28 Burst results for "Twenty Four Weeks"

Fresh update on "twenty four weeks" discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

04:29 min | 19 hrs ago

Fresh update on "twenty four weeks" discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

"Vow thrombosis or hospitalization for heart. Failure or major bleeding at twelve months occurred at amine of three hundred forty seven point five days in the river rock saban group and three hundred forty point days in the war for and group difference calculated as restricted mean. Survival time seven point four days death from cardiovascular causes or thromboembolic events occurred in three point four percent of patients in the river roxanne group and in five point one percent in the war for in group. The incidence of stroke was zero point six percent in the river. Roxanne group and two point four percent in the warfare and group major bleeding occurred in one point four percent of patients in the river rock band group and into point six percent in the war for in group. The frequency of other serious adverse events was similar in the two groups in patients with atrial fibrillation and bio prosthetic mitral valve river. Rock saban was non inferior to war for it. With respect to the meantime the primary outcome of death major cardiovascular events or major bleeding at twelve months phase two trial of the dp p. one inhibitor. Brent soka tube in bronchiolitis by james chalmers from the nine wells hospital and medical school dundee united kingdom the causal role of neutral searing proteases. In the pathogenesis of bronchial activists was studied with brin soka tube and inhibitor of protease activation in this face to trial two hundred fifty six patients with bronc act asus. Who had had at least to exacerbate tensions in the previous year were randomly assigned to receive placebo ten milligrams of brin soka tip or twenty five milligrams of prince. Oh khattib once-daily. For twenty four weeks. The twenty fifth percentile of the time to the first exacerbating was sixty seven days in the placebo group. One hundred thirty four days in the ten milligram brin sokhib group and ninety six days. In the twenty five milligram brent soka tube group brennan soka tip treatment prolong the time to the first exacerbation as compared with placebo. The adjusted hazard ratio for exacerbate in comparison of brent soak with placebo was zero point. Five eight in the ten milligram group and zero point. Six two in the twenty five milligram group. The incidence rate ratio was zero point six four in ten milligram group as compared with placebo and zero point. Seven five in the twenty five milligram group. As compared with placebo with both sochi sokhib doses sputum neutral last taste activity was reduced from baseline. Over the twenty four week treatment period the incidence of dental and skin adverse events of special interest was higher with both prince ohka tip doses than with placebo in this trial reduction of neutra fil syrian protease activity with brin sokhib in patients with bronchial act. Assists was associated with improvements. In bronchial ecstasies clinical outcomes a randomized trial of laranjal mask airway in neonatal resuscitation by nicholas. Peyot vich from the university of bergen. Norway face masks ventilation is the most common resuscitation method for births fixed in this phase. Three trial in uganda. One thousand one hundred fifty four neonates who required positive pressure ventilation were randomly assigned to be treated by midwife with a accomplice. Lorenzo mask airway l. I may or with face mask ventilation. A primary outcome event of death within seven days or admission to the neonatal intensive care unit with moderate to severe hypoxia. Schemic encephalopathy at day. One to five during hospitalization occurred in twenty seven point. Four percent of neonates in the ele- make group and in twenty four point four percent in the face mask group. Death within seven days occurred in twenty one point seven percent of the neonates in the lma group and eighteen point four percent of those in the face mask group and admission to the you with moderate to severe hypoxia. Schemic encephalopathy at day. One to five. During hospitalization occurred in eleven point two percent and ten point one percent respectively the frequency of predefined intervention related adverse events was similar in the two groups in neonates with physio the may appear to be safe in the hands of midwives but was not superior to face mask ventilation with respect to early neonatal. Death and moderate to severe hypoxia schemic encephalopathy women physicians and promotion in academic medicine especial article by kimber richter from the university of kansas school of medicine. Kansas city in two thousand a landmark study showed that women who graduated from us medical schools.

Roxanne Group Brent Soka Brin Sokhib Rock Saban Mitral Valve Kansas City Kimber Richter University Of Bergen Bronchiolitis University Of Kansas School Of James Chalmers Uganda Norway Nine Wells Hospital Sputum Dundee United Kingdom
Small businesses fighting to survive the pandemic

Guaranteeing Your Retirement with David Graham

05:11 min | 5 months ago

Small businesses fighting to survive the pandemic

"Let's focus on some small business owners today Alex what changes were made to the payroll protection program yes obviously during these are president times slot of small business owners have felt the pressure Lebanese restaurants or retail stores services other businesses that have been impacted by by opposite the pandemic and smashes the corona virus and there's two major programs of that that were pushed through Congress one already existed and that was the call the prickly and economic injury disaster loan program to BSP actively used for the release for hurricanes tornadoes things like that but in this case there is extra funny made for also she was a present to clear it they're able to use some of the funds for the crown of our sense of the server program nothing major really in terms of its regular course except that instead of being a natural disaster they used to this time around for for but the pandemic now the paycheck protection program that you referenced for the look at the most televised news when it first launched it was definitely a rocky ledge rollout because there's some concerns over the bank's been ready to issue the loan for the the program itself is could be rushed through the process because ultimately paychecks are be needed because a lot of folders right rely on those funds that said the president the house and the Senate all agreed to make some changes to it the unanimous vote that I've lived through or at least in the Senate and the then president trump also signed that the biggest change is that no longer will new PPP loan from an older PPP loans can use these funds for payroll of her twenty four week period from when they're dispersed Bedlam that because a lot of restaurants initially in areas of the country that are just starting to open up areas like New York City where I'm sitting right now the district Columbia which will on Monday formally move into what we call phase two of the use of more time to use the funds to bring staff back on board and also the other major changes is the lowest threshold the have to go directly to paychecks to allow a lot of businesses to pay rent pay their vendors you know key things that they'll need in order to fully resume operations hopefully for all of us writer then later are going forward well you know this small businesses make up seventy percent of the jobs in America and the small businesses have problems the whole countries and I have a problem child was far as I'm concerned having we were having a small business you can up small business god help it looks a lot of small companies small businesses now they're continuing to struggle so either you know you read in the paper every day restaurants still going out of business and what have you are there any government support programs in the works yet you know on the local level three level there have been more assistance programs that have been instituted in the city of Tampa itself is on the call one Tampa to where you can get some small grants and even some small loans in order to help on the whole business people flow but as you know the truth runs the way they are most of our business owner still so sugar retailer restaurant sometimes it's always not enough so on a national scale there have been more discussions about maybe the ten Chile refunding the P. P. P. program and all and then allowing businesses to go through again if they need more funding in order to try and keep people on the payroll I think you know this is obviously very hard philosophical discussion because there are some small business owners and everything bothered to apply for president need to it's it's hard because at the end of the day policy makers want to keep people on the job working having some businesses that have a parking PPP level they may have not been allowed to be formally open they did use the time they they brought their staff back to the bottom off the unemployment rolls to do other projects that may be would Amazon dot the US on this our local area some small businesses including in Gloucestershire restaurants use it as a good time to deep clean their restaurants maybe change other restaurant operated for the future I think you're seeing that a lot of Congress men and women are coming on the side of maybe we need to extend this program allows businesses especially small ones on the PPP program really is designed for very small businesses another leg up as we move into the next phase of the of of this current situation and to allow them the flexibility to to of all their business model and what is going to be the the new normal all right to save some jobs maybe even create new ones in the future all this is it because they go what we're dealing with this virus is the unknowns the anonymous and not not just getting sick but how do you run a business when you're not supposed to talk to people with you know other than on a computer or six feet apart from each other you know we're living in a very unique space and time and that system out of being smart about it and she helped washes up it's very very hard to plan even for the government

Alex
House passes bill to grant flexibility for small business aid program

Rush Limbaugh

00:32 sec | 6 months ago

House passes bill to grant flexibility for small business aid program

"Week but help may be on its way for small business owners who been racing to get a hold of some of federal corona virus really fun the house of representatives is expected to pass a bill to give small businesses greater flexibility in spending federal relief funds they received amid the corona virus pandemic business leaders have appealed to lawmakers asking for more time in spending the funds they obtain to the paycheck protection program which currently says they must spend the funding within eight weeks the house bill would extend the timeline to give businesses twenty four weeks to spend

Carole Joffe: Author of "Obstacle Course: The Everyday Struggle to Get an Abortion in America"

The Electorette Podcast

09:45 min | 10 months ago

Carole Joffe: Author of "Obstacle Course: The Everyday Struggle to Get an Abortion in America"

