32 Burst results for "Twenty Four Thousand Dollars"

Uber Ordered to Pay $1.1 Million for Discriminating Against Blind Woman

The Adam Carolla Show

00:55 sec | 4 months ago

Uber Ordered to Pay $1.1 Million for Discriminating Against Blind Woman

"Uber has been ordered to pay one point one million dollars after an arbitrator ruled that the rideshare companies drivers discriminated against a blind woman and her guide dog more than a dozen separate times lisa irving. She lives here in california. She said she was denied. Rides or verbally abused by drivers fourteen times from two thousand sixteen to twenty eighteen in one of her accounts they tell her to Get out of the car and try to force red car. I don't know if it had something to do with the dog or not but she was ordered three hundred twenty four thousand dollars in damages and more than eight hundred thousand dollars in attorney's fees and court costs uber of course argued that it's not their responsibility and You know this is. This is an issue not theirs. But in two thousand sixteen uber settled lawsuit by the national federation for the blind to ensure that passengers with guide dogs are given equal access. So that's gonna cost them another

Lisa Irving Uber California National Federation For The Bl
How often should I increase my rates?

The $100 MBA Show

08:39 min | 7 months ago

How often should I increase my rates?

"So doug asks on cuny wednesday. How often should i increase my rates. Last time doug increases rates it was all over eighteen months ago. So it's in my opinion time to do so. I actually think the maximum time. You should wait before you increase. Prices is eighteen months actually. I think you're just at the point where you really really really should be increasing prices. Especially if you're doing regular work this whole time the value you're giving your customers day in and day out now project after project is getting better and better every day and therefore you should be charging more for the increased value. I want to address A little bit of doug's of raising his prices he does own a ternary his existing customers. Ona discourage them from working with him again. I want to tell you from a customer's point of view. Who hires a lot of freelancers. That hires a lot of employees. If i work with somebody who delivers who. I come back and work with again and again. My biggest concern is not really them. Increasing the prices. My biggest concern is that they're not gonna be able to do. The work might have to find somebody else. That's really my worry paying a little bit more in order to get the same town. Does he get the consistency to get what i expect. Is a very very small price to pay. Many people. Don't realize that from a company's point of you from our point of view consistency is so important knowing what you're gonna get Having expectations and having them fulfilled this is incredibly valuable them so they don't wanna let that go and if you say hey My prices have gone up by raise. Gone up it's not out of this world. You know this is normal. Anybody who believes the service or create any kind of content. You know musician makes more money today than they did. Three years ago because they've gotten better as a musician or an athlete or any kind of professional. Like i mentioned a doctor lawyer. A service provider plumber and again from my perspective as somebody who's hiring somebody to do a service. I'm okay with paying more. If i'm getting good work done. I actually found that higher rates are not discouraging to actually things. I look out for actually want somebody who charges a bit more for example. Your website developers. Somebody comes to me and says hey you know. I charge eighty dollars an hour. You know that might seem expensive. But that person charges eighty dollars. An hour is experienced. The know what they're doing and they're probably going to be able to complete the project faster more efficiently And more accurately than somebody who's charging maybe half that forty dollars an hour depres is going to take a lot longer is going to have a lot more roadblocks and may not be able to do the project as well as somebody who is charging much more so sometimes you actually save money in the long run and serious buyers who aren't so price sensitive are the kind of customers you want to attract so in the long run increasing. Your prices are really going to help you. Increasing your rates so minimum increase their prices every eighteen months. You can even do it every year. But that's kind of my recommendation chain a year eighteen months now how to do this well. It's very simple the next time you engage with customer you can just mentioned it. Hey by the way last time this was my rate since then i've increased my rate. It's currently this over this project. It's going to cost x. Amount of money and stop talking or stop writing a lot of people that go on and on. Is that okay with you. I hope that's okay once you is that okay with you. Ask a question. Is that okay. That is opening up a negotiation. Because they can say well actually you know if you just say it as a fact. This is my right now. This is how much it cost now. And there's no question at the end of it people gonna be like okay. That's what i gotta do now. Many service providers have done a to type pricing strategy to. I think is really good Actually increase the prices for new customers at one rate and recurring customers or a returning customers than others. So for example they'll take their rate in the increase by twenty percent. That's the new price for new customers so people that don't know any better. You know know your first price. Best the price they know and four returning customers. It's fifteen percent and you can mention this to your returning customer. Because a hey buy. New prices are twenty percent higher. My new rate is such and such but I can give you a return customer discount so it will be so so and so it'll be only fifteen percent more the shows that you respect loyalty and appreciate their business and then hey you're giving them a little something special. How much should you increase. Will it depends on how often you increase your rates. Let's say for example you're increasing. Every year i would say no less than five percent and no more than twenty percent any more than twenty percent. Twenty five thirty It becomes a dramatic jump. This is why it's more Advisable to increase their prices every year rather than waiting every two or three years because then the jumps are going to be quite high but even fifteen or twenty percent increase may not seem too high but will make a big difference for you for all your clients so say for example. You're alary fifty dollars. A twenty percent increase is only going up to sixty dollars but across all your hours across all your customers. It makes a significant difference now. One of the things i recommend is when you're delivering the change of rate to are turning customer. You can offer them to lock in a longer term package for example to have you on retainer so say for example you say hey. My hourly rate is now a hundred dollars. is usually increased my rates every twelve to eighteen months. But if you'd like you can lock in this rate for the next two years if you want to. But you'll need to commit to a certain amount of hours on retainer month so you might say i need to have ten hours on retainer every month. That means a thousand dollars every month. That means a twenty four thousand dollars for thirty two years and this can just be a retainer Four any kind of work that they need to do Maintenance work update work and then anything outside the retaining hours you can charge them early at the current rate and people that like to work with you would like to lock in a great rate that they can have and have predictable pricing for the next couple years. This could be done in a very low pressure just by the way. Here's something that i offer and you'll be surprised. How many of your customers. We'll take you up on it. Because people like to save money. People liked to lock in a discount more on today's cuny wednesday but before that. Let me love to sponsor support for today. Show comes from our very own whether ninja looking for a webinar platform to host. You're alive tourelles classes or special events feeling. You're stuck on a never ending journey to find that. Perfect webinar software. That's not gonna break the bank. We get it. That's why we created webinar ninja and all in one of our software that allows you to host live. Automated hybrid series webinars. All in one place women earn injure also has built in tools for marketing and selling your digital products during and after your webinar. Whether doing a live course a sales webinars or building your email this with automated webinars. We have everything you need to get the job done. Each plan includes unlimited registrations and webinars. You can also insert recorded videos right inside your live. Events energy has been ranked as a top weapon or software for the last six years. Not only because it does the job but it does it well and it's easy to use some user say it's the easiest software they've ever used want to check it out every week. We run a live webinar demo and we walk through everything whether or ninja has to offer. So you can find out if it's the perfect weather nor software for you. Just go to webinar. Ninja dot com slash workshop. To sign up for our next live demo. Again that's webinar. Ninja dot com slash workshop to answer. Doug question on cuny wednesday halston. Should i raise my rates. Well like i said you shouldn't wait more than eighteen months. The sweet spot is anything between every twelve and eighteen months and you can increase it as low as five percent up to twenty percent and as long as you consistently do this. Every twelve to eighteen months you'll continue to be able to charge more and earn more based on your increased value.

Doug ONA Halston
Inequities Of The Pandemic

The Indicator from Planet Money

03:46 min | 10 months ago

Inequities Of The Pandemic

"Right here we go four inequities, the covert pandemic I up growing racial and ethnic inequality according to a recent survey by Pew Research. Throughout. The pandemic. Black. Hispanic. Families have struggled to make payments on their bills, things like health care bills or mortgage payments more than white families. One clear reason why is that black and Hispanic adults have been more likely to lose their jobs than white adults but another big reason is that white households had so much more wealth before the pandemic. Here are some staggering data points as of last year the median black household had about twenty four, thousand dollars in total wealth and the media. In Hispanic household had just a bit more about thirty, six, thousand dollars but the median white household had a hundred and eighty nine thousand dollars in wealth. That's just a huge gap. Also, white families are more likely to own shares in the stock market and to own their homes, and since both the stock market and home prices are actually higher. Now than they were before the pandemic wealth inequality has almost certainly gotten even wider, and this also means that white families just had more of an economic cushion going into the pandemic they had more savings and more stuff they could sell to help them get by when the. Economy started to go bad. The second inequity exacerbated by the pandemic is a pretty straightforward one people who make lower wages have been much more likely to lose their jobs because of the pandemic then people who get paid higher wages a big reason for this industries that pay low average wages, which include jobs in restaurants and bars and retail stores have themselves been more likely to have shutdowns or lose business then industries that pay wages like finance or law. In fact, people who work in these low wage industries are roughly three times more likely to have lost jobs since February and to still be out of work than. People who work in high wage industries, and that trend also overlaps with the third inequity, which is about the labor market for people with different educational backgrounds for adults with college degrees. Their total number of jobs is almost back to exactly where it was before the pandemic even started but there are still twelve percent fewer jobs for people with only high school degrees and eighteen percent fewer jobs for people who did not graduate high school, and there is another really incredible statistic that gets at the difference between people who have college degrees and people don't, and that is this is the ability to work remotely way from the office. Sixty seven percent of college graduates who have jobs can do those jobs from home for high school graduates. Only twenty five percent can work from home, which makes it hard for them to keep their jobs at a time of social distancing and business lockdowns. And the fourth inequity is widening gender inequality. There's more than two and a half million fewer women in the US labor force. Then there were before the pandemic and being out of the labor force by the way means that you don't have a job and also that you're not looking for a job possibly because you have other responsibilities like tending to a sick relative or watching the. Kids and women have been dropping out of the labor force in much higher numbers than men since the pandemic started. So explanation for these differences is that women are heavily concentrated in some of the industries that have had the highest losses things like teaching food service working in hotels. Another possible explanation is the pay gap between men and women women earn less money on average than men. Do, and so in couples where both spouses work, it can end up making more economic sense for the women to step out of the workforce if someone has to stay home and care for the children or the home, and in this pandemic, working mothers of young kids have been roughly three times more likely to lose their jobs than working fathers.

