24 Burst results for "Twenty First Century"

"twenty first century" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

02:16 min | 11 months ago

"twenty first century" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

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"twenty first century" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

03:33 min | 11 months ago

"twenty first century" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Left reckoned postgame with harvey and check out our mark levin. I'm also curious to hear from people in their life who have like mark levin like uncles or dads like. That's the main demographic who's watching this. And i just i want like that sucks because like i mean i know people who listen to stuff but like levin is just a different kind of abrasive and hysterical that i think like must do something to your psyche for like at least a few hours after you. Listen to a show so anxious for people to comment on that but patriot dot com slash. Recommend alright. let's reckoning checkout. No mckee show brandon's on here yet. But maria's matt can't join us he is away this week but checkout doomed and of course Once brandon joins us he. Oh plug something else will. Brandon is joining us here tomorrow. A recording for this weekend. A conversation with 'em kenema of the communication workers association and Of gamers united shoot. I game workers united. I think Talk about Unionized in the video game industry and digital workplaces in general so that be for patrons will really set for everybody. Afterwards hey brandon. Hey hey how's it going not bad what's happening Over on the discourse we'll just finishing up editing. Our latest episodes should be out on the soundcloud by india today. So look forward to that. You know we talk about riding covert number. We talk about the league of in brother. America leaving afghanistan and a host of other things including the nine hundred ninety. Eight of addition of charmed. Wow i do remember watching charmed on sick days and over in the summers That was that that that was like a fun. Show But i don't know if i would have the wherewithal to talk about it on a podcast brandon. I feel like we should say this with the f. I want to ask you sick days. Oh gotcha what what we did on sick days. Kids are generations of sectors. I think was one of the best. Maybe oh all right. Six four six five seven thirty nine twenty see in half Good leftist. That jamie and i may have a disagreement. Yeah you can't just say whatever you want about people just because you're rich. I have an absolute right. Mock them on youtube up there buggy wedding. I am not your employer negatively. I'm sorry. I didn't mean upset. European nervous here a little bit sat you riled up. Yeah maybe you should rethink your defensive at your fucking idiot which is going to get rid of you all right but dude. Do you want to smoke his joint. Yes you feel like you are a dinosaur.

mark levin brandon joins brandon kenema of the communication wo levin harvey mckee maria Brandon matt united afghanistan india America jamie youtube
"twenty first century" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

08:18 min | 11 months ago

"twenty first century" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"All right well. Let's talk a little bit more about the afghanistan withdrawal so yesterday known white supremacists sympathizer or. It was two days ago because it was at on on at night on. Laura ingraham show stephen miller. He went on her. Show two shocker. Fear monger about afghan refugees coming into the united states which is the least we can do after occupying that country for twenty years and causing lots of death But of course he's against it. And so cnn invited in afghanistan veteran onto their program to respond. And i thought it was pretty interesting. I i will say this is kind of something that outlets like. Cnn really loved to do because they just really like the concept of military officials pushing back against trump officials theme we saw throughout the trump administration. But i thought this was pretty fascinating and good actually. So let's take a look tree that we would take them to ours. What do you say to that. I have that man has been my personal nemesis now for almost eight years. I've been fighting him since he was jeff. Sessions's senate staffer. As far as i'm concerned he personally is as complicit as the taliban in these people's desk he should be held accountable for war crimes. He spent the entirety of the trump administration purposely. Trying to prevent these people from coming here. I've had meetings with him and his ilk. I brought the interpreter to who saved my life to some of those meetings. We we met with a lady by the name of andrea loving. She's deputy counsel for the house Judiciary committee for the gop. Janice and i were sitting. In a meeting with her she she's stevens counterpart. At in congress we were debating about whether or not congress allocate more visas for these people. She doesn't articulated what his platform was. I pointed to janice. I said you know this gentleman who saved my life. Maybe you've just never had a chance to meet. Afghan helped put a face to these people's names and they looked at me and they said you're doing nothing but letting islamic fundamentalist terrorists into our country and it's our job to stop you wrong. These are our people. There is no us and them. There's just an us. And you know what stephen miller never wore a uniform a day in his life. He's a privileged little brat. He ought to be held for war crimes. I can't stand that man. I can't believe that you're even giving him any more airtime. That that's the reason why that guys used continue to get publicizes because the media keeps putting him out there. That guy doesn't represent america. Here is the worst of us. What's going on right. Now is the best of us. I'm currently involved with a massive airlift planning operation from my living room. There are veterans all over the country who are organizing a digital dunkirk. We're not getting any sleep. We are determined to see our people get out and we're not going arresting till do it effectively and efficiently and most importantly we take them. All but people stephen miller needed to sit down and shut up because he's been part of the problem for too long matt you so i thought that was powerful. An interesting variety of ways. Stephen miller prosecuted for war crimes. I mean that's like an interesting perspective there. But i mean we should There should be a definite work crimes. Tribunal for what happened there. My point is that he's not like he's a white supremacist. But he's not the first on my list of people who need to be prosecuted for war crimes. There were a lot of people who had a lot. More power including george w bush including obama who committed war crimes including trump who committed war crimes. Who might be a little bit higher on the list. Dick cheney donald rumsfeld a variety of other actors and characters who should be on although don rumsfeld maybe post but regardless. I did like what he said there because look the way that people like stephen miller see their role in america is of course. Preserving white hegemony but they talk about islamic extremists. They kind of see that as a parallel ideology for them because they are white christian fundamentalists extremists in this country and so they characterize all muslim people under that same banner in order to fuel their us versus them project which hides their own extremism because it gets people. Say i'm on this team or whatever. the The outrage justified given i would imagine some difficulties with him that that that veteran they're mad seller grappling with. Why the hell we were even there. And why he was. Even though. I mean if we're going to limit our analysis to the withdrawal from afghanistan with the failure resenting not get into like the occupation itself but the withdrawal. The failure is the lack of you know accommodation to get people out of there safely and that is entirely because of a stephen miller and his explicit objectives as a person public life but also the democrats have been too afraid and they've basically allowed him veto and they should stop being so afraid of letting refugees into this country. Absolutely i mean the this biden was completely. I know he's updated stands for afghan refugees but he was too afraid to let in more refugees because they fear of like this blowback from the miller types in the tucker carlson types. You were going to call you a sympathizer with the 'cause they're also worried about the message would santo the refugees from other parts of the globe and this is part of that. Deterrence thing where they say like. Don't come here right. Well we if we're going to say that all of the nations that have been touched by us imperialism and our death squads and our and our military interventions that they have a right to come here because of what we've done to their nations. Wow that's a slippery slope So that's exactly right but unfortunately for peacock audience. We are out of time and we will see you tomorrow on which is a friday. That is the day of the fry interesting end for me. I know really. Yeah well. I hope i hope you guys love it. This is what you're gonna get for the next six shows so we're going to head into the fun half shortly math. Oh i know left reckoning happened on wednesday. You have some patriot on content. I imagine we had a hurricane and live last night. We talked about afghanistan a little bit and also biden two hundred days and why he basically all fdr talk was little bit little bit premature and a bit silly and then we also did about a half hour on mark levin which was a bit of an odyssey. I've never done a big deep dive into mark because he's very unpleasant to listen to compared to like donald trump or rush limbaugh to your impression. That was pretty good eleven. Yeah our skylife fast solid ski and and then the post-kim very fun harvey stayed with us. And i got him to talk a little bit about tom. Paine and his rivalry with John adams who turns out was a bit of a mark. Levin of time and tom paine was sort of the saul alinsky to John adams back then he thought tom paints overly democratizing. Philosophy was everywhere and didn't like that because he he was a bit of it aristocrat Desirer himself so a patriot dot com slash..

stephen miller afghanistan house Judiciary committee Cnn Laura ingraham united states donald rumsfeld congress Janice taliban janice andrea stevens gop jeff senate george w bush Dick cheney matt biden
"twenty first century" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

