easier now, it's harder now. It's anything I just want everybody to understand so about twelve years ago, right? I went out and network and no joke people that nobody even knew without a network box. Right? Nobody was using the word cash practice cash PT everybody, you know, if there was a cash practice it was like a dinky little office with a dinky little person who like had all their clients were judged according clients. Yeah, like 10 people, right? So we made a business decision to go out and network. It was strictly business. Can't remember who the first I think it was wage. That was our first contract that fell below our cost of doing business. So I was like it was an easy. This is what's funny. It's you know, you read all these things and people like I don't know what to do. Do I take insurance or life insurance. I'm like, it's a business decision. It's based on your client and write what you need to generate to pay your bills if Blue Cross is contract is $75 per visit and it costs you $80 to deliver care. That's a no-brainer. I can't yeah exactly at work with them. So twelve years ago, and that's really where the Where I look back and reflect where I was like hm. I gotta do something different and that's where this all patient experience thing and the front desk and then realizing which probably a lot this is the beauty every time I do this like every year that goes by more people are nodding their head going. Yeah, I get that and I'm like, that's cool because when you're ago two years ago three years ago people like I did not get it or that's not true. But this understanding that you know, if If Jerry calls your clinic that that first touch point right the front desk the journey starts there. So the patient success starts Thursday the business success. It's I call it I caught the entry point to the business everybody, you know used to be used to be everybody thought the entry point was well when when they get in the room with the provider with Brad and I'm like, yeah that first experience with the clinician, right? Yeah, and that was already goes I went through that right? Oh, yeah, and I went through that for a long time in my business. We're all I cared about was the providers right home. And so, you know just learning the value of all of a sudden wait a minute we managed and set expectations before they arrived we build trust before they arrived what I call a team Alliance instead. They're reputed client and while look at this magically here's the beauty of it patient numbers improved and buy pay sorry patient measurements patient success. So, yep. Getting better people happier all that stuff improve yet. Then my business metrics change. So I was like what's going on? Right? And that's been that last twelve thirteen years. It took me all that time to start equating. This change here was because of this right going further Upstream. It was like, wow, we changed the first phone call and we stopped getting billing complaints. It wasn't a billing issue. So things like that and that's off the company the client experience company does right we come in we look at the whole kit and caboodle. We look at your whole process, right? Do you understand who your ideal client is do you understand and it could be multiple. Do you understand what you're serving them with right? Cuz no man. Nobody wants physical therapy, right? Everybody wants a solution and then looking at the life cycle and then look up the system's you've built in to create an experience that you want your clients to help

Jerry Durham Blue Cross Alliance Brad
Second night of clashes in Philadelphia after police kill Black man

CRUSADE Channel Previews

01:07 min | Last month

Second night of clashes in Philadelphia after police kill Black man

"A second night of unrest in Philadelphia began Tuesday over the police shooting death of a Black Man Walter Wallace junior twenty, seven years old a thousand looters have reported targeting businesses. Police said in the city looters ransacked a footlocker rite aid and other retail stores. At least one vehicle was set on fire. The Philadelphia Police Department warn people to avoid an area where at least at thousand Luder were ransacking businesses in the port. Richmond area videos posted to social media show people leaving a Walmart with clothes, electronics, and other. Items Around Ninety one people were arrested Monday thirty officers were injured amid violent clashes. The unrest comes after the police shooting death of Wallace. On Monday, Wallace was armed with a knife was shot by two officers during a confrontation authorities said Wallace ignored repeated warnings to drop the weapon. Before he was shot, the officers had responded to his home twice before earlier in the day a third called, a first responders was meant for an ambulance to help the twenty-seven-year-old deal with a mental health crisis according to the family. Attorney.

Walter Wallace Philadelphia Police Department Philadelphia Walmart Attorney
Protests flare in Philadelphia after police kill Black man

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | Last month

Protests flare in Philadelphia after police kill Black man

"Philadelphia is dealing with the aftermath of the deadly police shooting today's the deadline for Philadelphia residents to request a mail in or absentee ballot and city officials are concerned that the violent protests following the police shooting of twenty seven year old Walter Wallace will discourage voters from visiting satellite election offices here's Pennsylvania state senator Sharif street there's a question about police accountability on the ballot and we need you to come out out vote Rebecca Reinhardt is a Philadelphia controller a man being murdered I don't know how you can watch that and not say that there needs to be structural change Philadelphia police responding to a call for a person with a weapon shot and killed Wallace after yelling at him to drop his knife hundreds of people took to the streets to protest the shooting late Monday night in protest the police said injured thirty officers and led to dozens of arrests I'm Jennifer king

Philadelphia Walter Wallace Rebecca Reinhardt Jennifer King Pennsylvania Senator Sharif
‘It’s a New Day’: Sudan Exults to Be Taken Off List of Terror States