Pew Research United States
US States with few virus cases get big share of relief aid.

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

02:07 min | 1 year ago

US States with few virus cases get big share of relief aid.

"Alaska Hawaii Montana and Wyoming not epicenters of the corona virus pandemic yet. These four states scored big this spring when Congress pumped out direct federal aid while the two hottest hits States New York and New Jersey comparatively little given the vast numbers of cases and deaths they had seen analysis shows that states with small populations like these took in an outsized share of the one hundred fifty billion dollars in federal money that was designed to address corona violence related expenses when measured by the number of positive tests for the Kovic nineteen disease their whole ranged from two million dollars per positive test in Hawaii to nearly three point four million dollars per test in Alaska in Wyoming with less than six hundred positive cases. The one point two billion dollars it received from the congressional package equates to eighty percent of its annual general state budget by comparison New York and New Jersey received about twenty four thousand dollars and twenty seven thousand dollars respectively for each positive Corona Virus. Test other states with high numbers of Corona Virus Cases Including Massachusetts Michigan and Illinois received less than one hundred thousand dollars per positive case. The money for state governments is a slice of the two point. Two trillion dollar federal stimulus passed in late March but in the corona virus fight the disproportionate share going to small states has consequences states with high numbers of infections and deaths say they need that money for immediate expenses related to fighting an outbreak that threatened to overwhelm their hospital systems from staff overtime to setting up makeshift hospitals. Some states with relatively few cases have been able to reopen their economies faster and have more options on how to spend federal largess many now trying to determine how they can spend the windfall while keeping within the federal guidelines

New Jersey New York Alaska Wyoming Hawaii Congress Montana Massachusetts Michigan Illinois
Source: Cowboys, Dak have returned to table

Golic & Wingo

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Source: Cowboys, Dak have returned to table

"The NFL dak Prescott the cowboys return to the negotiation table for the first time since the cowboys used the exclusive franchise tag on Prescott a source told ESPN's Edward Prescott was the first cow boys quarterback in team history to have the franchise tag applied to own a team source told order that the NFL currently shows a twenty six million eight hundred twenty four thousand dollar charge to the cowboys salary cap for Prescott even though he is a sign the franchise tender sources previously said the primary issue between the sides contract length the cowboys won a five year contract Prescott his agent Todd France one for the reason the cowboys want to spread the

Cowboys Espn Edward Prescott NFL Todd France
Los Angeles - Ex-LA City Councilman Mitch Englander Pleads Not Guilty To Corruption Charges

The Frame

01:19 min | 1 year ago

Los Angeles - Ex-LA City Councilman Mitch Englander Pleads Not Guilty To Corruption Charges

"Former LA city councilman Mitch Englander is free on a fifty thousand dollar bond hours after he was arrested in a federal corruption case the forty nine year old Englander was in federal court in downtown LA today to plead not guilty to charges that he lied to FBI agents prosecutors say he took thousands of dollars in cash and gifts from a businessman during trips to Las Vegas and palm springs KPCC politics reporter Libby dampen says according to the federal indictment Englander allegedly later tried to cover up those gaps including lying to the FBI repeatedly according to court documents having a staffer right a backdated shack that reimburse the businessman for some of those gaps and we're talking about you know of a very fancy trip to Las Vegas with the twenty four thousand dollar bottle service at a club ten thousand dollars in an envelope twenty five hundred dollars that allegedly a bill for drinks and dinner and a few hundred dollars for two escorts CPCC politics reporter Libby dank bent the federal indictment says the businessman involved in the case cooperated with the FBI Mitch Anglin represented LA's twelve city council district from twenty eleven to twenty eighteen he stepped down in the middle of his second term to take a job with an entertainment and sports facilities

Mitch Englander LA Las Vegas FBI Libby Dank Mitch Anglin Reporter Cpcc
Should I Pay Off My Mortgage Early?

Chris Hogan's Retire Inspired

06:33 min | 1 year ago

Should I Pay Off My Mortgage Early?

"I got a Hana on the line. Hello how are you. I'm well I'm not kidding. You already ready. You speak in my love language girl out like you already. What's on your mind? Well actually My current focus is dead debt. Free Scream I want to get on that stage ages. I would like to save and invest my way from a thousand air to every day. Millionaires around with being a thousand there. But I like to try that multimillionaire multimillionaires status if I'm liking. I'd like to which brings me to my question today. I could know if it's a good idea. Did a pay off my mortgage. Initially I wanted to ask about paying half but I'd like to know if I can pay off the entire mortgage right now but balance of the mortgage. She's a hundred and four thousand dollars and the interest rate that I'm paying right now is about four and a half percent during my income is about one hundred and ten came bouncing a year and I say Me Back up so I'm all all the way through all the baby steps up to number six at babysit you say well Actually I only had a car and On November Number Fifteen I was paying my credit card statement and I somehow ended up on my November. Two Thousand Eighteen The total I had paid in credit card and I I was made that point. I was done how much how much honestly that year I stayed in credit already card fees but the total bounds with like twenty. Four thousand dollars. You yeah scores. I was one of those ones where I was like. Oh well I'm GONNA bite it anyways out there on my credit card and Dan for it right. Hey I liked that and not only. Did you recover. You've moved forward so all right so you. Are you a saver. So how much do you have in savings right now. How about a hundred and twenty six thousanddollars? What how did you? What have you been doing? No when I want to say yes code on the almost eleven from you saying no one. I'd like to ask a Song Sean. Can you say. Can you sing. I'll call the morning. Okay I can't I arcade either Bob My producer on beacon saying I can't sing but um what you girl so you got one hundred twenty. Six thousand dollars saved up. You have been intentional. What is is this money's supposed to be for well actually The plan was to get to the point where I was at least liquid about one hundred thousand dollars so I just kept going okay. Well you know credit card thing made me so angry. I decided that I will pay the house off but I wanted to add to seek wise council. That is amazing. So how much do you have currently saved toward retirement. So right now have about one hundred and eighty hours Al Hea Okay and how old are you. I'm forty eight years old and I was very much on the conservative side for a very very long time and so I just recently started doing something a little bit different so good. Tell me this. How much is your mortgage payment? Each month right now with principle is insured for it and taxes about nine forty or okay and it's taken you how long to save this one hundred twenty six thousand Probably he just over a year and let me explain that. So I'm a single parent. Cashflow my daughter through college or whatever wasn't governance dollar ships I paid paid The rest in cash and then we will live in different places. Because I'm in the military so I had the manage to how hopefully Into different location location. What branch of the military or UN Navy and you've been in how long a total Thirty years but that's been active and reserve. Okay my goodness well. Thank you for your service. Here's the thing I love what you've done. I love the phrase saying no. I won't say yes. You've you've been intentional. You've attack debt. The thought of paying off that mortgage. Here's the thing it's going to be a game changer. But Shana you're GONNA have to reconcile this. You've got that big dollar or amount sitting in that bank account. Are you going to be okay right in that. Check and that dollar amount shriveling down to about twenty six thousand I e because I'm GonNa love and my living expenses for us in comparison to what I take home in is nothing real. Well I oh yeah no not only. Can you do that but young lady you write the check and pay off that house the mortgage payment you were paying put it back back into savings take that nine hundred and send it back into the savings and guess what in about four to six weeks. They're going to send you the deed to your house. They're gonNA send you this thing. It's a beautiful envelope right. I'm telling you it's pretty. You're open it. I'm did you open it all gentle and everything because you're GONNA won't hold onto it so yes without a shadow shadow of doubt you single mom rockstar. You pay that thing off keep moving forward. You're serving your country but you're also serving a legacy and I I am proud of you and yes you should pay that thing off and yes you should go do some fun things and celebrate in a way that you never have before. It's time for you to start saying saying yes to some things because you can do it. I'm proud of you and thank you for calling in. VIP's I'm GonNa tell you something. Sahana is an absolute testament to what can happen when you make a decision. It doesn't matter where you come from. It doesn't matter where you went to school. It's about the decisions that we make for ourselves beginning winning right now and I've absolutely pumped up and excited to hear from her To See what she made happen because she may choices for herself. That's a single mom. Don't get this twisted people. That's a single mom in the military who decided to say no when she wanted to say yes to save him be intentional. No and now. She's not buying a home. She's about to own that bad boy. Yes how's that feel. What that is is an absolute indication of what we do when we make decisions decisions and we get focused and not finished? I absolutely loved

Hana Bob My Un Navy DAN Shana Producer Sahana
New Federal Overtime Rule Takes Effect Jan. 1