10:02 min | 11 months ago

"twenty first century" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Kind of took a risk on different things and one of the really interesting things that we found. Was that one of the kind of key leaders in new virginia woman in new in like really talented organizer. And you know i remember. We spent a day kind of shattering her in the region state house and she's had these incredible relationships with these elected officials throughout and i think that was one of the things that we really learned. That was interesting that unlike these bit the big kind of newsworthy protests and rallies like so much of this work in terms of shifting the political power in favor of these organizations happened through this kind of negotiation negotiation had to be grounded in the work out in the community. What do you do though when they won't even take your calls like i mean. There was a report that came out of arizona to bring it back about how christian cinema just doesn't even doesn't even take calls from organizers on the left immigrant rights for example groups in in arizona. Like how do you move the unmovable. Yeah so i mean in in organizing. That is kind of like this idea. I tell the difference between sort of building power with versus building power over and so you know a lot of cases will you can do is you can build power with elected official right like you have shared interests right. They want votes and they want support. You've got constituency that you've organized and so you can tennis trade your resources to act on each other's interests so they support the agenda that you're trying to advance and then you help support them with boats and other kinds of things that that they might need and that's that's an example of building power with but in some situations like the one that you're describing cinema. It's really a situation where you have to exert power over right and so the question is if i'm working with an elected official who won't take my calls. Who is who's essentially blocking me. Then the question is what are the sources of where the resources the sources of power that i have that can essentially try to force someone like cinema to pay attention you know and obviously in arizona situation is very fluid with the kind of polarized politics that we have. It's really hard to kind of figure out how to break through. But i think one of the things that we were really struck by that all the organizations that we studied you know these organizations were working across across partisan lines across a business. And not you know low income communities like all these differences that we would normally think it was being opposites and they built these coalitions in order to be able to negotiate. For power. That you're describing. Yeah i i really liked that. Focus in your book on foc- focusing on creating independent power centers. And i mentioned this earlier but outside of gatekeepers like herself or even within the k. Street washington traditional lobby building a power center that is in oklahoma that is in texas. That is in montana. Whatever the case may be that is. I think instrumental but it's harder and it takes a while i. I'm just wondering if you could talk a bit more about having a long term strategy within sh short term goals because i think in the wake of bernie sanders campaign failing in two thousand twenty. There's been a lot of misplaced energy in some ways and not really a fully under fully formed understanding of the long hard work of change in progress. It's not linear there's huge setbacks and then there's largely incremental gains and then the occasional huge gain. But that's pretty rare. I'm just wondering what your take is on how how to incentivize that marathon mentality right so so couple things especially in so maybe i'll start with a historical story and then kind of start and then i think it will link back to your question. So there's a woman named frances willard who am at the turn of the twentieth century. She used to actually. She was like a real warrior for 'em de against domestic violence like she was really concerned about domestic violence. This is like the late eighteen hundreds and at the time she was trying to figure out. What can we do to stop domestic violence. You figured out like well. The big problem is what happens. Is that men go out to bars. And they get drunk and they come home and they'd beat their wives to her solution was if i wanna stop domestic violence. What i need to do is is is alcohol. Pay which. I am not advocating by the way she starts campaign to ban alcohol which eventually succeed in passing the constitutional amendment that banned alcohol for a period of time and in the early twentieth century. Right is the question is like how do you go about like passing a constitutional limit because actually really really hard right. You get three quarters of the states to sign if you get super majorities in state legislatures in national congress. Like all this kind of stuff. And so the way that she did it was. She went all over the country in to try to recruit people to her. 'cause you know in the first thing she did she would say if you wanna join. My 'cause the first thing you have to do is like take a personal pledge. Sign up alcohol right to show us that. Your values are aligned. Then the second thing you need to do you need to get together with a group of people in your community and try to shut down a bar right and it doesn't matter if you win or lose we just want you to try right and if you know anything about how to constitutional amendments passed whether or not joe's bar is open in any town. Usa is completely irrelevant to whether or not by constitutional amendments passed right. But the reason she was doing that as she wanted to ask people she wanted people to have the experience of action right. Learn sorry to interrupt but naturally people but women who had not been given the right to vote at this point and who were finding agency in the suffrage movement horley women who were not used to having their hands on the levers change. She was showing them that they could like work with other people right and learn something and so it didn't really matter whether or not you're successful is more that you had that experience and then once you did that she would invite you to join the national movement right into became this kind of like big thing. And of course as soon as they've passed amendment. They realized that we actually really do like alcohol. It passed back the other way but to me the bigger point of the story. Is this question of you know when you when you ask that question Well how do you do work in the short term that builds capacity for the long term. Like the question that i like to ask organizes. What is your joe's bar you know. What is that thing where you're giving people the experience of putting their hands and lives change of learning that. If they work with each other they can do more than they can themselves. Because that's always gonna be with them win or lose right. So it took years to pass his constitutional decades to pass a constitutional amendment but they had built this continual capacity over time. And and so like we see that trend again and again and again is that's the most successful social movements throughout history. Always have some form of that. Joe's bar you know it can be in a church. It could be in a gun club it can be you know in an immigrant community fighting to protect families from deportation right. It could be around police. There's so many sort of settings in which that kind of experience can happen but it's an experience of working together that really that really matters so the question of like how you incentivize it. I mean i said to me. That's part of what we're trying to do in the book is like i think that if people think that the way that you make changes by getting these mass titians without having that without having that base of that the you know the people from the joe's bar. The people are mc mixing metaphors now at the tinder kindling. Or whatever it is that you want to say then. You're not incentivized to do that. Work of of getting people to actually figure out how they sat down that bar in their community. But if you understand that that's actually how. You're going to get to the goal that you want but i think the on become a lot clearer. I agree. Well hurry han. Her book is called prisons of the people. Power organizing in in twenty first century america That was great talking to you. And i hope you know people who are politically inclined over the you. If you're watching the show might you might be able to glean some lessons from some of the advice. That harry provided today. Thank you so much for your time. Really appreciate it. Thanks for having me all right folks. We're gonna take a quick break and when we come back we'll be talking a bit more about the afghanistan withdrawal. Do talk.

arizona new virginia frances willard bernie sanders tennis montana oklahoma joe washington texas congress america Joe harry afghanistan
"twenty first century" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

05:45 min | 11 months ago

"twenty first century" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"A bunch of i think it was house and senate elections and they tracked. What the sort of variation in strategy was the single. Most predictive factor of what kind of strategy your campaign us was not whether you're in a red state or blue state whether you're having it was incumbent or an open cedar needs other factors might think about it was which consultant you hired right. We just crazy like it kind of blows. my mind. recommended means that these consoles kind of these formulas that they go and whether they're working in a red state no matter where they're working one-size-fits-all right. The size fits all kind of thing. But then you know if you're a candidate and let's say you're an insurgent candidate. Newt saying i want to try to run a different kind of campaign. The first thing you hear and this is kind of what happened to us because everyone says you can't do it. You can't do it alone. You can't do it your way. You need to hire these people who have experienced they come in and they have a formula you know and they teach you And they teach you how to do it. And i think that it's a real. It's a real kind of chokehold. Almost on the way that a lot of politics are run because of that consulting industry. Now i should disqualify. It's not to say there aren't some great console out there. There are if you do amazing work but it's really hard. I think for new people to break into that world and be able to differentiate between who selling me a bag of goods and who's doing really good strategic or care. And i think part of that is a a sapping of the agency of people right where they've kind of make you feel like there's so many barriers to entry and of course. You don't understand how to do this campaign silly person right and often. That's very gender and racial is as well like there's a ton of disincentives and a lack of encouragement when when talking about these grassroots campaigns. Because there's this understanding from a lot of people in politics that you can only do it if you have this knowledge base and so it'll it causes people to make pretty bad decisions. When oftentimes especially progressive candidates have fairly good understanding of what their communities yearning for. Yeah no i think that's exactly right There was a study that was done by. I can't remember exactly what year but it was. Within the last decade an organization that looked at their racial background of consultants hired by democratic the democratic party democratic party candidates and it was something like night like over ninety five percent white. You know and so there's a mismatch between the people who are doing the consulting and amd both the candidates and the communities on the ground that they're seeking to reach out to and it creates distortions. That that you can imagine. I think the other thing. Is you know thinking about the book. We were working on like one of the things we wanted to really understand. Is this question of in this moment of disaffection when everyone hates politics right how was it that these organizations were able to help. People feel like they could architects their own future. And that's like the opposite of what the consultant does right where they come in and say you can't design your campaign and you can't design your future like you need to leave it to us and i think too. Often people had the sense that like. Oh politics is for the professionals. Like i can't actually have some say what goes on in my community and that was the opposite of what we of these organizations so and then also i guess you you do another talk about you another example. You talk about another example from virginia with virginia Majority that was another really interesting case. Explain that to our audience if you could. Yes so virginia. For a long time had some of the most restrictive app voting rights laws for returning citizens in the country. And so i think they were. They were ranked like somewhere down. You know forty nine hundred fifty like with kentucky in terms of how restrictive they were and the for a long time there had been a coalition of organizations new virginia majority which is the one that we profile but also the virginia origin organizing project and and other organizations in the state that had been working for a long time to try to restore voting rights to returning citizens. Happening is that because Black and latino communities are so disproportionately incarcerated that meant they were effectively left out of the electorate as well because they weren't able to renew their citizenship once Once it came out office and so they have worked with both republican and democratic governors. For many years this has gone on for a budgeteers and it finally was during the mcauliffe administration when He the governor essentially has right to effectively issue these pardons that would open up voting rights to to all returning citizens and he issued like hundreds of them in a way that that enabled basically the a a big part portion of the black and brown community to to start to vote again but What was really interesting about that. Was that You know we were trying to figure out like how did this happen you know. How was it that if you look at public opinion in the state support for voting rights had not shifted you know and the political calculus for governors like terry mcauliffe hadn't really shifted either. And why was it that they were suddenly able to make this big shift and so much of it has to do with the work that groups like Majority regina ordinary organizing project had done to kind of bill constituencies in communities among people who were willing to kind of come to the state house and really hold the feet hold elected officials feet to the fire right and also have the back of elected officials when they went..

democratic party democratic pa Newt virginia senate virginia origin organizing pro new virginia mcauliffe administration kentucky terry mcauliffe
"twenty first century" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

