33 Burst results for "Twenty Meters"

"twenty meters" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:43 min | 8 months ago

"twenty meters" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Bringing people from very different areas together. That's what suffered the most. Yes so so much on like you do as you say. And even called the company's organiz their product line. so there's so many different factors so soclean to school working spaces. So i guess experiment here is about sort of startup ecosystem rate. Yes yes so what you find here here. The again the nice teacher was that the start ups were randomly assigned to their rooms. So it meant that. I didn't or we didn't have to. Because his co. on authored work We didn't have to deal with. Oh they chose to locate besides which is great to start off with and here what we find is that Startups learn from their neighbors. Only if these neighbors are very very close. I wanna say they're very close. I mean twenty meters. And if you are further down the paul then that you could you may as well be in a different floor and this is crazy to think about it. Because for thinking about all of these The research working on clusters in cities. And then we're moving into a co working place one floor and we find. It's only really between basically your neighbor That you're learning. That's that's pretty. Very very micro sophie. Think about that. And when i talk about learn from their neighbors the way we measured that was we were looking at technology adoption and so we used a website called built with That shows the tech stack of of upsets and we have exact time stamp so we could see when startup adopted a technology that the other start-up had already been using so. This is a great way. It's a different way of measuring its patents at It was a it's a. It's a unique in newer way of measuring learning from from others down in the state and so they have to be really cool together. You say i flicked work from physical synergy perspective. It brings back some memories. Seventy at hewlett packard covered in the in the ninety s and hd..

twenty meters one floor ninety hewlett packard at Seventy
"twenty meters" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"twenty meters" Discussed on Conversations

"<Speech_Male> There are twenty meters <Speech_Male> so there was a <Speech_Male> change in a mall <Speech_Male> so took the best three <Speech_Male> months to build <Speech_Male> one mile <Speech_Male> of start war. <Speech_Male> That's a shame in <Speech_Male> the stone. Is there <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> for <Speech_Male> the malls <Speech_Male> and the wall is <Speech_Male> usually about four foot high. <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> why did <Speech_Female> the town <SpeakerChange> of mount <Speech_Female> gambier <Speech_Male> build a wall. <Speech_Male> Oh that was <Speech_Male> a <Speech_Male> bill weird <Speech_Male> when really it's <Speech_Male> a retaining <Speech_Male> wall <Speech_Male> near blue lake <Speech_Male> and <Silence> it was built <Speech_Male> immediately <Speech_Male> after the first <Speech_Male> world war night <Speech_Male> celebration <Speech_Male> of the first world war <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> recognize <Speech_Male> one <Speech_Male> great <Speech_Male> with another <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> what makes it interesting. <Silence> Is that about <Speech_Male> a <Speech_Male> third of the population <Speech_Male> of mount. Gambier <Speech_Male> was a fighting <Speech_Male> the war. I think <Speech_Male> a third of the <Speech_Male> market <Speech_Male> the numbers a little bit wrong. <Speech_Male> But let's say <Speech_Male> a third of the mild <Speech_Male> population <Speech_Male> now. Another third <Speech_Male> would probably kids <Speech_Male> so there were <Speech_Male> a number <Speech_Male> men live. <Speech_Male> They built this great big <Speech_Male> wall coming <Speech_Male> of the dimensions. <Speech_Male> But i built <SpeakerChange> this great <Speech_Male> seeing one day <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> together <Speech_Male> and typically <Speech_Male> advised is <Speech_Male> the women by the skulls <Speech_Male> and the today <Speech_Male> and kept <Speech_Male> the flex fit. <Speech_Male> And i put a <Speech_Male> and built this <Speech_Male> degree <SpeakerChange> tiny war. We're <Speech_Female> just still live. Of course <Speech_Female> your <Speech_Female> ni- back in <Speech_Female> nineteen seventy six. <Speech_Female> He used his frontiers <Speech_Female> loaded to knock overstock. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Farmers have got <Speech_Female> a better <SpeakerChange> appreciation. <Speech_Male> Now <Speech_Male> i have <Speech_Male> The farmers <Speech_Male> this <Speech_Male> was one of the things that <Speech_Male> really struck me. <Speech_Male> They <Speech_Male> are attached to <Speech_Male> the walls that <Speech_Male> mean that literally <Speech_Male> they value them they <Speech_Male> say the heritage value <Speech_Male> in them but <Speech_Male> also a challenge <Speech_Male> for the farmers <Speech_Male> because many <Speech_Male> of the wolves which run <Speech_Male> through <Speech_Male> paddock's <Speech_Male> regretting convenience <Speech_Male> machineries <Speech_Male> getting bigger <Speech_Male> gave us on arable <Speech_Male> land. Machinery <Speech_Male> is getting bigger pedic's <Speech_Male> getting bigger and <Speech_Male> so forth and several <Speech_Male> stonewall. Running through the <Speech_Male> middle is <Speech_Male> just unworkable. <Speech_Male> And so i <Speech_Male> fully understand <Speech_Male> why they need to <Speech_Male> get rid of some <Speech_Male> of them. I <Speech_Male> would like to think <Speech_Male> that these <Speech_Male> walls can be prioritized <Speech_Male> and bounty <Speech_Male> walls for example <Speech_Male> can <Speech_Male> be maintained <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> because <Speech_Male> not in the road <Silence> but <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> it's an expensive <Speech_Male> business <Speech_Male> back in the days when the <Speech_Male> building. These things <Speech_Male> our pied <Speech_Male> a pound to china and <Speech_Male> five <Speech_Male> shillings or rod <Speech_Male> using language <Speech_Male> issue <SpeakerChange> other sensor <Speech_Male> but <Speech_Male> not not. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> That's right. I <Speech_Male> played much <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> but so <Speech_Male> labor was very cheap. <Speech_Male> Material was free <Speech_Male> whereas <Speech_Male> now to bill <Speech_Male> stonewalls. The stein <Speech_Male> is very expensive <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> the library is very expensive. <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> it's just impractical <Speech_Male> now so <Speech_Male> expect farmers <Speech_Male> to look after <Speech_Male> these walls which <Speech_Male> we think have heritage value <Speech_Male> is a <Speech_Male> big ask and i think <Speech_Male> they need <Speech_Male> assistance <Speech_Male> if we if the <Speech_Male> wider community <Speech_Male> sees the <Speech_Male> heritage failure in <Speech_Male> these walls than we should <Speech_Male> be prepared to support <Speech_Male> them but one <Speech_Male> major another <Speech_Male> their needs to be some <Speech_Male> discussion around here that <Speech_Male> might happen <Speech_Male> and farmers would be <Speech_Male> willing but <Speech_Male> i do need some support. <Speech_Male> Possibly <Speech_Male> support comes in <Speech_Male> the form of labor <Speech_Male> you know from <Speech_Male> people who want to <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> help restore <Speech_Female> noble. <Speech_Female> Thanks so much <Speech_Female> for being my <SpeakerChange> guest <Speech_Male> on conversations today <Speech_Male> for <Silence>

china twenty meters one mile nineteen seventy six today first world war one three Gambier four foot third
"twenty meters" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"twenty meters" Discussed on Conversations

"<Speech_Male> There are twenty meters <Speech_Male> so there was a <Speech_Male> change in a mall <Speech_Male> so took the best of the three <Speech_Male> months to build <Speech_Male> one mile <Speech_Male> of start war. <Speech_Male> That's a shame in <Speech_Male> the stone. Is there <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> for <Speech_Male> the malls. <Speech_Male> The wall is <Speech_Male> usually about four foot high. <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> why did <Speech_Female> the town <SpeakerChange> of mount <Speech_Female> gambier <Speech_Male> build a wall. <Speech_Male> Oh that was <Speech_Male> a <Speech_Male> bill weird <Speech_Male> when really it's <Speech_Male> a retaining <Speech_Male> wall <Speech_Male> near blue lake <Speech_Male> and <Silence> it was built <Speech_Male> immediately <Speech_Male> after the first <Speech_Male> world war night <Speech_Male> celebration <Speech_Male> of the first world war <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> recognize <Speech_Male> one <Speech_Male> great <Speech_Male> with another <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> what makes it interesting. <Silence> Is that about <Speech_Male> a <Speech_Male> third of the population <Speech_Male> of mount. Gambier <Speech_Male> was a fighting <Speech_Male> the war. I think <Speech_Male> a third of the <Speech_Male> market <Speech_Male> the numbers a little bit wrong. <Speech_Male> But let's say <Speech_Male> a third of the mild <Speech_Male> population <Speech_Male> now. Another third <Speech_Male> would probably kids <Speech_Male> so there were <Speech_Male> a number <Speech_Male> men live. <Speech_Male> They built this great big <Speech_Male> wall coming <Speech_Male> of the dimensions. <Speech_Male> But i built <SpeakerChange> this great <Speech_Male> seeing one day <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> together <Speech_Male> and typically <Speech_Male> advised is <Speech_Male> the women by the skulls <Speech_Male> and the today <Speech_Male> and kept <Speech_Male> the flex fit. <Speech_Male> And i put a <Speech_Male> and built this <Speech_Male> degree <SpeakerChange> tiny. We <Speech_Female> still live. Of course <Speech_Female> your <Speech_Female> ni- back in <Speech_Female> nineteen seventy six. <Speech_Female> He used his frontiers <Speech_Female> loaded to knock overstock. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Farmers have got <Speech_Female> a better <SpeakerChange> appreciation. <Speech_Male> Now <Speech_Male> i have <Speech_Male> The farmers <Speech_Male> this <Speech_Male> was one of the things that <Speech_Male> really struck me. <Speech_Male> They <Speech_Male> are attached to <Speech_Male> the walls that <Speech_Male> mean that literally <Speech_Male> they value them they <Speech_Male> say the heritage value <Speech_Male> in them but <Speech_Male> also a challenge <Speech_Male> for the farmers <Speech_Male> because many <Speech_Male> of the wolves which run <Speech_Male> through <Speech_Male> paddock's <Speech_Male> regretting convenience <Speech_Male> machineries <Speech_Male> getting bigger <Speech_Male> arable <Speech_Male> land. Machinery <Speech_Male> is getting bigger pedic's <Speech_Male> getting bigger and <Speech_Male> so forth and several <Speech_Male> stonewall. Running through the <Speech_Male> middle is <Speech_Male> just unworkable. <Speech_Male> And so i <Speech_Male> fully understand <Speech_Male> why they need to <Speech_Male> get rid of some <Speech_Male> of them. I <Speech_Male> would like to think <Speech_Male> that these <Speech_Male> walls can be prioritized <Speech_Male> and bounty <Speech_Male> walls for example <Speech_Male> can <Speech_Male> be maintained <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> because <Speech_Male> not in the road. <Silence> But <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> it's an expensive <Speech_Male> business <Speech_Male> back in the days when the <Speech_Male> building these things now <Speech_Male> pied <Speech_Male> a pound of china and <Speech_Male> five <Speech_Male> shillings or rod <Speech_Male> using language <Speech_Male> issue <SpeakerChange> other sensor <Speech_Male> but <Speech_Male> not not. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> That's right. I <Speech_Male> played much <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> but so <Speech_Male> labor was very cheap. <Speech_Male> Material was free <Speech_Male> whereas <Speech_Male> now to bill <Speech_Male> stonewalls. The stein <Speech_Male> is very expensive <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> the library is very expensive. <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> it's just impractical <Speech_Male> now so <Speech_Male> expect farmers <Speech_Male> to look after <Speech_Male> these walls which <Speech_Male> we think have heritage value <Speech_Male> is a <Speech_Male> big ask and i think <Speech_Male> they need <Speech_Male> assistance <Speech_Male> if we if the <Speech_Male> wider community <Speech_Male> sees the <Speech_Male> heritage failure in <Speech_Male> these walls than we should <Speech_Male> be prepared to support <Speech_Male> them but one <Speech_Male> major another <Speech_Male> their needs to be some <Speech_Male> discussion around here <Speech_Male> that might happen <Speech_Male> and farmers would be <Speech_Male> willing but <Speech_Male> i do need some support. <Speech_Male> Possibly <Speech_Male> support comes in <Speech_Male> the form of labor <Speech_Male> you know from <Speech_Male> people who want to <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> help restore <Speech_Female> noble. <Speech_Female> Thanks so much <Speech_Female> for being my <SpeakerChange> guest <Speech_Male> on conversations today <Speech_Male> for <Silence>

twenty meters one mile china nineteen seventy six world war one today first four foot three Gambier first world war third things
"twenty meters" Discussed on Hysteria 51

