35 Burst results for "Twelve Hundred W"

For-profit online schools are getting a second look from parents

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:51 min | Last week

For-profit online schools are getting a second look from parents

"As you parents try to figure out the best remote schooling options enrollment in alternative online schools is skyrocketing. Some of these are for profit schools that get public money from states or public school districts for each student they enroll and they've actually been around for years. Jennifer King. Rice is a professor of education. At the University of Maryland who's studied for profit virtual schools she says, you shouldn't assume that having experience in remote learning means the school is better. The way they make money is that they have tend to have much higher student teacher ratios, and so they have fewer teachers available and they also I think the obvious thing is they save money on their facilities and you know what it costs to maintain physical school plant. What might student teacher ratio look like? Well, how big our class sizes they can get quite big the the main of you know across all virtual schools in a recent study that we did was about forty four students per teacher in a virtual school compared to about sixteen students per teacher. In the national average across the board in brick and mortar schools there is a lot of variation though. So you know this is not a one size fits all. There are some virtual schools who have student teacher ratios that are as high as twelve hundred students per teacher. Wow. Yes. I mean that sounds like college and that's K. through twelve school potentially that's a k through twelve school. So you know picture very large virtual classrooms where you know a teacher either has a prerecorded or I guess maybe in rare instances asynchronous lesson where you know twelve hundred students from home are engaging in that curriculum. And what do we know about outcomes I know with charter schools it's not always easy to measure or maybe there isn't a lot of oversight. Do we know whether these schools work? Well, it really depends on you know that the school and the arrangement with the school system. So you know there are some virtual schools that that deliver reasonable outcomes but this has been extremely uneven. Virtual schools have been highly under fire and you know increasingly there's been greater accountability for virtual school. By state legislatures in this study that we do every other year, we track legislation that's coming out around virtual education across the states, and in recent years, we've seen much more focus on accountability and trying to hold virtual schools to the same standards that we hold traditional brick and mortar public schools So I think that has been a struggle. This seems like a good option but in many cases, the test scores are really don't measure up. And and if I could just add that's just test scores. The outcome if we really think about the broad outcomes of public education, we should be thinking well beyond how students do on test scores to you know their their development as human beings, their ability to interact with other individuals who have different belief systems or who come from different backgrounds. So you know most of those interpersonal kinds of developmental achievements are not even accounted for. Is this a moment? Do you think given the pandemic and how many school districts are suddenly having to grapple with remote learning? Is this a moment when district's could learn though from what virtual schools have been doing or they could improve each other i? Think it absolutely is I. So I don't think we need to think about this. In fact, I don't think we can think about these issues as binary you know as all face to face or all virtual and I. Think you know The answer is very likely to be somewhere in the middle where we find the mechanisms that work the best using technology and leverage that technology to improve outcomes in in public schools. But if we go all virtual, we lose that interpersonal the soft skill development that we also very much care about. So you know the idea of using technology in ways that can individualize curriculum an individualized instruction that give students more choices about what electives they might be able to take and move at their own pace through that content. You know that's all very attractive and online curriculum can provide that freedom and flexibility and individualization. But online curriculum fall short when we're talking about all of these other kinds of outcomes they. In fact, they have fallen short to some extent even on the test score outcomes. But if we think about that whole range about comes that we have for K, twelve education in our country, you know we need. We need time together we need to be with students We need students to be with one another you know they're they're all the physical dimensions and the clubs and the CO curricular activities that are so important to having a holistic education.

Rice Professor Of Education Jennifer King University Of Maryland
Virus spiking in eastern Europe; Hungary drafts 'war plan'

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 2 weeks ago

Virus spiking in eastern Europe; Hungary drafts 'war plan'

"Some countries in Europe are dealing with the resurgence of cove in nineteen the Dutch public health institute says twelve hundred seventy people tested positive for coke in nineteen in the last twenty four hours that's the highest number since mid April it's the second time this week the Dutch daily infections have talked a thousand and a sign that the virus is making a resurgence in the Netherlands in Birmingham England's second largest city households are being urged to stop socializing the latest government data for Birmingham England shows the infection rate has doubled in the past week and the number of confirmed cases in the UK has spiked at over thirty five hundred the highest daily total since may seventeenth in Eastern Europe Hungary and the Czech Republic registered all time daily highs on Friday I'm Jennifer king

Europe Dutch Public Health Institute The Netherlands Birmingham England UK Hungary Czech Republic Jennifer King Eastern Europe
Virus spiking in eastern Europe; Hungary drafts 'war plan'

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 2 weeks ago

Virus spiking in eastern Europe; Hungary drafts 'war plan'

"Some countries in Europe are dealing with the resurgence of cove in nineteen the Dutch public health institute says twelve hundred seventy people tested positive for coke in nineteen in the last twenty four hours that's the highest number since mid April it's the second time this week the Dutch daily infections have talked a thousand and a sign that the virus is making a resurgence in the Netherlands in Birmingham England's second largest city households are being urged to stop socializing the latest government data for Birmingham England shows the infection rate has doubled in the past week and the number of confirmed cases in the UK has spiked at over thirty five hundred the highest daily total since may seventeenth in Eastern Europe Hungary and the Czech Republic registered all time daily highs on Friday I'm Jennifer king

Europe Dutch Public Health Institute The Netherlands Birmingham England UK Hungary Czech Republic Jennifer King Eastern Europe
Leftovers Are A Food Waste Problem

60-Second Science

01:54 min | 2 weeks ago

Leftovers Are A Food Waste Problem

"Restaurants I shut down early in the pandemic American's rated grocery stores, they started cooking more at home and presumably generating more leftovers those leftovers can be a convenient future meal, but they've also got dark side. There's a tendency that you put an item on the plate that's a leftover those higher probability that you are not going to fully consume that item, and so he's probably GonNa go. To Waste Brian Rowe an applied economist at the Ohio State University he and his colleagues recently studied leftovers and food waste by tracking the eating habits of eighteen men and women in Baton Rouge. Louisiana, the participants tracked what they ate using an iphone APP and during the week-long study, the study subjects collectively piled twelve hundred different foods on their plates after analyzing what God eaten save or thrown. Away. The researchers found that leftovers were more likely to be picked data and not fully eaten, which is finding. We can all probably identify with, but they also observed that leftovers perhaps due to being older and less fresh directed diners attention to the other more novel items on their plate, which brings up an interesting possible strategy to get people to eat their veggies I, guess if you have an. Item that you don't normally eat as much of trying to get people eat peas perhaps surrounding it with leftovers is a way to make them focus of the newest item on the plate. The findings in the journal plus one overall Roe says one bigger lesson emerged on how to avoid scraping perfectly good food into the trash. So for us, the real take home here was choose a smaller meal. And you're less likely to generate leftovers and that's a good thing because leftovers all else equal tend to be wasted more often not that road doesn't have a few aspirational tupperware sitting around I'm guilty of this as well. We have stuff left over from last Thanksgiving sitting around our freezer and I know people who have moved with frozen items

Brian Rowe Baton Rouge Louisiana Ohio State University ROE
Samsung Galaxy Z Fold S will reportedly challenge Microsoft Surface Duo in 2021

The Tech Guy

00:47 sec | 3 weeks ago

Samsung Galaxy Z Fold S will reportedly challenge Microsoft Surface Duo in 2021

"Also this week, the new Microsoft, it's not a phone comes out. The duo comes at September tenth. That'll be interesting. Samsung Galaxy fold. They had their big event. They said, yes, you'll be able to get. September eighteenth. Silly season. And this I think now more than ever. We need to talk about technology because some of this stuff that galaxy fold to two thousand dollars the duo's fourteen hundred dollars. New iphones coming but probably not till October I'm going to guess. Those will be what thousand, twelve, hundred, who knows. Apple's really apple really opened the door to very expensive stuff. So you can see it's all. It's all headed our way.

Apple Samsung Microsoft
Driving the Carretera Austral, Chile

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

04:54 min | 3 weeks ago

Driving the Carretera Austral, Chile

"I'd like to welcome back to the show Steph dyson who has a travel journalist, a guidebook author most recently the Moon Guide to Chile and a travel blogger at worldly adventurer dot com. Steph. Welcome back to the show. Thanks having me Chris I'm excited to be back again. Well Of Truth. I should say when I say welcome back to the show, Steph has been on the show before you have heard her talking about northern Chile, a number of episodes ago I wanNA say five years ago. Yeah I think that's correct just before you started working on a guidebook. Kissed before Ya. So this is kind of rounding out that experience because the moon guy to Chile just published. And that was a quite a long amount of time working on this guidebook but also Steph was the show a week ago and something went terribly wrong and it did not record. So I appreciate your patience but I also appreciate your expertise on Chile. When. We talk about she leave this time we're talking about and I'm going to try and pronounce it the cut. US thrall the southern. Highway. Good. That was good pronunciation. I I. See you've been working on it. We'll have to do some things right this time. What is the? astral and where would we find that in Chile? The CATTA that Australia Archie means the southern highway to give you a bit of a clue and it's in Chilean Patagonia. Now, how to guy near is the sort of slightly nebulous region because nobody's really sure if it's somewhere on his own or if it belongs to other countries a what it is, but effectively, it's a region in the very far south of South America are in between Argentina and Chile. and. The kind of thorough style is the kind of rules western section. So it's the kind of Chilean bit where she gets really narrow sort of not part of the country, and it's just before you hit very southern Patagonia West toughtested by name and the destinations that you've discussed previously only put podcast bright further north than the last show we did on Patagonia, there is a lot of Patagonia. If we look at the map there. There's a lot of Chile in terms of height, not necessarily in terms of with. Yeah it's a long country and I have children most of it and it. Pile. Will End just this road is seven, hundred, seventy miles or twelve, hundred and forty kilometers. So when we talk about One week itinerary, you're going to start us not at the top and go all the way to the bottom where you're gonNA start, US. Yeah so I always recommend people planning Patagonia is starting inbound Maceda says about halfway down the cutter that'll style just outside this sort of biggest town in the area it's Koi Heike and it's an apple that where you can fly into directly in Santiago. So it makes it a really great destination to start your trip. and Are we gonNA do anything around the airport flying are where we going to start our actual trip? I would recommend picking up a call. Then you don't need a four wheel drive to cut that Australia just needs sort of reason, the high clearance because most of it is now paves. The big for the locals I'll tell you that hasn't that hasn't been paved before but yet you're gonNA jump in your car and you can head south for a couple of hours to via settled gusty steel, which really tiny little town outside of a national park. You talk about outside of national. Park. The one thing as we talk about this pretty much this whole way there are national parks everywhere I think. I'd made the analogy that if you started at the top of this highway in you're a squirrel, you could probably get to the southern tip of South America in jump from tree to tree within a national park. I'm not sure the tree is correct but the national parks is almost accurate. This just a whole lot of national parks here in southern Chile. Yeah, it's actually what the government did. Last year would start it up the root of their parks re to the parks. On, it's about two, thousand, four, hundred kilometers I believe I'm connecting pretty much port Lamont which is the very northern tip Patagonia all the way down to Cape Horn, which has its own national pockets the bit at the very bottom of South America's islands that people go. Because the sale is used around the whole and and it was a big deal because white windy down that. Square yes. Yes. There's now they sort of route to the pox. It's kind of this ingenious could you can't actually drive between all of them, but the capital style does opportunity to actually connect quite a number of them.

