38 Burst results for "Twenty Five Years"

Seeking Refuge On The Open Road

The Indicator from Planet Money

07:57 min | 4 d ago

Seeking Refuge On The Open Road

"When we reached bob wells. He was camped out of the grid in his white. Gmc savannah van in the middle of the california desert. Some twenty five years into his experiment in mobile living. How did this whole journey start for you. What was your life like before you discovered this this lifestyle while i was either very very lucky or very unlucky depending on your point of view it was the winter of one thousand nine hundred five. Bob was living in anchorage alaska where he'd worked for over two decades in a union job at safeway saint job. His father had worked until his retirement. At the time bob was going through a divorce and after alimony and child support payments. He says he was no longer making enough to clear his rent. He was desperate and that is when he noticed old beat up box banned for sale on the side of the road for fifteen hundred dollars and he decided he had to go for it. That was all the money. I had left in the bank. But i had to have a place to live and so i bought it and That night through a backpacker. Sleeping bag. Down and i began my van dwelling adventure in the winter and the cold van and i That first night. I cried myself to sleep. I literally cried myself to sleep. Or when you're going through a divorce you you cry yourself to sleep on a pretty regular basis ends but sure just of course greatly compounded here. I was homeless bomb living in a van on the streets. And how much lower can my life get. But bob done a lot of camping in his life and you had to make a small space cozy and after a few weeks eat figured out how to cook and stay warm deal to bed and cabinets used his gym membership to shower. Figured out how to make it sustainable. And the money. He was saving on rent. Meant he didn't feel like he was always on the knife's edge it slowly and subtly shifted from. I despise my life to. This isn't really that bad to hey. Every month i keep the money and put it in my pocket to. I kind of really really liked this. And that's the way it's been every sense. Was it difficult at all to kind of switch. Grand narratives about What trajectory you're supposed to take as a productive member of the economy absolutely it was a traumatic transition you know. We are trained from birth to death. Our purpose in life is to be good productive citizens and so it made me question everything i had done. Exactly what society and told me to do. I'd gotten a job. I wanna house. We'd had kids. I was following the american dream to the best of my skill level and ability. As i could and then i was forced into living what society told me was the life of total failure homeless in the van and for the first time in my life i was happy well that raises a lot of existential questions and when i looked around at all the people i work with work eat sleep. Working sleep work. Eat sleep. I said what society told me it was not true. I've finally found a way. That's happy for me. Let me try to understand that. My life and for the life of others a few years later bob had saved up enough to quit his job at safeway and by supplementing his union pension with seasonal stints as a campground host. He was eventually able to take to the road as a full-time nomad in two thousand five about a decade. After he moved into the van. Bob decided to pay forward. Some of the techniques developed the started a website called cheap. Rv living the serve as a kind of resource for other people interested or in many cases forced to move into a vehicle. I started the sole intent of letting people know there wasn't on alternative. You didn't have to live under the tyranny of the marketplace and the way to do that was to eliminate your biggest cost in life. Which is your housing with cheaply. Live frugally and then you can live well for a long time the site just kinda mosey too long picking up you know few page views here and there in two thousand eight happened. Bob says in the wake of the financial crisis. He was inundated with desperate messages. Have lost my job. I we moved in with my family now. My family is lost their job. Now we're all losing our own. What are we going to do. And that was the question. I got over and over and over again. Even after the economic recovery started to pick up the number of inquiries and page views and people in the community continued to grow. Fueled partly by the rise of social media. Bob started his cheap. Rv living youtube channel in two thousand sixteen and has since become just one of many popular nomad influencers but unlike a lot of the glossier more glamorous content associated with the hashtag van live crowd. Bob's videos are all about helping people struggling to keep their head above water financially and they're filled with the nitty gritty details of living behind the wheel. Today we're gonna talk about heat today. We're gonna talk about taking showers. The topic of today is poop. You can cut your behinds. Not one of them. You want that thing to be clean all the time. Bob also does these little interview profiles of people living in different kinds of vehicles cars to trucks to buses. Welcome back fellow nomads. Today we're going. Meet a new friend of mine. Joe sale load everyone relax. They're really out. There doesn't look like there's a bunch of people out there. Yeah thank you that video for the record. Two point five million views and counting. Bob says his videos have become so popular that he's now making more money than ever before. I think eventually the second break but it gets great reviews on amazon which is why i'm recommending ads in affiliate marketing. Help him bring in over one hundred fifty thousand dollars a year. Bob makes enough to have two full time assistants helping him with his work and because he says he never plans to live in a house again. He makes a very healthy profit. I'm make much more money than i ever thought. I could possibly make in my life. And i live in a van. My expenses are pretty darn low with that extra money. Bob started a nonprofit homes on wheels alliance to support people transitioning into living in their vehicles. They've started to outfit and give vance to people in dire need of a new vehicle. And bob says he saving up to buy a plot of land for an in person resource center. It isn't clear how many people are living on the road at this point. But in two thousand ten when bob started this annual gathering van and car dwellers in the arizona desert called rubber tramp rendezvous it had a few dozen attendees by two thousand and nineteen. They had an estimated ten thousand people show up and as a central node in this growing community. Bob has had a kind of front row seat to the massive disruptions of the past decade. And he's watched as certain demographics have borne the brunt of those changes. It's a surprisingly large female. Contingent older women in their sixties and seventies. When they were girls they were told get married. Stay home raise a family and so they never go up so sturdy and then now they're living on five hundred to eight hundred dollars a month so skirt and he cannot live in this country on five hundred two thousand a month so sturdy and live in house and you just can't do it and so they all desperately needed the solution as well and i told them all. If you move into your plan you can live reasonably well on that. You won't be rich but you won't eating dog food and there's hope bob says he has seen an uptick in views and inquiries about van dwelling over the last year. But so far he says the stimulus checks and the nationwide moratorium on evictions have slowed. The number of new nomads. Still he says as the baby boomers continue to age into social security and as the effects of climate change intensify bob expects the movement towards van life to surge and he sees it is his mission to try to help however he can. I've got a string of lifeboats. And i want to get as many as i can into the lifeboat and i think the hammer blow of two thousand eight really put a crack in people's confidence and i think when you combine that with this cheers a natural disasters and the epidemic. I think people are just going to be abandoning the american dream in droves. That's all i'm trying to do is get people out

BOB Bob Wells California Desert Safeway Anchorage Alaska Youtube Arizona Desert Vance JOE Amazon
Fresh update on "twenty five years" discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:52 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "twenty five years" discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Once your irs problems. Do you owe back taxes. Is there a lien placed on your property. Have your bank accounts been frozen or seized. Have your wages being garnished. Are you being offered by the. Are they sending you letters that demand actions and have urgent due dates. Well solving your tax problems is as easy as calling taxes three to one. The irs is the largest collection agency in the world. You need the best representation to give you peace of mind. You need experienced professionals that can cut through the red tape and stop the collection process. If you have a serious problem with the. Irs call the taxes three to one network. Today we'll get them off your back. Eight hundred five ten zero three three eight eight hundred five ten zero three three eight eight hundred five ten zero three three eight eight hundred five ten zero three three eight dish. tv is better than cable. Tv here's why dish has the nation's lowest tv price along with an award-winning dvr. That can skip commercials record eight shows at once and get access to thousands of movies. Your fingertips cable simply can't even compare so the smart choice is to cut the cable and get dish. Plus you get. All these great tv features free hd dvr upgrade free installation and free movie channels. Say goodbye to cable and get more with dish. Tv paulie five five two one two six five three six eight five five two one two six five three six as an added bonus you can switch to dish now and receive a fifty dollars visa gift card so call now and get dish tv. Eight five five two one two six five three six eight five five two one two six five three six. That's eight five five two one to sixty five thirty six limited time offer twenty four month commitment and credit qualification required cancellation fee monthly equipment fees and other restrictions. Apply promotion can change at anytime. Now you can make your home. Look great and save money right now. When you call renewal by anderson you can buy four windows and get the fifth one free. Plus you get twelve months with no interest. No money down. No payments upgrade your home by four windows and get the fifth one free installation and warranty or even included and the renewal by anderson certified retailers. Take every safety precaution to protect you and your family pay for twenty five years. People have trusted renewal by anderson for their window. Replacement needs and you can too so call right now. Don't wait learn how to get your free window when you buy four eight hundred two nine six one four four zero eight hundred two nine six one four four zero again. That's eight hundred two nine. Six fourteen forty interested fruits for purchase but his fate and fall within twelve months other conditions apply. We've adjusted our operations to serve you. Save me following. All cdc guidelines visit.

Twelve Months Twenty Five Years Today Eight Hundred Fifty Dollars Fifth One Thousands Of Movies Eight Eight Shows Six Fourteen Forty Anderson Five Four Windows CDC Four Twenty Four Month Sixty Paulie Fifth One Free
Wife of drug kingpin 'El Chapo' arrested on US drug charges

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 5 d ago

Wife of drug kingpin 'El Chapo' arrested on US drug charges

"Hi Mike Rossi reporting U. S. authorities arrest the wife of imprisoned Mexican drug lord el Chapo goos mon Emma Coronel a spoon the wife of Mexican drug kingpin Joaquin el Chapo goos mon was arrested Monday and accused of helping goos mon run his multi billion dollar drug cartel and aiding in his escape from a Mexican prison in twenty fifteen the thirty one year old Coronel was arrested at Dulles International Airport in Virginia she's a dual citizen of the United States and Mexico goos mon who headed the center lower drug cartel for twenty five years serving a life sentence after being extradited to the United States in twenty seventeen micron CEO Washington

Mike Rossi Lord El Chapo Goos Mon Emma Co Kingpin Joaquin El Chapo Goos Coronel Dulles International Airport Virginia United States Mexico Washington
Fresh update on "twenty five years" discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

The GaryVee Audio Experience

00:39 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "twenty five years" discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

"Tidy cleaning the much much much. Clean the toilets. The menu filling out is as the oracle. A i get stronger and stronger. We're not going to have to do that. Crowd you could just talk to it and a sales you can say. Tell me who am i. Top performing refs are. What's the probability that we're gonna hit our numbers the joint up on that note because they're doing it from a b. b. front you referenced. Alexa which is more b. two c. Obviously all the big tech companies are working on this. I'm just. I really value european your gut and this is hard. This is a hard question your gut to win us. Humans are interacting with an ai. Voice consumer facing tool like you're referring to were really doing damage right. You'll not hanging out. We're like let's order some sushi and instead of going to a phone and go into an app which seems revolutionary by twenty five years ago. I'm gonna be like blank. Pick company want to what name they call it semi the best sushi currently in the city and pick the things i want or things. I like or things like this note. Nonni i'm guy so extra clooney how far away from that nirvana. That is obvious. What's your gut. Tell you on. When that's a real scenario five years really that quickly think closer. Possibly it depends on our listeners. And how are how much early adopters they wanna be. I really so i. I'm sorting through like you. I'm just gonna keep asking because you're gonna know better than i am. I'll just use alexa. Hey alexa we're hey. Oracle hey oracle get the best seat to the highest ranking play in new york city now so i went and met with our development teams yesterday and they showed me. Hey alexa find me a coffee shop. That is not starbucks and alexis said here all the starbucks. Hey oracle finally the coffee shops that are not starbucks will. Here's the tallis. And here's the coffee people ball and here's your local store. Load away to see that. So it's already like we have the capability right now. Do do oracle have the consumer capability to make a consumer product and market it and get. It is the question in that game..