Hysteria 51

04:30 min | 1 year ago

"twenty meters" Discussed on Hysteria 51

"Okay so narrow. Marie we are neck section as in next episode known. How where what time are we at burley. Twenty minutes okay. Good okay good good. Good good good okay. It can arc never art. Okay okay. all right so marine. Kirby are stupidly burdened with sand and water hourglasses now guy and and cattle and crops and days seemed like they're getting shorter the nights are longer. Were freaking out. It's it's amendment out over right yes so okay. Now we're able to do some science though. Let's about finally it's about time okay. Let's say i want to measure physical event. Okay right so let's use the most. Let's use the most famous example of all time from science which is newton's falling to the ground. Okay all right. Yes if i wanted to understand how the apple falls right So i wanna know like well. How long does it take. Or how does the apple for like what's going on there understand that system. I need to have an understanding of time as well. Yes and so. I need essentially to start formulating mathematics or physical representations of these systems that i'm working in that include time in some way. Yes so for example. I know that if i throw in apple up into the air. Like if i throw an apple up the emory what happens to describe its flight paths to me so the apple goes up into the air and then it comes back down right so it. It goes up in the air shack really quickly. Then it seems to slow down Pause and stops at the top And then it starts to come down again. Yes if we were to measure the speed at the bottom the speed. I threw it up at the speed that it came down at those two speeds would be about the same but they would be an opposite direction so in other words i throw it up at twenty meters per second. Because i'm like a monster. Thriller falls down at twenty meters per second round right rougher equipment yes roughly the same time So it appears then that there is some. If i just measured the distance it fell. That isn't really enough information from right because it just goes up. It goes up a certain height and then it comes down right. If i include time though suddenly i can measure a lot of other interesting things. So for example. How quickly is the apple. Moving at any given time right which is what we call velocity. Yes so the apple goes up and as it goes up its velocity decreases it stops and then it starts to come down again k. So philosophy. Then i'm gonna define as how far something can travel in a given unit of time. Yes so it's like how much. How many meters seattle going per second right now something. Those seems to be happening. Whereas i threw the apple up.

Twenty minutes two speeds twenty meters per second Marie apple Kirby newton second burley seattle
"twenty meters" Discussed on Harvesting Nature’s Wild Fish and Game Podcast

Harvesting Nature’s Wild Fish and Game Podcast

05:07 min | 1 year ago

"twenty meters" Discussed on Harvesting Nature’s Wild Fish and Game Podcast

"That i liked it was like i'm not really using it anymore. starting to travel more in hunt so less time in the ocean in one of my buddies here was like. Hey we should start spearfishing. More and i was like what suit. Well i just sold my gun. So i i went the same route you did. I was like you know what i'm gonna go traditional. I'm going to go pull speier Because we're hitting a lot of the docs Like some of the jetties here close to my house in. I was like smaller fish opportunities. And then we started progressing. Going out with friends in the boat and Starting a almost exact same scenario like a shahdeh a shot a yellow jack and Literally i remember it. These guys fight pretty hard. Even if you have a spear gun to they'll they'll fight with your line but i remember have in my life six foot long spear poll of in in this Yellow jacket is just like it's bouncing like the fiberglass flexing back and forth and he's like fighting it and i'm trying to hold my arm straight trying to get to the top and then get to the top it's like another twenty meter swim To the to the uncut tiny meter twenty meters twenty swim. It's a twenty meter swim to the boat and so i'm trying to drag him and then one of my buddies shouts shark and i was just like call man like just one of those days but no nonetheless I get him back to the boat. So that i was pretty stoked about that but the fight and in that moment though 'cause there's nothing like outside of grabbing them and and you know pop on the gills or something like that is just not latin pop off and you lose them and emotions. It's equivalent to losing a deer in the woods or something like that like i. It's something you've either injured or hurt and didn't complete the process. So for sure julie he sorry said note now totally sad but also touching gears if i can. Oh my gosh i haven't. I've swam with sharks. I've experienced sharks in the water from a boat out here. And then i went diving on the north shore in On oahu with friends and glasgow sharks like what is the experience like with like spearfishing with sharks around like whoa. How do you navigate that So we we.

twenty meters julie twenty meter swim twenty swim six foot long one latin those buddies oahu
"twenty meters" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

WhyWeWork BrianVee

03:28 min | 1 year ago

"twenty meters" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

"Is disconnected from your Your bed tear cell phone to your car. Phone tier were computer tier and head. I'm a computer to so. Don't get me wrong. But this disconnect The inability to slow slow down. Just slow down and let the world come to you a little bit. Maybe ready join the. I live here amongst a forest of apartment buildings. They're fifteen to twenty story high it. There's just in this in this. Some think we live in the country that live in this area in the middle of say. Six apartment buildings. This one little neighborhood of apartment buildings. We have a kids play area with a small twenty by twenty twenty meters by twenty meters patch of grass. And they're not allowed to play on it so it was. You said criminal it. And i've fought for a long and i fight every summer that no i do play on it but i'm like this is the only place these kids can come in. Because they're not allowed kids. Stay in and play games or watch. Tv there's so you don't get those skills. You'll get allowed to turn our children loose the way i was as a kid you know i was born late seventies so we're still allowed at that age law of us who at least for rural to walk out the door be gone and wesley made mistakes and got her. I refused Juries have a long ways to go and get back. Those is there always bested. Joey speaking mistakes. Is there any mistakes that you made that you've learned that they're helping you along your path with working in your journey with life. I was an alcoholic so Don't do that a lot. Hatay joey's means i was in alchoholic under that. I'm a lot happier these days of being sober. You know those of us who do a lot of trauma at life A lot of experience to it's sometimes it's not just the trauma that will get to you. It's it's the fact that is amazing thing happened and this trauma happened to. That's like double twist on your head right. So i got off on attention keno. That's that's what i asked. If there's a mistake you made in in that. I have another question for that in a moment. But where do you place. I think from your perspective. You have some good insight education an exercise or the fundamentals First of all we are meant to work. you know. And that's a great great thing that you know why we work. 'cause we're we're into we're physical creatures. Were supposed to be. I like this old man. Alex allen used to say to be to just hundred years old. Now.

Alex allen twenty meters fifteen hundred years Six apartment buildings twenty twenty twenty meters Joey twenty story Juries First double one little neighborhood Hatay joey late seventies
Trauma in the Philippines asthirdmajor storm barrels through

UN News

05:21 min | 1 year ago

Trauma in the Philippines asthirdmajor storm barrels through

"These southeast asian nation of the philippines has being pummeled by the third major storm in three weeks adding to the pain and suffering thousands of families typhoon vanco locally known as ulysses made landfall on wednesday night and although it's much weaker than super typhoon goni. It bought catastrophic flooding across the capital manila sprawling densely populated city. Un uses video spoke to the un migration agencies. Kristen dedi chief of mission of iowan philippines who just driven to marikina central manila began by describing the scene just hours. After the latest storm's arrival parts of manila. That are twenty meters you. The water rose to twenty one. Point five meters so really significant. I'm actually standing on the river. Bed near marikina where the floodwaters absolutely raging l. And car are being taken away. And what things did. The storm hit manila. So the rain started yesterday evening. about six o'clock in the evening it started raining quite hard and then Definitely i was awoken in two wins howling at. You know it wasn't supposed to be as it certainly wasn't the strength of typhoon rolly last week but the damage in manila is much much more severe than it was last week so i was awakened at about midnight. One o'clock in the morning took a winds howling. Rains pounding poured throughout the night so at about three thirty in the morning they raised They have a signal system here in the philippines and they raise the signal for an area called fateh kina to level three and they were doing evacuations throughout the night so yeah quite quite intense so as things stand a lot of the population was already impacted by goni and were in evacuation centers. But how has the situation changed with this new star yet. While it's absolutely astro faded. The scituate ation so the for the new storm made landfall rowley or ideas. It's known go. Knee and international did not severely affect manila but it affected the provinces of alibi and cut to anise and camera. D'or sewer And those areas were again hit extremely hard with with ulysses just coming through so it's absolutely exacerbated. The situation you had people that were evacuated. Three and three weeks is the third type. Third major tie phone In three weeks. So it's exacerbated the situation for sure now this recent one which came through last night that had the additional impact on manila and manila was not as impacted from the first two typhoons Last week and the week before. But it's been hit hard with the with this one absolutely hit hard with a lot of flooding. People are still being evacuated enough rescue boats pulling in more rescue boats to bring people loud. Government is just doing an amazing job of the red cross of additional rescues. They've really. I mean right now you could see. They're bringing a lot more rescue boats for the people in terms of any initial estimates any any indications of damage or displacement especially in manila. It's not clear yet in the middle. It's not clear i'm not. I'm not sure what the numbers are at this point. I mean it's a very it's a moving situation But it has to be in the tens of thousands in terms of damage. it's massive. But i'm not sure. I mean it's too early to calculate exactly and i'm not. I'm not aware of any fatalities at this point. I have been on news today to see what the if there have been reported casualties. I haven't seen any but The damage from the flood waters is going to be is going to be massive definitely. I mean they're having flooding levels higher than joy under a hit in two thousand nine which really devastated parts of parts of manila. Absolutely government in a stretch the quite quite skill. that's. Cincinnati stripped earthquakes from the year then from co bid and now now. Three typhoon lebron It's just up. The we feel very bad for them outside manila. How's the situation in luzon and the areas that the typhoon went through. Yeah quite quite strong. There was a lot of flooding. This typhoon brought much more flooding than the whereas typhoon rolly lot of in damage but this typhoon. People's how are they coping. One one storm iphone and another over the last few weeks detrimental evacuated three times in three weeks. They lost their homes completely I mean they're tastes. Now t percent of what you know in some of these areas where they've been evacuated multiple times The definitely suffering Kidger also particularly stressed. I mean filipinos are the most resilient people in the world. But i don't know how much more i can take to be on his.