TIME's Top Stories

02:58 min | Last month

‘It’s a New Day’: Sudan Exults to Be Taken Off List of Terror States

"USA DOT ORG. President trump says Sudan to be removed from the US list of state sponsors of terrorism by Sami mackney. Cairo. President Donald Trump on Monday said Sudan will be removed from the US list of state sponsors of terrorism if it follows through on its pledge to pay three, hundred, thirty, five, million dollars to American terror victims and their families but some hurt in the attacks weren't happy with the deal. The move would open the door for the African country to get international loans and aid needed to revive its battered economy and rescued the country's transition to democracy the announcement just two weeks ahead of the US presidential election also comes as the trump administration works to get other Arab countries such as Sudan to join the United Arab, Emirates and Bahrain's recent recognition of Israel. Delisting Sudan from the state sponsors. Blacklist is a key incentive for the Sudanese government to normalize relations with Israel. Trump's announcement came after Treasury Secretary Steven mnuchin traveled to Bahrain to cement the Gulf states recognition of the Jewish state. Trump tweeted great news new government of Sudan, which is making great progress agreed to pay three, hundred, thirty, five, million dollars to US terror victims and families once deposited, I will lift Sudan from the state sponsors of terrorism list at long last justice for the American people and big step for Sudan. Sudan has agreed to pay compensation for victims of the Nineteen Ninety, eight bombings of the US. Embassies in Kenya and Tanzania attacks conducted by of bin Laden's al-Qaeda network while bin Laden was living in Sudan. General Farrah Bihan head of Sudan's ruling Sovereign Council welcomed trump's announcement. As constructive step. He said in a tweet, the removal would come in recognition of the historic change has taken place in Sudan. Sudan, his own a fragile path to democracy after a popular uprising. Last year led to the military to overthrow autocratic leader Omar Al-Bashir in April nineteen. A military civilian government now runs the country with elections possible in late twenty, twenty two. In an address to the nation Prime Minister Abdullah Home Doc said getting off the list would help his government benefit from debt relief and access foreign loans and investments which are seen as the country's gateway to economic recovery. The country has more than sixty billion dollars in foreign debt he said. It's a long way. He said it needs serious planning and hard work to achieve the maximum benefit of this opportunity. Once, the compensation money has been deposited. Trump is designed an order removing Sudan from the terrorism list on which has languished under heavy American sanctions for twenty seven years. Is Than. Expected to act to restore Sudan's sovereign immunity which would effectively stop future compensation claims from being

Sudan President Donald Trump United States Prime Minister Abdullah Home D Bahrain Israel Bin Laden Sudanese Government Cairo President Trump Nineteen Ninety Sami Mackney Omar Al-Bashir United Arab Farrah Bihan Sovereign Council Kenya Al-Qaeda
The Future of Voice Commerce: RCS Messaging

VUX World

06:19 min | Last month

The Future of Voice Commerce: RCS Messaging

"So I'll see, specifically, stance filled rich communication services. He's been around for quite a long sign. Is. It was put together initially by a group of some of the logic carriers. To looking into develop SMS. and. Seeing the the onset of. Turn over the top messaging. So messaging capabilities from the think tech companies. South on facebook. Great examples and I'll see very similar to see that in terms of very modern and rich messaging capability. Nice. Yeah so just going to go straight to the the the big question. What's wrong with us a mess why? Why aren't we just sticking with? that. So I? Think the one thing about. There's nothing grown when it's such I would say it says old technology it's been around full home physiology. I think many people will know that. It has. Something attention is used in the US networks to send data show packet. Of Information Information to each other. When it was Hasn't evolved a lot of being able to naked single message Mungo is involves so. said. Legacy said it's being rattle inside if he works pimple things wrong with I would say that it's securitate And we see a lot of span fraud and obviously it's It's just limited text. funky. Things Attacks Join it because industry twenty seven years ago semesters fake news saying we asked about things that can act in the UK carriers in. Lot of my colleagues several, why would I want to send a message to anybody? I can pick out this fantastic side I feel. Real conversation well, twenty years it's become messaging has become a huge thing. There's limitations as well. So it's black and white. Text messages of simply when it is. The Stanford Short Message Service is message service? Is, comparing black and white TV that has three or four channels to a full. Multimedia TVs to streaming channels in his. Such. A good way of comparing. Semester yesterday. And presumably. Don't. I. Don't know this for sure but presumably s messaging is slightly more pricey. Is it? David is. Actually. If it. Mom. Pricing. So I guess in terms of what's wrong with semester actually, there's nothing wrong with us at actually does what does very efficiently it's very effective of short message chilling is. Actually uses. That as effectively. As, known by Channel A. Of now as to be able to. Reach message terms of price. That's why I can have exactly I can be night. Texas she's on free. Somebody get abundance today. But still international texting cost. That's the reason why we Face question now, for example, because it's it's free mischief nationally. But. That's why. Price this is a obvious. Doesn't pretty. Well because Zach PSOMAS as because they'll being charged for image messages. At, scrape the show compensations but as you start to get a lengthy conversations during a custom. Station you could have thirty. Three agents. So. As must get quite crazy quite frankly. Cases. Galaxy s because it's it's designed. Conversation. Doesn't restrict as. Especially, group. Just Justin so I'm out right in. In. Tim I think you Hudson Corrections for me when I when I asked this prior to this episode. But I'll try I'll try it again because I think it was it was good so. I'm all right in thinking then the ICS message in a way of thinking about is the message in is. What's up. Bought near. On android device. A handset of some description. Yeah. That is a good way I. Think about IT I. Think another way you think about it just to come complement what we just saying there is. Also, the multimedia US today check like. That the top messaging services. Provided by a non telco companies. CS is actually a telco standard is become standard. It's a standardized through as universal profile which is managed to maintain by. GSI and carry astounded you. Get involved we can come to that. L. From what it means is what? About being native, this is crystal this. So you think about it knowledge thing everybody you another one of these on the listening to this set. Got Us. If you've got a mobile phone in your pocket today on your hands, it will. It's a standard saying that it does. Just a dumb. We'll do this and that is the foundation if he likes Ross, we're building upon that and don't. Shipping's Diane Silence. Come with. Capability. Incident. And it's part of the new five G. standards of getting the GPS and I. Want to reset just a bit more in China now that Chinese networks rolling out of five G. as astounded part of this office. Until. You mentioned a couple of times, android phones and and I know you're out Google is that why you're mentioning android phones or is that only android phones that are supporting our? Yes. Yes today, it said today's study to support

