27 Burst results for "Twenty Five Hundred Years"

Dr. Steven Gundry - Tired? Low Mood? Good Bacteria to the rescue!

Untangle

02:01 min | 2 weeks ago

Dr. Steven Gundry - Tired? Low Mood? Good Bacteria to the rescue!

"What to do when you get up and go has got up and gone. Which honestly is how a lot of us have been feeling these days so in the upcoming conversation were thrilled to be talking to dr country. And we're gonna learn about what you can do from a nutritional perspective to increase your energy and your mood and it does not what you think. Welcome dr country. Thanks areola happy to be here. Cut your band actually sitting by beds so there you go. It's a joy a pleasure to have you because for a lot of us are get up and go truly has got up and gone these days. It sure has who would have guessed. I know so. What's one of the first things that you recommend to somebody who is feeling like they could use a little bit more zip in their lives. There's many factors that go into. Why most of us are tired and fatigue and just don't have the energy that we thought we ought to have many of us think we are modern lifestyle or code. This is normal to feel like this but in fact my research in that of many others shown that this tiredness is not normal. When it's actually a sign that something is really wrong deep inside. There's two things that i think are really important for people to understand. One is that apocryphal. He's the father of medicine. Twenty five hundred years ago. Said all disease begins in the gut and how that guy could be so smart that long ago without are sophisticated tests. He knew that for instance are mood game in our gut. Our illnesses came from our gut. And we now know that he was absolutely right that most of our issues including being tired and including having depression anxiety actually stems from gut despite basis. Which is a fancy way of saying that the microbiome within our god is all screwed up

Depression Anxiety
Fresh update on "twenty five hundred years" discussed on This Day in History Class

This Day in History Class

01:20 min | 54 min ago

Fresh update on "twenty five hundred years" discussed on This Day in History Class

"The text is considered the oldest surviving complete dated imprinted book. The diamond sutra contains teachings on the buddhist principles of not abiding and non attachment and it's a key scripture mehanna buddhism the text also provides meditations on illusion and perception the copy of the diamond sutra that was published on may eleventh. Eight sixty eight is not the earliest example of block printing. But it is the oldest book to include a cauliflower that has a verifiable date a california is an inscription at the end of a book or manuscript that provide details of the work's publication. The diamond suture was first translated from sanskrit to chinese around four hundred ce in eighth century. China printing was done with wood. Blocks paper was made from mulberry. Hip then dyed yellow with bark from the amer court tree. The text was painted onto tracing paper which was put onto a wooden block. A carver then followed the trace techs to carve the shapes into the buck then the block was inked in stamped onto the paper in eight forty five towers. Emperor wu of the song dynasty suppressed buddhism as china denounced a foreign influences and old confusion and ideas reemerged temples and monasteries were shut down and adherence were banned from practicing. The ban was volta back not long after it was instituted but buddhism did not thrive as it had before a monk named wong yuen lou originally discovered wong gee's diamond sutra in dunhuang china in nineteen hundred. He was in a place. Now known as the caves of a thousand buddhas. A wall with hundreds of caves carved out of it. He found that entrance to a secret library that have been sealed where there were tens of thousands of documents. It's not completely clear who and why the documents were placed in the library cave nor is it known why and win the cave with field shut but in nineteen seven british hungarian archaeologist mark. Rl stein was mapping the silk road when he found out about the library after some negotiation stein bribed long into selling about ten thousand documents and painted scrolls for one hundred and thirty pounds by invoking wong's painter state. Sean zahn a buddhist monk and scholar. Who had taken a pilgrimage to india and the seventh century and was a translator of buddhist scriptures. One of the documents dine acquired was the diamond sutra. This girl is about sixteen feet or five meters long and ten and a half inches or twenty seven centimeters wide. It's made up of seven pieces of yellow stained paper pasted together with an elaborate illustration on the first paper that shows the buddhist speaking to a disciple. An inscription on the scroll says the following in translation reverently made for universal free distribution about wong g on behalf of his parents on the fifteenth of the fourth. Moon of the ninth year. Sean long that would work out to be may eleventh eight sixty eight. It's not clear who wong she was or why he had the diamond sutra printed. But it's likely that monks used a scroll to chant the sutra and that printing copies of the sutra allowed for wider dissemination of the buddhist teachings. Today the scroll is located at the british library. I'm eve coat and hopefully you know a little more about history today than you did yesterday. And here's an additional. No really old books books have been dated back to the bbc. Ears like the manuscript bulgaria's national museum of history holes which is more than twenty five hundred years old but what should be considered. A book is up for debate scrolls and clay tablets exists that are thousands of years old as well also. The international dahong project is a collaboration. That has digitized archaeological materials from dunhuang and other sites on the eastern silk road. Keep up with us on twitter. Instagram and facebook. At t h c podcast..

May Eleventh India Five Meters One Hundred And Thirty Pounds Tens Of Thousands Of Documents Sean Zahn Yesterday Twenty Seven Centimeters Today Wong Yuen Lou First Paper Facebook Twitter Hundreds Of Caves Ten And A Half Inches Seven Pieces About Ten Thousand Documents China Instagram Seventh Century
Is This Ancient Biblical Forgery Actually Real?

Kottke Ride Home

05:48 min | 2 months ago

Is This Ancient Biblical Forgery Actually Real?

"So close to a century and a half ago. A man named moses wilhelm shapira found fifteen manuscript fragments in a cave near the dead sea. They were written in an ancient hebrew script and contained. What shapiro claimed was the original book of deuteronomy blitz despite interest from the british museum to the tune of a million pounds. The manuscripts were found to be forged. Shapiro was disgraced and the documents disappeared but now a scholar named don dershowitz is questioning. If those documents might have been real all along so while the british museum was examining the manuscript fragments for authenticity themselves. Back in the nineteen th century. A few of the fragments were also on display to the public already attracting tons of visitors. The news of the possibly oldest ever discovered biblical manuscript had made headlines around the world. While awaiting the museum's official decree of authenticity. Someone else decided to take matters into their own hands. Charles simone clermont. Is you know who the times describes as a swashbuckling french archaeologist and longtime nemesis of shapiro's end quote examined the fragments for a few minutes and immediately went to the press to say that they were fake. The risk he played on his cursory examination paid off when the british museum experts agreed. Shapiro was humiliated by this and ended up. Tragically dying by suicide a few months later. The documents were sold at auction for a fraction of what they were originally expected to sell for. And most people soon forgot about the whole thing now. Dershowitz from the university of potsdam germany has published a new paper and companion book making the case that the manuscript was real all along quoting the new york times but dershowitz makes an even more dramatic claim the text which he is reconstructed from nineteenth century transcriptions and drawings is not a reworking of deuteronomy. He argues but a precursor to its dating to the period of the first temple before the babylonian exile that would make it the oldest biblical manuscript by far and an unprecedented window into the origins and evolution of the bible and biblical religion dershowitz. His research closely guarded until now has yet to get broad. Scrutiny scholars previewed his findings at a closed-door seminar at harvard in two thousand nineteen are divided. A taste of fierce debates likely to come but of dershowitz is correct. Some experts say it will be the most consequential bible related discovery since the dead sea scrolls in nineteen forty seven and quotes the times. Sagely points out that it's much tougher to prove something authentic than it is to prove. It's fake but there's an additional hurdle to be jumped. In this case the physical fragments themselves may no longer exist so back in eighteen eighty three there was a mad rush at the time to find biblical artifacts that would prove or disprove various points of contention emerging in biblical scholarship moseley around the documentary hypothesis. The idea that the first five books of the bible or the pentateuch were actually written by various authors. Not just one traditionally thought to be moses. It was in this climate of aggressive archaeology that shapiro. I established himself as an antiquities dealer in jerusalem and during which time he and clermont no became enemies. After camacho correctly denounced a collection of pottery. That shapira had sold to the german government. It's also important to note that shapiro was a convert to christianity having been raised jewish in russia so he was viewed with some skepticism from the other biblical scholars and archaeologists and also faced intense antisemitism after the deuteronomy manuscript was denounced. Fast forward to now. Dershowitz says one of the main reasons he thinks the fragments could have been real is because their contents differs quite a bit from the deuteronomy in the bible and many of those differences lineup with discoveries that were only made when the dead sea scrolls were found in nineteen forty seven sixty four years. After chapitoulas discovery of the fragments dershowitz also investigated. Some of shapiro's personal notes archived at the berlin state library and found three. Handwritten pages of shapiro trying to decipher the fragments. Filled with question marks and transcription errors. Dershowitz said quote if he forged them or was part of a conspiracy. It makes no sense that he'd be sitting there trying to guess what the text is and making mistakes while he did it end quote while some scholars of the evolution of biblical text or undershoots side cautiously believing the deuteronomy fragments may be genuine. Most pig refers people who study inscriptions are the ones that usually authenticate documents. Most of them aren't convinced they say the original fragments bear the hallmarks of modern forgery. That they agree with the notes made by the experts who examined them at the time and since no one has the fragments to examine physically now. It's a closed case and as for the content being impressions christopher rolston leading pig refer at george washington university said quote. Forgers are pretty clever with regard to content and they've been very clever for twenty five hundred years and quotes despite dershowitz his published paper and companion book. The jury is still out and who knows if it will ever truly be born ounce. It would have some pretty huge complications. If it does due to some of its key differences for example. It's missing all of the laws of the deuteronomy were familiar with in the bible. Ones upon which traditions and entire libraries have been founded. It would also bolster the theory that are tons more stories and traditions out there than just the ones that have been preserved in the hebrew bible.