Manila Vanco Kristen Dedi Iowan Philippines Marikina Central Manila UN Philippines Rowley Government Luzon Cincinnati
"twenty meters" Discussed on The 2 Dudes & a Mike Podcast

The 2 Dudes & a Mike Podcast

04:55 min | 1 year ago

"twenty meters" Discussed on The 2 Dudes & a Mike Podcast

"I'm hey man you get anything up there. I think i just heard some stuff. He's like no. I didn't hear anything and then also sting and they hit the laugh and he's like oh shit. Yeah we're under attack dude fuck and he looks at me and i look at here. Currently pants down. Oh yeah pants down around on this bucket and he's up in this lab like way up high you know like a little bit of ways to not like over my shoulder twenty meters down or so. I'm all like we'll talk to do. What are you going to do. I'm like train for this canadian. Government did not tell me this exercise when you get shot at mit shit. What do you do told me. No one told me man like they're supposed to prepare you for everything. So i'm just like fuck i gotta go man so you just stop. Yeah get the fuck back. The safer place. It's covered in like you know safe material you won't shot at and then of course the live just picks them up with their camera system in their cannon that twenty mike mike cannon just the bill and then you know no more small arms fire but That was the first time. I got shot at it was It was pretty wild as as it was kind of like. Not what you expect you go to war. You'd think smaller fires going to be like in the movies and it's going to be like some guy turns to you and pulls a gun out and i'll sensor shoot ninety and you're gonna get like john maclean firefight knock toby towers like i'm gonna see the guy knows some guy taking pot shots from who the fuck knows where and two or three and then finally one on the lab and made us go..

twenty meters ninety three two john maclean first time mike mike cannon one twenty canadian
Science briefs from around the world

60-Second Science

01:55 min | 1 year ago

Science briefs from around the world

"Hi, I'm scientific American Assistant News Editor Sarah Frazier, and here's a short piece from the August. Twenty twenty issue of the magazine in the section called it. He dispatches from the frontiers of science technology and medicine. The article is titled Quick Hits And it's a rundown of some non corona virus stories from around the globe. From Canada a new study models how gigantic morphing Blob of liquid iron in Earth's outer core underneath the Canadian Arctic is losing its grip on the north magnetic pole a second intensifying. Blah below Siberia is pulling the poll away. From Scotland, a geologic dating efforts suggests the fossil of millipedes creature found on the island of Cara formed four hundred, twenty, five, million years ago making it possibly the oldest known fossilized land animal older land animals have been spotted indirectly through preserve tracks. From Tanzania researchers discovered Africa's largest ever collection a fossilized human footprints left in volcanic mud about ten thousand years ago. Many of them came from a group of Seventeen people mostly women all walking in the same direction. From Norway archaeologists excavating a twenty meter. Viking ship buried below farmers field to stop a would eating fungus from destroying it. Ground penetrating radar had found the ship in two thousand eighteen and a new woods sample analysis revealed that could not be preserved underground. From Zambia in Mongolia. Spring satellite tagged Kuku completed an epic twelve thousand kilometer journey from one country to the other. It had originally been tagged in Mongolia in two thousand nineteen and traverse sixteen countries in his round trip migration. From Antarctica, scientists found that King Penguin excrement releases nitrous oxide also known as laughing gas. It forms a soil bacteria eat the droppings nitrogen rich compounds.

Twenty Twenty Mongolia Sarah Frazier Nitrous Oxide News Editor Tanzania Siberia Norway Canada Cara Scotland Africa Antarctica Zambia Kuku
Lamar Reveiws - Dead To Me

Bob and Sheri

05:03 min | 2 years ago

Lamar Reveiws - Dead To Me

"Time now are for the drinking People's movie a lot critic more and alcohol I demand. sales up He is fifty three percent dead to me too on much? Netflix. Make you do strange How you doing things? Like listen to excellent? this but Tennessee This is woman another was arrested winner from for Netflix. repeatedly calling That I nine probably one one would not asking have seen police the bring if a helicopter my wife hadn't because kept talking Blake about Shelton people was trying telling to kill her her about it I. and I do like Christina He seems applegate like a nice and I've been man watching her since married with children we were just talking and she's about turned him out to on be the voice a fantastic and I mean Gwen actor Stefani and she when I just picture keeps hers getting better living somewhere. and also like I picture Linda. her living somewhere Chiarinelli like London that Senate. or She's New York so or La. She's loose living on. and crazy. Blake Shelton's farm She's perfect for in the part. Now this is Oklahoma. one of those reviews I just where don't think her an sadly Oklahoma so he I can't must really tell he must you anything really be something. you This all lady I also can give. claimed You is the that there big was picture a man in the woods with no with a details knife and and I urge you to That be she's careful dating if Eric. you start Church reading about and this show Dolly. or Parton talking was to people flying about in that night always to see remember. her. Her name Just is Mary. let Myers my education. police they pair The less of visit you to know make sure she the was okay better off. You and are they found of course an open bottle of vodka because on the table because in if smelled if if of alcohol I tell and had slurred speech. anything that goes She was on charged with in misusing. the first episode Nine one one then so it's I just know not it's the stuff same. It's just not Staying the same. in You just all have the to time sit down but and watch it. you gotta But back off I will from the say bottle there folks. Christina applegate. I'm She plays with Jin you Blake. Shelton a really wouldn't be my first uptight. pick as my Real celebrity estate agent assassin. living in California. No not She's at got all. two Although and she has he was just probably lost a crack her husband shot he's to a real a hit outdoorsy and guy. run He driver. just doesn't seem to have that She's kind of Mollison. really sad she's Let's go very to today's very more of mad the day. and It's Scott she's completely wearing who frustrated says that because he has discovered not only has she lost her husband. what he believes It seems is the like entrance the police to an underground are alien just not base. working hard enough to find Google the person Earth helped who ran him him find down. it. I mean It's there's on a lot a small other cases uninhabited island but you know for in her. Indonesia. This only thing And he believes an it desperation. is a doorway to She's an underground joined alien grief base counseling because it group. doesn't fit in with its I environment. really believe It's you in could a secluded probably location. made a pretty good Where show. quote Just aliens based on love the to Grief have Counseling a hidden base? Group. It's it's really But I've good looked at these pictures. but It's there. also She meets an his secluded hippie location. woman. Where Nicholas And it's Cage around would her. love She's to have around a summer her age house and her something? name is That's Judy not necessarily and she's aliens. played by Linda Carter. Using Nellie Google and Earth tools. they He could measured not the opening be defined. more. It was twenty meters across Judy is which free he says spirit. is She's big enough so to calm. fit Not a a lot care of in the alien world. ships Jan is wrapped so up text tied as the word a two dollar Moron watch two and gene eight eight gene winds two up six spilling two her guts seven to judy four three seven. and We'll they send wind it up to you moving and judy you can into decide the for guest yourself house. of Scott has And found if the that doorway were to all an underground the show was ufo about station. it would be well When you worth text the word watching Moron to eight eight eight but two six wait. two seven three seven There's you're automatically more registered to win a bottle of our secret. very own hand sanitizer. Judy It's has called secret. people Gm me say. has secrets. I think Jen's he actually dead found husband a has secrets door and so to does a liquor just store about every character in this show so while warning we're found captivated that by the raw emotion I tell you what that it. shows You're a pervert between and Jin. you are Judy really focused on one we're area. also The entertained. I don't understand By how funny but the the the back pull and forth must be between really them something is. a serial We are still underwear intensely thief in Singapore trying to solve admitted the multiple in court that mysteries he snuck that out are being during uncovered lockdown and those to mysteries. steal a bunch of bras We are dying and underwear to know the answer to Number is what one makes us you don't click mess around the next with episode police. sterner In Singapore instead of it is off they the TV. will cain you literally The show is designed and when for they say been it's watching. a lockdown. You know They like probably crack cocaine. mean it. A The mayor government third designed over there for repeat so sales. sneaking It's out to steal people's it's exactly Bras the and same underwear. thing. I Each episode you know if is I thirty were if minutes I had that rated Rook R Liberty. for language. I don't know where There's I would ten go episodes per because season. none of my neighbors Two hanged seasons their underwear are on out. Netflix. Online's Right now where this where is would I an go extinct. to steal bras Just and underwear awesome to awesome. break into Awesome their house show and going to the is drawers? dramatic I guess is so extremely literally funny. and you know But the thing it's is a thriller like with at the same time the Internet. at all You of this could especially in theory have all the if women's underwear your past you want forty delivered to your and you've lived role through some for stuff these guys is not because I just was talking owning to the underwear. my daughter about It it needs and to she's the full married long. just Someone got married needs to and have she been goes. stolen I'm just I just. like It's not the this same particular. for me. I don't Category get to show of and pervert I said that's because as you have law going lived some on life. here You have to live a little bit of the life. transcends I think to really underwear. share you. Watch I some of this know right. but you're right. He Yeah would have I to don't break want into to say somebody's house like you. or to store I right want to give anything away. because It this is the you show know for some stealing grown people. women's Yeah underwear you've off got to of have had the clotheslines. life slap you in the face a few times That's and see in some stuff the same I mean and era that's what as makes it above so so stealing so good a pie my score from on this the farmer's is five wife's solid. kitchen Budweiser's window this house. right I just and this I is just another finished example up watching of why Hollywood. any woman So could trust I'm done you with that because and given I liked the choice very much y'all probably and all I between see skill you underwear is and stealing What a you're pie talking about the show you're talking about dead's meet Netflix love pie but I would take Netflix's the pie. I pushing this so coke hard. exterior When when did they first release it? trust full Nineteen of a suspicious released in nineteen also in nineteen. for your painting. I don't So I don't why want do to you be think known bobbling as up under a serial the radar for a underwear while? Now thing it's just you it's know. exploded I because mean people okay. are looking I for stuff got to a little watch. drunk one night and You I stole can't stop. somebody's I mean underwear once you start but cereal an episode says at the that end is. That's what you I just want to be known for. the only Let's thirty awful minutes is okay. that There when are only you thirty die minutes so it won't be in your newspaper. you just you Obituary gotta you gotTa but know people what's going will go on. They leave you back. right Serial at the perfect Pani. time that you want That's to exactly know. What's that right. little mix? I don't have many times. I said Let's let's close just watch out the first we. five We minutes have not just mentioned the first this five yet. minutes But we have to shout stop. out porn You can't star stop Ron Jeremy you sold who me. has I'm to become an environmental watching activist. so He's five. fighting Frosty to buds save a tree. for That is deadly. dad

Judy It Blake Shelton Netflix Christina Applegate Scott Christina He JIN Singapore Indonesia Slurred Speech. Tennessee Ron Jeremy Senate. Google Crack Cocaine. Nellie Google Myers Linda Carter Oklahoma California
"twenty meters" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"twenty meters" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The authorities in Ireland have rejected a bid by Donald Trump to build a sea wall around his golf course to protect it from coastal erosion and rising sea levels the team back resulting county class which is owned by Mr trump's company was told the proposed defenses could damage the St Jude habitats the Gulf club wanted to build a twenty metre wide barrier almost three kilometers long to protect the coals from heavy storms and the effects of global warming

Irish authorities reject Trump golf resort's plan to build wall

BBC World Service

00:26 sec | 2 years ago

Irish authorities reject Trump golf resort's plan to build wall

"The authorities in Ireland have rejected a bid by Donald Trump to build a sea wall around his golf course to protect it from coastal erosion and rising sea levels the team back resulting county class which is owned by Mr trump's company was told the proposed defenses could damage the St Jude habitats the Gulf club wanted to build a twenty metre wide barrier almost three kilometers long to protect the coals from heavy storms and the effects of global warming

Ireland Donald Trump St Jude Golf
Is Old Faithful Becoming Less Faithful?

BrainStuff

06:03 min | 2 years ago

Is Old Faithful Becoming Less Faithful?

