36 Burst results for "Twentieth Century"

Fresh update on "twentieth century" discussed on Champagne Sharks

Champagne Sharks

00:58 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "twentieth century" discussed on Champagne Sharks

"Having a much stronger presence especially in the seventeenth century in the communities this is before really domesticity takes over. So if you were a student that came up through women's studies and your primary focus was on white women's experiences you would actually even have the opposite of what you just. Shared they were in their class and that you would you would probably learn there was a decline narrative for women's power If they were taking like the seventeenth century as a period when white women were much more involved in the community in the courts et cetera because things hadn't really formalized into like a nineteenth century domestic model where the only proper place for middle class white woman is home I mean those world emerge I have familiar with encountering in early America Class. Students that just haven't studied early America and they primarily focused on the twentieth century in they think that white women's freedoms stem entirely from. The nineteen sixties. Or even seventies in terms of like a modern women's movement and there just isn't a lot of awareness of an earlier history not even going to entertain how they thought that enslaved men had more power than white women at the time I can't get. A lot of the you know this is one thing is I'm a student of history myself and of all the history of ever studied net especially African Americans specifically African American history never heard that before my life, but what happens is and a lot of the listeners of the show no I use this word a lot present them it's a lot of. Them and what they're trying to do was used way that they think today about black men for Blackman that existed two hundred years ago two, hundred, fifty years ago. which then you lose all the context us all. Well, fuck you lose all the truth and that's that's something that I've found with a lot of people that are so-called students of history but they're they're taking on the gender studies and things like that..

America Class Blackman
Getting Naked in San Francisco: A History

Bay Curious

04:01 min | 1 d ago

Getting Naked in San Francisco: A History

"Who other than reporter just plot check could take on this not safe for work assignment off she goes from. The state of California has indecent exposure laws, but those only apply if someone is being sexual like masturbating in public or intentionally offensive flashing someone. But what if you're just hanging out naked minding your own business? California leaves that up to local governments. For the first half of the Twentieth Century San Francisco didn't have public nudity laws. FRISKIN S- just didn't go nude much but then the sixties arrived and with it naked people. Some saw disrobing as a form of political artistic or personal expression college students got a taste for streaking and then there were the hippies. It's just delightful to be in I'll be in and that's what this is another exotic prank to add to a growing list of student oriented rites of Spring. It's sort of a happy happening for hippies in San Francisco hippies wanted to get closer to nature and they got naked a lot in golden gate park. Here's a quote from police chief. Thomas Hill it wasn't uncommon for a Gal that come out of the bushes there in the. Panhandle. Without a damn stitch and stand right in front of you with our hands up. I was out in the park in two started going to it on the lawn beside me just to remind you sex is sexual and as such already illegal according to the state. But still conservatives wanted tougher local laws to prevent this kind of behavior and they eventually got nudity banned in the parks. However, the rest of San Francisco was still fair game. As time passed other cities made public nudity illegal among them, San Jose, and Berkeley Berkeley's interesting because it's been mostly due to one naked Guy Andrew Martinez a student at the University of California Berkeley. Decided that American society is sexually repressed and in an effort to write things he began attending classes and going everywhere else in the nude save for a pair of sandals backpack people theorized that Martinez was able to go nude without major complaint for so long because he was easy on the is Martinez attempted shock tactic soon, became old news among his fellow students to me was simply the naked guy. Administrators however sent Martinez home to stay warm until his case can be considered by a student conduct board in Nineteen ninety-two Martinez was expelled showed up naked to his disciplinary hearing at UC. Then in one, thousand, nine, hundred, three here arrived naked to a Berkeley city council meeting members were offended and voted to make public nudity a misdemeanor crime. Back in San Francisco Nudist, enjoy their time in the Sun City developed a reputation for bodies in the buff especially at certain public events like folsom street fair a leather fetish festival or Beta breakers of rambunctious twelve k race who was an exhilarating experience people on the sidelines cheering. Go naked people go. All right. This is a rich Pasco in nineteen, ninety eight he started running naked in Beta breakers. Pasco is also the coordinator of the Bay Area Nature rests we're group of people who believe that the human body is God's divine creation nothing to be ashamed of, and that our interaction with Mother Nature is enhanced by removing the barrier of clothing. POSCO says it wasn't just public events where people could let it all hang out there also newt approved beaches in certain places where nudists would congregate lose a group of people in San Francisco who thought that going new to Jane Warner Plaza would be a good idea. It's that plaza in the Castro with a few benches where the streetcar stops, it's a little urban park. In this little urban park became an urban nude beach,

San Francisco Guy Andrew Martinez Golden Gate Park California Pasco University Of California Berke Reporter Thomas Hill Berkeley Berkeley Berkeley Bay Area Nature Jane Warner Plaza Panhandle Castro San Jose UC Posco Coordinator Newt
Breathe Again: From Miasmatic Disease To Modern Day Misconceptions

The Model Health Show

07:00 min | 3 d ago

Breathe Again: From Miasmatic Disease To Modern Day Misconceptions

"Hopefully, you've already heard that we lost a documentary recently, it is just taking off all over the Internet and the name of the documentary is called mask facts science in history of mask in medicine, and as you know right now we are dealing with A. Nationwide and worldwide pandemic, and we're looking for solutions and we're looking for things that have real efficacy to protect our citizens and to also maintain a level of health into to to create a system where we don't go through this again, that's what it really is at the end of the day because in truth the next viruses coming, you know Kobe twenty over. Twenty, one just like the flu virus you know these viruses mutate as we're GonNa talk about today, and we'll be dealing with more infectious diseases in the future. This is how life works, and so we went to look at what are some real clinically proven real world solutions to keep our citizens healthy and so we lost this documentary again, just skyrocket is over. Half, a million views already this week and has been a few days but something happened. Something happened I'm going to share with you a little bit later in the show but as of now, you check out the full documentary at the Model Hill show dot com for slash mask facts as I mentioned today, we're GonNa go on an adventure. We're going to go through some of the data that was in the documentary, but also ribbon dig a little deeper would expand on some things we're GonNa have a good time. And really, we want look at the beginning of this utilization of mask in medicine where the start and I think it's important to in that humans have been wearing masks for forever I for thousands of years whether it's for ritual whether it's for celebration also wore that's a time that different types of masks have been used but the specific use of masks in medicine actually started around sixteen hundreds when physician Charles de created the earliest versions of a has met suit. At this time he was looking at how can we protect the physician Dat was dealing with we're talking about this time of like the black plague, right the deal with plagues it was called a plague doctor. So a featured a waxed overcoat a lengthy Cain to examine people. Can you imagine somebody examining you am cocaine you with a cane from like six feet away? How disrespectful? So they had a cane also, there was this menacing eat mask that was part of this particular has met with this form of protection. and. The interesting thing is that this mask had very different purpose than you might suspect. Because at the time physicians all over believed in something called the Maya's matic theory of disease. And basically, the miasma theory of disease means the disease is passed from person to person or from the environment to person through the inhalation of quote. Bad Air. is coming from the environment, not necessarily prisoner person, but coming from the environment in inhaling bad air was the primary cause of disease. All right. Now, the mask was not necessarily used to prevent the physician from inhaling bad air what the beak mask was actually four was to crowd out the batter and instead hill good air and what they were doing was stuffing the mask of beat to keep it away from the person and they could even lights it light it on fire lake again Billy Madison. There's a scene where they're like the taking back the poop in lights on fire people sports. So they can actually stuff the beak with herbs and spices right shot at the KFC, and then they can inhale this good air to help crowd out the batter that was the technology that was there that was their approach and they felt that was affected. So this actually continued for quite a while with this mayes matic theory disease, you might think that this is a long time ago because it sounds strange. But the Maya's matic theory of disease did not become obsolete until the twentieth century that's actually finally became obsolete in the germ theory of disease really started to take hold. And this was around the nineteen hundreds. Physicians were now beginning to wear preliminary versions of surgical mask with a primary function of protecting the patient from contamination in surgical site infection. So kind of looking at today, it was used to protect the patient from the physician. In them not you know spraying out on them during the procedure in increasing their risk of infection. Now, visually, this became common practice for healthcare workers to wear mask and the surgical setting. Now is more hygienic practices began to be incorporated into operating rooms in hospitals. Several scientists sought out to discover whether or not the ritual of wearing a mask in surgery at a high level of effectiveness in preventing infection, which is their intent surprisingly several studies including a Meta analysis, and this means multiple studies a conglomeration of multiple studies examining this issue. This was published in Cochrane systematic review, very prestigious found that when physicians wore a mask or didn't wear a mask quote, there was no statistically significant difference in infection rates between the masked in unmask group in any of the trials. Could. Now, what this means is that even over one hundred years after the inception of the mask in surgery, the researchers noted that at best quote it is unclear whether wearing surgical face masks result in any harm or benefit to the patient undergoing clean surgery. In quote I want to look a little bit further because this just didn't make sense how this not be proven to be helpful at least in. So another study, this was published in the Journal of Hospital infections appropriate title. And they also concluded that the use of surgical masks surgery are obsolete and unnecessary. Researchers at the Center for Infectious Disease Research and policy summarises by stating quote clinical trials in the surgery theater have found no difference in wound infection rates with and without surgical mask. Despite these findings, it has been difficult for surgeons to give up a long standing practice.

Center For Infectious Disease Wound Infection A. Nationwide Plague Kobe Cocaine Cain Charles De KFC Journal Of Hospital Fire Lake Cochrane Systematic Review Billy Madison
Supreme Court Victory, Progress for Native Americans

WSJ What's News

05:31 min | Last week

Supreme Court Victory, Progress for Native Americans

"One of the big rulings from this year Supreme Court term was mcgirt versus Oklahoma. The five to four decision declared a swath of the state near Tulsa to be part of the Muskogee creek nations reservation enforcing nineteenth century treaties the US made with the creek that landmark recognition of native American rights could lead to nearly half of the state being classified as Indian country but it also. Wrestled with questions of sovereignty on native American reservations. This is an issue that native American legal advocates Sarah dear who is a citizen of the Muskogee? Creek, nation has been working on for many years. We had a chance to speak with her following the decision Sarah. I'd love to hear your reflections on this decision as well as the broader impact. This could have for all native Americans. Well. Winning a treaty case in the Supreme Court. In twenty twenty is not what anybody was expecting. This case came about in a very interesting and unexpected way as a result of some folks who were prosecuted by home, and so they they were the champions for tribal sovereignty I. It's a very odd circumstance where you have perpetrators of crime on the one hand and celebrating their victory because it means so much for Indian country. So Sarah, you've worked on tribal law and issues of sovereignty for much of your career. Why is this such a pivotal issue for you and for Native Americans? The Supreme Court does not have a great track record with tribal issues and so when cases move their way through the federal system, you know from the district to the circuit to the Supreme Court. Feel like we're always playing defense like we're really struggling to get the issues of tribal tribal governments you know to be treated seriously, and so I think this victory is not just important for native people from my tribe are even if people from Oklahoma but to see a treaty be held up as the law of the land, the constitution requires is a tremendous lift for people all over the United States who care about tribal issues tell us more about the work ahead regarding this issue. Sure. Well, one of the restrictions that still remains on our jurisdiction over crimes is that we can't prosecute. Unless it's a domestic violence case. So that means that if a non native person commits a homicide or a sexual abuse case against a child, if they do those things and it's on the reservation, we have no power over them in terms of the criminal justice system. So one of my long term agenda items is to change that to just re restore tribes like any government can prosecute anybody who comes into our community and commits an act of violence. I'm currently sitting in Kansas right now if I went to Missouri and committed a crime, you know they could prosecute me. So why shouldn't it be the same tribes Sarah gear slightly another big topic in the news, of course, is the impact of the coronavirus across the world and we know that it has also hit native Americans particularly hard. Why is that and what kind of attention would you like to see around this issue? I'm. So glad you asked that I think the primary issue that we're seeing of course, the health disparities that already exist. Right. So we've been talking about how folks have a higher rate of of sort of vulnerabilities like diabetes or lung disease, those kinds of things, and so tribal nations suffer from those disparities as well I think it's also hearkens back right to smallpox in a way because tribal nations almost disappeared as a result of widespread adoption. Starting in the seventeen hundreds and even continuing into the Spanish flu era. In the early part of the twentieth century, you know very high death rates and so there's a sense that here's a sense of urgency about viruses that may not exist in other communities because we know we're barely here. In the aftermath of smallpox, and so we do take these things very seriously. I also think that tribal communities tend to be very small and and sort of. Close, and so that also puts our nation at risk in are like in some of our trouble cultures, you just don't. You don't knock go see grandma. Culturally like you go see grandma right and so that's been a cultural barrier and some of our communities towards the necessary necessity of isolation that's been a hard cultural thing to to deal with for a lot of native people. We're also at a time where we're seeing a movement across the nation focusing on several rights reforming the justice system. It seems like we're also seeing a lot more intersection -ality on issues that overlap for multiple groups here. Do you feel that native Americans are being heard in these broader conversations in this broader push for equality? I do I think that you know the black lives matter has really open doors for for many different issues although the the centering of of black bodies and police brutality certainly at the core, the discussions and the protests that we're having a really opening up a lot of conversations and those are conversations that native people have wanted to have on a national level and wanted to be able to. Take to a larger audience and I think we owe a debt of gratitude to black lives matter which is open. So many doors to talk about difficult historical issues and of course, that's our story right typical historical issues that that have really damaged tribal communities and so that opportunity has we've really benefited I think from other forms of activism and I feel very grateful for the work that they've done.