Starbucks Yesterday Oracle Twenty Five Years Ago Alexa Alexis New York City Five Years Tallis European Nonni
Alabama: The Newest Amazon Union Battleground

The Indicator from Planet Money

07:03 min | 6 d ago

Alabama: The Newest Amazon Union Battleground

"Okay lena to understand. What is happening at this alabama warehouse. I'm guessing we should start by looking at some history. Yes and i spoke to just the person for that. Monday is gym specially and i'm a voca auditor for mercedes benz. Us international. We do audits on vehicles. After they're built jim as a very unique perspective on the union voted amazon because his mercedes plant. That was the epicenter of the last time. A super high profile labor battle played out in the state of alabama. And it makes sense that we'd be talking about auto plants because of course. A lot of foreign automakers have been opening factories in the south for decades. Now alex since the nineties yes they brought a lot of new jobs and jim you know he loves his job but he has a pretty glum view of why these foreign car companies came to the south in the first place the coming here because of the fact that there is not a fear of unions. You know they're saying we're just not educated. You know country bumpkins and whatnot. They don't know nothing about unions and don't care a lot of this stems from to work laws and all this other states which say that each worker can choose not to pay union dues still. The auto industry is historically pretty unionized. So the big auto union. The united auto workers decided to go after these new southern factories prompting intense anti union campaigns all labor experts. I talked to about unionization in alabama. Brought up this period of time. Like michael innes jimenez from the university of alabama the board that i'll never forget. Do you want tuscaloosa to be the next detroit. Let's throw race in there too. Obviously but seeing this post industrial city in a lot of pain and blaming the unions and then something incredible happened. workers at volkswagen in. Tennessee voted against the union and vw was the one company that actually wanted a union. It was the governor and republican lawmakers who fought against it from the air things just unraveled nissan workers in mississippi also rejected. The union at jim spits lease mercedes. Plant in alabama. Uaw didn't even petition for a vote. What it all comes down to is getting that vote and we haven't got that in twenty five years on three attempts so this sets the stage for where we are. Now this is. Why alina been asking you. How alabama became the first state to potentially have a unionized amazon warehouse. Right that's why so many people find it surprising. But i actually think that could be one of the three main reasons why this warehouse got to a union votes. So quickly we know amazon has stamped out union attempts and other places perhaps. The company also wasn't expecting such aggressive organizing in alabama compared to more traditionally Activist places. That's factor number. One are the other two to others are about the time and the place. Then let's start with a time. This is one of the things. I heard from the union. That's helping organize amazon workers in bessemer. The unions called the retail wholesale and department store union. And it's president. Stuart applebaum pointed out that this warehouse is only about a year old so it opened right as the pandemic started. I believe that the pandemic opened a lot of people is they understand now that they need a collective voice to stand up for themselves and to protect themselves. I also think that people had expectations when they came in that were not being realized. Amazon has been raking in profits during the pandemic which workers often bring up and also amazon went on a massive hiring spree and this by the way is often when workers ended up gaining some more power which is when they know that the employer needs more workers. The retail union folks say the best. My warehouse workers reached out to them quietly in the summer. They were describing grueling productivity quotas. They wanted to have more say in how they work. How they get disciplined. How they get fired. The union then mobilized support system of other folks from the region who are already unionized particularly workers from poultry plants. Okay and that brings us to your third factor alina. Which is the place right exactly. Professor michael innes jimenez pointed out something notable about alabama on that few people might realize if you follow the border and the coastline between california and maryland. alabama has the highest unionization rate for every state between california maryland. and then throw in tennessee. Also it's a pretty low rate. Only about eight percent of alabama workers are union members which is lower than the national average. But it is higher than all other southern states. And then you've got the specific location of the amazon warehouse which has bessemer. It's a working class. Suburb of birmingham. It's got early roots. In steel and mining and unionized labor. And another thing about bessemer is that it's a community that's predominantly black and the amazon unionization campaign is evoking social justice themes focusing a lot on respect in the workplace and of course this is all happening on the heels of the black lives matter protests. Yes exactly but the union also presented as part of its history. Its members marched with martin luther king junior in the sixties the union president talks about how in the south labor and civil rights battles have always been intertwined and so alina people think that all of these things at the time the place the context will end up making a difference and give alabama. The nation's first unionized amazon warehouse. the union. certainly hope so folks there told me more than half of the workers at the bessemer warehouse signed petitions for union shop. So they think this could be it of course amazon for its part has led a big anti-union campaign. They've got required meetings where workers were told. How union dues our waste of money. How great these jobs are already with all the benefits and the starting wage of fifteen dollars an hour and for context. The minimum wage in alabama is also the federal minimum wage which is seven dollars. Twenty five cents an hour which makes amazon starting wage of fifteen dollars an hour. More than double the alabama minimum. That is actually a big point four. Jim spits lee over the mercedes benz plant as he's watching this big amazon union. Vote play out it'll send a nami ripple but it's going to send one. It's going to let people know that. Hey even people fifteen dollars an hour. Seventeen dollars an hour can have union in their workplace. Bessemer warehouse workers will be voting by mail through the end of march. If this votes exceeds at an anti union place like amazon in alabama. This could turn a whole new page for both the

Alabama Amazon United Auto Workers Michael Innes Jimenez Jim Spits Lease Alina Volkswagen JIM Stuart Applebaum Lena University Of Alabama Tuscaloosa Professor Michael Innes Jimene Alex Bessemer Nissan Detroit Tennessee Mississippi
Fresh update on "twenty five years" discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

The GaryVee Audio Experience

01:06 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "twenty five years" discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

"Our talent to help us tell that frame store the brand story along the way they help deliberate and they're not just for that so i think you'll start to see brands doing more of that and obviously it's a second third fourth screen like you know. We had a our war room. We had twenty five people safely placed in a large room at another hundred behind the scenes. Activating not only or two spots but pre during post. I mean just the amount of war gaming that needs to take place to pull off a super bowl campaign. it just continuously evolves. We weren't thinking about tiktok as a platform last year. Now we are. How do we like. How do you realize those. Tiktok's emerging technologies in media platforms to help extend amplify the largest investment. Any branston. Do you know on a you know a one night. A standpoint case with the final seconds the favourite innovation that struck you as a human in the last year new platform new app knew anything thirty seconds on your favorite innovation. Well good good question thirty seconds for me biggest innovation last years. I will tell you this innovation for me to navigation. That i've never worked from home in twenty five years and now i have found myself like i'm paperless so i used to. I look like a horror of paper now. Paperless so for me. It's like it's sometimes when there's a crisis at create a develops an opportunity for us. It was like i found. The crisis found the opportunity for me. It's like i've been invaded myself and from work standpoint leadership so thanks for being number. See you buddy. Next we welcome. Lisa joy rosner. Svp brand digital marketing who claimed an entirely new role at oracle focused on content. Lisa joy is a silicon vet having worked in data and analytics her entire career. She lives by her mantra. Tell me it can't be done. And i'll do it worthing. Children in four years while launching to startups. Welcome lisa joy. Thank you so much. I'm so excited to be here. Lisa joyner like a superhero to companies for children for years. Like i think i go at it. That's incredible it's great to have you here. thank you you know. It's funny listening to that. I was thinking about. Yeah we had four kids diapers and i was the middle of launching this this big social media company and we also had eight puppies at that time and here we are in the middle of the apocalypse and now not kids in diapers but it four kids going through puberty and we got nine chickens. So it's it's really go matt it and instead of doing a startup doing this just monumental shift in a company like oracle. Let's go to that. You know knowing a little bit about your background coming into something so big.

Lisa Joyner Lisa Joy Thirty Seconds Lisa Joy Rosner Last Year Nine Chickens Tiktok Twenty Five People Twenty Five Years Four Years Second Eight Puppies Four Kids Last Years Two Spots Hundred One Night Oracle
Naomi Osaka beats Jennifer Brady to claim her 4th Grand Slam title

World News Tonight with David Muir

00:15 sec | Last week

Naomi Osaka beats Jennifer Brady to claim her 4th Grand Slam title

"And tennis star naomi osaka winning her fourth grand slam title. She defeated twenty five year. Old american jennifer brady in two straight sats. The australian open osaka is on a twenty one match winning streak including her championship. At last year's us open

Naomi Osaka Jennifer Brady Tennis Osaka
Australian Open 2021: Novak Djokovic and Daniil Medvedev Meet for the Title

The AO Show

03:09 min | Last week

Australian Open 2021: Novak Djokovic and Daniil Medvedev Meet for the Title

"The crusade for the men's singles crown comes to an end tomorrow. And when the undisputed king of rod laver arena novak djokovic takes on russian number-one neil medvedev the world number one djokovic. Gunning for a history-making ninth championship in melbourne. While the russian authors seeking his twenty first consecutive win and first major title to preview the match. I'm joined by not edwards and commentator. Nick mcardle nick at the start of in fact two weeks before this we had you on the show podcast and you picked this matchup is that what led you to make that cole way back. Then let's say lucked out. Let's be honest that wasn't necessarily total. Total fluke made many wrong picks before but coming in you know we talk about the twenty one matches in a row for osaka. It's twenty in a row for daniil. Medvedev the non includes a win over novak djokovic close twenty twenty i think medvedev has really come into his own as someone expects himself not only to go deep. Atp events which we've seen the last couple of years but now to really do at at the grand slam so the drop laid out for him. I think he's played to each match to the level now. Can he bring an eight time. Grand slam australian open champ. Seventeen time major winner novak djokovic. Can he meet that level in a final thoughts really eighty s. What i love most is after medvedev bates itsy pass in that semi final is that he said stride away. All the pressure is on novak. He just load him up because he's plight fonsi before and never lost and it sorta. But i love how he just playfully. Put that out there and look. I think he'll come at. He'll show you'll be a little bit nervous. But i think he's just going to swing freely and that backhands i mean. Gosh they both have terrific backhands. But it's going to be like jock itch playing a twenty five year old vision of himself. It's going to be such an interesting match. I really count. Wait for the all similar. It can not just in court croff necessarily but as personalities both very eloquent and sort of personable somewhat chiming in front of the camera but they do have this white line fever as we know totally. I love those points that you've made and i think medvedeva's become more comfortable without. We sought the us open a couple years ago in the crowd. Really got against him and he used that as fuel which i think djokovic has have that in the past that in the past for sure for sure for jovic against rafa roger. He's felt that too. I really think that it is an opportunity for medvedev lake. Nona saying just swing for the fences and the scary thing is when he swings for the fences. Oftentimes the ball goes in. And i really think he's going to use that experience of beating novak in london last year at the atp finals. He'll really be geared up by that. Yeah i think so too. And i'm really looking forward to. I think the one area that novak can probably try to exploit daniels is that netplay. He's not very good. Let's let's be honest when it comes to netplay so if he can drawer him in a little bit and maybe draw that out. I think that puts pressure on daniel. Bit amid gets off to a flying start is going to be hard to stop.