"Old faithful used to have a less than modest nickname attorneys timepiece. Since at least the late eighteen hundreds this wyoming cone geyser has vowed spectators with its predictable. Eruptions you can see the landmark for yourself in Yellowstone National Park home to over five hundred geysers more than one hundred and fifty of these water spurting marvels including old faithful occupy the parks upper geyser basin so named in eighteen seventy because it spouted at regular intervals. Old faithful gets more fanfare than any other geothermal attraction in the world visited by presidents and immortalized by artists. The guys are spouts about seventeen times a day. Countdown clocks tell gathering tourists when to ready their cameras for the next waterworks. Show is he. There's a simple formula. Rangers used to estimate. How much time will likely elapsed between any two eruptions of old faithful? According to the National Park Service about ninety percent of these eruption predictions are accurate within a window of plus or minus ten minutes. That's a solid track record but old faithfuls still isn't something you'd want to set your watch by. Five decades of observation have revealed that the geyser is changing since nineteen fifty-nine the average interval between old faithfuls eruptions has gotten longer and while most of the actual eruptions which occurred back. Then were rather brief. This is no longer the case we spoke by email with sin may woo a geologist at the University of Utah who studied the physics of geysers and related structures. She said geysers are rare because they require very unique geologic conditions a persistent heat source abundant water supply from groundwater systems and porous or fractured medium that allows fluid migration and he transfer within usually the heat comes from magma a liquid or semi liquid rock found below. Earth's crust which is called lava once it bursts onto the surface yellowstone is positioned over to magma chambers including a. Nice long one. That's just three ten miles underground. That's five seventeen kilometers. Their maker was a localized swell of abnormally hot material. Beneath the crest classified as a mantle plume. It's the reason why. Yellowstone has the world's largest geyser collection the chambers warm up subterranean reservoirs of liquid groundwater. Although the physics here aren't entirely settled. We do know that some of this water gets super heated. That means it's temperature climbs above and beyond waters normal boiling point since this water's held him. Tight corridors. It's got nowhere else to go at first bearing down on the superheated liquid is a combination of overhanging rock and colder water at cramped quarters to the mix. And you've got a recipe for high pressure but the pressure doesn't last forever in a geyser like old faithful hyperactive. Steam bubbles eventually pushes small percentage of the groundwater through a narrow opening at the surface. Just like that. The pressure decreases and sets off an explosion of hot water and steam. If you're wise you'll give old faithful a wide berth. Visitors can safely watch the geyser erupt from a boardwalk maintained by yellowstone venture off that path. And you might be on the hook for six months in prison and a five thousand dollar fine and besides getting too close to hydrothermal features. Like geysers or hot springs isn't a cool idea. When old faithful goes off the water temperature around its vent can hit two hundred and four degrees? Fahrenheit that's ninety six Celsius meanwhile the steam gets even hotter sometimes exceeding three hundred fifty degrees Fahrenheit or one hundred seventy seven Celsius viewed from an appropriate distance. Old Faithfuls eruptions are thrilling spectacles. Even if you've seen one before you might want to revisit the geyser some day because certain eruptions last longer than others. We'll explained that old. Faithful isn't as predictable as at once seemed there are two different categories of gaps between eruptions and of eruptions themselves an eruption that begins and ends in under two and a half minutes is considered short. Others are longer after a short eruption. There'll be an intermission of sixty to sixty five minutes before the Geyser spouts again yet old faithful will reliably take a break of around ninety two minutes once a long eruption subsides over the past fifty years longer eruptions at old faithful have become the norm short. One still occur but they are rarer than they used to be and no one is entirely sure. Why while the mystery is unresolved some geologists blame recent earthquakes for this changing schedule? The guys are source is another riddle. Scientists haven't determined where old faithful gets. Its water supply. Though in two thousand seventeen study Wu and five colleagues revealed an important clue using seismic waves sensors. They found a natural reservoir below the historic old faithful in which stands south. West of the Geyser who who said that body is interpreted to be a highly fractured and saturated area that we think provides fluids source to old faithful plumbing questions and by modal eruptions aside. Old Faithful is indeed more faithful. Then some of its counterparts. It's time we introduced the steamboat. Eiser another yellowstone resident. That happens to be the world's tallest. Active Geyser emitting jets of water three hundred to four hundred feet into the sky above. That's about ninety to one hundred and twenty meters but who said it is very unpredictable and has gone decades between eruptions the last eruption before March of two thousand eighteen was in September of two thousand fourteen. She added however that the two thousand eighteen blow up quote began an unprecedented active phase steamboat. Geyser has rented a total of eighty five times since then with the last eruption occurring February twenty first twenty twenty. We still don't know what initiates this active as what controls its eruptive behavior and what geometry looks like

Yellowstone Yellowstone National Park Geologist Wyoming Cone Rangers National Park Service WU University Of Utah
8 Offbeat Questions About Cruise Ships Answered

Tips for Travellers Podcast

11:23 min | 2 years ago

8 Offbeat Questions About Cruise Ships Answered

"Gary Benbridge. This is another my tips travis. There are eight questions I hear people often ask on a cruise ship or ask me about cruising. They really are slightly unusual and a little bit on the side so I thought I would actually answer them right here right now starting with this. Is there a jail on board a cruise ship. Well actually there is. What's known known as a break? Now if this some issue normally passages will be restricted to their cabin but there is on most cruise ships a brig this is normally a pretty secure cure room normally in your security where they can hold up rowdy passages or in fact I guess crew until they get to the next port and can hand them over to authorities artis if something serious has happened now in reality one of the big challenges on board cruise ships is crime. And how much crime exists onboard a cruise. The statistics would suggest crime rates are not particularly high. However it's quite difficult to understand because there's no requirement and no sort of central registry because of the way that cruises run where they're registered however one of the ways of looking at crime is there are eight serious crimes which cruise companies have to report? If they're either embarking or disembarking in the United States of those eight series crimes three of them are the most reported that salts sexual assaults and theft thefts of large amounts of property high value property. However it's not really known how much petty crime exists on board a cruise ship? There are no police police on board and security will deal with most issues so the things you tend to hear about are the more serious things saying that in terms of the amount of crime crime per thousand or hundreds of thousands of passengers. It's really low on a cruise so when a crime does happen on cruise ship it get a lot of publicity but it is kind of hard to get the stats but if you do for foul and you do commit a crime or cause a disturbance there is brick on board which you will be thrown into the second question that I get asked a lot and here is how many people die on a cruise every year. Well actually the number surprise me. Small around about two hundred deaths are recorded on cruise ships bear in mind something like twenty one. Twenty two million people crews on cruise ships every year. It's a pretty small a number. Most of those deaths are related to age the dying of old age onboard cruise things to look out for on a cruise. If you hear over the Tannoy a system of the loudspeakers Operation Bright Star that means as a medical issue on board some sort of medical emergency on board and if you actually hear Operation Rising Star Star that means that has been a death on board of course the cruise lines not normally like to publicize it if it happens because it's normally happens kind of creepy and a cabin or whatever. So what do they do with the bodies. Well actually cruise ships do have a morgue and have to carry body bags normally body. We put in a body bag. It'll be stored in the mock walk now. What happens there buddy depends a little bit on the port? Some ports will want the body to be disembarked. I guess sometimes the family disembark on other cases the body he will stay on board until the ship gets back to port. It often started in because that just makes it much easier for the cruise line and often for the family to deal with the third question is is it a ship or is it a boat a lot of people on cruises go crazy when people call a cruise ship a cruise boat. So what is the right terminology terminology. Well in the whole military and all the maritime world's one of the rules that people use is you can put a boat on a ship the competition on a boat if you look at cruise ships they actually have boats on them. They have life on them so that does make them so. It's kind of informal thing. Another point of view is is anything over. Twenty meters of sixty feet is considered a ship so actually for example and river cruising longtime. They were called river boats because because they were shorter than sixty feet long however the general view is that anything's over that size is ships as in the military world. Anything of that size is I liked to be called a ship in practice. There's no right or wrong. However people who are into cruising will tend to call it a ship and and not about you'll even find some crews captains please so strong and so I've been on cruises for example on celebrity cruises where Captain Kate is is renowned for a badge that she wears which says it's a ship not about the next question I hear lot and it's actually one thing I wondered about for a long time is? Why is the safety drill called a muster drill? It's quite hard to find out the reason for that but it seems to be. It's always been called that and it's comes from the word muster muster which means to gather and it's stuck. It's become one of those terms for the safety drill very important. Of course the safety drill has to be done within. Twenty four hours was of passengers embarking. Since Costa Concordia that's become even stricter and now cruise lines do that. Before the ship actually sets sail the fifth question and is. If you've ever looked at daily program you'll see a couple of people have lots of Friends of bill and Dorothy. For example. Have lots of friends so the question you could ask is. Why on Earth do bill? W dorothy and Jimmy have so many friends that they actually have a meet up or friends of Bill. W you was the one that really kicked it all off and it's because cruise lines originally didn't want to say that they were hosting alcoholics. Anonymous Meetings Built W. refers to William or bill w Wilson who was one of the CO founders of the A. Dorothy was the codename way back when for the LGBTQ jibbed community you'll find nowadays that very few cruise lines talk about friends of Dorothy meetings and they will just call them. LGBT MEET UPS nowadays. It's the Dorothy slang word has kind of disappeared people dischord LGBT. The other one that you may see although it's much less common is friends of Jimmy and friends of Jimmy. Que refers to the or narcotics anonymous which was founded by James Kenan most cruise lines though will tend to direct people looking for an NA meeting friends of Jimmy K to the Friends of Bill W meeting. So that's why Bill Jimmy and Dorothy have so many friends. Yes and meet UPS aboard the ship and other question that I hear a lot is is it saltwater. In the toilets of course no one's going to get close enough enough to actually find out and test for themselves. Well actually originally. It was saltwater in the toilets that's before desalination plants became really really expensive and were just just prohibitive so salt water was actually used both in the showers and also in the toilets that created a lot of problems because caused rust and all sorts of problems within the actual equipment. But it was originally saltwater. Today it's not salt water. The next question is where does all this clean pure non-salted water come from. There's actually three places that it can come from on a cruise ship. The first and the most traditional is what's known as bunkering bunkering is maritime term for loading loading water on board a ship and of course if what is bunkered on a cruise ship. It's tested on both. Make sure it's all safe to drink. However nowadays cruise ships will tend to make their own water and two ways of doing that the first of the processes that cruise ships use themselves on board is known as steam? Evaporation so this is where the cruise ship uses uses the heat. The huge amount of heat that's generated by the engines. They take salt water. The heated up it evaporates the water evaporates all assaults and stuff is left behind. They then turn the steam back into water through condensation and they have water that they can entreat and make ready the other process S.. which is the most common process is known as reverse osmosis? So what happens here is was taken on board. And it's basically pushed through the microscopic screen which then keeps all the salts in the stuff like that behind and any of the fresh clean water go through because the water is then treated and make sure that it's safe to drink and consume and soon so this is the key ways that the ship gets water that people drink and use on board so water is perfectly safe drinking. It's processed and treated extremely Tarini thoroughly before it's sent through the ship for consumption and use. The next question is around waist now clearly on ships of several thousand people well an enormous amount of waste is going to be generated by human waste and rubbish. Waste so what actually happens to all of that waste. Let's talk first of all about surge. Judge Binds National Law. Oceangoing vessels are actually able to put surge in the once that twelve miles out from from land and they're going to certain speed however cruise ships are however not allowed to do it so all cruise lines which part of clear the Cruise Line Association abide right by policy which says that no untreated surge will be put it into the sea anywhere in the world at any time. So what happens. Well it's treated on board. First of all they take blackwater which is basically the human waste and take gray waters. That's water that's come out of things like the kitchens or the basis or the showers. Those two would is is all combined in certain ratios there then treated by nearly sort of bacterial treatment which purifies it then goes through another process they use UV to really treat the water rather than chlorine or chemicals because ultimately the water wants treated and is back to being completely it'd be safe and free of impurities is released normally back into the ocean when it comes to food waste all the food waste is collected and it goes through. These grinders turned turn basically into a runny mixture which then is normally also able to then be released into the sea sometimes of course it is then pumped in on land when it comes to other waste raced this whole process. What's important to know is crucial to have an environmental office on board charge of all of these various operations? So when it comes to waste your cabinet shoot for example. We'll sort through all of your waist and sorted into plastics to metals into paper. All of the glass is collected on board. It's sorted by color it's ground down and then disembarked because it sold off as waste can be recycled on land papers sorted out it's all bundled up and again that's handed of And sold for recycling and the same is done separately for Kabul and of course for things like metal cans all crushed down so there's a huge pick operation. One things. I would encourage you to do if you have a cruise ship that offers a full behind the scene to now you'll have to pay for these but it will take you right and down as the deck of the ship and you get to meet the environmental officer and you get to see the whole processing plot and it's really interesting to see how they take the waste both human wastes and the gray ray water and paper and glass and cans and it's really good to see firsthand how it's actually dealt with so this whole big recycling operation that takes WCHS place onboard cruise