Supreme Court Sarah Oklahoma United States Muskogee Creek Tulsa Muskogee Diabetes Kansas Missouri
The 'Seductive Lure' of Authoritarianism

The Book Review

06:35 min | Last week

The 'Seductive Lure' of Authoritarianism

"And Applebaum joins us. Now from London, she is the author of the Pulitzer Prize Winning Gulag History and her new book is called twilight of democracy, the seductive lure of authoritarianism and thank you so much for being here. Thanks for having me, I want to start with a very basic language question because people are throwing around a lot of terms, these days, authoritarianism, dictatorship, demagoguery, autocracy, fascism, and sort of get to an understanding of what we exactly mean and what you need. Europe by authoritarianism. Book is about democracies really and it's about people and political movements in democracies who become dissatisfied with their own political systems and seek to change radically. And I. Agree with you that it's hard to sometimes describe what it is that they want to go towards whether it's a one party state or a liberal democracy or A. Not necessarily dictatorship. In which there's less openness and less competition, and so you know my book is about that. It's about the disappointment that some people feel with democracy and the draw towards more authoritarianism more centralized, less competitive, less open political systems. You're not so much concerned in this book with the specifics of the autocrats of our time, the Erdo ones and Putin's, and Orban's so much as you are with the people who vote for them side with them enable them. Why did you decide to look at it from that angle, but actually it's explicitly. None of book about voters I mean I think the reason why people vote for populist or authoritarian parties are various and I you know that sort of separate subject but you're right. It is a book about journalists spin doctors, intellectuals, and the people who sometimes help create these movements who create the ideas behind them, and then sometimes sell those ideas to the general public. Poorly I read about the because those are people I know not all of them are my close friends, but some of them are people have run into. The World I know and I thought it would be useful therefore for me to try and explain them in an an understand what happened to them over the last twenty years I wanted aired Juan because. About journalists and intellectuals he someone who and I think we could say this. About Putin von and others as well. These are people who have suppressed. The Press Ltd journalists closed down newspapers imprisoned writers who are the people on the other side who are the two of these other journalists and intellectuals who are supporting someone like Oregon. For example, in Turkey, will some of them are people who have become convinced. There's only one form of Turkish patriotism and that it's a nationalist form of patriotism and that anybody who has a different vision of Turkey vision of Turkey this integrated with Europe or a Turkey that secular those people are traders to. The country and their voices don't deserve to be heard. Some of the will have other motives. Some of them will be opportunists. Some of them will see the chance of if you get on the Government's bandwagon and you get on state media than its way to make a career, some of the will like the proximity to power. There's a range of reasons actually that's one of the themes of the book is, is the various different kinds of attractions that these kinds of movements have for people like that. So I'm probably betraying a little bit of my prejudice. As journalists and someone in the book world that the pamphleteer is the bloggers, the spin-doctors, the producer of TV programs in creators of memes. These are people that I can easily see supporting some of these autocrats I. Guess I'm interested in what circumstances in which countries it's writers intellectuals and and what's behind that I mean look they've always been nationalist intellectuals and intellectuals WHO and writers who supported dictatorships. well, into the twentieth century one of the themes of the book one of the kind of threads that I run through it is an analysis that was written in the first half of the twentieth century by French writer Julien Benda called it was called the clerks, the treason of the intellectuals, and it's a book about intellectuals who align themselves politically and who abandoned their search for truth or their object Tivi in order to be part of political movement. So this urge to do that and to be to play a political role or to be the voice sir to provide the ideas for movement is I mean I think it's as old as writing, public speaking itself. Talk about how you've seen that in Poland where you normally spend most of your time. So the book actually the idea for the book came from my reflections about the history of Poland. Over the last thirty years in especially some of the people who I felt aligned with in the nine hundred ninety s there was a kind of center right anticommunist movement that was I mean it wasn't ever cohesive, but it was the people within it certainly spoke to one another in the nineties who all had a similar vision of Poland and who all hoped for Poland it would be part of Europe and part of NATO and would be. Some kind of democracy. And connected world. Some of those people now have acquired a very different vision of Poland and they. Hope to pull, it becomes kind of Catholic nationalist one party state. They've been part of or supporters of a government that has cracked down on independent media and may be doing. So further that uses openly homophobic and anti Semitic slogans in its election campaigns and that I think worse of all really has sought to pack the courts in order to remove the independence of judges and the transformation of those people is one of the subjects of the. First part of the book, and again I think their motives are various I mean some of them are personal. They personally didn't like the political system that emerged in the nineties and two thousands and they they are. They didn't fight until they had a personal role in it. Some people felt police losing something they. They developed a stellar sometimes mythical nostalgia for some other version of the country that they preferred may have existed sometime in the past. Poland's cases to pre-communist past you know some of them felt that Poland was losing its identity as emergency urban there multiple reasons but the the overall impulse is one that I think Americans should be aware of too because the you know the attraction of authoritarianism, the attraction of the one party state or the attraction of liberalism I think can be felt in lots of countries including our own

Poland Europe Turkey Government Putin Pulitzer Prize Applebaum London Oregon Julien Benda Press Ltd Orban Juan Producer Writer Nato
Brandy Alexander

Dr Wilko's Campaign For Better Beverages

04:06 min | Last week

Brandy Alexander

"Good evening and welcome to the Baugh. Last week we discussed brandy. So this week. I'll be making you an unforgettable. Brandy Alexander. Take a cocktail Shaker. And fill it with ICE. then. Add a single measure of Cognac to the Shaker. Then at a single measure. Of Ground Creme de Cacao. You kind of course achieve the same flavor with white. down. But it won't quite make the same color tail in the end. Then add a single measure of. Cream for a few days. It will pull slowly which I'm afraid to make spur. Bad Audio. Yes the sound of silence. Celia Shaker and shake well. Strain into a cocktail glass. Movement or two for the Froth to settle. Before garnishing with freshly grated nutmeg. Breathing delightful rumor. and. There's reason this is often served as a deserved Cocteau, rich and creamy, sweet and flavorful. This drink works wonderfully as an after dinner drink because it sweet enough to replace desert. You can make it even sweeter by topping it with whipped cream. Drizzling Chocolate Syrup over the tone. Alternatively drizzle the Syrup in the glass before pouring the drink as you do. Chocolate Roseberry MARTINIS. And finish with whipped cream. The original Alexander was Jim based. Mixing Gin sweet cream white crimped account. It's rarely seen these days and I would posit this because Jenin Crema. An interesting mix. Well at least that's my opinion on the matter. There are more than a few rumors about how this creamy concoction came to be. There have been many famous Alexander's throughout history and many of them have had their story tied to this particular cocktail drama. Critic and Thou Gone Quinn Roundtable member Alexander. woolcott claimed the Tubas named after him. Other sources say it was named after the Russian saw Alexander the Second. Of Popular Arjun Story of the drink was named after Troy Alexander? A bartender directors in New York City restaurant. Who created the drink in order to send them white strict? Celebrating, phoebe snow. Character and of Popular Advertising Campaign in the Early Twentieth Century. During prohibition, drinkers struggled to hit over the Jin began to swap it for other spirits. And Cognac was the one that stuck. As I said before I feel this is the better choice. Variations on the Alexander besides Jim Brandon committees and coffee LIQUEUR INSTEAD Which makes for a delightful afternoon drink the tastes like a festive liqueur coffee. Swap some of the Kalou of vodka and you get at Exhau- integrate.

Brandy Alexander Troy Alexander Shaker Alexander Celia Shaker Ground Creme De Cacao Baugh Jenin Crema Early Twentieth Century Cocteau New York City Kalou Jim Brandon Tubas Alexander. Woolcott Exhau
Old Art Offers Agriculture Info

60-Second Science

02:42 min | 2 weeks ago

Old Art Offers Agriculture Info

"Pieter Bruegel, iconic, fifteen sixty five painting, the harvesters hangs at the Metropolitan Museum of art in New York City. The work depicts peasants cutting stocks of wheat nearly as tall as they are nowadays. If you walk through field, you're basically see. Read is about me hide. The short stature is actually a consequence of breeding from the second half of the Twentieth Century, University of Biologists Eve dismised selective breeding favorite genes for reduced height because they came along with genes. Genes for increasing yields defeated growing population. The says we is just one example of how historical artwork can allow us to track the transformation of food crops. Over time. He teamed up with Art Historian David Fron of Almirante to catalog such artwork from around the world. We have made looking at things where we can can canceled changes in shape in in size friends since childhood, their interest in plants in our work began with a visit to the. The Hermitage museum in Saint Petersburg Russia where they noticed odd-looking watermelon in an early seventeenth century painting by Flemish artist Frans Snyders, so if you think of melon, you got the through the door on the inside, but don't appear to be failing white biologist. Dismiss it as soon. The teacher had done a poor job, but art historian Front Helen and a different idea. He Says No. This is the best painters ever from that era so if he baynes. Baynes it like that that's the way must have looked like other paintings revealed that both red and white watermelons were cultivated during the seventeenth century. The color is determined by a gene that controls the pigment lycopene. There must have been sort of predation preventing the accumulation of the color now with all genetic knowledge that we have from various blunt species. We can look in more detail how something comes about for example dismissed, says carrots for started to be. As, orange only in the sixteenth century, thanks to selective breeding, Beta carotene pigment, and until the eighteenth century European strawberries appeared tiny paintings, they van grew in size with the advent of crossbreeding with north. American varieties. The research is in the journal Trends in plant science. Ultimately, the team hopes to create an online research database of historical plant artwork. They seek the contributions of art enthusiasts the world the the Social Media Hashtag. Art, genetics. In the source paintings need to be realistic. If you're going to use for example big also to try and understand how a bear in the early twentieth century, you might be misled. Indeed such an attempt could be fruitless.

Pieter Bruegel Front Helen Metropolitan Museum Of Art University Of Biologists Eve Hermitage Museum Frans Snyders Baynes New York City Almirante Saint Petersburg Russia David Fron
The Yearning for the Unexplained

The Book Review

05:15 min | 2 weeks ago

The Yearning for the Unexplained

"Colin dickey joins us now from Brooklyn his new book is called the unidentified mythical monsters, alien encounters, and our obsession with the unexplained Collin. Thanks for being here. Thanks so much for having me on I want to start by talking about another book when it came out pretty much a hundred years ago with a fairly lurid title. What was the book of the damned? Oh the book of the damned, so Charles Fort's as the author of the book damned, and he was a, he was a writer who I think he was. He was on a path to be a kind of I. Guess what you would call a crank writer somebody who had the sort of wild elaborate theory about how human civilization was controlled by radio, being sent from Venus or something like that he unsurprisingly didn't get very far with that particular book and it's it's. It's been lost. It was never published a it got rejected and immediate he he would spend his days down at the new. York Public Library he lived in Manhattan, he would walk. The New York Public Library, and he would just spend his morning reading various newspaper, and scientific, Journal articles about various strange planed things that that he came across everything from ball, lightning, two frogs and fish, falling from the sky, blood rains, just various bizarre things that nobody really could understand. Understand, or how good kind of idea what what was going on here? And he just started collecting those, and what came the book of the damned was this oddball collection of these unexplained phenomenon, and rather than advocates, some kind of theory, what makes the book of the damned so great and strangest? He just kind of puts it all out there and says we don't really have explanations for a lot of these things you know, hence the idea of you know the. The the book of the Damn these for fourth. These are damned facts. These are damned stories because they're. They're excluded from from science and religion was like the early x-files. Yeah, exactly, it's except without going so far as to even say that you know. Aliens are behind it. It's sort of I mean in his later books for it would kind of try in kind of offer a thesis, but those are usually kind of its weakest moments when he's at his best. When. He sort of just kind of throwing out these ideas without necessarily. Of having to answer them, just kind of putting them out there on the table for the rest of us to kind of marvel at our physical copies of this book still around Oh Yeah Oh. Yeah, it's still in print. That's actually in public domain, so they're they're you know you can get lots of different editions of it? I got this this Great Hopi Dover Thrift edition of all four of his books, which is like twelve hundred pages in total and the massive unwieldy thing that kind of falls me from apartment to apartment. All right well, we'll talk about your book now. which will explain why a? Book of the damned might figure into things. Let's start with your subtitle mythical monsters, alien encounters and our obsession with the unexplained. Give us a sense of what territory your book covers. You know enlarge party grew out of the two thousand sixteen election grew out of a lot of the sense of misinformation conspiracy theories, and all these things that were were floating around, and a lot of which was being attributed to social media which I. Think is fair and accurate, but I also. Wanted to dig a little deeper into the genealogy of where some of these beliefs come from and. What I found again and again is you know? Just simply telling somebody, the factual truth about an a given incident or conspiracy theories is usually rarely enough because these beliefs are operating somewhere on a kind of more primal level. I really wanted to understand how we became a culture. That is kind of yearning for the unbelievable. That is yearning for something that is beyond the reach of science and religion, and so ended up going back to crypt the bigfoot lock ness monster chew copper things like that as well as the lost continent of Atlantis, and Maria and an aliens in and UFO's sort of these these three threads that really define the modern particularly in America kind of the twentieth century America's attempt to find something, magical and mysterious. Scientific Rationale Yeah I was GONNA. Ask about who the we is. I'm curious are Americans. Especially Gullible do we have a particular history with conspiracy theory and this mass, hysteria or mythology I'm not sure it's goal ability, and first of all I mean I think that in some sense, there is an almost conscious decision to believe the unbelievable that that runs through a lot of this. It's not entirely exclusive to Americans. I mean certainly loch ness monster is a you know a denizen of of Scott, London, and the UK certainly loves Nessie, but I do think it is a by-in-large, a function of a kind of modern industrial age culture that has kind of tap out the world prior to. I Dunno, the you know seventeenth eighteenth century there were still literal monsters. There were still things that were unexplained. There were still hearts of the globe that that Western nations hadn't experienced a reached or whatever, and so you could still believe that there were strange things out there.

