30 Burst results for "Twenty Eight Thousand Dollars"

How Much Does a Wedding Actually Cost?

Money Rehab with Nicole Lapin

02:02 min | 10 months ago

How Much Does a Wedding Actually Cost?

"Experts project that twenty twenty one wedding costs will rebound what they were in two thousand nineteen if not higher so let's take a look at the twenty nineteen numbers. According to wedding wire the average cost of a wedding reception per couple was around. Twenty eight thousand dollars. Although i'd venture to say it was probably a little higher. Because according to the not here are the average costs involved with a wedding reception. Buckle up because it's a long one ten thousand five hundred dollars for a reception. Venue two thousand four hundred dollars for a photographer. Eighteen hundred dollars for a video for two thousand dollars for florist sixteen hundred dollars for a wedding dress. Three thousand seven hundred dollars for a wedding band twelve hundred dollars for a reception. Dj seventy dollars per person for catering and the average wedding in two thousand nineteen had one hundred and thirty one guests. I guess it's an odd number because of all the singles who want to go home or at least go to bed with a new plus one and that brings the total cost of food to nine thousand one hundred and seventy dollars. The rehearsal dinner costs on average eighteen. Hundred dollars five hundred ninety dollars for the invitations. One hundred dollars for the hairstylist hundred bucks for the makeup artist. Four hundred bucks for the party favors and last but certainly not least five hundred dollars for the cake that is a total of thirty five thousand nine hundred and seventy dollars to put that into perspective that the lot more than the down payment on one hundred and seventy five thousand dollar house or tuition for a year and a half at florida state university. It's a huge chunk of change. And again i would still argue that. Those estimates are probably low. I mean shout out to the bride. Who's spending one hundred ten bucks on a hairstylist. But if you're living in la you're probably spending five times that amount which brings me to an important point of course. These averages vary widely depending on factors like location. What time of year and even what day of the week it is. You're tying the

Florida State University LA
Should I Pay Off Debt Before Selling Stocks?

Ramsey Call of the Day

07:05 min | 1 year ago

Should I Pay Off Debt Before Selling Stocks?

"So i'm twenty five due to a very fortunate situation i kinda got doubly lucky here and got some money from my parents and my grandfather and also got really lucky investing in some things. I didn't completely understand what that money like. You often say The tricky part about that now is the ninety. Five percent of my net worth is in stocks. And i only make fifty grand a year Getting ready to buy a house at my fiance. i'm just concerned about the capital. Gains tax hit to create a downtown for the house. Some thinking i've made my fair share of dumb decisions but this money being young obviously Got a big chevy tahoe. That you know. I don't think i necessarily deserve. But i just happened to like something and do i sell it number. One deduct free and create positive equity to maybe absorb that tax. It or keep the truck just because i enjoy it is the truck paid for twenty thousand muslim but Yeah i i'm either way. I'm not taking the car anymore. So i'm thinking bill situations neither reading it off and you're twenty five years old. You make fifty thousand twenty eight thousand dollar truck and you have how much in this investment account. Six hundred and fifty thousand dollars. Wow wow yeah you've got you've been blessed beyond measure he s and how much how much of that is gain that is over a year old Probably about seventy percent of it okay. So that'll be taxed at fifteen percent and it's in single stocks and from the way you're describing this it sounds like it's fairly high risk situation in my right Some of it is the i decided you know. I got scared of it pretty early. So i moved sixty percent of the into management. I would say the other. Forty percent is individual stocks around consumer data collection and medical diagnostic collection. Yeah yeah uber. High risk cutting edge small-cap technologies and. Yeah you're pretty much. Playing russian roulette with those things are the roulette wheel anyway So The way i answer questions. We answered questions on this show is what would we do if we woke up in your shoes. Yeah man first off. Thank goodness you're where you are. Congratulations that's wonderful. The danger is that it worked that you may try to do it again. That's that's the dangerous part. It's like the guy that drops one quarter into a slot machine wins and he spends the rest of his vacation but all his money in the slot machine. Try and do it again. because you're not going to do it again. I d i. I do not have investments of those types because They scare me and And my real estate portfolio alone is worth hundreds of millions. So i can speak with Emotional authority in this situation. How it feels. When i was your age i was a millionaire and lost everything. And i don't want you to fall into that. What i would do is i would Move anything that is not in a managed account in mutual funds. Into that. And i would pay off the truck tomorrow if you're going to keep it Normally we say do not own things that are more than half your annual income. This is barely but you also have six hundred and fifty thousand freaking dollars laying over here so. I think you can afford a driver's truck if you want to write And then Believe it or not. I'm going to suggest you do not buy a home with your fiance right now. On number one. You don't buy homes with people you're not married to After you're married. I would rent something even if it's something nice for six months get to know each other. It takes about a year of being married to know how close to your mother in law by. Yeah yeah in other. After a year of marriage you will make different housing decision than you would make today together. We've been running here for about two years. We've been married. yeah correct after. You've been married a while. You will make a different decision. You would make as shacked up john say's It's a different thing. Just is true and so i would take my time. And you've been the. There's a tortoise and the hare you've been the hair and you're ahead in the race and i'm going to switch sides and become the tortoise and i'm just gonna slow your butt down on the investing and on the house i'm really happy where you're where you are and you're obviously a very sharp guy. Yeah i mean you're obviously very bright so you may not do anything we say to you called and asked us which the danger of that is. We're gonna tell you. Tell you the truth and i think he will dave. I think he's he's a little nervous a little scared. He wants to make the right decisions. She wants house. Yeah and. Here's the thing. Dave i was going to say instead of for you know. Save like you said spent the first six months we year when she will get married and then with him walking away after he pays the capital gains. I pay cash. I'll pay cash for the house. That's why i was gonna say did i. And i'm saying it's like a two three hundred thousand four hundred. I don't care i've hundred. I don't care now you're good really. Everything's paid for everything. The money's gone. Yeah of it your all your taxes. Well i mean by the time you guys not the. It's back. investment accounts. Guess yes your taxes at fifteen percent on seventy percent of six fifty is just. That's not gonna cripple. The situation is And yes i would pay the capital gains in order to get this in the right setting and it doesn't sound like that much of it's gonna be subject to capital gains because sound like you've already done that when you moved from these higher higher risk things into the manage stuff you probably took your capital gain chen you liquidated investments to move them. That's my guess anyway I don't know exactly how you did that. But that's that's what it sounds like. You did to me so anyway. I'm gonna pay what capital gains. You got to pay for making the move and get it all undermanaged and i would sit there something for a little for a year after marriage six months after you're married then i would buy with cash and pay off the car today and i wanna say to america listening. You are processing at work for him. Let me go try that. No do not do it. I mean i think the numbers. They've update numbers right around. Seventy eight percent of the people who play in his field. Do not make a dime. They actually lose money and so Yes you hear. It worked over here But it does not mean more than likely if you had a buddy that will hit a lottery. Ticket doesn't mean that smart by lottery tickets. It's just you know that's the bottom line. And so and brandis are gavin smart enough to wise enough to be a little bit afraid in this situation. But congratulations that you're there. I'm so happy that you're twenty five years old and six hundred fifty thousand dollars. That's just so cool. That's so neat. And thanks for calling in asking the question.

Dave John Chen America Brandis Gavin
The Road To Bankruptcy

The Indicator from Planet Money

06:22 min | 1 year ago

The Road To Bankruptcy

"After closing her spot in march. Daniela stromberg went looking for help anywhere she could find it. She applied for one of the ppp loans from the government and she was approved but those loans helped businesses cover payroll and yellow. Didn't just have payroll to worry about ci also had to pay rent around twenty eight thousand dollars a month. I'm day spa. i'm utterly vulnerable. So how would i then pay the full rent. Daniela turned to the one person who could really help her solve her rent. Problem her landlord. She needed to things from him. I need an exit strategy. I wanted to be able to give him three months. No this should this not be working. I needed reduced rent based on my ability to do business so the reduced rent was tied into my reduced revenues. The negotiation with her landlord was not easy. Daniela says they went back and forth for months. Then in july danielle caught a break governor. Andrew cuomo announced that new york city would enter phase three of reopening which meant that personal care services nail salons tattoo parlors and spas could reopen. Our phones. Were ringing from the day. The city said go It was amazing. Then yellow was thrilled. She was finally able to bring back some of her staff and she got to work. On new safety. Protocols daily temperature checks goggles masks and face shields she invested in a new air filtration system and uv sanitizing lights domi- was open for business. We were the neighborhood spa and we had been there for eighteen years. We have real relationships with our clients and most of my team had been with me more than fifteen years so people were happy. We were open again. Demise was completely booked to try to accommodate as many customers as possible. Danielle and her staff started coming early staying late but the numbers just weren't adding up. Danielle could only open to of her seven treatment rooms because of social distancing and she could only offer her low dollar services guess like massages so a one hour massage cost around one hundred and fifty bucks not bad for daniele but also that wasn't anywhere close to as profitable as a facial official might bring in three hundred fifty dollars for that same. Our only problem was facials. Were still prohibited by the state. So even after reopening daniels revenues were down seventy percent from the previous year and then in september danielle received a final offer from her landlord. It was two months of half-off rent. And if she wanted an additional month at fifty percent off she would have to sign five. More years onto her lease daniele was stunned. She was dealing with so much uncertainty. She had no idea where things would be in two months. She felt like there was no way she could sign this lease. What is two months. Mean what what's the relevance of that. What did he think was happening in two months. Like that's just magic thinking like it meant nothing. This was spit. daniele was at the end her rope. She told her landlord she would be out by the end of the month and then she called each of her thirty four employees. I said i am. This is really hard. I'm very sorry. I feel a win and i didn't wanna let anybody down but i lost my fight with the landlord and we're ending services on the fifteenth daniela's spa is one of more than one hundred thousand small businesses estimated to have closed this year when a business closes. It's still on the hook for the money. It owes some business owners like daniela file for bankruptcy as a way to deal with their outstanding debts. Kate waldoch is an economist who specializes in corporate bankruptcy. She says when a business closes it sets off a chain of reactions. That ripples through the economy. I the business owner stops paying their landlord. The landlord is making any money. And chances are in since we're still in the middle of the pandemic. It's really bad right now. They probably can't lease that. Space to a new tenant probably sitting empty and so all of a sudden the landlord can't make mortgage payments so the bank and then the bank is in trouble. Says kate because it was counting on money coming in from the small business and from the landlord and when businesses in landlords that means that that's money that the bank was expecting to make that it's not making so the value of the bank goes down and the cash that it was hoping to take in and then relent to another business or another landlord or another homeowner. Can't relent that money. Kate says the result is that there's less credit to help. Businesses grow in the future. She worries all of these. Recent bankruptcies will result in a serious recession. The likes of which we haven't yet begun to see when the virus is finally under control and businesses can start reopening again get says it will take a lot of cash to jump start the economy and she's worried that the banks just will not have that cash to lend or even if they do that they'll be skittish about lending it of course the government may step in here and flood the economy with stimulus. Kate says that could help. In fact right now. Congress is debating just how much support to give small businesses in. Its next relief plan but for daniela. Stromberg it's just too late. All i needed was read relief. That's it so. I mean this never had to happen. That's it. i never had to happen.