Bill Jimmy Cruise Line Association A. Dorothy Tannoy Gary Benbridge Travis United States Jimmy K James Kenan Costa Concordia W Dorothy Theft Captain Kate Officer Kabul UPS W Wilson Tarini
"twenty meters" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"twenty meters" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Twenty meters three hundred ninety feet in the last twenty thousand years and scientists can tell you a natural sea level rise stopped and man made sealevel rise began so the great news is we're probably going to have to adjust to a seven or eight inch per century rice the the bad news is water ski Manhattan postcards are not going to be in big demand not gonna happen so yeah any any pull a politician is also you know sort of stop the rise of the seas I think you better get though a little better a little bit of personal follow now is there any companies leading the way to get this thing taken care of war people don't panic and think it's all man made well I'm I'm sorry to say most of the industry has bought into this is trump tremendous pressure on companies I talk about it now the side the green box companies are spending millions of dollars every year on environmental methods or procedures that don't really do any financing for the environment such as subsidizing in purchasing renewables counting the carbon dioxide foot print even buying carbon credits in a lot of other things is that when I go in it present to companies I say there's only one place for this activity that's in your public relations department because it doesn't do anything else but they're under terrific pressure even the the the petroleum industry has come out saying that we have a great product.

sealevel rise Manhattan three hundred ninety feet twenty thousand years Twenty meters eight inch
"twenty meters" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"twenty meters" Discussed on KTOK

"Us that oceans have risen a hundred and twenty meters of three hundred ninety feet in the last twenty thousand years and scientists can tell you a natural sea level rise stopped and manmade sea level rise began so the great news is we're probably going to have to adjust to a seven or eight inch per century rice the the bad news is water ski Manhattan postcards are not going to be in big demand not gonna happen so the I. any any pull a politician as does the you know so to stop the rise of the seas I think you better get though a little better a little bit of personal follow now is there any company is leading the way to get this thing taken care of war people don't panic and think it's all man made well I'm I'm sorry to say most of the industry has bought into this is trump tremendous pressure on companies I talk about it not say the green box companies are spending millions of dollars every year on environmental methods or procedures that don't really do any financing for the environment such as subsidizing in purchasing renewables counting the carbon dioxide foot print even buying carbon credits in a lot of other things is it when I go in it present to companies I say there's only one place for this activity that's in your public relations department because it doesn't do anything else but they're under terrific pressure even the the the petroleum industry has come out saying that we have a great product everybody wants it but it's causing the climate that to change and it's hurting mankind so what would you do the shoot what's your take Steven and weather manipulation I because I'm convinced we can have that capability I think we do it on a local scale certainly they've been cloud seeding for.

Steven Manhattan three hundred ninety feet twenty thousand years twenty meters eight inch
Spain tries to refloat submarine thought to hold tons of cocaine

AP 24 Hour News

00:38 sec | 2 years ago

Spain tries to refloat submarine thought to hold tons of cocaine

"A sunken submarine believed to be carrying tons of cocaine is been towed into a port in northwestern Spain with preparations to extract its cargo under way police were hoping to crane lift the twenty meter sub onto the dock at the port of Alden so they could get inside more easily according to a government official the sub sank as police tried to intercept on Sunday in the Galicia region of Spain it wasn't clear if the crew two of whom had been arrested sank it on purpose Spanish authorities said it was the first time a submarines been found to be used in drug trafficking in the country with police divers pulling out a package of cocaine from the vessel on Monday there's been no official report on where the sub came from but media reports said police suspected it to a set off from

Cocaine Spain Alden Official Galicia Twenty Meter
The Man Who First Discovered Radio Waves Emanating From the Milky Way

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

02:49 min | 2 years ago

The Man Who First Discovered Radio Waves Emanating From the Milky Way

"WanNa talk about they. nerdy engineer born in Oklahoma whose middle name is guth. Oh goose I mean that's that's an excellent nerd middle name okay so I'm GonNa talk about Karl Guth Jansky who was born in Norman Oklahoma in nineteen o five one of six children in his family and Jetskis. Dad's zero was an electrical engineering professor and so little Karl Jansky when he grew up he followed in his father's trajectory to study physics engineering as well also as a young man Karl. Jansky earned a degree in physics from the University of Wisconsin. It got his undergraduate degree but then failed to complete his masters but then anyway he went went on to get hired by a company was hired for a position as a radio engineer with Bell Telephone Laboratories in nineteen twenty eight and this would have been when radio engineering was something fairly new so at this time in the late nineteen twenty s bell labs was interested in creating a system for a wireless radio based telephone service that would allow transatlantic phone calls. Let's just say you needed to call across the Atlantic Ocean to order a begetter something these radio based phone calls that bell labs wanted to do would have been in the shortwave frequency range meaning wavelengths of about ten to twenty meters and Jansky was given the job job of hunting down any potential sources of radio interference that would cause static on the calls so Jansky built a giant receiver antenna China to detect signals at a wavelength of fourteen point five meters and this was a directional antenna and that meant that it could be moved around to identify identify the origin vector of any particular signal right so it's not receiving signals from every direction the same you aim it in the direction that you want to pick pick up the signal from and it was mounted on a giant rotating platform outfitted with motorized wheels. Actually they were the wheels from a Model T. and it could be aimed in any direction to root out the sources of static or other interference that they were looking for. Some people called this jetskis. Mary go round. I've got a photo of a here for you Robert Yeah at first glance. It looks not unlike a giant biplane of some kind you know. Oh yeah with the stress on the wings and it looks like the world's most dangerous gymnastics equipment broken shins all around yeah it looks a little bit like scaffolding or the the system of goals and some sort sort of Sushi in sport but in the middle of course it's got wheels and it's got a little track that the wheels roll around on so that you can aim it to to calibrate where the the source of the interference is coming from so first of all he discovered the main source of terrestrial interference on this radio frequency

Karl Guth Jansky Karl Jansky Bell Telephone Laboratories Jansky Robert Yeah Engineer Jetskis Oklahoma Norman Oklahoma Karl Professor Atlantic Ocean University Of Wisconsin Mary China Twenty Meters Five Meters
"twenty meters" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

SPACE NEWS POD

03:21 min | 3 years ago

"twenty meters" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

"To get started so starship these are prototypes right now. Starship is in a prototype phase so they're still kind of building it out and working out a bunch of engineering technical details but if this goes well of star hopper can prove itself itself that it can actually do these hover tests while the first test for starship. We'll probably be something along the same lines as star hopperton right so it'll it'll do a tether test probably then it'll do a small flight test of little hover test about twenty meters senate will go up to six hundred fifty feet. Maybe somewhere along those lines. We don't really have plans figured out yet for this. We're not i'm not sure exactly what's going to be happening with these tests but after it's going after it does all these initial tests. It'll be flying into space. Starship is amazing because when it gets up into space it'll be able to land just like a falcon rocket rocket. Now it'll come back down to earth. It'll hover back down to earth it will propose itself back to the landing pad in land vertically where it will be refurbished a little bit checked out and that'll be able to launch again and this is important because it's spacex wants to launch a lot of starling satellites in the coming years stokes. Oh starship is successful it launches properly while that will allow spacex to launch a ton of these starling satellites along with of course you you know moon missions mars missions that stuff so coming up on friday we will have the next in most ambitious launch of star hopper now. They're gonna be <hes>. They're gonna be watching this closely to see exactly what happens and if all goes well in the next couple of months we will have news about the starship. It'll be crazy. How fast is actually comes to fruition if all works well so my friends i i wanna say thank you to patriotic patrons. You're amazing. Thank you so much m._p. For adjoining on patriae on appreciate your patronage if you wanna help out go to patriot dot com slash space news podcast and you can <hes> you know you can get some cool stuff. There actually reworking a bunch of stuff there so it's got to be a lot different than what it is. Now is right now. I haven't really been paying a lot of attention to it but i'm actually working on a plan to make it more viable and make it more reasonable for everybody. So you get more things. Thanks for helping out the show so i want to say thank you to everybody again for listening today and thank you for subscribing to the show and thank you for taking taking the time out of your day to spend it here with me on the space news pod as well walden and.

spacex walden six hundred fifty feet twenty meters
"twenty meters" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:52 min | 3 years ago

"twenty meters" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The world's second largest producer of salmon and accounts for almost a third of global supply the salmon industries provided thousands of jobs for people in southern Chile but a recent study suggests there's a wearing number of deaths among people working on salmon farms grace Livingston reports from the island to chip away and the Los Lagos region of Chile it's a misty morning and I'm standing by a lake Gracie dotted with fishing boats and fishing nets along the shore here a lots of little wooden houses brightly colored but weather beaten I'm too used to be a little fishing village but now most people here what for the big salmon farming industry me nobody for these hearing coming week you are here that's the issue quite kill but a was a diver in the salmon farms for eighteen years he's left now having seen two friends die one of them was his wife's cousin fill out the he was delousing the fish he caught trapped under the top Poland and couldn't get out to delight I summon divers have to swim down and put a tarpaulin round the bottom of the salmon pen so the pesticides to wash away menu guy cheio drowned in twenty fifteen when he got stuck between the bottom of the salmon pan on the top folded with the weight of hundreds of fish on top of him if you're calling it's hard so hard the young man full of life with children he left the family behind there about six thousand down my biz working for the salmon industry here in the last six years eleven divers working on salmon farms in Chile have died and twelve boatman transporting the fish have also died according to the NGOs echo of C. on us in the same period no workers have died on salmon farms in Norway the world's biggest salmon producer this is the headquarters of my they are real an association of divers in fishermen's groups Pablo yes so a diver in the salmon industry for twenty years is its president do you love someone enough the summon companies don't respect the procedures to protect divers all the diving regulations there's a rule that basic level divers can only go down to a depth of twenty meters but they don't respect the depth limits for basic level divers diverse jobs include collecting the dead summon the full to the bottom of the pens amending the underwater nets the sea lions liked holes in the lawn the vitamin where the dead summon for there is a cone pointing downwards and that's three or four meters below the bottom of the pan so it's more than twenty meters and divers have to go down there and went out of his check the anti ceiling nets these could be at depths of thirty or forty meters the most common cause of death is drowning and entanglement on the water nets I want from all over many other divers have become disabled like I've done since you it's a strange kind like be stings in my joints Hey when I meet my shoulders Mr esencia has necrosis caused by bubbles of nitrogen in his blood the crisis occurs when divers spend too long on the water or don't have enough time to rest this in itself a limit to the diving regulations say that you should not carry out heavy work before off the diving but we have to do the exact opposite before diving we sometimes have to fill and carry lots of sand bags weighing forty fifty or sixty kilos there was not much rest we have to work all day my guess is they're going to head next on now I've got a mosque everyone asks is it hard to speak.

producer twenty meters eighteen years forty meters twenty years four meters sixty kilos six years
"twenty meters" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