United States Facebook Mungo Stanford Texas UK TIM Diane Silence Zach Psomas Ross Fraud Legacy David Google Justin
"twenty seven years" Discussed on Sports 600 ESPN

Sports 600 ESPN

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"twenty seven years" Discussed on Sports 600 ESPN

"Close call my number when I come all waited in just the right to make a play and I got about an offender not seem like a clear line second half defensively you guys seem to make changes and seem to really step up your game what changed offensively for it we always always glad to compete or play together and have a tonight we are not there to gather we went out in the fall going on there through the first handful of games we talk so much about learning experiences to get two wins both on the road what's that say about where this team has grown so far early in the season I'm not but I was still going on I feel like I'm just very from day one which is game play no sound mentality we know we have a lot and on the road the one on the wrong it's always all right the one on the road this road trip we decided to you have a lot of folks were New Jersey here tonight how much fun to play in front of us some home finance it felt good about a solo also to be able to do that but again what about what all over here it just felt good about number and chatting with foxsports southeast yet eight points in the fourth quarter including the game winning bucket but you heard seventy seven points in the fourth quarter's combined this season most among rookies so far this season reserve won back to back road games for the first time since November of twenty eighteen team with the best record in the NBA getting another one on Wednesday mark is right away right three twenty seven years a hundred forty point.

New Jersey NBA three twenty seven years
"twenty seven years" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"twenty seven years" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"The bus for twenty seven years with. With a solar. I'm telling you might shop. It's a safe budget issue and union leaders and local lawmakers are asking the governor for approval Juliet Papa ten wins. News fifty nine degrees. Fair skies in midtown. Accuweather calling for a clear to partly cloudy overnight, low fifty degrees in the city forty in many suburbs later today, cooler with clouds and some sun shower around the afternoon, especially in the suburbs. Thursday's high sixty four degrees tonight Thursday night, mostly cloudy, some rain late low fifty four Friday, breezy and cool with periods of rain and thunderstorms. Some of the rain could be heavy at times, especially in the afternoon and evening Fridays. High sixty four Saturday turning out mainly sunny with cool gusty wind high sixty three Sunday, we'll see some afternoon showers. A high of sixty four wins news time twelve twenty five. Hey, guys on Seyran. Russell wilson. We're asking you to join us. And support of the DA's take that day when Saturday April twenty seven keep them safe cleaning them out take them back. Visit DA take back dot com. Do you want another truck or a truck like no other about deals on that truck during the ram spring sales event a truck with an available touchscreen that stretches and entire foot truck that has capabilities that don't exist in any other truck in its class like available air suspension? Heck, motor.

Juliet Papa Accuweather Russell wilson Seyran fifty nine degrees sixty four degrees twenty seven years fifty degrees
"twenty seven years" Discussed on Unchained

Unchained

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"twenty seven years" Discussed on Unchained