Daniela Stromberg Daniela Daniele Danielle Andrew Cuomo CI Kate Waldoch New York City Daniels Government Kate Stromberg Congress
Grow and Scale to Unlimited Processing with KhaazRa MaaRanu

Entrepreneur on FIRE

05:00 min | 1 year ago

Grow and Scale to Unlimited Processing with KhaazRa MaaRanu

"Cadre say was up to fire nation and sure something interesting about yourself that most people don't know fire nation. Hello. How're you doing? So glad to be here John One interesting thing about me is that I'm really. Fun Guy I just love doing things by Tanis -ly travel at the drop of a dime I'll do anything and everything at least one time fire nation where Zesbaugh. Naty like you can't blame Cova forever. You still have to be spontaneous from time to time and I think that that is something that caused red definitely has in spades there'll be communicating over the past few weeks I feel like you're just always traveling cadre. Used to travel a lot more before this whole pandemic thing. So that bug is absolutely there unlike you I loved tropical vibes. Places A Beautiful Landscapes Yeah, absolutely. I love her brother and I also personally love your arch Merill Journey, but I want to share with fire nation now. So talk to us about Your Arch Moreau journey to get you to where you are today. Sure. Many years ago with been around for maybe twelve to thirteen years. Now Time Flies John and I started as a door to door sales. Read Right I was working at an Elementary School in Orlando Florida and working my tail off to get into like twenty eight, thousand dollars a year a two weeks vacation hoping seven thirty to three thirty at whatever time off of work and I wanted to do something they gave me more time. Gives me more time and I work hard is up. Can I do something that doesn't can't my income but I, really just wanted to have more time. I'm like you after I just WanNa sit at the beach I. Just WanNa look out the window I just want to play basketball or actually I wanted to do with my children by how can I do that and so I went online inbound a position In a one, hundred percent commission sales opportunity. before and to California wasn't successful at all initially. Because he was trying to do with the corporate way with you know the sales pitch in the book and. Corporate approach in just got turned down. At. Every business that I went to drop it right now. So you know what? Let me just Relate to people from Detroit Michigan School of hard knocks in the thing I I know how to do is connect with people. You know winner talk we're not to talk sometimes and I did that in super. Just to speed it up really quick I. had a triple my income that year a quadruple did the next year. But then I realized that what I was doing wasn't what I thought. I was doing meaning that I was selling the product that I didn't even understand myself rice. Even though I had dropped the sales pitch book, still have the spirit of that particular company in the industry itself, and that is the spirit of confusion. So you know I was selling merchant programs where the be rates were. There'd be tough with at least not by Terminal Benign, bucks you Lisa for three hundred bucks. This is especially for brick and mortar businesses. You can lease terminal could cost ninety nine dollars you can. Literally Lisa the terminal but three to sometimes a thousand dollars per month for forty eight months in into the least they do not own the machine and it was just you know even the in the way we would pitch them. It was just a real messy thing once I realized what I was doing because I had never read the contract I had never really met the contract myself. I was just starting the program. And once I realized I had to move decision it was totally against particular companies I guess goes to really client on what's really happening behind the scenes by the time decline realize what going on it was too late they were locked into. A four, five year contract with all kinds of these anti get out of it was it will require legal entanglement right with them as you have to hire attorneys go through this other stuff in its contract. So it's Kinda hard to get out of it. So. I had to make a decision to leave that company, lead all the money that had all the recurring incumbent had to. It's up deleted lead cable right and so I did that I went to work with another company and in six months I had. Replaced the incumbent Henry the other company, man those bags were not. They were robbing me and I was by taking advantage of announced robbing Murchison's basically right or Robin clients. So. Same thing had been there all of a sudden. They create money out of thin air when I say thin air veneer. So as an example, there's something called Pi compliance that every business needs to happen in particular Brigham mortar businesses by you don't necessarily. Do but something healthy you it helps protect

John One Lisa Your Arch Moreau Zesbaugh Cova Elementary School Basketball Henry Orlando Florida Detroit Michigan School Brigham Murchison Robin California
How to Not Have a Lost Decade

Money For the Rest of Us

04:13 min | 1 year ago

How to Not Have a Lost Decade

"Welcome money for the rest of this is a personal finance show on money how it works how to invest it and live without worrying about it. We host David Stein today's episode three, fourteen it's titled Don't have a lost decade. Recently, got an email from a new plus member. He says he's treating the material on the website like an online college course but he had a question he wrote that he's approaching a crossroad in his life and he would like to prepare himself for that crossroad. He works at one of the Best Public Gardens in us as a horticulturalist he's been there three years makes forty three thousand dollars per year has four weeks of vacation full healthcare and Hsa they have a four zero three. B. Defined contribution plan where he gets a six percent match his boss enjoy working with him and he enjoys his job. This member also has his own business, a lifestyle business providing premium horticulture services for high end properties. He started in two thousand nineteen gross four thousand dollars and anticipate grossing twelve thousand dollars this year he has no debt. The only thing he owns he says, that is worth. Any money is an old pickup truck that's worth about three thousand. Is roughly eighteen thousand, five hundred dollars in his defined contribution plan and using the online tools on money for the rest of US plus. That, he's on track to retire in his early sixties. y'All says about two thousand dollars in a savings account pays two percent and about fifteen hundred dollars in a wealth front Robo Advisor. Account. He's living on about eighteen to twenty thousand dollars a year. After contributing to is defined contribution plan and health savings account, he brings home about twenty, eight, thousand dollars but that doesn't include is overtime bonuses or the work in his business. After taxes and contribution he estimates that he's bringing home about thirty, five, thousand dollars with everything, which means potentially he could save fifteen to seventeen thousand dollars per year and certainly ten thousand dollars per year. He writes for the first time in my life I'm not living paycheck to paycheck am planning for the future. The business I own. Now as a hobby passion, I turned profitable. It has been a great space for me to learn and have done a lot of just that but it ultimately is a glorified landscaping business. What they really want to own is a retail nursery that one day will become an event, an education centre as well. I turned thirty two months. I thought at this point I would go beyond an entry level position. I thought I would own my own house and maybe own a business full-time. Those goals seem so far away. The question I want to pose to you is, how do I get from where I am today to owning a five to ten acre property that can use to develop into my next lifestyle business as soon as possible Had An additional investment question that address in a few minutes. I he's not in an entry level position. He is a master, her cultures he's studied it. He learned a lot of those skills working at an organic farm and Tasmania. Got, his university degree. He was admitted to a professional horticulture program at the Public Garden where he works, he is very, very skilled in all aspects of landscape design and gardening. and. There are a lot of people that would be very envious that he has his amazing job working in horticulture and one where he can listen to a lot of podcast which he does. In order to answer question I want to compare to couples I know I've known for about a decade. This particular members approaching thirty. He's looking out over the next decade. What has to happen so that he doesn't have a lost decade and can reach goals I'm positive he can reach his goals.

David Stein United States HSA Public Garden Advisor GOT Tasmania
Boston: Man sentenced to 20 years for sex trafficking

WBZ Afternoon News

00:41 sec | 2 years ago

Boston: Man sentenced to 20 years for sex trafficking

"A man from Haiti faces more than twenty one years in prison for sex trafficking after sentencing in Boston federal court after serving his sentence fifty one year old Reginald Abraham also faces fifteen years of supervised release and must pay restitution of up to seven hundred twenty eight thousand dollars he was convicted of four counts of sex trafficking in in July of last year operating out of his homes in Drake it involved and he approached victims who were all from Maine through social media and force the women into prostitution has been in custody since his arrest in twenty seventeen he will face a deportation hearing after serving his

Haiti Reginald Abraham Drake Maine Prostitution Boston
"twenty eight thousand dollars" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"twenty eight thousand dollars" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"IRA at vanguard role the twenty eight thousand dollars into the traditional when you're done working okay okay just be careful and when he if he's going to do a loan forgiveness program be very careful about it the rules are tricky in terms of your you know kind of like your your game plan going forward just remember that during this time of transition cash is your friend you really want to make sure that you know as much as possible as your you guys are transitioning to making more money you know sort of it for a minute maybe not making so much money for you but right as a couple being able to do that that you don't get suckered into doing something dumb like you know in the middle of all of this what we're gonna do is we're gonna buy a massive house don't do that someone will give you someone will give you money to buy a house don't do it okay okay and let me just finish up here by just saying to you how old are you you said thirty four you know what you're still young you've got money saved make this transition don't let it go on forever don't plow through all of your savings to do this find yourself then find a job and make sure that you don't make any huge decisions while you're in transition okay okay we'll get back to your questions in just a little bit in the meantime go to jail on money dot com got a lot of content yet during the holidays mark was like a little elf very busy populating the website Jill on money dot com and if you're there and you got a question just click the contact US button and we'll be happy to help you out alright one little bit of a break and then back to you.