SPACE NEWS POD

03:30 min | 3 years ago

"twenty meters" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

"If you're listening to this you obviously <Speech_Male> like podcast and you <Speech_Male> probably like music <Speech_Male> to on <Speech_Male> spotify. You can listen to <Speech_Male> all of that and what place <Speech_Male> for free. You don't <Speech_Male> need a premium account. <Speech_Male> Spotify <Speech_Male> has a huge each catalogue <Speech_Male> of podcasts on every <Speech_Male> topic including <Speech_Male> the one. You're listening <Speech_Male> to right now. <Speech_Male> Uh spotify you <Speech_Male> can follow your favorite podcast. <Speech_Male> You never miss <Speech_Male> an episode download <Speech_Male> episodes to listen <Speech_Male> to off-line flying wherever <Speech_Male> you are easily <Speech_Male> share what you're <Speech_Male> listening to with your friends <Speech_Male> via spotify <Speech_Male> integrations was social <Speech_Male> media platforms <Speech_Male> like instagram <Speech_Male> so just search <Speech_Male> for space <Speech_Male> news pot on on the spotify <Speech_Male> app or browse <Speech_Male> podcasts <Speech_Male> in your library tab <Speech_Male> and follow <Speech_Male> me so you never miss <Speech_Male> an episode of the space <Speech_Male> news <Speech_Male> pod spotify <Speech_Male> is the world's leading <Speech_Male> music streaming dreaming service <Speech_Male> and now it <Speech_Male> can be your go-to <Speech_Male> for podcasts <Speech_Male> to <Silence> hello <SpeakerChange> and welcome <Speech_Male> back to the space news <Speech_Male> pot daily podcast <Speech_Male> about space <Speech_Male> science and tech. I'm <Speech_Male> your host walton walden <Speech_Male> and on this <Speech_Male> episode we're gonna be talking <Speech_Male> about. <Speech_Male> Spacex is star <Speech_Male> hopper <Silence> so if you're not <Speech_Male> familiar star <Speech_Male> hopper <Speech_Male> is the precursor <Speech_Male> to starship starship. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> Now starship <Speech_Male> <Silence> is spacex is <Speech_Male> gigantic <Speech_Male> rocket <Silence> that will be sending <Speech_Male> <Silence> people <SpeakerChange> <Silence> tomorrow's. <Speech_Male> That's the <Speech_Male> ultimate goal sending <Speech_Male> people to mars. <Silence> <Silence> They wanna do <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> missions <Speech_Male> <Silence> to the moon. <Speech_Male> They wanna do <Speech_Male> missions <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> orbit <Silence> and they <Speech_Male> will <Speech_Male> be using starship <Speech_Male> to deploy <Speech_Male> <Silence> star <Speech_Male> lick which <SpeakerChange> is <Speech_Male> spacex texas <Speech_Male> worldwide <Speech_Male> global <Speech_Male> satellite <SpeakerChange> internet. <Speech_Male> <Silence> Now <Speech_Male> starship <Silence> is gigantic. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> You can hold <Speech_Male> <Silence> <hes> <hes> <Speech_Male> hundred <SpeakerChange> passengers <Speech_Male> on this thing <Silence> <Silence> one hundred people <Speech_Male> that could possibly <Speech_Male> go to <Speech_Male> mars <SpeakerChange> if they get <Speech_Male> this right <Speech_Male> now <Silence> in order <Speech_Male> to <SpeakerChange> make a starship <Speech_Male> if <Speech_Male> i has to hop <Speech_Male> <Silence> right so it can't <Speech_Male> fly unless <Speech_Male> it has <Speech_Male> a bunch of tests <Speech_Male> has to hop <SpeakerChange> a little bit <Speech_Male> <Silence> and this <Speech_Male> is what's going <SpeakerChange> to be happening <Speech_Male> on <Speech_Male> friday of this <Speech_Male> week <Silence> friday august <Speech_Male> sixteenth <Speech_Male> the f. <Speech_Male> a. The <Speech_Male> federal alleviated <Speech_Male> administration has <Speech_Male> published notices <Speech_Male> to airmen <Speech_Male> the n. o. t. <Speech_Male> a. m. s. <Silence> for spacex <Speech_Male> is next star <Speech_Male> hopper flake <Speech_Male> <Silence> so this next <Speech_Male> flight is very <Speech_Male> important. <SpeakerChange> <Silence> They're testing <Speech_Male> <Silence> star <SpeakerChange> hopper. <Speech_Male> At six <Speech_Male> hundred fifty feet <Speech_Male> <Silence> enduring this <Speech_Male> test <Silence> starship <Speech_Male> <hes> testbed <Speech_Male> prototype <Silence> will <Speech_Male> spend about <Speech_Male> thirty to sixty <Speech_Male> seconds <Speech_Male> in the air <Silence> and it's going to be doing <Speech_Male> this one <Speech_Male> raptor engine <Silence> which <Speech_Male> will produce <Speech_Male> about <Speech_Male> two hundred <Speech_Male> tons <Speech_Male> of thrust <Silence> <Silence> but <Speech_Male> it's not the <SpeakerChange> land <Speech_Male> where it did last <Speech_Male> time. There's there <Speech_Male> were a couple <Speech_Male> tests already. <Speech_Male> The first test <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> was <Speech_Male> a tethered test <Speech_Male> and that went pretty <Speech_Male> well. There was <Speech_Male> another test test <Speech_Male> which star hopper <Speech_Male> kind of shot <Speech_Male> a bunch of fire out at the top <Speech_Male> of it <Silence> which wasn't the <Speech_Male> intended result <Speech_Male> of that test. <Speech_Male> The intended result <Speech_Male> was <Silence> <SpeakerChange> the <Speech_Male> stir hopper <Speech_Male> to hover <Silence> about <Speech_Male> twenty meters. <Speech_Male> Go side to side <Speech_Male> and then land <Speech_Male> again so that <Speech_Male> second test didn't really <Speech_Male> go too well and then <Speech_Male> a third test. I <SpeakerChange> went <Speech_Male> just fine <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> the third test <Speech_Male> <Silence> <SpeakerChange> went up in the <Speech_Male> air <Silence> move laterally <Speech_Male> side to side <Speech_Male> in it <Speech_Male> landed.

spacex spotify hundred fifty feet twenty meters
"twenty meters" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"twenty meters" Discussed on KTRH

"And operation right so that means it's values go up finally tax rates are coming down this is this is the first time in over thirty years that property tax rates have actually gone down a reminder there are some major construction tie up through the weekend if you're heading out for a Sunday drive avoid the southbound southwest freeway close from Wesley into chimney rock that's basically the area around six ten loop we've got construction on two ninety in bound around to the six ten loop is closed two eighty eight south freeway closed at the belt way in the east re way has some lane closures in the downtown area well attention not stargazers the best meteor shower the year is arriving this week the Perseid meteor shower will hit its peak over the next couple of nights and even with the full moon right now up to twenty meters per hour can be seen streaking brightly across the sky the show will be visible early Monday morning but will peak early Tuesday morning set your alarm clock NASA says the best time to see it is around two AM or just before dawn try to avoid a spot near bright lights and binoculars are telescopes are not recommended or you can watch a live feed of the meteor shower on the NASA media watch Facebook page starting tonight Cory Olson newsradio seven forty KTRE is the land reducing some employees hours because the new Star Wars galaxies edge land is under performing a Disneyland employee tells fox business they were expecting the millennium falcon smugglers ride they have about a two hour wait all summer turns out it's only about half that news on demand that K. T. R. H. dot com we're gonna have another update at twelve thirty breaking news as it happens I'm.

Wesley NASA Facebook Cory Olson Disneyland fox K. T. R. twenty meters thirty years two hour
"twenty meters" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:29 min | 3 years ago

"twenty meters" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Helicopters and flying around twenty meters in the F. Frank is a path to became the first person to cross the English Channel on a jet powered hoverboard his invention is the size of a state it's fully turbines powered by kerosene stored in a backpack compel him to speeds of up to a hundred and eighty miles an hour he sent a from the Calais just off the six this morning arriving cans around twenty minutes later on arrival he described his achievement is crazy BBC world news this is from our own correspondent on the BBC world service I'm on a on and hello and welcome to the program in this edition we're ready to squeeze into a crowded press conference in Beijing to hear the Chinese government's official line on the protests in Hong Kong we look at what's at stake in the province in Syria and we listen to the young Nicaraguans who are tired of the country Sandinista movement despite its forty years as the home of national resistance but first to Somalia and the death of yet another talented leader the country could ill afford to lose when the news came in of yet another attack in Mogadishu on the twenty fourth of July it was hardly unexpected the also Bob movement has consistently targeted shot bombed and killed people who might consider to close to foreign governments or not devoted enough to Islam it's killed members of the security forces civilians and school pupils throughout Somalia and beyond in Kenya but the attack on the twenty fourth of July it was targeted to calls particular terror and particular despair because it was aimed at the office of the capital's mayor Andrew Harding knew him well and remembers just how much he'd achieved in a lifetime of struggle it was later afternoon in Mogadishu a few years back the bleary eyed man in a disheveled uniform was blocking my way and brandishing a good night it seems an odd choice of weapon but that was hardly the point I reached slowly from my phone and called a friend for help I knew engineer your wrist so we don says he always did and I knew he would sort things out that was his specialities at the time engineer Yuri so with some obvious presidential spokesman but over the years he held many important posts government advise a cabinet minister and mayor of Mogadishu a charming brave dedicated a ridiculously modest man a grin usually lurking beneath his hesitant mustache it is nine engineer your research stands out it's because it's a nickname and Somalis take their nicknames seriously you resend means small engine it refers to the fact that I do Amman Omar Osman once trained to be an engineer hence engineer every so he lived for decades in London after fleeing Somalia's civil war he was a local councillor in healing and housing official a pillar of the community a British family man as well as a Somali but then in two thousand and nine he went back to Mogadishu alone no one sentence no one pushed him he did it because it was the right thing and yes he told the man with the grenades to leave me be but it worked over the years I've met so many members of Somalia's far flung the aspirin like engineer Yuri so I've left families careers and security behind to return to help rebuild tentative country over the knowing the risks knowing how dangerous Somalia still is some have opened restaurants or businesses or hospitals some like the gentlest hoedown Nilay came back from Canada to try to show the world a different side of Somalia its beaches its culture its food how down was one of the most energetic most enthusiastic people I've ever met two weeks ago she was killed by al Shabab when the Islamist militants attacked a hotel in the south of the country then last week came the news I've been half expecting dreading for yes a suicide attack on the mayor's office in Mogadishu six dead engineer your research was among the wounded I bring some friends to find out more it was bad the man was in a critical condition his skull damage he was later flown abroad to cut off the surgery one of the people I called was hoedown alley left the building not long before the bomb went off she's another Canadian Samani from Ontario the doctor and mother of three three years ago she left her young family behind and flew to Mogadishu she's not advising them as office focusing on the humanitarian needs of the city's poorest since the attack my family in Canada text me every day she told me the message is always the same one word leave but she want with kanji said that would leave a vacuum the extremists to fill she's been left feeling numb wondering who she can possibly trust anymore the bomb was detonated it stored by a blind woman who'd been working in the office next to hoe downs I didn't mention the words screen last month by a crowd of trump supporters in the US the words aimed at another Somali immigrants to Congress woman the words sent her back but I didn't need to mention them they still hang in the air back in Ontario Holden said people always ask me where I come from my kids get asked the same question all the time at least here no one asks that it's about finding your own space in this world where you don't have to justify your existence we talked about engineer your research about how he was one of those rat politicians who actually got things done who knew how to navigate Somalia's poisonous factionalism and then a few hours later I go to shore text message from someone else in Mogadishu is gone and your research died of his injuries on Thursday he was a relentlessly optimistic man any chance he got he would talk about Mogadishu's glory years in the sixties and seventies before the civil war it was he'd say a jewel of a city on Africa's Riviera it would be so again one day the last time I saw him was I think on the terrace of a new restaurant on Mogadishu's lido beach sunset in front of us crowds of young Somalis many back from the desperate for the holidays playing in the waves a rise of accents from all over the world and engine that you re so sitting at a long table talking into a fresh lobster enjoying the view a hopeful smile on his face Andrew Harding in recent weeks there's been a surge of violence in the civil war still tearing away at the fabric of Syria and particularly at the country's north west and the province of Idlib this is a part of the Middle East that scene millennia of human history and been witness to many in order credit regime to countless bloody conflicts and innumerable fighting forces and since the protests broke out in the spring of twenty eleven it's always been a center of resistance to the regime of Bashar al Assad my twenty seventeen as president Assad's military drove rebel groups out of one urban center after another elsewhere in Syria it lives had become the last major bowl told for his opponents but as Jeremy Bowen explains that may not be true for much longer in a country with more ancient monuments and delays of history than most the province of Idlib used to be a very interesting place to visit in twenty ten the year before the war started in Syria we stopped in it live during a journey from Damascus to Aleppo a day long drive from the capital to a city that had been a great trading post for millennia across roads on the Silk Road that connected Asia and Europe we didn't break the journey and it live city or in the villages that this weekend being hammered by the shells and bombs of the Syrian regime and its Russian allies instead I was looking for ancient sites that it sees my imagination more than seven hundred settlements on the high morals of north west in Syria that were abandoned over one thousand years ago then known as the dead cities and one of them the Saint Simeon Stylites he's lived on a stone column for nearly forty years UNESCO has designated the dead cities as a world heritage site in danger in twenty sixteen reports said said simians column had been damaged in a Russian Astruc eight or so years of fighting have ebbed and flowed through it live province and now it's likely to be the site of the Syrian wars lost big blessing of blood the density is another place to visit anymore not if you want to stay alive no one really knows why they were abandoned but in this sorry century there are no doubts about what's happening in its lead since the regime and its Russian allies launched an offensive against the province three months ago four hundred and fifty civilians have been killed it lead is the last big piece of land a major population center they still haven't recaptured a few days ago in a speech overflowing with frustration and anger the U. N.'s humanitarian chief mark local told the security council that four hundred and forty thousand people have been displaced within the IT living clave and the biggest humanitarian disaster of the twenty first century was in the making but the security council will not cannot act the five permanent members a deeply divided over Syria the result is a dead log that discredits an organization that's only as strong as the political will of its members in Syria it's no longer about whether rebels will unseat president Bashar al Assad he's won that war thanks to the tenacity of his regime and the decisive military intervention ordered by president Putin in twenty fifteen in the first year of fighting early in twenty twelve it was different I was able to drive out into the suburbs of Damascus through the last government checkpoints and after a nervous kilometer also into the beginning of big chunks of territory held by rebels they had all kinds of reasons for fighting but their fight is over the failure of the rebellion they called it the revolution is complicated and already the subject of books and perhaps some guilt from supporters in the west who didn't deliver the support they wanted to break the asset families hold on Syria most of the first fight is against the regime of pious Muslims mainly Sony's but they were not Sony extremists base to talk about the kind of Islamism you find in Turkish politics and didn't dream of an amorous or a caliphate but as their rebellion Wayne to men replace them who'd swallowed the crude and blood soaked distortions of al Qaeda and its offshoots including the killer jihadists of Islamic state the question now is who will shape the end game of the war Turkey and Russia at the outside powers that NASA and its lead the regime needs Russia's power Turkey once a big say in the future of land just across its border and to destroy the power and national aspirations of Kurds who did the hard fighting on the ground against I. S. and courts in the center of it all off three million people in the province that includes tens of thousands of armed men loyal to a range of malicious under an alliance led by a solid fist jihadist fighting group some of whose leaders came from al Qaeda the regime and the Russians say the fighting terrorists many in the west would not disagree even as they deploy that methods parts of Syria a beginning to recover from the war it led awaits the worst Jeremy Bowen.