Novak Djokovic Neil Medvedev Nick Mcardle Nick Daniil Djokovic Rod Laver Medvedev Bates Medvedev Novak Osaka Edwards Melbourne Cole Medvedeva Jock Itch Jovic Rafa Roger Medvedev Lake Fever
Tim Burton to Direct Live-Action Wednesday Addams Series for Netflix

/Film Daily

00:47 sec | Last week

Tim Burton to Direct Live-Action Wednesday Addams Series for Netflix

"Move onto our next item. Which is tim burton's next next project. Crisp what we know about that Tim burton is directing a netflix series. That is a spin off of the addams family And it's about wednesday addams and it's live action and it really doesn't sound anything like previous addams family projects before. Here's here's the rundown. The upcoming eight episodes series is a sleuthing super supernatural infused mystery charting wednesdays years as a student at the peculiar never more academy wednesdays attempts to master her emerging psychic ability thwart a monstrous killing spree. That has terrorized local town and solve the mystery that embroiled her parents. Twenty five years ago all

Tim Burton Addams Netflix
Challenges and opportunities of blockchain in the insurance industry

Insureblocks

05:08 min | 2 weeks ago

Challenges and opportunities of blockchain in the insurance industry

"For this podcast. We will be discussing challenges of blockchain in the insurance industry with special insights from ibm. And i'm very pleased to have mark mclauglin. Ibm's head of insurance strategy solution sales and partnerships worldwide mark. Thank you for joining us today. Could you please give our listeners. A quick introduction on yourself sure thanks lead and thanks for having me on as you said our head of strategy for the insurance vertical for ibm a teams pulled together. Ibm's hardware software services cloud and our business partners to deploy value for the insurance industry. I've been doing that myself For twenty twenty five years now. The first solution i built for the industry was artificial intelligence back in their early nineties for a large insurer here in the us and that solution is still running today which Either tells you something about our industry or something about my coding one or the other. so let's go was your coating absolutely exceptional. Not sure that's really really. No thank you for that introduction so as you know and hearing two blocks and we always ask. Our guest is first question which is what is blockchain. And how does it work the way i. Obviously i think most of your listeners. Are well aware that there is a difference between the blockchain enabled currencies like bitcoin and ripple and the actual blockchain functionality itself. The way i think of it is. It's a shared ledger. The trusted leisure. It's an ability for multiple entities. Who don't necessarily have a one hundred percent trusted relationship. They are business entities with different interests. Different goals but you can establish a common ground wear a set of documents they said of processes a set of data is maintained by a group across a business network and that is maintained in a way that is immutable Where everybody can see the changes that are going on and everybody has a record of what's going on you know whether it be you know data around contract or execution of a business process and being able to do that in a way that is trusted by all participants That can bake in features like smart contracts to help you automate some of those processes right. There's a lot of different things you can do. With the blockchain right currencies one of them but running a lot of shared business processes and other one of them and. i suspect. We'll be talking about that today right now. Thank you thank you for that. So as you are aware we've had a number of your colleagues on the inch. Blocks podcast from bos- expert within the blockchain in the insurance space. Now i'm curious to know from your personal standpoint. how would you characterize. The insurance industry's embrace of blockchain technology. Well i think high interest right. Insurers for a number of reasons are feeling the heat on innovation. Right whether you look at the you know. The forty six percent kager on tech investment. The last three years or the entry of of large-scale players like like paying on like amazon into more kind of online distributed type insurance ventures. Right whether you look at insurance being baked into other industries right when you go by airlines at the united states your offer travel insurance now as part of that process right. It's it's very different than the kiosks in the airport of old right. I think the industry knows that they have to figure out ways to connect to broader ecosystems. Knows they have to innovate and blockchain's one way to do that. There's there's definitely some great opportunities there's definitely some pitfalls but ensures you know high level of interest having a little trouble getting started in some cases and i think we'll dig into that as we go. Yeah exactly because you know we know we started our podcast mainly focus on the insurance industry in two thousand eighteen inch thousand nineteen. We spread out to cover other industries. Which is very fascinating to see the challenges and opportunities each industry have with regards to adopting mom blockchain but this is sticking for insurance for now. You know as you mentioned you had twenty to twenty five years experience in building solutions and partnerships ensures. Would you say that insurers are more or less open to embracing blockchain comparison to other previous or existing modern technologies such as cloud in ai to name a few. As you mentioned. You know you did this project in quite some time ago. How does blockchain compared to these kinds of technology. I think blockchain has great potential and as technology. I think insurers are are more than willing to embrace it. I think the challenges are the business model. Right i can take a And it and it's very easy to visualize. Hey here's here's a case. Where i could see how i might help me process a claim better. You know underwrite risk better advise in indentured. Better now actually getting it to do that is a little bit more challenging but visualize it. it's eas- right blockchain. It's a little tougher for the challenge. Isn't the tech. I think it's the use case behind the technology

IBM Mark Mclauglin Blockchain United States Amazon
Medvedev in 5, finally, advances to 4th round in Australia

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 2 weeks ago

Medvedev in 5, finally, advances to 4th round in Australia

"Rafael Nadal has continued his March towards a possible recall twenty first major title the Spaniard now into the Australian Open last sixteen up to stopping the left hander Brett Camry great news also hopefully rank twenty five year old American mackenzie McDonald is amazing run has continued and he too is for the men's final sixteen with your next face the full suite of Russian dental negative success old son for American women's hopes with Jessica pake let Jennifer Brady and Shelby Rogers all into the fourth round Russia's role what it is a showdown with the top seed actually but he I'm going to make us

Brett Camry Mackenzie Mcdonald Rafael Nadal Jessica Pake Jennifer Brady Shelby Rogers Russia
The Top 15 Little-Known Secrets On How To Improve Your Focus

The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

04:31 min | 2 weeks ago

The Top 15 Little-Known Secrets On How To Improve Your Focus

"If you don't know who i am. I am a author journalist and founder and executive director of the flow research collective. We study peak human performance where research a training organization on the research side. We work with scientists at ucla at stanford companies like deloitte energetics. Like that on the training side we work with everyday from the us special forces through executives in fortune. Five hundred companies essentially google etc microsoft. All the way up to the general public and focus on is kikkoman performance. What does it take to be your best when it matters. Most what does it take to level up your game like never before and most of my career has been spent studying peak performers. What i thought i was going to do today. Vision asked me to speak a little about my work on flow. Which will get to some of. You might be familiar with and a little bit about focus. And what i thought i would do is talk about fifteen things that peak performers know about focus and attention or routinely do surrounding focus attention and flow that most of us miss and this is something that is fairly common that i've noticed over peak performance. Meaning if you want to train people up in flow for example take repeat performers and regular people. Everybody can learn the flow stuff that works fine but afterwards peak performance can sustain it and most everybody else drop back towards baseline over time and a lot of that is peak performers to a lot of stuff through unconsciously along the way a lot of focus that the rest of us missed. So i thought i would talk about these things. We're going to start out with more general ideas about peak performance and get very very focused on focus as we move along so i wanna start with a really obvious statement but you see it very very consistently in all people formats which is a realization. That life is never going to be anything more or less than what you choose to make it. I like to talk about this. And i like to say there are only a couple things. We know absolutely for sure that we absolutely certain about the first is that we get one shot at this life. We know that for sure. Maybe we'll get more. Maybe we don't. We know for sure that we got one shot at this life. We also know we're going to spend about a third of it asleep. Which tells us that the only real question is what we do with the remaining two-thirds right. That's the only question that matters. And what p performers had figured out is that there's no magic pill nothing spectacular is ever gonna happen from them. I was just talking to andrew. Ubuntu neuroscientist at stanford and we do a lot of work with and heap says ever people former learn the same lesson. It is always crawl walk. Run there's no shortcuts. there's no way to get faster. You were going to crawl. Then you're going to walk then you're going to run over and over and over again. This brings us to the second thing which is building on the first. there are no shortcuts. There are no hacks in fact when we talk about p. performance after twenty five years of studying the neurobiology the science what goes on in the brain and the body when people perform their best can tell you. There are no shortcuts. There is quite simply getting your biology to work for you rather than against you. That is everything we mean by peak performance a different way. We sort of talk about this at the floor. Research collective as we like to say personality doesn't scale biology scales in other words. If you're in a looking through the kind of self improvement space at any level if somebody is trying to teach you what worked for them. They figured something out. This works may let me teach it to you. It's going to work for you. They're light they're absolutely lying. In fact that's a really great way to rue lives. I can guarantee one of the other truce peak performance. We don't like to say out loud is what works for me is almost guaranteed not to work for you. Personality doesn't scale why there are foundational things that have a lot to do with p. performance where you are on the introversion extroversion scale for example. How active are your dopamine receptors. Things like that. They are genetically coded for and laid down environmentally in. A lot of them are locked up before we ever become adults.

Deloitte Energetics Stanford Ucla Microsoft Google United States Andrew
Jay-Z, Foo Fighters and The Go-Go's nominated for Rock Hall

the NewsWorthy

00:32 sec | 2 weeks ago

Jay-Z, Foo Fighters and The Go-Go's nominated for Rock Hall

"Jay z. Tina turner and foo fighters are among this year's nominees for the rock and roll hall of fame. The hall released its list of sixteen candidates this week. Artists are eligible for a nomination. Twenty five years after their first official recording is released for the foo fighters jay z. This was the first time they were eligible some of the other artists and groups who made the cut included mary. J. blige iron maiden rage against the machine go-goes ll cool j. and chaka khan the nominees will be narrowed down over the next several weeks. You can vote on your favorites. Through april thirtieth.

Jay Z Roll Hall Of Fame Tina Turner J. Blige Chaka Khan Mary
Bromances Could Lead to More Romances for Male Hyenas

60-Second Science

02:56 min | 2 weeks ago

Bromances Could Lead to More Romances for Male Hyenas

"Morning in tanzania. The sun rises in goro. Goro crater the spotted. Hyenas are beginning their day. While vivian from germany's leibnitz institute for zoo and wildlife research sits nearby in a truck watching and waiting. Ooh the most exciting part of her day is when a male hyena crouches on his hind legs to poop and so i did collect a lot of fecal samples my money to a lot of behavior. Spend enough time following mass in onsite in tanzania in the field biologists have been monitoring the hyena. Clans of tanzania's. Goro goro crater for twenty five years. They've learned a lot about the species but there are still some outstanding mysteries why is it that high ranking individuals and in particular hiring man's often are more successful than low-ranking mass in terms of reproduction in spotted hyenas in contrast to many other mammals mass domed fight to access a high social rank. And they also don't fight to access reading partners and so. It is quite puzzling. Why high-ranking massive they don't fight and they are not necessarily more attractive to females. Why they should be more successful than males of lower social rank in also dvd and had nearly four hundred fecal samples collected from one hundred and twenty male hyenas. She analyzed the hormones inside of them and discovered that interactions among male hyenas were more stressful for lower ranking males and as a result they spent more time alone. The results were published in the journal. Functional ecology and do consequence of that is that low-ranking mass they spend less time. Quoting famous are therefore less successful. In terms of the number of spring the produced compared to high ranking mass. Who spend most of the time courting females all that time spent alone recovering from stress. Means that the lower raking hyenas aren't spending their time courting females and the females that they do manage to spend time with our themselves also lower rank the researchers think it has to do with the fact that lower ranking males tend to be newcomers within hyena clans. It takes time to develop their support networks among other males. They do have to spend a lot of time building up and maintaining these relationships before they can even think about courting females so for male spotted hyenas. It might be that the best path towards romance is to begin with the bromance

Tanzania Leibnitz Institute For Zoo And Goro Goro Goro Vivian Germany The Journal
South Africa halts AstraZeneca vaccine rollout