Shapiro Dershowitz Moses Wilhelm Shapira Don Dershowitz Charles Simone Clermont University Of Potsdam British Museum German Government Sagely Chapitoulas The New York Times Berlin State Library Moseley Shapira Camacho Germany Harvard Clermont
Pirates of the Carolinas

Travel with Rick Steves

03:45 min | 6 months ago

Pirates of the Carolinas

"Let's start with some wild tales of historical characters from the coasts of North and south. Carolina. Terrence Zip key is brought to life thirteen notorious pirates in her book pirates of the Carolinas. She relates stories of ships weighted down with gold crews too drunk on rum to fight treacherous colonial officials, mutineers, privateers, and the sad end of the line for the pirates who got caught. White Barents thanks for joining us. Hi, thanks for having me. Give us some background on this. What was the golden age of piracy in the United States? Well, we really don't know how long piracy's been around It's been around at least twenty, five, hundred years they are, and there was an era during its hey day that was known as the golden age piracy, and that was the light seventeenth century to early eighteenth centuries and The United States it'd be colonial America. It was colonial. America. When they came over here and Interesting Carolina had a lot of the officials had partnerships with the pirates. We were sort of commerce poor place back then. So we actually welcomed pirates like blackbeard until they had the big crack down on piracy and that was the end of that. So is it kind of the fine line between a privateer and pirate? What's the difference? It was such a fine line rick and basically a little piece of paper because a lot of the pirates started out they were privateers. And they were involved in Queen Anne's war wars all over Europe and everything, and they were commissioned to attack enemy ships in order to get money to get booty to help fund the war and they split the money with the crown. So yes. So the the king or the governor would say you are licensed to attack ships as long as they're not our ships and you p half the booty, but you gotta give the rest to us. So we can fight war whatever right and so then imagine when the war is over and your navy is no longer needed. All these men I've ever known. There's no employment. You know it was a fine line anyway between privateer and pirate. So a lot of them just became officially pirates and they got to keep everything. Nice business model. So, now, what was the basic action? It was mostly ships going from Europe to the Americas or where did they get their best opportunities at that time? That was all these merchant ships that were doing these trade routes and so you could just sort of sit out there. It was just like fishing and just block them off. They weren't very well armed or anything they were slow because they were big heavy. Ships with a lot of merchandise onboard now also, and it really didn't matter. This is one of those falsehoods that people realize people thought pirates just want gold and pieces of eight. But the truth is that they wanted what they could sell when they got these merchant ships and they had all these realms of fine linens and silks and tobacco and rum, and all this was this was pay dirt so they would. Get this stuff, and then they would go to the next port and just like you see when you travel a lot people stealing stuff off of ships and setting up a little stand and selling a cheap absolutely, and that's what they did like a lot more in partnership with the authorities here and so when they came into port and all that they would look the other way and then they would get A. Cut for looking the other way and the merchants would get discounted goods. The pilots would get money I mean everybody was happy sounds like a win win win lose situation I'm rick this is travel with Rick Steves speaking with Zip in her books called pirates of the Carolinas. We always think pirates of the Caribbean and your book is pirates of the Carolinas. Why was there so much pirate action and the Carolina? coast. Well at that time, these were pretty poor state. So we needed to get commerce wherever we could. So pirates were good for business. So we saw there were a safe haven for pirate in fact, blackbeard who was one of the probably the biggest chapter discussed in this book, he actually set up shop actually made a home and actually came part of the community and all up and north. Carolina. No,

Terrence Zip United States White Barents Carolina Carolinas Queen Anne Europe Rick Navy Americas Rick Steves Caribbean
Pirates Of The Carolinas

Travel with Rick Steves

04:31 min | 6 months ago

Pirates Of The Carolinas

"When I asked a couple of my friends from Ireland to join us on the show to talk about their country's legends of fairies and benches and things that go bump in the night. They were a little reluctant at first I thought it was because they didn't want to appear superstitious or maybe out of date. And that's what they wanted me to believe. But I wonder if they weren't just a little afraid. Coming up today on travel with Rick Steves we hear how the Irish comedy tells they grew up with very folk lurking in their surroundings in their testing their luck right now by making an exception to talk openly about it with us. We'll also explore San Francisco's legends of Ghost sightings from Al Capone on Alcatraz to a grieving mother who still wonders Golden Gate Park? Let's start with some wild tales of historical characters from the coasts of North and south. Carolina. Terrence Zip key is brought to life thirteen notorious pirates in her book pirates of the Carolinas. She relates stories of ships weighted down with gold crews too drunk on rum to fight treacherous colonial officials, mutineers, privateers, and the sad end of the line for the pirates who got caught. White Barents thanks for joining us. Hi, thanks for having me. Give us some background on this. What was the golden age of piracy in the United States? Well, we really don't know how long piracy's been around It's been around at least twenty, five, hundred years they are, and there was an era during its hey day that was known as the golden age piracy, and that was the light seventeenth century to early eighteenth centuries and The United States it'd be colonial America. It was colonial. America. When they came over here and Interesting Carolina had a lot of the officials had partnerships with the pirates. We were sort of commerce poor place back then. So we actually welcomed pirates like blackbeard until they had the big crack down on piracy and that was the end of that. So is it kind of the fine line between a privateer and pirate? What's the difference? It was such a fine line rick and basically a little piece of paper because a lot of the pirates started out they were privateers. And they were involved in Queen Anne's war wars all over Europe and everything, and they were commissioned to attack enemy ships in order to get money to get booty to help fund the war and they split the money with the crown. So yes. So the the king or the governor would say you are licensed to attack ships as long as they're not our ships and you p half the booty, but you gotta give the rest to us. So we can fight war whatever right and so then imagine when the war is over and your navy is no longer needed. All these men I've ever known. There's no employment. You know it was a fine line anyway between privateer and pirate. So a lot of them just became officially pirates and they got to keep everything. Nice business model. So, now, what was the basic action? It was mostly ships going from Europe to the Americas or where did they get their best opportunities at that time? That was all these merchant ships that were doing these trade routes and so you could just sort of sit out there. It was just like fishing and just block them off. They weren't very well armed or anything they were slow because they were big heavy. Ships with a lot of merchandise onboard now also, and it really didn't matter. This is one of those falsehoods that people realize people thought pirates just want gold and pieces of eight. But the truth is that they wanted what they could sell when they got these merchant ships and they had all these realms of fine linens and silks and tobacco and rum, and all this was this was pay dirt so they would. Get this stuff, and then they would go to the next port and just like you see when you travel a lot people stealing stuff off of ships and setting up a little stand and selling a cheap absolutely, and that's what they did like a lot more in partnership with the authorities here and so when they came into port and all that they would look the other way and then they would get A. Cut for looking the other way and the merchants would get discounted goods. The pilots would get money I mean everybody was happy sounds like a win win win lose situation I'm rick this is travel with Rick Steves speaking with Zip in her books called pirates of the Carolinas. We always think pirates of the Caribbean and your book is pirates of the Carolinas. Why was there so much pirate action and the Carolina? coast. Well at that time, these were pretty poor state. So we needed to get commerce wherever we could. So pirates were good for business. So we saw there were a safe haven for pirate in fact, blackbeard who was one of the probably the biggest chapter discussed in this book, he actually set up shop actually made a home and actually came part of the community and all up and north. Carolina.