F. Frank forty years one thousand years three three years twenty minutes twenty meters three months two weeks one day
"twenty meters" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"twenty meters" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Your wax? Yeah. I guess I'm I'm eating with one chapstick. Please tell me you're going to get this. Way too. Like I. I'm definitely poking things with my about how much weight, we would lose would be skinnier, because we wouldn't want to go the troubled eat like, spaghetti. Sweet stuff. We can poke. Yeah. Home would see in Shrek years, though chase. Oh, no. You don't. They don't their on the side. They kind of go out the top your head, right? Teddy areas. Green? Would you rather only be able to sleep outside? I like that. Only be able to eat things. You can throw twenty meters. Gosh. Eat things you can throw twenty meters. Oh, wow. Not any dish like just like a big ole ham. Wow. That's, that's a lot of ham. But like sixty you have to be able to throw that, like sixty something feet. What was the other one sleep outside y'all do that? Yeah. Let's leave outside guys. Let's sounds kind of fun. Yeah. Adventurous. I hope we get a tense. We can fashion one or something. Finding cave somewhere only eat things. You can throw. Yeah. Okay. Final one you ready. Yes, we're going to we're redoing, another one. The one we've done before..

twenty meters
Seychelles president makes plea to protect 'beating blue heart of our planet'

BBC World Service

00:25 sec | 3 years ago

Seychelles president makes plea to protect 'beating blue heart of our planet'

"The president of Seychelles has made a plea for the greater protection of the world's oceans in a speech delivered underwater, president Donnie four we're speaking from vessel more than one hundred twenty meters below sea level during a visit to a British expedition to explore the death. So the Indian Ocean referring to the oceans is the beating blue heart of our planet. I said the world was running out of time and excuses to combat

President Trump Seychelles Donnie Four One Hundred Twenty Meters
What Did the Opportunity Rover Teach Us?

BrainStuff

04:57 min | 3 years ago

What Did the Opportunity Rover Teach Us?

"Today's episode was brought to you by the new Capital One saver card with which you can earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment. That means four percent on checking out that new restaurant everyone's talking about and four percent on watching your team win at home. You'll also earn two percent cashback at grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases. Now when you go out you cash in what's in your wallet? Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff. I'm Lauren Vogel bomb back on January twenty fourth two thousand four Nasr's opportunity Rover descend into the Martian surface and survived its bouncy landing to the relief of scientists anxiously monitoring the space probe back at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, the four hundred million dollar Rover. One of a pair that NASA landed upon the red planet that year was designed to last for just a few months on the rough dusty terrain of the Martian surface. Instead to the establishment of researchers at lasted for nearly fifteen years in earth time, the longest time that any robot from earth has operated on another planet until it finally stopped communicating with earth after a severe Martian dust storm in June of two thousand eighteen after unsuccessful attempts to restore contact. Nasa. Officials on February thirteenth finally gave up and declared that -tunities mission was over the exact cause of the probes demise is unclear it could be that solar panels went dead under a chokingly thick layer of Martian dust, or that it's tonics failed due to the extremes of Marsh. Other opportunity had outlived its robotic twin these spirit Rover by nearly eight years it's final resting place is the aptly named perseverance valley during its astonishing lifespan this Gulf cart sized planetary probe weighing three hundred eighty four pounds. That's one hundred seventy four kilograms in earth, gravity managed to cover twenty eight miles or forty five kilometers. That's forty four times the distance scientists who designed it to cover it said a single day. Marsh driving record of seven hundred twenty one feet that's two hundred and twenty meters back in two thousand five during its travels. It accomplished plenty of other amazing feats here are a few. It took a whole lot of pictures. The opportunity snapped two hundred seventeen thousand images of the Martian surface, including fifteen three hundred sixty degree. Panoramas? Those images were more than just pretty pictures. Images from its panoramic camera equipped with thirteen different color filters gave scientists the opportunity to enhance the wavelengths and study changes in the features of Martian rock formation. Nhs it discovered. The Martian blueberries just a few months after arriving on Mars, the probe discovered tiny globules rich inhabitants, which scientists dubbed blueberries because of their shape and color. These blueberries provided evidence that ancient Mars had a watery environment and opportunity found more signs of ancient water and possibly ancient life on Mars at the endeavour crater opportunity found clay minerals that were formed in flowing neutral ph water in the distant past this discovery raises. The possibility that the environment around the crater may have been able to support microbial life millions of years ago. It also studied a whole lot of Martian rocks. Samples opportunities tools exposed the surfaces of fifty two. Martian rocks to reveal fresh mineral surfaces for analysis and cleared seventy two more rocks with a brush so that their surfaces could be investigated by its instruments. Also, it was one heck of a climber opportunity proved to be remarkably nimble robot scaling gravel slopes as steep as thirty. Two degrees. An off earth record with disability explored a whole lot of craters in the course of its travels opportunity studied more than one hundred impact craters of various sizes and gathered insights about how craters form and erode over time. And it learned a lot about the Martian environment opportunity studied, Martian, clouds and the Apache the Martian atmosphere, including how it affects solar panels on space probes. That information may help scientists to design even more rugged resilient Rovers in the future the Rover's instruments. Also tracked changes in Martian clouds as they accumulated, providing scientists with the opportunity to study Martian weather in the end NASA. Scientists sent eight hundred and thirty five commands to opportunity in an effort to revive it before finally giving up. The final transmission from earth was the Billie holiday song. I'll be seeing you so hats off to you. You were the best little Rover after. Today's episode was written by Patrick j Kaiga and produced by Tyler clang for I heart media, and how stuff works for more on this and lots of other exploratory topics. Visit our home planet has stuff works dot com. Today's episode is brought to you by the new Capital One saver card. Earn four percent cashback on dining entertainment, two percent, grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases. Now when you go out you can cash in what's in your wallet.

Nasa Capital One Endeavour Crater Jet Propulsion Laboratory Pasadena Marsh Perseverance Valley Lauren Vogel Rovers NHS California Nasr Patrick J Kaiga Tyler Clang Four Percent One Percent Two Percent
 Italy's leaders spar over high-speed rail project

AP 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 3 years ago

Italy's leaders spar over high-speed rail project

"A high speed rail tunnel through the Alps connecting France. And Italy may have reached a dead end is Italy deals with internal squabbles. Over the project on the French side a rock eating machine tunnels through the mountainside toward Italy at an average rate of nearly twenty meters a day. Meanwhile, is Italy's populist movements has taken a stand against big infrastructure construction on its side has been halted since last summer still other factions remained strongly in support of the project as the two sides. Argue construction remains at a

Italy Alps Connecting France Twenty Meters
"twenty meters" Discussed on This Week in Science

This Week in Science

02:53 min | 3 years ago

"twenty meters" Discussed on This Week in Science

"As long as the subject of humans right right university study questions reliability of how sea-level rise in low lying coastal areas is measured so to cut to the there is a technique called tide gauges and they look at an average of twenty meters into the earth to sort of determine the subsidence how earth is sinking in relation to these low lying areas ron coastal areas where sea levels also rising what the study points out is kind of just obvious if you had all the date in front of you i mean understood it and could read it and figured out what it was which is what they did is that sixty percent of the subsidence sinking of of ground in these low lying areas happens in the top portion of it the top five meters so the twenty meters that they've been using the gauge this sixty ish feet of soil and how much it moves versus just the most of the change in height actually happens right near the top and so that's all you really need to pay attention to if you're looking out for how flooding will occur on the surface based on the way that they're looking at this all of the estimates of how communities and low-lying coastal areas will be impacted by global warming have been grossly underestimated which is not good news because the news was already dire but yeah and unfortunately for i don't know how long we've been talking about our global warming stories and updates i think as long as the show's been a show the news isn't refer- really gotten better or more rosie it's but this is just another layer but when do the things they can do is if they use this new technique and identify the hottest of the hot spots that are in jeopardy there could be more efficient city planning basically people should just move move further inland go find some foothills that will be above well above sea level altitude out the two that's altitude help to do my have we made it to that other part of the show that's actually gonna happen today layers and luke about animal she exempt more.

twenty meters sixty percent five meters
Neandertal Spears Were Surprisingly Deadly

60-Second Science

02:50 min | 3 years ago

Neandertal Spears Were Surprisingly Deadly

"This is science Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata time three hundred thousand years ago the scene a herd of horses struggling in mud a short five meters away, a group of early Nando tall hunters throwing volley of wooden spears towards the animals, and then probably coming into an injured horse, and then perhaps finishing it off with thrusting spear on Emeka milks a paleolithic archaeologist at University College London. But there's something not quite right about that classic scene. She says specifically the Neanderthals spears may have been more sophisticated and more lethal than we've given them credit for which would alter that. Ancient Tableau, we believe that Neanderthals could have thrown them from farther away that that would have allowed them to approach animals that maybe weren't disadvantaged, and they wouldn't have necessarily needed to come right up close to the animal to kill it off. With thrust. Some of these. Shots with throwing spare could be lethal to animal like that. If they hit in the right way this revised assessment of Neanderthal weaponry began with the crafting of spruce timber into replicas of an actual three hundred thousand year old spear. The surface was finished with the same kinds of stone tools used to make the original milks, then recruited six male javelin throwers to Chuck the replica at a hay bale at five meters. They struck the target more than half the time at ten to fifteen meters. A quarter of the time, but from twenty meters just one in six throws hit the hey, I mean, it's still not amazing. Accuracy. I have to say I was hoping for better though, she points out that the javelin throwers aren't trained to hit targets. Something Neanderthals may have been more skilled at and the experiments suggest the weapons were at least capable of sailing much farther than had been thought and high speed video of the throws proved the spears could strike with deadly force. The research is in the journal scientific reports the crafting of these ancient spears also suggest. Just some degree of intelligence, a concept of or intuition about balance mass and design, for example, whoever crafted these ancient spears use the denser, lower part of the tree trunk for the spirit tips intended to strike prey, but we still don't know which Neanderthals use this beers in battle. I want to emphasize that we chose male athletes rather than female athletes. Not because we don't think that women were playing a role in hunting. But because we needed a homogenous sample, but I'd be very curious to know how women did in terms of accuracy, perhaps another round of tests with women throwers can address that. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher dot.