"I'm Jim Taylor. Skinner in this is the electorate on this episode. I have a conversation with professor reproductive. Rights Advocate Carol. Joffe about her new book. Obstacle course the everyday struggle to get an abortion in America. We opened our conversation by discussing. How legislation has failed to protect access to abortion because it overlooks the everyday obstacles. That make it nearly impossible from any women to obtain an abortion legislatively. I confess to being very cynical. I seriously I don't think that even I mean. Look the country's deeply deeply divided about abortion those who are pro choice. See these restrictions as inhibiting often in a very cruel way women's ability to get an abortion. Those who are against abortion say. Yeah that's the point. We we are putting these things in precisely so we don't believe in abortion so therefore These restrictions are good because they make it harder to get an abortion. They they make it easier to close down clinics so all is to say that. I'm I mean in terms of the legislative process I don't think that anything we say in our book will sway. Those who who are opposed to abortion could put an antiabortion restrictions. What my co author David Cone and I are hoping is that those who are pro-choice but do not do abortion work or study or advocacy twenty four seven like many of the People. We discuss in our book. will come to understand how onerous restrictions are and hopefully will will move to remove those legislators out of office so who who are doing this as people who are pro choice when. I look for someone to vote into office right just to put. It simply feels like this people when they speak to us and you know. They're saying vote for me when they talk about abortion they talk about Roe v Wade and it doesn't spread from there they don't really talk about all of the little restrictions that have gone into place which makes exercising your right to an abortion nearly impossible for a lot of women. I mean legislatively one of the things that you point out in the book is that you know Central v Wade past have been about what to- hundred restrictions by now probably probably more like thirteen hundred? Yeah I feel like none of our politicians are really focusing on those. Are you know they have a blind spot? They're only looking at Roe v Wade. We have the protective weighed. Yes no if certainly make sense and and You know what I would say in response to that is of course. It's important to protect Roe. V Wade and there's a lot to be very nervous about at this very moment about row but what researching and writing this book show to me. Is that many women already live in post real world. In other words if roe is overturned what presumably will happen is it will be turned back to the states. That means they'll be a lot of traveling from what we now. Call hostile states to quote haven states. But that's already happening. I mean one thing that really surprised me and I've studied abortion more than thirty five years. one thing. That really surprised me was just extent of the travel of efforts at took to just get to a clinic for so many women. The really important thing about your book when I was reading it. You outline the stories of a lot of women. I think the first person you highlight is a fifteen year old teenager right and her parents were kind of in and out of the picture. And when you think about the fact that in some states you have to have parental consent right and you think about the thousands of dollars at it takes to get an abortion and this particular person ended up in one of those e call fake clinic. What do they call them? A clinic crisis pregnancy center. You just talk us through that scenario of what that might have been like for her fifteen year old teenager while she was a extrordinary. We did not interview her personally. We we found her story she had written it up So I can't speak to her personally but she. She had extraordinary. Extraordinarily determination was like for her to go to the center. She lives in the state where she had to make a separate trip to the clinic. Twenty four hours before the abortion. She got to the clinic. She realized something was wrong. It was a fake clinic. These crisis pregnancy centers and there's thousands of them there. There are more crisis. Pregnancy centers in the United States. Now than there are abortion providing facilities and in a number of states. They get they get public funding. You know one of the most of the many things in this world to be enraged about one of the most enraging things is for example in the state of Texas. Money is taken away from family planning centres not even abortion. I mean you may be sure does not give money to abortion clinics but to family planning programs contraceptive programs and gives them to these religiously sponsored crisis pregnancy centers that outright. Lie To women they either tell them they're ultrasound is so far along that Can't pass get an abortion? Or sometimes they tell them they're ultrasound shows actually earlier stage in pregnancy than they actually are so these women won't rush and by the time they get to a clinic They'll be too late. Another feature of them is that they have been very aggressive about buying property. Is nearest possible to legitimate abortion facilities and it's often very very confusing to patients. I mean this this case that we talked about in the book we call her Collier. It's very common especially for example in in a case that we do discuss the park crisis. Pregnancy center had a parking lot right next to a clinic. People from the fake clinic would stand outside would wave women in who of course stopped that they were being waived into the real clinic. So yeah this is one of many many problems that women face when they try to get an abortion. When I read this story I I. It was just incredible to me. I was so angry. And just the Paul the links go to to to to lie to women and you know into teenagers who are going through something. That's really really hard. So and in that case with Talia this clinic you can remind me or tell me if I'm correct or not. This clinic was right next door very close to it and it looked very much like the real clinic and the name was very similar. That's right and when you go into these places they're they're you know they're wearing lab coats and make you think that their doctors that's right and just it's just unfathomable to me the link to go through none of the I think you hit the right word on the head. It's unfathomable that these fake clinics Goto but it also Jennifer I would also say it's unfathomable the lengths women not just teenagers but women in general have to go through to get their abortions and they do. Yeah they do right. That gets to one of my next questions do we do. We have any data on. The percentage is the percentage of cases where obstacles collectively were. They've been successful right in a woman knocking abortion we done. That's a great question. We don't have good data on specifically women who were dissuaded or allied to at a crisis pregnancy center. My colleagues here at UCSF in the answer program have come up with a estimate that about four thousand women a year Who Show up at clinics are turned away because they arrived too late in in just station. Your listeners should understand that all abortion facilities are not uniform some go only through the first trimester of pregnancy some go to eighteen weeks Some states a number of states have banned abortions after twenty weeks there's only three or four clinics and the United States that will perform abortions after twenty four weeks and that's usually for Fetal anomalies or the woman herself is is very ill. I mean those are not the only people who get abortions there. But that's the bulk of the cases so It's a very cruel vicious cycle Europe. Poor woman you find out you're pregnant you try you look around you. Try to find a clinic. You make an appointment you try to find someone who will drive you there. You try to arrange childcare for your children. Sixty percent of abortion patients are our parents You arrange to take time off from work so all you have to put all these things into place. What we found out is simply getting a getting a reliable ride to a clinic if you don't have your own car or even if you do some clinics a use sedation which means you are not able to drive yourself home afterwards. Anyway but the time you get all these pieces in place and you show up to the clinic you may be past that clinics limit

ROE Wade United States Professor America Jim Taylor Skinner Joffe Ucsf David Cone Texas Collier Talia Jennifer I Paul
"twenty four weeks" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"twenty four weeks" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Why C. B. D. the number one show in the tri state number one can be shown to try stay with the group himself Jeff him okay let me just say this ladies and gentleman there you go I'm doing it every week that is the reason why that's a new show but that I really love okay okay this is my show everyone that lives alright so that is the reason why Jimmy is a three time Grammy nominated guy because literally on the spot he invents stuff all that wait a minute he said it wasn't on the spot he's been rehearsing that yeah forget was a free right alright here we go yes okay so there you go you now know Jimmy is here now Jimmy is doing something for the show that's pretty exciting and political let us know if you can do it yeah playlist down also so we took a look at all the folks in the music industry which kinda is where Jimmy strength is of obviously and we try to figure out who in the industry were very committed to the cannabis industry and especially the medicinal side the campus space okay then so just let's think about when we say people that are committed to the space who might we mean these are the folks that you're gonna here and there yeah music throughout the next several weeks on the shelves of guys like John legend or even going back further Louis Armstrong more current Riana lady Gaga Donna and even with of course the great Willie Nelson all right so we will continue to try and Jimmy Jimmy thank you flip well there was an assumption that Jimmy well I got a now if I had to give his lover I say well done James I apologize for not a problem all right so we continue to track where the space is going and discuss implications on cornerstone of our society like music sports and while the same time addressing the racial political and financial issues as the show continues over the next twenty four weeks all right let's review the four segments of our show our first segment is called cannabis in the tri state plus one which of course Massachusetts well update you as you know on the key Candace issues and these four states our second segment is called stunning amazing facts what I consider to be the most relevant issues and opportunities in the space since last week he said what is called a Jimmy stunner they look at you go just house honestly longing to casually this right right for the third segment today's gas that will be my honor to introduce makayla Ramirez McHale is both the founder and CEO of the nonprofit called the beside foundation who worked with at risk youth we came as organization focuses on skateboarding to help create community commitment and confidence all in support of at risk youth hard to believe perhaps but skateboarding has become a substantial support in the U. S. especially among the female population surprisingly enough it's taken a number of years but females in sports girls and females are one of the fastest growing sport in the United States today I think second only behind soccer well I guess makayla also sits on the governing body of the sport helping determine the events and activities that will lead up to helping select the U. S. team in both street and park the two main segment of the sport as a final point Beyonce locker skateboarding is the fastest growing American support among girls under sixteen makayla is remarkable you won't want to miss that segment lastly we will end with our four segment called your messages we have time to fix that this is the most interesting direct messages we received following last week's show we'll be back with our first segment canvas the tri state plus one right after this in celebration of power of plans there is a leading destination in New York City for C. B. D. their organic CVD have flour is grown in upstate New York so come down and talk to one of their herbalists to learn about how CVD may relieve stress anxiety and pain located.