Writer New York Public Library Loch Ness Monster Charles Fort America Colin Dickey York Public Library Brooklyn UK Manhattan London Maria Scott
The Murchison Murders

Casefile True Crime

04:05 min | 2 weeks ago

The Murchison Murders

"The Murchison his large raging in the state of Western Australia. That's nine for it's agricultural and mining prospects. Spinning across two hundred, ninety, one thousand square kilometers, the region is home to many small sparsely populated towns that consists mostly of rugged up back and Darod Bush land. During the Western Australian Goldrush of the light eighteen hundreds, many people flocked to the area in the hopes of securing a fortune which resulted in the construction of several towns that were later abandoned when the short lived gold rush ended. Afterwards there was little work available except for agricultural workers shape, shearer's camel and toe spike is blacksmiths and boundary riders who were employed to maintain the outer edges of sheep and cattle stations. But. The turn of the Twentieth Century Roberts from the country's ace than sites had made their way across the desert, and into Western Australia's agricultural areas. European settlers had introduced the rabbits to Australia more than a hundred years earlier and to die, eventually became an invasive pest that caused significant damage to the country's ecology and farmland. To combat what became known as the great plague? The Western Australian government decided to build the world's longest fence which stretched all the way from the north. Coast to the south coast. In Nineteen, Oh two construction of the first phase began in the small wheatbelt belt in of Barak Open which became the major administration center for the fence. A twenty foot wide lawn was cleared through the Bush all the way south to a small bay called starvation. Boat Harbor and the Mesh fence was then erected to fate west of the center of the line. Twelve foot gates were installed at designated intervals to allow passage through the fence. Wooden posts were also added every mile h Ma with a number that represented the distance from Barak, open. In nineteen, Ninety five, the second phase began with the remainder of the fence, being built from Barracuda open to the north coast of Western Australia. Stretching for one thousand, eight, hundred twenty seven kilometers, it became known as the number one rabbit proof fence. The number two fence was completed in April of ninety five, and was one thousand, one hundred and fifty eight kilometers loan. It began on the south coast, approximately one hundred twelve kilometers west of the number, one fans, and essentially ran parallel to it before turning east and joining the first fence at Gum Creek. The number three fence, which was completed in Nineteen, seven, started knee Geraldton and extended two hundred and fifty six. Columba's east until it met the number two fence. Collectively the rabbit proof fence was three, thousand, two, hundred thirty seven kilometers long and building. It had cost the equivalent of around eighty three million Australian dollars in today's currency. A government sub department was established to supervise the constant maintenance of the fence. The maintenance team included a shape inspect off sobbing inspector, camel drivers. Rabbit hunters and boundary rod is. Fines were issued to anyone court leaving negates along the fence open, and it was also an offense, but any member of the public to use any of its maintenance tracks. Scattered along, the fence was small. Government earned stations and homesteads when maintenance supplies, watersheds and other facilities were housed.

Western Australia Barak Open Darod Bush Barak Shearer Bush Columba Boat Harbor Roberts Gum Creek
The Murchison Murders

Casefile True Crime

03:53 min | 2 weeks ago

The Murchison Murders

"The Murchison his large raging in the state of Western Australia. That's nine for it's agricultural and mining prospects. Spinning across two hundred, ninety, one thousand square kilometers, the region is home to many small sparsely populated towns that consists mostly of rugged up back and Darod Bush land. During the Western Australian Goldrush of the light eighteen hundreds, many people flocked to the area in the hopes of securing a fortune which resulted in the construction of several towns that were later abandoned when the short lived gold rush ended. Afterwards there was little work available except for agricultural workers shape, shearer's camel and toe spike is blacksmiths and boundary riders who were employed to maintain the outer edges of sheep and cattle stations. But. The turn of the Twentieth Century Roberts from the country's ace than sites had made their way across the desert, and into Western Australia's agricultural areas. European settlers had introduced the rabbits to Australia more than a hundred years earlier and to die, eventually became an invasive pest that caused significant damage to the country's ecology and farmland. To combat what became known as the great plague? The Western Australian government decided to build the world's longest fence which stretched all the way from the north. Coast to the south coast. In Nineteen, Oh two construction of the first phase began in the small wheatbelt belt in of Barak Open which became the major administration center for the fence. A twenty foot wide lawn was cleared through the Bush all the way south to a small bay called starvation. Boat Harbor and the Mesh fence was then erected to fate west of the center of the line. Twelve foot gates were installed at designated intervals to allow passage through the fence. Wooden posts were also added every mile h Ma with a number that represented the distance from Barak, open. In nineteen, Ninety five, the second phase began with the remainder of the fence, being built from Barracuda open to the north coast of Western Australia. Stretching for one thousand, eight, hundred twenty seven kilometers, it became known as the number one rabbit proof fence. The number two fence was completed in April of ninety five, and was one thousand, one hundred and fifty eight kilometers loan. It began on the south coast, approximately one hundred twelve kilometers west of the number, one fans, and essentially ran parallel to it before turning east and joining the first fence at Gum Creek. The number three fence, which was completed in Nineteen, seven, started knee Geraldton and extended two hundred and fifty six. Columba's east until it met the number two fence. Collectively the rabbit proof fence was three, thousand, two, hundred thirty seven kilometers long and building. It had cost the equivalent of around eighty three million Australian dollars in today's currency. A government sub department was established to supervise the constant maintenance of the fence. The maintenance team included a shape inspect off sobbing inspector, camel drivers. Rabbit hunters and boundary rod is. Fines were issued to anyone court leaving negates along the fence open, and it was also an offense, but any member of the public to use any of its maintenance tracks.

Western Australia Barak Open Darod Bush Barak Shearer Bush Columba Boat Harbor Roberts Gum Creek
Why Is There a Parthenon in Nashville?

BrainStuff

03:04 min | 3 weeks ago

Why Is There a Parthenon in Nashville?

"At first, no one expected the building to last. The Tennessee Centennial Exposition, which was something like a world's fair or Walt Disney world's epcot was held in Nashville in eighteen, ninety seven. It featured a full scale replica of the famous Parthenon from Greece the Plaster Parthenon. This plaster Parthenon which fit in with Nashville's ambition to be the Athens of the South housed an art exhibition over six months one point eight million people visited the exposition small when compared with the twenty, seven million, who turned out for the Chicago world's fair of Eighteen, ninety three, but huge for Nashville which, at the time had a population of one hundred thousand as a nineteen twenty one newspaper put it the general effect of the cream, colored staff structure with the brilliant colors, and the freeze and Gables, so overshadowed all the other buildings that when the exposition was over, the people demanded its preservation, and it became shrine to the residents and visitors of Nashville. But this shrine was not built for the long term by nineteen eighteen. The building had disintegrated so badly that it had to be closed for safety reasons, however, thanks to popular demand. The city decided to rebuild it. Isn't concrete structure in nineteen twenty. The Nashville Parthenon reopened to the public in nineteen thirty one. As with the Greek Parthenon, the columns on the Nashville structure are not completely straight, but have a slight convex curvature called emphasis. The corrects for an optical illusion that makes straight lines appear concave at a distance. The structure is also full friezes carvings, and includes a replica of the famous elgin marbles now known as the Parthenon Marbles. These marble structures were part of the original Parthenon, but were removed by the British earl of. And sold to the British Museum in Eighteen Sixteen, the entire transaction remains a point of dispute between Britain and Greece. And while the original Parthenon is in a ruin, the national version features the complete structure. A builders made educated guesses to fill in the parts. At the time of its reopening in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, one, the only thing missing from this replica Parthenon was a statue of the Greek Goddess Fina. But after twenty years of small contributions from the public via a donation box at the site plus some private funding, there was enough money to commission a forty two foot. That's thirteen meter statue, the same size as the original. Tennessee sculptor Alan require to eight years to finish the mass of work, which was unveiled in nineteen ninety, and features a spear that was crafted with McDonald's flagpole is the sturdy core for twelve years. The statue stood in plain white gypsum cement, but in two thousand and two it was gilded in real gold, although some people have complained that the gilding makes Gaudy, it's actually more historically accurate. Nashville Parthenon still serves as the city's art. Museum and it's permanent. Collection is home to sixty three paintings of nineteenth and twentieth century American artists donated by Nashville businessman and collector James.

Nashville Parthenon Greek Parthenon Nashville Plaster Parthenon Parthenon Marbles British Museum Tennessee Walt Disney Epcot Athens Chicago Greek Goddess Fina Greece James Mcdonald Alan Britain
Where Did the Phrase 'Grandfathered In' Come From?

BrainStuff

03:21 min | 3 weeks ago

Where Did the Phrase 'Grandfathered In' Come From?

"Across the globe, language and history are inevitably intertwined. Linguistic origins are borrowed and transformed and a society changes, new words or phrases are created to reflect the current cultural understanding some phrases and words simply morph into accepted usage their origins, forgotten or conveniently misplaced one such phrase grandfathered in has become common shorthand to mean that someone is exempt from following new rules or regulations, although it may evoke the image of a gray haired gentlemen, let off the hook because of his age. The term rose from something far less innocent. A deeper look into the first use of the phrase reveals the political racial climate in the United States during the late. Late Nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, a personal business is considered to be grandfathered in when they're exempt from new rules and can continue to operate under the existing set of regulations. New Rules will then only apply to future cases today the term is widely used across various sectors most notably in real estate and health insurance. But when the term was first coined in eighteen nineties, it referred to only one thing voting rights. After the Fifteenth Amendment was ratified the US Constitution in seventy, thus banning the infringement on citizens right to vote on account of race, color or previous condition of servitude, some southern states did not readily accept the ruling. Instead they carefully crafted amendments on the state level that circumvented the federal decree in an attempt to prevent black Americans from using party stations since the basis of race could no longer be used the state amendments imposed things like poll, taxes and literacy tests, these limits were powerful close to thirty percent of all voting age. Men were literate, a majority of whom were poor black men. But those taxes and tests would also affect poor illiterate white voters, thus a grandfather clause was added to allow an illiterate man to vote as long as he or his lineal ancestor that is his grandfather had been a registered voter before eighteen, sixty seven, which was three years before the passage of the fifteenth amendment. The clauses suppressed the vote along racial lines, but party lines were at play to at the time. Most Black Americans were Republicans. The Party of Abraham Lincoln, which then favourite expensive government, funded programs and most whites for Democrats. The Democratic Party then favored curbing expansion of government power. Suppressing, the vote served to keep power in the hands of the Democrats, the Party's wound up switching their big government versus small government ideologies of next sixty years, or so leading to the stances. We see today, but that's a different episode. In Nineteen Fifteen, the state amendments and clauses were ruled nationally unconstitutional, but the poll taxes weren't eliminated nationally until the adoption of the twenty fourth amendment in nineteen, sixty four, and on the state level in nineteen, sixty six with the Supreme Court's decision in Harper versus the Virginia Board of elections. That decades of continued voter suppression the phrase grandfathered in is used today without the connotation of disenfranchisement, but even as culture shifts whether we're aware of it or not. Language pulled the power of our history, positive and negative.

Democratic Party United States Supreme Court Virginia Board Of Elections Abraham Lincoln Harper
How Do Betta Fish Work?

BrainStuff

05:27 min | 3 weeks ago

How Do Betta Fish Work?