Terrence Zip America White Barents Rick Steves Carolina Carolinas Al Capone Golden Gate Park Ireland San Francisco Queen Anne Europe Rick Navy Americas Caribbean
How Does Your Garden Grow, with Nooks and Crannies

Your Brain on Facts

04:33 min | 11 months ago

How Does Your Garden Grow, with Nooks and Crannies

"Wants neglected plot on their recently inherited estate. The Duchess of Northumberland undertook to make special garden inspired by a trip to the MEDICI estates in Italy. The Duchess wanted to make a garden that was both beautiful and educational. The carefully tended plot features things like a trope. Abell Donna to tour common moral monkshood white. Hello Bore Blue Ensign, flowers and narcissus. It's called the annick poison garden. Because like the sign at the front gate, says do not touch any of these plants. These plants can kill you. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. We hardly need to say that mankind has been growing food for a longtime. The earliest domesticated plants and horticulture that we have evidence of thus far date to nine thousand B C e in the teen corridor the that runs from the Dead Sea to the Damascus basin. The people there planted grains legumes using sticks to dig in the dirt. The first written reference to gardening dates back soumare in lower Mesopotamia. King Gilgamesh mentioned that his city or ACC was one third gardens. Though. He probably meant orchards as much as anything else. From Egypt. We have paintings and models gardeners at work, and you can still see the remains of the Temple Gardens at Karnak. Or you can head over to Iran to see the layout and information channels of garden that was created twenty five hundred years ago. For the oldest garden we can find in Europe had over to Greece. Were Gardens both practical and ornamental were being put in by seven thousand vce two thousand years before the Egyptians. The creation of a new science botany, the study of plants meant that gardens became a place of learning even in the ancient world gardens could be an aesthetic choice as well as a practical one. Evidence suggests that the idea originated in Persia with Darius the great and his Paradise Garden beginning a tradition of walled in garden spaces. Lavish Villa Gardens in the Roman Empire Spread East China and Japan where Aristocratic Gardens featured miniaturized and simulated landscapes, like rock, gardens and waterfalls. Natural symbolized power and religious thought. Zen Gardens appeared and emphasized the concept of using the garden for reflection to increase. Want Wisdom. The most famous garden in the ancient world is undoubtedly the hanging gardens of Babylon. According to Legend in the sixth century BC. King Nebuchadnezzar a name that is never not fun to say. Bill to the gardens for his wife, a modest to ensure that she didn't become homesick for her birthplace of Medina near the Caspian Sea. But we don't get details of the garden from Nebuchadnezzar himself. Which is odd considering that he recorded his many other accomplishments in cuneiform, but there's no mention of the gardens. Several, ancient Roman and Greek writers wrote about the garden though. Some scholars argue that the gardens were actually built by an Assyrian Queen or the King of Niniveh. We don't know for sure because despite the gardens being one of the seven wonders of the world. We can't find it to study it. It's believed to have been destroyed by an earthquake in the first century C E. So why were they called? The hanging gardens were the garden beds suspended. was everything planted in hanging baskets? Bonus fact, the largest hanging basket planter in the world is on the side of the hotel. Indigo in the Paddington Section of London. It measures ten by twenty feet or three by six meters and weighs upwards of half a tonne. Now the hanging gardens didn't really hang so much as they over Hong or draped and their defense, the draping garden doesn't sound nearly as appealing. Accepting the premise that some royal or another wanted to build a royalty grand garden in the desert, it was going to take careful planning and serious engineering to pull that off. The structure was a cigarette or a stepped pyramid with walls between twenty and seventy five feet high, depending on which ancient account you're reading. So picture a walled city in the desert. Rising in the center of it alongside the Palace

Zen Gardens Temple Gardens At Karnak Aristocratic Gardens Villa Gardens King Nebuchadnezzar Egypt King Gilgamesh Persia Abell Donna Northumberland Dead Sea Europe Italy ACC Caspian Sea Greece Paddington Section Of London Niniveh Darius Damascus Basin
#362: Answering the Call of Holy Work with Luke LeFevre

The EntreLeadership Podcast

09:56 min | 1 year ago

#362: Answering the Call of Holy Work with Luke LeFevre

"Conversation is with our chief creative officer at Lukla fever. He's a part of our operating board and leads a team of over one hundred and fifty people and over the past several years. He's walked through a process personally. That has helped him uncover principles which make up the creative center of great work worked at a set apart. Work that is meaningful work that is holy. The first five words of this ancient book called Genesis which was written a long time ago. Twenty Five Hundred Years before Christ was even around like that was when it was collected based off of these stories that were orally transmitted for thousands of years before that in the first five words of this ancient book are in the beginning God created. And then you know creatives yeah. Great critics love that but then it gets to humans and it says hey. Let's make them in our image. The only thing we know about our which God says let us make them in our image our image. The only thing we know about his image is that he was a creator That's the only piece of evidence you have up to that point in this old ancient book and so that's the beginning and then later as this creation happens in man pushes against it rebels. God's plan to be with people is distorted he then starts the slow process of polling people back to him and eventually he finds this character. And I'M GONNA mess up how to say his name so listeners. Please help me. I think it's bell ultimately I always say Brazil and I think I messed it up but eventually yeah. It's a little or something like that. The law in Exodus thirty one. It says I filled him with the divine spirit to create many things. Like I could look it up here. God filled with the spirit of God in wisdom and understanding and knowledge and all manner of workmanship design artistic works to work gold and silver and bronze and cutting jewels for setting in carving wood into work in all manner of workmanship. Okay great thanks for the Bible lesson again but really this guy. Bazil was creating a place for God to dwell with us on the Earth again That was his assignment. It was his assignment and if This commentary in the Bible. I was reading. It says the first person the Bible mentions as being filled with the spirit. Was this guy and I read that a couple years ago and I was like what. How do I know that as a person who's been working for a long time I think work? Why is work inherently creative because we are made in as humans? We are made in God's image what we know about God's image is that he was a creator and he wants to manifest his ideas through us like he did with this zillow guy in like. That's just like really profound in. I think that work that stuff we have inside us that we want to make or perform or build or teach or organize or whatever has been in there since before we were born. And I think it's because we are made in God's image to create think so often especially today it's really easy to get wrapped up in that word creative and think that that's a musician. That's an artist. That's a painter. Maybe that's a graphic designer may be threatening if they're good or not but it sounds like you're broadening the scope of what is creative. Were hundred percent when I was five years old. I went to my aunt's house in the summer and we had a week long. We stayed with her and I had to to her church and those at our church and there was a drawing contest and a church at Church it was like drawn. Noah's Ark so I drew Noah's Ark and I'm like I don't know you just draw. Draw the arts or a couple of animals on their turn it in well. There's no big deal to me. I saw it in my head at drew. The picture turned in while the teacher was like putting them up on the board in. I'm like Oh month month. Pretty good you know. I just remember thinking that and then the next kids look like a banana in the next kids. Look like you know something else and I was just sitting there thinking like holy cow. I just might win this thing. I just drew the Ark and did I ended up winning and it wasn't like Oh good. Someone's recognized my talent. It was I don't know I just saw the arc so I drew the Arkansas. The other kids didn't do that now. I was talking to another friend of mine and he was like I remember being pretty young and sitting in a pizza hut and I saw that the pizza cost ten ninety nine and I asked my dad how much the pizza cost and he goes. Oh a dollar ninety nine. In this friend he goes business he understood. It costs two dollars to make it and they charge ten. So that's how you make money. How old who's like seven okay. So as a seven year old he was understanding the concept of profit margins xactly. I never had those thoughts. I just figuring booth. Yes so the thing in me was to draw like I could just see things. I could connect dots. It could do that stuff. His was this business thing. I have other examples like my brother-in-law Brent huge entree fan has been through a lot of our stuff. He's always since as long as I can remember. Been the guy who ran the sound. Did the video had the CD's when he was a kit like he recorded all the movies. You know when you record movies on VHS. Three movies on one six hour he was. Just he's always just been drawn to this video technology side of things and I think it's because that is God's gift to each of us and they're all different but it's all made in his image which is to create because I think that thing were drawn to whether it's business organization drawing speaking whatever it is that is the creation God wants to create with you. Yeah that's amazing so I mean it's almost like what you're talking about is like as kids. We are creative. Yes we collective wheat. Everyone that's listening. This everyone the planet we are creative and then the thing that pulls us away from that has all these layers that we put on top of ourselves. But what you're saying. Is that our core? There is something creative inside of us under percent. I don't know what it is for each person. It's different but my wife we home school. We've got four kids. She when she was little she remembers setting up all her dolls in the basement and she was in front of these dolls and she was teaching on a whiteboard and she was probably five years old and now she loves it. And there's the slow poll towards that thing that has been in use since before you were born. I think in. There's there's relationships the squash it. There's parents that squash it or encourage it. There's just lots of reasons why you believe it or don't believe it but I think there is a pole towards something that has been in there since before you were born in. That is the creative so it almost seems like the way we can properly maximize our role in the president is to recognize that there is a piece of us that is creative that is demanded to be effective here. I think so. I don't know if it's demanded I think you can deny it. I think you can let fear or ignoring it. Or who am I to do that? Cover it up or years of pushing it away or things like that that can cause you not to use it. There are people. I know who haven't followed this thing and they're lazy or they don't do something with it and so maybe a little bit sad. It's sad it is sad if you don't use the thing it's really sad because you're not doing the gift I think. I think I believe that God wants to make this stuff with us. And he's like hoping we do you know giving us opportunities to do it. So is owning a small business inherently creative work. One hundred percent depends on how you got into it but I think there is a pole towards this thing The people I talked to. I did an entree mentoring session at the last ems. And I was talking to this guy. I'm blanking on his name but he ran an ambulance company an Independent Ambulance Company and it was like so. Why did you start it? And he was like. Oh we'll just something to do and I'm like no come on a wage cheaper in ways to just find some you and he goes. Well I worked at one of these places and they. It was just not a great experience. I just wanted to do something different. And I'm like okay. But what about the ambulance thing that? Why are you drawn to that? It's not just well. I didn't like the way that they did it. He was like I just love helping people. I just love helping people and he gets to do it like people in their most hardest time of need. And that's the real root I bet you. He's always been a sweet kid who was a helper when he was a kid. And that's the poll. And if you are oftentimes I think and data I don't have you know spreadsheets and stuff if you aren't working in that thing that you've been drawn to that's wearing Zaidi comes that sort of thing comes. That's where that sadness comes at. You were just talking about like if you can't express somehow that thing that's where you get stuck in alcoholism or a addictions and things like that I think. Because you're you're trying to squash or quiet this feeling that's been inside of you and Escape Reality Game. That's a great word for you