C. B. twenty four weeks
"twenty four weeks" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

02:45 min | 1 year ago

"twenty four weeks" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"S. is where you want which one is yeah ever see or hear from all climate change I wore the fake so the the fake glasses on the second debate with the whole court can Isley's campaign for the presidential nomination will be or is about to fizzle out is is absolutely it's thank you kind of started with his old is can't fizzle in the yes campaign knows reached its hundred and thirty thousand donor threshold but it is not yet reached two percent support in any of the qualifying pole has even reach one percent support I don't think it has you know he got accomplish what you want to accomplish he's a guy I knew he was going to be president but he wanted he wanted to talk about climate change no matter what you ask about how to get that conversational there which you know I can I can respect that and angling for maybe the deputy of you know environmental something it right one of him is when he could end up at the P. A. if the dems way under or something like that yeah there you go that's a wrap that your news from Marshall full of C. Armstrong get a show the conscience of the nation frankly given the super progressive politics of urban Washington state he's reestablishing is bona fide uses a crusader for what those blue voters believe them when is the debate it's end of August which is next week so I assume the rates next week this could be pretty exciting because you really are getting all the the heavy hitters on one stage and you won't you won't have an hour's worth of conversation being one percenters are less you have no time the debate's going to be August twenty eight okay so it's it's Wednesday point of order do we have any news on Marion Williams their name Williams Williams she's not gonna make it she's not a two percent internet here name is not on the list oh no nobody's business so she's not slamming it we can get this so that's going to we're getting about piece to get our department of peace it's going to be eight eight counter weight to west point she's going to have an academy of peace I don't think you understand there are only twenty four weeks before the Iowa caucuses some to get serious narrow the field only twenty four weeks who has a long time here you sh sorry said it but there was a good start to win and end the war with Denmark by the who's on the next season of dancing with the stars which has three seasons per year Joe Biden with another gaffe wire radio people on the air they did a poll of people on in radio which is kind of interesting and Larry King with his eighth divorce now it's very very disappointing all said stories Norman out some animal got all these stories next what.

twenty four weeks two percent one percent
Planned Parenthood back in court over Missouri's last abortion clinic

All Things Considered

04:07 min | 1 year ago

Planned Parenthood back in court over Missouri's last abortion clinic

"Missouri's only clinic that performs abortions is fighting to stay open that fight against the state's health department is playing out in the courts today last week, we asked the head of Missouri's department of health and senior services Randall Williams how the closure of this clinic might affect Missouri women's access to abortion access always important to us. And so, is, you know, Missouri's continuous to eight states and so they're certainly or abortion to Soltys very close by. Illinois and Kansas Alison directs one of those nearby facilities. She runs the hope clinic in granite Illinois, roughly twenty minutes drive from Saint Louis welcome to all things considered. Thanks for having me. How have you and your staff in preparing for the possibility that Missouri may one day be left without a clinic that provides abortions? Well, I think abortion providers all across the country, have theoretically been planning for this day since Trump was elected to office and those conversations have picked up more rapidly infrequently since the beginning of twenty nineteen. And now we have had to rapidly put in some of that crisis management planning into practice over these past two weeks. Can you give us examples of some of the kinds of steps you're talking about some of the steps we have taken as hiring new staff considering patient flow and how to allow patients to expect? The same safe and compassionate care that they always have from us without having to be in the clinic, longer hours, we've been utilizing volunteers to do mundane clerical work for us that we once had the opportunity to do. So we've been increasing our number of patients and staying open longer hours than what we would have normally expected. I imagine your clinics. Capacity is limited in some respect can you scale up to the degree that you think you might have to. Absolutely not right off the bat. We see about three thousand patients year here at hope clinic and. Does that include STI treatment? Okay. The last report, I think, from the gut knocker institute of abortion patients in Missouri was thirty five hundred and twenty seventeen. That is more than double what we currently see wouldn't expect to take on all of those patients where their number of neighboring states set could provide services, much more close to home for patients. But we are in a unique position that we're so close to downtown, Saint Louis and that remaining abortion provider in Missouri. And that we also go to twenty four weeks just station which a lot of our other neighboring states do not. So we have already seen about a thirty percent increase of abortion patients in the past two years, since Missouri, passed its last ban on abortion and twenty seventeen but we have seen an increase in those numbers already in twenty nineteen impaired to the. Same time last year, and we expect that to continue to go up, not only with Missouri patients. But from several other neighboring midwest and states in the south you prepared for something similar to this in two thousand sixteen. When Kentucky was left with only one clinic, providing abortions has this been different from that. Yeah, I think so because all of our worship providers including myself, are Missouri residents. And they also provide gynecological care in the state of Missouri. And so for a lot of reasons we feel like we're a clinic, that is operating in two states abiding by Eleanor law that also feeling the direct impact of what's happening in Missouri both professionally medically and also personally Alison dream is the director of the hope clinic in granite Illinois, just outside Saint Louis Missouri. Thanks so much for speaking with us to have a great day.

Missouri Saint Louis Missouri Alison Dream Illinois Saint Louis Department Of Health Soltys Randall Williams Gut Knocker Institute Donald Trump Kentucky Kansas Eleanor Director Twenty Four Weeks Thirty Percent Twenty Minutes Two Weeks Two Years
"twenty four weeks" Discussed on The Brilliant Idiots

The Brilliant Idiots

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"twenty four weeks" Discussed on The Brilliant Idiots

"Do it ought you my thoughts over why don't you want to kill cleaning that up? Kenneth look on there. That was so Tom. All Monday by foxhole. Everything you said is after Lutely true. It's just weird to me. Why people kiss muscle. Everybody the, the women's the last military, like war fought in farms to World War. Two reference trainees in foxholes. Now they're controlling drones. Yeah. It's all drone do now here's the thing if you are going to be a tranny, and you're going to control the joins gender, whatever. Whatever, whatever what head. Shortly. Call me. You are. Okay. So if you're controlling the drones, maybe. No, like acrylic nails. Is that a fair thing for no matter who it is, if you're gonna be Jane is good high grow, but with heels and can you control the drone and kill me kill them do shit? Here's if you're gonna be transgendered facet go all the way to five o'clock shadow on dress. New dick hang out the front. Like, like she'll go go talk talk. Yeah. Clean up little fucking Rouge on. Yeah, don't half ass. It don't come out throughout like why is it so dirty? It's like you wanted this. Yes. And other things. Men's rooms be dirty. That's how it is over here. When you're in a war you really do shit with a person agenda sexuality is all that. You like it doesn't matter aimed fucking gun aimed, his gun always about abortion. It is six months. No, not it is. Second third trimester, twenty four weeks. No. Yeah. Twenty four weeks to four weeks. Ain't six months later. That's fucked up. That's them. Go go go go go go. All right. All right, guys. Filo. Filo. Filo. Filo. Filo. Filo. The URL is Filo.

Filo Tom Jane Kenneth six months Twenty four weeks twenty four weeks four weeks
"twenty four weeks" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"twenty four weeks" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"One Bank USA a eight when Anthony Weiner wraps up his twenty one month sentence for sexting with a fifteen year old girl in may, the former New York City congressman we'll have something else. He needs to do a judge today ordered Weiner to register as a level one sex offender for a minimum of twenty years. Even though he's considered a low risk for re-offending. He will be required to verify address annually and head to police station every three years to get a new photo taken Weiner, by the way was not in court today after serving time at a Massachusetts prison. He's now at a halfway house. A prominent New York lawyer will be in Boston federal court today in the college admissions cheating scandal. Here's correspondent Aaron Katersky. Ordin Kaplan, the co-chairman of the international law firm, willkie Farr and Gallagher said in a statement, he intends to enter a guilty plea to the criminal charge against him. Kaplan allegedly paid. Seventy five thousand dollars to rig his daughters. ACT his statement said she had no knowledge whatsoever about what he had done and has been devastated to learn it Kaplan cities deeply ashamed and pledged to win back the trust and respect of his daughter family and community earlier this week. Actress Felicity Huffman and Lori Lachlan appeared in federal court to face charges for allegedly paying to help their daughters. Get into elite schools Harvard University is investigating its fencing coach Peter brand over financial transactions and decision to admit a student at the school for the fencing team. The Boston Globe says brand sold his Massachusetts home to a businessman in two thousand sixteen for nearly one million dollars hundreds of thousands above its value. The report says not long after that sale was completed businessman's son was admitted to Harvard brand has been at Harvard for twenty two years. He had no immediate comment wins. News time three forty nine. So much of our lives depends on GPS in cars smart. Phones and other devices. Well, some GPS equipment could go haywire this weekend. That's because when twenty four satellites that orbit planet earth went online in nineteen eighty they had enough storage space to remember only one thousand twenty four weeks. So when they hit that Mark tomorrow evening at seven fifty nine the counters will reset to zero the fed say they've been warning utilities financial systems airlines and others about this for the past two years. The air force which runs the satellites says the likelihood of major issues is low. There's a tomato paste recall to tell you about conagra as hunts tomato paste, no salt added six ounce cans may contain mold because of the manufacturing process. The recalled cans have a best by date of October sixteenth twenty twenty. There are no reports of illness. He said just throw the product away. They will also honor any returns police in Greenville, South Carolina, say they have solved a twenty nine year old case of a baby found dead. The baby was born in February of nineteen ninety police believe she was still alive when somebody raptor in newspaper and bedding and put her into a box that new vacuum cleaner. Come in then left her in a field with a pile of trash in an old sofa last November DNA submitted a genealogy sites found a likely match to the baby's father who pointed them to his then girlfriend now fifty three year old Brooke Graham Graham is now under arrest charged with homicide. I'm Rita Foley wins. News time three fifty one from the ram trucks traffic.

Ordin Kaplan Anthony Weiner Harvard University Massachusetts New York Brooke Graham Graham Mark Boston Globe Aaron Katersky Felicity Huffman Bank USA congressman Boston Greenville Rita Foley Peter brand South Carolina co-chairman fed
World's smallest baby boy goes home from Japan hospital

Financial Issues with Dan Celia

00:16 sec | 1 year ago

World's smallest baby boy goes home from Japan hospital

"The world's smallest baby has finally gone home. After spending five months hooked up to machines in hospital in Tokyo, the baby boy, wait nine point forty five ounces at birth. Slightly more than a grapefruit. He was delivered by emergency c section after his weight. Stop increasing twenty four weeks of pregnancy.