Chile Steph Dyson Patagonia United States South America Australia Steph Cape Horn Government Port Lamont Santiago Chris Argentina Maceda Apple Chile.
U.S. National Debt on Track to Surpass Size of Economy

WSJ What's News

04:40 min | 3 weeks ago

U.S. National Debt on Track to Surpass Size of Economy

"The US has spent trillions of dollars fighting the coronavirus pandemic. All of that spending is pushing the nation towards a new milestone next fiscal year the Congressional Budget Office. Says US government debt is expected to exceed the size of the economy for the first time since World War. Two K. Davidson covers economic policy for the Wall Street Journal Hi Kate thanks for joining me Hi emery. Thanks for having me. So put this in context for us the last time the national debt was this high was World War Two, very different times in our history but these periods actually have a lot in common when it comes to national debt. That's right. The debt has been rising this spring in part because policymakers have even said, they view this moment as as a battle as almost a war against US global pandemic, they've spent trillions to try to cushion the economy from the negative effects who has businesses have closed down. Millions of people are out of work. They've approved a ton of money to get people enhanced unemployment. Benefits stimulus checks, emergency loans, and then also, of course, things like vaccine research and aid for hospitals. So all of that is going towards fighting would they do as this threat that's on on par with what we experienced during wartime. So the vast majority of this spending was, as you say to combat the coronavirus, can you detail some of the largest expenditures under those efforts? So the the? Biggest factors were, yes. All these stimulus measures I would say in the big ones were the the stimulus checks that went out. Remember most Americans got a twelve hundred dollars per person checks and and five hundred dollars for dependent children that was several hundred billion dollars. Congress also devoted a ton of money to the paycheck protection program. Those are those emergency loans for small businesses. That was another huge component between two bills. It was over five, hundred, billion dollars I think about six, hundred, billion actually, and then the third one is enhanced unemployment benefits. Stra six hundred dollar weekly checks that people have been getting on top of regular unemployment benefits. Those of course expired at end of July so that spending is coming down a little bit but all of those were. Big, pieces of this overall efforts to help the economy right now. Now, Congress is still debating whether to provide additional stimulus relief. How does the nation's debt load now play into these discussions among lawmakers? Well, I think it's it seems to be an important. Although both sides will sort of point fingers over whether these concerns are genuine Republicans have cited rising debt certainly is a big concern. A reason to be cautious about borrowing more Democrats are saying you know we we need to borrow now to protect the economy and it's worth it to take on more debt. If you're making sure that you're protecting economic growth on because leaving millions of people out of work at they're losing their homes businesses or closing can have long term negative effects on the economy. So they're saying it's worth it right. Now, and some of them are also pointing out that you know Republicans approved a very large tax cut a couple years ago that has constrained revenues and definitely both sides have approved big spending increases in recent years. So there's plenty of blame to go around but I think right now most people in most economists are saying debt should not be the top concern. So some some Republicans have acknowledged even some in the administration are saying look we we can't afford this right now especially, because interest rates are so low and we should do more. Right, and you spoke to some economists who said that despite the big economic contraction in the second quarter, this could have been much worse without some of the fiscal support detailed. That's right and we can see that in the data there are some some groups that break this down they look at the contributions of federal spending to overall GDP and right there was a a big drop off in the second quarter but we saw that fiscal stimulus spending by the federal government actually contributed but had a very positive effect in in other words supported supported economic output and made sure that it wasn't even worse. So you know just because of the way that. GDP is calculated and that's that's fairly typical during a recession. We see governments come in and do it the question right now as well. How much more support is the economy really need and I, think some people are worried that there. We could see because of these debt concerns we could see a situation where what we saw after the last recession where some people argue Congress pulled back on this support to quickly they pulled back too soon and that just really slowed the recovery. So so some folks are saying look don't make that mistake this time around yes. Debt is very high but we we can afford it. There's still big demand for US

United States Congress Emery Congressional Budget Office Wall Street Journal K. Davidson Federal Government Kate
States and colleges attempt to reopen as U.S. approaches 6 million coronavirus infections

the NewsWorthy

00:48 sec | Last month

States and colleges attempt to reopen as U.S. approaches 6 million coronavirus infections

"It seems the coronavirus pandemic is starting to take a toll on America's heartland Iowa north. Dakota Self Dakota and Minnesota have recently reported record one day increases in new cases Montana and Idaho are reporting record hospitalizations and all around the country. Some colleges are seeing outbreaks of their own at the University of Alabama classes started about a week and a half ago, and since then more than twelve. Hundred students have tested positive for in nineteen. The Washington Post reports most universities have ruled out strict safety measures like mandatory mask wearing and regular testing, but it seems the biggest issue is that universities have a hard time regulating off campus activities like college parties at the University of Alabama officials say no students have had to be hospitalized still it's worth noting cove in nineteen be serious as of early this morning more than one hundred and eighty three, thousand Americans have died from the

Dakota Self Dakota University Of Alabama Washington Post America Iowa Idaho Minnesota Montana
Should You Start Accepting Apple Pay?

The $100 MBA Show

06:10 min | Last month

Should You Start Accepting Apple Pay?

"One of the reasons why I'm doing this lesson today on apple pay is it's something that I actually looked into a few months ago. I did a massive amount of research on. This is worth actually incorporating in our website in our payment process. Depending on your website could be something as simple as just flipping a switch or a custom solutions is can take some time and money in our case it's the latter. So I wanted to make sure before we invested the time in adding apple pay that is actually the right time to do it something that we should do now and will benefit us in the future. So I did all the research for you. Let me tell you what I think first of all, let's talk a little bit about apple pay is applebee's basically apple's mobile Wallet most of US know about apple pay because it's either incorporated in a iphone that you have or somebody you know that has an iphone were they pay Vajpai wave where they just you know bring their phone to credit card machine and a charges their account. This is just one aspect of apple pay, which is the NFC aspect the near field communication aspect where basically it's like the tap and go technology but apple pay is a lot more than you can actually pay via apple pay if you're an apple device for online transactions because has already secured safely your credit card information and really with a double click on your phone or A click of a gun on a laptop with a touch ID, you can pay for things the fast way you could pay for anything and many big websites have caught on said, wow, this is actually a very, very fast way for people with apple devices to pay for goods I'm talking about online websites not even in physical stores. If you're in a physical store is a no brainer. You need to have NFC technology where you have tap and go where you're utilizing the whether it's apple pay or competitor like Samsung's. Even some credit cards now that have that built in but when it comes to your online store, apple pay again is a fast way for people to just use the stored information that's on their device on their computer on their phone or on their ipad to pay for things with a single click. Now, what's intriguing about this technology is basically allowing your customers to have as fast as a checkup process as they do with something like Amazon where They save all your credit card information you add to car or you just pay immediately and it's done. Amazon's really locked that down and it's the one of the reasons why they have such rapid growth and Jeff visas as one of the richest men that ever lived in the history of humankind and that technology that fast checkout is one of the reasons why Amazon so successful. So imagine you can borrow the experience in put it into your own. Website and that's really why I wanted to look into this because it really allows people to have a seamless checkout experience. The step where you at your payment details online for any transaction is the step where you're going to experience the most friction. This is where there's the most likelihood for people to abandon car. You can remove that friction altogether with something like apple pay you are one step ahead you're really gaining a competitive advantage from your competitor. And allowing your customers have a better experience. Now, of course, this is only relevant for those who have vices, and of course, apple pay should be an additional form of payment. So they can pay by credit card that you pay by apple pay. You might even want offer pay pal. The point here is is that it should be in addition to traditional credit card payment and you might be thing wall You know how many people actually using this Will there's two stats that really compelled me to say this is an important thing to implement in your website number one, five percent of all transactions online are paid with apple pay already in two, thousand and nineteen it's five percent you can increase your sales. Simply by offering this okay. Second in just five years from now in twenty twenty-five, the projection is ten percent they're going to go from five to ten percent in that short amount of time one and ten payments online are going to be with apple pay. You might be thinking what else ago well, another thing that makes people believe the apple's going to take over the carless payment is the sheer growth of the company itself apples at a tremendous pace. It's already the most valuable company in the world just hit a two trillion. Dollar valuation the Most Valuable Company in American history apple has already started to sell products at all different price points and they're not just an expensive product. Now, where you know you buy an iphone for twelve hundred dollars, they have iphones for five hundred dollars. Now they have the I watched, they have ipads for four hundred dollars. The point is that they want to get you in the ecosystem as early as possible as many people as possible because in all of that they on the same kind of software that will incorporate. Apple Pace, you'll be able to pay for things on those devices. Even if it's a four hundred dollar device, it's not an expensive piece of hardware. So applebee's only going to grow and experts have already said that you know paypal still the leader in online transactions and online payments, but they're starting to lose footing an apple CERNA gain on them and it all has to do with the fact that it's so seemless in order for you to pay for anything on pay pal if you're on a website, you choose the. PAYPAL option, and then the next sends you to pay pal and then you've got to sign into your pay pal and then you've got gotta authorize and you have to confirm. So it's a few steps and then you go back to the car and then you check out with apple pay. The experience is literally just choosing applegate and checking out you know you're going to confirm on your device either through face id or with touch ID, and it's a done deal over.