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:19 min | 1 year ago

New Federal Overtime Rule Takes Effect Jan. 1

"Which workers should get paid extra for working long hours? That question is at the heart of a new overtime rule. From the trump administration more workers now now qualify for overtime although far fewer workers will qualify under a rule that was proposed under President Obama. NPR's Alina Seljuk reports which the number of workers now eligible for overtime pay is growing by one point three million people that's because the Labor Department is changing the threshold for the kind of salary. Worker has to make qualify. Here's former Labor Department's chief economist. Heidi Sheer Holtz. There's just a broad rule that generally early people who work more than forty hours a week in this country are eligible for overtime pay and this one is about who's exempted from those protections. The people who get paid by the hour already have overtime pay guarantees. So this rule is for salaried workers and the idea behind it was that people who are say bona fide managers managers or supervisors don't need overtime pay protections. Here's Paula Zahn with the worker advocacy group National Employment Law project overtime rules a lot like a minimum wage for the middle class. They make sure workers have time for their personal lives by protecting the forty hour. Work Week and you know there was an exemption for highly paid managers and professionals. Who are you know the assumption was? They had the bargaining power to negotiate their own pay and work schedules. Except the salary level has eroded over the decades so people making as little as twenty four thousand dollars a year until today could have been denied overtime. Pay Think fast food or retail managers. The new trump role gives that threshold a boost up to nearly thirty six thousand dollars which she says mainly affect those lower-paid frontline managers she. He says before today six percent of full time salaried workers were eligible the trump administration's rule raise it to just around fifteen percent sheer sure Holson worked in the Obama administration on another rule that would have by now extended overtime pay to more than twice as many workers she says by today would have guaranteed overtime. Pay Okay for managers making as much as fifty one thousand dollars a year but that rule was challenged by the business community and blocked by a federal judge in Texas the trump administration ernest ration- chose not to defend it but wrote its own version. Here's Mark Friedman Vice President for workplace policy the US Chamber of Commerce. We think that a more narrow a more refined sour special was was in order. And that's what this administration has put in place. Besides Friedman says many businesses did adjust to the Obama era rule for example changing schedules reshuffling duties or raising the salary for lower paid managers to keep them exempt from overtime pay and so he he says a lot of employers are already compliant with the new trump administration rule. A lot of the adjustments. That might have happened with already. Happened back in two thousand sixteen. Meanwhile argue the trump role is a missed opportunity. Well technically it's an increase in reality. It was a rollback a token increase increase that was aimed at blocking something. More significant and San points out. Multiple states have already taken on overtime. Pay going beyond the new federal

Obama Administration President Obama Paula Zahn Mark Friedman Heidi Sheer Holtz Labor Department Alina Seljuk NPR Holson SAN Chief Economist Us Chamber Of Commerce Texas Ernest Ration Vice President National Employment Law
Economic Crisis Rattles Venezuelan Cattle Ranchers

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:29 min | 2 years ago

Economic Crisis Rattles Venezuelan Cattle Ranchers

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from frame bridge they make custom framing easy and affordable frame your art in photos at frame bridge dot com or visit their new stores located on Fourteenth Street and Bethesda row. Get fifteen percent off your first frame bridge order with Code N._P._R.. In Venezuela the food shortage there is such a crisis that millions of Venezuelans have left the country in the Western plains ranters dairy farmers find themselves pushing up many factors preventing them from ramping. Ramping up production everything from gasoline shortages to cattle wrestlers John Otis reports Jose Arteaga leads me on a tour of a slaughterhouse in the western Venezuelan town of my cheek is yes in the nineteen ninety s it was one of the largest in Latin America Arteaga and other workers killed in process seven hundred beef cattle per day. There were three shifts. The work was is nonstop Arteaga says today the pens shoots and killing floors are empty due to nationwide. White blackouts the facility is dark with pigeons flying around near the ceiling. The decline of Venezuela's meat and dairy industry has been a long time in the making it started in the two thousands when Venezuela's Socialist government seized is numerous ranches and milk plants as well as the machecas Slaughterhouse which critics contend was badly managed more recently as Venezuela has sunk into its worst economic crisis in history. There's been an outbreak of crime in rural rural areas and move US loose arrows. He thought people as you. Angelini says that famous recently stole two hundred forty cattle from his much his ranch they offered. Offered to release the animals in exchange for a ransom payment twenty four thousand dollar ransom for your two hundred forty head of cattle. Yes that's a lot yes a lot of money and you don't have ranchers face other hurdles. The collapse flaps Venezuela's oil industry coupled with U._S.. Sanctions against President Nicolas Maduro authoritarian government of leaded gasoline shortages spare parts and vaccines are also scarce says powered Marcus who heads the cattle ranchers. This federation in my cheek is we don't have the supplies tractors or on gasoline that you know all the all the things to make work in the farm and we have to reduce the for a a few years ago Venezuela had fifteen million head of cattle but Marcus says that number has fallen by more than half meat production has contracted by two-thirds a._F._D._C. Salon. I mean we will Kayla. Soldano Kenneka bus when meat is available. Marcus says that most Venezuelans are too poor to purchase it now. Ranchers and machecas are simply trying to survive. Eliya among them is Nester Romeo his four hundred acre dairy farm. It's been in his family for more than one hundred years yellow. Marino get throttled Neil yes if I fell only five even dollar but he he says his two sons have no intention of taking over the farm when Rome at a retires one recently left Venezuela now lives in Dallas by now. It's late afternoon in time to milk the cows but there's a problem blackouts followed by power surges when the lights come back on have damaged Romero's storage tanks unable to refrigerate milk you.

Venezuela Jose Arteaga Marcus President Nicolas Maduro United States Eliya Angelini Socialist Government Romero Latin America Neil John Otis Kayla Nester Romeo Dallas Marino Rome
"twenty four thousand dollars" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"twenty four thousand dollars" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"And just about any and all businesses, but moving right along we were talking earlier about borrowing money from K, and why that's also a pet peeve of a lot of individuals and mine as well, but I will be hypocritical. If I didn't take the other side of the argument because I am guilty of having done that. In fact, I recall back in the mid to late nineteen ninety s where I borrowed from my 4._0._1._K the maximum that it could at the time. And I borrowed from my line of credit and bought real estate. Now, did I take risk you better believe I did? But did I know what I was doing. Well, I thought so and that real estate ended up paying off very very nicely and what happened to the stock market, by the way in two thousand three two thousand and two cratered. Yeah. So you just mentioned John one of the negatives before the break is the opportunity cost. Well, that's got to work both ways the opportunity cost is well, the market could keep going up, and you could leave some you know, some returns on the sidelines. But the market can also go down and those payments that you make back to yourself going directly into a market. That's gone down. Means you got to buy more shares cheaper prices. So when when the pundits right about that stuff. They can't just take one side of the argument and not give you the other side. Yeah, they did say can be substantial center, saying be careful. They didn't mention the other side where it can also be good. But yes, the opportunity cost you're right. A couple more of these Jerry very quickly. We've heard this one many times interest on a 4._0._1._K loan is not tax deductible. So you should never take a loan from your 4._0._1._K almost no interest anymore is tax deductible. When you think about it and mortgage, even mortgage interest for most Americans is not income tax deductible. Why? Well, that's simple married. Couples get a twenty four thousand dollar standard deduction. So your mortgage interest and your property taxes and the other schedule a deductions have to exceed twenty four thousand dollars before dollar one becomes deductible. That's true charitable contributions as well. So for many, I don't know of most is the right term. But for many that interest is not the doctor bowl and for most even if it is deductible. It's not as valuable as it used to be well, and if you put it on a credit card interest your credit card is intact. There you go. They say paying interest to yourself is not a good idea. They say that they believe four one K loans make sense many people because they're paying interest to themselves, and they say well here, I it is normally not a desirable financial strategy to pay interest of any kind second. Why would you want to pay a higher interest rate on a loan just because you're paying it to yourself that just means you have less of a paycheck to live on? Healthcare. You're paying your loan back with interest that is not deductible, but it is going into your account both the interest and the principal's going into your account. And that goes back to the argument. It's actually a pretty good idea to have borrowed the money before the market drops to pay your interest and principal back, plus your contributions dollar cost average of the market's down. So that one's kinda lame. But I mean, there's a certain element of truth to all of these. But whenever you're writing an article, you've got a skew it the way you want to skew it, right? Well, you have to and you have to come up with seven or nine or something so just to others, and I don't I don't think much of these very quickly. They say a reason you shouldn't take your 4._0._1._K.

Jerry principal John twenty four thousand dollars twenty four thousand dollar four one K
"twenty four thousand dollars" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

03:07 min | 2 years ago

"twenty four thousand dollars" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Clean twenty four thousand dollar coat five hundred bucks, maybe a thousand and but it's out there. Twenty three thousand twenty four thousand dollars for a coat, man. Oh, man, never heard that before my life. I never would have guessed that out against the high end for coats were like two grand but twenty four thousand that's wild live on KFI AM six hundred. Tasty Tomas Angeles, Orange County radio station. Got the typhus. I'm Erin bender live from the KFI twenty four hour newsroom. L as city council. President has filed a motion to keep people from contracting typhus in city owned buildings. Type is typically spread by fleas infected by rodents councilman herb Wesson says he became concerned about the issue what his own staff recently heard sounds of rodents, and they found dropping employees thought that she was either bitten by or saw a fleet. We had them rip out. All of the carpet says the motion he filed calls for all city owned buildings in downtown LA to get the same treatment his office received the motion also calls for an assessment of all live plants in the buildings and new regulations for how city employees store and dispose of food. California has put out a list of its lowest performing schools school district has one hundred ten schools that require assistance, more than twenty of those are charter schools Alicia. Smith Oreo go with education. Trust west says, the ranking can have an upside identifies with schools should be receiving assistance and resources from the state to support students that are struggling more than two dozen schools in LA have been singled out for comprehensive support. The state report looked at the bottom five percent of schools from kindergarten to high school. Andrew mollenbeck, KFI news. The storm that just hit so Cal has been ranked category too. Using atmospheric river scale goes one to five UCI professor Goodwin. Magnus daughter says the rankings could help predict droughts and usually a ours. I'm Eric rivers, very beneficial for especially for California because that's how we get our moisture that's how we get our rain. She says higher rankings could mean constant downpours which caused problems like mudslides in fire areas. A couple has been arrested in Rancho Cucamonga for sexual acts with a girl younger than ten detective Donald patent says police learned of the possible abuse last week during a search of the residents relocated. Evidence cooperating. The victim statements patent says Jason Whitney and Melinda. Smith were arrested for sexually abusing a girl under the age of ten and we also located to loaded handguns and usable amount of methamphetamine inside of the residence sat and says both worked in the porn industry. Smith is an actress and Whitney is a director and producer the bedroom was set up for filming movies and web shows and pants says it's possible. Other kids may have been abused in Rancho Cucamonga, Chris ancarlo KFI news echo park, stall on the one on one. Some good news here on the southbound side offense way, this big rigs finally out of lanes and traffic. However,.