Jill
For Her Head Cold, Insurer Coughed Up $25,865

Morning Edition

05:38 min | 2 years ago

For Her Head Cold, Insurer Coughed Up $25,865

"There's no question that medical bills are often higher in expensive neighborhoods and there's no question that this corner of New York City not far from grammar see park is one of the most expensive bits of real estate in the country but still you have to ask if you go to a doctor with a cold and a sore throat should you expect the last bill that tops twenty eight thousand dollars that's what a doctor at Manhattan specialty care just off Park Avenue south charge Alexa cast the I caught up with this forty year old public policy consultant at an office uptown I start getting a really sore throat and so I decided just to go the doctor to see if I had strep throat I was leaving on vacation that next week overseas and so I just wanted to like have some antibiotics in case it didn't go away the appointment with doctor Roy thought a lot he was quick she says a throat swab and blood draw and she was out the door with her prescription for cold went away pretty quickly and she enjoyed her vacation I get back about ten days later there's several messages on my phone and I have an email from the billing department at doctor Patel he's office the teller that BlueCross BlueShield this mailing her family a check for more than twenty five thousand dollars to cover some of the out of network lab tests the actual bill was over twenty eight thousand dollars but the doctor says they will collect the twenty five hundred dollar copay I thought it was a mistake I thought maybe they meant to hundred and fifty dollars I couldn't fathom in what universe I would go to the doctor for a strep throat culture and some antibiotics and I would end up with a twenty five thousand dollar bill this is perfectly normal the doctor's office kept assuring her and they sent a courier over to our house to pick up the check did the doctor tell you what test she was running now did you tell you that she was sending things to a clinician alright that lab that was out of network now definitely not yeah he went back and forth a little bit with the billing people right you were that you made it clear that you're unhappy about this yes I made it very clear that I wasn't happy about it in fact she told him she would report the doctor to the New York state medical board the test in question turned out to be DNA probes that were looking for a smorgasbord of viruses and bacteria Dr Renae majority professor of family medicine at the Georgetown University school of medicine sees no reason to run them in my twenty years of being a doctor I've never ordered any of these tests let alone seen anyone of my colleague students in other physicians order anything like that in the outpatient setting I have no idea why they were ordered maybe for a patient in the intensive care unit or with a difficult case of pneumonia there could be a reason to run these tests he says the ones for influenza are potentially useful but there's a cheap rapid test it could have been used instead there about two hundred and fifty viruses that cause the symptoms for the common cold and even if you did know that there was virus a versus virus to be it would make no difference because there's no treatment anyway so no reason to run these tests Alexa Kasdan also wondered whether running these tests and running up her insurance bill is even legal or show marking an attorney in overland park Kansas who specializes in medical billing says that depends on the details there are a lot of state law issues that can be involved and there's a lot of contractual issues that can be involved in this particular issue New York state has a surprise billing law patients need to be informed if they're in network doctor is referring a test to an out of network provider and to warn people that they could end up with a big bill state laws also limit cozy relationships between doctors and labs that could be at play here once companies also have contracts with doctors say making sure lab tests are done in network but billing expert marching says insurance companies aren't monitoring those claims as they come in most claims processing even for something a claim like this that you and I would read it after the fact and think gosh this just seems outrageous to pay this much money for these types of lab services are often completely automated there's never a human set of eyes that look at the bell and decide whether or not it gets paid the list prices in this case or about twenty times the going rate in that Manhattan zip code marking says and if the threats wanted been sent to lab core which is in network for Castin I'm courses that would have charged the insurer about six hundred and fifty dollars rather than the more than twenty eight thousand dollars for essentially the same tests Dr fought a lot he did not respond to requests for comment and even though a lexicon aspen didn't have to pay practices like this still cost us morning says she may not be paying anything on this particular claim but overall if the group's claims and costs rise everyone all the employees and and their spouses paying into the health plan may eventually BPP paying for the cost of this after we started asking questions about this cast and Kerrier Blue Cross blue shield of Minnesota launched an investigation they acknowledge that the review process failed to flag this extraordinary bill this at the doctor's office had not cash the check so they put a stop payment on it well they dig deeper morning says people can take issues like this to their insurance company or state regulators or do some of their own legwork before leaving the doctor's office I always ask where they're sending my labs or where they're sending my images so that I can make sure that that's in network with my health

New York City Twenty Eight Thousand Dollars Fifty Dollars Twenty Five Thousand Dollars Twenty Five Thousand Dollar Twenty Five Hundred Dollar Twenty Years Forty Year Ten Days
"twenty eight thousand dollars" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

04:21 min | 3 years ago

"twenty eight thousand dollars" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Brain stuff lined up on here when it comes to great American feuds there's Hamilton in our field McCoy and of course hearty and Mickey which my co workers assure me as a funny joke some of the most famous in history have been settled in all kinds of ways with pistols murders and yes even rap battles but the truly American way of handling big beef is to hand them over to lawyers and drag them into the court which means that even the paddies rivalries can have wide and long standing impacts on our society the legal tussle that took place between Henry Ford and the brothers John and Horace Dodge helped shape the auto industry as we know it if you also leave the ground work for how judges even today look at the relationships of businesses with their shareholders employees and competitors there is no Henry Ford without John and Horace Dodge and there is no Dodge the Ford Motor Company the once formidable partnership hadn't dissolved and inviting for a leg up on the burgeoning American automobile markets fourteen Dodge are some of the most iconic names in US car making history it turns out that the guys behind both brands started out on the same side the Dodge brothers an unruly pair known in Detroit for their drinking progress and affinity for knocking people out cold in bar brawls got started in the car business in nineteen hundred building Oldsmobile transmissions just a few years later they were the chief supplier and outside machinists for Ford motors model Hey the company's first automobile they also pointed up a large portion of the twenty eight thousand dollars that Henry Ford received from investors to get started investment soon paid off Ford motor turn to thirty seven thousand dollar profit less than three months after selling the first bottle Hey but the Dodgers had bigger plans they used the Dodge brothers motor company banner in nineteen fourteen to launch their own car the model thirty thirty five the vehicle was intended to compete directly with the Ford model T. Henry Ford did not take kindly to this new competition he made a pair of decisive moves to try to take the wind out of Dodge sales Ford stopped paying dividends to the Dodge brothers and other investors then he slash nearly two thirds of the price tag on his cars we spoke with mark Hodak an adjunct professor in New York university's business school while the Dodge brothers were for its primary target quote for it didn't want any shareholders he considered shareholders to be parasites the Dodgers promptly sued Ford claiming that he had price has cars too low there by cheating shareholders of potential income by the way their suit was filed the day after Henry's son's wedding the Dodge brothers were guests at the reception anyway the ensuing legal battle eventually found its way up to the US Supreme Court the case is often described as a win for the dodges but how do and some legal experts said that's only half of the story the court ordered for to pay a dividend to the Dodge brothers and other shareholders in doing so it rejected Ford's claim that he wanted to keep that money in order to reinvest it to bolster the company's production and boost workers' wages the decision is often cited for the legal theory of shareholders privacy or that businesses should maximize profits for the benefit of shareholders judge Russell Ostrander refer the court a business corporation is organized and carried on primarily for the profit of the stockholders the powers of the directors are to be employed for that the court also acknowledged another important legal theory commonly referred to as the business judgment rule seems the corporate directors generally act in the best interests of the company and have widely way to do so as long as their moves are reasonable the court cited this would result another segment of the case it rejected the Dodgers attempts to block Ford from expanding his factory Ostrander wrote the judges are not business experts is recognized the plans must often be made for a long future for expected competition for continuing as well as and immediately profitable venture the experience of the Ford Motor Company is evidence of cable management of its affairs Ford may have had that part of the decision in mind when he made his next move against the dodges after the court ruling fourty ounce he was selling the company to his son she also planted a rumor that he might start a new car business all this drove down the value of the shares in Ford.

twenty eight thousand dollars thirty seven thousand dollar three months
"twenty eight thousand dollars" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