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:57 min | 2 weeks ago

South Africa halts AstraZeneca vaccine rollout

"South africa has halted its rollout of the oxford astrazeneca vaccine just a week after the country received. Its first million doses. It seems the vaccine offers limited protection against a new variant of the corona virus. That's now dominant in the country. Salim abdul karim co-chair of south africa's ministerial advisory committee on covid nineteen spoke to a world health organization briefing yesterday. We don't want to end up with a situation where we vaccinated million people too. Many people would have vaccine that may not be effective in preventing hospitalization and severe disease in total more than one point. Two billion corona virus doses have been allocated for the continent. But it's not clear when all those jobs will arrive. The longer any region remains unvaccinated. The greater the chance that more variants arise vaccines though can be tweaked in a formulation of the oxford vaccine targeted at the south african variant could be going into arms by autumn. What scientists cannot address is the long run damage to africa both in human and economic terms so far continent to have been spared from the worst case scenarios predicted early on in the pandemic but the longer term picture remains bleak many ways the impact of the pandemic and africa is worse than it appears on the surface around the official numbers. Kenley salmon is one of our africa correspondent based in dakar. It is the case that having a young population has to some extent protected the continent from the virus africans and died from it that americans europeans but the true scott of infection. Death is really hard to gauge. Studying sudan recently showed the perhaps only two percent of all the covid desk for a quoted in the official tally and the economic impact is worse than it looks last year. The region's economy shrank for the first time. In twenty five years tourism has been badly hit as have commodity exporters things like oil in nigeria and taken together. Gdp per capita fell below twenty ten levels last year so things are perhaps not quite as bad as some other parts the world but certainly still very tough and things may get tougher house. What are the particular challenges to africa. Africa faces quite a number of challenges in the next few years as it tries to recover from the pandemic but the biggest i of the really is vaccines. Some african governments have perhaps failed to grasp the urgency of the situation in tanzania for example the populace president john food even casually cast out with a vaccine work but i do forgive aside claiming the postman precautions such as steaming nation were better than vaccines and even added that if the white man was able to come up with next nations then. Vaccinations for aids. Malaria and cancer would have already been found. So it's not so much a question than of supply. I mean given that quite a few vaccines have been essentially booked at the stage. A number of vaccines have been booked but the big question is when will they arrive because right now there aren't anywhere near the number of axes required forever on in the world and rich countries are of course the front of the queue for those vaccines have been produced africa's going to need perhaps two point six billion doses to vaccinate everyone and those are not being made locally so they have to rely on supplies elsewhere for the moment so that means joining the queue. All this means that whereas rich countries aim to vaccinate most of their people by the middle of this year the african. cdc a public health. Bali in africa's aiming for sixty percent of africans to vaccinated by the end of next year. But even that may be too optimistic. For the poorest countries. The economist intelligence unit sister organization estimates that in most african countries most people will not be inoculated until mid twenty twenty three or even early twenty twenty four and there must be serious consequences of it being that long until the continent is on average vaccinated. Africa is likely. It doesn't get those vaccinations into suffer. Further waves of the infection while after the disease may have amped in the rich world. And that of course will cause more death and more suffering. Doesn't risk that. Having the virus transmitting between people frequently africa could allow new variance to evolve. We've already got the south. African variant and these new variants could endanger people even in rich countries if they prove to be resistant to vaccines and then finally of course not having vaccines could force. African policymakers to continue with these very difficult economic lockdowns curfews even after many other countries around the world set free of those kinds of restrictions and if the public health concern lasts that long then surely the economic concerns will last at least that long. That's right in many african countries facing pretty severe crises at the moment just getting finance to pay their bills. Africa has very limited fiscal space on average countries in sub saharan africa. Spending more than thirty cents on every dollar. They raise and text revenue paying their debts. And that's up from twenty cents on the dollar before the pandemic on the debt side to over half of low income sub saharan african countries are now classed as in distress or at high risk of distress. According to the imf and what about countries with bigger economies the two biggest economies in africa nigeria and south ever both in pretty deep trouble nigeria for example was described by the world. Bank is being an unprecedented crisis. Recently the bank is not normally quite so blunt in nigeria. There has been a legacy of management for a number of years and pandemics really accessible that quite badly. Now focused suggested by twenty twenty three. Gdp per capita may go back as low as it was in one thousand nine hundred eighty time when the oil price was some high on so africa too is in trouble that have been in recession twice in the last three years before the pandemic hit of course now is dribbling itself with a particularly heavy toll from the pandemic so both countries in fact are facing a difficult road out of the crisis. And what about outside help in terms of financing has been quite a bit of outside help although the crisis of course is very big but in twenty twenty the imf for example provided sixteen billion dollars in loans most of that came with relatively few strings attached and this help frigging countries to respond to the pandemic to avoid some of the liquidity crises that were looming the world bank also dispersed another ten billion but many countries got that funding to if the imf under emergency allocations that came quickly and relatively easily and those allocations for many countries will soon be exhausted. The rich world has been trying to help when it comes to debt. They've provided liquidity to countries through some bits of suspension initiative that basically allows poor countries to put off debt repayments until july. Twenty twenty one. This is of course helpful but the trouble is that those payments just suspended and they have to be paid back with interest in about five years time so as the chief economist for africa the world bank put it to us. It may just be kicking the can down the road to. How do you see this playing out. Then how high could the human cost of all this be while the stakes are pretty high. The pandemic has already done lower damage to people's health and africa. it's hitting their economic prospects and they wealth and it's also affecting education of course. Hundreds of millions of students in africa have been affected by school closures. This increases the risk of dropouts and reduces the prospects for africa's largest every generation so overall the costs here really quite significant. There are some reasons for optimism. We may see vaccine rollouts accelerate. There's also hopes that commodity price rises could give africa real boost as the global economy recovers been on balance. The evidence probably points to at pretty difficult road ahead with several more waves of the virus hitting already struggling health systems and perhaps a form of economic long covert in africa. So you know africans have come through this showing remarkable resilience but it may be toughest years are still to come in. Thank you very much for joining us. thank you

Africa Salim Abdul Karim Co Ministerial Advisory Committee Kenley Salmon Nigeria Oxford South Africa John Food Astrazeneca Dakar Saharan Africa IMF Sudan Tanzania Malaria CDC
Tips For Staying Sane

Mentally Yours

05:16 min | 2 weeks ago

Tips For Staying Sane

"Welcome erica stevens mentally yours. Thanks very much for joining us so we has just about your book even together. The guinness guy tucson sannoussi Why did you want to create this. I had. I've always wanted to write a book about my experiences with psychosis but i kind of felt that it would have more to offer offers a book if i listed the help of a co author. He was a professional in mental health. An augment stephen a conference on and it was about schools. New routes tibet to catholic schizophrenia. anti newell basket sphere. Its area of expertise. Less ask him. let's ask him and he was for. And so we started writing this book together But just felt the kind of just mike spirit. Just the expert by experience will lived experience on and maybe wouldn't hold water. I thought that it would be much better. Talbot's that too. What about east stephen so obvious similar oversee from a professional perspective. So as okay said. I have kind of specialized in researching schizophrenia for twenty five years and look after any large number of patients with illness and other and had wanted to write a book that would be accessible to them and to a wider audience. But also one. That wouldn't be too dry rocket dynamic and around about the time. I'm i'm erica. I also told by various agents event. If i wanted to write a book like this. I definitely need to get Lots of people stories in it so lots of people with lived experience contributing Beating erica was a very happy coincidence and from there took us a while to get going but i think we broke during two eighteen and then finished off in nineteen before publishing of this year. And who would you say that. It's forty anyone with schizophrenia. And anyone is interested in like working schizophrenia. Or care and put some moments schizophrenia. Like a friend or a loved one. Yeah i think. I anyone who's got Or any other type of psychotic illness. This a few different types of psychotic illness Bipolar disorder for example People often have psychotic symptoms of that and other conditions. That are less common so anyone kinds of problems. Anyone looking off to them girlfriend. Mother father sister brother hawks would also. Perhaps anyone is our cassette. Just interested in knowing a bit more about psychosis genuine schizophrenia in particular so one of the psychiatry senior trainees kindly read the book. drafts and coming to the drafts to improve the readability. Apparently who has no connection health connection was he apparently likes reading the extent. For at least it's it's worked. It's an interesting one for me. Because i was now hundred solder and i had psychosis so it would have been lucky to have a ham but like the i think when i i have my my first bit of mania because the thing is it happens and then you get back to normal source of reading. I what's happened to. Why as happened what to do next radius. That's almost as bad as well as just happened in a way. That kind of Mystery around it. Will this fair around it. You're right to tell us a bit about your experiences again our. We've always had you on the poco before that was a while ago. now so you're right to tell we re to go right to tell listeners about your experiences psychosis first episode. Was rhinos on about twenty two Fourteen hours say it's been about two decades of living with psychosis Something i can manage quite well with medication and different therapies But it can be quite terrifying when you have a psychotic episode and there's definitely more at the start of the illness later on and i think the police spying on me. I think i've committed really henious cry and all much like a burglary or you know so of a monkey or something really say area slight blowing up canary war types areas And i just really believe. It's true. And i might start to think the The songs i hear on the radio have been written especially for me to kind of condemn more behavior or the tv might be talking to me in subliminal messages and is terrifying united states ironic to me how much fear or inspire notice when they hear a half psychosis when the reality is you know. I'm just terrified myself. Really in a housebound when it's happening.

Schizophrenia Erica Stevens Mike Spirit East Stephen Erica Psychotic Illness Bipolar Diso Psychosis Tucson Talbot Tibet Stephen Okay Hawks United States
How Founder Craig Groeschel Built Up Life.Church

The EntreLeadership Podcast

03:11 min | 2 weeks ago

How Founder Craig Groeschel Built Up Life.Church

"Many organizations like craig's don't always start out with a master plan but the good news is. This is something you can learn along the way we started Twenty five years ago in a little two car garage on a very snowy sunday with about forty people and we kind of expanded from there to some different places built a building a few years later and we were. We were kind of on the front end. experimenting with doing video teaching and go on multiple sides so we were Either the first or one of the first churches in the nation to just kinda start plowing background. And if you fast four twenty five years as of today. Our church meets in thirty six physical locations. Where in eleven different states have a great team of people tons and tons of volunteers that are actively engaged. And then we're super aggressive digitally as well doing a ton of online ministry and normally what you would think of in social media and such to to outreach but also real vibrant online Kind of church service that meets a bunch of times during the week with people all over the world. I could imagine that when you started that. You didn't necessarily see everything that you're doing kind of those let's get going and and then we got to keep up with vision as we go along. Did you become a leader in response to what was going on or have you always had a bit towards leadership you know. That's a great question. So i was. I played sports growing up. So you're an athlete as well when when you're an anytime kind of extracurricular activity you kind of stumble into leadership whether you're following somebody or whether you're doing the leading so i had a started to recognize the times on the field where i might assume a leadership role that When when there was a vacuum and then oddly enough when i started The church in my mind. All i had was a pastor pastor so there was a metaphor for that would have been like the shepherd that takes care of the sheep and looked at jesus scripture. That's what i saw was Person who loved and cared for people. it was an honest until a few years end that i took a different lens and started to realize that A pastor or shepherd could also be a really good spiritual leader and it was really interesting. When i changed my lens and started looking at jesus not just through the eyes of someone who cared for people but he actually led people. It was revolutionary and It kinda brought something. I think that was inside of me. But i didn't know that was there that now you know love talking about as much as anything and it translates good leadership good leadership in church and a for profit and nonprofit in family Anywhere you go. And i think Leadership so important. So that's why you know. I'm a big fan of what you all do. Autrey leadership podcast the The conference we have coming up is just a great investment in in leadership and we. We know that everyone wins when the leader gets better. And i appreciate your investment in me and all the other leaders around the world helping us get better.