KFI Erin bender LA Rancho Cucamonga California Smith typhus professor Goodwin herb Wesson Donald patent Tomas Angeles Jason Whitney Orange County President Andrew mollenbeck Chris ancarlo Magnus director Eric rivers
Why Trump's Tax Cut  Will Be Eroded Next Year by Inflation Switch

Financial Exchange with Barry Armstrong

01:50 min | 2 years ago

Why Trump's Tax Cut Will Be Eroded Next Year by Inflation Switch

"Headline in the Wall Street Journal reads, the Trump tax cut to be eroded next year by inflation switch. What are they talking about? Mike. I it's getting a little bit complex. But a lot of the numbers that we use when we're filing our taxes. They get adjusted every year for inflation and going forward the IRS is going to be using a different measure invitation than they have for the last few years. Okay. So long story short. Let's take these standard deduction this year. Twenty four thousand for married. Couples married couple you get deduct automatic twenty four thousand dollars off of your gross income next year. That's going to go up to twenty four thousand four hundred dollars based on the inflation number that the IRS is using. But if they have been using the old formula, it would have been twenty four or five fifty seems like a small amount, but compound that over a decade, and you can see how it would be pretty significant over a longer period of time. Yes. So you know, you figure. Okay. So it's one hundred and fifty bucks this year. Maybe it's one seventy the year after one eighty so, you know, over a ten year period that might be the standard deduction instead of going up by six thousand dollars goes up by five thousand instead, you know, those kinds of things again, those aren't the actual numbers. There's a bunch of the bat, by the way, don't even have indexed inflation. So for instance, the child tax credit just got bumped up to two thousand dollars, but it doesn't move. It's always going to be two thousand bucks unless they change. It manually was that the that was the same with the previous one right this previous ones. I think. Two thousand and pretty much didn't move. So it just something to be aware of as you're getting ready to head into twenty nineteen is look obviously tax brackets went down. But those brackets aren't necessarily adjusting up is much and some of the other pieces in terms of near that standard deduction and other things aren't adjusting up by as much as they would have previously as

IRS Wall Street Journal Mike Twenty Four Thousand Four Hund Twenty Four Thousand Dollars Six Thousand Dollars Two Thousand Dollars Ten Year
RMDs: The money the government makes you take?

The Ray Lucia Show

00:57 sec | 3 years ago

RMDs: The money the government makes you take?

"I thought I would cover some of the basics of things that you might need to know about required. Minimum distributions and in particular, if you turn age, seventy and one half. Eighteen you have a required. Minimum distribution do this year. Now can be postponed until next year. But then you'd have to and there's a lot of planning that goes around. When when you have, you know, taxable income and sometimes that taxable income, and you've got to might not be as opportunistic as taking one this year. Another example, of course, would be if you're still working while your age seventy and a half, it might be beneficial for you to postpone taking it. So let's let's talk about required. Minimum distributions now. I know I know of no other plan. That retirement plan where you don't have to take a required. Minimum distribution. I'm talking about qualified plans 4._0._1._K's four zero three Bs profitsharing defined benefit money. Purchase. IRA's simple steps. Rollovers all of those subject to a required. Minimum distribution. However, if you own less than five percent of the stock in the company under which you are in a 4._0._1._K. Then you don't have to take a required minimum distribution from that particular 4._0._1._K plan. Remember the rules state that if you have other 4._0._1._K's four zero three Bs at cetera qualified retirement plans from other companies. You must take a required minimum distribution individually from each of those IRA's, no an IRA all non Roth IRA's can be at least from an accounting perspective amalgamated together, and you can take a distribution from any one of them to satisfy the requirements of all, but that is not the case with different qualified plans, and that's really important because some people will add everything up, including their qualified plans. Take a required minimum distribution. And remember the penalty is quite substantial. There's a fifty percent penalty on the amount you were supposed to withdraw and did not. So in that case, if you have two hundred thousand dollars in an IRA and four hundred thousand and a 4._0._1._K, and you take a six hundred thousand dollar amount and take four percent, which is about your first year required distribution, you take twenty four thousand dollars out of your IRA to satisfy all. You just violated the rules and you always fifty percent penalty on four percent of four hundred thousand dollars or about eight grand in a penalty tax. So you'll you'll have to make sure that you understand these rules now all of this money will likely be taxable. If the money went in pre-tax it's coming out taxable. Now, what a lot of individuals. Do not realize is if you had non deductible. Money's going into an IRA. You cannot single that money out and just take out that non-deductible money tax free. And the example I liked used because the math is simple as this. If you had ten thousand dollars of non deductible contributions, and your total IRA, including that ten thousand dollars is worth one hundred thousand. And you take a ten thousand dollar distribution. Only one thousand of it will be tax free ten percent of the total. In other words. There's a pro ration- if you will of the post tax money and the pretext money.

DAX Milan Fifteen Percent One Percent
Hundreds of neo-Nazis march in Berlin, protected by police

KSTE Programming

00:29 sec | 3 years ago

Hundreds of neo-Nazis march in Berlin, protected by police

"As a. Doctor And he went to get an MRI founded cost and twelve hundred dollars looked further and found. That people get charged up to twenty four thousand dollars, for an MRI if. They go into the and. They get one wow well he said let's stupid. Crazy and exploitive I'm going to buy one and offer it for a lot less but he couldn't get one because the state wouldn't let him It'd. Be News Radio I'm John

President Trump Robert Muller Twitter Alex Jones Richard Jordan Russia New York Times Jack Dorsey Adolf Hitler NBC Colonel Sean Ryan Rudolf Hess United States John Jeffreys Iraq Jones Bob Carson
"twenty four thousand dollars" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

03:51 min | 3 years ago

"twenty four thousand dollars" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Takes care of cholesterol takes, care of cuts and bruises and even. Broken bones in most cases. I. Mean for crying out loud we've done all those things you. Know, I just, the, fact, today, we, had a patient she's twenty one year old. With a brain tumor her insurance was charged. Twenty four thousand dollars for Medicaid they denied it we're able, to get it down to forty one dollars. Per treatment over the course of the term it'll be nineteen hundred dollars but you know. That's what we're fighting, for, the. Ability to help our patients Mets how partisans you. Gotta say that again He. Just. Say those numbers again that is unbelievable Okay is this your. Show or my just helping. I'm just helping. Out I. Don't need your help Sean Hannity, show go ahead Insurance was charged twenty four thousand dollars and? We can get it. Down to as low as. Forty one dollars. To treatment Over the course, of the six hundred What does the insurance companies embrace you mean that'd. Be the. Best thing they ever did they should and. I think often that's why we're concert we can six a lot of this because. We're on the right side of, it everybody wants to support Affordable Care but we do get your legislators to be knowledgeable about how this system. Works and ultimately get employers and patients and then eventually insurance companies to see that we're all on the same side and we're innovating in the. Direction that helps patients access. Lower costs you. Really. Dramatic stuff, here I, appreciate. It Dr number atlas MD Wichita Kansas I wish you were in New York I would use? You in a heartbeat. Although, one, of. My best friends is my doctor so I have I. Couldn't. Leave him hanging his just harass. Him, I. Just you know? I sent him a, picture, of the, other day because you, know my poor mother in. Law turned her ankle Mike what should she do what do you think he diagnosed it on the phone. And just to be safe we got our picture but she's better now all right thank you serve the whole absolutely all right eight hundred nine four one Sean let's go to let's say hi to is it Howdy in Florida Howdy how. Are you, hi Sean. How're you doing you're a great American oh good sir thank you for joining us and. We appreciate. Your call great so keep it short and. Sweet yes sir what are you got Ray Glenda said well you know I'm a. Problem solver bene- problems all my, life and so I look at this problem of of the whole Pfizer court and all that kind of stuff. And the ice rink with the the recourse we should use is that the house of representatives should impeach the Pfizer court to be able to. Flip it up into the. Open air so. That. The way, that it, does. Business shows up I mean you gotta You gotta know that in the first what's thirty five years thirty eight years of, course. They only turned back? Twelve applications and then somehow mysteriously in two thousand and sixteen two thousand seventeen they, turned back thirty four, in each of those. Years but. It's assuming the Pfizer court. Assumes. That the, applicant is. Has, got the, best. Interest of the. United States and they're they're honest and they'll remember. It. Was I rejected? According, to. Reports the only? Thing that put it. Over, the, top. And Andrew Magee McCabe even said so the only thing. That. Put it over the top was. The, dossier. Without the dossier? There's no Fiso more, now, we know, the dossier was never, verified now we know it's. Full of bought and paid for Russian lies and it was an everybody knew it but they didn't tell. Any of the judges so the judges were lied to 'em manipulated and it's unbelievable to me that there's not consequences for this who's going to do the consequences it would have to be the judges on the Pfizer court would have to. Turn around, and say And they would have to be the ones that would put the. Pressure back on the department of Justice they would have to do it so the only, way to do that. Is to get the house of representatives to impeach. Them so that pressure is there of okay tell us what, happened who did it why did it, happen in this doesn't need to be in. A public forum but it needs to be, to the house of representatives who they are accountable to and then turned all that upside down..