05:02 min | 3 years ago

"twenty eight thousand dollars" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"By downloading the iheartradio app Welcome to brain stuff production of iheartradio. hey rain stuff lauren bubblegum here when it comes to great american feuds there's hamilton burr hatfield and mccoy and of course cardi and mickey which my coworkers ashore me as a funny joke some of the most famous disputes in history have been settled in all kinds of ways pistols murders and yes even rap battles but the truly american way of handling big beefs is to hand them over to lawyers and drag them into the courts which means that even the pettiest rivalries can have wide and long standing impacts on our society the legal tussle that took place between henry ford and the brothers john and horace dodge helped shape the auto industry as we know it if you'd also laid the groundwork for how judges even today look at the relationships of businesses with their shareholders employees and competitors there is no henry ford without john and horace dodge and there is no dodge v ford motor company if a once formidable partnership hadn't dissolved into infighting for a leg up on the burgeoning american automobile markets ford and dodge are some of the most iconic names in u._s. carmaking history it turns out that the guys behind both brands started out on the same side the dodge brothers and unruly pair known in detroit for their drinking prowess and affinity for knocking people out cold and barbara got started in the car business in nineteen hundred building oldsmobile transmissions just a few years later they were the chief supplier and outside machinists for ford motors bottle a the company's i automobile they also ponied up a large portion of the twenty eight thousand dollars that henry ford received from investors to get started that investment soon paid off ford motor turn to thirty-seven thousand dollar profit less than three months after selling the first bottle a but the dodgers had bigger plans they used the dodge brothers motor company banner in nineteen fourteen to launch their own car the model thirty thirty five the vehicle was intended to compete directly with the ford model t henry ford did not take kindly to this new competition he made a pair of decisive moves to try to take the wind out of dodge sales ford stopped paying dividends to the dodge brothers and other investors then he slashed nearly two thirds of the price tag on his cars we spoke with mark hodak an adjunct professor in new york university's business school he explained that while the dodge brothers were for its primary target quote ford didn't want any shareholders he considered shareholders to be parasites the dodgers promptly sued ford claiming that he had priced his cars too low thereby cheating shareholders of potential income by the way their suit was filed the day after henry's son's wedding and the dodge brothers were guests at the reception anyway being suing legal battle eventually found its way up to the u._s. supreme court the cases often described as a win for the dodges but hodak 'em some legal experts say that's only half of the story the court ordered ford to pay dividends to the dodge brothers and other shareholders in doing so it rejected for its claim that he wanted to keep that money in order to reinvested to bolster the company's production and boost workers wages the decision is often cited for the legal theory of shareholders premacy or that businesses should maximize profits for the benefit of shareholders judge russell austin dir wrote for the court a business corporation is organized and carried on primarily for the profit of the stockholders the powers of the directors are to be employed for that end but the court also acknowledged another important legal theory commonly referred to as the business judgment rule that principle assumes the corporate directors generally act in the best interests of the company and have widely way to do so as long as their moves are reasonable the court cited this went up resolved another segment of the case it rejected the dodgers attempt to block ford from expanding his factory australia wrote the judges are not business experts is recognized the plans must often be made for a long future for expected competition for continuing as well as immediately profitable venture the experience of the ford motor company is evidence of capable management of its affairs ford may have had that part of the decision in mind when he made his next move against the dodgers after the court ruling ford announced he was selling the company to his son she also planted a rumor that you might start a new car business all of this drove down the value of the shares in ford motor company that was enough to spook the dodgers and other investors who sold there Shares back to the Ford family exactly what had wanted in the first place. today's episode written by chris offer and produced by tyler clang brain stuff is a production of i heart radio has has stuff works for more in this and lots of other topics involving the sick burns of history our home planet has works dot com and for more podcasts by heart radio is radio.

twenty eight thousand dollars thirty-seven thousand dollar three months
"twenty eight thousand dollars" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

03:28 min | 3 years ago

"twenty eight thousand dollars" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"We defied months, my bills about fifteen thousand count light now by a car notes. So I've got my. Eighteen or about thirteen her car. We recently got again. Going into debt and twenty eight. What's your household income? Eighty two whenever she goes back to work. It should be about one hundred thirty. Okay. And these two cars are worth one. Now, what are they worth? I'm not sure they're worth. Brand new colour. And we have twenty eight thousand dollars on that my trucks and Chiapas sixteen now about thirteen thousand on that. Yeah, your car or this last car purchases over in the stupid zone. For sure the here's the thing you can't get rich when you own a whole bunch of stuff. And when everything you own going down value. Sure, anything you owns going down in value. You got forty thousand dollars worth of depreciating assets. And that's the only thing you own. So, yeah, these cars are bad shape. You gotta get this cleaned up man. Yeah, that's what I would do that today. And then it would get on a tight budget. The two of you look at this and say, if we're going to keep this new stupid car, we bought we have to pay it off immediately. We have to pay it off very, very, very fast. Like. Let me see you're making a hundred. You got to do it in less than a year. Her bills using? By design so all of her income can go straight to the car. Fortunately, I finally decided to bring her involved in finances, and she's on board with the envelope hairy with non essentials. Been all of your income going to anything. I want you guys to put all of your household income, and a pile and live on, as little as you can possibly live on and pay that car off fast. So I think you're gonna have to do it more than what you're talking about. And then the last part that really throws. Again mistakes were made. We both have a code our name on cosign Malone for a vehicle for my family, one of which, my, my brother laid on twice really dropping my credit score. And he says, three thousand left on that. Official for me to pay off that lyricist on that. And have him reimbursed me to prevent my credit score from getting any lower. I'm not worried about your credit score. You need to stop borrowing money. Anyway. Sure. Sure I do want him to get the stupid thing paid off, if he doesn't you're gonna reach over and pay it off rich go, though, they're gonna come after you, so, you know, they, they need to get lit up on that. There's only one of these or there's two of these there. So whose name. My wife has her name on my other brothers loan. Eight thousand Lord. Okay. Yeah. I mean your, your usual left your family vulnerable trying to help your brothers who weren't being wise. We'd made this decision married..

Chiapas Malone Official twenty eight thousand dollars forty thousand dollars
How Does Henry Ford's Feud with the Dodge Brothers Affect Businesses Today?

BrainStuff

06:02 min | 3 years ago

How Does Henry Ford's Feud with the Dodge Brothers Affect Businesses Today?

"Today's episode of brain stuff is brought to you by AT and T, and it can wait eighty two percent of people admit to using their smartphone while they're driving were all used to seeing it. But ninety three percent of people don't approve of distracted driving. We feel awkward speaking up about it. And it's time that changed because it's not worth the risk a text alike, selfie, whatever it is when you're driving. It can wait. So the next time you see a friend family member or other human using their phone while they're driving. No that it's okay to say something distracted driving's, reckless. Take a pledge to end distracted driving at it can wait dot com. A message from AT and T. Welcome to brain stuff. A production of I heart radio. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren vulva bomb here when it comes to great American feuds. There's Hamilton Burr Hatfield and McCoy, and of course, Cardi and Mickey which my coworkers shore me as a funny joke some of the most famous disputes in history have been settled in all kinds of ways with pistols murders. And yes, even rap battles. But the truly American way of handling big beefs is to hand them over to lawyers and drag them into the courts, which means that even the pettiest rivalries can have wide and long standing impacts on our society. The legal tussle that took place between Henry Ford and the brothers John and Horace dodge helped shape auto industry, as we know it the feud also laid the groundwork for how judges even today look at the relationships of businesses with their shareholders, employees and competitors. There is no Henry Ford without John and Horace dodge. And there is no dodge v Ford Motor Company if a once formidable partnership hadn't dissolved into infighting for a leg up on the burgeoning American automobile market. Ford and dodge are some of the most iconic names in US carmaking history. It turns out that the guys behind both brands started out on the same side. The dodge brothers and unruly pair known in Detroit for their drinking prowess and affinity for knocking people out cold in Barbara all's got started in the car business in nineteen hundred building Oldsmobile transmissions just a few years later. They were the chief supplier and outside machinists for Ford Motors bottle, a the companies I automobile, they also ponied up a large portion of the twenty eight thousand dollars that Henry Ford received from investors to get started that investment soon paid off Ford Motor turn to thirty-seven thousand dollar profit less than three months after selling the first bottle a but the dodgers had bigger plans. They used the dodge brothers Motor Company banner in nineteen fourteen to launch their own car. The model thirty thirty five the vehicle was intended to compete directly with the Ford model t. Henry Ford did not take kindly to this new competition. He made a pair of decisive moves to try to take the wind out of dodges sales Ford stopped paying dividends to the dodge brothers and other investors, then he slashed nearly two thirds of the price tag on his cars. We spoke with Mark Hodak an adjunct professor in New York university's business school. He explained that. While the dodge brothers were Ford's primary target, quote Ford didn't want any shareholders, he considered shareholders to be parasites the dodgers promptly sued Ford, claiming that he had priced his cars. Too low thereby cheating shareholders of potential income, by the way, their suit was filed the day after Henry's son's wedding. And the dodge brothers were guests at the reception. Anyway, the ensuing legal battle eventually found its way up to the US supreme court. The cases often described as a win for the dodges, but Hodak and some legal experts say that that's only half of the story. The court ordered Ford to pay a dividend to the dodge brothers and other shareholders in doing. So it rejected Ford's claim that he wanted to keep that money in order to reinvest it to bolster the company's production and boost workers wages. The decision is often cited for the legal theory of shareholders Premacy or that businesses. Maximize profits for the benefit of shareholders. Judge Russell Austin Dir wrote for the court a business corporation is organized and carried on primarily for the profit of the stockholders. The powers of the directors are to be employed for that end. But the court also acknowledged another important legal theory, commonly referred to as the business judgment rule that principle assumes the corporate directors generally act in the best interests of the company and have widely way to do. So as long as they're moves, a reasonable, the court cited this went up resolved. Another segment of the case it rejected the dodgers attempt to block Ford from expanding his factory. Australia wrote, the judges are not business experts is recognized the plans must often be made for a long future for expected competition for continuing as well as immediately profitable. Venture the experience of the Ford Motor Company is evidence of capable management of its affairs. Ford may have had that part of the decision in mind when he made his next move against the dodgers. After the court ruling Ford announced he was selling the company to his son. He also planted a rumor that he might start a new car business all of this drove down the value of the shares in Ford Motor Company that was enough to spook the dodgers and other investors who sold her shares back to the Ford family exactly what Ford had wanted in the first place. Today's episode was written by Chris offer and produced by Tyler claim brain stuff is a production of iheartradio's how stuff works for more in this. Lots of other topics involving the sick burns of history. Visit our home planet has works dot com and for more podcast. Iheartradio is I heart radio app, apple podcasts, or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Are you following your passion? I'm Carla Marie the host of side Hustler's, join me as we hear the story in hustle of people following their passion outside of their regular job side. Hustlers. Listen and subscribe on the iheartradio app at apple podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Ford Motor Company Henry Ford Dodgers Dodge Brothers Motor Company Horace Dodge AT Dodge United States Dodges Mark Hodak Detroit Henry Iheartradio Judge Russell Austin Dir Carla Marie Hamilton Burr Hatfield Apple John New York University
"twenty eight thousand dollars" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"twenty eight thousand dollars" Discussed on WTVN