Tokyo Forty Five Ounces Twenty Four Weeks Five Months
World's smallest baby boy goes home from Japan hospital

Radio From Hell

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

World's smallest baby boy goes home from Japan hospital

"What happens the world's smallest baby. Has been born a baby boy. Born at nine and a half ounces. Houses. The smallest on record. And he's doing fine apparently wasn't easy for the little guy after twenty four weeks of treatment in intensive care. He grew to a healthy seven pounds and was sent home. This was a baby born in Japan. The little boy whose name was not released was introduced to the world after a c section delivery in August at the Kayla. Your university in Tokyo, he was so tiny at birth. He reportedly could fit into the palm of someone's hand, the average weight of a newborn baby ranges from five and a half ten pounds. I weighed nearly ten pounds. I was born the

Tokyo Japan Ten Pounds Twenty Four Weeks Seven Pounds
Republicans introduce House version of bill banning infanticide after failed abortions

Sean Hannity

10:57 min | 1 year ago

Republicans introduce House version of bill banning infanticide after failed abortions

"If a mothers in labor, I can tell you exactly what would happen. The infant would be delivered. The infant would be kept comfortable the infant would be resuscitated. If if that's what the mother and the family desired, and then a discussion would ensue between the physicians and the mother, oh, by the way, he's a pediatric surgeon those pictures of the person in black face on his page, and in a Ku Klux Klan outfit. That's you know, he's a medical student. He's a pediatric doctor apparently. So let me understand the. So you know, we'll deliver the baby who make sure the baby's comfortable. And after the baby's comfortable. Then the mother's going to decide whether if the baby's in need of medical attention, whether or not help resuscitate the baby, okay? There is a human living soul that is apparently being kept comfortable living on its own a human being, and then well, we'll let the mother decide you wanna keep it or not keep it. Then we'll have a discussion with the doctors and the mom not. Maybe we'll go down to the maybe we'll go down to the kitchen or the commissary in the hospital and see what that's like I mean, it is beyond gruesome now, it's expanded to Rhode Island and New Mexico and California and oh now Massachusetts has gotten on board. They wanna similar Bill. It was a motion in the Senate to protect babies born alive from an abortion, Democrats, wouldn't even let it come up for a vote that would have offered protections for babies have even botched abortions that lived you. Don't think it happens. It did. It it does. Now joining us is Melissa Odin. She is an abortion attempt survivor, and by the way is gone on to live a great life. As I understand it as two daughters of her own. She didn't miscarry one son. She speaks out loudly for the voiceless, and we also have with us, doctor Levin Tino. Dr levered Tino started doing abortions in nineteen seventy seven in New York state. During his residency graduated in nineteen eighty went into private practice. I in Florida than in New York and five years doctor Levin, Tino, he performed over twelve hundred abortions, including one hundred second trimester saline abortions. And then later DNA abortions up to twenty four weeks. And they both join us now. Thank you for being with us. Thank you. Melissa odin. So. Your mom, tried to abort you. But you're alive. What happened? Well, I was the type of procedure Dr Lepetit. No, did I am a saline abortion survivor, and it was also in nineteen seventy seven. So you know, what I know is that my birth. Mother was nineteen years old. She was a college student, and she was actually forced into this abortion by her mother. My maternal grandmother who was a nurse at the hospital where it was performed. So this type of procedure was meant to poison and Skuld me to death. And my medical records actually indicate that I soaked in this toxic sell solution for five period while they attempted to induce my birth mother's labor. And finally that fist day they succeeded. I was expelled from the womb in the final step about abortion procedure. And of course, they thought I would you delivered as a successful abortion, otherwise known as the deceased child, but lo and behold, I was born alive. It's unbelievable now did you ever confront your mother about this? Yeah. So I'm adopted and didn't know that I survived a sealed abortion until I was fourteen. How did you find out? By complete accident. Really? It was a pretty traumatic thing. But my sister, my older sister. Let me know that there was more to the story of my life. And I sat her mother down and never expected for her to say, you know, you survived a failed abortion, and you know, it's devastating. I wish the other side of this issue could understand how traumatic it is to live this kind of life. This is not an easy truth to live through or to live in this kind of do you have any residual physical or mental impact from this. And other oil, you're describing emotional, but are there any physical issues that you've had to deal with as a result of what you're describing is utter brutality. Right. Not long term. So when I first survived the day thought, I had a fatal heart defect there were arguments about whether I would be provided medical care. I've actually been contacted by nurses at that Haas. Spital who were there? I'm gonna meet one of them next month probably face to face for the first time. But I know that there were arguments that they laid me aside that certain people didn't wanna provide me medical care. And so when somebody actually mother your your real mother, ever apologize. Yeah. So I'm one of the few abortion survivors, who's been connected with my biological mother. We actually have a really great relationship. We actually live in the same city. I have this very face filled life that God has blessed. So we live in very close proximity. I was just the other day. She's very sad about what was done to me. What was done to her? You know, she said her greatest regret in life is that she didn't run away from our family to save me. In other words, it was her family pressure that she was pregnant. I assume another young age, and they were pressuring, right? And not just pressured. I mean, literally her mother made that abortion takes place. Wow. Don't talk about right? So many times this past. That's what it used to be. You know, nobody remembers what happened to one of the Kennedy kids putting a hospital, and and basically had a lobotomy some horror riffing treatment of children. Geraldo willowbrook when he discovered with some disabled kids, in the way, they were treated like animals, it was horrible. Dr Levy Tina, let me start with you. So you. Perform some twelve hundred abortions including abortions as late as twenty four weeks. If a if can we can cannot child now be sustained at twenty four weeks with all the medical advancement. We've made. They can. And this is this is what prompted Sandra Day O'Connor years ago to say that Roe versus Wade was on a collision course with itself because row the original decision. Seventy three said that a state could prohibit late term abortion third trimester abortions, and they picked that third trimester. Because that was the beginning of viability and nineteen Seventy-three medical science has not stood still even the WHO at this point recognizes that fetal viability starch probably around twenty two weeks. Now, there are some that survive earlier, but survival is viability is now defined barely consistently is about twenty two weeks of just station. Well, let me ask you a so you did this for a number of years twelve hundred abortions one hundred second trimester saline abortions DNA abortions up to twenty four weeks. How do you feel about having done that at this point? And then I'll ask you to describe it, which is why I gave a listener warning earlier, obviously, I'm not happy that that's the decision. I made I stopped doing abortions over thirty years ago. How would you stop you change your mind? My almost six year old daughter was killed in an auto accident. I'm so sorry when you do a DNA abortion, a second trimester Dini abortion. You are literally tearing a child to pieces with your own hands. And I did over one hundred and twenty of those procedures I did do saline abortions in my residency many years before but those became. Say we don't do those anymore, but you know, after her death, and I never thought anything of it. I got used to it. But after you lose a child, and I tell people, you know, if you have a child, you may think you have some idea of what that's like if you haven't been through this yourself. You have no idea what it's like, I hope you never find out. And after Heather died was struck by a car and killed several weeks later, I showed up to do my first Dini abortion, and literally tore out an arm or a leg in the instrument got sick, but had to finish the abortion. I mean, once you start an abortion, you can't stop you'd have to get two arms two legs and all the pieces because if you don't your patients gonna come back, infected bleeding or worse. Well, let me ask you. Okay. So an early term abortion is what you're describing at what point does it become. You're talking about tearing out limbs. And when you take them out with these instruments, which are ripping out. I mean, you see an arm you see hands you see fingers. You see toes you see ahead. You see is. I mean, what are you seeing when you're doing this? You got it. You just described it yourself now first trimester abortions are typically done either by suction DNC, or now the medical abortion pill, R U, four eighty six or Mitha practices is called. But even when you do a section DNC, and you can only do that a few weeks after pregnancy if I'm not mistaken right right now, it's approved up to ten weeks from last menstrual period or eight weeks from conception. But in reality mifepristone is being or are you forty six is actually being used in the second trimester as well. So it's being used even at later stages of pregnancy at this point. But you know, whether it's the suction. Eight weeks last menstrual period from head to rump. That child is about one inch tall at twenty weeks. Look at your hand from the middle of your middle finger down to your wrist. That's the crown rump size from the head in the rump. Counting legs of a baby at twenty weeks. And as I always tell my students and others. You know today, you're an adult one child. Once you're a baby. Once you're an inch tall. But it was always you.