Apple Amazon Applebee NFC United States Samsung Applegate Jeff Visas Vajpai
1910 Edinburgh Missionary Conference

5 Minutes in Church History

04:16 min | Last month

1910 Edinburgh Missionary Conference

"In June of Nineteen Ten World Missionary Conference took place in. Edinburgh Scotland. This conference met for a total of ten days. It was international it was ecumenical. About twelve hundred delegates from mostly Europe and America and representing all sorts of Protestant denominations came together to spend these days talking about the need for world missions world missions can look like. In the beginnings then of the twentieth century, you can trace the roots of the World Council of Churches Actually. Back, to the Edinburgh Missionary Conference. The World Council of Churches was established in one, thousand, nine, hundred, forty eight, and you could pull on the threads of various groups that led up to it and you'd be taken right back to Edinburgh Missionary Conference. It was a very pivotal moment in the twentieth century. So let's take a look at five aspects of the Edinburgh Missionary Conference. I as we've mentioned, it was ecumenical. Now at that time, it was predominantly Protestant when we're talking about ecumenical there were no Roman Catholics present. There were no Greek Orthodox president there were only Protestant denominations present. But as a term ecumenical continued to expand and expand and broaden in broaden. So. I you talk about within Protestant denominations then accu medical would come to mean Protestant and Catholic and Jewish. Then you would add Islam then you would add eastern religions today the word ecumenical is very broad in very elastic. Well. The second thing about the end borough missionary conference is related to that question of the Ecumenical Movement in that is the question of inclusive ism or pluralism. Then Borough Missionary Conference consisted of eight major reports, and one of them was on this topic the missionary message in relation to the Non Christian world and they began raising questions is Jesus Christ the only way Is the Bible, the true and final. Authority is Christianity that is biblically faithful Christianity is that the only true religion and so you can begin to see how those questions could be answered in the wrong way and lead to very deleterious negative consequences. Well, that's the question of inclusive ISM and pluralism. A third aspect of the Edinburgh missionary conferences that it did increase attention to missions. The nineteenth century, the eighteen hundreds was a great century of modern missions. It was the century of William Carey missionary. Expansion. Well, the twentieth witnessed even greater missionary activity, and during the Twentieth Century missionary activity was carried on even during and despite of world wars travel got much easier and so missions expansion increase. So the twentieth century was a great century of modern missions. One aspect of this in particular is our fourth thing and that is the impact on Africa. Of course, leading into nineteen hundred Africa was dominated by Islam and by the folk religions that were across the continent. But after this conference, significant attention was given to Africa and there was this major push missions. into the continent of Africa one book chronicling this was published in one, thousand, nine, hundred, thousand, five, it was entitled Africa, an Open Door, and so the Edinburgh Missionary Conference inspired and encouraged mission endeavors. In Africa we'll fifthly the Edinburgh conference served to remind the delegates and the constituencies they represented of the great need of the big world that we live in in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ten, the world's population was one point five, billion people. In June, of twenty, twenty. The world population is estimated at seven point seven billion. It's the big world and that's a big need.

Edinburgh Missionary Conferenc Borough Missionary Conference World Council Of Churches Africa Twentieth Century Edinburgh Scotland Ecumenical Movement William Carey Europe President Trump America
5 Ways to Spice Up Your Pix Life

The Digital Story

05:43 min | Last month

5 Ways to Spice Up Your Pix Life

"Much has been written about the evils of your Acquisition Syndrome often referred to as gas. And the US. It is a real thing for many photographers. But my personal view of this election is isolated more to spending big bucks on cameras and lenses. What about those smaller purchases that bring us true joy and energize our enthusiasm for photography. I'll make my anti gas case on today's tedious podcast I. Hope You enjoy the show. I don't know if you've ever done this but I'm going to admit you right now. That I have okay. Now fortunately is just you and me so you know no one else will. No I've never I've never admitted this anywhere else before. And this is the truth I'm telling you the truth right now. So but just from my mouth to your ears right now have you ever Set. A new camera or an accessory for it. On. The table in front of you while you worked watch TV listen to music you know just. said it there It wasn't in use. There was no particular reason to do this. Other than you just wanted to look at it and admire it's beauty. I've done that. Honestly, I. I have done that more than once. To cases that come to mind right now, the first one is the Olympus pen. F. In its handsome leather half case Oh. My Gosh. What a beauty So pretty. The other one is the Fujifilm x one hundred V with its aluminum grip? Yeah. That's pretty two different cameras you know the my pen F is a silver Penev. Got Some really beautiful silver lenses and I get this brown leather half case with a matching rhys strap. Really Nice and then my ex one hundred V is the all black model which I really liked for the Fuji Film. And it has this aircraft aluminum grip really really pretty. Really Nice. And when I look at these things sitting on the table in front of me. While I'm watching TV, while I'm listening to music while I'm browsing the web doing whatever the heck. I do at ten o'clock at night. It makes me WANNA go out and take pictures you know I go i. Can't wait to get that camera my hands and go do something. And that's the idea that's the idea and especially right now that's the idea. To be excited to have enthusiasm to you know want to go do something that you actually can do pick up your camera and go take pictures when we're a bit stale feeling that stale how can we spark this kind of joy? Without digging our credit cards for a fifteen hundred dollar charge in my trick as you've already figured out has been through new accessories and techniques, and you may be surprised to know that I have five of these. To share with you this week. Okay. So let's let's get started on these little things. This is my anti-gas list. Okay. Because they don't qualify they don't call not one of these qualify. For Gear Acquisition Syndrome and you can argue that with me but I'm not going to yield on this on already. Here we got and I'm GonNa fool with you on the first one the first one's. GonNa. Mess with you right out of the shoot. The first one is a new Lens. Coin what you just said, right a new lens but a vintage one. Yes. So it's only new to you is been around for a long time. Yes. You could spend twelve hundred dollars on a new state of the art optic no problem. You can spend more than that if you wanted. But scoring of vintage beauty for one hundred dollars or less. Can Be just as satisfying in evokes a far less guilt. In the images that this glass producers can truly inspiring because it seems like each lens that you find on Ebay or craigslist or Oetzi or your local camera shop each vintage lens that you find has a different feel to it and. Go. Wow. This is really Kinda neat and sometimes in the world of digital optics everything sort of produces the same super magnificent results right which is great. Until you know a thousand frame of the same super magnificent result and he got I really would like to see something different. A new vintage lens can do that. And since most of US shoot murless or have a meritless camera, they adapt these lenses adapt. So well, meritless cameras. It's not even funny. You can get an adapter for like fifteen bucks at works. Great. You have this manual Focus Lens you take some pictures with it. You're going. Wow, this is really interesting. This looks different. It's different operating is different looking through the electronic viewfinder with it's just different the way around and it can be very motivating very inspiring. It can push you to photograph things that you might bypass otherwise just because turn out interesting with this particular Lens.

United States Fujifilm Rhys Craigslist Oetzi
Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