Chief Creative Officer Church Noah Zillow Brazil Bazil Arkansas Zaidi Independent Ambulance Company Brent President Trump
"twenty five hundred years" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"twenty five hundred years" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"All been about starvation he did not come to pass it all goes to explain the slogan out there liberalism is a mental disorder have a good day there thanks to have no the idea of over population has been going on for a long time it's hit drums up business for Planned Parenthood it has no basis in reality may come a point when we you have a population have reached a tele going critical mass but it eight billion people ain't it the idea you always see these futuristic movies where and and some of them are good movies like the fifth element I love the fifth element but the earth that they depicted in the whatever year it is twenty five something or other when they got flying cars member we are promised flying cars by the end of the nineties by the Jetsons and that didn't happen now movies are doing things like you know twenty five hundred years engine twenty five hundred of your twenty five hundred we have flying cars well time cop took with a horrible John Claude van Damme movie I believe that took place in nineteen ninety nine it was made in the eighties it is without the time travel was around in nineteen ninety nine Hollywood gets the future wrong all the time but all of these movies about the future it's always kind of dystopia we never actually figured out we never do well as a species in the future we have sort of oppressive poverty but then you see that the entire planet is giant buildings with people living on top of each other in studio apartments essentially like in the vin element where birds Willis lives in a studio apartment and a three hundred story building because there are so many people it's just so over crowded you fly from Baltimore to Los Angeles today and you will see more open space than you could ever possibly imagine we are not over populated we are not at the way the point of all my goodness we're all going to starve to death we don't have enough room we're living on top that's not how it works we're not anywhere near that I think people are polluted by a new look the earth is huge it's gigantic and it's hard to put that in context two people and you think well we look at this city living in Baltimore there these tall buildings and so many people in this one area cramps together it's not because there's nowhere else to go with not because you can't buy a house with a front lawn or go to a park somewhere people choose it for convenience sake where I chose it for thirteen years to live in Mount Vernon because a I didn't have a car be it couldn't afford a car so I was right near the trains and walking distance to a grocery store the idea that my god the planet cannot survive because of too many people we won't be able to feed ourselves in the eighties there was mass famine in Ethiopia every other commercial seem to me they were doing benefit concerts USA for Africa and Live Aid were all for dealing with the the starvation over there any V. O. pia which was man caused bad government man because it wasn't nature because we had plenty of food on the planet so yeah I'm I'm by the way on Los Angeles Jeff said you know talking about how it's a it's a it doesn't rain out there and certainly that's climate change well if you if a bomb urinates in the woods it causes a mud slide there's a reason for that Los Angeles was a desert until human beings decided to make it not a desert they made a very long river out of concrete to bring water and irrigation to the Los Angeles area it's naturally a desert so if it goes a while without rain that is not climate change that's at well in theory it is it's the climate trying to change it back to what it naturally was a desert that happens and when you don't cut down the underbrush that falls in your forests guess what happens that stuff dries out and a cigarette **** or lightning strike can cause a fire it's not climate change because while cigarette **** aren't necessarily a part of nature lightning strikes are and they've been around for a long time hurricanes and tornadoes and wild fires happened long before the evil white man ever set foot on this continent and they will continue in perpetuity because they are natural weird weird thought but it's true but let's talk about Vinny steal my body with remax community if you plan to sell your home and it's pretty safe to assume that you want to make the most money possible right of course that's why I recommend you call of any steel Maryland's real estate authority but he was just here a couple weeks ago and I learned why.

twenty five hundred years thirteen years
"twenty five hundred years" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"twenty five hundred years" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Next three segments book that is twenty four chapters long and we're at we're getting up to chapter twenty four Apollo is gone to the gods on Iran Olympus and said we got to stop this nightmare Achilles out of control but really the only got the matter Zeus right yeah and he's going to he's got in fact order that Achilles give the body back to the big the big man's gonna say okay this is this is it this is enough and and and and and the whole beware point right before break this is not a bad way to think about that hold on is he apologized to god is associated with delaying and and and wisdom and other things in art and so when you when you when you look at the story of the Kelly the one word to come to his mind he where he'd be where human being you know look what can happen to our own burning desires local can happen human being they can be this extreme aging outrageous deadly thing that simply has to be stopped at a certain point is so interesting is the is the warning against all burning desires rewarding specifically against anger hi well I think you know how that's a great question however is it the the the human beings and Homer has got engines like we don't quite have nowadays he got fired up today they want they want excellence glory victory and I think that that is good for Homer but when it is either not governed our questionably governed as it is in the case of the Kelly is it this monstrous thing hi my name is that that desire needs to educate it does need to be rejected cut out they need to be guided form and dean Smith who are we talking about right now what time of the killings yeah so lasted through twenty five hundred years ago outrage the body yeah but the guy comes to the end comes to do in our next segment when the Greeks considered the and they don't have to have it right there in the eighties so he was worried about immortality in song he got it did me yeah it's not clearly that what he was expecting I mean he he's mainly remembered for the outrage over the body about being a warrior too but I think that what Homer directly to ending up the power book twenty four which is the element of the well these and as as he says believe it or not for this guy in this condition and I'm going to grant him glory now now some of the surprises of the and is that the stream is Casey Kelley this guy is you know wondering by the ocean and yet her out and dragging about the body around he is actually gonna be Garside by the end of this call you have the sense that Zeus planned this all along or is god making up his mind the most powerful god as he goes along my sense is that this is the end of the wealthiest was working toward across the whole town that is huge and complicated subject and we have the time to go through all the nitty gritty but the bottom line at the end is I am going to grant him glory now so if someone is saying it and I'm going to sell that are coming to fill that out knowing he wasn't expecting and and it will involve giving the body of Hector back to this factor but what I was getting at complicated though it might be willing to break is it where Homer intended to and at the beginning obviously the poem is a complete poem but did did he set us up to look back at their houses had this planned all along I'd say yes I think this is the most interesting of the gods and the ending here their age well and with the with the return of the body and when the rate when their age and the alien hands and it looks to me like a perfectly made whole okay very satisfying and I think the will of the news hi this is working toward any and it's probably working toward book twenty four at the summit which is what piece.

twenty five hundred years
Becoming Indistractable: How to Acquire the Skill of the Century