Levin Tino Melissa Odin Ku Klux Klan DNC Rhode Island New York Rump Dr Lepetit Private Practice Mifepristone Senate Sandra Day Massachusetts Dr Levy Tina Geraldo Willowbrook Spital Haas New Mexico
Interview with Powerball winner Lerynne West

Ellen on the Go

03:05 min | 2 years ago

Interview with Powerball winner Lerynne West

"You pick the numbers yourself? I did not pay. You just ask them. Yeah. I got an easy pick. I it's always been my thought that if if I'm going to win if if I meant to win it, I'm going to win no matter how many how many tickets I by, you know, just just let it half the machine. Yeah. Okay. All right. So then you buy that. And then the drawing is the next day. Yes. Okay. And then how did you find out you one? So I'm going to let a friend's dog out. And she texted me, and she said did you win the lottery, and I. I said, I don't know. I said I'm on my way to let your dog out when I get there. Check my ticket, and I got there. And I went to check my ticket, and I didn't have any tickets, and I thought okay there at home in the moving so on my way, home, I called my sister. And I said, you know, so she called me. And and said that somebody from Iowa won the lottery and said funny, you mention that she said your tickets are in my truck. And so I said go out and check him for me. I said the Powerball spor and she said, oh my God, Lauren. The Powerball is or and I said no way and she said, yeah. So I said some me a picture. So she sent me a picture, and I went to I a lottery dot com, and I entered the day in the numbers. And when you get a number, right? It comes up in red and nothing was in red. And in fact, I entered the wrong date. So I. Fixed the date and. So other numbers came up in red and it said jackpot. Well, I've done something wrong again. So I started going through, you know, going back and forth with the picture of the ticket with the lottery dot com. And I'm like, oh my God. I said you get in your truck and get that ticket up here now and drive slow. Didn't want any acts. No flying out the window or anything. Okay. So you've received the money yet. I have received the money I had to go to my wealth managers office last week to sign papers, you already had a wealth manager. That's new to me. And you started a foundation. I did I started the Cowan foundation, you know, when I won the lottery, I thought I have a responsibility to to do good for other people in to help other people out his well, the Callum foundation is named after Mike grandson who was born at twenty four weeks in lived one day. So it it's named after him to honor his memory, the fact that you can do that. I mean that obviously was a very difficult thing to happen to your, you know, daughter, I guess daughter, and, but the fact that you now have this money to start a foundation in his name.

Lauren Mike Grandson Cowan Foundation Callum Foundation Iowa Twenty Four Weeks One Day
Abortion Facts: What You Should Know

Science Vs

01:46 min | 2 years ago

Abortion Facts: What You Should Know

"Higher risk for depression or anxiety than women who ducked box when women don't get an abortion that they want the research shows, they have less money, less education and probably less job opportunities. So when it comes to science Bessis abortion to the fee is the outcry stack up. Here's what we know. The majority of women in America have abortions in first trimester up when the fetus has a hot and is around the size of a pumpkin seed. He ninety nine percent of abortions given in the US, those fetuses probably don't feel pain as best assigns can tell fetuses cont feel pain until at least twenty four weeks or about six months abortions. Don't involve cutting a woman or open the pills or section and potentially forceps when it comes to the risks. The best evidence tells us that abortions do not increase a chance of a woman getting breast cancer or being fettle was likely. She will get cramps, and she will bleed. What about guilt or depression? Well, while some women who get an abortion may feel guilty and depressed off top. The science tells us that the majority do not and women who get an abortion that they want a not more likely to experience depression than women who have their babies. That science versus abortion.

Breast Cancer Cramps United States America Ninety Nine Percent Twenty Four Weeks Six Months
"twenty four weeks" Discussed on Your V Life

Your V Life

04:26 min | 2 years ago

"twenty four weeks" Discussed on Your V Life

"Thank you for joining and welcome to your life. Welcome back to your doctor Shawn wrong time time, overall. Welcome back. Gene, intel. Actually missed because you forgot. We were way you Montale. I'm sorry. I'm sorry. What one time summers off. I mean it's a relaxed. That's why we took a Bank because it was hard to coordinate everybody. You hear that right? Why we have to. Okay. So I got the Email just didn't respond. I'm like at the beach. I'm trying to let go to the getting off the summer. Awesome, though. I still came back to work. The faming, but whatever. Far though was great. We had a couple of good beach parties. Apple somewhere. Cold cold. Some people sometimes. Name them experience. As my experience. We'll do that. Questions you have. Questions for a lot of things. I'm sure those tags. So good. So we wanted to get back on for a while. As we said, we took a few weeks six weeks because we were just doing the world trade. So basically what I wanted to start with I, it's one quick thing just to get it out there because another whole episode on this if we need you. But I had a experience today in the office where someone fielder coz tests and when the diabetic, right? And so when a diabetic. So it was everyone when they're pregnant. It's a screening diabetes test twenty four weeks between twenty four and twenty six. You take that Aren strain that tastes nasty, which that bad people are each member, those they had those. The frozen things didn't have the frozen. I had a drink it. It was on saying, we were kids though tastes like. Chef, everybody, machine, Tori. Yeah, last year. Like what? So between twenty four twenty six weeks. Everyone's given this test, call your glucose tolerance test. Basically do is you don't eat or drink anything. I tell people for three hours before. Okay. And then nutrition drink. One shift, three minutes drink the drink all at once and that you can put over ice. Yeah. And then you blow whatever you finish, your blood has to be drawn an hour after you finish this appointment that like one o'clock, I tend to be on time so. But if you know your doctors which a lot of people people are busy. If you knew it was to over weight, usually your OBGYN then do it in the office, but you don't want to drink the too early. I'm just saying time, right? It has to be. Call because they were upset that they feel the one hour test and it happens. He so so I just wanted to tell the south there because it's a test that every woman has to take. Yes. And so if you feel that one hour test, it does not mean that you have to stay diabetes. Okay. So I think that this this patient and she completely freaked out. She went online. She started reading about diabetes. Springs and I get it. I understand why you would freak out. But I tried to first of all it was like nine forty five at night when she called me. I don't remember Tesla's all tonight right today. Our. Right. So anyway, it won't be though to make. Yeah. Talk about results. If I, if I don't have them. Anyway, so that we use is glucose level. Our hospital, we work through Mount Sinai system is and we've stricter. Cutoffs and the national in America. The cut off the glucose test as Google of one forty. We use one thirty little stricter. And if you fail it that that's a screening test, I wanted to talk about the difference between the screening tests and the diagnostic test, and it goes for every test to get medicine. So if you go for your mammogram, if you look at your your restriction, they screening mammogram. Okay. So you go for mammogram is something's abnormal mammogram, then you go to a diagnostic mammogram or an ultrasound, a biopsy. So meeting that screening tests are general guidelines, but like here's where we're at, and this is ever we have to hit..

diabetes Springs Shawn Mount Sinai Apple Google America Tori Tesla one hour twenty four twenty six weeks twenty four weeks three minutes three hours six weeks
"twenty four weeks" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