How I Built This

1:03:33 hr | Last month

Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

"Oliver Karaz was born and raised in Germany mostly in rural parts of the country his mother was German and his father was from Iran in came from a long line of doctors. For me, it really starts in some ways with my dad and. The timing rapidly had every reason to become a social activist and and so he came to Germany from the Middle East when he was very young around twenty with no money in his pocket no language skills. And you personally then worked on of odd jobs, but he eventually became a psychiatrist but what has really shaped me much more than being born in Berlin is. Social. Active. Isn't that I that I saw him live and that he really made our family mattress we always talked about talent responsibility and the need to use. Whatever telling behind to help those. Around us that we can make a difference. Given that your father was Iranian and your mother was was sort of. German. An Uber even though you were born in Germany, did you feel did you feel as Germany everybody else? So I didn't have a second identity. We only used spoke German at home and yet. As you say I was also a not always fully accepted. So if I give you an example, my school twelve hundred students and you could pick out to the didn't look like everyone else and I was one of them right and even an enlightened country like Germany. That is notable. So I had what I call a visual accent would people would see me on the street and they would ask me how to speak German. So well and But they also school the skipped my name when reading out scores because they weren't sure how to pronounce my last name and opportunities taken away and even at was physically threatened so i. I think that really shaping in many ways because I realized. Very early that in order to be as successful as everyone around me I would have to be dramatically better in really work much much harder than anyone else and so that used to be strong work ethic in me. For the record Oliver is somewhat down playing his work ethic. Because just out of high school, he actually started his first successful company. It was the early clunky days of the Internet, and he designed a way to help people send emails more easily and he wound up selling that business not for a ton of money, but enough to get him through medical school. But. After practicing medicine for a couple years Oliver realized he couldn't stop thinking about that first business he'd started and how he wanted to start another. So he quit his job in medicine and consulting job with Mackenzie and eventually moved to New York. That was my goal was actually to start another company that that's A. Healthcare, but I I'd also realized at the time that I sold my first company and far too cheaply in that I should learn more about business I and at McKinsey God exposure to balance sheets and panels and hit a lot of very practical experience and what it means to manage business. And I think they fondly of my time at McKinsey was one of my better decisions. McKinsey GonNa Mackenzie is a little bit like going to business school. A lot of people at McKinsey have come from business, schools. In that. Many people go to business school thinking they will find a co-founder. Did you were you actively looking around at your colleagues to think maybe I can do something with him or her you know maybe that person. Absolutely and were you just thinking about different business ideas all the time? Well, it is actually very hard to find good ideas and my definition of a good idea was that it needed to have a great mission I. wanted to make sure that we actually do something good in that. We stayed true to sort of talent breaks responsibility, but also wanted to be a large market and to have a great motor rounded and also I wanted to be based on contrarian inside. Because I thought that all of the best companies have that at its core. While she wanted mission, you wanted a company that could kind of dominate its field by building a motor around it, but was also contrary and that's that's that's those are some interesting. Criteria. And that's why I screen for several years rejected pretty much every idea that that I came across And meanwhile. While you're going through all that I guess you meet this guy Cyrus Masumi. WHO's another McKenzie consultant and and just you just. Become friends like he's like somebody like in and you guys start hanging out. While we got put on study together that required us to travel globally and you've ever done that it meant frost were sixteen eighteen hour days together for three four, five months on end and we really. Got To become great partners in that and and what we realized that we had some. Very complementary skills. Cyrus is one of the most charismatic and gregarious individuals. You'd ever meet his very passionate. He could be more forceful, which sometimes was needed to be effective with clients. And you've talked to me now for a little bit as you can probably tell. More dispassionate and logical and more measuring. German? More, German in many ways, right. also was effective with clients by by. and Cyrus is American right? He's American this but that That close listened and how we work together that really started friendship and we stayed close for the study and be caught up over lunch pretty regularly denounce different business ideas off one another and. I think we connected because we had similar interests because. On. Some levels We were equally passionate about what we're doing higher says, passion was more visible to others than mine but we. Were close enough together that we both accepted. The other as. individual that that we could learn a lot from. Was it was it clear pretty soon after you start hanging out, Sarah's that this was the guy because you were. You're on the lookout for a partner. They I think it was was absolutely an option I know reality is that. With. Both founded companies before Mckinsey and we both knew that we wanna do it again and as I. was always great about being. Very honest. Rather than just nice and and I value that a lot. Yeah. All, right. So So this guy, Cyrus Super Charismatic, really smart clearly, the two of you start to to work together. And what what kind of business ideas are are you coming up with? While we kind of fell in love with a new idea that came about a one of these launches were Cyrus. Told me about how he recently ruptured his eardrum by flying with a cold and then found it very difficult to actually find a doctor and he had asked for recommendations and called down his insurance directory listing started with the as. Doctors weren't accepting new patients some no longer accepted two centurions one provider Pasta Way and so he said, well, why does it take four days to the doctor when I'm in pain right? And why can't this much easier? And we. Both very quickly. realized the potential of this idea from. Working at project be new helps us the for actually spending millions of dollars for marketing to grow their patient base because they had wasted inventory, right they had something that I like to call hidden supply, which is these last minute cancellations no-shows reschedules. That the that go to waste, and then on the other, there are the patients who had a hard time accessing this. You thought it immediately clicked with these my God. Yes. Doctor's appointments connect patients to doctors. Yeah. Well, look if you go through the forfeiture that I had read, it's a great mission right? We're making one of the most personal needs more accessible for for patients we can help patients to get in fast we can help the doctors become more efficient. We can make the entire health care system more cost effective people out of the emergency room things like that, and it's a marketplace. So there is a strong mode and clearly anything in healthcare is a large market and I think the contrary and inside that we had. was. The fact that. Most people thought it's normal that people have to wait twenty four days to a doctor because there's a doctor shortage in read our inside was really no doctors have asthma debate ability because of these last minute cancellations, no-shows reschedules and so I felt very about this idea. So. So you member like how long between the time that the you had that first conversation To the time were both you said, let's start this business was like monster or weeks or days. was was weeks. We what we what we started doing is actually. Mocking up the side in how imagine back then in powerpoint pointing just the wire. Website. Yeah. Wire frame. Exactly. We would. We'd go into starbucks and we'll chat up strangers and say, Hey, here's a five dollar gift card. Give me your thoughts. Sorry I'm GonNa. Go back. You just go to people in starbucks Gift Card and say, can you give me your thoughts? Random Person? The absolutely that's that was sort of our market testing. They wouldn't. They would be like excuse me this is a little weird. You're my space. Might also happen from time to time but you know there's lots of people on starbucks is very in German of you. That's debris because usually he would be to report tentative about doing that. Well, you know I think there was a lot less rejection than you think people actually quite open I. Suggest you try this out but if you If you're unthreatening in Luke harmless as we probably dead and then they'll be pretty open. You went up to and starbucks and you'd say, Hey, we're thinking about a company here. Can you just look at his powerpoint give you five dollars Gift Card and what was in the powerpoint, the popcorn and was just what we thought. This website would look like and we would ask them is the set service that resonates with you would you use it and and we got an incredibly valuable feedback here and really set us in many ways on the on the right track right? So and what pointed to the two of you decide let's quit McKinsey. Let's. Let's pursue this. Probably a month or two after we initially discussed idea did anybody say you were crazy for quitting? Everyone. Everyone told us. Crazy and got a lot of negative feedback on the idea to write people would say this is Bloomberg out I would never pick my doctor on the internet or I already have a doctor or you know doctors wouldn't accept patients that that are looking on the Internet of all kinds of protections that people had when they were thinking about their own situation by. When when you talk to people and starbucks, they actually thought about it much more positively. So we were encouraged enough to say, well, this is going to work as long as we get out of our circle and don't ask McKinsey consultants doctors. The responsible be better. All right. So you are in your thirties at this point. And presumably were making pretty good cash at McKinsey because you were probably you'd know expenses you're on the road all the time so. When you quit, I'm assuming you had some money to launch the business and probably live off for a while. Yeah. So I very deliberately had never raised my living standard to the money that the paying McKinsey and I had saved every dime so that I could. No be in a position where can fund this embraced can afford not to take a salary for a couple of years. Wow. So so a couple of hundred thousand and you saved. You know. Maybe. I'm to Germany to discuss personal finances but. I had. Built this. Radio, you can tell the. Story Yeah I I had I had enough money to live off for for several years but I also Saturday night both finance the company early out of our own savings so that clearly diminish We had leftover after that. So now, you both decided to quit. and. You have some technical expertise because you had. You had done some coding but this is next level stuff. Were you able to be that technology founder and Cyrus was going to be the the sort of the business founder? Absolutely not as I add coated but at that point, I had not touched a computer for a long time We knew we need to have a technical co founder and so Sarah's knew a guy named Nick Guanzhou from the time together, trophy software, and this is another company that they would both worked at the that's the company that they're both previously worked together and Nick just brought a totally different perspective and really educated Addison me on a lot of things and and he was really the one who understood a building a seamless experience for the consumer and ends May. Zach Docs. Early Genius, did you did you have the name dock from the beginning? Not, not initially we we went to several phases on on what the right name could be for for while we wanted to have a descriptive name. So we looked at physicians, dot Com Doctors Dot Com, and we actually tracked down the owners of one of these domains and they wanted several million dollars for the domain name. And and we were finding the company ourselves. So that was out of the question. So then we just sat in a room and we brainstorm a list of fifty or one hundred names, and then started eliminating names until we arrived at Dr. What does it mean? or it doesn't mean anything which was the WTO bit we could. There were zero search results. Okay. There's no meaning behind his ACH. There's no meaning behind and and in hindsight it was precisely the right thing to do because it really was a blank slate for us to fill with with meaning and really build a brand around. Zero such as October we started. It address nate the right lake once you know that it takes more than three weeks from picking up the phone and dialing for doctors till you actually see someone you realize Oh, this really not much else that we have to wait so long for to get. And this is more important than most of these other things you already have. Fantastic access View Magin. If air travel way that healthcare workers that wouldn't be an expedia that wouldn't even be Delta Dot Com that would be individual phone numbers for every plane. Imagine. If that happened, you know a half the planes would fly empty it would be a massive pain and that was actually the state of health care before sock. Is Amazing that that the nothing like this was out there in two thousand seven. I look at I. Think. In many ways you couldn't build it a much earlier. In the early days. When we went out there, we were the ones installing Internet of the doctor's offices. We. They they were a many times just migrating from a paper books to scheduling systems. We were at the cusp of digitisation for healthcare. We were just lucky in our timing to get this right in and start offering the service when that also happened. All right. So you decide to pursue Zach dock and it's the three of you. I'm assuming really just at the beginning and were you working out of out of one of your apartments? Did you guys rent space? No, we worked out of respect for. Many. Times we came to make yet the nicest apartment and and we could bring breakfast Burrito and bake him up and you know the the reality is that we originally had a pretty ambitious launch plan right so we got together around July. We wanted to launch by December of two, thousand seven. Something interesting happened were nick send an email suggesting to look at what was then called techcrunch forty. Take is is now a household name but the draw for us back then was there was a fifty thousand dollar prize now it's called tech crunch disrupt think. So it's a major a startup competition. It's a startup competition and we were the first class of this was much less known be budgeted two hours to fill in the application in really which will send it off. He didn't think about it anymore that there was an early July and early August we've heard that we had been accepted, but there was a complication we'd have to be ready by September eighteenth or. That was three months sooner than we had originally planned to launch. So you'd have a live website by September that is right that is right with doctors with doctors, right So we actually debated for a few hours whether we should even tried to go for that but we ultimately said, yes, we can get the website working and we wanted to have enough doctors just a bars wouldn't look pathetic. Brayden. Coded Night Neither Day and nick really busted his but he did the patient facing side of the website and that was the programs. What was potentially even harder because we're tried to launch a marketplace was to actually get the initial supply on there and remember the website wasn't there yet so. Tires ended up going door to door for doctors offices. Excuse telling them a powerpoint page, and this is really a testament to cyrus sheer willing determination if you think about what it means to really start a company early on, there's nothing to show right you may be a powerpoint but there's no website there's no patience. There's no other doctors no social proof and it has to run on passion and very clear that that is Cyrus superpower. He just went to random doctors offices or he had like a list of doctors offices and he started kind of walking block by block. Well, there's a lot of walking