06:51 min | 11 months ago

"twenty first century" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"It allows people to feel like they're participating in activism without doing so like genuinely it's kind of just like what some some of the philanthropy donations that you're seeing. I don't want to be too cynical but In in some humanitarian efforts. Like are you as cynical as me about that kind of stuff because i i worry about. It's sapping of energy of longer term more effective projects. Yeah so. I am cynical but i think of it a little bit as a both. And and and here's the analogy that i have so i have a ten year old zilina survival skills right now so we spend a lot of time thinking about how you build fires right and so one of the things that you learn if you trying to build fires is that if you let go out and title you know light a match on all these big logs that you're gonna die right like instead what you have to do. Is you light the match on the tender which he took the kindling kindling hits up a fuel logs. Fuel logs are what sustain the fire over time and to me. The kind of things like a large-scale petition A big boycott things like that. Those are the fuel logs and the mistake. That we make is not is not trying to do those because if you need you need that kind of scale you need to give lots of people. Opportunities has support you and get involved. But it's trying to sort of light fuel log without having the tinder mckinley already there. You know and so. If i'm an organizer and i'm unwinding that match the mat-su should be lighting is on the people who are going to be the transformative leaders right that really invest in and build this fire so to speak right. And then if they're if they're strategically chosen than than you know they in their own social networks then begin to heat up the proverbial full fuel lager of start that that petitioner. Whatever it is. I think too often. What we see is that you see. A lot of campaigns goes straight to the petition and they have nothing underlying at the moment they get challenged or the moment something goes wrong they have nothing to fall back on. The spark disappears bright. And then i guess you talk about the proposition. Two oh six fight arizona as an outlier essentially which is a good way to look at activism because their success here and a lot of times. It's not going to be successful. Which i think is really important for people understand to understand how to be an effective organizer and activist. Yeah i mean the null expectation whenever you start any kind of social change. Effort is definitely status quo and that's not just true for graphics organised you if i was starting lobbying campaign to try to overturn law or something like that. Like changes just really hard given the way that our system is structured so status. Close absolutely the expectation I've organizer friend has a saying. Which is that organizing. Is like beating your head against the wall until it's not right. It's it's this kind of thing where it's like. You feel like you're making no progress. You're making no progress. You're making no progress and all of a sudden. It's like the floodgates open and they think often we see that in campaigns like this where because you you lay the groundwork lay the groundwork progress really hard to make visible. But then all of a sudden something happens and and and everything kind of explodes you know and i think when we think about arizona two thousand twenty for example just to go back to that example. It's like no one in twenty ten when they were having that vigil on the state house lawn could have anticipated that ten years from now you know all countries is would be on on then then thinking about which direction they're going to go on the press in this very contested presidential election. No one could have predicted that but were they ready when the moment came absolutely right. And that's because of all the all that work if they had done before and so you know in prop two hundred to six the story that we tell their you know. That was an effort to try to get. Minimum wage passed in arizona through a statewide ballot initiative and the organization that we're studying which is an immigrant rights organization. Call lucia when they first started trying to work on this. Everyone's like don't do it. Like arizona is not ready like we're seeing minimum. Wage goes through and cities like seattle and these different kind of blues blue cities and blue states but arizona's not ready like stick to your leg work on immigration issues and the leaders of which are like. Look you know we. We hear what you're saying but are people are saying what they need is. They need better wages. I mean that's what their communities are telling them so. They persisted and the fight that they had to have was they finally. They were able to bring people around actually running the campaign by people. I mean kind of national democratic establishment. When they're able to bring them around then. The people are like fine. If you're gonna run this you know minimum wage campaign in arizona. We're going to bring in consultants from dc and he's gonna come in he's gonna teach you how to run the campaign so to step aside no like we want to do this on our own terms and they had the fight to to earn that right but then they did and they ran the campaign in a way that was trying to leave something behind right. That was trying to build capacity in these communities that could be used beyond the campaign and they worked really strategically to try to build alliances with local business to kind of bridge cross difference in the differences that you wouldn't normally that you would normally think of as being in opposition to each other. They were able to win that campaign. And you know the whole infrastructure they built in that campaign then went on to support all of us other work. They've been doing state rights. And i mean you mentioned consultants. That's a lot of feelings about equality. And i mean i'm going to ask you to elaborate a bit because i think a lot of people don't understand how much of a cottage industry the consultant practice is in. I mean they basically almost bankrupted the dnc. because they were so committed to this group of money consultants who don't add anything but provide the perception that they're very busy in there adding something so i guess talk a little bit about that as an antithesis. To the kind of organizing. You're talking about here. Yeah so there's a study by some political scientists not my work by jacob montgomery at washington university and brendan niane where they were looking at. What is the impact of consultants on political campaigns. Essentially right and if i were to talk to you say like well what do you what do you think are the things that determine campaign strategy right in and here we're talking about congressional campaigns lighthouse senate campaigns and you might say things like well. Is there an incumbent in office. Red state is a blue state. Isn't a swing state. You know. I mean things that we can kind of anticipate the typical things that we have big as as terming campaign strategy and what they found was that when they looked at.

arizona mckinley lucia seattle dc jacob montgomery brendan niane dnc washington university senate
"twenty first century" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

06:47 min | 11 months ago

"twenty first century" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"We saw at sixteen in georgia. We saw this exact. I stacey abrams campaign. Set up the infrastructure for what we saw today. Yeah because she had lost people forget that but she had lost her. Or i mean we can debate whether or not. She lost she even if she even if she regardless of whether or not the most boats. She was not seated as governor. Let's say she took that infrastructure and she turned it into something so much bigger that has had these huge impacts international politics and imagine if beddoe had done the same at with his losing senate campaign. Yes we'll never know. He ran for president and said and we also have. That work turned out all right. But i i guess like you know because your book is more focused on organizing outside of elections. We can talk less about some of those elections. You open your book using the example of arizona. Sp ten seventy kind of a lens to which through which you're you're looking at this. What struck you in particular about that. Fight yeah so the book starts with this question of. Why is it that we've seen this trend especially in twenty century america where so many people can into the streets get involved in politics in a lot of different ways and government seems not to respond right and we see we have examples of you know again and again and again of where that happens and so what we wanted to do is sort of figure out. Where are there outliers. Where are there places that have actually broken through and beat that trend where people who take action actually do have influence tainting the outcomes if they want and the reason why we were interested in arizona was because i'm over the decade between twenty ten to twenty twenty roughly when we're doing the research A lot of the immigrant rights groups that emerged from the fight around the pushback to s ten. Seventy neither happened in two thousand ten. They were able to kind of change the politics of arizona and we finished writing a book before two thousand twenty election happened. But i think in the same way that were just talking about georgia. A lot of the work that they did lay the groundwork for flipping arizona in twenty twenty but part of what we wanted to understand. What was the work that they were doing during that decade when no one was really paying attention at a national level to the work that was going on the ground and so we started in in this moment in two thousand ten when espy ten seventy was the most restrictive immigration law. That had been passed up until that point and it came as a little bit of a surprise. Right it wasn't it wasn't that immigration issues had been hotly debated for many years. But no one really thought that you can have a law Strict and so it flew through the arizona state legislature and we profile. These two organizers who are like. Oh my god you know what just happened. What do we do you know. And that question of like what do we do in this moment. Could've gone in so many directions and that was what we wanted to try to really unpack. So i mean then. Talk about the fight. I guess in particular Too because you also talk about the flip side of what happened in arizona with proposition two. Oh six. I guess you can talk about both of those examples and how they were instructive. Yeah so So in two thousand ten after ten. There's this moment where everyone is thinking. Like oh my gosh oregon do and if you think about like if we were to think about the transactional world that electoral that were just thinking about. Like what would people say right. They might say things like well. We're trying to get then governor jan brewer to not sign this so with and for people that don't know what. What was the bill the bill this is the. Show me your papers. Law which is really restrictive anti immigration law that essentially gay authorized. you know local governments to You know a violate the right. It's emeric communities oliver the state and and so you know instinct for Cases could have been like okay. Let's start a petition. We'll get like you know. Millions of people from across america had assigned because she trying to get jan brewer to not On the law right. We're gonna try to raise all this money and had these big call. Campaigns to the governor's office the legislatures are different. Things like that. We're going to boycott arizona businesses these kinds of strategies that people fall back on. And i think you know what these organizers did which is so interesting as they said. You know what we want to do. Is we want them to see our faces or like. They wanted to humanize fight until they ended up. Deciding to do was essentially organizers vigil on the state house lawn that started out as four people in grew to like hundreds of people and it didn't have the scale of a petition campaign or something like that but what ended up happening is that they sustain that visual for over a hundred days and that visual became this crucible of leadership development and relationship building that then lay the foundation for the decade long fight though that came afterwards right. So i think it's conceivable that we can say that arizona twenty twenty wouldn't have happened if that vigil hadn't happened if they hadn't spent three months There and an example of the kind of work that went on there is. There's this great story of when i'm sheriff are pyo. Who's in the torius very strongly anti-immigrant share arizona. So this when he was still in office and he came at some point out to the to the vigil and he was going to try to get them to leave the lawn and exert authority a different ways. And there is a group of of latino women who are in a prayer circle at the time and he comes starts trying to push my way and this woman turns around and she walks. She puts her hand up in his face and says respect. Like we're praying right now you know and so it's just a sort of small story of the way in which people who are at their most vulnerable were able to realize their own ability to stand up to power and that you know that vigil didn't didn't achieve it's short term victory in the sense that. Sp ten seventy did pass. But that laid the groundwork for all the work that came thereafter and like bats. That was part of the a similar to what we're talking about before. Is that win or lose. What of the campaign leave behind. Will that vigil last a ton of things behind In a way that would have been really different. They just done a petition campaign or something like that. Well i mean you've talked about petition campaigns or boycotting campaigns. Right like a lot of that to me seems more passive and i think not boycotts can actually i mean. Of course i'm a supporter of for example They can have enormous power but say like a national saying. Oh were you know what we're seeing what we saw a little bit in georgia over the voting rights bill the restriction like. I don't know what that does..