Craig Shepherd Autrey
What the pandemic has revealed about the real value of college

Modern Ruhles with Stephanie Ruhle

05:25 min | 3 weeks ago

What the pandemic has revealed about the real value of college

"We've got a moment. We're in crisis. Can we do better. Ron lieber is asking that very question in his new book. The price you pay for college is the author of the new york times personal finance column your money ron for years and years and years. We weren't thinking about the price of college the value of college. Is it worth it. Well i think you have to start by asking yourself what college is right. what is college for. I wasn't sure what the answer to. That question was so i asked you know scores of families and i heard the same things over and over again colleges for getting an education for having your mind grown in your mind blown. It is for kinship. It is for finding the people who will carry you through life. It is for getting a credential whether it's the gold plated one that will open doors or just the degree that will allow you to grasp hold of the middle class and hopefully stay there and so in order to answer. The question of whether college is worth it. You need to find it for your individual family that we as a nation can dictate for any given individual but then how did we get to this place right. My dad worked in the summer and put himself through school and had a tiny bit of debt. After how did college get this expensive. There are so many more things pulling on our household incomes than there used to be. We are entirely responsible in most instances for our own retirement. We're paying more and more out of our own pockets for healthcare. Many people are paying off their own student. Loan debt well into their forties or fifties right so people don't have the same kind of disposable income as they might have earlier states have reduced their subsidies towards higher education which means the price of the state schools has gone up and the private institutions. They've gotten more and more expensive so the middle class. There is being squeezed. This whole idea of i want to go to a liberal arts college and better myself and in the world is will be. My voice. teacher is kind of an antiquated thought. Sure i'd like to enrich myself but not if it's going to put me in hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of debt. I remember when i was a senior in college. I went to lehigh and lee. Could absolutely help you on the career services front. If you wanted to go work in an accounting firm or be an engineer i wanted to work in investment banking so i drove to new york city with my mother and i stuck into the career services office at columbia university and i borrowed these giant binders. That had every piece of information that you needed for every bank every financial institution so you could apply for the summer internships. Now i went to the photocopy machine to start and you needed to have a school. I d to use the photocopier. I got caught. And i got kicked out the reason i bring this up. We send these kids to college but the best jobs are directly linked to only a few schools. So do we need to start looking at. Here's a college. What is the job. My child is going to get on the other side because otherwise they will be sitting here in hundreds of thousands of dollars with a debt. Yes to all of that first of all. That is the most bad ass career services story that i have ever heard your description of this as quote unquote best jobs right. I mean it is true that the best jobs in investment banking very narrow feel from certain institutions. Right unless you beat down the door but are those. The best jobs in america are the best jobs for anyone. Goldman sachs's is hiring. All these people in salt lake city now do not come from columbia and harvard and stanford mit. So then we have to ask ourselves well. These are iconic jobs in in certain social classes but are they really the best jobs out there for any given twenty two year old. I don't think so. Before the pandemic we knew there was a skills gap in the united states. We were at full employment yet. We had millions of americans who are not making enough money to support themselves. We had people who had jobs but good enough jobs. But you hear people making that argument saying you cannot afford to support yourself and your family working in a fast food restaurant but that job was never intended for someone who has a family to support. Is there an opportunity to actually create a real jobs program. A skills retraining program so it's not just about raising minimum wage. It's about retraining. People to qualify themselves for better higher paying jobs yes and that infrastructure already exists we can use the community college infrastructure to provide that skills training but we also have a shortage of qualified instructors to teach some of these skills. Why because the skills are so in demand that the people who would be doing the instructing are making five times as much money being actual practitioners. If you're a master plumber. You're not going to spend twenty hours a week teaching at a community college even though it would be a service to the community if you are a welder with twenty five years of experience right same thing is true. So how are we going to create the budget that allows for more people to be pushed through rigorous training programs. And so we need to do more I think from a state perspective and from a federal perspective not just provides the money but also to ensure equity and access to these programs

Ron Lieber New York Times RON Stanford Mit Lehigh Columbia University New York City LEE America Goldman Sachs Salt Lake City Harvard Columbia
Gigi in Wonderland - Vogue's March Issue Cover Story

Vogue Podcast

09:26 min | 3 weeks ago

Gigi in Wonderland - Vogue's March Issue Cover Story

"She's perfected the art of living in the spotlight. But motherhood has opened digi hadeed up to a new world and a new set of priorities. I'm khloe mao evoked contributing editor. And this is g. G in wonderland knew that i have that animal in me says gee hadeed relaxed. In bright. from december cold the twenty five year old model is astrid colored quarterhorse named dallas. And telling me about the birth of her baby in september here at her home in bucks county pennsylvania following a fourteen and a half hour labor at her side. Were her partner zane. Malik her mother yulong to her sister. Bella and a local midwife and her assistant when you see someone do that you look at them a bit differently. I probably looked crazy actually. She says a giggle tinged with pride. I was an animal woman. Mallet cut the baby. Click that she was out says gee gee gazing forward through dallas alert ears as we plod through the upper fields of harmony hollow. The farm owned by longest boyfriend. Joseph goalie a construction firm ceo. I was so exhausted. And i looked up. He's holding her. It was so cute. She's in a cropped long as puffer stretch. Czar jeans and warned black riding boots and looks like neither a harried mother of a ten week old nor paparazzi ducking supermodel with her hair roped into a smooth bun bear face and tiny gold hoop earrings. She resembles mostly her teenage self. An equestrian who showed jumped competitively while growing up in her hometown of santa barbara. California what i really wanted for my experience was to feel like okay. This is a natural thing that women are meant to do. She planned to deliver it a new york city hospital but then the realities of covert hit particularly sequestering here ninety minutes from manhattan and the limits on numbers in the delivery room which would preclude yolanda and bella from being present. Then she and malik watched the two thousand eight documentary the business of being born which is critical of medical interventions and depicts a successful home birth. We both looked at each other. And we're like. I think that's the call. Gd says they placed a blow up bath in their bedroom and sent their three cats and border collie away when the midwife expressed concern that the sphinx and maine coon felines might puncture the tub with their claws. Malik ask gee-gee what music she wanted to hear and she surprised him by requesting the audio of favourite children's novel the indian in the cupboard. He downloaded the film because it was one of his favorites too and they spent the early hours of labor watching it together. That's something we'd never talked about. But in that moment we discovered we both loved. Gd says bash family. She then tells me that malik. The former one direction star turned solo artist. Who has famously press shy and declined to be interviewed for. This article likened his own experience of her birth to align documentary. he'd seen in which a male lion paces nervously outside the cave. The lion s delivers her cubs z. Was like that's how i felt you feel so helpless to see the person you love in pain. Doom dula malibu high classmate carson. Meyer had prepared her for the moment where the mother feels. She can't go any longer without drugs. I had to dig deep. Jichi says i knew it was going to be the craziest pain in my life. But you have to surrender to it and be like this is what it is. I loved that you'll monda and the midwife coach through the pain there definitely was a point where i was like. I wonder what it would be. Like with an epa darryl how it would be different jichi frankly. My midwife looked at me and was like you're doing it. No one can help you your past the point of the epidermal anyway. So you'd be pushing exactly the same way in a hospital bed so she kept pushing. I know my mom zane. Bella were proud of me but at certain points i saw each of them in terror says she ducking under a leafless branch. Dow also who've sucking in the muddy terrain afterward z and. I looked at each other. And we're like we can have some time before we do that again. The baby girl named kai digi revealed on instagram in january from the arabic for the chosen one was a weekly. She was so bright right away. Gd says adding that. The baby's heart rate stayed consistent throughout the labor. That's what i wanted for her. A peaceful bringing to the world. Kyw's world has so far remained small. Her mother rarely leaves the bucolic corner of horse country where the hadeed put down roots in two thousand seventeen. Malik bought a nearby farm. The shoot for this story. In early december at a studio in manhattan was the first time g g had left her daughter since birth yolanda took over caregiving duties even bringing her granddaughter along to feed the miniature. Ponies mama and mccoo. Gee-gee has no nanny no baby nurse. None of the traditional celebrity crutches of new motherhood during our interview the baby stayed with her father and zan's mother tricia who is visiting from england for a month to help she decided to completely take care of the baby alone says yolanda odd. And i think that bond is so important. The dutch former model turned real housewives of beverly hills. Alum was my welcoming party. When i arrived at the farm booming. Hello her arms wide on the threshold in. Camo print puffer and boots. I'm proud of her face on magazine but seeing her give birth was a whole other level of proud yolanda says you go from looking at her as a daughter to looking at her as a fellow mother. The natural transitions and generational shifts of new motherhood are at play in the household. It is a family happily influx on the sprawling. Thirty two acre property. The handful of cottages are designated for different siblings. But this summer. When g g moved out of her cottage into zan's house bella and brother anwar graduated to larger cottages leaving. The smallest is a guest house. We're still close by says she but we have our space to be our own little family. She hosted thanksgiving dinner for the first time this year with zero mother cooking the turkey g g. A prolific home-cooked herself made banana. Pi and baked yolanda favourite tatham. Bella occurred over stuffing and spiked apple. Cider in the kubota tv g g got her christmas tree early for the occasion dressing it with personal ornaments. That she and malik have exchanged over the years. The most recent being glass nintendo console a reference to a favor quarantine activity. I decorated fully. Without my mom's help. And i think i did her. Gd says they are tribe publicly known for their closeness yolanda the doting den. Mother gee-gee the fresh-faced protective older sister. Bella the edgier veronica deejays betty and aloof baby brother on war joining g g and yolanda in the kitchen for latinos and cinnamon rolls before a horseback ride eyewitness. These rules confirmed. Yolanda has the sink drinking a smoothie and finishing gee-gee sentences when she grasps for word g g threatens to have a connection if anwar eats her cinnamon roll when he ambles out of his cottage. But motherhood is a new phase and it will be up to g g to decide whether it belongs on the silhouettes of social media. I think she wants to be real. Online's as bella twenty four by phone from new york city but until her child wants to be in the spotlight and can make the decision herself. She doesn't want to put her in that position. Bela who splits her. Time between her. Soho loft and the farm and facetime with her niece and sister every morning says she already enjoys reading books. Aloud that jeeves to read to her including the rainbow fish and the very hungry caterpillar. It's pretty nostalgic. Bella says it could be argued that we are all hungry caterpillars this year cocooning and comforting with hope of emerging bright winged vaccinated g. G wants split her time between her condo and no-ho and the first class cabin of airplanes when lockdowns began she had just returned from walking fashion shows in four countries and discovering. She was pregnant on the other end of covid. She will emerge as a mother. Happily headquartered in rural pennsylvania. Still a supermodel. But one determined to lead more secluded less peripatetic life. I always want to be here fulltime. She tells me. I love the city but this is where i'm happiest furious. Speculation and countless think pieces have attended the question of what this time will mean. Will we slow down flee cities for less frenzied. More mindful life in many ways. Gee-gee the bodyman of such ideas. The sheiks glamorous version yes but also a person drawn to reassessment. It feels like now. I'm in a different place in my life. She says and she does seem genuinely at home

Yolanda Malik Khloe Mao Gee Hadeed Yulong Bella Joseph Goalie Zane Dallas Dula Malibu Jichi Monda Kai Digi Astrid Bucks County KYW Manhattan Mallet
You Are What You Subscribe To