involved a we launched in Manhattan so you can literally go down the street and you see. The signs and you walk in. And he was basically saying look, it's a way to connect you to patients. How was how many by the way? What was your objective? How many doctors do you need to sign up to have this website look okay by September Between six and ten was our goal. Okay. So just doable it is a was extremely hard really. Is telling doctors is one of the hardest things to do why were they saying? Well, first of all, it is baby very hard to even speak to a doctor they are being shielded. Their time is very valuable. Office managers are trained not to let anyone talk to them to protect the doctor from people walking in selling them stuff shirt them. Secondly, they many didn't want to give up control over their calendar which has to write. We ask them to post times that a patient could book into it and it was just a far fetched idea for many of them the patients would actually do this. So he got a lot of knows he got a lot of knows. He'd go there and he just simply not leave until he got a chance to speak to the doctor and a few times. It was even escorted out by security. I really think one in a million could have put this off. I mean was he going to particular kinds of doctors or was he generally focused on an Internet general? Practitioners Ob sobe began with dentists Okay. Because our thinking was that. People go to dentists most often, and we wanted to make sure that we have an offering that is relevant for patients as often as possible. I. Got you so so eventually unassuming, you do get what six to ten or how many did you get by September of two thousand seven Eight. In the meantime, you inequity doing the back end stuff you were doing the coding and building the website does right and as you were building it. How did it look? So. The bit that Nick Build looked awesome for the time I think. It was impressive. We were. Very. Satisfied that we had a scroll bar that we had a map that we had back then already the insurance selector and a lot of feature that. Weren't to be found really anywhere else. All right. So September two, thousand, seven, you are ready to reveal. This service at. Tech. Crunch. And Doth Review present or did did Cyrus kind of wishy the spokesperson? Cyrus. I presented Nick stayed behind in New York to make sure that the less the website was actually up and running This is in San Francisco that you went to the we flew out to San Francisco and So we lost sock talk in front of Eight, nine, hundred people. A lot of them were journalists when the judges opened up with feedback guy covers ocoee who we newnan in valued. As embezzles forever apple he came out to said he he didn't get it. He would never use this in front of everyone right and. His direct load something like honestly Oh, it just never occurred to me to go to any doctor that's really burned in in my brain and what was worse is that he seemed to be right we didn't get a single booking. We were hoping that this PR would get us out of our initial batch of users, right because your other. So many tech journalists there. So you know the publicity may be would would would lead to bookings and that was the hope but. It actually took three days before regard our first legitimate a patient, and and in the entire first month, we only got five bookings. You come back from San Francisco and. You know you had Guy Kawasaki. Say I don't I would never use this service? I'm sure he feels differently today but man maybe then Ezio said that but did did you come back feeling like like dejected like losers or or were you excited like how did you feel coming back? While you know I think we obviously hoping we would eventually get more bookings and In the beginning you probably refreshed. The Bookings Report Hundred Times a day by as we were thinking through what we realized. It was really a typical two sided marketplace challenge It's just a classic chicken and egg problem. You need the supply to get the demand and you need the demand to entice them supply and for dark was even trickier. Right when you think about it, healthcare is hyper local. Very complicated. So you have to match. Supply and demand on a Zip code specialty level, and then we have thousands of insurances take. Until we realized that our odds of actually finding a patient that wanted. An offer there. Quite low, and so the best path forward was to methodically build up supply, and so we just kept going put up a huge map of Manhattan on the wall, and then a sleep put little flags on of where the doctor's brother we're on the website in which insurance is accepted and we just we knew the perseverance. Is the name of the game. Back in just a moment how oliver and Cyrus Begin to drum up interest in stock and how they even start to raise some money at figure out how to dress differently, stay with us guy rows and you're listening to how I built this from NPR. Hey everyone. Just a quick thanks to our sponsors who helped make this podcast possible I to epic provision maker of epic bar beef was nature's idea the epic bar was. 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The deal with our personal finance tuneup series will help you feel more confident and get you on the right track listen and subscribe to NPR's Life Kit. And just a reminder, you can preorder the how I built this book right now, and if you do I'll send you a free signed book plate to go inside the book. The book is a collection of insights and wisdom from some of the most incredible and inspiring makers, inventors, builders, and dreamers on earth to preorder and to get your free signed book plate while supplies. Last, please go to Guira DOT COM or how I built this dot. com. Hey welcome back to how I built this from NPR Cairo's. So it's two, thousand, seven and Oliver. Cyrus. Nick are basically powering through with Zach dock going door to door trying to convince doctors. It's a valuable service and the thing about doctors even though they're really smart and capable and we depend on them. A lot of their offices especially back in two, thousand, seven or sort of technologically in the Stone Age. There was incredibly complicated to sink the doctors calendars with ours. Because none of the software was actually made to sink. Were even in the places where we had syncs up and running, we would frequently get. Feedback while the punishment didn't happen because the doctor wasn't available and we really couldn't figure out why this was the case because when we did screen chairs with the office to their calendar and and our calendar, it was identical right and couldn't figure out why that's happening. So I decided to sit next to the office manager I went there and got to know him and his family photos of his dog. I fixed the printer taught a better strategies to play minesweeper still couldn't figure it out. Until one day, the doctor would come out and she'd say, Hey David I'm out next Friday. And then what does David do does he go into the calendar and block out next Friday or does he take a post? It note On a doctor out next Friday and sticks this too is monitor. In the real world. These post it notes, of course happen and but once you know that Matthew Friend, you can start filtering this out and that's one example they were literally a thousand point, one percent solutions that we had to figure out to make this work. Wow. That sounds I'm getting exhausted. Just hearing about that because this is like even like Google calendars, right? Yeah. Yeah. That was that was early days and what we were extremely focused around were making show the experience was fantastic. If something went wrong, we fix it. Right. So I was our customer service I personally would call the doctor and and confirmed the appointment was all said if it wasn't I, personally contact the patient to let them know and then I would offer them. Amazon Gift Card alongside with an apology those actually one case where it didn't catch a patient in time. and. The were in the subway to the doctor, and so I raised them to the doctor's office and picked up a bouquet of flowers on the way there and met them in person to apologize. And that was really a turning point burs. The service has to work and we need to be have this patients I attitude in in terms of how it works completely ingrained in the company. All right. So you clearly need to kind of grow this Were you offering this service doctors for free at the time? Initially. We for free by we eventually started charging fifty dollars per month. But Sam doctor you come into my office and you say, Hey, if you pay me I can bring you more customers. I would be skeptical I would've said to you you who whose, who even knows about you. You'RE GONNA you're asking me to pay you money for Phantom bookings for maybe no customers I mean did some of the doctors say Many. The US summarize our sales challenge. Right? It was very hard because even if you wanted to, we couldn't easily share how many patients their competitors are down the road God like that was something that was confidential. All right. So you are you got this chicken and egg problem. Not, enough people signing up and he gets skeptical doctors but you know that the service could really benefit the doctors, but you also need them to pay for because otherwise you know but business. Meantime at a certain point I'm assuming you guys start to think we'd better go out and look for money if we're going to really make this thing work. Yeah. Yeah. That that happened in the spring of two, thousand, eight we decided we raise series. And we we make the rounds we get in front of a number of the big name, BC New York the also go to Sandhill road in impel. Toho Santo Road we leads and road initially were very successful at all we got Polite knows. and. Ray No feedback control someone took us as I told us you know what the idea seems. Good. But you're consultants I'd and the perspective of its consultants can't get anything done and what realized is that even though we had both founded companies before our Mackenzie Pedigree in our keys and button down shirts, they were really hurting us, and so we wait rank Khakis and button down shirts. It sounds crazy. Were they pleaded pants or were they at least nine pleaded please. Yeah Yeah. Yeah we after hearing that feedback We very quickly just went to the next gap and bought jeans and t-shirts and from that on the combos with VC's when but a lot better. So you went from McKinsey consultant look to this are the tech casual uniform of jeans and t-shirts that that's exactly right and we introduced ourselves not as NBA's and McKinsey Consultants but we introduce ourselves previous entrepreneurs that are starting their next company. was was anyone biting? Were there people who were like? Yeah there's a great idea I'm in. So interesting enough we had raised some money from. Friends and colleagues, and many of those they invested in US business plan unseen just based on the fact that we. Were giving up our careers at McKinsey to pursue talks. So that felt really a great. and. As we started changing how we appeared in how we introduced ourselves to venture capitalists L., we started to get offers and so in August of two thousand eight, we ended up raising five million from KHOSLA ventures expeditions mark. Wow Mark Banya Jeff bezos, and Venus is. All their. Funds are in which sounds like a lot before you WanNa do it's actually. Kinda limited because you still it seems to me in two thousand eight even though you have five million dollars a lot of money you still have this problem which is you've gotta get. Customers, and then to get customers, you need lots of doctors had lots of options but to get doctors, you need lots of customers booking through the site to you do that precisely D- These five million dollars per lily earmarked for making New, York, work, right, Miguel, I market work but. immediately after raising the money the financial crisis hit. And You may remember there was rest in peace a memo that went around about startups, right? Yes. About start ups, never being able to raise money arrested in peace good times. So we got this job is to make the money stretch in. We probably learn not during this time This was really our first go round making hard choices and what I want to be frugal and not to do things we can't afford and We learned to not let money replace critical, thinking and creativity. But now we continued to grind away at New York and at some point felt while if you want to get. To the next level we have to prove. Dr Isn't just a New York City phenomenon. Right? We had to prove that it would work in a second city But at that point, we didn't have the money to do this anymore, and by the way you're still your approach was still the same. It was door to door. That's right door to door and how how you building awareness about the about the fact Zach existed with customers with potential customers. So we it was day very difficult to get someone. To the website. Yeah but when they did. They loved it because it was such a step change from how healthcare used to work for him. Right they used to have to pick up the phone and wait on hold and then plays scheduling. tetris. With the office manager, can you do Wednesday morning about Thursday noon? Friday afternoon, and now they could do the same thing in a minute and have complete overview about the ability patients loved it and they told their friends. So we we started to get word of mouth. Going, and so we saw New York really taking up and we felt like, okay, this does this go into work in New York. At a minimum rate, but we also realized that it took us a fair bit of time. And money to get it going. In New, York and do we couldn't with the money we had left from the five million easily expanded into a new city at the same time. Raising money was going to be difficult because the next generation of investors wanted to see that it works and other cities as Walter. So we were a little bit in this catch twenty, two we ended up. Applying to. Force boost Your Business Competition Four. Forbes has his competition as sell to where they give away money right to they were promising a hundred thousand dollar prize. And at this time. We won. And Yeah what did is they gave us one of these large publishers. Clearinghouse is sex and very useful actually used to cover a hole in one in our only conference room. There was a hole in the wall and we covered it with that. At, this point you are, you are working out of an office, not not an apartment at this point we were working out of A. Shared Office space we work. Yeah. So they had given us publisher clearing house is is check but they fail to give us the small check for three months and we were getting really nervous, but it would still get it but. But ultimately, we got that one hundred thousand dollars and that's what we used to launch and our second market in DC in Washington DC and would did it require you guys to move down there or were you did you hire because I'm assuming you had to? A lot of your early capital was going into sales. Business Development hiring sales reps, is that right? Right, we had a couple of sales reps at the time. A. Very first employee ever was a sales rep is still with the company today and He was great. He figured out how to. Really charm his way. To the doctor. So there were no more security guards escorting anyone out. When did you? I'm assuming that even in two, thousand, nine, two, thousand, ten, and beyond we're not yet profitable. Far From It? Yeah. Far from it right because it's a capital intensive business. Yes. We obviously invested heavily in customer service wanted patients to have a great experience. And we had a quite sizable engineering team because that was actually a major engineering effort. So what started to happen when did you start to kind of see? A real turning point. Yeah. So we we we had launched New, York successfully with. Years. Of hardwork, we've gotten it off the ground is transported that to DC at work well, in DC, and now he said, well, why are we not in more cities and so we actually we raised serious be with fouled respond and We used to expand off the East Coast Francisco then Chicago and we just got better better at it. So we then ended up raising serious and two thousand eleven from Goldman NTSC, and we primarily use this to grow our sales team and sign up more more doctors in from two thousand eleven till two thousand, thirteen, we launched roughly thirty new cities I read that by by two thousand, fourteen would covered. Like forty percent of markets in the US, which is huge I mean that's right I mean that's a huge number of cities. And in that year evaluation. Of tzakda. Past Billion Dollars I mean that's That's pretty remarkable i. mean you were kind of on this like really rapid trajectory and you a pretty straightforward model right and you were charging doctors a flat fee every year and then. They could take all the bookings they wanted and I think that by that point like by two thousand, fourteen knew it was not cheap. It was expensive