arizona stacey abrams beddoe arizona state legislature georgia jan brewer espy america senate oregon
"twenty first century" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

07:11 min | 11 months ago

"twenty first century" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Right we are back. And i would like to welcome to the show hari han. She is the co author of prisons of the people power and organizing in the twenty first century in twentieth century. america hard. Thank you so much for your time today and so much for having me. Yeah so. I'm excited to talk to you about this. You write about grassroots organizing and collective action which i think is something that our audience in particular is interested in Because i i saw a lot of what your book did was kind of as a critique of in many ways electoralism or the reliance on elites to or enter the reliance on entering into those fears as opposed to creating your own power systems bat elites which are arguments that. I'm incredibly in favor of and sympathetic. To so i guess let's just start really from the beginning which roe v to write about grassroots organizing and collective action. Yeah so i am. The footprints of the people is probably. It's it's you know. I've written several books not grassroots organizing. And i think i really got into it because i grew up as the daughter of immigrants in texas and so my family was super political. Growing up we lived in this very diverse Immigrant working class community and politics was not at all something bad. I thought about the what really got me interested in it was. I went to college and got involved in student activism and through happenstance have had this experience of working with a bunch of other people to realize what we could do if we work together which is so much better than just working on. I think that's what got me really hooked in organizing and politics And so i went. And i worked in capital p. politics in washington. Dc for a few years but then eventually realized that. When i was working in the day to day of a political campaign for example i couldn't really think about what was going on and and decided to go back to grad school. And that's when i thought live really wanna to do is like study and understand organizing and collective action and how it works so i mean what was that experience like for you to work on campaigns because i did you know i think a small amount of just grant intern ship. Work back in my Younger days on campaigns and it sucked like this. So i i i totally respect and understand like why people work on campaigns and that's instrumental but i just mean in terms of like okay. This is the one singular goal and it's the election it doesn't i guess have larger implications. I i kinda quickly understood that. Maybe that wasn't for me but seems like you had a bit of that same reckoning. yeah well especially. I'll tell you a story so the first campaign ashi ever worked on was george bush senior in one thousand nine hundred now because i knew anything about politics thought that i was republican because i was in texas and i was taking a history class and they required us to go like volunteer for a campaign and that was like the easiest. Go and sign up for. So i know the first around like i really had no idea what was happening. I show up on a saturday morning. And they give me like lists of doors or whatever. They assigned me to hit like clipboard with that list. The doors we're supposed to go knocking on doors and we did our thing. We come back after several hours super hot and we give the clipboard to the volunteer coordinator. Whoever remember he lifted the clipboard was like great. Thanks and threw it into a pile with a bunch of other clipboards. And the first thing that i realize is like i'm just a cog in this giant machine like they don't actually care at all about this experience that That we had and so that kind of drove me. I think even further to politics and took a while to get back to it. But when i am then in two thousand worked on democratic presidential campaigns and had much better experience like on that in that sense i was working a staff and really remember that experience that i had in high school and tried to always think about like. How are we cultivating these experiences from volunteers. Coming and trying to actually be a part of of the bigger campaign but I think we did that. But it. But i will admit i think like you get bell. It always felt like an uphill battle you know because the world of politics is super transactional. And it's really hard to feel like you're you're actually doing something valuable and that you're actually part of something bigger and i think that's what drove me to want get more involved with more kind of movement worker grassroots organizing work when i went back to grad school can there be. Campaigns are a bit more movement adjacent or sympathetic to that i mean. Of course the bernie sanders campaign on a national scale comes to mind but progressive candidates that are fundraising from small donations. That am. I never was able to work on that kind of campaign but i covered them. That that has shades of a lot of what you talked about your book with. Imagine yeah to me. The big question is what does the campaign leaving behind. You know so a typical campaign. It's like you burn all through all these resources including human resources right including people staff and volunteers and they come election day win or lose your everyone's out of there right and there's nothing left in the community into a community that is work. Sorry campaign at is working in movement adjacent ways like the sanders campaign. I think portions of two thousand eight obama campaign. I think they're we have examples in modern. History are ones where you know when the campaign ends regardless of victory loss after campaign. There's something left in the unity that lasts beyond the kennedy on the campaign themselves and to me that's the mark of movement that makes it different from the transactional political world that dominates elections. Well i mean now. I have so many examples right to contrast so say. Take take the kentucky senate race against mitch. Mcconnell right charles booker was grassroots candidate and he got close but he didn't win the primary against eighty mcgrath. Who lost in very convincing fashion to mitch. Mcconnell in the general election that was such a missed opportunity in my view. Even though booker is running again against rand paul to make something that lasted in a campaign as opposed to something where a ton of money flowed in from chuck schumer's fundraising apparatus. The emptiness that. I could feel it from here in new york like it was just such a stark example of the dynamic. You're talking about a hundred percent agree. And i'll give you another example that broke my heart personally because in texas was better works campaign when he ran for senate came really close to defeating. Ted cruz had generated so much grassroots energy across the state if they had been able to harness that to rebuild the dampness capital d. democratic party politics in the state then you know that would have potentially had much bigger ramifications right if texas turns blue that has much figuring efficacious for our politics..

hari han texas ashi george bush america washington bernie sanders kentucky senate charles booker Mcconnell mitch sanders kennedy mcgrath obama rand paul chuck schumer booker Ted cruz
"twenty first century" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

01:37 min | 11 months ago

"twenty first century" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"The cia the fbi in in in in their role in some of these In some of these outcomes and a lot of that is because there's a fetish ization of what they do When i think a lot of our viewers understand the reality of what they do and how much destruction that they have caused throughout the globe and domestically as well we are going to take a quick break very quick quick quick break and when we come back we will be joined by a hurry. Han author of or co author. I should say presumes of the people. Power and organizing in twenty first century. America anthem. All.

cia fbi Han America
"twenty first century" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