Lochhead on Marketing

06:18 min | 3 weeks ago

You Are What You Subscribe To

"All right. So i wanted to share with you something that my wife. Carrie ann i did the first At the beginning of the new year. And that's We sat down and we reviewed everything that both of us were subscribed to and we sorta did a purge and a respectful and together. We said you know what kind of content do we love. What do we want to learn This year what should we stop consuming. What should we start consuming and we did this very thoughtful very proactively over the course of about an hour and the high here for me is. I think it's important to be very very careful. Whose ideas that you let into your brain you know. We only have so much brain shelf space and we only have so much. Time to consume books podcasts Whatever the case you tubes whatever we like to consume and so being very thoughtful about what we put into our brain is actually a very important thing and i think there we put some shit in our head. That can hurt us pretty badly. You know if you're a longtime listener you know Have no love for the hustle stars. And i think they've done more damage to entrepreneurs and marketers than any recent group in history For a simple example you. I've heard hustle porn star. Say hustles the most important word the english language. Well i've also heard hustle porn star. Say no one ever worked himself to death well in japan they have a word for it. It's called karoshi and it translates into death by overwork. So nonstop hustling for twenty. Five years is probably not what you want to do. In addition even worse maybe is. You can hustle all you want but there's a difference between hard work and smart work hamsters hustle in their wheels to and they don't get anywhere. So what's your hustling about matters. And if you're a regular listener you know that i believe that Legends become known for a niche. That they own. So if you're hustling to design your own category that's one thing. If you're hustling trying to compete with an entrenched category king. You're gonna be in for a world of pain and yet millions and millions of business people still consume the stupidities of these hustle porn stars every day and the marketing and entrepreneur. World is stuffed with stupid ideas. Here's another example that drives me nuts minimum viable product. Why is this a good idea. Who the fuck said we. The first thing we deliver to the world should be something called a minimum viable product. It should be called a product. You fucking think is legendary and awesome and you wanna share with the whole world nother just dumb dumb dumb. I could go on with a very long list of very dumb ideas that are marketed to marketers and entrepreneurs all the time the bottom line is be very thoughtful about what you put in your brain because what you put in your brain is what you get out of your life now. Personally i like to go back to some of. Oj's peter drucker can touch him he. He's the original management thinker. His book the effect of executive changed my life by way of example. David ogilvy david. Ogilvy david ogilvy. If you're an entrepreneur if you're a marketer you're not a student of david ogilvy get on it. I go back and look at it all the time. Another one you might love in a similar vein is george lois. He sort of the punk rock version of david. Ogilvy check him out also. Of course the geez of positioning. Our reese and jack trout the so i love to go back and look at a lot of the original masters now some of the newer things that i love checking out is Check out a master class. This is incredible way to learn how to do to be taught writing by malcolm gladwin by way of example or taught how to do a three point shot by None other than steph curry. They have legendary people in many many different domains teaching their skills. It's an incredible product. Love masterclass podcast. You might wanna check out and this is not an extensive example or an extensive list. It's just an example of a few. That i like One of the jeez of marketing podcasts. Marketing over coffee by my buddy john wall and his partner. Christopher penn legendary Venture capitalists mike. Maples junior. his podcast is called. Starting greatness insanely great. Another legendary entrepreneur. Podcast is called no bowl and it's created by my buddies paul martinez and randy comas. And it features that teaching of the legendary bill campbell. Who was none other than steve. Jobs is coach if you're in the b. two b. world couple of podcasts. I love dave gerhardt's b. to b. marketing leaders. Podcast check it out. G. is emerging og. He's awesome My buddy brian burns has the One of the top sales podcast for b. two b. people be to be revenue leadership and the brutal truth about sales and selling brian burns. Check him out. And then the other one i like on sort of the lead gen funnel management Get leads enclosed shit online in the more beat. A sea world is russell brunson and he's got a whole series of podcasts and books most of them have the word secrets in them. Checkout marketing secrets podcasts. And he's all about hooks and offers and driving traffic and all of that stuff so those are just a couple to think about but most importantly i'm encouraging you to sit down and ask yourself a couple of key questions. What the kind of content i love. What do i most want to learn in the next twelve months. What should i stop consuming. What should i start consuming and remember. Be very careful whose ideas you let into your head because your thoughts become your actions your actions become your outcomes and your outcomes become your

Carrie Ann Ogilvy David Ogilvy George Lois Malcolm Gladwin Steph Curry Brian Burns David Ogilvy Peter Drucker Jack Trout Christopher Penn Maples Junior David Japan Paul Martinez Randy Comas Ogilvy Dave Gerhardt Reese John Wall
"twenty five years" Discussed on AA Beyond Belief

AA Beyond Belief

03:33 min | 3 months ago

"twenty five years" Discussed on AA Beyond Belief

"That was that was my sponsor gene really. He you know he is to talk about He was just he was the guy came in at as i said before an enormously intelligent man that sokaiya trained in switzerland the whole thing and did not recognize his own alcoholism until he was in his mid sixties came in at sixty seven. He died a short of his twentieth anniversary and he would. He would just heat. Just you know jewish a jewish atheist. Right he would. He would speak enviously of how he would work with. People enmeshed hysterical misery. For months weeks years. Whatever just trying to elevate them into normal unhappiness. That was the goal right then. He would come to a meeting and see somebody struggle through the door just bowed low with the weight of failure and addiction. And all this the soul crushing life experience sixty minutes later prance out the door under brand new life course held us. Hardly do this. what happens. What happens if they're what how. How is this possible. So the envy envy he said. I'm not gonna call it a miracle you know of if you to on a out of a turtle starts flying around the living room. Yeah it's a miracle right. This is all within the realm of human experience or something that so powerful and an aim meetings. I can understand why people do think it's divine. It's miraculous because it does feel that way and you know when you go from from active alcoholism to being sober. The the difference. Oh stark and that you would spend you know in my case not as many years as many other people spent but you spent so many years in addiction. Oh man it's it's a pretty hopeless condition so you have to be from. That does seem like a miracle but actually is just people helping each other it is and i was a smoker to pack a day guy artist thing i ever gave up just excruciating. When you give up smoking you announce it people say good for you way to go right say i gave up drinking..

sokaiya alcoholism switzerland
"twenty five years" Discussed on AA Beyond Belief

AA Beyond Belief

05:23 min | 3 months ago

"twenty five years" Discussed on AA Beyond Belief

"They not a piscopo. Well are group meets at a unitarian universalist church and of course they're friendly and then the other. The free thinkers group here in kansas city pre covid. They met an episcopal church and they knew that that group was an agnostic atheist group and they welcomed them. I was raised unitary of our you. Yeah yeah so. Yeah i that that church is so popular that you can't there's no. There's no space. I probably would be spaced now. But so instead of the humanist step beating we renamed it a humanist twist so that alleged. that's pretty good. It's pretty good too. I like that now. Actually tried a meeting and casey that didn't go over too. Well it was. We have a. We had a lot of people that had never been nasa aa meeting before in their lives. Irregular a meeting. And they're like in their twenties thirties maybe early forties and they didn't really know anything about the history of alcoholics anonymous. Do is their experience and there are secular group. We don't bother reading ridge literature and so forth. So i thought okay. I'm going to have this meeting. It could be a step meeting. And i'm gonna teach these people about aa right. And so i was. I wanted to appreciate the history of it and it turned out to be hell because it was like They felt like it was a class. It was it was like they felt like they had homework assignments they had to do. It didn't go over too well so what we ended up doing with that meeting as we turned it into kind of like a book club so that we would read a different book every month or long it took us to go through the book. We just sit and read it and talk about it. Also great springboard. Yeah it was great meeting. That actually happened just and then it was going along just great and then covid hit back in march and that's when we stopped meeting and we have not met in person sense right. It's it's always struck me curiously that that. There's so many The a agnostic.

piscopo free thinkers group kansas city casey nasa
"twenty five years" Discussed on AA Beyond Belief

AA Beyond Belief

03:50 min | 3 months ago

"twenty five years" Discussed on AA Beyond Belief

"You know some. Are you drawing me. Miller tat join you. Look your fifty-three-year-old balka you know in the in the in the Humanist a- meetings of people are are far cooler about the they know they know. What's gonna i gotta get to that group. Next time i go to new york which who knows when that will be. But my wife. And i used to go to new york frequently and the last time that i went i and i've mentioned on a podcast before because i just love the meeting so much but i went to a meeting and the health kitchen area and it was. It was a regular meeting. It wasn't a secular humanist meeting but the people were so so damn nice. And i just felt like i just i felt like i was at home and i felt like it was really special experience to be at that meeting and then One of the people in the meeting. She took me showed me where there was a coffee shop around the corner and i went to that coffee shop and spent a few hours there. And there's a real real special experience so after that experience. I think that's probably. That was the last time i was in new york. It's hard to believe. So that's been five years ago and i told myself everytime i go to new york. I'm going to have to go to a meeting. And i needed to check out some of these secular meetings in new york because i've just never took the time to do that. The they're wonderful. They're absolutely marvelous. A by the way in the atheist meetings in hell's kitchen breen.

new york Miller
"twenty five years" Discussed on AA Beyond Belief

AA Beyond Belief

04:34 min | 3 months ago

"twenty five years" Discussed on AA Beyond Belief

"Life. yeah you know. Yeah and then a lot of the and as we know a lot of the a lot of what we have to work on once the alcohol leaves us we just have our regular human condition that anyone any anybody has that we need to work on to live at peaceful existence or his peace fees peaceful possible anyway for work could be messier than alcoholics lives. If you go through there was another. As i've talking to china keep hearing all these things these voices. The one of my absolute favorites was i. Don't remember specifically what people told me. When i came in but i remember helping feel yeah same here and that was that's how you know we don't remember. We don't remember breath. We remember moments moments and just having somebody say yeah me too. What a. what a gift. And if somebody's actually listen to you. They've actually listened to what you had to say. And then and and give you something back. So how long did it take you to put this together. I guess happier okay. Of course the thirty some years that you spent actually writing it but and then a you're actually assembling. It came out about same time. I think you're far better person than i am. Because you stuck with it but but you're you those all those years but then the assembly also half a year just kind of nice to shove lot better mortimer desk just kind of peck away and you got to see 'em come together. Yeah yeah and realize you might have had. You may have something special there. Yeah we actually. You probably knew that in the beginning as you started the project. I knew something wonderful got. God knows how many books i've gotten you know. Help books and books about sobriety and so on and so forth but nothing like this. There's nothing just kind of tapped into the end of the collective well and the this assembly of just just people talking is wondering what's been the reaction. Well as i said you know to sending these out these rehab ordering books. I've gotten A lot.

messier china
"twenty five years" Discussed on AA Beyond Belief

AA Beyond Belief

05:37 min | 3 months ago

"twenty five years" Discussed on AA Beyond Belief

"Would talk about how I would i would have gene. That was so brilliant. What you said he said don't do that don't do that. Don't do this to me. I am a conduit. that's all i am. Listen and pass it along. Listen and i pass it lug. That's all you can do. You're not that smart. Get that out of your head. But you can listen and accumulate knowledge and so that that sort of that was the germ of the idea that this is the conduit would also a good title and what was the experience like putting it all together. All you know it's funny. You listen to those words you read the words and you say and you think i remember the hat that was that guy that ed so Memory lane of the order. My favorite stories in the book has i was a sober companion to a very wealthy guy had been out of rehab and i traveled with him to russia and we went to a meeting. It was supposed to have been an english-speaking meeting and we got it wasn't it was a russian meeting and i sat there in the audience and speaker speaking just as were down the street. Where and and i understood saying i remember that from the book and then they ask you to come back and and speak to them right. Picking a bunch of chechnya. I go da. Whatever the you know the eight words and russian and they're all adding is an interesting. Yeah so the universality of this thing is is is is really wonderful and i just love i love it. I love the what it does for people's lives I i so sorrowful to see people who for whatever reason can stick with it and have a lot of people have died back out. They perished then the sadness. Why couldn't you who what was it. What were that. Why did this happen. Everyone guy said his name was thomas and he he. I saw him on the icu. A life support after he dragged himself to death a used to say so boring missa. We're not here to entertain you..

russia thomas
"twenty five years" Discussed on AA Beyond Belief

AA Beyond Belief

03:02 min | 3 months ago

"twenty five years" Discussed on AA Beyond Belief

"Come with me so she had this vision that we're going to go into a darkened church basement and there be a lotta you know disreputable looking people retaliating shopping bags muttering about parakeets. Or whatever you know like toothless old guys and she walked into this this meeting Call lenox hill. It's not a humanist meeting but she walked in there and and people were dressed well. They smile were laughing. There was a woman named emma who who big delicious cookies. Everybody we didn't know if you're there for the meeting emma's cookies so delicious cup of coffee and three speakers caught up and they were the best. I've ever heard that that they could have been a broadway show. I would've paid broderick prices this. It's she got out afterwards. She should do that. Cells will walked outside. She said that was wonderful. Time feels so great. Can i join. I said no sadly you can't because you don't feel bad about yourself just the way you you're made at your so sorry you can have access to this and that i was that sort of fed in the idea of this book that the the the lessons learned the principles applied can work in any all of life's messy stopped if you subtract the substance of alcohol or drugs from these these pearls of wisdom as you call the debt that it applies if you're sex of your shopaholic whatever you can take that same thing and and apply these these these these wonderful tools of understanding and growth. What i like about. Also the title of your book is something that i learned late in. My recovery is in my opinion. One of the most effective things about a is that people listen. It's different like you know if you go to group therapy you go around the room and you you say something. Your therapist will give some input and then you might hear from the rest of the members of the group at an aa meeting. Generally usually you talk and people listen and that listening is just a huge gift. I mean that's what people need. And i didn't realize it at the time but you know as a i was a young person when i was drinking and i was having a lot of problems. So of course they were the elders in my life. Trying to figure out what how to fix me. Tell it giving me suggestions. Tell me what i needed to do. And so forth. Don't hear that. In a nasa had people who listened to me and that skill of listening is something that is.