viewed really raised the price it was like three thousand dollars a year, right? Something like that. Yes recharged Dr Three thousand dollars a year and and there was a flat fee. No matter. How many bookings Actually facilitated for them and and the reality was for some doctors that got a lot of bookings that was a great deal. Yeah. But but there were also doctors that God a lot fewer bookings and for them that fixed cost was actually too expensive and some of them were starting to leave the service, and so we got into a situation that required us to invest a lot to stay where we are and then invest even more to continually grow our overall provider base, which means we had to build out a massive sales team to always sign up more doctors right and. Some point during this time L. Nick actually ran an analysis showed that it would take several years if ever fries to make our money back on on many of the doctors we signed up because you would have to sign up. X number of hundreds of thousands of doctors paying that amount every year. To make your money back to to make sort of our the cost of the sales team back. Wow and L. it. This was pure that would make us dependent on external capital for our very long time, and now it's a clearly there are many companies that have taken. Grow fast at all costs approach. And They Held onto this forty extended period of time by L., it clearly puts talking to a dependency to. Investors in their mind says, yeah. So. Meantime. You know I I from what I understand. There's disagreements I mean there there are you know the leadership team including Cyrus he he's I. Think he's he's sort of his position as the flat fee model is actually the best way to go is that a fair assessment of of his position? Yeah. I think that's right. I. Mean there were two fundamentally divergent ways held the business could go forward right. One way was to continue to work on optimizing the unit economics of our subscription model and the other way was to think about how to make it more transformative leap and then find a new more profitable. And more sustainable model and. Their. Look I can certainly understand The reluctance and taking this leap if companies rechange their underlying business model once they have a certain scale and then live to tell about it, right. We know the names of the companies that have done this net flicks, but from DVD's to streaming adobe. From box software to the cloud, but there's not a lot of companies that do that. and. Needed to make a choice which which direction I wanted to go. And and I should say over that. Became intensely personal for you because hugh and Cyrus really disagreed on on on the direction of the company should take. Steps down he he left the company and you moved into the role of CEO. Those right and what ask you about this neo. Beauty's in the flies of this show is its simplicity and we talked to one person or sometimes too. It's a single narrative, and so we don't have cyrus with us to tell us what happened but I wanna ask you about this time because. This was your co founder. This was your partner This is your friend and he was leaving the company. How did you feel at that time? I all I can say was a very hard and very emotional period for everyone involved and It was certainly a departure But how was through that given these two divergent choices you you couldn't. note, both of us could be useful to talk and. I have to imagine that for for period. China. was sort of the friendship. Look been we were very close we. Were not only friends we had worked for eight years believe together fourteen hours a day, and we probably talked more to each other than to anyone else in our lives but you know. Still touch from time to time and. I think he's joining us on from sideline. He still at prison million owner of the company Yeah, he's still. Here's the thing I mean we've we've told stories about breakups we've had we've had episodes were there were married couples who split divorced but continued the business e O products. Susan Griffin Black and an her husband Brad They continued the business stacy's pita chips continue the business after the divorce sold it for a quarter billion dollars. You guys were worth value to one point eight billion dollars at this point. was was ever party that just thought you know, God look at what we're doing on the core we're going and. I mean did you in service it down and say you know this thing is just growing and? Let's just figure this out. I think the challenge is that it's not as if there was an article way to decide what the right path forward is. As long as investors wanted to give us money growing all costs was yeah. Fine Strategy. The question was just how dependent you wanted to be on the continued goodwill of investors. It sounds like you were tired of going out raising money. You didn't want to do that anymore. Oh, not at all but I think you want to raise money from a position where you know what your turn to is and and. It wasn't clear that the business model would work in in a way that that we could just flip a switch and be profitable. Yeah. So. That was a tough year for you. Two, thousand fifteen. There was an article in business I think business insider, and it was about the sales team. It's October that year and it was. It was some allegations that you know Pete member sales team using adderall even cocaine they were under immense pressure. They were working all the time when you saw that article. And I'm not saying you even aware of any of this. You may not even aware of it but I. have to think that that article really alarmed you and and maybe even embarrassed you. Look A. There were a number of articles in two thousand fourteen fifteen. Didn't absolutely get everything, right but Budweiser I can say is that At. The time doctor had their sales team and we're. Getting very quickly and Your maybe maybe. Too focused on. L. Hitting targets and. Not. Focus enough on creating a strong culture the I hear these stories from six years ago from from time to time and from from now from candidates and and really every time. This happens like a Gut Punch. Because, this we know we're completely different company now. On on so many levels, but clearly, you saw that in new that you had to change something. While yes, I look I l there's a there's a couple of things about this. Right? We are a technology company, but we had said ourselves up too much about. Instead of writing wins and really too little about being adaptable and darning and and building the trust required to try things that now pet the risk of failure. and. So one of the first things I did is to change core values. You know to emphasize those behaviors each one of our values adaptable, not comfortable and other one is progress before perfection learners before masters right and. We only kept really one DIA CONSTANT DEL patients I. Personally that. That was more of the culture that I thought was right for Doc to succeed on many dimensions. So, you take over the company it's got high valuation, but you're still not making money and you know that you've gotta change the underlying business model you're never gonNA make money. And from what I understand this is the beginning of what you have internally described as the second founding of the company. That is right. That is right and that basically happens in in two thousand, eighteen you you launch this new business model where instead of the the dollar membership fee. Basically, you would charge doctors a lot less like two hundred or three hundred bucks, but then every booking you, you would take a cut from that booking. So like a travel agency. A little bit charge for new patient booking. So the existing patients to practice we made free but yes, there was the fundamental idea and. It sounds like such an obvious thing to do but but here's the problem with it and why why are we thought it was incredibly risky to try this. Our best customers that had been on for a long time. They got lots of pockets right and if we start charging them per bookings, their prices go up very significantly in some cases ten times more and that seemed. Competing, insane to us. In. Particular because when we talked to other companies that were at gone through similar changes and even pricing experts, they're number one advisor was make sure whatever you do never charged your best customers more and frost would be precisely. The opposite. In the thing that was counter-balancing this in our mind was well, maybe we'd be able to bring on a lot more doctors because the barrier to entry is now much lower that was there was the back and forth in the team to figure out whether that's the path we want to want to go. So, this is still a risky strategy because you're depending really on new bookings because the two hundred dollar annual fees dramatically lower and I have to imagine in year one, you actually saw drop in your revenue in the year one of of this curve. Second founding. Right. Well, it's from a risk profile worth at that. Right the warriors that you lose all your best customers in with it, all the bookings day used to be getting. and. So we needed to be ready for a very significant drop in bookings and revenue and the second Challenge was here that. The beauty of this approach modest and we got all this money upfront right and Sharon. Now to bond, we're getting paid after the booking with with a thirty day payment periods, we had a huge working capital requirement to make that happen. So did you see a drop and revenue in two thousand eighteen when you rolled this out? No we didn't because we actually didn't see the doctors leave the way that we hit on -ticipant did in fact, you know while we had very much worried that they would be upset and some of them certainly were upset. We were providing so much value to them that. You know what? What took you. So long I knew as getting a great deal all along. So that worked really well, and we had piloted in Georgia initially in April. Two thousand eighteen and then that had worked. So we we then all allowed in Colorado a few weeks later that work to, and from there we went to Washington state and again, very positive results and after these three days. Okay Great. We know this works does it out in our largest most important market? Let's go to New York and that and terribly horribly wrong. They the doctors in New York. Not only were so pissed off they actually I read. mounted a change dot org. Petition I. Don't know what to to to end this practice or something. They were really mad. They were really really mad and I guess you guys responded you said, are we won't we won't roll this out in New York for a while. Yeah look in New York. We. Facilitate Roughly, one in five new patient doctor relationship in the entire city on dock and so. The economic impact for the providers in. was much greater than for the providers in Georgia Colorado Washington. So yes, to give you one example, there's a dermatologist and so and he paid under the ultimate model ten doctor say paid thirty thousand dollars and under the new pricing model, his cost was going to go up from thirty thousand dollars to roughly three hundred, forty, thousand dollars. Wow. So what was your response to that? I? Mean it seems like a pretty reasonable. Concern. Yeah. So look after the conversation with the Dermatologists I. Actually. Put down the phone and I thought you know what? He's right. And so I pause and we regrouped and. We did a couple. Of things during this time, like the first one is we just went on a listening tour. You know we talked to provide their feedback and we just adjusted our this plan to give providers a much longer grace period to decide whether the wants to addition to the new model or not, and then. So then we read on New York six months later and and when dramatically better. So the strategy works and you see results from the strategy pretty quickly like within a year. Within a year, we had we finally at some incredible momentum was really going better than we had expected in our wildest dreams. Our existing client went down to essentially zero. I mean people still retire and and move jobs by no one really left the service and we were adding more and more providers because the barrier to entry was low and So in two thousand, nineteen we began growing profitably. It sounds like two thousand and nineteen was really the banner year. Two thousand nine hundred was a was a fantastic year and honestly we had so much momentum coming into twenty twenty and feel like, Hey, we worked really hard for three years and profitable and now the sky was the limit until. Tells Sam until March of two thousand twenty. Two Marjo twenty twenty and that's. That's really maybe the third founding DOC right? Well, I want to ask you about March twenty twenty because. Your Business is based on people booking with doctors and going to the doctor I have to imagine your revenues must have plummeted like every other industry like I mean doctors offices are still in most of the country. Slow or are trickle of patients coming in. With the lockdown started happening we saw impersonal bookings declining anywhere between fifty to ninety percent by the end of March I'm not surprised and lot of that buys I was getting was to. Lay off people and make sure that we hunker down to weather the storm but I saw an opportunity to build windmills, right so I thought well, we need to be there for our patients. We should be expanding into telehealth and I need every team member to help me do that and so we. Really went all important and supporting video visits and I'll probably June eighteen began redesigning the tire marketplace support virtual care, and so we actually released. Doctor Video Service and we made this available to. Any. Physician whether they are on soccer. for free. And by the way head, you plan to do this. How long would would I mean I'm imagining if you said in in February district I really want to focus on telehealth Would you have expected that by May would have been ready to go. Absolutely. Not I think what has been really fantastic to see is how? We really finished two years of roadmap in two months. Wow, and it's great because it's just gives us a window on what the next phase of doctor will be and really looking forward to that in my mind were the point were Amazon started from going. Books to also adding CDs. We have just gone from doing only in person to also A. Doing telehealth and I can't wait to see how this unfolds. It sounds like you. Might be reading between the lines but. You. Really, admire and respect your co-founders particularly. Cyrus and the work that he did to to build this company but I wonder if do you think that you will a I dunno, rekindle your friendship i. Is it something that is in the cards because a break is? Is Emotionally, it's hard Mesa really hard. Yeah, look I Do I think we'll work fourteen hours together again maybe not but you know I I've gotten through tougher breakups and reconciled in my past, and so I think we are we're in good shape and honestly know we are meeting were talking from time to time Yeah. We both have things to do and places to be so we're. Not, hanging out all the time. But it's now also five years ago So We are we're merch focused on making our join the baby successful. When you think about your journey and All Its happen to you how much do you think this has to do with? with luck and how much do you think it has to do with with the hard work you put in your your skills. Well I'm going look I I believe that there's really three ingredients to success. In order importance there are lock the talent, then hard work and. The only one. That's comedian. You control his how hard you work right and Now working hard to gives you more shots on goal It helps his day on the top of what you your talent allows and absolutely restarted at the right time the right place. So What what I'm proud of an all that journey has only that yet when we were wrong and when be had to revise and. When we needed the grit to actually make it work. I L we lived up to that and and that's really The all that anyone can ask themselves to. Oliver Karaz co-founder of Zach Braff by the way, remember how they originally wanted to call it physicians dot com or doctors dot. com. COULDN'T AFFORD THE MILLION DOLLAR PRICE TAG to buy the domain name. DOC DOT COM wasn't only available the price they paid for that domain name. Six Bucks. and. Thanks so much for listening to this show this week, you can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. You could also write to us at H. I. T. at NPR DOT Org. If you want to send a tweet, it's at how I felt this or at Cairo's can also follow me on instagram that's at Guy Dot Roz. Our show was produced this week by Jet Anderson with music composed by Tina. Bluey. Thanks also to Julia Carney Candice Limb Neva grant and Jeff Rodgers I'm guy. Roz even listening to how I built this. This is NPR. Black voters play a crucial role for any Democrat who seeks to win the White House but some big devise amongst that block and some serious influence