Pfizer court Sean Hannity Ray Glenda Mets Medicaid department of Justice Mike New York United States Andrew Magee McCabe Wichita Kansas Twenty four thousand dollars twenty four thousand dollars nineteen hundred dollars thirty eight years Forty one dollars forty one dollars thirty five years
Amazon is being used as a laboratory for new products

Marketplace All-in-One

02:13 min | 3 years ago

Amazon is being used as a laboratory for new products

"Ten years ago, the financial crisis changed the global economy as we knew it. If you've been following our project divided decade, you've heard some of the many ways that crisis also affected people's personal economic lives in today's installment of our series. How we changed. We hear from shontae Ray talking to us from one of the three toy stores. She owns in the Saint Louis area in one thousand nine hundred five. I took a job as a clerk in a little toy store and Edwardsville while I was getting my BFA in sculpture, and just I feel like kind of became a natural retailer. My husband was very supportive and seemed like he was willing to dive in lead a toilet with me. So we bought three giant stores with thirty five employees and the future was wide open. Two thousand eight. The holidays can didn't come. We didn't sell any doll houses. We didn't sign castles, train tables at stopped, and we came out of that season with a what the heck is going on. What? What just happened? Part of our strategy during the worst part of the crisis was to go directly to our Bank and talk to them. They could see it going on with everyone. So it wasn't a surprise that we were also struggling and we renegotiated the terms of our SPA loan. In two thousand thirteen. We went to our normal Bank appointment and the bankers called the entirety of our of our loan. We were shocked and heartbroken. The Bank guy cried with us. We cried and we were crushed. We sent out a letter on a Friday afternoon telling everyone that we were closing our stores. And at that point, hundreds and hundreds of families came people like, what are you talking about? This can't be possible. You know, I had moms that are like my water broke in your store. As all these families were coming in the question kept coming up, well, what do you need? Like? How much do you need? And we, you know, we said, I, it's a lot. I don't know. We don't know what it what we need to keep going, but we were kind of forced to give a number. And so we said, well, if we had seventy five thousand dollars, then we could push the Bank off, but I'm not comfortable with that, you know? And that's kind of where we left it. My husband and I was are actually our tenth wedding anniversary pi day twenty thirteen. My phone exploded and they had raised eighty two thousand dollars, and we're giving it to me no strings attached. And we were floored. When you have a town that says, we really want you here. You know, it's a very powerful statement by their grace was the only reason we're here. Well, in my hard work. The company shanty Ray and her husband own is called happy up Inc. We've got some pictures on our Instagram that marketplace APM. And while you're there, tell us your story with the hashtag how we changed. Welfare has been back in the news lately with the White House council of economic advisers calling earlier this month for reform of social programs, like food stamps and rental housing assistance. But while welfare has long, been one of those hot button issues that people tend to have a lot of opinions about the facts about how the system works in this country aren't so well known over the last few years. Our wealth and poverty team has been working to change that in their podcast, the uncertain our marketplace's Chrissy Clark led an investigation into how federal welfare funding actually gets spent across the country, and the answers are pretty surprising. She joins me now with an update on her reporting. Hi Chrissy. Hey, Amy. So we use the word welfare to mean a lot of things. What are we talking about specifically today? Yeah, so it can be used to refer to everything from food stamps, Medicaid. But what we're talking about right now is the program known as temporary assistance for needy families or Tanith. And this is the federal program that provide. Ads, cash assistance to poor families after welfare reform in nineteen, Ninety-six cash assistance, stop being something based strictly on need. And now there, lots of work requirements and time limits involved. The thing that changed is that welfare became a block grant. Capped at about sixteen point, five billion dollars a year. And now each year, the federal government gives a certain amount of town of money to each state states have to contribute some of their own funds. And then the key part is that each state decides how they're going to spend their pot of federal and state ten of money, and they are given a lot of flexibility and what do we know about how states are actually spending the money, so they're spending it in some pretty unexpected ways. The first surprise is that for the last few years, if you look at all the states combined only about a quarter of Tanna funds goes to actual cash assistance to poor families. Then another quarter of the funds goes to what you might call work, supports, things like job training. And child care transportation to and from work. But that's all to say that just a little more than half of Tanna funds go to what most people think of as like the core purpose of welfare, which is money directly assisting poor families or helping them get a job, where does that leave the other half? So that's where things get even more surprising. So states use some of it to fill their own budget gaps for unrelated things like pre k. and child protective services. And then there's this kind of crazy quilt of other programs that the money goes to for many years. For example, in Oklahoma, some welfare funding was going to marriage counseling workshops, not just for poor couples, but for anyone who signed up. And then Michigan is an interesting example about fifteen percent of Tanta funds there go into college financial aid and scholarship programs, and these largely benefit students from middle and upper income families, not just poor kids. So in fact, when you crunch the numbers, actually. More Tanith money is going to these college scholarship programs in Michigan than to actual cash assistance for needy families. Wow. Is that because there are just fewer families that need that help? No. So so nationally poverty has slightly declined in the last couple of years since the recession when it spiked. But the poverty rate is just about as high as it was back in nineteen Ninety-six. When we overhauled welfare around thirteen percent of Americans live below the poverty line. And that's about twenty four thousand dollars a year for a family of four. The other startling thing that I found in my reporting is that nationally very few families who are poor receive cash assistance. In fact, there are more avid postage stamp collectors than there are people who get cash welfare in the in the in the country nationally, just twenty three out of every one hundred families who live at or below the poverty line gets cash assistance in more than a dozen stay. As the decline is even more pronounced less than ten out of every hundred. Poor families gets cash assistance and what's behind that decline. So part of it is the time limits. You're just not allowed to receive assistance for as long even if you are still struggling with poverty. It's also just a harder program to navigate. Now, the application process is more difficult and more time consuming. There are these work requirements that can be hard to meet. So for families who don't have a lot of resources that might just discourage them from even applying in your reporting, what did you find in terms of what this actually means for families who are out there struggling to get by and could use that cash assistance? Yeah. So I've talked to people who sell their blood plasma to get by. They're also just the everyday tough choices that families face. I talked to one mom who on a given day might be grappling with whether to buy toilet paper or cough syrup for her kids because she just did not have enough money to buy both. So the hard question what is being done, if anything about this. So there is a welfare reform Bill that has been introduced in the house that would put more oversight on how states spend their money. And in the hearings leading up to the Bill, a member of congress actually pointed to things that we had revealed in our reporting like these college financial aid programs that we're getting ten if money that was going to higher income families. They pointed to that as one of the problems with how the program works. These days, the Bill had been expected to come to the floor this month. But in the run-up to the midterm elections, it looks like welfare is just too hot button topic to touch right now. So we'll have to see. All right, Christy Clark host of our documentary podcast, the uncertain our Krissy. Thanks so much. Thanks for having me. And you could see our updates to how your state spends welfare money at marketplace, dot org. Coming up for the first time, children with disabilities are entitled to more than just the bare minimum. But what if schools can't offer much more than that first, let's do the numbers. The Dow Jones industrial average fell thirteen points less than one tenth percent close at twenty five thousand forty four. The NASDAQ picked up twenty one points two-tenths percent to finish at seventy eight forty one and the s&p five hundred rose five points a tenth of a percent to end at twenty eight. Oh six more than a third of companies in the s&p five hundred report earnings this week investors will be watching for signs. The tariffs are affecting company decision-making bonds fell. The yield on the tenure t. note, rose to two point nine, six percent, and you are listening to marketplace. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by lending club for decades. Credit cards have been telling us by now pay for it later with interest, despite your best intentions that interest can get out of control fast with lending club. You can borrow up to forty thousand dollars to consolidate your high interest debt or pay off credit cards into one fixed monthly payment. Your path to financial stability starts today go to lending club dot com. Slash marketplace today to check your rate in minutes. All loans made by web Bank member FDIC equal housing lender, and by lifeproof backpacks. Check them out at lifeproof dot com. Slash marketplace and get fifteen percent off any pack. So phones and other small devices stay safe inside. Select backpacks also have an ingenious side access laptop pocket ideal. For when you're going through airport security. And speaking of security, most lifeproof backpacks are quipped with a super secret stash pocket when you need to hide away a passport or some cash, and they're all outfitted with front tie-down stole overseas stuff. Outside with four sizes, there's a lifeproof backpack for any outing grabbed the Quiapo eighteen leader for day trips up your carrying capacity with the squamish twenty liter or go with the go twenty two leader for tons of pockets or max out on space with the squamish XL thirty two liter get your lifeproof backpack. Now at fifteen percent off by going to lifeproof dot com. Slash marketplace, lifeproof backpacks, carry on. This is marketplace. I made me Scott. When you think about buying this week's groceries, chances are Amazon, isn't your go to destination? At least not yet, but that doesn't mean food isn't selling on the site. Nisha novelty food products are increasingly popular on Amazon, which has kind of turned it into a laboratory for testing new food products. Vanessa Wong as written about this. She's the deputy business editor for BuzzFeed news. I asked her, I some examples. Some of their bestselling products include like protein powder and like weird chocolate covered almonds that you've never heard of and strange, like limited time or promotional offerings from some of the bigger food manufacturers. So like one of the big themes this summer, you might know this a lot like Jurassic World Food being watched on Amazon, which includes like a twenty five dollar box of Kellogg's. Frosted flakes that comes with a digital screen loaded with behind the scenes footage of the film. Film which you can only get from a box of cereal on Amazon. You know, twenty five dollars sounds pretty cheap. That's true. You know, it's interesting. I was wondering like who actually buys this stuff, and I found this guy who bought the drastic world, frosted flakes and admitted that like in no sense was it worth twenty five bucks? He could have bought the cereal and like gone to see the movie for less than that. Why are they putting some things on Amazon that you wouldn't find say in a grocery store, there are a couple of reasons. It's kind of like a lower risk environment. So at traditional grocery stores, they actually charge manufacturers fee to have their products on display. And so there's that, you know, there are a lot of kind of logistical complications and supply chain things that get in the way of launching a new product. And when you go an Amazon, you kind of have a lot more control over the situation in terms of like how many you sell, how many produce how it's marketed. The thing that is a little. Complicate about Amazon is that Amazon obviously has a lot of control over like algorithms and like where your things show up, which obviously has a lot of impact on whether or not consumers see them and buy them. And how does this fit into Amazon's overall strategy? I mean, obviously, with the purchase of whole foods, it's a bigger player in the grocery space. Is this part of its larger effort to take over? You know, when it comes to Amazon's strategy who can really say at this point, they are like all over the place, but in terms of their food strategy, obviously they're trying to beef up like what types of offerings they have for customers. And one of the ways to like differentiate themselves from brick and mortar grocery is to like, have a different product assortment. So you know, by getting food startups launch, they're kind of like novel and novelty snacks and big manufacturers to kind of like tryout promotional items and other things kind of like brings customers to your sites in. Talking about food, right. Well, how long do you think before we might get there where people go to Amazon for their regular groceries, not just their Jurassic world, frosted flakes I think we're a long ways from their e commerce has had a lot more success in other industries like electronics, apparel, things that ship. Well, groceries is complicated. I mean, aside from like snacks and kind of other dry goods that are temperature sensitive at cetera. It's really hard to get people like, you know, regular food that they can cook that day. The market share of like ecommerce and food is tiny. It's like less than five percent. Still the nessa Wong is deputy business editor for BuzzFeed news. Thanks, thanks so much. At last count more than six and a half million public school children receive special education services, how schools educate those children is governed under a federal law that covers thirteen disabilities. A lawsuit about that law went all the way to the US supreme court last year. The court's ruling changes. What kinds of services schools and districts are legally obligated to provide? Marketplace's Lizzie O'Leary went to find out what that means for the country's largest school district New York City. I hate it. I'm listening Heinsohn picking in a bright orange shirt eight year Old Aden's ready to show off what he's learning in third grade. French, his mom Alana Philip remembers meeting his French teacher. I said French, he studied French because in pre k. Aden was diagnosed with a subtype of autism. One thing that really comes out clearly is it seems as though this thing is going to take a lot of money, there was the occupational therapist. So Aden could learn to hold a pencil. The reading program at one hundred fifty bucks a session and a private neuro psych evaluate and that costs forty five hundred dollars out of pocket in New York City within sixty days of requesting an evaluation. Parents, teachers and other school staff are supposed to hash out an implement a student's individualized education program or IEP under federal law. It's the document that lays out exactly what services a student with disabilities gets. Here's Alana. Philip again, what I had to really fight full was one to one tutoring, an extra support as we know not. All schools have the same resources that's Laurie pod Vesper. She's an advocate at include NYC a nonprofit that helps students with disabilities access services. She says school, sometimes make recommendations based on what they can give, not necessarily what students need in the past New York students with disabilities were often taught separately in their own classes. But then in two thousand ten, they changed the funding formula. Now the district give schools more money if they keep kids with disabilities in mainstream classrooms. The idea being that if you educate students with disabilities alongside their peers, they'll do better academically and socially, but it's just that enough again, Laurie pod Vesper who's a proponent for these kinds of classrooms? My gut reaction is no. There's still huge achievement gap between students with disabilities in New York City. In general education students, New York City schools spent three point, seven billion dollars on classroom instruction. For special education students last year about thirty percent of such spending and they're doing better at getting students classroom services than ever before. But still one in four kids don't get the full services. They're legally entitled to two families. Recently sued the district in a statement, the New York City department of education says they ensure students with disabilities have access to education in quote, the least restrictive environment, and they say they try to resolve concerns as quickly as possible nationwide. A lot of families have sued Jack Robinson Representative, Colorado family whose case went to the supreme court. You have this inherent tension between what the parents want and believe is necessary for their child to succeed. And you know, with the school district is is willing to do alerts financially or just conceptually the supreme court ruled unanimously that just access to education is not enough chief Justice. John Roberts wrote, schools need to offer. Services. So students quote, make progress appropriate in light of the child circumstances. But the first time children with disabilities are entitled to more than just the bare minimum, the federal law, which gives students with disabilities rights to an education also promises funding to cover forty percent of extra special education costs today, only fourteen percent of those funds have come through leaving it up to states and districts to figure out how and what they can pay for since the supreme court ruling the federal education department released guidance to schools clarifying their increased duties. What we don't know yet is how that will play out for students like Aden or anyone else with a disability since divided by ten by ten. Correct? Good boy, high five for now, it likely still means a lot of hard work in New York. I'm Lizzie O'Leary for marketplace. You can check out a marketplace, special report on the economics of disability. Fear more stories about work and healthcare, all at marketplace, dot org. And this final note, the new York, Daily News lost half of its newsroom staff today, publisher trunk Inc, which also owns the Chicago Tribune and the Baltimore Sun among others bought the tabloid last year for just a dollar plus the outstanding debt in a note sent to employees. The company said efforts. So far to stem revenue losses have not gone far enough. The cuts include the paper's editor in chief Jim rich who tweeted, and I quote, if you hate democracy and think local government should operate unchecked and in the dark, then today is a good day for you. That's it. We gotta go. The Dow Jones fell thirteen points less than one tenth percent. The NASDAQ picked up twenty one points, two tenths of a percent and the s&p five hundred rose five points a tenth of a percent. Our daily production team includes Bridget Bodmer Maria Holland. Horace Sean McHenry and daisy. Philosophies are special projects. Desk includes Tommy Andre