"Hey Brain Steph Lauren Vulva bomb here. With their striking bold colors and flashy fins. Fish are one of the more popular types of fish sold for home aquariums. Perhaps because unfortunately there are a number of misconceptions about these creatures. The truth is that they're not as hardy and easy to care for as many believe Beta fish, sometimes called fighting fish are tropical fish native to Southeast Asia Wild. Betas typically live in rice paddies and other shallow stagnant bodies of water because these wetlands. Wetlands routinely shrink during the dry season. Betas hop from puddle to Puddle, trying to find a reasonably deep pool where they can hang out until the rains return due to these conditions, Betas developed what's known as a labyrinth organ that gives them the ability to obtain some oxygen from the air as well as the water. The sub order that includes Betas are sometimes called Labyrinth fish or Jeremy. Betas got the nickname fighting fish due to their territorial nature during the eighteen hundreds. Perhaps especially in what's now Thailand, the fish were bred for this purpose and fights were forced for entertainment. Betas were first introduced to the United States in the twentieth. Century, wild, Betas generally have small fins in our dull, green or Brown in color, but today's pet Betas have been bred to be quite colorful with elaborate fans with proper care, a pet beta. Beta can live for two to four years, but before you buy one, make sure you're aware of these five common fish tails about the the Beta fish. Perhaps the most widespread myth about Betas is that they can live in small bowls. The opposite is true Beta, fish need a tank that's at least five gallons about twenty leaders and ten gallons, or about forty leaders is better. The origin behind this persistent myth is uncertain but May. May come from the fact that Betas are often sold in small containers, and because they have some ability to breathe out of the water, but this can be stressed if they're housed in close quarters, especially if they share space with fish, perceived as rivals, small tanks being, there's nowhere to hide even when house alone or with fish that they get along with. They still need hideouts to escape to, but while the tank should be spacious. SPACIOUS, it shouldn't be too deep as Betas are more comfortable, swimming back and forth not up and down. We spoke via email with Matt. Layton a longtime Beta fish owner and editor of Vivo Fish who explained that Betas should be kept in tanks, no deeper than twelve inches or thirty centimeters, noting that their fins aren't that powerful. He said if it's too deep, the Beta may not be able to get up to the surfaces easily. Easily. It's heartbreaking to see a Beta struggling climb and then be pulled down to the bottom by his tail. Another myth is that Beta aquariums don't need a water heater or filter, but Betas are tropical fish that need to be kept in water, ranging from seventy six to eighty one degrees. Fahrenheit, that's twenty four to twenty seven, Celsius unless you're home never veers hotter or colder. You'll need that heater. A water filter is important to even. Even though wild Betas live in murky puddles without a filter, the fishes excrement and eaten food can make the water toxic, though be short purchase filter with a gentle flow as Betas. Delicate fins do better in calm water in addition that their fins could be damaged by the section in higher flow filters. Meanwhile, it's actually true that Betas don't mind being alone, and they tend to have issues with other fish, if male Betas are placed. Placed together or placed with other fish that have bright colors and large fins. Their natural territorialism often prompts them to fight. However they can definitely live with other aquatic creatures, such as ghosts, shrimp snails and African Dwarf frogs they can also live with other species of fish, but they do best with bottom dwellers was small fins. They're less likely to fight over territory like the coolie loach, female Betas can often live harmoniously together given adequate. Adequate space, which means at least five gallons or twenty liters per fish, but always introduce new fish slowly and monitor them guides. Online can help you acclimate your existing fish to the idea of new tank. Mate tricks like rearranging hiding spots in feeding your current fish before adding a new one can help, but you should always watch them carefully for a few days and be prepared to move an aggressor to another tank or another home. Another misconception is the Betas can live off of plant roots alone while Beta. Fish are often sold in small vases with the plant. Betas are carnivores, not herbivores in the wild they chow down on insects and Larva, so feed your pets, fish pellets or flakes specially crafted for Betas you can supplement with high protein treats such as blood worms and brine shrimp, but remember that fish can become overweight just like any pet, so feed in moderation, ideally only as much food as the fish can eat within three to five minutes finally. Don't expect a Beta. Beta to be layabout. Many people observe Betas and pet stores where they're often kept in small containers, hinder their activity, and many owners erroneously keep their efficient unheeded water, which makes them lethargic, but Layton says that Beta fish are playful in the proper setting. He said I've seen them. Push Moss balls around dance around their tank display their tails, and generally be quite active. Betas are inquisitive, and will interact with plants, toys, and structures, floating or sinking. Just make sure they're fish safe and don't have any sharp edges. That could hurt those beautiful fins.

Beta Fish Vivo Fish Layton Thailand United States Matt Puddle Jeremy Editor
Who Were the Wild West's 'Petticoat Rulers'?

BrainStuff

05:01 min | 3 weeks ago

Who Were the Wild West's 'Petticoat Rulers'?

"The United States continues to lag in terms of the representation of women in government. As of June twenty twenty, we ranked eighty first out of one hundred ninety three countries. One perhaps unlikely town became known for unprecedented progressiveness a century ago, Jackson! Wyoming In May of nineteen twenty, yes, three months before the nineteenth amendment nationally recognized women's right to even vote an all female nicknamed the petticoat rulers established order in this wild. West, town. Wyoming was ahead of its time. In terms of women's suffrage back in eighteen, sixty nine, it had been the first territory or state in the union to pass a law. Guaranteeing women the right to vote. We spoke by email with Morgan Jawan. Executive Director of the Jackson Hole Historical Society and museum. She said this may be a bit dramatic, but I often say that Jackson could very easily faded into landscape in the early twentieth century. If not for these women, this was a rugged place, incredibly difficult to settle while Jackson had a strong community where everyone helped each other out, there was very little emphasis on government and civic responsibility. It may be tough to believe that an all female government could have ruled a small town in twentieth century. America, when sexism still remains a major barrier in modern politics, but on May Eleventh Nineteen, twenty, Jackson elected Grace Miller as mayor and rose crabtree made Loney Festina height and Genevieve van flack as council members, the five women claimed victory over an all male roster, and crabtree even beat out her husband Henry for the position. This landmark win was no accident, either the election drew the most voters. The town had seen at that point, and in many cases, the women dominated their male opponents spy margin of two to one. While towns in Kansas and Utah had already elected all-female town councils in eighteen, Eighty, eight and nineteen twelve respectively, this election was a major turning point Yellen said the all Women Town Council of Nineteen twenty stepped up and shaped the town into the place. We know in love today. They graded the streets. They expanded electrical service and installed streetlamps. They established the first town cemetery and built the town's budget. Be Able to continue serving community members. According to a nineteen twenty two article from the Delineate or magazine, there was only two hundred dollars in town coffers when the women took office due to uncollected fines and taxes. As the article states. went out personally and collected every Senate due to the town from those who ignored the notices. Before the end of a fortnight, there was two thousand dollars in the treasury. Things didn't necessarily all start out with a Flash Bang. Though Yellen said a funny story I'd always heard all women town council had formalized the square, and until recently I assumed that meant creating the park like square. We see today, but what it actually meant was that these councilman as they called themselves and official documents simply prohibited the grazing of cattle on the town square. You have to start somewhere. As for what inspired the women to effect lasting change. Yellen says their methods and motives were rather simple. She quoted mayor. Grace Miller from an interview in Nineteen, twenty two. We simply tried to work together. We put into practice the same thrifty principles. We exercise our own homes. We wanted to clean well-kept progressive town in which to raise our families. What is good government but a breathing space for good citizenship? While so-called petty coat rulers successfully establish a lasting legacy y'all win cautions that celebrating their history simply isn't enough. She said the story of the All Women Town Council is incredible and certainly something to celebrate and be proud of for the town Jackson Hole has many stories of powerful women, and generally our history is one of inclusivity, adaptability and ingenuity. Everyone had to pull their weight and be open, minded in order to survive. However it still important to look at the big picture and use history as something to learn from, and not just celebrate Jackson did not see another woman in an elected position until the nineteen eighties, the all woman town council was necessary and successful, but unfortunately did not create a new normal, and Jackson was not immune to the times, but it is exciting and encouraging to see more diversity in our local government, including women in all levels elected positions. The women of nineteen twenties still serve encouraging role. Role models for anyone in Wyoming, a visit to the Jackson hole historical. Society and museum offer plenty of additional insights into the legend of these women of the wild west. The museum houses a number of historical documents and photographs of the women and information about their time in office as well as Mayor Grace Miller sidesaddle and the black coach. She can be seen wearing in most photos. They also have a number of exhibits online, and you can do further research through their stand classen research center.

Jackson Women Town Council Of Nineteen All Women Town Council Wyoming Yellen Jackson Hole Historical Societ Grace Miller Jackson Hole Mayor Grace Miller United States Rose Crabtree Morgan Jawan Delineate Or Magazine Senate Treasury Executive Director Genevieve Van Flack America Official
Fizz Fizz, with Fantastic History of Food

Your Brain on Facts

06:10 min | 3 weeks ago

Fizz Fizz, with Fantastic History of Food

"Dating back at least the seventeen hundreds people of Europe drank natural mineral water believed to cure of variety of illnesses like gallstones scurvy. Even bathing from these natural springs was seen as therapeutic. People literally went for the waters, though that freezes only hanging on its fingernails through the expression I'm not here for the water's usually set of someplace. You don't want to be like work. Many people tried to sell the water off site, but packaging and transportation at the time were prohibitively difficult and expensive, so they went with the next best thing. They'd manufacture their own water. Fine I'll make my own mineral water with blackjack and hookers. Most y'all are confused, but one person just snorted coffee through their nose. Mark my words. In seventeen sixty seven British chemist Joseph priestley tried carbonated water as you would beer by fermentation with yeast. The results were weak, but they worked in seventeen, seventy two. He published a paper entitled impregnating water with Fixed Air. priestley's apparatus, which featured a bladder between the generator and the absorption tank to regulate the flow of carbon dioxide was soon joined by a wide range of variants. However, it wasn't until seventeen eighty one that carbonated water could be produced on a large enough scale with the establishment of companies specializing in producing artificial mineral water. Others improved on Priestley's work, and while he did get respect from the scientific community, he didn't make anything for the invention that made possible a four hundred billion dollar a year industry. American, Inventor John Matthews designed a Soda Fountain that Could Produce Enough carbonated water for all his customers all day in eighteen, thirty, two, leading to the opening of the First Soda Fountain. In Their Heyday Soda Fountains were elaborately decorated places for rejuvenation more like a walk-through health retreat a snack counter and they were usually found in pharmacies. Pharmacists already used sweet tasting flavor syrups like lemon lime to mask the taste of bitter medicines like Quinine, an iron liquid medicine, being the standard form time rather than pills. At some sparkling water and you've got something new on your hands. Sas Parrilla for example was used to treat syphilis, supposedly and phosphoric acid and ingredient in most colas was thought to help with hypertension. The oldest major soft drink America Dr Pepper was created by Pharmacist Charles Alderson in eighteen, eighty, five and marketed as an energy, drink and brain tonic. Soda, the Effervescent News Hadn't medicine. We might be frustrated by. It takes a new medication to get to the market or top of mine a new vaccine, but it beats the old way of doing things at least from the consumer side from the manufacturer's side. The late nineteenth century, the era of the patent medicine was the best time to be alive. You could put anything you wanted in a bottle and call it medicine. You could still go around calling yourself doctor without having to prove it. Mix Up some tap water. Whatever's handy something bitter to make? It tastes like medicine, and then something sweet, so it's not too bitter, and of course if you can booze and hard drugs. Have Pretty printed with filigree and vague, sometimes contradictory claims and watch the money roll in. Behold the age of the patent medicine. Patent medicines are named after the letters patent probably letters patent since it was granted by the English crown. The first letters patent given to an inventor of a secret remedy was issued in the late seventeenth century. The patent granted the medicine maker a monopoly on his particular formula. The term patient medicine came to describe all prepackaged medicine sold over the counter without a doctor's prescription early English patent medicines sold like Jordan's in the colonies like dice Dr Bateman drops, whose original patent was granted by King George, the I in seventeen, twenty six, and was still available into the twentieth century. Not About to let the Brits make off with all the Lucre America began to cultivate their own patent medicines, an industry that boomed in the decades leading up to the civil war in the US very few patent medicines actually had a patent. You could get yourself a bottle. Love hosters celebrated stomach. Bidders Phero China John cleese Kella CEO. Bark and iron tonic reaches embrocations Emerson's Rheumatic Cure. Brooks's Barefoot Appointment SP Goff's magic oil, ligament or something just called salvation oil patent medicine actually played its own small part in the war. The government tax their sale along with the sales of matches, playing cards perfumes at L. to fund the war effort and repay military debt. Just like cigarettes today, patent medicines had to have a tax stamp on them for decades. Thirty years after the civil war, the government returned to Patent Medicine Taxation to fund the Spanish American war, which ran from eighteen, ninety eight to nineteen o two using a distinctive battleship stamp. The second half of the nineteenth century with the rapid growth of industrialization and populations in American cities was a high point for such hokum. Literacy was also improving with meant that they were more magazines and newspapers for patent medicine makers to advertise in and more people who could actually read the ads. There was also a pervasive and widespread distrust for medicine of the day. This was the era of heroic, medicine. Doctors went to extremes like bloodletting and purgatory gives to cure disease. We. Know now that making it already sick person poop their brains out or cutting them with a blade that you didn't know you needed to wash between. Patience is a bad idea, but back then it was no pun intended cutting edge stuff.