The Small Business Radio Show

07:00 min | 1 year ago

Becoming Indistractable: How to Acquire the Skill of the Century

"Well. There is no doubt that today would technology. We Are Addicted to distraction attraction so much so that we don't get distracted for a short period of time we actually go looking for a distraction with all the buzzers and beeps. How do we ever get anything done here. To help is near Iol who's WHO's lectured at Stanford Graduate School of Business and they have so Plattner Institute of design. He's got a great a new book out called indestructible how to control your attention and choose your life which reveals the Achilles Heel distraction and provides a guidebook for getting the best technology without letting it get the best of US near. Welcome back to the show. Thanks for having me again. This is a huge problem because we can't get anything done because we always get so distracted. Does that mean that we gotta smash cellphone against Iran with some critics would tell you that that the problem is the technology. He and I believe that for a while and I I did all the books. Tell you to do out there. They tell you to go on a digital detox. A thirty day plan that technology is melting your brain. It's addicting all of us. There's nothing I think you can do about it. So I went ahead and got rid of my technology. I got myself a flip phone twelve dollars off of Alibaba then I got myself a word processor with no connection and I sat down on my desk and I said finally free of the technology. I'm going to be super focused and I still got distracted because I would say oh. There's that book that I've been meaning to read. You're my desk. It needs decluttering trash. It probably be taking it turns out that the subject of distraction and how to overcome it is way more complicated and way deeper deeper and more interesting. I think than just blaming technology yet again for our problem. So what you're saying is technology is just the latest iteration of being distracted. We've always been distracted. I I guess as long as we didn't it. When we had some free time or the luxury being distracted value? Couldn't we couldn't be more more correct trek that in fact Plato talked about the nature of class the tendency and we had to do things against her better interest twenty five hundred years ago people were complaining about. Oh boy isn't the world so so distracting these days and the world has always been distracted because people have always been distracted bowl and so the idea here behind my book is how do we become indestructible tractable and wouldn't that be a superpower if we could just do whatever it is. We say we're going to do to live with personal integrity because we know what to do already right. We know that if we want to be healthy we have to exercise and eat right if we want to have close relationships with our friends and loved ones. We have to be fully present with them. If we want to do our best work you have to focus and and do the hard work. Why don't we do these things we do. It's not because we don't know what to do if because distraction gets in our way and it's such a great point point near because it really pisses me off people. I don't have enough time to be able to do that and they just use time as an excuse when it really in my opinion is really about attention the intention actually right. That's absolutely right so you understand what is the action. We have to start with what distraction is not. The Opposite of distraction is not focus. The Opposite of distraction is traction. Most words come from the same Latin root which means to pull and they both ended the same six letter word Jason Wine. That's built accent so traction is any action that pulls you towards what you want to do. Things you do with intent the opposite did of traction. Is this traction any action that pulls you away from what you want to so. I'm not here to tell you what you do with your time. You should live live according to your your values what I want to help you whatever it is use as important to you in your life based on your values. That's what I want to help you do but a lot of times we say we need to focus on this right and we know we gotta do but then we just don't do it. What holds us back and how can we help ourselves be held accountable that that near absolutely so there are four basic steps to becoming indestructible in the first one is about understanding. What drives us to distraction and to answer that question? We have to take a step back and ask ourselves. What drives us to do anything? Why are people motivated to do everything that we do. In our day to day lives and if you ask most people this question they'll give you some version of carrots and sticks that everything we do about pursuing pleasure and avoiding pain right points of this and it turns out not true that in fact human motivation. Asian is not spurred by desire for pleasure and the avoidance of pain turns out that everything we do we do for one reason and one reason is the avoidance of discomfort. I'm for that everything you do even the pursuit of pleasure wanting something craving desire. There's a reason we say love hurts because neurologically speaking speaking that's the way the brain gets us to act and we know this is true physiologically right if you feel hunger pangs. That's not comfortable so you eat when you're stuffed on if it doesn't don't feel good when you stop eating so it turns out those are physiological sensations. The same is true with our psychological sensation so when we're lonely slowly we check facebook when we're uncertain we google when we're bored. We check stock prices. sports scores news all of these products and services catered to this uncomfortable emotional. IQ So if we can acknowledge that all human behavior is spurred by desire to escape discomfort this means that time management is pain management so all the productivity hacks all the life hacks all the grew tips that you hear out there are useless list in less first and foremost we understand how to manage discomfort. We mean to acknowledge. The reason they get distracted is because we are looking for emotional. Oh pacification the reason we pick up our phone. Check email. All we shouldn't get distracted by one thing or another is always because we are looking to not feel something that we are. Ill equipped to the away. It's interesting because we and I've seen you write about this before where we're going through our feed because we're looking to feel good about ourselves because we're trying to avoid doing something else. How do you get people to change their behavior because I really believe near that people only change if their incredible amount of pain what so it's not my job. Jabu change anybody's but I do think that this becoming indestructible is the skill century that there is a bifurcation going on between people who will allow themselves to be manipulated by others whether that's their boss their kids their spouse the news twitter facebook all of these potential distractions will guide your behaviors. There's in ways you don't intend or people who decide I am indestructible. I know how to manage my attention in order to control my life so I don't WanNa change anybody unless they're looking for it if you don't stuck with distraction as you get done everything you. WanNa do Everyday Kudos to you. Keep doing what you're doing. If you're anything like I was I would have this massive to do list of all these things I do and day after day. I just recycled that to do list from one day to

"twenty five hundred years" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"twenty five hundred years" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Its heyday about twenty five hundred years ago the city of Babylon was the biggest in the world some two hundred thousand people lived there you may have heard of king Nebuchadnezzar the second credited with the hanging gardens of Babylon one of the seven wonders of the ancient world or the tower of Babel from the Bible believed to be based on a real old Babylonian temple well that one is still there fifty miles or so south of Baghdad in what is now modern rock and for today at least Babylon is back in the headlines UNESCO has just officially named as a world heritage site and your skin around his in a rock she joins me now he Jane hi Mary Louise I have to start with my amazement that Babylon was not already a world heritage site why not yeah well the main reason is that it hasn't been treated very well so if you look around at the houses in neighboring villages they used to be made of bricks that were actually removed from the site of Babylon and then there were really big projects the British built a railway threw it in the nineteen twenties recently there been oil and gas lines laid through it the Saddam Hussein era he inscribed his own name in some of those bricks hi and then we have to mention that in two thousand and three the US led coalition put a helicopter landing pad in there so a lot of damage done to that site but the argument has been now that you should see that as a part of its history have not as an argument for not listing it as a world heritage site sounds like so much damage done to the original site over the years you've been there what does it look like when you visit Babylon today okay I'm gonna be honest here because it is one of those sites where you really have to use your imagination because it's huge and only ten percent of it has been excavated so you can see the original walls not all the way down because it's been built on layers but you can see these very high walls and on weekends it's packed with Iraqis if you go other days it's kind of desolate and empty but he was a magical thing that you want to that processional entryway and you can still see the original bricks from more than two thousand years ago with those figures of the dragons with the serpens heads and you're walking on four thousand years of human history and that in itself was absolutely magical modern Iraqis view it they are surrounded by so much history so much of it so ancient Roman what has been the reaction to the news today well there's been quite a lot of jubilation I reached American conservationist Jeff Allen by phone the indelible on tonight he's with the world monuments project and he's working on a U. S. funded project to help restore Babylon Austin how people were celebrating there are a number of people on the entrance of Babylon tonight you just want to be near the plates are there was a box full of local government officials who showed up get the picture site and July you're having a bit of celebration street people out in your cars being happy and glad that you're lacking and that's a wonderful thing that she's doing our records are just really healthier for once they're in the news for something good instead of like chaos in car bombs and and just briefly Jane what will this listing mean for Babylon diss me more resources to go in and you said it's only a fraction of that that's actually been excavated it probably will not be more resources for excavation but it will mean potentially more resources to protect what they have it will give the department of antiquities more power against ministries like the oil ministry that builds oil pipelines there in my free up some other ranking government money when I went there a few months ago there was no museum open there's no gift shop yes tell gift shop there's no cafe but mostly it will give it more publicity and and a rack is really hoping that tourists will start to come in for the first time in decades and here's gene arrive talking there about the ancient city of Babylon which UNESCO name today as.

Babylon twenty five hundred years four thousand years two thousand years ten percent
"twenty five hundred years" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"twenty five hundred years" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Medicare. All it is now. Not just employer. See they see Bernie Sanders. Turn that around the employee said changes in the system, if you have individual insurance, you're getting the system changed all the time. That's happened. To me. I mentioned CIGNA's great company a couple years ago. We got the note like eight different letters doctors going that was gone, by the way, we appreciate your business, but we're outta here on that particular policy. Have a nice day. You like your doctor keep production? Save twenty five hundred year except not. Well. And I was like, let's let's Medicare works. Pretty darn well for people who have Medicare the time to worry now where they say, well, let's just expanded. It'll be great governments. Fantastic. Government can't organize a one car funeral procession. One eight hundred seven sixty KFI B get some calls coming up here. One eight hundred seven sixty five three six two. I want to remind you about Stanley steamer why? Because Stanley steamer can do what you need them to do at any time. They are fantastic. There are a lot of reasons why people clean Stanley steamer, first and foremost, you clean the carpets and a great especially after the long winter after the rainy weather man after today, but there's a lot more remove the dirt the germs the allergens. It's allergy season get that stuff out of their clean the air. Ducts get it all done at the same time. Take a look at the spots and soiled animals areas. Repents kids, maybe both have left things in the carpeting, there's those spots. Tired of looking at them..