New York Bridget Bodmer Maria Holland Lizzie O'leary Horace Sean Mchenry Aden Tom Desk Tommy Andre Chicago Tribune Daily News Editor In Chief Trunk Inc Jim Rich Baltimore Publisher Producer AMY Scott
"twenty four thousand dollars" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"twenty four thousand dollars" Discussed on WTVN

"Just under social security check that could be avoided had they had money and ross and other tax free types of accounts and could pull out of that so what we want to do is have that an ideal amount that we want to have that's creating income from tax deferred is only twenty four thousand dollars a year so once we've done that we want to start converting we want to curb some of that over to a roth and other tax free solutions over time so that in like i told brinton christina look this isn't going to be a one year or two year fixed it's going to take about eight to ten years to get you there but eventually we're going to have you to a place where you can be in the zero percent tax bracket and i it was kind of the look of disbelief kristen that does sounds too good to be true already well you know the thing is it takes a lot to get your head wrapped around the whole concept right but it's not rocket science once you really get the concept down in in canada i guess can see the light at the end of the tunnel for lack of better terms it makes sense and many people say why didn't i think of this or i wish i would have thought of the sooner but really not maybe not in all cases but in a lot of cases we are able to get you tomorrow tax efficient place not everybody can be in a tax free place because i mean we just met with a family last week that their pension is going to be over one hundred thousand dollars they're never going to be in the zero percent tax bracket we just wanna make it to where they don't end up in the maximum tax bracket later we did just few projections for that family and by the time they're eighty years old they're required minimum distribution was going to be nearly a quarter of a million dollars that's amazing to.

kristen canada ross brinton christina zero percent one hundred thousand dollars twenty four thousand dollars million dollars eighty years ten years one year two year
"twenty four thousand dollars" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"twenty four thousand dollars" Discussed on WTVN

"They're going to have to pay tax on eighty five percent of their social security benefit now the significance of that when we did the math on it was that that's going to cause them to pay about forty one hundred dollars a year in tax just under social security check that could be avoided had they had money and ross and other tax free types of accounts and could pull out of that so what we want to do is have that ideal amount that we want to have that's creating income from tax deferred is only twenty four thousand dollars a year so once we've done that we wanna start converting we want to curb vert some of that over to a roth and other tax free solutions over time so that in like i told brinton christina look this isn't going to be a one year or two year fixed it's going to take about eight to ten years to get you there but eventually we're going to have you to a place where you can be in the zero percent tax bracket and i it was kind of the look of disbelief kristen that does sounds too good to be true already well you know the thing is it takes a lot to get your head wrapped around the whole concept right but it's not rocket science once you really get the concept down in in canada i guess can see the light at the end of the tunnel for lack of better terms it makes sense and many people say why didn't i think of this or i wish i would have thought of the sooner but really not maybe not in all cases but in a lot of cases we are able to get you tomorrow tax efficient place not everybody can be in a tax free place because i mean we just met with a family last week that their pension is going to be over one hundred thousand dollars so they're never going to be in the zero percent tax bracket we just wanna make it to where they don't end up in the maximum tax bracket later we did just a few projections for that family and by the time they're eighty years old they're required minimum distribution was going to be nearly a quarter of a million dollars that's amazing to me so here's the.

kristen canada ross brinton christina zero percent one hundred thousand dollars twenty four thousand dollars forty one hundred dollars eighty five percent million dollars eighty years ten years one year two year
APD requests exemption from sending National Guard to border

Bob Clark

01:34 min | 3 years ago

APD requests exemption from sending National Guard to border

"Stop a man critically injured at the flying j truckstop at ninety eight and i forty sunday night was taken off life support and has died albuquerque police say the man who's not been identified was intentionally struck by car the suspect fled the scene in silver chevy cobalt was a pennsylvania plate that suspect is still being sought the avid turkey police department last governor martinez for an exemption from deploying apd cops are in the national guard to be deployed to the border president trump is considering sending four thousand national guard members to secure the us mexico border but apd has a staffing shortage and fifty to sixty offices are in the national guard and apd spokesman says sending those officers to the border is a potential public safety risk in albuquerque the response of the governor's office says that martinez will work with the feds to determine what tasks and levels of support are needed the santa fe police department is working to bring back its bomb squad but it'll take time a city spokesman says the santa fe police department has received a twenty four thousand dollar grant from the state homeland security department to send three team members to the fbi's hazardous devices school as the only program in the us to train and certify bomb technicians but there's a long waiting lists the fbi has her has had to assist santa fe police on recent bomb skiers and occurred at the downtown post office and the social security office on fifth street coming up in one minute what you can expect the next time you fill up koa newsradio time nine oh four wanna get rid of an old.

Cobalt Turkey Police Department Martinez Donald Trump APD Santa Fe Police Department FBI United States Albuquerque Pennsylvania President Trump Mexico Santa Fe Twenty Four Thousand Dollar One Minute
The Latest: Russia says spy claims are British posturing

John and Ken

01:18 min | 3 years ago

The Latest: Russia says spy claims are British posturing

"The centers for disease control and prevention says suicide is the second leading cause of death for people aged fifteen to twenty four a consumer group has called for the dwp's ratepayer advocate to be flushed out consumer watchdog accuses the dwp of overcharging customers at ignoring calls to straighten out the bills group president jamie court says the ratepayer advocate isn't living up to his title is terrorism and the dwp is like a soviet bureaucracy it acts like that this woman claims the dwp shut off or power last fall because of a mixed up bill twenty four thousand dollars three kids in my house in santa monica andrew mollenbeck kfi news us ambassador to the united nations has america stands in solidarity with great britain against russia over the poisoning of a former russian spy nikki haley told a meeting of the un security council the us believes russia is responsible for the attack last week if we don't take a media concrete measures to address this now salisbury will not be the last place we see chemical weapons used britain's prime minister says the spy and his daughter were exposed to a military grade nerve agent russia has denied any involvement traffic from the helpful socal honda traffic center we have a crash.