"Twenty eight thousand dollars. Thousand dollars per person. Family of four twenty eight thousand you're not paying any more premiums pay any more co payments in uh paying anymore the doctoral 's house Twenty-eight thousand you not paying. But of course, it does you'll go to pay more taxes. It's not it's like, I'm gonna take you on a cruise and the cost of the cruises ten thousand dollars. But it's not going to cost you a thing when you're on the cruise really where do I sign up give me a check for ten thousand right now. But when you get on the ship, nothing's gonna cost you anything. Wow. What a deal. Some crazy Bernie admits that taxes are going up, and it's going to be an allusion that your healthcare is free. You're just not gonna pay at the point of sale or point of usage. An audience member back the sound seven here crazy Bernie now that your tax returns have been released and you've been identified as a millionaire in the top one percent. Will you pay your fair share? And how do you plan to apply the policies that you've been talking about enforcing on top earners, raise the issue? I am a million watch lean this year, we had five hundred sixty thousand dollars in income. That's a lot of money, and that money in my case case came from a book that I wrote pretty good book to read it. Bestseller sold all over.

Bernie five hundred sixty thousand do Twenty eight thousand dollars ten thousand dollars Thousand dollars one percent
If a podcast is too long, a fifth of listeners never return

podnews

02:36 min | 3 years ago

If a podcast is too long, a fifth of listeners never return

"How long should a podcast be while if a podcast is too long, two thirds of weekly podcast listeners return to that podcast later and continue listening when they have more time. That's according to a survey of radio fans. However, twenty one percent say bait never come back winning to our advice on how long a podcast should be in our newsletter. And in our show notes. Dan Meisner has looked at two years of the apple top two hundred podcasts, and he's discovered a number of trends, including more society and culture podcasts than ever before we linked to how the apple podcasts charts work in our show notes and in our newsletter. And now a note of caution a company called planet TV studios as approaching podcasters with the promise of coverage on FOX business US cable channel it sounds flattering. But don't waste your time. They want twenty eight thousand dollars to highlight your podcast, according to one. Podcast who contacted us? If you've twenty eight thousand dollars to burn on an average of just one hundred and forty nine thousand viewers when at least you could support pod news to where pod news dot net slash support. Acosta's launched in France, yen Tebet will run the French business, formerly he was in charge of Spotify for continental Europe over four million people in France, listen to podcasts every month. That's roughly eight percent of the country says the country's Media Metrix research podcast movement has a new head of sales Christy, Scott Christie was formerly selling Tom Taylor. Now, the excellent daily Email for people in radio Tom retired at the end of last year. Stitches CEO Eric dying was interviewed about the benefits of podcast advertising by yahu finance anchor has added analytics metrics to its mobile app. So you can now even check your download numbers on the bus. And what's the difference between radio and podcasting pod? News editor. Me in his weekly radio. Tomorrow piece for an Australian radio industry website points out that podcasters want to help each other. Unlike radio in developers corner this week supporting pubs hub hubbub could significantly help. All parts of the podcasting ecosystem pubs, hop hubbub. Cuts down on redundant ARA. Says polling a means it's faster for listeners to get new episodes. As we write in our overview article linked to from our show notes and our newsletter. It just needs a few lines of code and Google podcasts. Already supports it. Chaim? Just got such a stupid name,

Tom Taylor Apple Dan Meisner France Acosta United States Ceo Eric Dying Yen Tebet Google Chaim Europe Spotify News Editor Head Of Sales Scott Christie Christy Twenty Eight Thousand Dollars Twenty One Percent Eight Percent Two Years
"twenty eight thousand dollars" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

03:01 min | 3 years ago

"twenty eight thousand dollars" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Now, not any more how much money four hundred thirty million dollars that deal is worth more than the value of eight National Hockey League franchises. I think Florida Arizona. Carolina Winnipeg Nashville, Colorado and buffalo. He's worth more than eight teams in the National Hockey League. Bob Castellini paid two hundred and fifty million dollars to buy the reds and like twenty five two hundred and fifty million and he's getting four hundred and thirty million. Two. So that one I'll take one team which which who does read blog put out. This fact, which is really interesting halibut seven dollars per pound salmon twenty dollars per pound, trout one point eight million dollars per pound. So just in case. He's a darn good baseball player can get it done. Well, that's one guy that that. That's one guy that can get it done. Well, what does this mean for the economics of baseball? Let's see willy the NC double A tournament begins tonight. I four in Dayton couple of games. I got a text from Dayton parent. Yes. What does it cost to send your kid university of Dayton live on campus for one year segment? Gimme your analysis. How much? Twenty eight thousand dollars Rachel one year university of Dayton. Oh, I'm in. I'm going to say thirty two thousand dollars Chinese you prices, right? The answer is fifty six thousand wow. For one not under in Spanish. The showcase you would spend in four years a quarter of a million dollars. Now is that when mo- went there was only two hundred a month scam. It's a scam. College is a scam. Call it out fifty thousand fifty six thousand. Live on campus tuition books room board fifty six thousand dollars. College is a scam. I'm glad I went when I did me too. Aren't you you to how much would it be at a university law school a university of Toledo now? I don't know. I spent four years there at night, and I came out owing twelve hundred dollars. Taibbi about twelve million. I am told by the president Jose Barr says yes that fifty percent of law school graduates with jurists doctor degree do not work in the law because they can't find a job. Now, and you owe on average two hundred thousand dollars coming out, and you have no prospect of working as a lawyer now is is that that's not a good thing. How we look at the job job perspectives. There is not good. They work as far backs bartenders. Uber drivers and they're done. So please continue Mike deeper than the rest of they might give law advice.

Dayton National Hockey League baseball Bob Castellini university of Dayton reds Carolina Florida buffalo Colorado Winnipeg Arizona Nashville Rachel Toledo Mike Jose Barr Taibbi president
Come Work For Us: We'll Help Pay Down Your Student Loans

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:27 min | 3 years ago

Come Work For Us: We'll Help Pay Down Your Student Loans

"Support for this NPR podcast and the following message come from NBC's new drama the enemy within Erica shepherd betrayed her country. Now, she's the FBI's only hope in stopping America's greatest enemy. But can she be trusted Mondays beginning February twenty fifth on NBC the size of the average student loan has nearly doubled over the past decade or so collectively Americans carry more than one point five trillion dollars in student loan debt. And some employers are seeing that as an opportunity they're offering to help repay loans on workers behalf as a way to attract and keep their talent. NPR's? Yuki Noguchi reports carrier Brian graduated from college six years ago with a political science degree and twenty eight thousand dollars in student loans. It was stressful because coming out and having to have a a payment of about two hundred seventeen dollars a month. I it just seems like a lot of money to pay back when you don't really know where you're going to be working how much you're going to be making O'Brien. Now twenty-seven wanted to save for a home or a wedding, but loan payments were her biggest roadblock. I've wanted to be debt free before I got married and ideally come to the table with some savings, then a year and a half ago O'Brien joined Fidelity Investments in Irvine California to work in client relations. She was told that after six months, she'd be eligible to have the company contribute to our loan payments. So I quickly marked my calendar. I call my parents at night and told them how excited I was because I had no idea an employer would help you pay off your student loans such benefits are relatively new and unusual. Only four percent of employers surveyed by the society for human resource management offer it, but you can see why it's increasingly popular, especially as school loans, become a bigger shackle. Data suggests student debt is delaying or preventing people in their twenties and thirties from buying homes at the same time unemployment is low and skilled workers hard to find employers who pay down student loans or more attractive. Live especially to younger workers, Kim Wilem is managing partner at Baker Tilley's human resource consulting group millennial turnover is different than any other generation before. And if I'm able to recruit somebody based off this benefit and then retain them for twelve or twenty four months longer than I'm getting a reward out of that. There are possible downsides often if an employee lease before a certain amount of time, they must repay the money. But while him says that can backfire sometimes what we see is that an employee becomes disgruntled, and then they're working they're simply because they don't wanna have to repay. But many say the upside is big at fidelity, for example, more than a quarter of its worker signed up for the program, which is only three years old. It pays up to ten thousand dollars over five years. Oshawa shrieking Taya a vice president of fidelity says those who participate stay longer at the company for us really focusing on retaining those. People especially after we've invested in training them as a really important thing. The program success lead fidelity to now sell it as a service other employers can offer she train beer ball is director of congressional affairs for the site for human resource management. She says loan repayment would be more affordable to nonprofits and small businesses. If congress makes it tax free for employers and workers more employers might be able to offer student loan repayment as a benefit to their employees, even without the tax benefits. Some employers say, it's worthwhile Madeline Macintoshes CEO of penguin Random House, which started offering loan repayment two years ago. She says about ten percent of the publishing companies five thousand employees participate, including she says older people who returned to school or took out loans for kids. I feel like it has really of outsized, emotional or psychological benefits for employees. I feel like if they were ranking it this would be up there at the top. And I don't think it's the most expensive. It's. Cost the company about a million dollars to date, far less. She says than what it spends on health insurance. You can Gucci NPR news Washington support for this podcast and the following message. Come from Comcast business having the nation's largest gig speed network was just the start. Now, they're providing gig fueled apps and solutions that exceed expectations and help businesses perform Comcast business beyond fast.