Cyrus Masumi Mckinsey New York L. Nick Germany Starbucks Oliver Karaz Partner Office Manager United States Dot Com Doctors Dot Com Co-Founder Amazon Zach Dock Manhattan Middle East Sarah SAM Co Founder Iran
How Oliver Kharraz Built Zocdoc

How I Built This

04:55 min | Last month

How Oliver Kharraz Built Zocdoc

"One of the most challenging problems for startups that offer to connect customers with service providers is what's known as the chicken and egg problem. This is the problem companies like AIRBNB and lift had to solve without homeless things in the case of AIRBNB or drivers. In the case of lift, you'd have no customers but at the beginning, neither of these companies had any customer. So convincing people to list their homes or drivers to offer rides to strangers was not. An easy thing to overcome and Tony? Shoe. The CO founder of Jordache on the show back in two thousand eighteen had the same problem. When he started out, he needed customers who wanted food delivered to their homes henny needed lots of restaurants to participate. But you can't get restaurants without the customer demand and you can't get those customers without lots of restaurants. Same thing with class pass and Birch box you need both sides of the market to buy in. And back in two thousand, seven in New York City Oliver Curme. Had, the quintessential chicken and egg problem he and his co founder. Cyrus Masumi trying to launch Zach Doc. It's an online service that takes a lot of the pain and frustration at of booking doctor's appointment. You can go online find the type of doctor you need plug in your insurance and then book an appointment through system that's directly linked to that doctors. Calendar, a super simple and smart idea, right. But back in two thousand, seven Oliver Cyrus had to convince doctors that this was a service worth paying for. But then why should they pay for it if it were not potential patients and meanwhile oliver and Cyrus, had to show potential patients that this was a service with lots of great doctors to choose from. All those chickens and all those eggs took a long time to bring together. And then after growing slowly, and then quickly Oliver faced his biggest growing pain of all the realization that he had to completely revamp the business bottle of doc if it was going to survive. A decision that was so painful. It actually led to the break-up of his nearly ten year partnership with Cyrus. But let's start at the beginning. Oliver Karaz was born and raised in Germany mostly in rural parts of the country his mother was German and his father was from Iran in came from a long line of doctors. For me, it really starts in some ways with my dad and. The timing rapidly had every reason to become a social activist and and so he came to Germany from the Middle East when he was very young around twenty with no money in his pocket no language skills. And you personally then worked on of odd jobs, but he eventually became a psychiatrist but what has really shaped me much more than being born in Berlin is. Social. Active. Isn't that I that I saw him live and that he really made our family mattress we always talked about talent responsibility and the need to use. Whatever telling behind to help those. Around us that we can make a difference. Given that your father was Iranian and your mother was was sort of. German. An Uber even though you were born in Germany, did you feel did you feel as Germany everybody else? So I didn't have a second identity. We only used spoke German at home and yet. As you say I was also a not always fully accepted. So if I give you an example, my school twelve hundred students and you could pick out to the didn't look like everyone else and I was one of them right and even an enlightened country like Germany. That is notable. So I had what I call a visual accent would people would see me on the street and they would ask me how to speak German. So well and But they also school the skipped my name when reading out scores because they weren't sure how to pronounce my last name and opportunities taken away and even at was physically threatened so i. I think that really shaping in many ways because I realized. Very early that in order to be as successful as everyone around me I would have to be dramatically better in really work much much harder than anyone else and so that used to be strong work ethic

Germany Oliver Cyrus Oliver Oliver Curme Co Founder Airbnb Zach Doc Cyrus Masumi Oliver Karaz Tony Jordache Middle East Birch Henny Iran New York Berlin
370: Why Kemba Walker is the Celtics Most Important Player v the Sixers w/ Abby Chin - burst 06

Celtics Beat

01:11 min | Last month

370: Why Kemba Walker is the Celtics Most Important Player v the Sixers w/ Abby Chin - burst 06

"I. WanNa tell you before we get back to abby here no shortage of action going on in our exclusive partner bet online sports making their way back. It's not just you have seen NASCAR soccer anymore. PGA NHL Playoffs. NBA Playoffs are coming. Julie based ball NFL hopefully not far behind bet online has all the best odds in lines of the upcoming matches. This weekend some futures bets for the Lakers are positioned right now is the betting favorites plus two, eighty, five, win a championship, the clippers right behind them at plus three ten if you're looking for some longer odd Celtics plus twelve, hundred, the sixers yes those sixers plus five thousand. So that is what we're looking at if you need more. It's not just sports and online has simulated sports as well. You need just the real life stuff, NFL NBA UFC happening every day live for you to check out if you're looking for something other than sports that's fine as well. But online has hundreds of live Casino Games Poker tournaments. All the best props in the business availability is visible online dot ag or use your mobile device join now to receive your welcome. Star. Playing today has been online your online sportsbook experts.

Sixers NFL NBA Abby Clippers Nascar Soccer Partner Lakers Julie PGA NHL Celtics
370: Why Kemba Walker is the Celtics Most Important Player v the Sixers w/ Abby Chin - burst 06

Celtics Beat

01:11 min | Last month

370: Why Kemba Walker is the Celtics Most Important Player v the Sixers w/ Abby Chin - burst 06

"I. WanNa tell you before we get back to abby here no shortage of action going on in our exclusive partner bet online sports making their way back. It's not just you have seen NASCAR soccer anymore. PGA NHL Playoffs. NBA Playoffs are coming. Julie based ball NFL hopefully not far behind bet online has all the best odds in lines of the upcoming matches. This weekend some futures bets for the Lakers are positioned right now is the betting favorites plus two, eighty, five, win a championship, the clippers right behind them at plus three ten if you're looking for some longer odd Celtics plus twelve, hundred, the sixers yes those sixers plus five thousand. So that is what we're looking at if you need more. It's not just sports and online has simulated sports as well. You need just the real life stuff, NFL NBA UFC happening every day live for you to check out if you're looking for something other than sports that's fine as well. But online has hundreds of live Casino Games Poker tournaments. All the best props in the business availability is visible online dot ag or use your mobile device join now to receive your welcome. Star. Playing today has been online your online sportsbook experts.

Sixers NFL NBA Abby Clippers Nascar Soccer Partner Lakers Julie PGA NHL Celtics
The Australian Wastewater Treatment Plant Powered By Leftover Beer

Coronavirus Daily Briefing

02:17 min | Last month

The Australian Wastewater Treatment Plant Powered By Leftover Beer

"When lockdown hit much of the world in March forcing bars and restaurants to close a lot of them were huge supplies of food and booze. They couldn't sell here New York City where bars are just put in big orders for Saint Patrick's Day. They released able to fulfil delivery and takeout orders for several weeks. Many bars added entire cases of beer at steep discount to their delivery menus. It was actually pretty awesome. But in Australia, they got even more creative in the state of South Australia local breweries sent millions of leaders of stale beer to the Glenn l wastewater treatment plants just west of Adelaide and that beer has been converted into renewable energy to power the plants quoting CNN the plant mixes organic industrial waste with sewage sludge to produce biogas, which is then turned into electricity to power. The whole facility usually generates enough bio-gas provide about eighty percent of its energy needs. But the recent influx of beer has boosted its energy generation to new levels reaching six hundred, fifty, four megawatt hours in a single month Lisa Hannigan manager of production treatment at Sa Water, said in a statement beer worked. Well for the plants digesters, hat said referring to the large sealed concrete tanks where sewage sludge is heated in an oxygen free environment and decomposed to produce methane rich bio gas. The booze is high calorific value. The amount of heat released during combustion makes perfect for anaerobic digestion process she added and quotes and add further said that the three hundred thousand, some odd cubic meters of bio gas being generated month now is enough to power twelve hundred houses and is also a joker saying in the statement quotes honorably, our thirsty digesters have been doing their bit for the environment by drinking themselves silly and was such a horrific diet. It's no wonder they produce so much gas and quotes. And this is just the latest example of people creatively innovating on what was previously thought of as waste beer is particularly difficult to dispose of in any environmentally friendly way. So finding a sustainable use for it like this is beyond awesome and I hope there is a way to make a continue even when breweries don't have as much extra beer line around as they did this past spring.