"By these traditional financial services firms where they're going to start trading bitcoin and stuff like that. But then you were also talking about what your investing in what developers are building how how to relate to each other. Because once I did just sort of seems like trading and speculation. And then on the other side, it's like building technology. So what how did those connect? Well, I think it's some of it comes down to founder expertise and background. And there are the really interesting infrastructure solutions that are being built now for the enterprise are usually coming from founders who have spent time there who already have the relationships who saw this. And they were they were tapping into there are slash bitcoin. Sub read it during work hours with their wheels spinning trying to figure out a way to do their day job in the financial world better cheaper faster using the software. And but we definitely see these two camps. There's there's the founder's building tools to solve problems Quing trackers one that let's just retail investors. Just better track their crypto taxes, very important thing. A bunch of tax payers learned last year. And to build software to do that. Because turbo tax out of the boxes not handled to a quip, calculating, your tax exposure from all of your trades across your seven different exchanges, or what have you? And so there's that sector which is still sort of working to just solve problems for the average consumer. But then there's this infrastructure that folks have been talking about where they're not getting headlines because it's not as cute as crypto CDs. But, but because someone has a relationship to the financial world, they know they know what it needs, and they're willing to do the long slog of development that could very well take years before they even get something to their customers. But they're willing to take it because they can see ten twenty years ahead. It doesn't seem like there's any other way to do it. Yeah. I completely agree with everything. You just said we were particularly fund makes a lot of the people. I'm a bit of a sort of naive to miss when it comes to technology looking at it. What can we do? What's possible? Then punt that with people like most is been that done it at Jp Morgan for twenty seven years who actually know why things all the way they are. And you know. Would be nice, you know, someone disintermediated CSD's will make real time settlement teaser across the board. But there are practical reasons why this is possible or take an act of congress to actually change some of these regulations. So that's probably not the best thing. I thought up to be trying to be taking on so in sub with same institutions and they recognize that too. And they are actually adapting evolving, so agree. You've got to have that that make sure of of the deep experience of being done it across the board. Then also a little bit of new startup in these Jassem to to get keep going for as long as it takes. I am curious because I feel like these are still pretty different tracks to one on this what they call decentralized finance track where it's gonna company, but it's this team of developers. And then they get this outset and incentivize behaviors on this network. And I see these developers. They're building the centralize money markets or to centralize derivatives or essentially exchange, and I'm just curious. How does that and does that end up really competing with traditional financial services down the line or do they work together in some way, or what's the vision there? I don't fig most of these things are actually centralized. I think what of talk about the centralize whatever service is bullshit because at the end of the day, I think recently ether delta, the founder was paid a four thousand dollar fine of the SEC for her so called this centralized application. So they centralized fine right on him for his essential as application. I think also Red Eye Dax which is a large larger decentralized exchange is now instituting KYC on their platform, which is kind of in crunch groups with this whole aspect of anyone can trade, but then we're doing KYC news. So obviously somebody's afraid that they're going to prison for something, which means it's not really centralized..

founder Jp Morgan congress SEC four thousand dollar twenty seven years ten twenty years
"twenty seven years" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

First Class Fatherhood

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"twenty seven years" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

"Listening who are a little unfamiliar with your story. Please hit us with a little bit about your background. And how you ended up infiltrating the Hells Angels motorcycle gang. Well, I was a federal agent ATF agent for twenty seven years over the course of that time almost all my experience, and all my city was an undercover work over the course of my career I participated in over five hundred undercover operations one of which was the infiltration of the Hells Angels motorcycle game, which was primarily based in Arizona. But which went all over the country with operations. Wow. Okay. Yeah. As a single guy can kind of understand the philosophy of. Hey, if something happens to me, so be it. But as a family man as a father, there's so much more at stake. There's so much more to lose. So how did you handle the fear of one something happening? To you. And now your family having to move on without you or to being uncovered and your family now becoming the target of a retaliation pull. That's a good question and those fears for my family became reality. After the Hells Angels case concluded in my undercover operations were done. My true identity was revealed and the death in violence threats came and those threats went well beyond me. There was threats to get videotape. The gang rape of my wife or death threats on my kids. There were threats locate my daughter who was a teenager at the time and torture her there were threats. I had Hells Angels threatening to say, hey, we know what your kids go to school. We know you love that little boy when he gets off the when you're waiting for him to get off the school bus someday. And he doesn't get off you. Think about who's got what we're doing to in two thousand eight my house was burned to the ground gonna fail to Sassa mation attempts. My family was inside the house at the time that arsonists hit they barely escape they escape with smoking Latian injuries. And and we're lucky to get out of the house, actually, my son who was ten years old at the time discovered. The fire everybody was asleep. He was awoken by the windows shattering from the fire. The house was was consumed planes at three o'clock in the morning. He rescued his mother and his daughter. From the fire, the arson. Investigators said if your son doesn't wake up your family dies in that fire. So those fears that you described and what my professional life brought into my personal life in brought onto my family became reality. Incredible. Wow..