Joseph Priestley Patent Medicine Taxation Europe John Matthews Quinine John Cleese Rheumatic Cure Mark Syphilis Lucre America United States Dr Pepper Hosters Pharmacist Charles Alderson Dr Bateman Brooks Jordan
Mass Media, Markets, and Human Malware

The Portal

06:58 min | Last month

Mass Media, Markets, and Human Malware

"Hair Eric? My name is even I'm calling from the Boston area. Could you help resolve the media, markets and human malware mobius band? We're told that the media and social media influence our opinions, but at the same time we are told that in this day and age the media is thirsty for our clicks so in effect we tell the media what we want, and they give it to us well, which is, are we the masters, or are they? The same goes for markets. Markets are great. Great at identifying needs and pricing them, but markets also convince us that we need some really bad things as an example, universities want to import cheap labor to do research. This is done to maximize research dollar spent, and this is perfectly rational yet. You have argued that this is a problem, even though the market is doing exactly what it was designed to do. My intuition tells me that human malware seems to be the culprit here, but what exactly is going on I'll leave that for you dancer. Aviv you raise a very important topic. This has come up a bunch of different places. George Soros for example has a famous principle of reflexively which he believes that he can convey to almost no economists. Effectively it is the concept that not only do minds move markets, but markets move minds. That is, if you think you know what's on, and you start to see that the market isn't behaving in any way. That seems to reflect your preconceived ideas. You may change your mind for example. You thought that the world was falling apart thousand. The stock market starts. Capping upwards very confusing to most people, so there's a way in which you have a two way interaction that you would expect. Social media is both dictating our tastes, and it is trying to figure out our tastes so that it can profit from it. At least the people who run the companies that social media is dominated by now What do we do in a situation which tastes formation is not understood for example in economic theory given that all of this market mediated. We have a very long-standing tradition. The tastes are to be treated as given which I think goes back to Marshall. probably the early part of the twentieth century. So, we're not allowed to ask. Why do you prefer to why and what would cause you to change your tastes? In fact wants tastes are given. They tend to be fixed in economic theory. Precisely because the? Economists didn't know enough math to be able to track tastes change. In fact, this is the basis of my research with PM Alani into gauge theoretic. By adding more mathematics, we were able to show that you could continue to compare people's tastes between two different points in time if the tastes the same. We have a big problem because tastes, formation has in fact, eluded any kind of analytic effort within the economics profession, and we are in a market mediated situation. I think we have to take this two way. Relationship very seriously now. John Archibald, wiler once famously tried to take the mathematics of Einstein's theory of general relativity. and. He said Here's how you'd express it. You say that space tells matter how to move. Matter tells space had a curve. While in some sense, this is exactly what is occurring in the two way. Process that you're talking about. That's actually mediated through a single equation rather than two separate equations, so you have a very interesting situation. Are there equations are? Is there new mathematics our new form of analysis that can actually deal with an interacting non linear system in which we are both being influenced by media, and we are influencing media in return, and now when you have a really complicated feedback loop like that. Can you say anything about whether or not? The market will tend towards a positive or a negative social outcome that is is the market going to officially get us to a better place, or is it going to fishing? Get us to a place that we don't WanNa. Be at all. These are the sorts of questions that have been traditionally punted by the academics, and so I think you may not even understand just how profound a question! You've asked We've been at this for a very long time, and it's stunning to us the way in which the economics profession pretends to be. in curious about this. There's a paper by two particular authors both of whom have received the. Prize, that is frequently referred to as the Nobel Prize in economics. Elbow technically is not. and. These authors are Gary Becker and George Stigler and they wrote a paper called Biggest biggest business dispute Tottenham and they argued that tastes should be treated as the same for all men and do not vary over time comparing them to the rocky mountains. The reason that paper so bizarre is that the field is terrified of your question. What happens when you ask that question is that the field may in fact collapse, and it required to people at the very highest levels. Of The economics profession to effectively put a tourniquet on the bleeding that you can expect to stem from asking that question because they didn't have the mathematics or the sophistication to be able to handle it, and furthermore it may very well lead to a check on the power of economists that question does not have a positive answer, maybe markets in fact, lead US right up to the gates of hell so with the economics profession did. Did was that they put in a very artificial claim, which is that you don't need to worry about that? Because tastes cannot, in fact, be altered, this is positively academic nonsense of the worst kind. You'll find this paper in the late nineteen seventies and I have it on excellent authority from a member of economics, profession affiliated with the Chicago Department in which both of these gentlemen worked that. In fact, they did not see. Economics as a free field so much as as a bulwark against. Soviet style communism given when they were writing. Now, if that's true, it means that we came up with an artificial position in order to make the claim that capitalism was superior to communism. Communism was defeated, but modern economists don't necessarily even know that some of these claims were inflated specifically as a political bulwark rather than it's an intellectual contribution. So vast one hell of a question I. Don't know whether you find that. That was one hell of an answer, but Maybe, we should do more on this topic you've raised in the. For having such a an incisive look at the situation.

Boston George Soros Eric Nobel Prize John Archibald United States Wanna Marshall. Gary Becker Chicago Department Einstein George Stigler Tottenham
James Montgomery Boice

5 Minutes in Church History

04:16 min | Last month

James Montgomery Boice

"Welcome back to another episode of five minutes in Church history on this episode we will be in the twentieth century visiting with James Montgomery Boyce. Doctor Boyce was born on July seven, nine, thousand, nine, hundred, thirty, eight. He lived in a bedroom community of Pittsburgh. was quite a high school athlete. His Dad was a doctor and position voice for a fine education as a high school student voice was sent to the Stony Brook School and New York. He was mentored by Frank E. Gabe line, Biblical, scholar and theologian in his own right. Well after Stony Brook Voice went to Harvard for his undergraduate, and then he went to Princeton for his give. After that he was on his way to Basel for a PhD in theology while he was in Basel all there were a group of people who pressured him to start a Bible study, and he started a Bible study that became a church and to this day there is an evangelical church there in Basel that great, reformation city. And there's a church there founded by doctor. Boyce well. He graduated from Basel and Nineteen. Sixty six and two years later in nineteen, sixty eight, he was installed as the Minister of Philadelphia's Tenth Presbyterian Church near Rittenhouse Square on Spruce Street and Philadelphia Historic Church its. Spire went way into the sky, and its organ and its pipes could be heard throughout the city on a Sunday morning. Well in the nineteen seventies and nineteen, seventy, four to be exact Boyce started the Philadelphia Conference on Reformed Theology. And in those early years people would gather there and intense church to hear John, Gersh ner and a young RC sprawl and J I packer and others, this constellation of reformed theologians in Nineteen, seventy, eight, a number of them joined together informed. The International Council for Biblical and A boy served as the chairman Dr. Scroll served as the President and see put out the Chicago statement on an errand see. They established themselves for a ten year run, and that was the life they had a voice also helped establish the Alliance for confessing evangelicals and nineteen ninety-four. That group stood strong against the evangelicals and Catholics together document, and took a stand for justification by faith alone well, in addition to those organizations. We have the books that doctor. Boyce wrote one of them. Foundations of the Christian faith is his systematic theology. It's billed as a comprehensive and readable theology. He also wrote renewing your mind in a mindless age, and another one of his books to cities to loves is subtitled Christian responsibility and a crumbling culture in addition to those books. He was known for his. Commentaries these of course grew out of his many sermons preached from Nineteen Sixty eight to the year two thousand from the pulpit of Tenth Presbyterian Church. She did a five volume series on John that was published a four volume series on Romans, two volumes on the minor prophets, three volumes on genesis and three volumes on the psalms. They're also commentaries on acts flippy in Nehemiah, Joshua Equations and Philippians and a few more books well Dr Voice was married to Linda. They had three daughters, nineteen, eighty, eighty-two Linda and Dr, Boyce. The city. Centre Academy School there in Philadelphia. On the morning of Good Friday, April twenty, one, two thousand Doctor Boyce was diagnosed with cancer. He died eight weeks later on June fifteen, two thousand. During those eight weeks he had one more thing to write in. There were hymns. He wrote thirteen in all. One of them is entitled Hallelujah. The other come to the waters, an invitation for all who have no money, but are thirsty, and those who have no funds about are hungry to come to the waters to come to the fountain to drink freely of Christ.

James Montgomery Boyce Tenth Presbyterian Church Philadelphia Stony Brook School Basel Stony Brook Voice Philadelphia Historic Church John Frank E. Gabe Line New York Harvard Spire Pittsburgh. Dr Voice International Council Rittenhouse Square Centre Academy School Princeton Gersh Ner Joshua Equations
White Jesus

The Scathing Atheist

03:48 min | Last month

White Jesus

"Oh wait, Jesus. What are we going to do with you? I just I find it so funny that the people who argue against taking down racists statues keep trying to come up with something to put at the end of their slippery slope, and we keep in like yeah. No I could do without that to. Keep saying Shit like well. What are we going to tear down statues of George Washington? Just because he wore the teeth of the human beings that he owned, and we keep seeing like. How are you not hearing this? Right and of course the latest failed float parade. A horrible was white Jesus. A Bunch Heritage Not Hate U. N Word Lover. Types tried to that rhetorical question on over the last week or so, they're like. Yeah, well next up. You gotTa try to tear it out. The statue of Jesus and we're like. I mean I wouldn't stop you if you were tearing down if you wanted to do that, because like honestly, what could be a greater symbol of racism? Then White Jesus. According to their religion Jesus was the only perfect human being historically, of course he's Brown, but they turned him white. Because how could a perfect person be brown whiting up the guy? The entire religion supposed to emulate is the very definition of white supremacy. Hell, even referring to him by his anglicized name instead of. The name he would have had is a vestige of white supremacy. And that's to be expected. It's a religion of racism, so we shouldn't be surprised that their simplest racist. Even before we start setting it on fire, think about it what set Christianity apart from other religions of a stay was by and large. It's claim to universality right. Most religions word of varying degrees exclusionary back then. They were a way of marking the end group from the outgrew. Gods are different from their gods, and that's why we all stick together and our group. The idea of monotheism wasn't new. Obviously, they copied that off the Jewish. Kids paper along with most of their holy book, plenty of religions at the time believed that there's was the only real. God but Christianity was one of the few that also believe they were supposed to convert every other damn body to their religion. Now I that's just a cult with an aggressive strategy, but once that religion seeps into a culture at large. It's Kinda hard to imagine how that doesn't lead to a AAs supremacy type attitude. You in Christians went out into the world they were going out into the theological backwaters matter which direction they went, even when they happen upon cultures that were very clearly more advanced than their own. You know like like he didn't China in the Middle East their religion still convinced them that they were superior to these people I mean. Jesus is the one True Path to God and these idiots had never even heard of him before. How advanced could they possibly be? And with those tenuous justifications Christianity set out to enslave colonize loot, subjugate and genocide every part of the world they could put their fucking feed on all the while, bearing the Bible as their badge inside their book, they found ready justification for every heinous crime. They committed white. Jesus reigned over all of it in silent approval. But one of the Jesus, they were worshiping look like the Jesus of history. Would it have been harder to justify their crusades if the people were killing in Christ's name, look more like him than you did. What would have been harder to maintain a skin color based system of slavery if your Messiah had the same skin color as your slaves. Would it have been as easy for the twentieth century to embrace the racist underpinnings of Eugenics if they had to declare Jesus inferior to get there. Might be no across the board. Right like I mean. They do seem to know that Jesus was Middle Eastern. They do seem to recognize that he wasn't a white dude most of the time, but when they picture, what do they picture? were. They imagined the face of Christ. They imagine a white face or a black one.