Christopher Dodd Christopher Dot University College London Emeka Chuck Sixty Seconds Five Meters Three Hundred Thousand Years Three Hundred Thousand Year Fifteen Meters Twenty Meters
Space Economics

The Indicator from Planet Money

09:58 min | 3 years ago

Space Economics

"Thirty seven meters. Thirty meters twenty meters seventeen meter standing by for touchdown. These were the sounds inside of Nasr's Jet Propulsion Laboratory near Pasadena, California on Monday afternoon, as the people working there eagerly-hoped Nasr's unmanned spacecraft. The insight would nail the really tricky landing on the surface of Mars touchdown confirmed. Ever gets. It doesn't rats NASA. No, it's thrilling thrilling the landing did the insight which was carrying instruments that will help scientists to study the surface of Mars, and it's an habitants and learn whatever it can about the planet occupied or not this is able to prove it's not occupies. This is all very inspiring stuff. But our interest in space missions here. The indicator is not actually about the science as always it's about the economics. I'm Garcia, and I'm Stacey Vanik Smith and technically Cardiff economics is a science science issue. It's a social science. I think they. This is the indicator from planet money today and tomorrow on the show, we're going to take a look at the economic history of the US space program with a space economist. Yes, there is such a thing as a space economists. There's kind of thing. We'll tell you why the incites mission to Mars is actually a throwback to the way NASA used to do things. And we'll also explain what the economics of space looks like now. This message comes from the indicators sponsor capital. One capital. One's indicator is zero because they offer accounts with zero fees or minimums, and they offer accounts that can be opened from anywhere in five minutes. Capital one. What's in your wallet capital? One NA. Support also comes from SAP. Concur employees can submit expenses from anywhere. It's how the best run businesses make their expenses run better SAP. Concur. Learn more at concur dot com slash NPR. Matt Weinzierl is our space economist, well sort of he teaches at the Harvard Business School. He's an economist, and he has a really passionate interest in space. Matt knows that most people have a fascination with space because of like the grand themes exploration. The search for aliens going to the moon so planets AB someday living on Mars with its other inhabitants. Exactly, not Matt. He got excited about space for a different reason is the over the last decade, really almost two decades. Now, we've seen a real flourishing of a commercial space sector. See back in the Cold War decades, the sixties seventies and eighties. When the US was researching the Soviet Union to the moon and developing the space shuttle, Matt says the US space program was meant to provide Americans with so-called public goods. And this is a really important concept in economics public goods are defined by two things first when someone uses a public good it does not. Prevent another person from being able to use it and second when a person uses a public good. It also doesn't take away from how much someone else can use it. So a computer is not a public good. No, not at all. Because I'm using it. And you. One example of public good is clean air. My breathing. It does not stop Stacey. From also, breathing it or military protection. Just because I'm protected by the US military doesn't mean that Stacey is not protected. Matt gives three examples of the public goods that NASA originally was meant to provide the first one national security being able to defend ourselves from space or do something else space was critical importance to national security the second scientific discoveries. So too early. It's hard for the private sector, which is motivated by profit to do basic research in things that won't obviously be sellable. The third public good something you just really can't put a price tag on national pride. Don't usually talk about as much. But I think if you think back to the Cold War that was clearly a big part of it that we wanted to show that our model. Our our society was was the better choice for other societies to take and as the name suggests public goods tend to be publicly provided or. Vied by the government using taxpayer money because there isn't always an obvious motivation for the private sector to provide these public goods, there just isn't an immediate way to profit from them. And yet these goods are valuable to society. So the government uses its unique ability to direct massive amounts of money into providing those goods, it's a centralized economic model. The government agency in this case NASA decides what to do, and it has no competition for how best to do it and using this model. Matt says NASA has really accomplished amazing things over the years, think of the moon missions. And yes, the Mars landings like the one this week and also helping to build the international space station, which is a research laboratory the size of a football field that orbits the earth. And finally, of course, there was the space shuttle program, which was designed to transport people and stuff into space. But Matt says by the early years of this century NASA was struggling to define what its next mission should be NASA hasn't put a man on the moon. Since nineteen seventy two and the space shuttle program, experienced two tragedies, I when the challenger space shuttle exploded in one thousand nine hundred six and second when the Columbia space shuttle disintegrated in two thousand and three and that says it was a lot more expensive per space shuttle flight than people hoped and it got into space a lot less often in two thousand four the administration of President George W Bush announced that it was canceling the space shuttle program and this left NASA with a problem. How is it going to send cargo and cruise into space to do things? Like, for instance, supply, the international space station without space shuttle program NASA came up with two strategies one was a conventional big government centralized program, which would last many years and cost many billions of dollars and then on the margins. There was this idea to spend a little bit of money to encourage a more decentralised, private sector driven space economy. But basically it turned. Out that that conventional program went over budget and behind schedule and eventually got cancelled. But that little experimental program that involved NASA, partnering with the private sector that worked out. This programme was known as cots c o t s and that is an acronym. For commercial orbital transportation services. Nasa issued a report last year saying that the cots program had been this huge success and a model for the public sector to partner with the private sector. And since then NASA has launched no pun intended, is maybe slightly intended other partnership programs that are just like it. Yeah. And the basic way these programs work is that when NASA needs something NASA tells private companies how much it might be willing to pay for it. And then those private companies get to work on figuring out how to provide it for example, last decade when NASA wanted a better way to send supplies to the international space station, and in fact to private companies orbital sciences and SpaceX convinced NASA that they could use their shuttles to resupply. The. Space station. So NASA paid them combined three point five billion dollars for a total of twenty resupply. Flights to the space station. And there are plenty more examples. Like right now NASA is asking private companies to propose technologies they can build and which NASA will pay for that will be useful for future moon missions. We're going back. Yeah. Matt says that NASA is more of a partner with such private companies than a supervisor NASA sets the goal, but private companies compete with each other to come up with the best way to meet that goal and the private companies, then get to keep most of the innovations that they come up with and which they can use to develop new products that they can sell in the private sector or which they can sell to organizations other than NASA. From an economic standpoint this newer, decentralized model has a lot of benefits there's competition between companies which tends to make products better. There's also a profit motive for those companies and incentive for them to discover new technologies and NASA gets access to these new technol-. Gies for a lot less money than it would have cost to develop them. Plus this model is laying the groundwork. Or Stacey laying the space work. Very nice. Very nice, not very nice for the future. When a lot of activity in space will be driven mostly by the private sector. In other words, these partnerships between NASA and the private sector are creating new marketplace for space technologies. We're one did not previously exist and private companies right now are coming up with technologies that will have actual value that could be bought and sold for actual money in this possible future. So what are these new exciting activities going to be and what weird new economic challenges might these activities themselves create Matt tells us about them on tomorrow's episode to tune in. I'm excited to hear more about the martians. Hey, it's catch out with the code. Switch team few years ago. I adopted this queue, but also shy eagle next from a dog rescue. But I noticed really fast he mostly barked at my friends of color made me wonder is my dog racist. So I went to find out check it out on the next code. Switch podcast.

Nasa Matt Weinzierl United States Stacey Vanik Smith Jet Propulsion Laboratory California Nasr Pasadena Government Garcia SAP Partner Cardiff Harvard Business School Soviet Union Football President George W Bush
Mars Mission Makes Clean Landing

60-Second Science

03:09 min | 3 years ago

Mars Mission Makes Clean Landing

"This is Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky passed through peak. Deceleration telemetry shows the spacecraft saw about eight G L, and Markle Bravo and Iraq radio science reports carrier detected. Inside is now traveling at velocity of two thousand meters per second control room of the NASA insight Mars mission earlier today as the spacecraft landed on the planet after a voyage of six months and three hundred million miles. It'll be sending a probe some five meters below the Martian surface to measure heat flow and listen for tremors. Most of the talking is by Christine's ally of Nasr's Jet Propulsion Laboratory travelling at one thousand meters per second. Insight about four hundred meters per second. It will deploy it's twelve meter diameter. Supersonic parachute. Parachute. Parachutes deploy nominally at about mach. One point seven thirty. One seconds pass round. Patients are serving signals consistent with parachute. Deploy. Trees shows parachute deployment radar powered on. Did you separation commanded twenty two seconds pass? We have radar activation. Where the radar is beginning to search for the ground once the radar locked on the ground and inside is about one kilometer of the surface. The Lander will separate from the back show and begin terminal descent using twelve descent engines, twenty seven seconds pass altitude convergence the radar has locked on the ground. Yes. Danny by the Lander separation. Lander separation commanded altitude six hundred meters. Gravity turn out four hundred meters. Three hundred meters. Two hundred meters. Eighty meters. Sixty meters. Fifty meters constant Rossi thirty seven meters thirty meters twenty meters. Seventeen meters standing by for touchdown. We'll be until about eight PM eastern time today that NASA knows if inside solar panels are out and working correctly. They needed to literally wait for the dust to settle from the landing before deploying the panels catch down confirm. Scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky.

Steve Mirsky Nasa Markle Bravo Jet Propulsion Laboratory Iraq Christine Danny Rossi Nasr Sixty Seconds Four Hundred Meters Per Second One Thousand Meters Per Second Two Thousand Meters Per Second Three Hundred Meters Twenty Seven Seconds Four Hundred Meters Thirty Seven Meters Two Hundred Meters Six Hundred Meters
NASA's InSight probe successfully lands on Mars and deploys solar panels

60-Second Science

02:52 min | 3 years ago

NASA's InSight probe successfully lands on Mars and deploys solar panels

"As the spacecraft landed on the planet after a voyage of six months and three hundred million miles. It'll be sending a probe some five meters below the Martian surface to measure heat flow and listen for tremors. Most of the talking is by Christine's ally of Nasr's Jet Propulsion Laboratory travelling at one thousand meters per second. Insight about four hundred meters per second. It will deploy it's twelve meter diameter. Supersonic parachute. Parachute. Parachutes deploy nominally at about mach. One point seven thirty. One seconds pass round. Patients are serving signals consistent with parachute. Deploy. Trees shows parachute deployment radar powered on. Did you separation commanded twenty two seconds pass? We have radar activation. Where the radar is beginning to search for the ground once the radar locked on the ground and inside is about one kilometer of the surface. The Lander will separate from the back show and begin terminal descent using twelve descent engines, twenty seven seconds pass altitude convergence the radar has locked on the ground. Yes. Danny by the Lander separation. Lander separation commanded altitude six hundred meters. Gravity turn out four hundred meters. Three hundred meters. Two hundred meters. Eighty meters. Sixty meters. Fifty meters constant Rossi thirty seven meters thirty meters twenty meters. Seventeen meters standing by for touchdown. We'll be until about eight PM eastern time today that NASA knows if inside solar panels are out and working correctly. They needed to literally wait for the dust to settle from the landing before deploying the panels catch down confirm. Scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky.

Jet Propulsion Laboratory Steve Mirsky Nasa Nasr Christine Rossi Danny Four Hundred Meters Per Second One Thousand Meters Per Second Three Hundred Meters Twenty Seven Seconds Four Hundred Meters Thirty Seven Meters Two Hundred Meters Six Hundred Meters Twenty Two Seconds Seventeen Meters Eighty Meters One Kilometer
What Do Trees Eat?

Imagine This

03:20 min | 4 years ago

What Do Trees Eat?

ABC Ambrose Tunis Dan Relief Popovich. Diesen Twenty Meters