Hells Angels ATF Sassa mation Arizona arson rape twenty seven years ten years
"twenty seven years" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:16 min | 2 years ago

"twenty seven years" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Twenty seven years working for General Electric in one capacity or another at one subsidiary or another leaving at the end of last year as the company's vice chair running a group called G E business innovations her thoughts on her career. And what it takes to thrive in a constantly changing workplace earn a new book called imagine it Ford Beth it's good to have you on. Thanks for having me kind. So let's get this out of the way. I well. Why did you leave GE was it just time? Well, it was time. But I left sooner than I imagined. I would we had a leadership change. And you know, how that goes new new boss new team and the old the old team's gotta go. She she says rather bluntly. That's you know, when you gotta go you gotta go. I guess right. Yeah. I thought a lot. I thought a lot this year about knowing when to exit and how you think about that. Because I think I'm all about change. And I think knowing your exit is also something you have to think about well. So that's really interesting that you bring that up because the topic of this book of of. Changing creativity. And all of that you say yourself in this book that despite all the success you had in your career. I mean vice-chair G for Grenell out. You are not atypical change agent. I'm not I come to this as an introvert reserved person. I hold back. I have an example where I worked in CNN and for Ted Turner for a year before he knew my name. And so I'm just not the one that put the ideas out there, and I had to really work to overcome my natural reserve and also some confidence along the way gimme a case study would you and let me put the caveat on the answer. You can't pick one of the big innovative companies that we all know and love like Facebook, Amazon or or apple right? Who do you like out there who's doing change and innovation? Right. I've I've been really intrigued by what I see WalMart doing right now. Digital onslaught calms. What do they have a million employees? I mean, the scale and complexity they by jet. They realized they have to go digital what I like about their story is they recognized. I think maybe late, but they've recognized it that they have to work with their strengths. What are their strengths one? They have a lot of employees to they have physical locations. So they've been investing more in having people pick up the packages on their way, home from work. It's hard to change from within. When you're a legacy company will let me poke in the aisle a little bit, right? And talk about g e because GM is maybe the granddaddy of legacy companies in this economy. Right. And and it has I won't say fallen on hard times lately. But it's been undergoing substantial change. Not always successfully it's not even in the Dow industrials anymore. I mean, it's it's a legacy company that is still trying to make the turn. Yeah. And I I mean, gee has fallen out of grace certainly from the public perception of late. It's a great company, and I was so proud to work there. I wish people could separate the stock from the company, but it's also a public company, and so I realized even saying that maybe sound a bit naive. But I think people especially with established companies, I think we underestimate the complexity that happens with scale the the need to keep the core machine running and innovate in the new, and it just creates a lot of tension and complexity and cleaning that up is really hard. And I I think we hold our legacy companies to a to a different standard just because we expect it to be easier, and it's not so let me ask you actually about taking a risk and again, an anecdote in the book Steve Jobs called and said, hey, come work for you. In point of fact, he called twice right? Yeah. And you said, no. Yeah. Budget? You look back at that. And go we need a break pregnant pause after that, right? Right. Yeah. I mean granted this for apple game. You know, what it is today? But it wasn't all long ago. Yeah. And I'll give you just a little bit of context that I was at NBC at that time in a really miserable assignment. And I had a lot of reasons to wanna leave there, and my gut was this wasn't the right job for me. I also think I was a bit afraid, and I probably didn't have the confidence. Even then that I could make it there. And so it's one of those things that I'll be honest. I did regret it at times, especially when their stock price went up. What was that? I remember sitting down, and and we're like how good could that stock ever be? But I think just regretted an opportunity maybe to push myself in a new way. But I did it for good reasons to I was incredibly loyal to the path. I was on and the G gave me lots of opportunities to grow and be innovative. So I had reasons to also know I could forge a different pathway was to Beth Comstock used to be a GE for very long time. Now, she writes books. This one is called imagine it forward. Thanks a lot. Appreciate you, Tom. Thanks kind. Nice talking to you. Thank you. Coming up heads and tips are cut off over here. As we move down the line. They cut it plates moved into a melon process. Aluminum.

General Electric Ted Turner Steve Jobs apple Beth Comstock Ford vice chair CNN NBC GM WalMart Facebook vice-chair Tom Amazon Twenty seven years
"twenty seven years" Discussed on KMJ NOW

KMJ NOW

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"twenty seven years" Discussed on KMJ NOW

"Business for over twenty seven years in fact factor one of the. Few companies that have been. Around longer than their twenty. Year warranties. And isn't that really who you want to do business with somebody who's been around for a long time give them. A call you can find out more information by going. To their website lifestyle solar Inc dot com that's lifestyles solar Inc dot com come summer you'll be Be glad, you did Has a cowboy Smile on your face The coolest Ruka Nita stake in. Have Bruce Kojak gonna show Around Interesting desert mama Kallstrom laminates join him The right side of the left coast I cannot believe that. This first our has come. And gone it has gone by quickly I've got a lot more to share with you A lot more. In this briefing that he gave us for instance He took at that time Senator. Clinton down to the West Bank got her opinion on, the wall He also took a young, Senator by the name of Barack Obama at that time didn't have any ideas gonna..