10:17 min | 11 months ago

"twenty first century" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Of world. Health officials who decried the decision as indefensible in light of the enormous global vaccine gap biden also announced that all nursing homes must require their staff be vaccinated or lose federal medicare and medicaid funding as his administration begins to threaten legal action against states barring masks in schools and lastly a federal judge has blocked construction permits for a giant oil drilling project in alaska. One that the button administration despite its flowery language on climate change has chosen to support all this and more on today's program. Welcome back to this show ladies and gentlemen or welcome to the show if this is the first time that you are seeing this beautiful program. I am not. Sam cedar sam will be out for the next. I guess including today. Friday and all of next week. He's on a much needed vacation. I'd never say that to his face. Obviously but he does deserve it. He works hard. And so i hope you stick with us. I think we have a lot of great interviews lined up a lot of great guests including today changes to do also few changes. Come down the pipe. What do you mean. We'll we'll get to those later. We don't want we don't want to do do awe. I don't even. I don't even remember. I presumably know what you're talking about but they don't remember what you're talking about so Well i guess we will talk about that later. But let's talk a little bit more about afghanistan. Obviously it's the first Biggest story in In the news right now. So there's been a bit of a scramble by members of the intelligence community to point fingers at other people namely the binding administration for the chaos that has ensued in the bloodshed following our withdrawal from afghanistan the swift rise to power by the taliban and all of this finger-pointing which is taking place in the press. It leads back to the inevitable conclusion from these intelligence community people that we should be in afghanistan longer right. That's what they desire. And so what they're leaking to. The media is all designed to bolster that very case the mean particularly the cia. Renew this is going to happen And we had looked at this file. We found that can prove it. Look at look at us for the complete failure which is of course in large part due to the military intelligence right and the fact that intelligence is often contradictory and they can pull out that one file that totally rips into the binding administration while we knew this would happen. How could you do this. And then they have a million files that would be more favorable. They strategically leak this stuff in order to maintain us imperialism in the case for war. Legacy media's reprinting these cover your beep. Cya efforts as if they're fact which we know they tend to do and they lean on intelligence sources. That are cherry picking this intel. So that they can back up their own desire to remain occupying afghanistan so chairman of the joint chiefs of staff mark. Milley who recently went viral for his response on a question by matt gaetz to About the military learning about critical race theory which was pretty good. He chose to respond to some of those claims yesterday. Let me make one comment on the intelligence because seeing all over the news there are warnings of a rapid collapse. I have previously said from this podium and in sworn testimony before congress that the intelligence clearly indicated multiple scenarios were possible. One of those was an outright taliban takeover following a rapid collapse of the afghan security forces and the government. Another was a civil war. A third was a negotiated settlement however the timeframe of rapid collapse. That was widely estimated in ranged from weeks to months and even years following our departure. There was nothing that i or anyone else saw. Did indicated a collapse this army in this government in eleven days. So i i actually do believe in. i think. Part of the reason that presidents didn't make this call and we've covered this extensively on the show to withdraw from afghanistan was because of what they perceived as a mountain of blowback from the media which were seeing now and intel and the intelligence community that was always going to do this because they work backwards from their desire to remain in the region. That's just how they operate and biden made the correct decision here and it's it's deeply sad that the taliban taken over but you know i actually believe me there. And it's not. Because i trust government. Officials are the biden administration inherently. It's because i inherently for good reason. This trust our intelligence community. There's a structural problem with military intelligence which is evident in the mike hastens book on an reporting on standing mcchrystal. Which is there's a there's a whole bunch of things stopping the worst news from getting to the top and the denial of basic reality is baked into these intelligence assessments. So i i. It's probably true. But i think that points to a you know like you said the larger failure in our ability to confront reality. When we're you know killing lots of people with our war machine right. And i think we also can make the point that we recognize based on past experience and reporting from people like michael hastings and Just understanding of what. The war on terror was like that. We've seen what's happening in the press right now before. It's exactly what has happened for decades when it comes to our involvement in the middle east and abroad and we i don't think sufficiently critique the national security reporters that breathlessly reprint this stuff. Well this this is beyond media critique this critique of the ci and the military who who co op media as if they are taking a military objective. That's just like part their job. And it's completely hostile to democracy unit always really has been especially on the part of the and yes milita- media critique candy shallow and like but in this instance it's because they're operative in this project that it's important to understand and you know the other thing about this too. Is that the intelligence community is inflating their importance. We didn't need intel to know that the pull out from afghanistan was going to be messy. We were talking about it on this program to and i guess like perhaps it can have some value but they believe that day are instrumental to the whole problem with afghanistan. Is people like the of course. Soviets have been empowering warlords in that country for decades and decades and decades. And that's not a good way to for instance see an improvement in a lot of women in any kind of country so and and that was that was what they were doing in afghanistan for decades. At this point that was a part of the american backed financed government that they were upholding there and so like they have self interest. These are their jobs. They want to see some of the stuff through. It's also human but the the the the human element is propping up something psychopathic. I just think like jim shudo of cnn. Net sack reporter tweeted this out yesterday too. Many times i've witnessed the. Us military tempted dutifully carry out difficult and dangerous missions left to them by the miscalculations of civilian leaders. That is really dangerous. Talk like i think that that politicians deserve a whole bunch of blame for their failures and participation in just mass atrocity but the idea that they're the obstacle and not our our military who's been out of control for i mean definitely post world war two and then you know you wanna go into twentieth century. Nineteenth century history nineteenth century history. Like you know it's a bad thing. Yeah are it should not be a part of modern society that we're deferring to the wise leadership of military officials over elected officials and saying that that's what gets in the way like a like literal professional assassins who were prioritizing over civilian leadership right and that's like a scary assumption that underlies a lot of the fall of major democracies and governments throughout the world. When you give credence to military leadership and i know that seems ironic given the fact that we just played a clip from italy there but you know the context is everything right. Exactly the context of saying that he that i mean. That's another kind of dangerous thing he does is he blames the press. They're say the mili- that's who's actually that's up to the press. Well yes we have a. We have a problem with naming our Our intelligence community..

afghanistan Sam cedar sam taliban Legacy media biden Milley matt gaetz intel biden administration mike hastens medicaid Cya michael hastings medicare joint chiefs of staff alaska cia mcchrystal congress army
"twenty first century" Discussed on More Content Talk

More Content Talk

04:55 min | 1 year ago

"twenty first century" Discussed on More Content Talk

"When i go out and i see stuff like that in the world. Today reminded of the victorian era. I'm reminded of how the wealthy extreme wealth can lead to hedonism and can lead to just falling for all kinds of marketing ploys. The victorians had so many goods. The wealthier classes had so many goods that they didn't know what to do with them after a while they were just piled everywhere there was there was no gold studied. Diamond studded tissue boxes and fainting couches. Really i'm serious fainting couches. Just so you can feign. Just a couch see could faint. Oh we need to bring those back. We need to bring back to the diamond. Studded tissue boxes. We need to bring back the hunting couches. We need to bring back the handkerchiefs. We need to bring back the mail wigs. We need to bring it all back because you're all so wrapped up in this fashion bullshit. You may as well just go. Full victorian start talking to british accent. Wave your hands. In the air is people evacuating by who who. I've just been to the pen. I've just shot amazon You're not wearing the appropriate clothing..

"twenty first century" Discussed on More Content Talk

More Content Talk

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"twenty first century" Discussed on More Content Talk

"A <Speech_Male> <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Female> mess <Silence> and <Speech_Male> you're looking at me like <Speech_Male> i'm the one <Speech_Male> who has the <Speech_Male> problem <Speech_Male> He's not <Speech_Male> wearing anything from <Speech_Male> amazon. <SpeakerChange> He <Speech_Male> must be crazy. <Speech_Male> Ha <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> aw <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> like. I said before <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Silence> you make my job easy. <Silence> <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> need to do anything <Speech_Male> all i <Speech_Male> have to do. Sit <Speech_Male> around and wait for you <Speech_Male> to come to the comment <Speech_Male> section an act like <Speech_Male> a jackass <Speech_Male> and just pointed out <Speech_Male> just point <SpeakerChange> and say <Silence> see told <Speech_Male> you see <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and you see. It's <Speech_Male> wonderful because <Speech_Male> it does the country <Speech_Male> a service <Speech_Male> it gets <Speech_Male> its head out of its own asked <Silence> for change <Speech_Male> it turns <Speech_Male> things around and it says <Speech_Male> hey you know a policy <Speech_Male> thing you're always talking <Speech_Male> about well. Guess <Speech_Male> what asshole. <Speech_Male> Welcome to hypocrisy <Silence> ville. <Speech_Male> That's <Silence> usa all the way <Speech_Male> baby <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Silence> <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> no. I don't think there's <Speech_Male> anything wrong with the country. <Speech_Male> I think there's something wrong with the people <Speech_Male> in the country. <Speech_Male> The country didn't <Silence> do anything to me. <Speech_Male> America <Silence> didn't do anything <Silence> to me. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> It's the people <Silence> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> who <Speech_Male> pretend to be. Americans <Speech_Male> who are not really <Silence> americans <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> not really <Speech_Male> their american <Silence> in blood <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> in incense <Speech_Male> in dirt in the sense <Speech_Male> that they were born on the dirt <Silence> of america. <SpeakerChange> But <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Silence> <Speech_Male> if you're coming <Speech_Male> to mean you're talking <Speech_Male> about you need to wear <Speech_Male> the appropriate clothing <Speech_Male> that is inherently <Silence> un-american. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> It has nothing <Speech_Male> to do <SpeakerChange> with <Speech_Male> the history <Silence> of this country. <Silence> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> And you should <Speech_Male> know better and <Speech_Male> if you don't <Speech_Male> you're <Silence> an idiot <Speech_Male> because <Speech_Male> you're an american <SpeakerChange> you're supposed <Speech_Male> to know your history supposed <Speech_Male> to know we come from a <Speech_Male> long line of <SpeakerChange> people who didn't <Silence> give a fuck <Speech_Male> about the <Silence> way they looked <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and yet. <Speech_Male> I'm sure you're all be celebrating <Speech_Male> the fourth of july <Speech_Male> in your gucci <Speech_Male> and year <Speech_Male> <Silence> You know <Speech_Male> various <Speech_Male> Ralph lauren <Speech_Male> and fashion <Speech_Male> after fashion <Speech_Male> pary <Speech_Male> upon pary <Speech_Male> and on and on it <Silence> will go. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> You know pretty <Speech_Male> soon. We'll have the marines <Speech_Male> and the cops walking <Speech_Male> around and ralph <Speech_Male> lauren. <Speech_Male> It'd be designer <Speech_Male> cop right <Speech_Male> as you're getting. <Speech_Male> The shit kicked out <Speech_Male> at least look at his man. <Speech_Male> This guy's <Speech_Male> wearing good. Close <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Silence> <Speech_Male>

"twenty first century" Discussed on More Content Talk

More Content Talk

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"twenty first century" Discussed on More Content Talk

"Awesome. Just like more content please. Yes and it's funny because the right loves to pretend that they reject fashion don't they don't they just love to pretend to reject the idea of fashioning yet. They wear the same clothes that the people on social media where same close same expensive shit right. 'cause you gotta look good. You gotta look good. I don't know why. I don't know if you think that every person you need is looking your or some shit because if you do. You're an egotistical mess if you can't go outside and just be wearing some normal shit you need in order to get some confidence you need to put on some gold chain or jewelry or you know special limited edition leather whatever or cotton. Whatever whatever it is. I don't i don't care what it is if you need to do that. You're weak and you're pathetic if you need to do to feel better about yourself. That's what you need to feel better about yourself shit. That's that fucking smoking as child labourers. Pregnant women women have probably had all kinds of abuses. You need to wear that shit to feel good about yourself. I don't know what to say to you. You're.