Taya NPR O'brien Yuki Noguchi Erica Shepherd NBC Comcast Kim Wilem Fidelity Investments Gucci Npr FBI America Oshawa Madeline Macintoshes Washington Baker Tilley Irvine California Congress
"twenty eight thousand dollars" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

03:10 min | 3 years ago

"twenty eight thousand dollars" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"To that now one eight seven seven one eight seven seven zero see the AL. I was going to say once. Panels and not all are by. Doc. Say. Someone is going to get three to four cancel. Any other? Medical condition. If you're over the age of believers over fifty. You're gonna get any treatment private. Wow. And is pretty much across the board in Britain. Don't have the funds to do it. So. Socialist healthcare. What? Does the money come from? Is the biggest problem and in right now? Is no money to fund the national health service and all your little breakup solve it like the health, which is in the. So it's west of Scotland. The only get a percentage from all the money. L service cakes. So no, no money over there anymore. Basically over here. Call it bankrupt. And it was a nightmare. Gosh, I wish I could talk to you, man. I wish I could talk to you weren't there for fifteen years, man. I know exactly that you know. So here we are touting in America this Medicare for all. And again, where are we going to get the funding? They broke it down. And we talked about this a couple of days ago how, you know Medicare for all would work. They made it, you know. All look really pretty on paper where I everyone who got Medicare how well we're gonna tax employers. Okay. We're going to do an income based premium paid by employers. Get six hundred thirty billion from that. We're going to do an income based premium paid by homeowners who make or over twenty eight thousand dollars or just Americans who make over twenty eight thousand dollars. They think they're going to get two hundred ten billion from that. They think they're going to add an extra tax on those who make over two hundred fifty thousand to squeeze another one hundred ten billion from that. And then they're gonna they're gonna tax capital gains dividends of mind. With a playmate income another ninety two billion so tax tax tax tax tax. Then fifteen billion from limiting tax deductions for Americans with yearly earnings over two hundred fifty thousand and then twenty one billion from new responsible estate.

Medicare America Britain Scotland twenty eight thousand dollars fifteen years
"twenty eight thousand dollars" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"twenty eight thousand dollars" Discussed on KOMO

"If someone can provide them information that leads to conviction for the shot he line and the shot see lines. It's actually against. There's a mammals act that they have. And if you're guilty of it, you can spend a year in prison. There's a twenty eight thousand dollar fine per crimes Percy lion, and like other criminal fees and other other things that can happen. Yeah. All right. Well, speaking of animals research animals, we hear about this a lot. But apparently, there's a possibility of adoption. Yes. So there's a Bill that's going through legislation right now that would require research dogs and cats that go through public university research. Laboratories to put the animals up for adoption before youth, euthanizing them. That's kind of neat. Yeah. No one spoke against the Bill when it was out there hearing on Tuesday. Even even the researchers are for it. Yeah. Yeah. It sounds like it check it out at komonews dot com. Seattle. We made it the tunnel is open. But traffic still congested, get KOMO. Aaa traffic alerts every ten minutes on the fours. Breaking traffic news as it happens. Stay connected. Stay informed. Komo news one thousand FM ninety seven seven right now could be tonight on news four five raising your tiles credit a great way to stop identity thieves. We should be able to protect them. But the process just doesn't seem right. What every parent needs to know before handing over at their info. Consumer reporter Susan HOGAN is working for you tonight on these four five with Wendy Rieger. Jim Hanley and chief meteorologist Doug camera. Getting you up to speed the minute you get home with the day's top stories and changing weather conditions working for you on NBC four.

KOMO Percy lion Jim Hanley Wendy Rieger chief meteorologist Susan HOGAN Seattle NBC Doug camera reporter twenty eight thousand dollar ten minutes
"twenty eight thousand dollars" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

03:30 min | 3 years ago

"twenty eight thousand dollars" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Of drugs available. Elsewhere in the world is paid for by the people in the United States. We do pay charge for our drugs because there's no drug reimportation because we have patent protection in the United States, and we reap the benefit of that. Because the vast majority of medical discovery happens right here in the United States will Harris takes very radical positions. She says get rid of all private insurance. Visit deeply unpopular position understand when you see polls and say seventy percents of Americans are in favor of nationalized healthcare, when you tell them they have to be they have to pay additional taxes to the tune of like twenty eight thousand dollars per family per year, by the way, that they have to pay that additional some not even that some say, we're gonna raise your taxes at all. All these support for Medicare for all dropped from seventy percents among Americans to twenty seven percent among Americans. In other words, when you pull the question for America's would you like free stuff seventy percents of Americans are like, yeah. And then when you say, well, it's not free then seventy percent of Americans. Like, nah, you know, what forget about it. Also, if you tell them you want to eliminate private insurance only thirty seven percents of Americans are in favor of Medicare for all that wasn't the only radical proposal put forward by Senator Harris. She also suggested in this town hall that you wanted to ban all semiautomatic weapons across the United States. There is no reason in the civil society that we have assault weapons around communities that can kill babies and police officers. There is no reason why we cannot have reasonable gun safety laws in this country. And guess what? Guys. Here's the reality of it. Also, we're not waiting for a good idea. We have the good ideas and assault weapons ban. Background checks. Okay. There are background checks that are federal background checks for every federally licensed firearms dealer in the United States. If you buy a gun at a gun shop, it has to go through a federal licensed background check. That's the way that this works when she says she wants to ban assault weapons NS any semiautomatic weapon. Only forty percents of Americans want to ban semiautomatic weapons in the United States. But she's pushing for it and not only issue. She pushing for it. She's suggesting that if you disagree with her it's because you don't care enough about dead kids. This one is just a bugaboo of mine. I think it's evil and awful that suggests that people disagree with you because they just don't care enough about kids killed in shootings. It's just absurd. But that's the position she's going to push twenty six and seven year old babies were massacred. In Connecticut they fail to act. Here's what I think. I think that somebody should have required. And this is gonna sound very harsh. I think somebody should have required. All those members of congress to go in a room in a locked room. No press. No. And nobody else and look at the photographs says those babies, and then you vote your conscience. Okay. You do this on abortion? I'll do it on God's. How about that? How about that? Because the truth is every time I see a kid killed in a shooting. My first reaction is that's so evil and awful, perhaps we should have people there to protect people from being shot, you know, arm people with guns to protect people from being shot democrat solution to looking at aborted baby is allow because the answer is right there in front of them. They don't wanna take. And that isn't the only extreme thing that Kamala Harris said, she even got even more extreme. We'll get to that. It just one second first. Let's talk about how we're gonna make your business more efficient this year. How are you going to hire better? The best way to hire. Is by using ZipRecruiter you posted job right now to several job boards. And then you've got tons of the wrong resumes. And then you have to sort through all of the resumes, just to find a few people with the right skills and experience those job sites that overwhelming wrong resumes. They are not smart,.

United States Senator Harris assault Medicare Connecticut America congress twenty eight thousand dollars twenty seven percent seventy percent one second seven year
"twenty eight thousand dollars" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"twenty eight thousand dollars" Discussed on WJR 760

"Democrats on Capitol Hill, urging President Trump to close the door on the prospect of another government shutdown lawmakers negotiating to end the impasse over the border security funds. Michigan Senator, Debbie stamina says Democrats want stronger borders, I wanna see northern and southern border security that is smart and strategic and keeps us safe. And that's something that every single democrat supports and as Lana makers negotiate an end to an impasse over the border security funds. Some are saying there has to be another. There cannot be another government shutdown. The price is too great. You have a real problem coming out of this shutdown. And that is that people are quitting that are willing to work for the government are. You know, a beginning PSA makes twenty eight thousand dollars. They're not treated with respect democratic congresswoman, Debbie, Dingle, speaking to guy, Gordon and Republican Fred Upton agrees. He says the shutdown and its aftermath have been shocking that there were some five billion pieces of mail fifty IRS received that they get an open our farmers loan program. Small business law coat ramps air, traffic, controllers caucusing coast guard folks, who are got some some real hazardous duty right now, whether they interdicting drugs all that type of thing not being paid President Trump accepting house speaker Nancy Pelosi's invitation to give his state of the union address on Tuesday night, February fifth WJR news time six oh five..

Debbie stamina Trump President Fred Upton government Senator Nancy Pelosi Michigan IRS Dingle Gordon twenty eight thousand dollars
"twenty eight thousand dollars" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

03:12 min | 3 years ago

"twenty eight thousand dollars" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Financial wellness. And here's good news financial wellness programs in the workplace are on the rise ninety one percent of employers pretty much all of them say that they are likely to expand their programs over the next year or two in financial wellness, and it's a really good thing. Because thirty three percent of workers one out of three say that their level of debt is ruining their quality of life. Would you say that is your level of debt ruining your quality of life? The average debt is twenty eight thousand dollars and one out of three workers say that they're suffering with this one out of three workers say that they worry about their money. Several times a day at work. Forty seven percent say they spend more than our of their work time dealing on their personal finances. In other words, they're basically ripping off their boss instead of doing their jobs, they're handling their personal finances. Half of American workers say that they're doing this spending an hour or more at work per month on their personal finances. Forty three percent say they would be more productive at work. If they weren't so worried about their personal finances. And in fact, this raises increased costs of absenteeism people missing work because they're dealing with money issues or a relatively new phrase. You might not be familiar with not just absenteeism, but presently ISM. What's that? It means. You are at work. You showed up your presence. But that's about it. You're not doing any work. Presently ISM is as costly to an employer as absenteeism. According to this research, twenty one hundred bucks per year per employee is what? Absenteeism in prison T ISM costs your employer. And if the employer is spending twenty one hundred bucks a year per employee on these costs that's twenty one hundred bucks a year. They can't give you in pay and benefits because they have to spend the money. Elsewhere. And here's the worst part forty-one percent say their stress level related to money has increased over the last twelve months has yours. I mean, we've got a stock market that's been rising and economy that's been growing unemployment that's been falling wage growth that's been rising. And yet four out of ten Americans say their stress level is up compared to a year ago. So if yours is up if your financial stress level is up one good news. Your employer is probably aware of it and working on doing something about it to help you. Because of it helps you it helps them right? You're less likely to quit your job, you're less likely to underperform at work. It helps your employer for you to be financially good shape, number two. Do something about it. If what you've been doing ain't working don't keep doing it change your habits. Adapt a different style or a behavior that is more productive than negative. And if you're struggling on how to do that to figure out what the changes ought to be and how to implement them call us. Call us a triple eight plan RIC. I'm willing to bet that you've got resources either money or time that you're not taking advantage of and with a couple.