Senator Bruce Kojak Barack Obama Clinton West Bank twenty seven years
"twenty seven years" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"twenty seven years" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"He was twenty seven years my senior with enough life experience no better he was at the time at the pinnacle of his career while i was in my first job out of college do you think differently or feel more responsibility okay it's a tough question and when you look at president clinton and then you listen to his response this is inexplicably not a question he was prepared to answer sounded like this but you typically have ignored gaping fax in describing this and i bet you don't even know them this was litigated twenty years ago two thirds of the american people sided with me they were not insensitive i had a sexual harassment policy when i was governor in eighties i had two women chief of staff when i was governor women were over represented in the attorney general's office in the seventies for their percentage in the bar i've had nothing but women leaders in my office since i left you are giving one side and omitting faster president i am not not trying to present aside okay face serious impeachment there were some attempts to get him classified as near great and he's sinking like a stone in historical estimation and his postpresidency which has been kind of shabby has has made it even worse many pundits have openly wondered how vice president mike pence handled the task of being number two bonds such an ostentatious personality like donald trump is that it must be painful but as the vice president himself and you get a different answer he spoke with our host chuck douglas on ninety eight point nine fm the answer in columbus ohio between the media and the atmosphere washington dc have you found it challenging or does it just strengthen your resolve.

clinton president vice president mike pence donald trump chuck douglas columbus ohio harassment chief of staff attorney washington twenty seven years twenty years
"twenty seven years" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"twenty seven years" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"In the business twenty seven years i said this he's a top shelf announcer well said go thank you jc in boston you're on the saturday night show thank you for taking my call so the way i see it there's a real big buzz in the city right now after that series taking him to seven he punched us around that entire series but we kept coming back because of the talent that we have the coach that we have he is smart to come here he doesn't have to play the minutes he doesn't have to do a triple double when he gets to the playoffs every single game because he's surrounded by scrubs and when he defers they all brick he's coming to a good team a good foundation danny aines you're going to work that out the kid asked earlier why i don't see the reason why the warriors aren't going to be a dynasty the reason is when the brawn james comes to the boston we're gonna take them out neil said thank you jc in boston then you could i don't know if kyrie has to be a part of that seriously if it ever happened i'm not saying it would you don't need you got hayward and you don't know as his rehab from what i've read i'm not there in boston seems to be going great but you never know we'd be the same player he was in utah you don't know that lebron to boston not brand seems desperate then for ranks this goes back to getting crushed by some in the media and all the lebron haters if he goes anywhere he's already ran away wants to get rings a miami came back got a ring against golden state in cleveland he runs again k d went from oklahoma city to golden state you know the great ones michael whitton finished you know with the wizards is working with charlotte because jerry krause and at the time owner jerry reinsdorf are just crazy that's not have michael jordan lifetime.

boston danny aines warriors neil utah lebron miami cleveland oklahoma city michael whitton charlotte jerry krause jerry reinsdorf hayward michael jordan twenty seven years
"twenty seven years" Discussed on Legion of Skanks Podcast

Legion of Skanks Podcast

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"twenty seven years" Discussed on Legion of Skanks Podcast

"Is so funny that's joe now here's later like twenty seven years old and i walked in held you ten yeah my mom was thirty and i was like ten or eleven and which i walked in and he was there when we heard their whole story slow it down this other guy mom data so the guy mom dated came back that night and like was ringing the doorbell when she didn't answer he was just drunk the sky he liked punched in glass nothing let himself in and just was gashed up bleeding crazy am i stepfather never got the fuck my mom i think because he helped the guy and they called the ambulance and cinemas way i know i should've hit him but he was just like when he got up there he was just like the guy was like out of his mind and just like he was going to bleed out fad watching eating ice cream cone no matter what tripping over this plus butts every memory jay's childhood he's eating an ice cream i'm just here guys couch i was eating ice me saw shot once in an alley behind library i was eating what were you doing there i was looking for yeah i just needed some more not a lot of if you guys are wondering in a three block radius there's no ice cream i've been looking is holding a popsicle yeah popsicles the big thing that we never going to talk about on this show was roseanne what's going on with her she back.

joe jay roseanne twenty seven years
"twenty seven years" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

The Dave Ramsey Show

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"twenty seven years" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

"But i lost my job of twenty seven years ago or two twenty seven years due to a merger about a year and a half ago so i had ten years left to go on a fifteen year mortgage refinanced it for thirty so that i could afford the payments so now i'm making half what i was making we wanted to stay in this town where our kids and our grandkids and church are and the question is should we take money out of our 401k to pay off this house quicker or should we even not what do you make money into our four t right now household is about one hundred thousand okay all right here's the thing we we we need to have the house paid for by the time you are retired you're sixty right if we said five years that's five hundred thousand dollars coming into the house in five years you've got two hundred thousand dollars worth of debt on the house and so we got to do something here probably what i would do if i were used i would stop investing and i would pour every dollar i can squeeze out of my budget on that house and let's try to pay that house off i think you can pay it off conservatively in five years probably could do it in four because we're gonna planning on retiring about seven and the real question was why would i take money out of or not put money into the 401k that's making twelve to pay off a mortgage it's only four and eight well it because of rich because of.

five years 401k five hundred thousand dollars two hundred thousand dollars two twenty seven years twenty seven years fifteen year ten years
"twenty seven years" Discussed on The Minimalists Podcast

The Minimalists Podcast

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"twenty seven years" Discussed on The Minimalists Podcast