Stanley Bernie Sanders CIGNA twenty five hundred year
"twenty five hundred years" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"twenty five hundred years" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"On Google and come back to ancient life world dot com and per to CD today, non GMO, and all organic, you don't wanna be using a petroleum product. You want to be using the cleanest CBD product on the market patient life, oil dot com. We even have CBD for your pet. Help your pets discomfort help your discomfort. Log onto ancient life oil dot com. That's ancient life oil dot com. Newly reduced prices to pass off the savings to the most important person you ancient life, oil dot com, and one more thing we have topical. To. So if you have joint pain and some different issues that are going on in your body. You might wanna use a topical think about it. Ancient life oil dot com. Are you Doug, Andrew hair? I call my favorite financial vehicle. The laser fund laser is an acronym that stands for liquid assets safely. Earning returns delays are fun to limits. The dangers of rising taxes inflation and market volatility. You know, losing money when the stock market goes down is unacceptable to me. Learn how I protect myself when that happens I want you to have a free copy of my latest bestselling book the laser fund how to diversify and create the foundation for tax free retirement, especially if you have money trapped in an IRA or 4._0._1._K come and learn what you can do better for a half day. Learn how to retire by design in Layton, Salt Lake and Provo where teaching from ADM to two PM wherein. Layton, Friday, April twenty-sixth, Salt Lake Saturday, April twenty-seventh and Probo Saturday may fourth their free. Call now. Eight to six one eighty one eighty one call eight two. Six one eighty one eighty one trying to find them for twenty five hundred years.

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Nancy Sinatra Sr., Frank Sinatra's first wife, dead at 101

Radio Surgery

02:41 min | 3 years ago

Nancy Sinatra Sr., Frank Sinatra's first wife, dead at 101

"The ad council she met him when he was just an up and coming singer now nancy sinatra the first wife of frank sinatra has died fox's gary bomb garten has the story nancy sinatra was the first of frank sinatra's four wives she was also the mother of sinatra's three children like her legendary husband the first mrs frank sinatra was also a native of new jersey they met on the jersey shore in one thousand nine hundred thirty four when sinatra was a relatively obscure singer they were married from nineteen thirty nine to nineteen fifty one and just days after their divorce sinatra married wife number two glamour girl ava gardner antsy sinatra senior dead at the age of one hundred and one gary von garten fox news well as of today there's legalize sports betting with an easy reach of new york city the betting now taking place at the jersey meadowlands home of football's giants and jets a supreme court ruling cleared the way for sports wagering outside of nevada and already some new yorkers are making the trek to bet on their favorite teams well there's a change for women in the navy as we hear from fox's rachel sutherland women in the navy can let their hair down ponytails and other hairstyles are now permitted changing a longstanding policy that had forbidden it sailor yeoman first class with toya jones made the announcement this past week emails sailors were dinner dress uniforms will be allowed to your hair in that falls below the collar shirts jackets and co many black women had asked for grooming standards to be changed the new policy also allows lock hairstyles in rope like strands in wider hair buns in washington rachel sutherland fox news startling discovery in egypt archaeologists have found a mummification workshop near the country's fame pyramid south south of cairo the also discovered a shaft uses an ancient burial place the site is twenty five hundred years old located in egypt's first capital i'm rocker starring fox news radio for heat and humidity for sears we head through the weekend afternoon readings expected to be in the nineties all the way into the start of our business week sunshine here this afternoon window ninety s partly cloudy tonight low seventies fix of clouds and sun hot and humid sunday widely scattered late afternoon or evening showers and storms possible tomorrow mid nineties tomorrow afternoon better chance to see some showers and storms monday and tuesday i'm ken boone from the weather channel for talkradio six eighty wcbs no there's water everywhere dad a pipe broke my carpet we need a plumber fast does plumbing we need somebody to clean up this water and runner ruder does water cleanup find a phone and all.

FOX Gary Bomb Garten Mrs Frank Sinatra Football Nevada Navy Toya Jones Cairo Egypt Ken Boone Nancy Sinatra Sinatra New York Rachel Sutherland Washington Twenty Five Hundred Years
Properties of Water

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

04:08 min | 3 years ago

Properties of Water

Twenty Five Hundred Years Hundred Years Two Weeks
"twenty five hundred years" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

03:56 min | 3 years ago

"twenty five hundred years" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Is just a blind process not a conscious designer now one thing is getting genes into the next generation genetically based traits than in the past contributed to genetic proliferation of flourished all traits that haven't fallen by the wayside and the traits that have survived this test include mental traits structures and algorithms that are built into the brain and our everyday experience so if you ask the question what kinds of perceptions and thoughts and feelings guide us through life every day the answer at the most basic level is not the kinds of thoughts and feelings and perceptions that give us an accurate picture of reality no at the most basic level the answer is the kinds of thoughts and feelings and perceptions that helped our ancestors get genes into the next generation whether those thoughts and feelings and perceptions give us a true view of reality is strictly speaking beside the point is the result they don't our brains are designed to among other things delude us not that there's anything wrong with that some of my happiest moments have come from delusion believing for example that the tooth fairy would pay me a visit after i lost a tooth delusion can also produce bad moments and i don't just mean moments that in retrospective in retrospect obviously delusional like horrible nightmares elsa mean moments that you might not think of is delusional such as lying awake at night with anxiety or feeling hopeless even depressed for days on end or feeling bursts of hatred toward people i the may actually feel good for a moment but slowly corrode your character or feeling bursts of hatred toward yourself or feeling greedy feeling a compulsion of buy things are eat things or drink things well beyond the point where your well being served though these feelings iety despair hatred greed art delusional the way of is delusional examined them closely you'll see that they have elements of delusion elements you'd be better off without and if you think you would be better off imagine how the whole world would be after all feelings like despair and hatred agreed can foster wars and atrocities so if what i'm saying is true if these basic sources of human suffering and human cruelty are indeed a large part of our in large part the product of delusion there is value in exposing this delusion the light so as logical right there's a problem that i started to appreciate shortly after i wrote my book on evolutionary psychology exact value of exposing a delusion to the light depends on what kind of light you're talking about is understanding the ultimate source of your suffering doesn't by itself helped very much let's take a simple befuddle mental example eating some junk food briefly satisfied and only minutes later feeling kind of crash and maybe a hunger for more junk food this is a good example to start with two reasons i it all straits subtle are delusions can be there's no point in the course of eating a six pack a small power uttered sugar donuts when you're when you're believing that you're the messiah or the foreign agents are conspiring to assassinate you that's true many sources of delusions that all discussing this book they're more about illusion about things not being quite what they seem then about delusion in the more dramatic sense of the word still by the end of the book i'll have argued that all of these allusions do add up to a very large scale warping of reality a disorientation that is as significant inconsequential as out and out delusion second reason junk food is a good example of start is that it's fundamental to the buddhist teachings okay and can't be literally fundamental of the buddhist teachings because twenty five hundred years ago the buddha todd junk food is we didn't exist what's fundamental the buddha's teachings though is the general dynamic of being powerfully drawn to sensory pleasure the winds of fleeting at best one of the buddha's main messages is that the pleasures we seek evaporate quickly leave us thirsting for more we spend our time looking for the next gratifying thing the next powdered sugar doughnut the next sexual encounter next status enhancing promotion the next online purchase but the.

twenty five hundred years
"twenty five hundred years" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

03:25 min | 3 years ago

"twenty five hundred years" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"And algorithms that are built into the brain and shape our everyday experience though if you ask the question what kinds of perceptions and thoughts and feelings guide us through life every day the answer at the most basic level is not kinds of thoughts and feelings and perceptions that give us an accurate picture of reality no at the most basic level the answer is the kinds of thoughts and feelings and perceptions that helped our ancestors get genes into the next generation of those thoughts and feelings and perceptions give us a true view of reality is strictly speaking beside the point is result they summarize don't our brains are designed to among other things delude us there's anything wrong with that so my happiest moments have come from delusion leaving for example that the tooth fairy would pay me a visit after i lost a tooth delusion can also produce bad moments and i don't just mean moments that in retrospective in retrospect obviously delusional like horrible nightmares elsa mean moments that you might not think of is delusional such as lying awake at night with anxiety or feeling hopeless even depressed for days on end or feeling bursts of hatred toward people i them actually feel good for a moment but slowly corrode your character or feeling of hatred towards yourself or feeling greedy feeling a compulsion to buy things are eat things or drink things well beyond the point where your well being served though these feelings anxiety despair hatred greed art delusional away a nightmare is delusional you examine them closely you'll see that they have elements of delusion elements you'd be better off without and if you think you would be better off imagine how the whole world would be after all feelings like despair and hatred agreed can foster wars and atrocities so if what i'm saying is true if these basic sources of human suffering and human cruelty are indeed a large part of our in large part the product of delusion there is value in exposing this delusion the light as logical right there's a problem that i started to appreciate shortly after i wrote my book on evolutionary psychology exact value of exposing a delusion to the light depends on what kind of light you're talking about sometimes understanding the ultimate source of your suffering doesn't by itself helped very much let's take a simple but fundamental example eating some junk food briefly satisfied and only minutes later feeling a kind of crash and maybe a hunger for more junk food this is a good example to start with two reasons i l how subtle are delusions can be there's no point in the course of eating a six pack a small power uttered sugar donuts when you're when you're believing that you're the messiah or the foreign agents are conspiring to assassinate you that's true many sources of delusions that all discussing this book more about allusion about things not being quite what they seem then about delusion in the more dramatic sense of the word still by the end of the book i'll have argued that all of these allusions do add up to a very large scale warping react a disorientation that is as significant inconsequential as out delusion second reason junk food is a good example of start is that it's fundamental to the buddhist teachings okay i can't be literally fundamental of the buddhist teachings because twenty five hundred years ago the buddha todd junk food is we know it didn't exist what's fundamental the buddha's teachings though is the general dynamic of being powerfully drawn to sensory pleasure that winds up fleeting at best one of the buddhist main messages is that the pleasures we seek evaporate quickly and.