Jesus George Washington Brown Middle East China
Dig for Victory

Gastropod

06:06 min | Last month

Dig for Victory

"To get to today's urban gardens, let's go back in time to the founding of the US, there were certainly major cities Philadelphia New York Boston, but it wasn't. Until the eighteen hundreds that more and more people move to cities and urban ization in the US really got underway. These are people who would have grown almost all their own food before, but now they live in a city. They can buy food at the market. So how many of them kept up gardening in their new urban homes? A lot of food production went on. On within city boundaries well through the start of the twentieth century, there were lots and lots of urban livestock, because people were raising pigs and cows and chicken for food within city limits anesthesia day as a historian at the University of Delaware, and she's working on a PhD about Victory Gardens. It's only really during the city, Beautiful Movement and the progressive era that city start passing ordinances that actually outlawed these forms of local food production in the name of cleanliness and sanitation and middle-class standards of respectability, because only poor people grow their. Their own food. The city beautiful movement was big deal during the eighteen nineteen in one thousand, nine hundred wealthy urbanites, all this rural migration and immigration, and of course, the rising inequality and poverty and tenements in their cities, and they were not happy. They tried to clean the city up. They built big boulevards and parks with monumental fountains, and eventually they also introduced strict zoning laws and chickens and vegetable patches were not part of these new beautiful cities urban agriculture. Something poor people needed. It had to go some cities overtime had already. Already banned maybe the animals in the streets, or even keeping certain animals within city limits, but this really solidified during the city, beautiful movement city started to enact ordinances that said no farm animals in the city at all and no front yard vegetables, either meanwhile the poor had more pressing concerns than how the city looked frequently, when bad harvests and economic fluctuations raised food prices, they could not get to eat. There were dozens of major food riots in American cities throughout the eighteen hundreds. The first urban gardening movement starts in eighteen ninety. Ninety three in the town of Detroit, because of this panic of eighteen, ninety three, there were lots of panics. In those days, the stock market was very new, very volatile and long story short, suddenly, basically overnight, forty three percent of detroiters are unemployed in what had been a booming city and the Mayor Hazel S Pingree I has to find some way to answer. The cries of his constituents. So what he does is, he starts the first urban farming movement, which is ironically happening at the same time that many productive activities within the. The city are being outlawed. In other cities, urban leaders didn't want farms in their cities, but they also didn't want riots, and so letting poor people groza food on vacant land was seen as an acceptable temporary band aid in times of shortages. The Detroit plan was called the potato, patch plan and it had pretty impressive results by eighteen, ninety, six seventeen hundred families were farming more than four hundred acres in the city, and there are letters there from local detroiters writing into mayor Pingree, saying you so much I was able to grow. Grow Food for my family and lots of the people that wrote in. It's heartbreaking, because these letters are hardly legible there in broken English. Many of them were recent, German and Polish immigrants who were taking advantage of this program to grow foods dot connected them to their home as well as to feed their families. The Potato Patch program was seen as a success, but it was never meant to be permanent in less than a decade when economic situation in Detroit started to improve urban farms kind of petered out until the next big. Big Crisis, which was World War, one, the city beautiful movement had stamped out urban gardening the Detroit potato patches were gone, but suddenly there was a huge need both for food, and for kind of coming together in a patriotic sense. At least that's how Charles lay through peck sought. He was a lumber baron from New Jersey and early on in the days of the European conflict. He wrote the US government and said people should be reason. Food would help them contribute to the war help stock shortages, and the USDA promptly said Sir. We've got better ideas going here for better uses of fertilizer and seed supplies so thanks for your input and no thanks Charles hadn't made his fortune by taking no for an answer, so he took that Fortuna and started a Liberty Garden Movement himself, and he quickly found a whole group of rich people who wanted to join him in getting Americans. Gardening again to support the war Charles and his friends created a movement. There were Liberty Gardens. Gardens on Boston Common, and in Union Square in New York and big corporations like Eastman Kodak and General Electric set aside land at their factories for employees to grow and boy scouts even had a garden at Grover Cleveland's Childhood Home in New Jersey. Even the government caught the Liberty Garden fever, and they created a school program to teach budding young home farmers how to grow food and support. The soldiers was actually one of the first nationally. Nationally promoted curricula in the country, the Liberty Garden Movement seemed to really catch the public imagination. However, there was no infrastructure for collecting numbers. The only source we have is Charles Lathrop pack himself wrote a book called the war garden victorious in one, thousand, nine, hundred nineteen, and he claims that the movements sponsored five million gardens which time when there were just over six million actual professional farmers in the US is kind of impressive but remember. Remember Charles is our only source for this number and he might have been biased. It's really incredibly hard to say, but despite its holds on the national imagination, it had nowhere near the impact of world. War Two Gardens in terms at share mount of produce ground, sheer numbers of people participating sheer difference it made in the global war effort, and that's probably why you listeners at least in the US you don't use the Term Liberty Garden. Gardens you probably say victory garden.

Charles Lathrop Liberty Garden Movement United States Detroit Victory Gardens New Jersey Hazel S Pingree Liberty Gardens Term Liberty Garden New York Us Government University Of Delaware Philadelphia Usda Boston
"twentieth century" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"twentieth century" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Almost a third term does that mean massive damage done to our country. I got a look at it. in the twentieth century clouds receded by numerous countries around the globe with various chemicals to produce rain. the airforce is on record as saying quote they want to control the weather by twenty twenty five and we are not talking about just seating the plows for many. the media about the truth. yeah I don't even know if these incidents. warming is reflected. an estimated one billion dollars worth of damage on the threats that he's growing. paralyzing crippling. five and six the writer of the black horse. people like you. well the one. there's west of us. we feel it.

writer us. one billion dollars
"twentieth century" Discussed on /Film Daily

/Film Daily

02:58 min | 1 year ago

"twentieth century" Discussed on /Film Daily

"Hey, what's going on and writer, watcher buoy, happy one? Okay. We have a lot of news to get to because yesterday were doing the water cooler solicit jump into it but start with Disney's acquisition of Twentieth Century, Fox. We've already seen some casualties. You know, in terms of many jobs. But now we're starting to see the casualties on the production slate, there was a film in film adaptation of most guard that was slated to go into production in just two weeks. But it sounds like that's not happening anymore. HD? Would we know? Pantley Disney has axed mouse guard which was split to be directed by maize mentors west ball. And starring Idris Elba. Andy circus, Thomas, buddy Sangster. And so, you know, so, you know, so Neue Mizuno this is going to be a motion capture animated film, which was adapting David Peterson's beloved comic series of the same name. But it seems to have been scrapped by Disney in the first major film, a casualty of the acquisition. But it seems that they disease allowing the producers which includes Matt Matt Reeves to shop the project around to other studios with potential for new home to be at Netflix. This is so strange because I feel like out of anything that was on the FOX's slate that they inherited I feel like most guard is so Disney. It's like, you know, I it's an authoritarian tale of like, you know nights. It's. These, but but with mice in creatures like that sounds so Disney to me would you thinking, why do you think they are getting rid of this? Well, according to some sources to the Hollywood reporter just ni wants thout. Fox's output to be mostly adults oriented fair because they want to have sort of that jurisdiction over the family market and mouthguard is just too similar to other properties that they have already going on like lion. King jungle book other CGI motion capture heavy films, and they just kind of want a twenty twenty two hundred FOX to just focus on the more adult oriented fare expertise section of avatar. I guess that makes sense one of my favorite board games of all time has called bites and mystics, and it kind of takes its cues from the most guard series. It's it's it's kind of. I mean, it's it's it's definitely it's own thing with his own characters own story, but it definitely took inspiration for most garden, I know that's being developed into feature films. So this never happens. We might end up getting that which could be cool. Speaking of the FOX acquisition we from day one. We've been talking about. I think everybody's been talking about the superheroes..

Pantley Disney FOX Disney Matt Matt Reeves Idris Elba Neue Mizuno Twentieth Century writer Andy circus Netflix David Peterson buddy Sangster Hollywood King ni reporter Thomas two weeks
"twentieth century" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"twentieth century" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Evening, everybody. Well, nice date safe. You like. It just December. Like it was like that today. The showers will continue through tomorrow. My pick up a little bit through the overnight period through early tomorrow and the Michigan end by Friday morning, still only in the mid sixties with southern California's most accurate and dependable forecast. I'm CBS tubes. Cars camp KNX, ten seventy NewsRadio. Currently fifty four degrees in Carson fifty-one in Chatsworth. Fifty two in San Clemente at ten forty seven a longtime top staffer for Senator Connell Harrison resigned after word leaked out about a four hundred thousand dollars settlement to a harassment and retaliation claim against him. Larry Wallace had served as director of the division of law enforcement. When Harris was California Torney general, then he worked for her as a senior adviser when she became Senator a former executive assistant to Wallace accused him of harassment and beaning behavior in two thousand sixteen Harris who has become a prominent figure in the metoo movement says she was not aware of the issue. We have an update on a story we reported on Monday. The district attorney's office has decided not to charge a Toronto schoolteacher was accused of sexually abused. A former student Kevin mckelway teaches English at south high school. He was arrested on campus on Monday at the time Torrance police said they were acting on a tip from the public and they were reviewing evidence to potentially identify additional victims for the DA's office at declining to pursue a case against mckelway because two alleged victims did not want the matter prosecuted and did not want to be interviewed. Another woman has come forward to accuse former CBS chief les Moonves of sexual misconduct, June Sealy Kimmel says he forcibly kissed her in one thousand nine hundred eighty five veteran she pitched the movie to him. He was at Twentieth Century Fox at the time this as an internal CBS investigation turns up more evidence of sexual misconduct as well as lying and destruction of evidence. The New York Times says the moon Bez one hundred twenty million one hundred twenty million dollars severance package is in jeopardy. CBS's? Jamaica Donkin has reaction from his lawyer attorney did tell the times this. He denies having any nonconsensual sexual relation and cooperated extensively and fully with the investigators. A spokesman for the investigator said no findings have been reported to the board and the board has reached no conclusions on this matter. The times against says that this report is expected to be presented to the board next week nine CBS board of directors annual meeting is next Tuesday. Exit talks between Megan Kelly and NBC may be just about over variety is reporting the Kelly will be free to take jobs with other news outlets. Once the deal is finalized, and she leaves NBC for good. She's expected to walk away with thirty million dollars the value of the remaining part of her contract. But money is probably not what's been holding things up things like confidentiality agreements, and how they're structured can be tough to resolve the network cancel the morning program. Megan Kelly today in the wake of her onscreen remarks about wearing black face makeup for.

CBS Megan Kelly Senator The New York Times Larry Wallace Kevin mckelway harassment Harris Senator Connell Harrison Jamaica Donkin NBC director Sealy Kimmel Chatsworth Twentieth Century Fox California investigator les Moonves San Clemente
"twentieth century" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"twentieth century" Discussed on KCRW

"And from Twentieth Century, Fox with widows four women decide to pull off a heist payback the debt their husbands left behind in the new thriller from the writer of gone girl, and the director of twelve years a slave widows in theaters Friday, it's a twenty two. This is morning edition from NPR news. I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm David Greene families across the United States are fighting with the federal government over a deadly chemical dozens of people have died from inhaling methylene chloride. This is an ingredient in common paint removers NPR's Rebecca hersher reports in October twenty seventeen a thirty one year old man named drew win decided to upgrade the walk in fridge at his small coffee company in north Charleston, South Carolina. True was gregarious. He was brilliant in his coffee business. That's his mom. Cindy, anyway, the floor of the cold brew coffee fridge needed new paint. So drew went to a hardware store and bought a can of goof off paint stripper on October thirteenth 2017 his business partner found him collapsed on the floor of the fridge. Cindy, win spoke to South Carolina public radio's Victoria Hanson around the one year anniversary of her son's death. It is. It is. And we don't consider it an anniversary because we all our family feels anniversaries or something. You celebrate. You don't celebrate death of your tiled drew died of suffocation, according to the coroner's report. The culprit was a chemical called methylene chloride. It's an ingredient in popular products with brand names like goof off striptease cleaned strip and Jasko among others. Methylene chloride has killed at least fifty eight people since one thousand nine hundred eighty and because of all those deaths a few years ago. The Environmental Protection Agency started studying methylene chloride trying to figure out if it should be banned altogether. So walk me through it. How does the EPA decide to ban a chemical? So there a variety of mechanisms for Richard angler is a former chemists that the now he works for a big DC law firm called Bergersen and Campbell. He gamely explained the mind-numbingly barring very thorough process. The EPA uses the figure out whether a chemical is too dangerous for consumers are the exposure levels. What are the circumstances? Are they working in close baiser? They're working outside. It took years to finish asking all those questions but in thousand seventeen they finally had an answer..