ISM twenty eight thousand dollars thirty three percent Forty seven percent Forty three percent ninety one percent forty-one percent twelve months
"twenty eight thousand dollars" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

03:12 min | 3 years ago

"twenty eight thousand dollars" Discussed on KTRH

"Financial wellness. And here's good news financial wellness programs in the workplace are on the rise ninety one percent of employers pretty much all of them say that they are likely to expand their programs over the next year or two in financial wellness, and it's a really good thing. Because thirty three percent of workers one out of three say that their level of debt is ruining their quality of life. Would you say that is your level of debt ruining your quality of life? The average debt is twenty eight thousand dollars and one out of three workers say that they're suffering with this one out of three workers say that they worry about their money. Several times a day at work. Forty seven percent say they spend more than our of their work time dealing on their personal finances. In other words, they're basically ripping off their boss instead of doing their jobs, they're handling their personal finances. Half of American workers say that they're doing this spending an hour or more at work per month on their personal finances. Forty three percent say they would be more productive at work. If they weren't so worried about their personal finances. And in fact, this raises increased costs of absenteeism people missing work because they're dealing with money issues or a relatively new phrase. You might not be familiar with not just absenteeism, but present t ISM. What's that means? You are at work you showed up your present. But that's about it. You're not doing any work. Presently ISM is as costly to an employer as absenteeism. According to this research, twenty one hundred bucks per year per employee is what? Absenteeism in present. He ISM costs your employer. And if the employer is spending twenty one hundred bucks a year per employee on these costs that's twenty one hundred bucks a year. They can't give you in pay and benefits because they have to spend the money. Elsewhere. And here's the worst part forty-one percent say their stress level related to money has increased over the last twelve months has yours. I mean, we've got a stock market that's been rising and economy that's been growing unemployment that's been falling wage growth that's been rising. And yet four out of ten Americans say their stress level is up compared to a year ago. So if yours is up if your financial stress level is up one good news. Your employer is probably aware of it and working on doing something about it to help you. Because of it helps you it helps them right? You're less likely to quit your job, you're less likely to underperform at work. It helps her employer for you even financially good shape. Number two. Do something about it. If what you've been doing ain't working don't keep doing it change your habits. Adapt a different style or a behavior that is more productive than negative. And if you're struggling on how to do that to figure out what the changes ought to be and how to implement them call us. Call us a triple eight plan RIC. I'm willing to bet that you've got resources either money or time that you're not taking advantage of and with a couple.

ISM twenty eight thousand dollars thirty three percent Forty seven percent Forty three percent ninety one percent forty-one percent twelve months
"twenty eight thousand dollars" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

03:12 min | 3 years ago

"twenty eight thousand dollars" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Financial wellness. And here's good news financial wellness programs in the workplace are on the rise ninety one percent of employers pretty much all of them say that they are likely to expand their programs over the next year or two in financial wellness, and it's a really good thing. Because thirty three percent of workers one out of three say that their level of debt is ruining their quality of life. Would you say that is your level of debt ruining your quality of life? The average debt is twenty eight thousand dollars and one out of three workers say that they're suffering with this one out of three workers say that they worry about their money. Several times a day at work. Forty seven percent say they spend more than our of their work time dealing on their personal finances. In other words, they're basically ripping off their boss instead of doing their jobs, they're handling their personal finances. Half of American workers say that they're doing this spending an hour or more at work per month on their personal finances. Forty three percent say they would be more productive at work. If they weren't so worried about their personal finances. And in fact, this raises increased costs of absenteeism people missing work because they're dealing with money issues or a relatively new phrase. You might not be familiar with not just absenteeism, but presently ISM. What's that means? You are at work. You showed up your presence. But that's about it. You're not doing any work. Presently ISM is as costly to an employer as absenteeism. According to this research, twenty one hundred bucks per year per employee is what? Absenteeism in prison, t- ISM cost your employer. And if the employer is spending twenty one hundred bucks a year per employee on these costs that's twenty one hundred bucks a year. They can't give you pay benefits because they have to spend the money. Elsewhere. And here's the worst part forty-one percent say their stress level related to money has increased over the last twelve months has yours. I mean, we've got a stock market that's been rising and economy that's been growing unemployment that's been falling wage growth that's been rising. And yet four out of ten Americans say their stress level is up compared to a year ago. So if yours is up if your financial stress level is up one good news. Your employer is probably aware of it and working on doing something about it to help you because it helps you it helps them right? You're less likely to quit your job, you're less likely to underperform at work. It helps your employer for you to be financially good shape, number two. Do something about it. If what you've been doing ain't working don't keep doing it change your habits. Adapt a different style or a behavior that is more productive than negative. And if you're struggling on how to do that to figure out what the changes ought to be and how to implement them call us. Call us a triple eight plan RIC. I'm willing to bet that you've got resources either money or time that you're not taking advantage of and with a couple.

ISM twenty eight thousand dollars thirty three percent Forty seven percent Forty three percent ninety one percent forty-one percent twelve months
"twenty eight thousand dollars" Discussed on Last Podcast on the Left

Last Podcast on the Left

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"twenty eight thousand dollars" Discussed on Last Podcast on the Left

"So are they still in business? The John Deere this part of Germany. I only know that they still make Mangla tractors and trailers because I found a used farming equipment site selling a two thousand nine Mangla silo bull eight thousand twenty eight thousand dollars. I'm just going to say rebrand. A little bit was known is like that was the highest quality farm equipment around mangle. But you're right. Just call it Johnson anything ever. As we sit earlier Yousef mingles childhood was completely normal. Although being the eldest son of the family who ran the whole damn town probably had an effect on a superiority. Yeah. Well, yeah. The weirdest thing about his childhood was just that. His nickname was Beppo Beppo Beppo Beppo you got cut out of the stooges. Know there were accidents. But none that would point towards mass murder interest over Beppo. What do you have to do an elementary school to get nickname? Beppo Yosef the whole story didn't go into why he was called Beppo just said that his childhood dig name was Betham just like tiny hats. I mean, honestly, if you would be much more excited by the name Beppo if he was a young man trying to get onto the Notre Dame football team. And he was a rag. Boy, everybody just tell he could work hard to get on the team when it's the one of the orchestrators of the worst crimes against humanity. All time Beppo takes a different color. Right. Absolutely. If I remember correctly Beppo, I think was Superman's monkey freely. Interesting. Okay. There's Beppo the super monkey comet the super horse streaky the super cat. We get it superman. I've really super understood. Thank you. Thanks to twenty three and me for supporting today's last podcast on the left. We now live in a world where we have access today.

Beppo Beppo Beppo Beppo Mangla John Deere Betham Yousef Germany Johnson murder eight thousand twenty eight th
Government shutdown negotiations continue on Capitol Hill

Overnight re-air of day's programming

03:32 min | 3 years ago

Government shutdown negotiations continue on Capitol Hill

"And urging them to urge Senator McConnell tap. Allow a vote on more or less exact same Bill that passed the Senate unanimously on December nineteenth? In this segment, and until the end of our program this morning, a special line for federal employees to two seven four eight eight thousand is that number all others, two two seven four eight eight thousand one Jacky Simon is with af G E, the nation's largest federal employees union, should the federal government expect to lose employees when this is all said and done or people people are gonna leave federal service. Well, that of course depends on how long this thing lasts. You know, there are some misconceptions about. The salaries and wages that federal employees earn the members of our union are very modestly paid in particular. There's been a lot of attention on a transportation security officers people who do screaming security screening at airports at BWI airport down the road. Here. They start at twenty eight thousand dollars a year. They take home less than five hundred dollars a week. When that's your your economic resources. You can't go very long without a paycheck. And so these are people who were very committed to the mission of their agencies. Very proud of the work. They do they take it very seriously. And they do a great job. But they can't do it for free. This is she's spread radio programming from Monday WC SPF from Washington. Talk about the call outs. And is that something that could be used as a tactic to put pressure on ending the shutdown? Call out the TSA call outs. The people who've called in sick during the central employees are calling in sick. Well, I think that story has been exaggerated somewhat certainly it's not condone union. It's not coordinated by our union. And there's no sick leave during a furlough. So they can't even really take sick leave. But. You also have to include the fact that there's a lot of comb flu going around and their job exposes them to the general public every day in a very intimate way. So there's all kinds of factors that could explain that. But we're certainly not encouraging people not to go to work who've been directed to go to work. We're telling our members. Absolutely if you have received notice from your agency telling you that you are required to to go to work that your job has been designated accepted. Then you should absolutely go to work Jacky Simon on this morning's Washington journal as promised we are going to go live now to New Orleans where President Donald Trump is about to speak to the American farm bureau's annual convention. I've had a good convention this morning. I've been up airport. And been able to ask Gordon, I guess this morning. So I'm so excited that we got a full room today. And I know that you're going to give them all of the big farm bureau. Welcome. So thank you for being here. I'm looking so forward to the wrestler that the program here today. I guess that we have with is such a good friend of mine. He's been a friend of mine for a long time. Served as governor my state. He's been a farmer still is a former at art. He's been a veterinarian. He's run agricultural businesses. And now he is the secretary of agriculture for the United