twenty five hundred years
"twenty five hundred years" Discussed on The Andrew Klavan Show

The Andrew Klavan Show

04:15 min | 3 years ago

"twenty five hundred years" Discussed on The Andrew Klavan Show

"The guy dial died maybe it's almost twenty five hundred years ago and here he is saying the wisdom of the world this is why the left tries to destroy our education because the wisdom of the world is conservative i'll tell you somebody somebody else who said something important abraham lincoln who said the fastest way to get the best way to get a bad law repealed is to enforce it strictly and that is what has happened now have we gotten great so yesterday trump signed an executive order saying that children can stay together even though he says that he's going to still be strictly enforcing our immigration laws so that everybody's saying oh well he's caved in he turned around now they've got him on the run but i am wondering whether he has actually outsmarted the opposition on this do we do we have jen this is hi jen how you doing i think having me back let me just remind people that you are the director of public policy for the james dobson family institute and accomplished constitutional law attorney with also a background in criminal law and the author of the legal basis for a moral constitution hello so so explain to people what exactly does the executive order say yeah trump was incredibly brilliant here when this news first broke yesterday morning i was frankly a little bit concerned going what is going to be the substance of this executive order but if you actually read it don't just read all of the people talking about it and the different perspectives i mean definitely read some of the good ones including mine but definitely read the executive order and it's titled affording congress and opportunity to address family separation and that's really already it is and so an executive order is just a formalized executive actions so president trump could have done this just by directing attorney general jeff sessions and the secretary of defense himself he could have just done this but he wanted to tell the american public what he's doing and all he said is that our policy as the executive branch is to enforce the law we can't do anything that is over and above what congress legislates and that's entirely constitutional so if you actually read this all he saying is we're going to enforce the law and to the extent that is allowed by law and available resources then we will keep families together and that's a very good thing but he saying congress and the court system which is a nod to the floor hey florida's then that's that's really the extent that's allowed by what so this was a brilliant move where he saying our hands are tied here if you don't like this by the way kamala harris who said the executive order does nothing we'll of course it doesn't because president trump actually isn't a dictator and he is an excellent one and this is a key thing he's saying congress in article one section when you have all legislative authority this is your job to do something about it they're bidding him to be addicted or basically when there's when chuck schumer's shaking that penitent he's basically begging him to be addicted now the the wall street journal keeps saying oh this is a new policy the separating children is a new policy and the way they write it is very foggy they make it sound as if like trump just invented this idea who i have a good idea let's pull kids away from their from their parents but that's not right no not at all i mean this has been an issue that has gone back i mean the the floor versus reno janet reno who is of course bill clinton's attorney general this issue an immigration gratien generally has been an issue since the founding of our country and immigration and naturalization is given to congress to legislate on but this particular issue goes all the way back to the clinton administration and that particular settlement in nineteen ninety seven and so it's amazing to me injure that this is just suddenly some kind of peak crisis moment right at the same time that the inspector general's report is coming out that shows the bias of the fbi that shows really really negatively on hillary clinton in the democratic party now all of the sudden it's trump's fault and like you said everyone's saying we want him to act like a dictator yet he's literally hitler who was a dictator but somehow we're supposed to reconcile the two they're trying to put him in a no win situation.

twenty five hundred years
"twenty five hundred years" Discussed on The Upgrade by Lifehacker

The Upgrade by Lifehacker

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"twenty five hundred years" Discussed on The Upgrade by Lifehacker

"If you have any background in that he was interested in processes under causes essentially and that's a very modern view of things i joked that he was a premodern post modernist because he was very much into disentangling the different threads in the tapestry experienced deconstructing experience and deconstructing the apparent self in particular and so you know when i became more and more knowledgeable about but as some it just seemed like it was a natural map to what in the world is going on the brain because twenty five hundred years ago there were no amr is or eeg's but there was a deep penetrating interest through contemporary training down into really small beaumont's of experience a lot of granularity of mindfulness if you will and now with modern brit science we know more and more clearly what the mapping is minimally the code relating correlating of underlying physical neuro processing to ongoing experiences the ongoing streamofconsciousness hidden that becomes very practical which is my particular interest i'm really interested in how we can use our growing knowledge of what's happening inside the three pounds of tofu inside the coconut right inside the black box of the brain how can we use that knowledge in practical ways to stimulate neural processes neuro circuits neuro regions and insulting strengthen them and thereby strengthen the mental factors like happiness wisdom that those underlying neural processes support so your book resilient it's divided into twelve primary inner strengths that help build resilience can you tell us a little bit about those fundamental idea i will would is resilience than why should i care resilience is about both surviving terrible conditions and thriving every day particularly in pursuing your goals and opportunities in the face of challenges so.

beaumont twenty five hundred years three pounds
"twenty five hundred years" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

The Jordan Harbinger Show

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"twenty five hundred years" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

"Answer either sometimes where we were so good at lying to ourselves that maybe i maybe a never really find the internal trigger maybe i've really convinced myself that i'm hungry well two things actually lack of self compassion and a lack of belief in your own power so let me talk about self compassion i that studies have found that the more self compassionate you are the more likely to achieve your long term goals and this is anti thankful i think how we are raise that we think no pain no gain right and then you know it's if you don't suffer then you didn't work hard enough and i don't think that's true actually for for these type of things that we need to be compassionate with ourselves socrates plato twenty five hundred years ago talked about a crazy this nature of human beings to do things against their better interests so as you said distraction is not new it is part of the human condition i mean the brain is built to be distracted right think about i mean if you've ever tried to meditate just thinking about nothing is really hard it's impossible very difficult so the brain is constantly getting us off track it's natural you're born like that there's nothing wrong with it but we expect ourselves to have these these willpower that would let us accomplish what we wanna competent then we beat ourselves up when we don't or when we feel something we don't want to feel and so the answer instead of self compassion and is curiosity rather than beating ourselves up and then the second big mistake i see is that we think were powerless there was a really good study done a few years ago that found that the number one determinate of whether an alcoholic would relapse was not the amount of physical dependency k wasn't the amount of actual alcohol that they consumed it wasn't the level of physical dependency that didn't determine whether they would relapse after treatment it was the belief in their own powerlessness and i see this all the time and this is what scares me about this recent all these recent stories about with.

twenty five hundred years
"twenty five hundred years" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"twenty five hundred years" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Light house logical right there's a problem that i started to appreciate shortly after i wrote my book on evolutionary psychology exact value of exposing a delusion to the light depends on what kind of light you're talking about is understanding the ultimate source your suffering doesn't by itself helped very much let's take a simple but fundamental example eating some junk food briefly satisfied and only minutes later feeling a kind of crash and maybe a hunger for more junk food this is a good example to start with two reasons i it will strates how subtle are delusions can be there's no point in the course of eating a six pack a small power uttered sugar donuts when you're when you're believing that you're the messiah or the foreign agents are conspiring to assassinate that's true many sources of delusions that all discussing this book they're more about allusion about things not being quite what they seem then about delusion in the more dramatic sense of the word still by the end of the book i'll have argued that all of these allusions do add up to a very large scale warping of reality disorientation that is as significant inconsequential as out delusion second reason junk food is a good example of start is that it's fundamental to the buddhist teachings okay can't be literally fundamental the buddhist teachings because twenty five hundred years ago the buddha taught junk food as we know it didn't exist what's fundamental the buddhist teachings though is the general dynamic of being powerfully drawn to sensory pleasure the winds of fleeting best one of the buddha's main messages is that the pleasures we seek evaporate quickly and leave us thirsting for more we spend our time looking for the next gratifying thing next powdered sugar doughnut the next sexual encounter the next status enhancing promotion next.

twenty five hundred years
"twenty five hundred years" Discussed on Think Again

Think Again

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"twenty five hundred years" Discussed on Think Again