lenox hill emma broderick aa nasa
"twenty five years" Discussed on AA Beyond Belief

AA Beyond Belief

04:34 min | 3 months ago

"twenty five years" Discussed on AA Beyond Belief

"Something i'm thinking about are going through or dealing with it's true it's hit it. Because although it is in categories the just the random nature of it can be can be propitious. I just thought of something A friend of mine from home group is an artist and he actually brings a little sketchbook two meetings. And i'm wondering if it's because there's that part of your brain. I wonder if it helps you. Actually to listen and participate in the meeting by having that part of your brain working you saw. Add when i when i when i drag opinion television app because otherwise i'll be up running around the apartment readjusting. The the the reality of attaching spices or something that helps me hoax focus and i wonder and you titled the book. I'm twenty five years of listening. Why why did you decide on that title. Well as sort of joked about earlier it was in a catchier and thirty two years and six months of listening but there was you know when i started it or decided to do that. that name just that sort of stuck because it was around twenty five years began thinking you i really should consolidate these got these the spiritual hoarder with taxes with these sketchbooks that are you know being a spill out of the closet. Maybe i should just condense and put together. so that's what i did and Covid quarantine. i would've never you know. Every cloud has a silver lining. They say well. There's a silver lining. This particular very dark cloud was that i can't leave the apartment. You can see my wife behind me working remotely. that's we are here to. It's just it's just me and my wife and my job and yeah so but it provided the opportunity to to to to seize that opportunities that beaumont and begin to put the so. That's grown out of this. Last was fairly easy to do because all the material. They're.

beaumont
"twenty five years" Discussed on AA Beyond Belief

AA Beyond Belief

03:40 min | 3 months ago

"twenty five years" Discussed on AA Beyond Belief

"Win and then write down things just things that obviously may already i it. It really should be called thirty two years of listening but it's not a catchy title. Twenty twenty two. But you're listening but it was. It was a just as accumulated of things people said and the beauty of it. These these people were Scholars or or sages or prophets beds. A shoe salesman a rotor. Roader salesman of banker obama A ex-con a housewife hairdresser. There was just an ex priest. Everybody's just this stuff and everybody had gone through the fire. They pass through the fire. Come out the other side More complete than than gone they they. It emerged with this kind of marvelous hard earned wisdom and and so i just i got it. Just write this stuff down about this book not stop. Because they didn't write a. I was smart enough to listen. Write it down. And then and the idea of peppering the texts with with the images of people which i have to hasten to say or all altered so no was at you and that you know none of that can go on so to give it a the feeling of of being in a meeting of being around other human beings because it is that that's who we are just huddling together in the dark or whatever you want to dramatic well no. It's kind of book. That i read it from cover to cover beginning to end but this is a book that i could just have around the house and just pick up anywhere and i can. I can imagine a lot of readers would be doing that is divided up into sections. Where you've got different topics covered that you might find a at a meeting anyway. So someone if they if they're looking for inspiration they can go to the section on inspiration or acceptance or whatever But i can just see someone. Just you know having a little bit of a peaceful afternoon and just thumbing through the book and just enjoying the feeling and the experience of the of hearing though hearing what they would here at their home group or something similar. Yeah thank you for that. That's a great great insight great compliment. I always thought that people should have at least three copies. What one to carry around with you so people would know that you were in the elite of that mentally ill a second one to keep in the bathroom. Hundred scare the crap drinking and the third one to put under your pillow have a drunk dream. That's those are the three a strict place. But it's true you.

obama
"twenty five years" Discussed on AA Beyond Belief

AA Beyond Belief

02:38 min | 3 months ago

"twenty five years" Discussed on AA Beyond Belief

"Ap beyond belief as a podcast by four about people who have found a secular path to sobriety and alcoholics anonymous. Today my guest is glenn s who wrote a wonderful book titled twenty-five years of listening Over a twenty five year period attending. Aa meetings glenn brought a sketchbook with him To these meetings that he used to write down little pearls of wisdom that he would here at the meetings and also to sketch the people that were around him so after some time he realized that he has a bit of a treasure trove here that he decided to share with the rest of us much to our benefit. So hi glen. Welcome to beyond belief so nice to have you here. I jot thrilled to be here. I love your book now. They told you when i when i was reading that A lot is is really interesting. A lot of the little sayings that you wrote down. I've heard in meetings around here in kansas city but a lot of them i didn't hear and but i got the sense when i was reading your book that i was actually an aa meeting. I felt like i was at my home group having coffee with my friends. That's that's the feeling that i got from reading your book. I was actually trying to trying to do that. It's it's so funny the things you're pointing at things you've heard in your local meetings that you read in the book is there is kind of the universality of this. The people really do pick up on things. I've been to meetings and moscow comparisons and flint michigan at every rock right and you keep hearing the similar things and i thought this is just awful. These things are just sifting through my fingers like sand on the beach of. They should be shared the collected. Yeah yeah and. I'm glad that you decided to do that. Why don't we. Why don't we start with the story of of book by telling your story you know what about you. Tell us a little bit about yourself and how you got into the program recovery of ours. I'm drunk. I'm i'm an alcoholic and i came into the program in nineteen eighty five. I think at that point. I'm richard dawkins atheist sam sam harris. You know mark twain whatever so should right on the red. I just can't bear that step at that point. My sobriety meant so much to me..

glenn s Ap glenn glen kansas city moscow michigan sam sam harris richard dawkins mark twain
"twenty five years" Discussed on Business Wars Daily

Business Wars Daily

04:04 min | 7 months ago

"twenty five years" Discussed on Business Wars Daily

"If you're an offroad aficionado or even just WANNA be. This story is a big deal. After a quarter century Ford is resurrecting the Ford Bronco a direct rival to the jeep. Ford produce the Bronco for thirty straight years starting in nineteen, sixty six. The vehicle had only two doors reportedly one reason why Ford discontinued it in Nineteen ninety-six consumer sentiment was shifting toward four doors. Historians say the Bronco Developed Cult Status. After it was discontinued today, the beefy muscular vehicles, a sentimental favourite restored vintage models can sell for up to two hundred thousand dollars with a corporate unit called Ford icons. Ford is Heavily Marketing Nostalgia that division includes the Bronco, a Mustang and a new line of Ford F one fifty pick-up trucks, including a hybrid version, and soon to be debuted all electric. And Nostalgia sells, but it's far from the only reason. The automakers releasing a Bronco for the twenty first century. The company is capitalizing on a trend according to the automaker offroad vehicle, so called rugged SUV's. Twice, as popular as regular SUV's CNN reports that has engineered the new bronco models for quote hard off road driving. You know the kind that allows you to quote. Get far from civilization. An even stay there for awhile. Is the perfect escape for pandemic induced cabin fever. Get a dose of Adrenalin while avoiding the plague. It's a combination made for advertising. Heaven Kit needs to be the jeep wrangler as the Juggernaut of off road vehicles. CNBC reports that automakers have been trying to quote dethrone the Wrangler for decades. Without much success. Even during the pandemic GPS kept selling Fiat Chrysler sold an average of seventeen thousand jeep wrangler every month for the last five years according to the Detroit news last year, almost a quarter, million wrangler flew off dealership. Lots and experts say jeep owners are loyal. To a fault. Still Ford executives have moxie. They're predicting sales of two hundred thousand broncos over the next year, according to Automotive News. and. Keep in mind that the low end version of the new line. The broncos sport won't even be out until years end higher end versions of the Bronco won't be at dealerships until next spring. Ford is doing everything it can to make the Bronco enticing enough to away jeep lovers, and of course to persuade new off roaders to come into the Ford camp that includes besting the ramblers largest tires thirty three inches with whopping thirty five inch tires, Ford says a Bronco outfitted with the almost three foot in diameter tires can easily go through a couple of feet of water models also come with removable roofs and doors. Drivers can store the doors in the Bronco. For, it says. At about thirty thousand dollars, the price of the two door base Bronco comes in at only two hundred dollars more than the base price of the jeep wrangler at the top in a limited number of first edition for door Bronco started about sixty one thousand dollars, Ford began taking one hundred dollar deposits on Broncos last Monday when it released the new line I edition reservation slots sold out within a couple of hours. Still as bullish as the auto press is about the Broncos, the release comes against bleak backdrop for the auto industry. Overall vehicle sales plummeted when covid nineteen emerged shut the industry down for two months recently, both Ford and GM reported second-quarter sales declines of about thirty three percent from a year earlier jeep parent, Fiat Chrysler did even worse with sales down forty percent. And that puts a lot of pressure on Ford to live up to its promise of adding a billion dollars to the bottom line next year through Bronco Sales. And it adds pressure Chrysler to keep jeep at the top of the OFFROAD HEAP Stakes is high as the boulder strewn rocky mountains. The war between Bronco in gene. We'll be fascinating to watch.

wrangler Ford broncos Bronco Sales Fiat Chrysler Ford camp Adrenalin CNBC Detroit GM
"twenty five years" Discussed on Business Wars Daily

Business Wars Daily

02:24 min | 7 months ago

"twenty five years" Discussed on Business Wars Daily

"Get a dose of Adrenalin while avoiding the plague. It's a combination made for advertising. Heaven Kit needs to be the jeep wrangler as the Juggernaut of off road vehicles. CNBC reports that automakers have been trying to quote dethrone the Wrangler for decades. Without much success. Even during the pandemic GPS kept selling Fiat Chrysler sold an average of seventeen thousand jeep wrangler every month for the last five years according to the Detroit news last year, almost a quarter, million wrangler flew off dealership. Lots and experts say jeep owners are loyal. To a fault. Still Ford executives have moxie. They're predicting sales of two hundred thousand broncos over the next year, according to Automotive News. and. Keep in mind that the low end version of the new line. The broncos sport won't even be out until years end higher end versions of the Bronco won't be at dealerships until next spring. Ford is doing everything it can to make the Bronco enticing enough to away jeep lovers, and of course to persuade new off roaders to come into the Ford camp that includes besting the ramblers largest tires thirty three inches with whopping thirty five inch tires, Ford says a Bronco outfitted with the almost three foot in diameter tires can easily go through a couple of feet of water models also come with removable roofs and doors. Drivers can store the doors in the Bronco. For, it says. At about thirty thousand dollars, the price of the two door base Bronco comes in at only two hundred dollars more than the base price of the jeep wrangler at the top in a limited number of first edition for door Bronco started about sixty one thousand dollars, Ford began taking one hundred dollar deposits on Broncos last Monday when it released the new line I edition reservation slots sold out within a couple of hours. Still as bullish as the auto press is about the Broncos, the release comes against bleak backdrop for the auto industry. Overall vehicle sales plummeted when covid nineteen emerged shut the industry down for two months recently, both Ford and GM reported second-quarter sales declines of about thirty three percent from a year earlier jeep parent, Fiat Chrysler did even worse with sales down forty percent. And that puts a lot of pressure on Ford to live up to its promise of adding a billion dollars to the bottom line next year through Bronco Sales. And it adds pressure.