"Way and that was really the beginning of reexamining my lifestyle habits and and reforming my relationship with food and reprioritising how i was spending my time quite frankly and and it took many many years to get to a point where i get to sit here and talk to you guys but that was really the beginning of the whole thing so sounds familiar a little bit yes it's been deal with himself recently to we've talked past podcast you want to do but we can for rich yeah yeah just some reservoir is because i think our audience is probably heard it a couple times already so recently i was well let me just backtrack i was saying it sounds familiar because it's the living for the american dream and realizing you have nothing yes you're at the right table here with the right people who who have that in common with but which i was talking about specifically is my my blood work i got back at i like the beginning of february so my cousin passed away twenty seven years old from psoriasis he was he was a heavy drinker he had blood work done and two thousand fourteen he was great no problems and then four years later dies of psoriasis if you would wait a die too if he would have had a blood test prior to save his life so after seeing this i'm like man like i know i live a healthier lifestyle than what he did but still wanna you know just kind of gave me that extra motivation and get my blood checked and when i got checked my hemoglobin anc which is a basically tells you your average sugar in your blood for the last ninety days it was like seven dot one which is i mean it's pretty much diabetic type two diabetes so my my doctor call me he's like dude you gotta tell me about what you eat and i was explaining him my diet and he's like no no no man like how many doughnuts do you eat today.

twenty seven years ninety days four years
"twenty seven years" Discussed on Talk Radio WPHT 1210

Talk Radio WPHT 1210

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"twenty seven years" Discussed on Talk Radio WPHT 1210

"Advisor for twenty seven years i respected you greatly until this morning i heard you talk about the deal you are an embarrassment and very upsetting that you didn't get the whole story don't make it like we're all bad so we don't need a rule that tell us to do the right thing for the client because if i didn't that wouldn't be a business twenty seven years if you want me to come down and don't get bursary can give me a call if you wanna put me on the air which i doubt it in all of this that's the question that i ask and the answer is the cfp board stepped up we stuck our neck out and we said we're going to do what's right all right so edmore president of element financial services and member of the board of the certified financial planner board of standards potentially you could argue serving two masters had to see if people were not been unanimous in its approval of the revised rules clarifying that all cfp's everywhere all the time the stack in the client's best interests which is what you know we do here element financial have the board voted no and defeated the proposal what would you have done.

Advisor president twenty seven years
"twenty seven years" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"twenty seven years" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

"Maxine waters was first elected to congress from greater los angeles in nineteen ninety maxine waters is a democrat she's got a high national profile she has been in congress for twenty seven years she has reported a republican opponent for her seat this year he also ran against her in the last election cycle is man named omar navarro omar navarro is an ardent trump supporter is a former car salesman lost a maxine waters in two thousand sixteen by more than fifty points still giving it another try this time with backing from high profile trump supporters from all over the country among them trump adviser roger stone pardoned former arizona sheriff joe arpaio and the info war guys info wars guy who says the sandy hook massacre didn't really happen as for mr navarro himself according to the l a times he resigned as a local traffic commissioner last year after a pepper spray incident he was accused of pepper spraying a child while actually been aiming to shoot pepper spray at ralliers at a pro sanctuary cities event you know so plead guilty last fall to a misdemeanor that had to do with an electric tracking device he attached to his wife's car after pleading guilty he was sentenced to a day in jail and eighteen months probation and he was ordered by the court take an anger management course now listen to what happened when the local paper the daily breeze tried to ask them about that quote initially said there are a lot of omar navarro's implying that perhaps someone else with the same name was convicted of the same charge on the same day involving the same wife then he said the incident that led to the criminal charge occurred years ago actually happened last year finally he acknowledged the conviction but first he blamed the orange county district attorney's office and the media for fake news and then finally he admitted that it was his own doing.

los angeles congress omar navarro omar navarro salesman roger stone joe arpaio commissioner pepper arizona orange county twenty seven years eighteen months
"twenty seven years" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"twenty seven years" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"I was talking about how passionate they are about this more now this passion and as brand loyalty from a business perspective but i'd like the creativity i was joking about my nascar experience being lightning mcqueen i didn't know that they were real nascar razors in cars three i didn't know that but if you want a good way to develop the next generation of fans video games movies of pixar that is good i'm very impressed that they found a way to get that thai my son by oldest you'll be twenty seven years old i told him how the count by using the numbers on the side of cars on nascar the first number he learned was forty three okay whose fortythree beds richard petty oh i thought i'd skied we could use ever number of the week but i do you have what i do have a number of the week i fear flood those big phenomena confused feel fed it to be the one that under five not wear the number because of my we had a chance to go for three and around his numbers in good time experts are wearing the number i would is happy proud bloomberg business it supports the number of the week die zayn valve of the number of the week very easy 60 very easy sixty other sixtieth running that's correct i'll see you said that are that's like that's why i know it yeah i listen when you speak see you though psalms one i will let me let me a man i was listening when you said that wave back 1950 nine as relieved petty won the first daytona five hundred i can go on to the great chant we know people listen to the show we owe go on as i can i can not they used used there was nothing in the infield in fact back in the day during that time there was a football field in the infield right right as you come off the trial but that's where the football field was sold rightward today we use the daytona and hopefully no one will slide through the grass there that's where the football one impress i'll tell you what i can do okay i can tell you carlot which slipped out of his car that that dunedoo the net.