"twenty first century" Discussed on More Content Talk

More Content Talk

02:41 min | 1 year ago

"twenty first century" Discussed on More Content Talk

"Am i supposed to respect you because you wasted eighty dollars shirt. That baby built that baby threaded together. A little child. You know what maybe it. Maybe it wasn't a baby. Maybe your clothing doesn't come from china. Maybe comes from italy. A from dalia. Yes the finest italian leather tanneries with the with the slave workers. You know about that now. You don't you don't care. But i'm going to say it anyway. They pay those people nothing to build. Those closes sleigh basically slaves that they're getting from africa imigrants. Come over there complaining about working for you know cents. An hour fifty cents an hour or some bullshit. No worker checks people getting losing hands in the factories all kinds of crazy shit. That's rate black. Slaves your gucci leather jacket. That's right there's a reason. I don't get dressed up and it has nothing to do with Being a sociopath anywhere that shit you put that shit on and you know goddamn well. A baby died building it but you just so glorious look at you look at you. You look amazing. aren't you. Just the bee's knees because there's also a lot of women working in those factories the women empowerment people. You know with with your nice. You're nice business suits right in. And it's the business suit that's going to get you the job right in a in a in a woman who is working while she was pregnant helped build year ladies. Business suit. Good for you. You really made it because you've got a slave to build your clothes and don't get me started on what's going on in india. Is it reason people from india coming here because they don't want to work in the factories building your shit anymore. That's right this is your fault. You beautiful beautiful series you beautiful beautiful commenters coming demise social media and harassing me because i reject this bullshit. This fashion nonsense low. This is known sir. Christopher card from more content please and more content talk. I am telling you anchor first of all because thinker is free which is a really good reason but anchor also has awesome creation..

"twenty first century" Discussed on More Content Talk

More Content Talk

03:26 min | 1 year ago

"twenty first century" Discussed on More Content Talk

"As if i didn't invent that fucking shit right i mean i'm black. I'm black ditch. I was making for the people for wearing the wrong thing before you even knew what fashion was white people. You realize this. It's funny because all these insults his talking points that these Supposedly very educated independent. Why people have they all stole it from this black stuff that we all did in the ninety s. We used to do all the you know. that that that dress looks tore up that outfit looks you know whack that that You cl- you colors. They match in your shoes right. You know we did all that stuff before and we've moved on we don't care anymore it's boring. You know why it got old just like conservatism. It got old and got old fast. But there's still some wife people today that have stuck on that shit in there all over tic tac. They're all over the place all over instagram. I'll see it as much on twitter to be honest. That's alkali attack alleged about twitter but to be completely honest with you. I don't see much of that on twitter and that's because because twitter leans left leaning more and more becoming more and more disinterested with looking good. You know why because the people that were trying to impress are idiots and also because people on the left or a little bit more educated. But we're all these beautiful beautiful clothing that you buy amazon and that you bought it you know wherever giovanni the door chair wherever the fuck you fucking shout you can't even who knows where you shop now gucci. Whatever you know. Whatever you're buying wherever some Singer you know war in a stupid another stupid music video. You know the the justin bieber t shirt that you wouldn't bought it the gap or ralph lauren. Where the fuck shot supposedly shops the shit he got for free. Because that's why you people by this stupid closes because some celebrity got it for free and you saw celebrity. Where fucking shirt win. Bought the same shirt. Because you're so original rate give me a break. Do you think for one second that it even crosses my mind what anyone thinks of what i'm wearing. Why why would i care. Can you answer that question for me. Because i don't have any idea why would give fuck what crazy as people on social media care about the way address and you know these social media influencers. They're insecure people very insecure so insecure in fact that a lot of them struggle with Mental problems that breakdowns would not everyone follows the rules. You know and they want project that onto other people like no no. No no you have to wear the proper clothing. Were on social media. It's time to just not gonna address. Fuck you fuck you and your sorry ass Way of life..

"twenty first century" Discussed on More Content Talk

More Content Talk

03:02 min | 1 year ago

"twenty first century" Discussed on More Content Talk

"Override louvri wounded welcome to another episode more content tuck. That's the only show that cuts through the glam. The glitz all the bullshit to bring you. The truth is news that we can find that before. I get our little new session here today. I'd like to start off with brite with a with a brief lesson in history Said breach there for a minute or brees in a nice french cheese now. Brief brief lesson in history In the days of your there were a certain Kind of people now Some of these people were known as men. Some of them were in. This is around the victorian area around tapping about these people were called men these People who walked around with their chest puffed out stuff like that and some of them are in the title and some of them didn't There were a lot of lazy men there all kinds of crazy men that were honorable men. They're dishonorable men There were men of character there. Were you know. Men of intellect They were men of religion. They spiritual men. There were men who feared the end of days. They're all kinds of men. And amongst those men they're set a subset of men and they were known as flaps. What is what is what does it mean to be foppish. Well thought is a man who wears excessively beautiful clothing and extravagant clothes and dresses up constantly and in fact is obsessed with his appearance. Narcissism narcissism is Something that you're born with this factory can be developed by anyone. Anyone can be up at any time. So why am i talking about that well. Social media is filled absolutely filled with fox. People who love these. These men and women doesn't really matter what the gender is but they're so obsessed with the way they look and they're so obsessed with being perfect in every way and they're so obsessed with being perfect in every little way that they need to come to your account your social media account and make fun of the things that you're wearing because that's the hit cool thing that the kids are doing these days.

US, China officials to meet in Alaska in first talks under Biden

5 Things

00:23 sec | 1 year ago

US, China officials to meet in Alaska in first talks under Biden

"President. Joe biden's top. National security advisers will meet with chinese diplomats on thursday secretary of state. Anthony blinken and national security advisor. Jake sullivan will lead the two days of talks for the us. In anchorage alaska the biden administration has cast the relationship between china and the us as the biggest geopolitical test of the twenty century.

Anthony Blinken Jake Sullivan Joe Biden Biden Administration Anchorage Alaska United States China
Jesus the Philosopher with Dr. Jonathan Pennington