18:04 min | 2 years ago

"twenty four weeks" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Seventy six point six percent after twenty one weeks of pregnancy. So to see that the reproductive health factors, not the country risk women's health. When you allow it for any reason, essentially post twenty four weeks, and then say, it doesn't even need to occur in a hospital, and my understanding of the it does allow for non physicians to. To perform abortion throughout all nine months, and we'll get to that non physicians aspect of it in a minute. But Anna Kaplan, what do you say to the particular argument that we just heard obviously? Mr. Lacey Corsi does not want New York state's current abortion rights law expanded to include abortions after twenty four weeks of pregnancy. Under the you know, what she sees is very broad term of the the health of of the of the woman. So this is this would be a change in the law. So argue that that change in the law is a good thing. Well, the law clearly says it allows women to have an abortion after twenty four weeks. The pregnancy is not viable, a what mother's house is in question and endanger, I suggest that she'd go back and read the reproductive health act because that's all this Bill. The viability of fetus and the health of the mother being in question. I can tell you. I've met many women who have told me and told me their stories where they want it. They were pregnant they wanted to get pregnant they wanted to bed this child, but they found out after twenty four weeks that the CIA. Will not be. Viable, even maybe ask Airbus, and that they were under New York law had to go through the whole pregnancy. By a rock to bury this child once the child was born is that something that we're advocating. This woman had to leave the state. So she can go ahead and abortion because she knew that this trial. Life will not be a viable one. We put Dr house act. What it does it allows a woman to have an abortion after twenty four weeks. If the pregnancy is not viable or the mother's health is at risk. That's all it does. They are. Really? Reading this Bill not correctly. Putting a lot of fear in people. Listeners if you've just joining us, we're in a fall election series, thirty issues in thirty days of I five issues all this week are relevant to control of the New York. State Senate we did rent laws, Monday New York state single payer healthcare yesterday today. It's three the New York reproductive-health the Bill that would codify Roe versus Wade abortion rights in New York state law in the event. President Trump gets to keep his campaign promise and his supreme court appointees overturn Roe the Bill is being blocked by Republicans who control the state Senate. This is one of the reasons that control of the New York state Senate is such a big prize for both sides in the November election, and our guest are Anna Kaplan who was just speaking democratic state Senate candidate in Mineola manhasset area of Long Island her opponent incumbent Republican state Senator Elaine Phillips opposes the Bill. But did not respond to our invitation to join the segment so on that side, we have Michelle Sterling Heights Ecorse. See from the group feminist. Choosing life and our phones remain open at two one two four three three WNYC. Let's go to a caller right now, Christina in Manhattan, you're on WNYC. Hi, christina. Hi, thanks for letting me ask my question. I oftentimes tencent I hear this debates and statistics being cited in support I question, and I'm trying to understand why your guest to anti-choice is voting a much higher abortion rates in New York state, and based upon what numbers and why it might be because of the obstructions in so many other states and people knowing that you can get abortions in New York, and it's relatively easy to get in and out of near. There's so many transportation options to your being a hub. So what are the real statistics behind New York's abortion, Mr. Lacey, Coursey what what statistics are you? Certain first of all for how much higher the abortion rate is in New York than elsewhere. And then to the callers particular question, do you think whatever higher rate, there isn't a York might be the result of the availability here. So a lot of those abortions are being performed on women from out of state who come here. I mean, that's a great question is said, I'm quoting or coming from the Guttmacher institute. That's so New York state divorce rate at twenty nine point six percent. And the national average at fourteen point six percent. I the the reason why New York state has such a horrendous abortion rate is something I think we really should be discussing rather than, you know, looking for ways in which to expand late term abortion in New York state, which reproductive-health that does by enacting a broad rather than a narrow health exception. So. Ms kaplan. Do you have any other thoughts on the highway presume presume those statistics are reliable because the good marker institute is affiliated with Planned Parenthood and generally respected by both sides. I think for statistical analysis so assuming those numbers are right. What would you say? How troubling do you find it that New York has a much higher abortion rate than other than many other states? And what would you say about the reason? Well, I think as a New Yorker we all understand the best doctor talk here in New York people come for all types of procedures. So to say that people come here to aboard and are racist so much higher than everyone else. Does not mean that it's all New York residents. And again. I I'm not familiar with those statistics. What role what we productive health act? Does it really ensures women's rights and just codifies which has been the law, the lack my opponents cranes that she is? Totally. We are at a point. Now that I believe this legislation to adopt role in New York state had been. Bring to the Senate floor. But the Republican Senate have always stood against it. Role is the land of the law. Of the line. But now that's coming on board gets might not be the case. Why not? Let's take another call latonya and Robin county on WNYC high latonya. Good morning to your guests. My my only issue with the abortion debate in general. Is what means and mechanisms are being put into place to prevent pregnancy in the first place. So many women are using abortion as birth control. And that clearly was not the intention when abortion was passed in nineteen seventy. It was to protect women's rights to govern their own bodies not to allow them to make mistakes carelessly or otherwise. And then have the resort of abortion as a problem solver. I wait to hear response from your guests. Kaplan. Well, I think that's why we have the con- comprehensive contraceptive coverage Iraq. This requires the health insurance to provide and tweet cooed all types of FDA approved contraceptive drugs and devices and products. And again my opponent who's not here. Who's not on this show? Cosponsored the Bill. And claim to be a full supporter. But when it came when the Bill came to the floor for a vote by a hostile amendment. She didn't vote for it. Are you agree? That's why we also need to pass the comprehensive contraceptive coverage act. Does he see CA? But again, we have the my opponent. Not really voting for it. Even though she was a cosponsor latonya when you say using abortion as birth control. What does that mean, exactly? Because a lot of women and men listening to this are probably thinking, well, nobody goes into an abortion lightly, and nobody doesn't use birth control on the basis of. Oh, well, I can have always have an abortion Lottie, da. Well, I I think there are. Unfortunately, who think that way. That that precaution. There. So many mechanisms to prevent pregnancy in the first place, we don't live in a society that out was birth control. And you can get a shot you can get a pill. You can get an icy. There's so many mechanisms to prevent pregnancy. If we're not utilizing those mechanisms in the first place, we're not talking about accidents, though. Talking about people who are just not guarding their reproductive organs in a right way to prevent pregnancy. When they know before their pregnancy is not fair goals. And do you think? Speaking to and do you think that the law in any way should ascertain the reason or the behavioral leading up to a woman's pregnancy? Or other reasons for an abortion before allowing the abortion proposal. No, absolutely not because that would put us back before Roe versus Wade don't wanna do that. That's not what I'm proposing. What I'm proposing is as strong and persistent at people are with the fighting for the right to abort a child. We also need to fight to educate. People inform people about prevention of pregnancy in the first place. It's about getting at the problem before it becomes a problem as opposed to actor latonya never deny a woman and right to whatever choices she make for her body. Gotcha. Thank you very much for your call. I wanna go now to the other issue that that's been raised having to do with who gets to legally perform abortions in New York, and where under the terms of the reproductive health act that we're debating with our. Guests. And Republican gubernatorial candidate. Laura brought this up in the clip replayed. Also, the incumbent Senator from this Minneola manhasset district, Republican Senator Phillips. Also brought this up the idea that. Not just doctors could perform abortions, and Mr. Lacey Corser you brought up. Also, I think the question of whether this would allow abortions for the first time not to be performed in hospital as well. What's the status of that right now? People can go to a clinic which is not a hospital and get a legal abortion would this reproductive health act change that or expand that is that your understanding. Well, I mean, you know, I I just wanted to say that. If the life of New York, she's abortion as a tool of crushing rather than in power. And we really see any expansion of deregulation of abortion is degrading of women and in making it makes really a mockery of the quest for women's equality. We've got a law. I have to linger on that. Because I know a lot of listeners will react to that. You're saying that having the law give the choice to women whether having abortion or not. Is a form of oppression against women. You don't think that women need the opportunity to discard unborn human life is they see fit as a way in which to achieve a quality. I think it's really think misplaced. I mean, we continue to make substantially less than men for example for equal worth female poverty. Rates continue to be much higher than Mel poverty rates. And so I, you know, the whole idea of, you know, again, fighting for the right to discard human life as we see fit as what we're properties of everything that early American feminists fought against right? Susan B Anthony and Elizabeth Katie Stanton said no we as women are not property. We're we're human beings with the right to vote and to think that you know, we need that extension to say, well, the unborn child is property clearly d be disposed of his women's see fit the only way in which to achieve equality. I think hurts women. Lunch. Take a short response on that. And then I want to get back to the question of nurse practitioners ability to perform, I think again, the reproductive health act clearly says nurse practitioners or medical professionals were license to help in non surgical abortion. Clearly says what it is. Okay. This is not like anyone can go ahead and get an abortion from anyone. What's what's? What's it non-surgical abortion taking a pill? Taking a pill. That's not surgical. So. Go ahead. This would actually allow more woman to get the medical help that they need. Especially in rural areas, especially in poor and underserved areas. What they don't have access to a medical doctor. So when you're who is selling your practitioner nurse or physician assistant is licensed to do basically just a non surgical abortion. So when your opponent, the incumbent Republican Senator Philip says in a statement that she opposes the reproductive health. Partly because it allows non doctors to perform abortions, the only abortion, the non doctors could perform and the way they could perform there's nurse practitioners helping women to take a pill. That's correct. And my opponents Elaine Phillips is like Mr. laced false information out there and putting fear in people. And Mr. Lacey closely. Do you have any different understanding of what the law would allow in that respect? Yes. My understanding and reading of the reproductive fact, ultimately does allow non physicians to perform surgical as well as non surgical abortion. That's correct. And I do know that recent polling from the show scroll foundation clearly says seventy five percent of New Yorkers opposed changing the loss of someone other than a doctor can perform surgical abortion. So New Yorkers, you know. Oppose really reproductive health act. According to some polling. All the way through nine months to perform the abortion, the two of you have a difference on the facts here, which we're going to have to now look up. In fact, check I don't know if we're going to be able to get it by the end of the segment in just a few minutes or we'll have. The facts because that's exactly what I'm saying is exactly what their reproductive health tax us. It allows to medical professionals to administer non surgery abortion. I agree with that. But it also allows them to. Your surgical abortion as well. And I mean, we're with certain with certain exceptions. But broad interpretation of the reproductive health act says a non doctor can perform the abortion, whether it's surgical or nonsurgical we're going to fact check this listeners and bring you the the answer that we discover on tomorrow show. Meanwhile, Antonia in Brooklyn, you're on WNYC. Hello. Hi, brian. I'm so I'm so excited that I get to speak to you. Thank you so much for bringing this topic. I'm a forty year old woman with three children, and I just want to say that was so many women having children later in life, particularly in New York state..

New York Manhattan Senate Senator Phillips Anna Kaplan Roe Christina Senator Mr. Lacey CIA Mr. Lacey Corsi Airbus York Republican Senate Bill Guttmacher institute Michelle Sterling Heights Ecor
"twenty four weeks" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

04:38 min | 2 years ago

"twenty four weeks" Discussed on KGO 810

"Confirmation hearings what would they be let's go to john calling from oakland john welcome to caja leo how are you doing jarred very well john thank you you're a two questions i would ask how did you feel about late term abortions liber decision yeah i think those are two great questions late term abortion is permitted if a doctor recommends it you know it it's not done on request by a to avoid at any time or no no they don't they do not rovigo wave limited that essentially to the first try master the row defy defined viable as potentially able to live outside the mother's wound auto bite with artificial aid and so in kc the other case we've talked about the viability may occur at twenty three or twenty four weeks or sometimes even earlier in light of medical advances but fundamentally what they're saying is the first trimester one of the points on aggregate i trump and when i heard him talk about abortion was he was against late term abortions so now maybe i saw a woman up until the day before or whatever but you know you sit down with trump he would say the same thing well let's start what he's saying and if you listen carefully the donald trump on the campaign trail he favored recinding roe v wade there was no ambiguity and he promised that he would put people on the bench who would rescind roe v wade so it's a serious question and this court pick is going to fuel more discussion and certainly you can be certain that dianne feinstein and other women in the senate are going to be upset and certainly chuck schumer a man in the senate is going to raise issues and the real question will be what will to swing women in the senate do lisa murkowski of alaska and susan collins of maine what will they do do boy say do they believe his prior and hopefully the baby i mean opinion be much attorney which may be unbiased minnesota too much work comes to a judge oh minnesota opinion really influencing if you came to the supreme court and i would remind you of two cases the united states versus richard nixon in nineteen seventy four and the paula jones case both of which were decided by the court and both of which compelled a president who declared executive privilege that he had to comply so i mean i appreciate the call on the fought but i want to remind you that donald trump has doubled down on his past rhetoric about sending the issue of abortion to the states which frankly is another way of overturning roe v wade you understand what it means and the president said this very clearly that ravi wade should be returned to the states to allow them to decide the issue now let me explain what that means that means that in a state like new yorker california were overwhelmingly there is a feeling that an abortion should be granted should be permitted but what if you live in indiana or alabama or mississippi well then it would become a state issue i'm gonna tell you what i honestly think it goes back to the states planned parenthood's gonna raise a lot of money to transport women from states where abortion is banned to a state where they can have an abortion talk about a disgrace president said he wasn't gonna ask about roe v wade and he didn't but he knew the answer because well the heritage foundation and the federal society found out the.