NPR South Carolina Cindy Jasko EPA Bergersen Rachel Martin Twentieth Century David Greene Environmental Protection Agenc United States Charleston director writer Rebecca hersher partner Victoria Hanson Campbell
"twentieth century" Discussed on /Film Daily

/Film Daily

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"twentieth century" Discussed on /Film Daily

"And I feel like I kind of get when I need to get from those for like shows like orange is the new black or house of cards or whatever it is. I don't know. I guess I guess I'm just haven't been super impressed with Netflix original movie selection to the point where I would pay extra for special features for it at this point. But, you know, they're always thinking more in like the TV Rome. Like, I wanna see like stranger things extra features. I'd like to see, you know, some cards, you know, in the writer's room, or you know, all that kind of stuff like the stuff that you'd get from a normal DVD. Yeah. Yeah. That's true. I could I could I could see the there are enough. Netflix shows out there. And maybe like they could do something with like stand up specials and stuff to have like a, you know, have the comedians like walkman through some of the process of putting together those shows because they do a ton of comedy and stuff like that too. So yeah, I mean, there's definitely a lot of potential there. I don't know. I wonder if that's something that they would be interested in as a company, I just don't under-. Because their whole business model was to get people subscribed in watching as much content as they possibly can. And it seems like these special features especially for the movies that are released is Artie produced. So that's content that like is very easy. Probably the license the stuff that you know, for like stranger things and original shows. I I can't imagine it would be that much money to produce. Like, it'd be a lot less money to produce that than it is producing their original programming. You know, so I feel like you would just keep people binging, which is what they want. They want people. There is all time. Let's go out to Twentieth Century Fox, which apparently is using. A I to predict audience behavior in movie trailers, Ben what is going on here. Yeah. There's a new study that says that twentieth century FOX's using artificial intelligence to analyze movie trailers in the hopes of finding thing parts of those trailers that audiences respond to and then recreating those elements in trailers for other movies to try to. I mean like Hollywood is is so drilled down on analytics and details, and you know, they they've commissioned all these different studies and every studios doing this where they have all of these numbers that they you know, it's all about data crunching trying to predict audience behavior. So now the verge has pointed us to this study that was published last month where Twentieth Century Fox created a machine called Merlyn, which is an experimental movie. Attendance prediction and recommendation system, and it's full of all sorts of technical jargon. And I in. This article at slash film. You guys can I would highly actually recommend that people read it because it's way easier to read and comprehend than it is for me to talk about it because it's so sort of out in the out it's very out there. But basically what happens is researchers take individual frames from movie trailers use this machine learning to label specific items on the screen like trees, and cars and faces and stuff like that. And then they compare that data with similar data from other trailers, and and then movie attendance numbers to see if they can sort of draw a correlation between all this stuff and help predict audience viewing patterns, so I mean. It's like explosions equal money. I guess I guess yeah. There's a little bit of that. They actually did like a thing where the this Merlin system, I guess took in all of the analytics from the Logan trailer and then spat out a bunch of predictions of what audiences would want to see based on the images that they found and in this Logan trailer and based on previous movie attendance numbers and the number the predictions weren't. Exactly, right. But like the top five movies that audiences actually did pay to see the the computer system predicted those. But just not in the correct order. They didn't know they didn't put them in the top five. They actually put them in the top twenty movies that audiences that they predicted that audiences would want to see so there's sort of on the right track here, even though it does sound kind of nuts. But like I said it's easier to sort of comprehend this data in text form than it is for me trying to talk about. It in the abstract..

Twentieth Century Fox Netflix Rome writer Artie Ben Hollywood
"twentieth century" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"twentieth century" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Twentieth century this weekend, nineteen ninety less than one year after the destruction of the Berlin Wall east and west Germany come together on what is known as unity day, reuniting east and west for the first time in forty five years. This week in one thousand nine hundred five at the end of the trial of the century. Former football star OJ Simpson is acquitted of the nineteen ninety four double murder of his estranged wife, Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ronald Goldman in the epic two hundred and fifty two day trial. Simpson's dream team of lawyers employed, creative and controversial methods to convince jurors that Simpson's guilt had not been proved beyond a reasonable doubt. And this week in two thousand thirteen espionage and military thriller author Tom Clancy whose books included the hunt for Red October. And patriot games dies in Baltimore at age sixty six following a brief illness during a career that spanned nearly thirty years Clancy pen more than two dozen novels a number of which were made in the hit, movies and popular video games. That's your look back at this week in history. Now, it's the weekend box office review the combo of Kevin Hart and Tiffany haddish proved potent as their comedy nights school easily topped the weekend with twenty eight million. It also earned a strong minus cinema score from opening day audiences and is on track to finish its run at around sixty million for more than double its twenty nine million dollar estimated budget not far behind in second place. Small foot was on far with expectations ringing up twenty three million audiences. Also gave it in a minus cinema score average predicted to finish up with about seventy million by the time and leaves. Last weekend's champ the house with a clock in its walls fell the number three adding twelve million to give it a ten day total of forty four million which is just above its estimated forty two million dollar budget, a simple favor clocked in fourth place with six million giving it a total of forty three million today. The none took over at number five with five million over the weekend and one hundred nine million overall. Can't remember seven crazy rich Asians past the one hundred sixty five million dollar Mark to become the sixth highest grossing romantic comedy of all time just ten million behind nineteen ninety eight. There's something about Mary and that's your weekend box office review on iheartradio. Thanks.

Nicole Brown Simpson Tom Clancy Berlin Wall west Germany Baltimore Ronald Goldman Tiffany haddish Kevin Hart murder football Mary one hundred sixty five million twenty nine million dollar forty two million dollar forty five years fifty two day thirty years one year
"twentieth century" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

08:42 min | 2 years ago

"twentieth century" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Twentieth Century, Fox has pulled scenes from the predator. After director, Shane black casts. His friend registered. Oh, okay. Not cool. Twentieth Century Fox was just days away from locking picture on the predator when an urgent note came in delete the scene featuring Stephen struggle struggle. A forty seven year old didn't have a big role just two three page scene. Shared with actress, Olivia Munn but last month, mud. Learn that struggle is registered sex offender. My God who pleaded guilty twenty ten after facing allegations that he attempted to lure a fourteen year old female into a sexual relationship with the internet. How did Libya I I really respect her? How did she even find out this information? She went to the FOX executives, and they decided to pull him from the movie, I'm very impressed with her. How did no I'm just making this up? But I betcha she hated the guy, and I betcha she had some friend in law enforcement or some friend with that looked him up in some capacity, whether it'd be an sex offender database or Google or whatever and they. Found this little gem, and she took it to the executives. Do you ever do that when you're working with someone, and you don't think that they're right? I know I've never done that. So you out their background. Extensively with you. And you were the first now, no, I just show up. I'm the idiot that shows up and has a party and has fun and doesn't think twice, and you know, a couple of times here and there have been a weird situation, but I never reported them. So I have a friend who used to be an in house counsel for a company, and he used to have to do background checks on people's part of his job. So how do you do that? Like is this a bat, there's background checks, and then there's background checks. Right. Like where you go and really go through the garbage and almost like hiring a private detective. Well, it wasn't quite that extensive, but one of the things that he had access to was this online database where you punch in someone's name the city that they live in, and it will tell you down to how many traffic tickets, they have every interaction that they have with the cops that results in charges being filed even if they weren't convicted of a crime charges that were planned out charges that they were convicted of if they were tried. In acquitted all of that information would pop up. So of course, we plugged in all of our friends. And what did you find out a lot of traffic? Tickets a few d- wise, no-one no-one guilty of anything serious had. Well, that's not so bad. I know people now that. You know, especially with dating and apps that want to do background checks, and I don't think there's anything wrong with that necessarily. I don't know. I don't know that I'd go that far. But would you want to know if you were going on a date with someone they were convicted of now, if it's a first date, I don't even know if I'm going to like them, I might not ever see them again. So what do I care, but if it becomes more serious have I ever done that? No, what about date three or four. Now, I've never done that to know if they were convicted of any and now that I have kids involved, it's a whole different deal. But convicted I mean, I I usually I meet people through my friends. So I assume that they're they're not felons. But you never know. Maybe I would what about bankruptcies would you want to know about those? Money's never been an issue for me before. Maybe now it should be. I should learn something. I know because I like I'm still that idiot that falls in love for for love, you know. So I don't really care what his Bank account is. I really truly I've never cared. And I I don't think I if I were fell again, I wouldn't care. You actively wouldn't wanna know any of that ever looked for any of that information my entire life, and I've been married twice. And I've dated if a convicted felon, well, and that's going to be problematic. I would imagine. But I I would assume I know it's a convicted felon, don't you think maybe maybe not some people talk about reinforcing my singled him, thank you. But when you have kids, it's a whole other deal. You don't need any of these creeps around tens of thousands of Californians have been registered to vote incorrectly by the State Department of motor vehicles, including some who were assigned the wrong political party preference. Officials insist the heirs were limited to twenty three thousand people of the one point four million voter registration files sent to the elections offices between late April. And now when California's new automated motor-voter system went into effect and actually early August Californians who were affected will soon receive notifications in the mail instructing them to check their voter registration status. Now, I think this has been going on longer than they're reporting because I have friends who this is happened to where they show up to vote, and they're registered in one political party and they show up. And then they say, oh, no, no, no. You're not a democrat or Republican or whatever. And they just get it all wrong. Why shouldn't be doing this at the DMV? The DMV is rude up organization. And it's not what they're supposed to do now. But we've also seen. Problems with voting machines. Anyway, so why not give I mean, I'm of two minds with this. I mean, what about the post office? Well, you get the postcard at the post office, and then you mail it to the county registrar. So they're just giving you the postcard they're not doing anything with it. But with the DMV they're actually doing stuff with the information, which means they screw it up because the DMV screws everything. Do they really they do? Oh, okay. I haven't had issues with the DMV. I've had nothing but great experiences. Don't ask. Why? So Mike an appointment. I go one o'clock. I'm here for my one o'clock five take your picture. It's great lighting. I'm like, I understand what everyone bitches about my grandma shoulder car. Yeah. And whoever she sold it to dig bad things with it. What do you mean they ran into someone and injured though? Was cylinder your grandma's? She filed out all the paperwork, that's bad, and they screwed it off. And so whoever it was the got maimed in this accident went after her, that's horrible. So she had to hire an attorney. She was in her. I think eighty five okay? That's ridiculous. Go through all that guy. That did it. It wasn't even you know, a woman matching her description. Yeah. But they didn't care. They just wanted to her laughter. Yeah. Whoever's name was on the register to oh, that's horrible. I guess the other cars today, I was guessing up to story. I must look like I I don't know what the hell I look like, but I'm guessing up and this guy probably about thirty five pulls up in his Honda Civic kind of black car. And I'm on the phone with American Express for other reasons, I won't get into. And it's guys talking to me. I'm like, I go. I'm sorry. What did you say? And he goes. Yeah. Can I have a key help me out? I need a gallon of gas. And I I was so I go, no. Out a surfer guy, like long, blond hair. Nice looking car. Good looking I go. No. What do I look like a Bank of America go, I'm a single mother of two. Are you yelling? He's like speeding off. I love the fact that you look into them. I was so freaked. I'm like, are you I thought it was just gonna ask me. Hey, do you know the way to like directions? Can you give me a gallon of gas? It's like the other homeless good looking guy. What is up with these idiots? That are good looking at come up to me. And just expect me to give the money. I'm like, no, it doesn't work that way. My money goes to my kids, you jackal get away from me. I've. Almost people. They all look like Nick Nolte of the mugshot come to the corner where I got someone I got in the fight with money on mother's day member attractive to good looking. And I said are you nuts? It's mother's day. And I have two kids waiting. I just flew in from one of my jobs. Like, oh, no. Then I go into this rant and the cab drivers looking at me like she is crazy. But these guys are young good looking like what you just walk up. Like, that's pretty ballsy. Do I would never walk up to somebody who works hard and say give me your money for no reason whatsoever. Like, just it's not a stick up. But I'm just asking would you mind spotting me, like forty bucks? You don't know me would do spags. Sorry, go make your own money. Go be a model. You're good looking. I didn't I did not compliment him though, you were given career advice to why was yelling and he spent. Yeah. In the gap. As I told you and then the American especially he's like, are you still there? I go home sorry about that interruption. You'd better not hit the gas pedal to all right? He's low on gas. It's four thirty. What do you say? We do another one of these tomorrow. But tomorrow will do on the fair. Nice. But right now county fair in Pomona, it's time for headlines next thirty minute nonstop.