DWP Group President United Nations Britain Russia Nikki Haley Un Security Council United States Prime Minister Jamie Court Santa America Nerve Agent Honda Twenty Four Thousand Dollars
"twenty four thousand dollars" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"twenty four thousand dollars" Discussed on TechStuff

"To these st louis business journal says the still happening in st louis missouri now according to the st louis post despatch big raised about eighteen million dollars from investors in two thousand and an even sponsored a race car during the indianapolis five hundred that year there are also stories of lavish parties expensive wines in fact part of the bankruptcy proceedings because spoiler alert big went out of business to part of the bankruptcy proceedings include the auction of twenty four bottles of chateau lafite rothschild which was a worth about twenty four thousand dollars within nine months of raising those millions of dollars big closed now that led to roberts getting some heat in st louis see i changed the st louis for this part and sunni add folks at the state and federal and city levels all askings really tough questions about his entrepreneurial efforts and undaunted he picked up stakes any moved to florida a near tampa he started a new company called infineon labs and on january 20th 2003 he started the company 2002 by the way but in two thousand three on january twenty the company issued a press release about their plans it's a short one so i'm going to actually read the press release a tampa bay area technology company infineon labs corporation will develop and market a new game console though outperformed the xbox sony's playstation two and gamecube the company plans to market a highperformance gaming console and delivery system to provide consumers with options and capabilities that are not available in today's marketplace the console will appeal to the hardcore gamer and the high end consumer electronic purchaser the next generation game console provides a robust fault tolerant delivery system that supports games on demand game rentals game demos seamless upgrades and patch management the game console is and always on broadband device it is easy enough for chilled.

chateau lafite rothschild roberts tampa infineon labs infineon labs corporation sony st louis missouri st louis florida twenty four thousand dollars eighteen million dollars nine months
"twenty four thousand dollars" Discussed on Remso Republic

Remso Republic

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"twenty four thousand dollars" Discussed on Remso Republic

"Lines twenty four thousand dollars a year i feel obligated as as gubernatorial candidate to create a system that does not raise taxes my pro my plan federal and dividend will not raise taxes but will just simply lease out empty federal land and pay people money so that they have more to afford health insurance that way we can keep private health insurance send their kids to school wherever they want to go i mean in fact this is my federal and dividend is a very very libertarian idea and i i've been seeing it thankfully more and more libertarian grabbing on sinn yeah this is great and maybe we don't pay a basic income maybe what we do is we completely eliminate taxes with any income we earn from that federal and durban to me it's not necessarily a we have to pay based income would woods's upsetting knees is that the american government is sitting on one hundred fifty trillion dollars of land and not doing anything about it for me that's a half million dollars per american per three hundred twenty five million americans we should have access to that wealth it's our wealth is this in addition to already existing welfare programs or does this eliminator cut some of them so this would be entirely in addition but the thing that i want to do and the reason i support this is they would completely eliminate all these other programs you can eliminate the medicare you can eliminate the wealth or you can eliminate social security you can limit you can you can downsize the us government dramatically by implementing this one single program and the great thing about as republicans love it democrats love it and the reason republicans love it is because they're going to have all this brand new business the tackle all this new lands develop you know what i mean.

health insurance woods american government social security sinn us one hundred fifty trillion dol twenty four thousand dollars million dollars
"twenty four thousand dollars" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"twenty four thousand dollars" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Tax bill the standard deduction nearly doubled so for a family of four next year it will be twenty four thousand dollars now the standard abduction is the amount of income that you are automatically not tax timezone next year more households are expected to take advantage of that they'll take that it that deduction instead of itemising it just won't make central for them to itemize anymore and they won't be taking deduction for charitable contributions and that worries charities not the people are going to stop giving but that they'll give less without this tax brain all right so there's something else changing with property taxes qian 20th yeah some people are going to pre pay their property taxes right now before the end of the year that's to take advantage of property tax deductions that are still available to them right now they go away in 2018 under the tax bill there's a cap on property tax deductions what about tax rates themselves i mean out of this whole thing was about when will people notice that change molly could happen as soon as february that workers would see the lower tax rates reflected in their paychecks but for a lot of people they're going to really notice to the big impact will be after they file their taxes further 2018 income and start getting refunds in 2019 item most people are going to get some kind of tax can next year how big but it really varies widely the tax policy center it's a think tank they estimate the average tax cut will be 1600 dollars next year but that's an average as one accountant told me this week people are not high hi pathetic allows the amount of.

property taxes tax rates accountant property tax molly tax policy twenty four thousand dollars 1600 dollars
"twenty four thousand dollars" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"twenty four thousand dollars" Discussed on WLOB

"And ad council news radio i'm million wu the gop tax reform bill under pressure for lastminute changes by some republican senators like marco rubio who want an expanded child tax credit is currently structured it's only wrote on her daughters which means people making twenty four thousand dollars working on that can be able to utilize as much of the credit as they need coming from the house and senate conference committee a compromise planned today what we know so far is that the corporate tax rate that's expected to drop from the current thirty five percent twenty percent that would go into effect next year the final they'll would also cap the state and local tax deduction known as salt at ten thousand dollars boxes lawrence the minute he and the kremlin announcing the russian president's agreed with president trump to exchange information and possible initiatives regarding north korea fox news report you decide each fm one hundred point five star gary and thirteen jail with your local wlob update at the bottom of the hour good morning it's friday december 15th forecast increasing clouds high temperatures only the mid20s today here's what's happening a wisconsin woman faces a murder charge in the death of fouryearold kendall chick in was cancelled last week 43yearold sean i gather oh the fiancee of the victim's grandfather was arrested at her home just before six last night chick was taken to mid coast hospital and brunswick where she died shortly after arrival but girl lived with their grandfather stephen blood and the gallo the state medical examiner's office said checked died from a blunt force injury to the abdomen gather was taken to jail in wisconsin at her first court appearance is not been scheduled wyndham police say a young boy was rushed to the hospital after he fell off a roof yesterday morning the nine year old climbed onto the roof around ten i am the collect icicles hanging from the eu's it when he slipped and fell off police estimate the drop to be at least twenty feet the a c l u of maeve wants the state the shutdown along krikah youth development centre soft portland in the wake of a damning independent state commission report on what's going on there the assessment was done by the center for children's law policy while they follow the.

eu krikah wyndham stephen murder north korea corporate tax senate gop maeve marco rubio wisconsin medical examiner gallo mid coast hospital gary president kremlin the house tax credit twenty four thousand dollars ten thousand dollars thirty five percent twenty percent twenty feet nine year
"twenty four thousand dollars" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"twenty four thousand dollars" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"The box you can take a standard deduction and then you don't have to um itemised now under our plan like they outline 'cause i hope right the original plan for donald trump we doubled out of out so you know for how family you're not going to get twenty four thousand dollars your first twenty four thousand dollars tax pre and and we estimate i doing not that now almost nine out of ten families won't have thirty demise did options they'll be able to just check the box it's the first twenty four thousand dollars taxfree and then pay the tax rate on the amount over that you know it strikes me that that a lot of people cheat themselves out of money by by not itemising i mean insureds easier the older reference to phrase 1040 ez form all right on our graduate i have i have civil you does my taxes wherever grateful for because i have no doubt whatsoever that i have never lost money on having somebody idolized for me and i don't have a particularly complicated uh economic uh background got of a few investments was really nothing complicated i i think most people are really uh how about be convenience is worth the to them for that simplification because i think that they're probably hurting themselves may be less so under this tax reform they'll be fewer fewer ways that you can get out from under your tax burden but that fact notwithstanding you still come right back to the fact that i think more people should itemised while you you know what i was looking up the tax code you know i cannot believe kinds of deductions are on the call you can get tax deductions for you know there are investing a with windmills and bull sperm and you know uh uh nascar race tracks and uh you know you buy you buy a catholic college they'll give you a twelve thousand dollars rebate off with.

donald trump twenty four thousand dollars twelve thousand dollars
"twenty four thousand dollars" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

02:16 min | 4 years ago

"twenty four thousand dollars" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"These new jersey republicans have a point all right up in an ad for a long time the federal tax deducted on state or local factors and i think a lot of those members who would acknowledge are there when you're in those high high tech states it's important for middle class families that they have the break but the reason they need that is because albany and trenton uh and the leader of the democrat leadership in those states continue to raise taxes higher and higher level their property tax sometimes they're paying over thirty forty thousand dollars so what we've done is works help fix the problem but in a different way my uh not by continuing the state and local tax deduction but by lowering rates for everybody under a bill the first twenty four thousand dollars you are and will be taxfree because we double the personal exemption uh we allow for property tax deductions ten thousand dollars but we also look we get rid of the alternative minimum tax we completely repeal the death tax my desk at a benefit so many small businesses and incidentally congressman big victory congressman tom macarthur of jersey said he would support the tax cuts in jobs act that's a big deal he had expressed some concern by whittingham owing was a big deal we work with and other members from new jersey and new york four neil annoy minnesota those states that have those really high taxes that rely on salt well we've been able to jewish down through the aggregate data that every income level in their districts will see a hack cut right when you read all the things we're doing lower rates doubling their standard abduction lowering corporate rates and what it means for escorts small businesses the astor's they end up paying less money than they're paying the date even while getting rid of so that the bottom why people care about it in i'm going to be paying more or less in taxes not wouldn't kinda special loop loopholes or you know i'm not a good itemize all of my deductions because uh getting tax too much at the state and local level house out when you look at all of this you wait a minute after factor in all of us in i'm the pay less in taxes that what really matters is this gonna use that money.