john oakland twenty four weeks
"twenty four weeks" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"twenty four weeks" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"To go yes there is it'll just be back terrier that is funny that they'll go down that road at the same time that you know they could have a feed us which is a baby twenty four weeks fully formed heartbe is nose mouth thing is and toews speed everything's there it's okay to kill that baby but bacteria ramaz it'll be life life they'll scream and they will scream they want just say they will screaming and someone will play david bowie promise you gonna happen trust me so so there you go that's how that's gonna go down we didn't have much time to talk about that either much as i wanted to get to it but you know sometimes it's there's a lot going on we can't get to everything so we go all that stuff as well you could do you around research so loud you know i advise you to do that you should probably go do your own research as well apparently by the way this particular bacteria which was found in the arctic permafrost they think would also be at a survive on pluto and on some of the moons overseeing saturn and jupiter jupiter's moon europa so you know they could find life in these other places as well but it won't be as good as life malls because we'd life for mas you get to sing a little bit of david bowie so that's the way says listen this never not a good reason to do that there's always a good reason to do that.

david bowie toews twenty four weeks
"twenty four weeks" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"twenty four weeks" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

"Like the fans that are coming up to me and guys that are coming at me going birla needed that video like i dunno i was dealing with this and it's helped me you know my marriage just helped me figure out why don't talk to my wife anymore you know and so it's been it's been a cool thing for me and it's all because the fans gave me the confidence to go because i think i don't know if anybody's battles this as far as being in the public eye but sometimes you feel you want to be like the cool personal time you only want to show show podcast on this did you like feeling like i have some i have no idea why feel this way i have some responsibility to be the cougar always yeah i feel like not wanna show anybody like the the real side of things and i and i think the reason why i like a lot of people nowadays valley anxiety is constantly comparing ourselves to people we don't even though they are always so you go on instagram the next thing you know you're for your twenty four weeks into some dudes page you haven't never us happened to have a mutual friend that you know that person is saying like like less pretty dote oh shit he's thirty lump thirty he's wait for the night we all do it in i well maybe it's just me but i feel like we have conversations about it which helps and talking about it because i'm like why do we all continue i call i call it like shopping for anxiety because you like go looking like no it's bad and you just keep scrolling and you keep comparing but you know it's like not doing yourself any any favors but it's so i feel the same thing like i think i've always just told myself like a gun i'll guy friends and i'm like the cool girl and now as i get older i'm like way more emotional way more like in tune with my myself and i'm i'm different than i thought i was but now i feel like this pressure to be like on all the time to which i mean it is part of my job but also that's it is kind of a job and it's a responsibility and that's probably why you feel that way because the people who don't know you and when you do have a platform that's what they come to you four and that they find joy in your joy and they turn to you for like a laugh or certain things so you do feel that responsibility and obviously we're also happy to be able to share that with people but it it does come with a little bit of anxiety i think like going back to being a people pleaser it took me a long time to be getting a record deals you have a better shot of light being starting pitching them i'll be right so you've went on from a double wide trailer in a small town like the whole thing to me is like every day i go into warner where you know play show when people show up and it sold out somewhere and i've never been to stay on like what the hell it's still something like this is insane it's not anything like people care about my scrunchy like out of everybody out of the bachelor which is like i feel like you have been the most successful at like maintaining like a fan group and like really like making something out of it and like for you to be like they care for you to question that blows my mind but like it's just natural to icing because i think i've always just really tried to be myself and i am honest with with people as well with anxiety or having like tough days because i'm like i can't always be on like i just can't and nobody nobody can and nobody should know because it's wait i do that in run yourself into the ground and stay on all the time that it drains you yeah and like you can't constantly pull yourself out without getting filled backup whether that spending alone time or with friends or exactly exactly a long time to realize that like.

twenty four weeks
"twenty four weeks" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"twenty four weeks" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"On the travel ban ki and he was very reluctant in his concurrence to side with the narrow majority in that case but he has been a fifth vote to hold on presidential power and he wrote the barbadian decision on the gitmo detainees giving them the right to habeas corpus has been a critical fifth vote reining in presidential powers on on on the gitmo detainees in with regard to the patriot act not just on president obama but i'm president bush before him so that is going to be very very critically important arena and i'm gonna guess anybody that president trump nominates will give him expansive presidential powers and presidents to come but how far because trump we often see as a wanna be authoritarian hold that thought thought for a minute on terrorism and also the russia investigation because before we lose the thread on abortion i wanna take a caller who's very relevant to that and it's garin in brooklyn guarantee thank you so much for calling in hi how are you so yeah i just wanted to sort of share some perspective and talk about what roe v wade does because a lot of people are framing this issue with regard to you know how it will affect roe v wade sarobi way doesn't really give us the right to an abortion it limits what shapes can do to restrict abortion and and you know it's row and companion cases so a lot of what actually affects your right to get an abortion is state law as as we were talking about it and you had forgive me time is short you had a story that you watch it to tell about your wife right yes my wife and i found out at thirty weeks that are pregnancy was not viable and again we live in new york the new the the cutoff in new york due to a state law which is actually unconstitutional due to the roe v wade ruling state law limits your ability to get an abortion after twenty four weeks even in cases where the fetus is not viable or where the the health of the patient is threatened so again those those those exceptions are protected by a row but new york state law predates row so for instance in new york that big thing we need to do is fix our state law decriminalise abortion if roe fell today it would not affect new yorkers because we are already due to a state law you know not allowed to access abortion after twenty three twenty four weeks and i guess i would have to confirm whether that's the actual limited new york but you're certainly making the point and in very personal terms with your wife having to go to colorado to get the abortion and in her case in your case how much it would be state by state the more the supreme court backs backs off i just want to ask before we run out of time about trump's authoritarian tendencies and the supreme court because i can imagine trump asking his advisers today alexander who on this list of twenty five is going to be loyal to.

twenty three twenty four weeks twenty four weeks thirty weeks
How Suicide Quietly Morphed Into a Public Health Crisis

The Complete Computing Show

01:33 min | 2 years ago

How Suicide Quietly Morphed Into a Public Health Crisis

"Good morning i'm connie joe with the latest from newsradio one or two point nine k a r n a pregnant woman visiting oregon was staying in bitten at the treadmill cal angela miller injector herself with some meth and then went into labor fox exceeds price mckeon tells what happened next police say the baby who was approximately twenty four weeks gestation survive the birth but died shortly afterwards at the hospital now miller is charged with introducing a controlled substance into the body of another her baby and second degree murder after the newborn died a child killed in a drag racing incident now a dad mourns the loss of his twelve year old daughter anaya dill worth who was killed in that car crash and the driver michael scales her father admits to reckless driving with her in the car on their way to mcdonalds fox sixteen notes her dad at another driver decided to drag race in north little rock speeding sidebyside down riverfront drive last wednesday when the vehicles allied and spun out of control the shocking deaths by suicide of the famed fashion designer and a celebrity chef turned tv host this past week have people talk in the number of suicides has risen twenty five percent across the us and at arkansas the suicide rate has jumped thirty six percent the arkansas department of health says a suicide has become a public health crisis and the cdc notes that both celebrity deaths last week kate spade and anthony bourdain were by hanging over seven thousand without power yesterday afternoon after severe storms passed through friday in garland county first responders spent.