"Vast scholarship and argument over these over twenty five hundred years and then you land sort of where i like to start to modern accounting of it is a nineteen sixty two conference at the vatican where john eccles the nobel laureate in neuro science at the time a man who figured out how the senate apps work of the brain and so forth put together a conference call brain and conscious experience and he had all kinds of people there but those same three ideas were represented by the then current narrow sinus eccles himself was dualist donald mcivor distinguished neuroscientist physicists from uk had the best kind mechanical articulated view but he thought there was a spirit after death and then my former mentor roger sperry was there and he he thought it was more that's the brain could develop middle states which could then control the brain parts but it was all physical it was all part of the biologic system so the same three ideas twenty five hundred years later now in the hands of the early modern neuroscientist singing about there are the same and i virtually say that those pretty much stick around today to and why do you think in a nutshell why why so persistent why so hard to shake well no one's come up with compelling other answer so there there's not a force entrant here there's all kinds of arguments in complexities about the nature of the structure of it and you know in modern terms may just too simple over simplify probably but get sense of it there's there the philosophers had have done a lot of work on this and there's kind of the school will talk about john searle at berkeley who believes that subjective experience is a real thing and can be studied in the brain and that's the story and then you got the the other distinguish philosopher dan did it who says well certainly is something but it's probably an allusion and when we figure out how the brain works it'll it'll be done in an illusion a fashion you seem to somewhat agree with tenets view that there is some aspect of illusion going on.

senate donald mcivor uk roger sperry john searle berkeley dan john eccles twenty five hundred years
"twenty five hundred years" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"twenty five hundred years" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Light house logical right there's a problem but i started to appreciate shortly after i wrote my book on evolutionary psychology exact value of exposed delusion to the light depends on what kind of light you're talking about sometimes understanding the ultimate source of your suffering doesn't by itself helped very much let's take a simple but fundamental example eating some junk food briefly satisfied and only minutes later feeling kind of crash and maybe a hunger for more junk food this is a good example to start with two reasons i it will strates how subtle are delusions can be there's no point in the course of eating a six pack a small power uttered sugar donuts when you're when you're believing that you're the messiah or the foreign agents are conspiring to assassinate you that's true of many sources of delusions that all discussing this book they're more about ill losing about things not being quite what they seem about delusion in the more dramatic sense of the word still by the end of the book i'll have argued that all of these allusions do add up to a very large scale warping of reality a disorientating that is as significant inconsequential as out and out delusion second reason junk food is a good example of start is that it's fundamental to the buddhist teachings okay i can't be literally fundamental of the buddhist teachings because twenty five hundred years ago the buddha taught junk food is we didn't exist what's fundamental the buddha's teachings though is the general dynamic of being powerfully drawn to sensory pleasure it winds up fleeting at best one of the buddha's main messages is that the pleasures we seek evaporate quickly and leave us thirsting for more we spend our time looking for the next gratifying thing next powdered sugar doughnut the next sexual encounter the next status enhancing promotion the next.

twenty five hundred years
"twenty five hundred years" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:55 min | 3 years ago

"twenty five hundred years" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Why is that is worth looking at so absolutely yeah absolutely you say you also write about the word housework because that's yeah and it was a time in the you know an agricultural times everybody worked at home and the word didn't even can't come into the dictionary until the eighteen thirties when industrialisation began to take place then work was separated from home for the first time you know the factories were created and and so that work has really never been included in economic thinking because for about twenty five hundred years since the word or you know me i whisper coined the economics has been pretty man demand conversation and a pretty exclusive man demand conversation in other words he's been a particular class a particular race with particular expectations and education so it's it's through now makes is my attempt to make that conversations more visible that history more visible and provide people with the vocabulary that is often obfuscating and founding you know like what is the collateral debt obligation or you know what are these energy and we also you know in all fairness the the the way in which are konami is today and the fact that we're not teaching anyone let alone women some of the basics in our schools in or just starting to is just appalling as well it is it is are their efforts i mean i think women have to take a little bit of responsibility for a little just a allowing and i think this is changing and i hope screen now makes as part of that change but we because we have seen that this is a sort of exclusive conversation going on and it doesn't have much to do with us they leave out so much that is important to us that we we love and we've got plenty of other important things that we essential things that we really have to do that we've been willing to sort of let the guys take care of this and look at washington or wall street though the bigger the piles of money the more exclusively male the territory tends to be and we women really have to begin paying closer attention and beginning to have conversations with each other about our lives or economic lie live it's.

konami washington twenty five hundred years
"twenty five hundred years" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

03:03 min | 3 years ago

"twenty five hundred years" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"That is worth looking at so yeah absolutely yeah absolutely in you say you also write about the word housework because that's yeah and it was a time you know in agricultural times everybody worked at home and the word didn't even can't come into the dictionary until the eighteen thirties when industrialisation began to take place then work was separated from home for the first time you know the factories were created and and so that work has really never been included in economic thinking because for about twenty five hundred years since the word or you know me i was i coined the economics has been pretty man demand conversation and pretty exclusive mantoman conversation in other words he's been a particular class a particular race with particular expectations in education so it's do now makes is my attempt to make that conversation more visible that history more visible and provide people with the vocabulary that is often obfuscating and confounding you know like what is the collateral debt obligation or you know what are these energy you know and we also you know in all fairness the the the way in which our economy is today and the fact that we're not teaching anyone let alone women some of the basics in our schools in or just starting to is just appalling as well it is it is their efforts i mean i think women have to take a little bit of responsibility for a little just allowing and not i think this is changing and i hope now mix as part of that change but we because we have seen that this is a sort of exclusive conversation going on and it doesn't have much to do with us they leave out so much that is important it was that we we love and we've got plenty of other important things that we essential things that we really have to do that we've been willing to sort of let the guys take care of this and look at washington or wall street though the bigger the piles of money the more exclusively male the territory tends to be and we women really have to begin paying closer attention and beginning to have conversations with each other about our lives or economic lives it's still a very taboo subject and i hope that makes makes that a little bit easier to well i can tell you that we're we have to have you.

washington twenty five hundred years
"twenty five hundred years" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"twenty five hundred years" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Light house logical right there's a problem but i started to appreciate shortly after i wrote my book on evolutionary psychology exact value of exposing a delusion to the light depends on what kind of light you're talking about sometimes understanding the ultimate source your suffering doesn't by itself helped very much let's take a simple but fundamental example eating some junk food briefly satisfied and only minutes later feeling a kind of crash and maybe a hunger for more junk food this is a good example to start with two reasons i l strates how subtle are delusions can be there's no point in the course of eating a six pack a small power uttered sugar donuts when you're when you're believing that you're the messiah or that foreign agents are conspiring to assassinate you that's true many sources of delusions that all discussing this book they're more about illusion about things not being quite what they seem about delusion in the more dramatic sense of the word still by the end of the book i'll have argued that all of these allusions do add up to a very large scale warping of reality disorientation that is as significant inconsequential as out and out delusion second reason junk food is a good example of start is that it's fundamental to the buddhist teachings okay i can't be literally fundamental of the buddhist teachings because twenty five hundred years ago the buddha todd junk food as we know didn't exist what's fundamental the buddhist teachings though is the general dynamic of being powerfully drawn sensory pleasure winds a fleeting at best one of the buddha's main messages is that the pleasures we seek evaporate quickly.

twenty five hundred years
"twenty five hundred years" Discussed on WREK

WREK

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"twenty five hundred years" Discussed on WREK

"Moon now they didn't land on the moon they're tough scouting out possible lending sites for future apollo eight mission but it's when humans shoot away from earth straight into space and it's that mission that yield at the famous photograph earth rise where you can see earth rising in the distance uh above the rising of the moon but there's something else that happened on that mission that i find incredibly moving namely the apollo wait mission would disappear on the far side of the moon for about fifty minutes and there would be no radio contact there's always a lot of drama about whether they would reappear and reestablished radio contact or not and so there's always these bought fifty minutes self off tents waiting and when the crew when the apollo aid capsule appeared on the on the other side of the moon and reestablished radio contact they had a message for earth for the earthlings uh and they had prepared it ahead of time they had written it on fireproof piece of paper since we talked about paper and they took turns reading it and and what they read was and god created the heavens and the earth the opening of genesis for me that's important for two reasons one that at this moment at this historic moment the humans would turn to an old text a text that's twenty five hundred years old to read at that moment of technological advancements and that this old text which turned out to be sold perfect for capturing that experience off the astronauts being floating up there in space seeing earth for the first time from a seeing it in the distance and this just captured the the power of old stories which is really what the book is about in a beautiful way well after all the years and decades and centuries has what we consider to be literature changed along the way you know it it has and one of the things that i wanna communicate in the book is that when we tend to think of literature i think a lot of us including me tend to think of the fiction bookshelf it you know in the book and and yes that's nice nice form of entertainment but how important can that be but what i tried to do is look at deep history off of written stories and what.

fifty minutes twenty five hundred years