pixar nascar bloomberg football twenty seven years
"twenty seven years" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

WDTK The Patriot

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"twenty seven years" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

"The don't want the radio show on the hillsdale monthly as always were working on your financial freedom today my friend is uh an opportunity forest revelled in mario futuristic inferences that i live by for twenty seven years and most we know that long time i've thought texans or that houston just could not have a good sports team and then i did a little coversation the other day about the difference between the astros who were playing to win and the texans were playing to not lose and what's interesting is epr ahead that discussion i had many many people contacted me tell me where they thought it's exactly right that the texans were playing to not lose and the astros were playing to win well my friends we all know what happened last night they wanted all world series hats off congratulations houston finally gets into a playoff and winds as an incredible day for houston texas now today i'm gonna make texas houston even more centerpiece of everything because in the past in houston for many many many years houston was like the number one place to invest in real estate specially for apartment complexes and it was that way for many years and then all of a sudden we had the big oil crisis and you know barrel boiled went down to twenty or thirty dollars bear whatever got down to and they started late and people often all of a sudden houston's economy changed and houston as an investment location was brutalised and then we had harvey and.

astros world series houston real estate harvey texas twenty seven years thirty dollars
"twenty seven years" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"twenty seven years" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"You will save money i think every time we do this cumulatively we save one hundred thousand dollars conservatively with all of the people that call you can save a thousand a month couple hundred a month a hundred a month you save enough it's well were there's no obligation and nothing can go wrong they do all the trans transferring for you i don't know why people say well i've had straight form for thirty five years and i'm happy what do you mean you're happy gino which are paying how do you know you're happy how do you even though you're happy you know now we my heart is worn by this campaign were doing and mark was boosting it for me today on the facebook post i did a facebook post any any any a gofundme me for a guy dan dan wants to adopt his daughter he his sevenyearold stepdaughter he wants to adopt her because her father is the convicted child pornographer and child exploiter he's in prison for twenty seven years they found forty thousand items of child pornography images videos of todd dealers in infants being molested this is disgusting and the guy in prison is being appointed an attorney to fight it so he wants visit tation with his daughter he's in prison for twenty seven years she would be much better off to be with the man that has raised her since the age of three andhra biological mom but the dad is fighting the adoption we are trying to get legal fees not all of them were getting a discount on legal fees for sure but expenses to take this to court and to fight it now please go to facebook referral list facebook and look at the post or go to go fund me and then you look for fight for adoption that's on gofundme fund me fight for adoption please we've had so many generous people if you can only get five or ten bucks in my pledged to you is and we are donating to my pledged to you is that what now one dime we'll be wasted i promise you that now one dime will be wasted.

gino dan dan attorney tation facebook child pornography todd twenty seven years one hundred thousand dollars thirty five years
"twenty seven years" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"twenty seven years" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Simple serve resumes joe oakland san jose cumulus station police officer killed stink trooper shot i'm christopher crews a police officer and kissimmee florida has been shot and killed which morning police arrested a man and charged him with firstdegree murder cheap jeff odell officer matthew baxter has been with the kissimmie police department for three years he was twenty seven years old he was married to acres semi police officer and has four children a second officer was gravely injured in a shooting last night to police officers recovering from being shot in jacksonville florida last night spokesman mike breen one also drug and both of his hands of left and right hand another officer were struck in stomach with the right around the suspect and the two officers were transported from the same the three victims that were inside of the house are all safe and police say the person who shot to pennsylvania state troopers at a food marred about sixty miles south of pittsburgh last night is dead we officers are in stable condition police in boston say they're ready for today's plan gathering of the conservative boston free speech coalition and the groups that are planning to protest correspondent polo sandovol on the scene says police have been monitoring social media and have contacted individuals who threatened violence as four counterprotesters they will be meeting offside is there saying that they're facebook page indicates that they could see potentially thousand about five hundred police officers will be on duty for the gathering to be held in the famous boston commons tens of thousands of protesters expected duke university and durham north carolina said it removed a statue of confederate general robert e lee this morning from duke chapel and press at trump will not participate in this year's kennedy said our honors in a state but this morning the white house said the president and first lady have decided not to participate in this year's activities to allow the arteries to celebrate without any political distraction i'm christopher cruise uh home what have led on we've got more food his hanshang let centenarian america's struggling with hunger.

president kennedy durham facebook boston pennsylvania jacksonville kissimmie jeff odell murder firstdegree san jose cumulus station joe oakland america florida white house trump duke chapel robert e lee north carolina duke university social media polo sandovol pittsburgh the house mike breen officer matthew baxter twenty seven years three years