wrangler Ford broncos Bronco Sales Fiat Chrysler Ford camp Adrenalin CNBC Detroit GM
"twenty five years" Discussed on Business Wars Daily

Business Wars Daily

02:05 min | 7 months ago

"twenty five years" Discussed on Business Wars Daily

"Support for this podcast and the following message comes from the Disney Bundle now enjoy Disney plus Hulu and ESPN, plus all for only twelve ninety nine, a month at Disney plus dot com slash Disney bundle includes who lose ad-supported plant access content from each service separately. Are. From wondering I'm David Brown. This is business wars daily on this Tuesday July twenty first. If you're an offroad aficionado or even just WANNA be. This story is a big deal. After a quarter century Ford is resurrecting the Ford Bronco a direct rival to the jeep. Ford produce the Bronco for thirty straight years starting in nineteen, sixty six. The vehicle had only two doors reportedly one reason why Ford discontinued it in Nineteen ninety-six consumer sentiment was shifting toward four doors. Historians say the Bronco Developed Cult Status. After it was discontinued today, the beefy muscular vehicles, a sentimental favourite restored vintage models can sell for up to two hundred thousand dollars with a corporate unit called Ford icons. Ford is Heavily Marketing Nostalgia that division includes the Bronco, a Mustang and a new line of Ford F one fifty pick-up trucks, including a hybrid version, and soon to be debuted all electric. And Nostalgia sells, but it's far from the only reason. The automakers releasing a Bronco for the twenty first century. The company is capitalizing on a trend according to the automaker offroad vehicle, so called rugged SUV's. Twice, as popular as regular SUV's CNN reports that has engineered the new bronco models for quote hard off road driving. You know the kind that allows you to quote. Get far from civilization. An even stay there for awhile. Is the perfect escape for pandemic induced cabin fever..

In House vs. Consultancy

The Design Intent

05:19 min | 8 months ago

In House vs. Consultancy

"Well all right alex. Hey great talking to you again really appreciate your time. we're back for some more design intent. Myself tony orlando. Daniel phipps aaron hernandez and of course the creator founder. Alex you'll have to pronounce your last name for us. Alex this niece okay. Well let's go. The ad is okay so similar site so happy to talk to you guys Maybe we can you introduce yourself of where you guys worked So the the reason why we gather today is because. I won't do this interview because i often have. This kris jenner of You should be working in their constituency our in house because Differences that can happen at the end of doing years of working. In hostile working inconsistency you will have a very different skaters. So that's why. I think it's it's good to have both side here on in this interview. we antonio who Will introducing serve but is basically designed neither at delta and we have a daniel simpson everyone who are like with fund design. Now at so we really to weld one with the in house we've constituency so that's Good interview to learn on the. What are the pros and cons of each side. Yeah i think that's good. That's a good topic. I know i have people asking me that all the time. I'll let you go first daniel since you're okay you've kind of been around in both worlds. Sure i have the i. I don't know fifteen years of my career. Kinda bounced back and forth a little So right now. I'm with access design actually started the company in two thousand and five so i guess Two thousand and twenty. That would be fifteen years prior to that. I worked for a couple of different Companies delving one of them. I worked for ibm and then another one and in between there i worked at a short stint at it consulting company up in the chicago area as well so for the first part of my career bounced back and forth a little bit and then i kinda finally may finally made the decision of okay thank the consulting thing is is a good place for me to rest for a while and so. That's what i've been doing since. Two thousand and five fifteen years running running your own small business correct consulting for various companies all over the country to some more for international companies as well So yeah and for the record. I've actually hired dan quite a bit to do work for me. Working adele so I'll i'll give a quick introduction of myself. I'll give a bit of a history later. I'll let aaron kinda talk about his his role. But i'm antonio designed enter for latitude no dell and i've been with dell thirteen years now but i've been in the industry for quite a long time erin so my name is aaron and i work here with daniel. I had access. I've been here for a little bit over two years two and a half years and a half years and this is all the experience or real real world. experience have had And i know it's a. It's a huge question whenever you're graduating or you're about to graduate or you're in school it's like what wh- what what she do. She go the consultant route or the more corporate route so i hope People get to learn how many years of experience you have in the field. Two and a half advocate. So that's that's you can give us the formula have i did. I have twenty years of experience. In most of it is inconsistency so we we have like like a goo- good of people different spectrum invasions on the same on this. I if one thing i would say that anybody getting out and design new in the design world or even established the design where i think the most single most important thing he can do is make sure that the the mentor that you work for or with is the right mentor for you. I i think that's you know my career was was the last with with really fantastic. Mentors when i would start at. Ibm right out of graduate school. And if it wasn't for those guys in al i'll name them John swansea was probably the first designer that i worked for for a long time who retired from ibm lenovo a few years ago. He worked there for over twenty five years. I

Daniel Phipps Daniel Simpson Alex Tony Orlando Aaron Hernandez Kris Jenner Antonio Aaron Kinda Daniel Dell IBM Adele Chicago DAN Erin Aaron John Swansea Lenovo
"twenty five years" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"twenty five years" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Write twenty five years before he became a murder me and he said that that first day and it was training with the highway patrol here in Florida he said he knew nothing it was a real eye opener he came home he said and we got to teach this to everyone we know so that's where our little my wife rides and I and I just you know I strip she's taking classes but you've got a really learn before I let you come on that thing but it's funny because I do I often will ride behind motorcycle officers and I and I think you know what they they don't get hurt they must know what they're doing there's got to be something that they do right three techniques three motor techniques they been teaching at the cops for over sixty five years in the general public when they see a turn they think I'm a cop which is a wonderful thing as you do the right thing you do the rector how did you do that what should what should cart watching auto drivers know about motorcyclists what should we be paying attention to to help it be safer for them your phone down yes put it down pay attention yeah yes please it's like you gotta have my head on a swivel every Sunday coming home from work me too so I'm driving I'm always checking the mirrors I see somebody behind me is lane splitting what should I do should I slow down pullover should I just drive straight what do I do well when people here in Florida we can't lane split I wouldn't do it if it was a lot of it is legal in California I see people at seventy miles an hour lane splitting yeah as far as we're concerned it's deadly it's dangerous if you don't know what you're doing a lot of the crotch rocket riders there yeah they do everything fast but the problem is.

murder Florida California twenty five years sixty five years
"twenty five years" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"twenty five years" Discussed on 600 WREC

"It helps these bacteria in our guts, which may even improve mental health, the bacteria in the gut can secrete over fifty known neuro transmitters, we've all heard of serotonin that's the happy juice that makes us happy. And when somebody's depressed, big pharma, makes a pill that makes you have more tone and low and behold, when we eat the proper foods and we have the proper gut bacteria, they producer tone, and that gets into a brain and literally, the bacteria are making us happy, he may have never thought about your gut health, but fencer says it's not too late to start one as you can get some good probiotics or sin -biotics, as it were which will help kind of jump start the process, but to maintain it, you have to do a very simple thing, which is eat high quality foods and real foods authentic foods, organic foods. And why is that because we have to remember that these bacteria have cobalt with us over millions of years. Two co metabolize. The foods we were meant to eat and in the last twenty five years, and fifty years, or so when we're adding things polysorbates, eighty for example, or zero calorie, artificial sweeteners, these bacteria have not evolved to co metabolize. Those compounds fences are nutrition needs have increased over time. And it's important, we keep that in mind when we feed our bodies improving the quality of what we eat may just improve the quality of who we are. Chef Dr Mike fester invites you to read his book shaman and find out more information on.

Dr Mike fester producer twenty five years zero calorie fifty years
"twenty five years" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"twenty five years" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"Twenty five years, we estimate that nearly thirty seven thousand of the deaths that occurred would not have occurred if we hadn't been reading all the research that's out there people still do it. I mean, you can drive on seventy five or eight twenty or thirty five here in the North Texas area. There are people going ninety or more. Legal to drive really fast. And then there's always those that want to drive even faster report shows us, what we in here in Texas know, that there are some stretches of highway where it's eighty five as the legal speed and some other states have eighty in some areas, you also say in the report and correct me. But you're basically saying there's no turning back. Convince. To bring back speed limits. Interstates interstates people just expect to be able to go fast say is if we can't go backwards. Stop where we are right now. Does your research show how much time you're actually saving. So if you're driving along interstate and in Texas, and you're going eighty versus seventy five how much time are you really saving. Well, the best you're gonna do is state, maybe five minutes every hundred miles. And that's perfect. If nobody's in your way. And you don't have to slow down for any reason. Five minutes is all you can get invested time. KRLD is the video game. Fortnight an irresponsible. Addiction care. News time, seven forty three. When there's breaking news NewsRadio. Ten eighty KRLD is on the scene..

Texas North Texas Twenty five years Five minutes five minutes
"twenty five years" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"twenty five years" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"We we we we are not to the place yet where we should be remotely close to declaring that we have achieved what it is we want there's a great deal of work that remains our eyes are wide open with respect to the risks but it is it is our fervent hope that chairman kim wants to make a strategic change a strategic change in the direction for his country and his people and if he's prepared to do that president trump is prepared to assure that this could be a successful transition one more cut cut number eight talking about our objective in north korea cut number eight chris here's what this will look like this will be americans coming in private sector america's not the us tax payer private americans coming into how build out the energy grid they need enormous amounts of electric of north korea to work with them to develop infrastructure all the things that the north korean people need the capacity for american agricultural support north korea so they can eat meat and have healthy lives those are the kinds of things that if we get what it is the president has demanded the complete verifiable irreversible denuclearization of north korea that the american people will offer in spades and as part of that are we in effect saying to cam if you give us what we want you can stay on in power we will have to provide security assurances to to be sure this has been the trade off that has been pending for twenty five years no president has ever put american position where the north korean leadership thought that this was truly possible that the americans would actually do this would lead to the place where more coming up after the break mike pompeo john bolton new and what is going on in jerusalem historic day in america the.

kim north korea chris america president chairman us mike pompeo jerusalem twenty five years
"twenty five years" Discussed on AM 870 The Answer

AM 870 The Answer

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"twenty five years" Discussed on AM 870 The Answer

"Prosperity what does that mean in terms of direct us investment in north korea and are we as part of this willing in effect to guarantee kim security that that regime change will be off the table chris here's what this will look like this will be americans coming in private sector america's not the us tax payer privatesector americans coming in to help build out the energy grid the need enormous amounts of city in north korea to work with them to help infrastructure all the things that the north korean people need the capacity for american agricultural to support north korea so they can eat meat and have healthy lives those are the kinds of things that if we get what it is the president has demanded the complete verifiable irreversible denuclearization of north korea that the american people will offer in spades and as part of that are we in effect saying to kim if you give us what we want you can stay on in power we will have to provide security assurances to to be sure this has been the trade off that has been pending for twenty five years no president has ever put american a position where the north korean leadership thought that this was truly possible that the americans would actually do this would lead to the place where america was no longer held at risk by the north korean regime that's the objectives when i said earlier this week that i think chairman kim shares the objectives in america people i'm convinced of that now the task is for president trump and he'd meet to validate the process by which this would go forward to set up those markers so that we can ago she ate this outcome you have any problem giving kim's history and the history of his family as an oppressive regime any problems with the idea of the us even if we get our deal in effect giving us security guaranteed to the kim regime but we'll have to see how the negotiations proceed but make no mistake about it america's interest here is preventing the risk that north korea will launch a nuclear weapon in l a or denver into the very place where sitting here this morning chris that's our objective that's the state the president has laid out and that's the mission that he sent me on this past week to put us on the trajectory to go achieve.

north korea america president trump kim us chris chairman denver twenty five years