property tax alternative minimum tax congressman tom macarthur jersey new york minnesota albany trenton congressman whittingham thirty forty thousand dollars twenty four thousand dollars ten thousand dollars
"twenty four thousand dollars" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

02:09 min | 4 years ago

"twenty four thousand dollars" Discussed on WGTK

"The the state and local tax deduction that seems to be a big sticking point for a number of republicans particularly in the northeast the walker's through this these tax preferences that that allow taxpayers the ability to duck state and local taxes and to avoid being taxed twice on the same outcome to these new jersey republicans have a point all right you know this up in that uh has been in place for a long time the federal tax deduction on state and local taxes and i think a lot of those members to would acknowledge that when you're in those high hightech states it's important for middle class families that they have the break but the reason they need that break is because albany and trenton uh and the leader of the democrat leadership in those states continue to raise taxes to a higher and higher level their property tax sometimes you're fan over thirty forty thousand dollars so what we've done is worked help fix the problem but in a different way my uh not by continuing the state and local tax deduction but by lowering rates for everybody under a bill the first twenty four thousand dollars you are and will be taxfree because we double the personal exemption uh we allow for property tax did auctions capped at ten thousand dollars right but we also look we get rid of the alternative minimum tax we completely repeal the death tax my that's gonna benefit uh uh so many small businesses congressman big victory congressman tom macarthur of jersey said he would support the tax cuts and jobs act that's a big deal he had express some concern by winning was a big deal and we work with our and other members from new jersey new york four neil annoy minnesota those states that have those really high taxes that rely on salt what we've been able to jewish show them through the aggregate data that every income level in their districts will see a hack cut right when you fact read all the things we do at lower rates doubling this standard deduction lowering corporate rates and what it means for escorts small businesses astor's they end up paying less money than they're paying.

property tax alternative minimum tax congressman tom macarthur jersey new york minnesota astor albany trenton congressman thirty forty thousand dollars twenty four thousand dollars ten thousand dollars
"twenty four thousand dollars" Discussed on KELO

KELO

01:43 min | 4 years ago

"twenty four thousand dollars" Discussed on KELO

"For most families and the first twenty four thousand dollars we double the personal exemption so the standard deduction so your first twenty four thousand is not going to be taxed and everybody across the board gets a tax cut plus the corporate side abc and in the house kevin brady just past at out of his committee uh john sent tax rate down from thirty five highest in the industrialized world that's immediate a we wanted to make it a cause want to get that economic impact and bringing jobs back to america and we do that something else we do we completely repeal death tax sean that's something that you know everybody knew i heard that six years away low you're not going to do it right away it phases out so each year it it gets we increase the amount that is exempt from the death tax until it finally completely goes way i like the idea that any time you get you know we always get the uh i always we never get the spending cuts and we always get in all of all give the bulk of these cuts are immediate for families your your lower income tax brackets those are immediate thought the corporate tax cuts or immediate so dear you're going to get a lot of benefit there but also if you look at the phase out part of that is done because look i mean we had targets we had to hit and you don't want to increase the deficit this is going to bring it a lot of new economic activity so you to let's let's see how this works it's going to work really well from the estimates were getting already obscene ports at average families will get over twenty five hundred dollars more in their pockets and you're gonna see wage growth something we haven't seen in a long time sean because the economy was going so slow because of the the battle bottle policies in the crazy regulations of course president trump has finally reversed a lot of that and you're seeing slow increase now and in.

kevin brady john sean trump the house america income tax corporate tax president twenty four thousand dollars twenty five hundred dollars six years
"twenty four thousand dollars" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:27 min | 4 years ago

"twenty four thousand dollars" Discussed on KGO 810

"Put 24 touted at a law you still get text at one hundred thousand dollars so it's a post tech deposit with a it will never ever be tacked again alush congress changes the rule so that twenty four thousand dollar deposit continues to grow uh until whatever you want to use it or not use it and any of the gain in taxable the traditional would you take that twenty four thousand dollars out a retirement it is now taxable but here's the key hurdle although here's what a ten twenty thirty forty years that tradition shuttle deposit is growing tact deferred to do the arithmetic in almost every case the traditional ira 401 k will grow faster stronger than the law because you're deferring debt tax burden and therefore you're getting more net income and a lot of folks after that deposit need net income this week to play this week's bills right and so in most cases not every case you're turning up a high touch bucket when you're working to wonder retiring you're at a lower tax bracket so so it here yalies it it killers did leave you ten million dollars you're going to be an ira tax brackets so if you've got wonderful relatively leaving a lot of money the russ maybe the better solution so that's what it so that's why these ultra ultra rich that were sending their my offshore and hiding in getting a lot of trouble now that we have all these this stuff beginning a leak that's why they would do a roth is because they were gonna have a lot of money and so they don't want they wanted to pay that initial tax get that over with let it grow knowing that if i had the double or triple that money that they have a higher income therefore for them not paying the tax later is a better deal not paying the tax on the increased principal amount exactly right ejected ray threat for most average folks eight and about nine upset of us it is favorable to go the traditional route unless you out some extenuating circumstance where your your income tax at retirement is going to be significantly higher eh for most of.

income tax ira principal ray ten twenty thirty forty years one hundred thousand dollars twenty four thousand dollars twenty four thousand dollar ten million dollars 401 k
"twenty four thousand dollars" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:25 min | 4 years ago

"twenty four thousand dollars" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Fullest potential and empower american families to start dreaming again and to see how tax the tax reform to 505 eight nine i can get a next is the majority leader of the house kevin mccarthy republican california well this is important day i hope you understand the significance of it for every member this could really become the most significant bill they ever make a decision in their term in congress more than three decades for the last time we had tax reform the size american public has been asking for it i think it's a little ironic that today is the seventh anniversary of republicans being elected to the majority of the house and then moving to the senate and now we have a president who has pushed to make sure hardworking americans get to keep more of what they are three major points i wanna make ross twenty years old i started my first small business small business creates more jobs than any other thing in america in this bill they'll get lower taxes the go to 25 percent the lowest it's been in forty years more small businesses more jobs second every single american is gonna keep more of what they are the single american when you talk about a standard deduction instead of the first six thousand dollars you are in taxfree it's twelve these families in couples the first twenty four thousand dollars you are taxfree you get a keep it you get to determine what's best to invest we're going to bring the money that sitting overseas back to invest in american business even before this bill goes into effect i believe you're gonna hear from businesses saying they wanna come back to america the cornerstone of what ways and means what president trump has worked so hard about at the end of the day is that middleclass family able to get more as you heard from every other speaker up here almost twelve hundred dollars in your pocket that's the difference this is about tax cuts this is about america first and this is about the.

majority leader california the house senate president america trump kevin mccarthy congress ross twenty four thousand dollars twelve hundred dollars six thousand dollars three decades twenty years forty years 25 percent
"twenty four thousand dollars" Discussed on WJNT 1180 AM

WJNT 1180 AM

01:54 min | 4 years ago

"twenty four thousand dollars" Discussed on WJNT 1180 AM

"Uh no question uh you're you're gonna get a significant middleclass tax cut uh bid is not going to shift the burden from higher income households to lower middle income household so uh for instance one of the things that were really excited about that are going to double the standard deduction now what that means is or a married family uh the first twenty four thousand dollars that you make is going to be completely taxfree uh for a single individual the first wealth of knowledge to make going to be completely taxfree a we're going to significantly increase in expand at the child tax credit but that's another big deal uh we're gonna eliminate a lot of these special interest loophole the divulje benefited the wealthy um and and really focus on middleclass folks and so yeah that's going to be a huge huge middle income lower income tax cut out for folks all across the country yes and we're also be fewer tax brackets i think what we have seven brackets no don't way yeah seven brackets right now we're going to get that down to three uh con validate those twelve percent 25 percent at thirty five percent of so that combined with that doubling of the standard deduction is this just gonna be really exciting her family cliff i imagine some democrats in some economists are sceptical about this plan have you notice that well you know historically tax reform has been one of those issues that it's been a bipartisan issue going back to the 80s i mean they pass these things with massive by part bark bipartisan majority today the president's traveling to indiana senator joe donnelly democrat is going to be on the plane with him going out there uh the same thing happened we went north dakota had a democratic senator why would this out there we're getting some signals that even some democrats i may be supportive of this could ultimately but he republican or democrat hopefully even in this environment something we all could come together on is putting more money in the pockets art working american and so i i am optimistic they will get by part.

tax credit president north dakota senator income tax indiana senator joe donnelly twenty four thousand dollars thirty five percent twelve percent 25 percent
"twenty four thousand dollars" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

01:48 min | 4 years ago

"twenty four thousand dollars" Discussed on WLAC

"Point where they could have taken an initial twenty four thousand dollars at retirement a chance as still not back paradigm attacks and we see that all the time and as people who liked to plan is people who like to to look at both the investment side of the tax says that just that hurts hino yuli cadet aeges face she sick keep a missed opportunity know if this is a five or a sixyear thing if it's been ten years since they retired i mean you're talking about hundreds and hundreds of thousands of dollars that they could have converted to ross or take announced pin and not paid any tax and you know you're saying how rank and recapture that and she go back in time in the same conversation happens every time to is well why would i want to do that well because you wanna get it out of that tax will back to a nontaxable bucket for your benefit down the road but also yet hassle on how your kids unit after that as the of it to the kids dash free oh you mean the q touch paychecks that's right and and that's conversation and again this week as the most frequent conversations ahead with people who is they do faction have to pay tax with nine here's your money spouse despair oscar road over taxfree but other than that the tax man has their hand down so when we come back we'll continue talker we will but these type of things in some other preconceived notions people come in with and how we can try to combat those things of hp people so they could face building for their retirement in their legacy for use radio fifteen june was tissue facts blustery food back in a moment the now israel help wanted dot com salutes the employee of the month but one employee you can't live without the others let's just call them dave why have you been shredding for hours the.

hino ross hp israel dave twenty four thousand dollars ten years sixyear