DMV Twentieth Century Fox Olivia Munn FOX Shane black Libya Fox Stephen Google director California Nick Nolte Pomona Honda State Department of motor Mike
"twentieth century" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

The Thinking Atheist

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"twentieth century" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

"It's to meet jesus christ to become saved the reason this work is because up satan and the satanic panic wire is still targeting and indoctrinating little children to fear of an escape the devil the satanic panic is alive and well no matter how many love verses christianity preaches christianity is at its very foundation of fear cult from the beginning of the bible through the end whole narrative hinges on having the antagonism against which the hero might play from the serpent in the garden in the book of genesis the agent of lucifer who would come to steal and kill and destroy to the satan of revelation who will be bound for a thousand years and ultimately destroyed the devil the devil is the linchpin for all of christianity he's the reason we should surrender to jesus the reason to accept god the reason to line up and bow down and obey it's so important that we break these chains of fear the stop giving ourselves over to the irrational the magical the plays upon our greatest fears in the bearing human tendency to panic we panic pretty easy dumpling as a species we are involved in evolving species we have to open that closet door and discovered that in regard to satan in the supernatural there simply is no monster in there as one of my listeners said so aptly on twitter and i had to steal it and put it on screen he said this you know it's sad when you have imaginary friends it's even sadder when you have imaginary enemies.

twitter thousand years
"twentieth century" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

The Thinking Atheist

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"twentieth century" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

"Still find it on hbo somewhere the longest and most expensive trial in american history to that point based on what fear assumption paranoia zero convictions see row convictions time lost money wasted by the millions lives devastated about this recent story of this texas coupled they were sent to prison on satanic ritual abuse charges in the nineties they were imprisoned falsely for twenty five years and were only recently set free why because they got caught in this tidal wave of paranoia all right find south we've got to get to the point already i hear you my friends wide dredge all this up today what's the relevance of the satanic panic now my point is this my friends the satanic panic is not over the entire foundational narrative of christianity revolves around what the activity of and the warnings against god's arch enemy the devil his scheme is the one who deceives the world the snare of the devil he comes to steal and kill and destroy and the whole world lies in his power recently mega evangelist billy graham talked about satan's ability to deceive we should never think he is not to be feared the warnings about the end times remain a huge part of christianity's final chapter the book of revelation still taught is if we live in the end times and the end is near we got extra schism still going on across the planet this guy alleged to have done more than ten thousand he passed away a couple of years ago more than ten thousand conducted by himself personally according to his account we see stories of people who are harmed or even killed through these x sources of saberi.

hbo texas billy graham twenty five years
"twentieth century" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

The Thinking Atheist

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"twentieth century" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

"About this guy anton levin doesn't believe in a literal supernatural satan what about the church of satan that sacrifices animals in a costs and kidnaps are virgin girls and all the comes after your kids what about that will if you read the eleven satanic rules of the earth it says do not harm little children and don't kill nonhuman animals and last year attacked door four your food well this is a revelation isn't it what about this 1980 book michelle remembers someone the fact check it and came to the conclusion that it's all complete or shit like there's nothing to corroborated in fact this one period of time that she was supposed to be enduring an eighty day long satanic ritual she had attendance perfect attendance at her school along with all the other students and yet this story fuel the satanic panic of the nineteen 80s the mcmartin trial was based on what the testimony of the children hugely problematic to begin with now this is where we have to be careful because whenever young children come to us with accusations of abuse we do need to listen and we need to properly vet these claims i'm not trying to be dismissive of the claims of abuse but if you were to hear the claims of the children and if they had been observed correctly at the front end of the discussion how much pain might have been avoided by we have good reason to doubt the validity of these claims and this was common in these satanic ritual abuse charges pbs frontline special about satanic ritual abuse talking about the suggestive interviewing techniques used and this was very much the case for they bring the young children in and they're like where you abuse no did they touch you know come on bobby don't you wanna be a good boy gave you a candy or whatever the they do in fact hbo produced a film about this a compelling nineteen ninety five movie called indictment that martin trial i think you can.

bobby anton levin michelle hbo martin eighty day
"twentieth century" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

The Thinking Atheist

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"twentieth century" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

"You'll not on our model that there's oftentimes a cut that goes from behind the ear all the way down to the throat another area that's obvious in these kinds of ritualistic cardi who beat pettigrew or the briefing room on the right and the left side the upper chest this oftentimes is the signature of the high priest another area that you might find satanic ritual carving he's in the stomach area and as was true in the same all we laugh about this stuff right we about that stuff but the truth is is that these accusations of satanic ritual abuse destroyed lives of course we can't talk about satanic ritual abuse without talking about the mcmartin trial the mcmartin daycare trial the mcmartin family accused of satanic ritual abuse of the children that they were charges over and for almost a full decade from 1983 to 1990 this was the trial that mesmerized the nation it was featured on geraldo rivera is 1988 television special called devil worship exposing satan's underground and he interviewed the parents of children who went to mcmartin daycare he talked to anton libai's wife yet osce osborne on and this piece of sensationalistic horseshoe.

geraldo rivera osborne pettigrew mcmartin anton libai
"twentieth century" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

The Thinking Atheist

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"twentieth century" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

"And you can see the fivepointed cats like if there really was proof of the devil that might be i've got a cat at home and i love it his name is cat we spell it with a k his name is cat he just might be an age of terrible you get that one why do you think dana carvey church lady resonated so much with the population right on saturday night live why did this take off because they had tapped into the cold cure i don't know what is it out there state may be right that's how people were speaking the constant warnings by the bible bangers about satan satan satan i was in junior high in a private christian school when they warned is about satan by showing has these films they're often called the thief in the night series there's more than three i think there's at least four but they showed us the three christian school they brought us all in for quote unquote chapel which was church service and they lowered the light and they showed us these films about the end times and it took the basic tribulation narrative ats the blink of an eye without warning christians across the planet disappear they go to have it right jesus comes back there was no actual trump it in the the christians we're just gone like that and the nonbelievers were left behind at according to many theologians jesus then gets control of the planet to his nemesis satan and let's satan run the earth for seven years y i have no idea and then jesus comes back after seven years after the meat grinder of the tribulation and then jesus rains on earth four thousand years for a millennia and then he finally destroy satan and some people say he jesus makes the earth a new heaven but most of theologians i've heard in protestant christian churches say we then go off to heaven but that's kind of what happens i jesus comes back the seven to your trip then jesus rains on earth for a millennium and then it's habit well according to the films the tribulation happens it's not too late to accept jesus if you missed the rapture it's just that you have to endure the tribulation if you choose jesus after he comes back the first time there's a one world government depicted by these guys in nasty looking sunglasses and uniform it's with the van call.

christian school dana carvey church seven years four thousand years
"twentieth century" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

The Thinking Atheist

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"twentieth century" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

"Wean anybody here warned about satan's holiday when you were a believer few of you we heard horror stories about how the wing this guy actor's is mike wonky he proclaimed that he was a former satanist high priest drug user in satan is tied 'price and he did a christian perspective on halloween talking about all the horrible sacrifices all the say tanic ties to halloween mike work he had written an autobiography released in 1978 called the satan's seller he said he was a satanist high priest at night you know cut people's fingers off than me they had see ganic gorges and the animal sacrifice all these horrible things and then he found jesus and it became a very popular christian comedian in fact he founded and headed up for a long long time a dollar quote unquote ministry he wrote the schemes of satan book that was released in 1991 more on satan's attack on humanity but on halloween i mean that's the day right that's the daily you wanna lock yourself up because they tanic rituals or practice on halloween it's the day you got a check your kids halloween bags because people are putting razor blades and apples the satanist once your kids in the emergency room and they were going there by the thousands this horrible whatever you do on halloween make sure you lock up your black cat lock up you cat the satanist are out there they are going to get you can't and you're gonna go sacrifice your cat on the altar by the way speaking of cats and i just thought this was funny i saw a mean on the internet or a poster a graphic a comic whatever you want to call it that showed a cat and said every time a cat cleans itself it is worshiping the dark lord.

mike wonky halloween ganic gorges
"twentieth century" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

The Thinking Atheist

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"twentieth century" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

"Judas praised masud after two guys got drunk and shot themselves in a suicide pact the grieving families found judas priests music in their rooms or whatever and decided the band was responsible took him to court this a singer rob helford on the witness stand in 1990 the case was dismissed by a judge you is the time of the night stalker the serial killer richard ramirez back in 1984 85 guilt sixteen in california he said that the acd song night prowler inspired him to prowled a sneak into people's homes at night another smoking gun in the say tanic panic conversation the beatles helterskelter was alleged to be the inspiration for the manson murders 1960 sixty nine remember charles manson led a murderous commune killed actress sharon tate and four other people in august of sixty nine remember that the '60s '70s saw the rise of the celebrity serial killer from manson did the son of sam that zuhdi egg john wayne gay seat baen b and others all of this feeding into a public attitude of beer it was the time of the ex sources now it's hard for us to take ourselves back to 1973 when the film released based on the book but at the time people considered it to be genuinely cursed and demonic people running out of the theater believing they had witnessed a piece of hell itself it's hard for us to take to go back that far because we're so jaded by the horror films and the culture and whatnot back then this was considered satanic 1982 saw the tylenol murders anyone remember this somebody put cyanide cyanide into bottles of tylenol prompting a national panic in fact tylenol actually was pulled from every shelf in the united states and this is this is where they develop the safety caps for our medicines something good came out of the tragedy but people felt really pay.

Judas masud rob helford richard ramirez california sharon tate sam united states charles manson tylenol
"twentieth century" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

The Thinking Atheist

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"twentieth century" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

"Keira satan each cheese wiz but satanic rock music had become the scapegoat for pretty much every horrible headline on the planet he moves going wrong with your kids go and their bedroom look at their album collection find out what they're listening to what are they putting in their ears the sounds in their head the voices the influence might very well be coming from satan and i totally got my buddy are an ross permission to use his face for this image okay okay it was surreal phone call i call them up i'm like hey what's going on broker i'm good he cannot kipp would you be the devil okay no no mind remember this was in many ways a generation already inclined to paranoia and religion fueled indignation it was the time of jerry falwell and the moral majority they warned about in america falling into the clutches of permissiveness some selfindulgence in rebellion and wickedness right the mid eighty saw the height of the controversy about sex drugs and violence represented the lyrics of pop music rock music we saw tipper gore and other people established the pia marcy the parents music resource center there were senate sub committee hearings this d snyder of twisted sister frank zappa john denver was there all testifying before the senate subcommittee.

jerry falwell tipper gore john denver Keira satan kipp america pop music senate frank zappa
"twentieth century" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

The Thinking Atheist

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"twentieth century" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

"I was he got his start back and 1968 as the front man for the english rock band black sabbath their moniker alone and a front to god their debut album cover feature this creepy woman alleged by many to be a real life which over the years christians reeled at songs like sabbath bloody sabbath children at the grave and lady evil and so many others also in on these satanic conspiracy the resign maiden anybody warned about iron made number the beast album alice cooper absolutely satanic we were in this is true warned about stevie nicks that she was a witch that she practised witchcraft during her concerts so beware don't ever attend a concert because they practised witchcraft had tb next shows we were told that a cdc was not just a band name but actually stood fort anti christ devils child you want more proof that the devil was trying to destroy popular music in the 80s i mean there's nothing sacred my prime just getting i just i actually really like don johnson is a is a man is an actor you know but it when he came out with heartbeat 1980 six and i i just happened upon this image and a koogle search and i was like i must put him in my presentation and i don't know why it just seemed to fit anyone here familiar with backward masking tokyo okay bans ranging from queen to deep purple to slayer to the eagles were alleged to be hiding subliminal messages in the groups out there albums hidden messages in their song so you play the album forward you hear the lyric song is intended but you stop and you role that album backward with your stylise you may hear something you may uncover some subliminal message a satanic message that supposed to infect your brain of this is going to weird a few people out but i'm going to actually play some examples of backward masking four you now i want you to take yourself back into my childhood what was it like being raised an indicative of religious fundamentalism where we were taught the absolutely true bible and everything must spiritual warfare we're we're living in the end times jesus had come back at any moment satan was everywhere we were conditioned brainwashed to believe this stuff to be true when we were genuinely afraid.

rock band alice cooper don johnson eagles stevie tokyo
"twentieth century" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

The Thinking Atheist

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"twentieth century" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

"You see that the colts and the hearts iin so babar lucia poke him on dangerous potentially yes it is still quoting for met slick or paraphrasing haunt her hunter can hypnotize you we can eat your dreams and drain your energy that's a satanic bauer labral is a mind reader that's dark magic cadaver emits negative energy that harms other people ghastly can make you go to sleep ganger laughs at your frights neater renews his poison many of these creatures evolve helping to sell two kids this take tanic lie of evolution in fact in one of the game's here is an incarnation of a polk him on that's actually evolving i'm sure in the exact fashion that charles darwin wrote about in on the origin of species you know with flash in lebanon and enlightening this instantaneous transfer blanket cambrian explosion poke him on is kind of what we're see back to the car article the children are taught to use these creatures to do their will by invoking colored energy cards fights and commands much of it is reminiscent of the occult in eastern mysticism well the warnings continue from preachers like this guy rick wiles now two rick hosts the ironically named true news radio show just think of an unholy union between william lane cragg and say alex joe and you have rick wa also k well last year he warned that satan was using poke him on go to target churches with virtual digital cyber demons he went on to declare that he believed poke him on go was a magnet for demonic powers this was not twenty years ago this was just recently there was rampant talk among christians in christian circles about a time magazine article that had come out with the creator of poke him on saturday she to jiri where he admitted to time magazine that polk him on had demonic influence the story said that the games were created as a backlash against his christian parents tailored toward an antichristian sentiment or satanism holy shit it's the smoking gun bright the creator of poke him on told time magazine outright that it's a tool of the double now those of us who are products of the 70s 80s and early 90s remembers similar warnings about the devil's influence in pop culture it was.

colts lebanon rick wiles alex joe time magazine charles darwin william lane twenty years