Jacky Simon Secretary Senator Mcconnell Bill Senate BWI Big Farm Bureau American Farm Bureau President Donald Trump TSA Washington Gordon Washington Journal New Orleans Twenty Eight Thousand Dollars Five Hundred Dollars
"twenty eight thousand dollars" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"twenty eight thousand dollars" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Catcher for. Yeah. I was on part of that. Yeah. And they've got cool stories be betrayal. In the Grand Canyon. Yup. People would rather go to jail them watch a sex scene or watch a sex scene with their parents and talk about their finances say that again, people would rather go to jail or watch a sex scene with their parents and talk about their finances. People are so freaked out about having financial conversations with a partner or someone knew that they would rather do be in traffic for an hour post. Have an embarrassing photo them posted on social media gets twenty seven percent would rather be stung by a bee. Let me tell you something putting your head in the sand. Does not work own it talk about it and don't entire. Yeah. But how many people do, you know, after they got married, then one of them confessed is what their college debt. Something with their loan amount is I did it up front. Yeah. Yeah. A lot of people might you know, it's like that would be that would be. That's why money is a hard thing. That's maybe one of the things that people fight about when they're first together when together is because which is why I always like just like, I'm keeping my own checking account for my own account because you know, some people are savers and other people aren't and so what do you do with the mutual money that you're running your household? It's. Ugly weird that people I think so too that you would be so upset that you wouldn't wanna talk about what if you didn't want to say to somebody. Yeah. I have twenty eight thousand dollars in student loan for my philosophy degree. Well, you have to own it at some point. Front before. I get married then after that is grounds for divorce. I know Bleier. No. That would. I mean, anything can be worked out twenty eight for my philosophy more like fifty six whatever implying does not a.

Grand Canyon partner twenty eight thousand dollars twenty seven percent
"twenty eight thousand dollars" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"twenty eight thousand dollars" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Oh, I think we just lost you, David. All right. So here he is an unhappy to address. And in fact, I am excited to. Addressing. The difference between the two no the forty nine thousand does not include our benefits, but the one hundred twenty eight thousand dollars is that hard cost to the American taxpayer. Yes, it is. Yes. It is. Right. Where does that come from? Well, that comes out of our paycheck. So we're making forty nine thousand frankly, it doesn't matter how much more making and benefits the average salary the average base salary as of two thousand sixteen anyway, the most recent information, I could find for federal government employs about eighty nine thousand dollars, which gives you an idea of how Kush the benefits offer the average federal government employees that the gross salaries about eighty nine grand. But the total benefit is one hundred twenty eight thousand the point remains the point remains, the one hundred twenty eight thousand is still the hard cost for that federal employees to that person that's making a gross forty nine thousand dollars. That's why it is an apples to apples comparison when we're talking about non essential federal government workers you have people that make forty nine grand per year that have to shell out a hundred and twenty eight thousand dollars for these people that are supposed to be working for them. And then you have the mainstream news media that does what will they turn around. And. They trying to make you the person making forty nine grand rose feel guilty about the person who's furloughed that as one of the previous caller mentioned will likely get off the back bay. There's even talk about them getting interest on back pay. I'm not kidding. That we're supposed to feel guilty about them. You know, what we have to pay one hundred twenty eight thousand and I say again, where's the equity win was the last time a single federal government employees was interviewed by Anne, one of the mainstream news media outlets acid. They felt guilty. That no Sally in.

David Sally Anne one hundred twenty eight thous twenty eight thousand dollars eighty nine thousand dollars forty nine thousand dollars
"twenty eight thousand dollars" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

04:46 min | 3 years ago

"twenty eight thousand dollars" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Just in in skimming through things I'll last night and then again this morning. There are plenty of people that obviously worked for the federal government. I had some people actually identified they worked for the federal government, and the longest is basically who and die. You know? How dare you? You know in it's wrong people they count on it. It's jobs and everything else. But but the one that I enjoyed the most on there. There are a few different people who questioned my numbers one hundred twenty eight thousand total compensation. And. A couple of people are asking me the source on it. I will tell you a source for numbers. I if I get them to you. If it actually is a source that's required. And you being the federal government employees. I might be slightly alarmed that you are aware that it's public record. And that these sources the federal government which happens to be the bureau of economic analysis. So the source for that one hundred twenty eight thousand and total compensation. Is the federal government that you work for? By the way. So that that might be another reason why we have issues when we federal government employees. They don't realize the source for government information. Maybe L slightly alarmed by that. Now, the other thing that I think is teachable moment. In the real world. And again, I I said yesterday, and and it goes in one ear and Albie other or people just don't I guess, if you're a federal government employee think I'm being genuine when I say this. I do mean it with absolute sincerity. I hold no animus ubiquitously for any federal government employees. If that was the right thing for you to do for your family for your career. And it's good. Good thing for great more power to ya. All right. This isn't about you. It's about the crappy politicians that created the crappy bloated federal government that we have to pay for. I do not blame you. Now, if you want to defend the crappy blooded federal government and say that under any circumstance, the only answer is to continue the status quo government. Yeah. Then I'm going to challenge you because I think that's wrong. I think it's reprehensible that the average person who makes a gross income of forty nine thousand dollars per year. Has to pay without any question whatsoever. For one hundred twenty eight thousand dollars employees. And again, the federal employees. They weren't fruit will won't they worked for for us. Worked for details. Right. And so in the grand scheme of who who's calling the shots here. Well, if we don't earn money, and we don't have that tax by the federal government. There's any money in the federal government to pay the salary or to pay the the benefits that are received by that particular person your position in the federal government. I mean details by the way that the government has nothing that isn't handed to had one person that said, yeah. But their employees pay taxes, I never said anything otherwise it doesn't change the dynamic. Emmy, right. I mean, and again eighty two percent of spending at the federal level is optional optional see the only thing that is absolutely required defense, and some basic infrastructure, and this this country generously appoint all of the federal spending that goes into that constitutionally mandated category rolling talking about eighteen percent. So. But you know, these people have families and everything else. Yeah. Yeah. You know what? So does the average person or can the private sector that has no guarantees see one of the things that becomes really clear when you hear federal government employs complaining about this adversity. Is what reality check see you. And I working in the private sector working in the real world. Do we ever have a guarantee one day to the next necessarily know if the company goes under that could be it, right? I mean circumstances change if somebody can do your job better, you might be out of a job any number of things that's the real world. But in the government doesn't work that way. Does it? No. I mean. Yeah. Heck a time. Trying to get fired. A in many cases. And to the extent that you're dealing with adversity. It's when Donald Trump says you're not gonna get another race next year. Who? So. Yeah. Federal government employees. Hello. This is the real world where there are no guarantees where you know, you're not entitled to a job, let alone aja the prepaid toll compensation that is in the neighborhood of two and a half times, the average private sector person.

federal government Donald Trump Emmy Albie one hundred twenty eight thous forty nine thousand dollars eighty two percent eighteen percent one day
Ashley Judd Sues Harvey Weinstein for Damaging Her Career

The John Batchelor Show

01:09 min | 4 years ago

Ashley Judd Sues Harvey Weinstein for Damaging Her Career

"Ashley judd is suing deposed hollywood mogul harvey weinstein correspondent mike cremedas in the lawsuit filed in los angeles county superior court judge accuses weinstein of defamation sexual harassment and violation of california's unfair competition law central to the lawsuit is director peter jackson saying that weinstein had warned him that judd was a nightmare to work with jackson was considering judge for a major role in his lord of the rings movies weinstein has denied trying to derail judd's career and said he had no role in jackson's casting the pay at big tech can be pretty big google parent alphabet has revealed that the median compensation for its employees as nearly two hundred thousand dollars a year but an amazon where jobs include bookstore clerks and warehouse workers the median salary is only twenty eight thousand dollars annually this is the first year companies are required to reveal median compensation i'm ann cates is an important decision it should not be based solely upon advertising attention this is an important message for anyone that has taken the prescription medication invokana invokamet or invokamet xr for their diabetes in may.

Ashley Judd Mike Cremedas Harassment California Director Amazon Ann Cates Hollywood Harvey Weinstein Los Angeles County Peter Jackson Google Twenty Eight Thousand Dollars Two Hundred Thousand Dollars
Malaysia proposes sweeping 'fake news' law

WDRC

01:10 min | 4 years ago

Malaysia proposes sweeping 'fake news' law

"It's red eye radio he's eric harley and i'm gary mcnamara you ready for this one all right all right malaysia proposes jail for up to ten years for what fake news the malaysia prime minister's government tabled a bill in parliament monday outlawing fake news now that would literally mean the onion would be outlawed in malaysia it might be with hefty fines and up to ten years in jail raising more concerned about media freedom in the wake of a multibillion dollar graft scandal the bill was tabled ahead of a general election that's expected to be called within weeks as he prime minister faces widespread criticism over a huge graft scandal under the anti fake news bill anyone who published his so called fake news could face fines up to one hundred twenty eight thousand dollars and ten years in jail or both.

Eric Harley Gary Mcnamara Prime Minister Malaysia Ten Years One Hundred Twenty Eight Thous