Connie Joe Newsradio Oregon Mckeon Miller Arkansas Anthony Bourdain Garland County Second Degree Murder Anaya Dill Michael Arkansas Department Of Health CDC Kate Spade Twenty Five Percent Thirty Six Percent Twenty Four Weeks Twelve Year Nine K
"twenty four weeks" Discussed on We Paid To See This

We Paid To See This

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"twenty four weeks" Discussed on We Paid To See This

"So that's yeah so they're they're going back and forth and there's this great it's also narrated because he's in hawk is writing in his journals so at that moment there's this great bit where ethan hawke is like there's like the i like light in him at this moment of the movie like maybe ten minutes in the has this intense passion where he's like he challenged everything i said and it was like he was a head of me this point whatever and then he just goes it was exhilarating and it's yeah so it's twenty two to twenty four weeks is the maximum cutoff so killed a kid but it's weird that she said he wants to motor child is that right or kill out that's it's interesting movie languidly written is beautifully written to the point of you don't catch everything the first time there's like when when eastern hawk first comes over for that first meeting there's just this incredible moment that could be nothing but she's like do you wanna coffee and there's like this weird silence where he's like about to say no i don't he's he makes an excuse for it but doesn't really say anything she's like we have immediately and he's like yeah have a t like it's just this great it's so so frigging well written it is i guess a poem it's a song this movie and he agrees to meet with the husband agreed to meet with ethan hawke and on the next day they're gonna have lunch together and discuss this stuff and blah blah blah and before that can happen he cancels the next meeting with him via text message ethan hawke has this flip phone and i kinda love the way and hot closes the cell phone it's weird thing by the way it's shot in four three and there's a lot of crazy weird close ups with feels like a play at times it's such an intimate movie that in a second you'll see why was frustrated the second time i thought but.

ethan hawke twenty four weeks ten minutes
"twenty four weeks" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

The GaryVee Audio Experience

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"twenty four weeks" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

"Video long form content with no right hook lot of jabbing if you're start up it's going to go out of business and twenty four weeks if you don't sell some stuff we're in full right hand hook facebook post seo sem influencer marketing with calls to action the cell all that stuff completely as determined based on the client's current short term and long term needs but the truth is short term and long term needs really balanced based on a moment in time and so you know the reason i think i'm good at business is for all of my talking i m ten x at my listening skills and they all just comes on the listening and so the way we strategize predicated on listening and i think the biggest challenge for so many of the vader nation that's that's watching right now is i don't think a lot of you and this with all due respect this is for everybody i'm just picking new because i love you tough love i think a lot of people aren't really sure what they want to accomplish in a one year window versus a five year window ten year window and their behavior doesn't map to it to me i got lucky i just decided it's everybody shows up to my funeral hedge forever build up equity cash it in as i needed if i ever need it which is allowed me to be very patient and and really has allowed me to dictate my behavior of being probably a better human being and weird way again i think a lot of people would find funny in a lot of ways i've been a pushover as a as a entrepreneur because if you would look at it in the short term on leaving money on the table i'm not fighting for every cent i'm not trying to drill it down to the biggest valence i'm not being getting mine every time because i'm just hedging along the way and so just comes down to what you're trying to accomplish the better question to this question is how.

twenty four weeks five year one year ten year
"twenty four weeks" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"twenty four weeks" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"Medicine doctors clinicians excetera i tried to influence the way people see the patient so that patients can get better care so it's interesting that at least for me that i need to exist i always kind of thought that that that establishment existed to make my life better i didn't realize that i needed to influence them to be good to me i thought that their whole purpose was to be good to me again as a patient so it's it's it's interesting you know at of a really interesting point and all the different interviews that we've done or at least that i've done hardly anyone has ever brought up that issue i i just as a moment of background eleven years ago i was dying of stage four kidney cancer the best available data diagnosis wasn't it wasn't great data but the best available data said my second survival was twenty four weeks and instead six and a half months after diagnosis my treatment had finished and by a couple of months later they said it looks like you beat it and so i come at this work from the perspective i i was saved by the best of medicine i was clearly a case where healthcare achieved its potential against overwhelming ons and over the next couple of years dr san standing and invited me to learn about the patient movement empowered engage equipped in abled patients of which he was one of the pioneers and i'm the came amazed to discover that the profession and the science that had saved my life has gigantic gaps in up and sometimes things fall through those gaps so i started studying and learning listening as much as i speak understand health term what i learned to your point is that a couple of centuries ago physicians truly had no clue what was going on in the body you know everybody thought that the body ran on four humors green mile black bile phlegm and blood and then starting somewhere in one hundred hundred plus years ago science entered the picture and we started the understand that if he did not topsy on somebody the lung disease you saw things and then for a long time the only way to know anything.

kidney cancer twenty four weeks eleven years
"twenty four weeks" Discussed on The Young Turks

The Young Turks

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"twenty four weeks" Discussed on The Young Turks

"And what's the what's the payoff for i mean it's a footbridge go around who cares they've risked people's lives it's this new construction method called accelerated bridge construction and it was a name alone i've oh right right it was actually developed in part at fau which is why i think this as a publicity opportunity and it was developed with a couple of other universities but yeah the whole idea is it goes up in like six hours as opposed to obstructing traffic for twenty four to or not even like for twenty four weeks or however long it takes to build a bridge we've had the in here when they built the bridge over the four zero five and shut down traffic for days entire days at a time yeah yeah never defending anything that they do to enhance the four or five in any way but because they did that it didn't collapse and people didn't die yeah so that leads to the most important point which is like it's we gotta constantly defeat these right wing mythologies is so they say oh regulations always bad all right now you should honor it slows everything down you got to deregulate well it kinda depends doesn't it right so if there's overregulation which is entirely possible then yeah you should deregulate a little bit if wall street keeps crashing their economy i'd step up the regulation rather than step it down as an example and in bridges let's keep it up let's keep the regulations out right because if we're just fall then people die and it's kind of a bad idea look billy's use claps all the time back in the day we didn't know how to build them to be earthquake resistant for example when greek said right or we did know but there was no regulations enforcing it so it was cheaper to build a building without those required regulations.

fau billy twenty four weeks six hours
"twenty four weeks" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"twenty four weeks" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"For twenty four weeks lowered their taught with production sales in so what i'm saying you and he can all figure out what i'm trying to say is they're sales guys okay financial advisers it's all about sales they make their money earned fees their trade to sell they are not train to trade and we want to teach you how to trade in what spend more time on your portfolio so you're not paying the fees these guys that are cornea okay because they make their money and fees are we want to guess white give you the education sweat you can get better returns right out rate in not only do they spent a lot of time on the phone but if you have been around for a while and you have one hundred two two hundred hence as you mentioned before you really can't devote enough time individually to each person to have a portfolio that is designed for them is protected on an ongoing basis considers sector rotation asa rotation considers making money when the market goes down i think most people go ahead and ask your financial advisor how you are positioned to make money when the market goes down the next time it goes down or how are you protected other than being in what they might call asset allocation or diversification because you probably are not really well diversified so you know you you the idea the important thing is that people know they have to take responsibility for their our own financial situation yet they still turned their money over to someone they probably of never met or might never meet and that person then turns money over to someone like a mutual fund manager and basically you're put it into a buy in hold strategy that is guaranteed to go down when the market goes down at trading can be exciting okay and again there's a lot of people that get bored out there and they and they pick up bad habits like i talked about earlier ria this trading is not boring you're gonna love it once you get an you're you're gonna learn okay and again there's so much learn whether it's stocks options futures forks it's something for everybody here but she's still got to get going and.

advisor fund manager ria twenty four weeks
"twenty four weeks" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"twenty four weeks" Discussed on AP News

"Ryan and taxes coach fired by tim mcguire within ap newsmen at house speaker paul ryan watts a simpler federal tax code lower rates on businesses and individuals while eliminating many loopholes deductions and exemption it is time to cut taxes and simplify the code it is time to create jobs and grower economy he tells workers at a massachusetts assu plant that us companies are tax as high as forty five percent while corporate taxes in canada and other countries are just fifteen percent all miss football coach you freeze has resigned university in mississippi chance are jeffrey vedder blaze what he calls a pattern of misconduct and apart of free as we simply cannot accept the conduct in his personal life that we have discovered freeze was making more than five million dollars a year his program is under nc aa investigation out alleging academic booster and recruiting misconduct man and boy hospitalized after being rescued from a car that slammed into a light pole and southern illinois and burst into flames today i'm tim mcguire radio news fewer americans applied for unemployment benefits last week the number of people seeking benefits remains near historic lows indicating a robust job market labor department says weekly unemployment applications fell by fifteen thousand to a seasonally adjusted two hundred thirty three thousand jobless aid applications which are close indication of laos have come in below three hundred thousand for one hundred twenty four weeks in a row players have hired this year at a slower pace the employment rates fall into a healthy 44 percent president trump is lashing out at special counsel robert muller ap's matt small reports he doesn't think muller should be leaving the investigation into russia's meddling in last year's election because he was one of the top job in the fbi president trump's suggests special counsel robert muller has an ax to grind and a new york times interview trump says he talked a.

massachusetts new york times fbi special counsel president nc jeffrey vedder mississippi football tim mcguire paul ryan watts house speaker robert muller trump russia laos illinois canada one hundred twenty four weeks five million dollars forty five percent fifteen percent 44 percent
"twenty four weeks" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"twenty four weeks" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"On the blaze dot com this is a because watched that uh have you guys watched the a tv show genius no okay so it's not sure we been it is is on fox uh dortha goods just called genius right isn't that the that's the hospital one but i i it was it on fox or is it uh i guess i just watch i watch everything either on netflix ceramahs on uh and it is this great show the told about a guy who is like a mark zuckerberg and has left the tech industry and decided he's going to start his own hospital and he's started in silicon valley and he's got a higher the rebels the people the doctors that the fda is mad at uh at all the doctors the take chances and uh he is going to pick patients all around the world that everyone says ne nothing can be done he's to pick them and they're going to develop cuers it's that treds cetera so it's cutting edge based on technology that is on the horizon and it's very optimistic i mean this you will watch the show and you'll start thinking oh death really could be a thing that we really don't understand very soon soon one of the episodes had a a a womb of a uterus bag if you will of a big bag and they are it wasn't even a bag it was a uh a a tank and a baby was born prematurely because mom was on heroin and the baby was going into distress they had to take the baby we asked uh and but it before twenty four weeks it was just not gonna survive and uh the lungs would collapse so what to do what to do what to do and you see this episode and you're in your like okay come on but they they put the.

mark zuckerberg heroin netflix twenty four weeks