Knowing Faith

09:09 min | 2 years ago

Jesus the Philosopher with Dr. Jonathan Pennington

"Here. We are and we are joined by Dr Jonathan Pinkston. Thank you for coming on the show. We're glad to have you. Hey I am absolutely thrilled. That's excellent so You are just wrapping up Sabbatical. You've just wrapped it up. That's right okay. And you're telling me before we jumped on Mike that Iran a bunch of fiction on Sabbatical. Yep Okay tell me what you were. Because I'm reading a bunch of fiction right now. Yeah well I always do. I often joke that I actually just professor to support my fiction in reading habits. Because I'm and I mostly listen to because that way I can just constantly listen to them when I'm sometimes walking driving doing dishes. London whatever So I listen veraciously. All kinds of things got some favorite authors like Ursula Gwynne and others but I just I just read Willa cather author. You know her. She was a famous nineteen twenty century. Her Book Called death comes for the archbishop. That was really good. I also read the entire David Foster oster wallace reader which is both fiction non fiction any Wallis. Some you know everything. Infinite Jest while infants all the way through that truth be told but all his essays everything it was fast essay that stands out to your hand. Yeah the one about the State Fair Illinois that was and and The one about television is a long essay about television. Its effect on people. Yeah so he wrote an essay on I think it's called collect. They've named a collection of essays this as well but both flash and not where he talks about tennis pros. Oh yeah that's right. That was man. It's incredible it was so he wrote that. I've never watched tennis in my life but after I read the essay I got on a bender with watching professional tennis. Yeah you don't you don't like sports. That actually have is that it is well. He's so ham fisted the rest of the very literally. Exactly I was GONNA say haven't reading David Foster ause because I've been watching football and I didn't you know what big game was on today. JV Edit tell somebody else's like is there a big game and they're like it was like who do you have today in college. Like is this the sports ball. Don't even Yeah Ursula. Gwen are you into science fiction too. I mean good science fiction. Science fiction is created equal. But I'm reading this collection of short stories by Ted. Yes absolute escalation escalation absolutely. No I just know cool. I like old school like okay. We'll Ted Chiang is amazing. I read the earlier collection and that the story and they're called the story of your life the basis for the movie movie arrival which is one of my all time favorite movies. Have we not talked about not using it got so. Hey it wasn't at Brad like several times and he did not get sick. Okay we'll start talking about cross fit or are you still there. Okay listen if you have not read Ted Cheese amazing. He's incredible okay. So that's Dr Pennington Worley. co-signing an endorsement. If you listen to this podcast broadcast hanging in there for you. We love to have you know. We're we're glad to have Dr. Go ahead please. Oh no no no no what is amazing about him and league win is the same way and you should care about this and you should try. Is that a think a lot. About the power of language in shaping our thinking An culture yeah and so both Lin Chang are constantly thinking about how we say things and the way we structure our society and how languages connected that. That's why that that movie arrival. Yeah did you ever see that. Yeah so it's not language it was about how I know amy. Yeah on that one whitaker's in it too right. The Guy Blackhawk as well as listening. I have a big crush on her. She reminds me of my childhood crush. Elizabeth Montgomery say an actual the person's name and that person would be listening going. Oh I never even knew that he was with again where he's an actual person. You might actually be witched. Oh Man who can forget are- even recording. This has been hot. No we are although I could talk to you about Hans Fictional the rest of the time that we have together. Dr Painting is a professor and author posture preacher. He's written a number of books. He has a friend to the TV institute. Big Friend Friend town this week and teaching It's been my favorite time of the year. It's the most wonderful time of the year so even when we started the training program one of the hopes was bringing in outside speakers Experts in their field but are also churchman. Church women people who who want to to do theology or new tests ultimate cities at the highest level in the academy but can also translate to the local church and we didn't know it was gonNA work five years ago But we brought you back five times so it's worked. It's pretty well and you know this. Our students have just really gravitated towards you. And I've also seen you Avenue now for seven eight years or so You've always been a wonderful the teacher and a good friend. But even as you've been preaching more your church just seeing God used that to shape you into a just a beautiful person into theologian into a real. You're a real person. You know what I mean by the air you're dealing with substantive issues but you're also living In a broken world that we're living in and you're able to speak speak in both of those worlds. Yeah so grateful for that well. It's the teaching works because of hungry people could be up there doing my stick and if people were hungry angry it wouldn't be the same. It's an interaction and so you guys have created something so beautiful here of hungry people who are seeking the Lord and trying to figure out their lives and and so it's annoying to come in and it's been fun part of that so you've been in town this weekend speaking about the gospel of Matthew. And would you say that has been where your focus has been the last number of years. It sounds like yeah so I had the great privilege of doing a PhD. In Matthew hasn't stopped since and I always when I think about Matthew I always think what he says in an esoteric way in chapter. Thirteen that The scribe train for the Kingdom of Heaven continues to bring out of his treasure house else. Things old and new and so we've been studying this book of Matthew for two thousand years and they're still. I've been studying for twenty years and every time I read it I see do things. They didn't see it especially everytime I preach from it one of the things that I've been amazed even though not write articles or books teach. It's when I go go to preach a passage that I come to understand it I think in its fullest way. What do you think that is I wanted to ask you about the the process of rediscovery? So somebody's many. Listen to this like okay. I'm on my Bible Reading Plan and I've done it faithfully the last twenty years. I'm coming up on a book of the Bible. I've Read Twenty Times Thirty Times Forty Times. What is some of that process of rediscovery for you as you walk the same path over and over again? How like where does that come from? Does it never feel like it's just old hat like well. Of course you know. This is what what he's doing here in the Greek and this matthew. This is a typical matthew. Move that he's making right here. Like what does rediscovery somebody no no but but what is But what does it look like. What rediscovery look like? Somebody's spending lots of time in one book of the Bible. Yeah I I think it is a it is a literary and theological Michael masterpiece and the reason. We're still reading it. Two thousand years later is obviously. It's in the Bible. We believe it's inspired. But it is a masterpiece. The reason it's still worth worth reading over and over and and a great piece of literature is one that you've reread. I just wanted to read once. And the more so structured and I always remind students that it by the time matthews written this thing down. He's been pondering and praying and preaching teaching and rearranging and editing for like thirty years. Probably by the time. He's this is is his magnum opus. This is as great piece. Just like we would read You know brothers Karamazov for something over and over and you'll see things in it even more. This is a masterpiece. Sure piece and you never get tired of it. I think the other thing and this is why things I so appreciate about all you guys. I'm thinking of Jan.. How much joy her books to her experience? As a teacher feature I think you'd probably affirm this that when you go to teach you go from passive learning to active learning and so that's what I think is amazing that I'm teaching teaching and preaching for Matthew. That's when I come to understand it more. I think you guys build things into the institude. Were there reversing say. Yeah I think so. I think a big part of the reason why I never gets boring is because I'm an active reader passive reader

Matthew Tennis Ursula Gwynne Professor David Foster Dr Jonathan Pinkston Ted Chiang London Iran Willa Cather Mike Lin Chang Elizabeth Montgomery Ted Cheese Illinois TED Dr Pennington Worley. Gwen Karamazov Brad
"twenty first century" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

06:18 min | 3 years ago

"twenty first century" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"The past twenty first century ad it's something to deal west fandom and you know fans of popular like you know popular movie franchises tv shows and everything but you know what like puts me down the most about the twenty first century is that most of these like band and stuff like that like they bring the hype too high to the point that when they release something new from these you know so called tv shows and movies it tends to kill the hype of these shows and that's what i've been noticing a lot with tv shows like a game of thrones and then also the new sequels for star wars from certainly the last jet i which is a really big letdown for most star wars fans including myself but it was like a fifty fifty for me in my personal opinion but i noticed that let me say i agree with the sentiment especially because i'm a gamer so i play a lot of video games and i saw be mighty number nine debacle v a ukulele debacle all of that i watched it play out live just extremely over hyped games and no man's sky has another great example that could not possibly ever have living lift up to the hype that was built around them so when you promise yeah he hasn't done anything short of that is going to be short of that it's kind of like for the same issue what happened was a witch battlefront that video game it was recently released by dicey ea which is called battlefront two it was like one of the most hyped gains and they even said oh this is not gonna be a lead don't like we did with powerful one with a bunch of micro transactions and look what they did they did the same exact thing i've seen review yeah yeah yeah yeah sounds like then i order game see monkeys out of the back of a comic book and the picture of the sea among kids had like dc monkeys with the guys and they were wearing bright bridles under a little see people riding around the number and then when the monkees came they were just they were like shrimp exile either you know it's an end that taught me don't believe the hype exactly an m another thing but i just don't like about the the twentyfirst century and you know today as a society is false advertising is so like comment think about it like the first light since you mentioned the scene monkeys that was like a very like i've seen documentaries about see monkeys thing that they were false advertising there were actually moving like you know they're like a bunch of like it was just like you know it was like a like a sort of explain like money is sold like they sell it they sell it and then they take the money and they just walk away you know they don't really care about the customer feedback or anything that's what i've been noticing with a with what society as a whole because i remember watching video called down the rabbit hole embrace theresa where this a author was talking smack about how his book was the best book ever and that he was also talk down by critics on amazon you know something like that to really interesting video if you if you take time to look at it it's called a down the rabbit hole and press tour it's a it's really interesting in one thing's for sure is that there's other things that 'em like businesses do are kinda like dummy like what they do is also a they tend to you know they tend to just be lying to you're face like in commercial like and i recently saw and it's another example educating my mind is i recently saw that new movie toy story four have you seen the movie 'cause i don't wanna spoil it i i have not but i also have no intention of watching it so i'm okay i literally that wasn't a mess i mean some people listening might intend to watch me but more to the point yes false advertising is definitely a problem i'm not sure it's a problem that government could fix or anything like that because i think most people people you know they want the hype they want be excited about the product and they're just short notice to real life ten not realize that however much they build up these hype is exactly how disappointed they're going to be by.

Disney Sets March 20 Closing Date for 21st Century Fox Acquisition

Daily Tech News Show

00:34 sec | 3 years ago

Disney Sets March 20 Closing Date for 21st Century Fox Acquisition

"Disney announced Tuesday that its acquisition of most of twenty th Century, Fox. We'll happen at twelve. Oh, two AM eastern time merch twentieth. At that time, the FOX broadcast network, Fox News cable channels and the national sports channels will be spun out as a new company called FOX corporation on March nineteenth. Disney is in the midst of selling the FOX regional sports channels as part of its agreement for regulatory approval in the US twenty century. Fox president Peter rice will become chairman of Walt Disney television and co chair of Disney's media

FOX Disney Fox Corporation Fox News Walt Disney Peter Rice United States Chairman President Trump Twenty Century
Star Wars Universe Update

Talk Nerdy to Me

05:09 min | 3 years ago

Star Wars Universe Update

"Wars would've miss it is, but there's a lot of cool stuff happened to. Yes. Kevin Kennedy doesn't kill everything. She she was a lot of bad feeling high. Man. I tell you something. Well, you know, I think it's. It's more of the toxic fan base than anything because we can talk about that to God, man. It's just so solo amazing movie. Curtis or so wrong. Yeah. I mean, I I love although solo I actually actually making the custom from solo make one of the metre precisely. Oh, no wrong. Front. Hat to have other hats taker. Docs? So shoot my things. Water. So I think it's just so as a right now. Kevin kennedy. I guess pulled the both have moving. Yeah. I heard it was going to be all the in between all the in between indefinitely kids. I really wish they would have probably started out with either. You know, a boat. They started out with a bullet movie instead of solo solos cooling, all but. The toxic fan base. I keep saying that because I am a huge fan. I'm part of the first part of the two D two builders club of rebel Liege. I think they twenty Century Fox has so many licenses is I'm just waiting for them to buy Warner Brothers. And then and then Batman is owned by Disney, and then going to go into the mobile universe

Kevin Kennedy Rebel Liege Warner Brothers Disney Century Fox Curtis Twenty Century
Netflix joins battle to win Indian viewers online

FT News

04:35 min | 4 years ago

Netflix joins battle to win Indian viewers online

"Today in knees and fakest. We're looking at India west, some of the world's biggest retail and technology companies have recently entered the market encouraged by the rapid grace in the local telecoms network. Among these net flicks which recently launched one of its first original Shays sacred games targeting Indian ordinances. Johnson sing talks to Karen Stacy about whether the video streaming service can repeat the success. It's had in other parts of the world. But this video teaser, Netflix recently announced that sacred games will have a second season secure and tell us briefly about sacred games. Sacred games is Netflix, his first big Indian made series. And the idea is I spoke to some of the executive producers behind it. What they told me is that they wanted to make a narcos for India and to do that. They've taken the two thousand seven novel sacred games by Vikram Chandra, which was a huge hit when it was released and they've turned it into an eight part thriller. They've spent millions of dollars on this and they've hired some really big hitters. They've hired Hindi film stars such a safe Ali Khan, Noah's it incident, key radical up, take these big names and they've paid them big salaries to make sure that they make a splash with the first ever proper India made series. The series starts with a well-known gangster and a series of via. Episodes which culminates in a policeman trying to track this gangster down to his fortified Lehrer. It's quite a start. It's quite a dramatic opening, and it's a real statement of intent from net flicks. The show might have helped create the buzz, but is it likely to bring net flakes big rewards in terms of audience numbers and revenue Reed? Hastings net flicks. His chief executive was in Delhi around a year ago and he was very bullish on India. This is a country that's growing at well over seven percent in terms of GDP. It's the fastest growing major economy in the world. It's also going through something of a online revolution. So there's a company called geo of very cheap telecoms company that's offering people free data or next to free data and hundreds of millions of people have snapped up this office. So they're able to access things like streaming service in a way that people simply went before where does net flicks fit into this? Well, Reed Hastings has very ambitious targets. He wants the. Next hundred million customers to come from India, but however they have positioned themselves right at the top of the market. So sacred games is inexpensive piece of television. They've also commissioned several originally made feature films and some smaller series as well. But all of this is costing money and they are charging the customer for that. They've got a business model worldwide, which means that it's all on subscription fees. They don't have any adverts, and that means they're really in a very small slice of Indian society. And then he's going to be there challenge. So Reed Hastings talks about one hundred million subscribers current estimates by chess market. The market research company suggests that Netflix only has five hundred thousand or at least by the end of two thousand seventeen hundred only five hundred twenty two thousand subscribers in India is good a long way to go. If he wants to get to those lofty ambitions. So Netflix is big in emerging economies such as Brazil. But in India, it's. A late entrant. How competitive is the market and have the got this strategy? Right. I think the thing that net flicks really needs to figure out is that Indian consumers are price sensitive like almost nowhere else on earth and they really want the cheapest deal. It doesn't matter what you're buying in. India people are looking for the cheapest deal they can possibly find. So if you look at net flicks is competition. Companies like Amazon companies like hot star, which is the market leader that's actually owned by Rupert Murdoch's twenty Century Fox, then much cheaper there about a quarter. Third of the price net flicks is charging eight hundred repeats a month which is around ten dollars, which is pretty much what it's western subscribers. Pay Amazon new charges. One hundred twenty nine repeats amount to sign up to prime and hot star is around the same. Well, you could see that in the figures. So by the end of two thousand seventeen while Netflix had five hundred twenty two thousand subscribers. Amazon had six hundred and ten thousand subscribers and hot star had one point six million. So the problem that Netflix is going to find is that if it continues to sell its products for the high

India Netflix Reed Hastings Telecoms Karen Stacy Amazon Vikram Chandra Shays Indian Society Ali Khan Johnson Executive Lehrer Chief Executive Rupert Murdoch Delhi Brazil Noah Twenty Century
Disney and Comcast Raise the Stakes in the Battle for Fox

Todd and Don

00:46 sec | 4 years ago

Disney and Comcast Raise the Stakes in the Battle for Fox

"Twenty first century fox and comcast for sky britain's topic pay tv company so twenty century fox about twelve hours ago offering thirty two and a half billion dollars comcast coming in with an all cash offer of thirty four billion dollars you may wonder what is so special about sky sky has twenty three million viewers across the uk and europe they have the rights of the english premier league during the past eighteen months for twenty first century fox and comcast have each raise each other's bids two times so it is a kind of ping pong match for anyone following this deal in sun valley deirdre bolton fox news or you go so now you're up to date tech news there brought to you by texas mutual.

Comcast Britain UK Europe Sun Valley Texas Thirty Four Billion Dollars Billion Dollars Eighteen Months Twenty Century Twelve Hours
Adam Schiff says there is still "significant evidence" of collusion

NPR News Now

04:40 min | 4 years ago

Adam Schiff says there is still "significant evidence" of collusion

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Jack Speer president. Donald Trump's cabinet is undergoing yet another shakeup secretary of State. Rex Tillerson's been ousted NPR's Scott Horsely reports Tillerson reportedly received a phone call from the president today. Several hours after Trump announced on Twitter, he'd fired Tillerson. The White House insists Tillerson was not blindsided by the tweet, but had in fact been warned over the weekend that the change was coming. A State Department official who offered a different account has liked Tillerson been shown the door Trump has chosen CIA director, Mike Pompeo to replace Tillerson. The outgoing secretary sounded emotional. As he told reporters, he'll work to ensure a smooth transition. All of us we know want to leave this place is a better place for the next generation. Tillerson thank the career diplomats at the State Department as well as members of the military. The former Exxon Mobil CEO says he'll return to private life proud of the opportunity. He's had to serve Scott Horsely. NPR news, Washington. A federal appeals court is allowing most of taxes, law, cracking down on sanctuary cities to take affect as mad largely of member station K UT in Austin reports, parts of the law of been on hold amid a court challenge the law known as Senate Bill four was passed last year. It allows police to question people. They've detained about their immigration status. It also allows the state to punish local officials if they do not comply with requests from federal immigration authorities that could even include jail time for those who don't cooperate. The law was challenged by a coalition of civil rights groups and cities, including Austin, Dallas and Houston. They argued the law was unconstitutional. The appeals court largely rejected their arguments and are letting the vast majority of the law be enforced for NPR news. I met largely in Austin, Democrats on the house intelligence committee are strongly disagreeing with their Republican counterparts over a draft report released yesterday, Republicans on the panel saying they did not see any evidence of collusion or coordination between members of Donald Trump's presidency. Campaign and Russia. But California Democrat Adam Schiff dismiss that from a very early point in the investigation, the chairman made the decision that his mission was not to find out what Russia did not to determine the role of US persons, but rather to endeavor to distract the public to put the government on. Trial shift says he believes their significant evidence in the case. And he says, Democrats are writing their own report house. Probe is separate from an investigation being carried out by special counsel. Robert Muller prices at the consumer level, took a modest bump up last month though inflation appears to be relatively reigned in Labor Department reporting today. It's consumer price. Index rose, two tenths of a percent in February CoR prices, stripping out volatile, food and energy were also up two tenths of a percent down day for Wall Street. The Dow dropped one hundred and seventy one points to twenty five thousand seven. The NASDAQ closed down seventy seven points at seventy five. Eleven the S and P five hundred was down seventeen points today you're listening to NPR. Britain says, President Trump as a short, the country's prime minister. The US is quote with the UK all the way in terms of calling on Russia to provide clear answers about the nerve agent poisoning of a former spy May's office saying the president and the British leaders spoke by phone today. Downing Street says, prime minister, three Somme reiterated Britain's viewed. It was highly likely that Russia was responsible for the attack against surge and Yulia script. How Russia for its part is dismissed its connection to the incident and says, it will not meet a British deadline to provide answers unless the UK share samples of the nerve agent vice media founder. Sean Smith is stepping aside is CEO. He'll be replaced by veteran broadcast executive seminars. David Folkenflik reports Smith's announcement follows the dismissal of several executives from his conduct toward women. Brash profane and ambitious sheen Smith has been a strutting symbol at his company which arose has an underground Canadian cultural magazine and is now a digital powerhouse without posts on TV as well. Now Smith is somewhat chasing. Nd he acknowledged late last year that the company had failed female employees and several executives were fired. After allegations of sexual harassment emerged financial questions roses. Well, vice investors include Disney Hearst and Rupert Murdoch's twenty Century Fox, but vice medium missed its financial goals last year by a lot. Now, Smith will be executive chairman. The new CEO is an executive from Andy networks, Nancy Dubuc, David Folkenflik, NPR news, New York critic, futures prices lost ground today. Benchmark crude was down sixty five cents a barrel to end the session at sixty seventy one a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange. I'm Jack Speer NPR news in Washington.

Rex Tillerson NPR President Trump Donald Trump Russia Washington Jack Speer Austin Sean Smith State Department CEO Scott Horsely Mike Pompeo Nerve Agent United States Exxon Mobil Twitter