Lisa Hannigan New York City Saint Patrick Australia CNN South Australia Adelaide HAT Sa Water Glenn L
Trump pushes forward with executive action on economy despite legal questions

The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

02:33 min | Last month

Trump pushes forward with executive action on economy despite legal questions

"CNN White House correspondent Boris Sanchez Boris President Trump is defending the executive orders issued on pandemic relief even as the White House is struggling to explain them they're having trouble landing out for the American people. Yeah that's right. Jim The president also spinning these executive actions claiming that they do more to help struggling Americans than they actually do the president dodging criticism even from within his own party that these actions are unconstitutional and also ignoring previous statements that he's made about executive actions. Tonight president trump sparring with his own party taking aim at critics of his new executive actions tweeting that Nebraska Senator Ben Sasse is a Republican in name only saying he has quote gone rogue. Again, this foolishness plays right into the hands of the radical left Dem's SAS tearing into trump's decision to circumvent stimulus negotiations in Congress calling the move unconstitutional slap comparing the actions to President Obama's signing of executive orders after lawmakers could not reach consensus orders that trump himself frequently criticized. The country was in based on executive orders right now Obama goes around signing executive orders. It's a basic disaster you can't do it in theory is opposed to you know the old fashioned way get everybody into a room and get something that people agree on trump was not in the room getting lawmakers together instead spending the weekend at his Golf Club in New Jersey as questions linger over whether the actions will survive legal challenges, members of the administration struggled to even explain them. Twelve, hundred dollars. Are you talking about in addition to unemployment that they're already getting nervous having. that. I. Beg. Your pardon the twelve hundred dollars will come from the payroll tax. It should be eight, Hundred Bucks I beg your pardon it should be eight hundred bucks for the unemployment eight, hundred or four hundred. No should before it should be eight hundred dollars. But White House Chief of Staff Morton Meadows appears more concerned with public comments from the administration's health experts. The Washington Post. Reporting Meadows has admonished Dr. Anthony Fauci for sounding out of sync with trump according to the post. Meadows has also excluded health experts for morning meetings with staff privately sharing skepticism about Dr and Dr Deborah burks questioning their expertise and regularly raising issues on which she thinks they've been

Boris President Trump Executive President Obama White House Morton Meadows White House Correspondent President Trump Senator Ben Sasse Boris Sanchez CNN Dr Deborah Burks The Washington Post Nebraska Golf New Jersey Congress Dr. Anthony Fauci Chief Of Staff Jim The
144: Remembering Michael Ojo w/ Leonard Hamilton - burst 08

Jeff Goodman Basketball Podcast

01:08 min | Last month

144: Remembering Michael Ojo w/ Leonard Hamilton - burst 08

"There's no shortage of action going on at our exclusive partner bet online sports slowly making its way back. Obviously we got UFC NASCAR soccer. They lead the way NBA Now nhl you got and hopefully we'll see some some fell soon but online has all the best odds in lines for all the upcoming matches We got NBA Futures Lakers still leading the way barely over the Clippers Lakers plus two eighty five clippers plus three ten bucks right there plus three, twenty, five rockets plus twelve, hundred Celtics plus twelve hundred than big. Actually. Raptors plus one thousand. So there you go. Need More Ben. Online has simulated NFL NBA, UFC happening everyday live for you to out looking for something else other than sports. Has Hundreds of live Casino Games. Poker. Tournaments and all the best props in the business visit but online dot ag or use your mobile device. Enjoy now receive your new welcome bonus and start playing today that online your online sportsbook experts.

NBA UFC Lakers Clippers Partner Soccer Raptors DOT Nascar Celtics NFL
"twelve hundred w" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:51 min | 11 months ago

"twelve hundred w" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"At midnight one use radio twelve hundred W. away I'd has been popping up more and more just being here feels really empowering many people believe this but I don't think the media just turn their back on them because the media some I think that it's easy to get people word dominant what you want from what people say this is all about it's time the American people came out and started pushing back you know people can be really nasty is nothing but a robot covered in make up talks for months now once he ran out of ammunition he reportedly got down on the floor lying face down and ready for all the cold front there's something seriously wrong with our policy of so I define a destructive cult authoritarian structure someone at the top of the plans that have the full power a little ways this is the whole we're trying to run he didn't say anything in this quiet the whole time because children being killed they were pulling their pants down at the a supermarket.

twelve hundred W
"twelve hundred w" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"twelve hundred w" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Alexa, play twelve hundred W A on iheartradio. That sounds like a pretty good choice to. Travel experts are saying that more than a third of all Americans are going to travel this weekend 'em next week to the holiday season. That means more than one hundred ten million people most of them just getting in the car and going witch with this many people on the mood, you know, who loves movement plaintiff's, lawyers the more movement, there is the more accidents. There are more lawsuits. They're potentially are the more big settlements. There are the plaintiff's bar loves movement, the plaintiff's bar cannot survive. If there isn't movement, I've had one of them tell me this they need. People driving cars have an accident. They need people in motion when things going wrong when their emotions so that some deep pockets person could be sued. There's another group that benefits and people in motion and that's burglars. People that try to break into people's homes. The best time to do that is when nobody's there. And a lot of people are not going to be their starting this holiday season one hundred and ten million people just get in the car and going leaving homes unoccupied simply safe would strongly suggest that you do more than just lock your door. Take the initiative to install your own home security system in the new year and make sure that when you're on the move and.

Alexa twelve hundred W
"twelve hundred w" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"twelve hundred w" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"These radio twelve hundred w away. I if you want us, just ask your smart speaker for us. Alexa, play twelve hundred w away I on iheartradio. That sounds like a pretty good choice to me wake up is upon you staring straight down and keenly through seeing all that you and everything that you can never be. Yes. And I is a brand new eye ready to blink. So face forward. With arms wide, open and mind. Are you ready to go? Speaker spoke up and. I'm CLYDE Lewis, and this is ground zero. The number to call the night. Triple eight six seven three thirty seven hundred that's triple eight six seven three three seven hundred. Avid listeners of my show. Understand. There's always a basic blueprint for programs. There's.

CLYDE Lewis Alexa twelve hundred w
"twelve hundred w" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"twelve hundred w" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"We're doing everything we can possibly do. This is going to take very heavy rain coming in. We can expect to more of the same get the picture reports where we're getting our news from NewsRadio twelve hundred W O AI. He's the Toronto already. Here are more alien presence. Are we about to bring it into existence? Artificial intelligence is an existential threat coast to coast AM tonight at midnight on NewsRadio twelve hundred w away. I. Christmasy? Remember to stay with. Respect your mother's. Tell you what. This. Presents. Yeah. If you're bad, boys. Bad boys and girls. Bring you some signals eve is nice. But you always get choked. You don't really need. Homicide. Three inches tall. Maybe waiting a Santa Claus. To continue. Was abducted from her home on January twenty two. And. Remarkable. If you to. Would you looking for?.

Toronto twelve hundred W twelve hundred w Three inches
"twelve hundred w" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"twelve hundred w" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

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"twelve hundred w" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"twelve hundred w" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Hacked and somebody you don't know, this is NewsRadio twelve hundred W A. I happen to you. If you haven't it will some point odds are just the mere mention of it happening to you makes you uncomfortable. Start imagining it putting it in place. What do you do? How do you stop it? What kind of hassles? Do I face now? Imagine when it's real you get a phone, call from a credit card company asking you to confirm a dozen or so extravagant purchases or worse. You read a credit card statement, the shows up in the mail with a laundry list of charges, you know, nothing about for the past thirty days that is what lifelock tries to have you avoid experiencing. Lifelock's online identity theft protection service is set up to detect threats and violations as early as possible doing it right now be happy millions of Americans more than ever before. They're doing it. Twenty four seven they are monitoring the online activity of all of their clients. I mean, nobody's spying on them. There have algorithms you have a spending pattern you create. What's happening is it lifelock is comparing your established pattern to current? And if they find some exorbitant spending or really out of character behavior. That's when they get hold of you. And that's how you find out long before anybody will tell you when they spot a pattern. That's unusual. You hear about it? They ask you are you doing this or not? And depending on what you tell them. They either go away or they get in.

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"twelve hundred w" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"twelve hundred w" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Twelve hundred W O AI on iheartradio. That sounds like a pretty good choice to me. a proposition by a man to a woman with one leg shorter than the other. I've never seen. A list of the greatest one hit wonders that that song wasn't number one ever. VH1. did a list of greatest hits the greatest one hit wonders of the eighty s of course, it came up. But then I saw a greatest one hit wonders of all time. By the way, I'm often asked by listeners in emails what I'm reading or.

VH1. Twelve hundred W
"twelve hundred w" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"twelve hundred w" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Nine on twelve hundred w Oy Quarterback it is the. Weekend joepags has the weekend off, ironically not.

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"twelve hundred w" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"twelve hundred w" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Never. Will Alexa. Play twelve hundred w. Away I on. Iheartradio Tell me You're. So young No You're listening to coast to coast AM with? Input All right so the magin what it's like as the second World War is winding. Down and the Soviet noose is tightening around.

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"twelve hundred w" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

05:42 min | 2 years ago

"twelve hundred w" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Day newsradio twelve hundred w o eighty i giuliano i can't find the part of the article that i'm looking for right now but i remember reading it it might be the chapter the translated chapter from the serbian air force book which mentioned about this ufo appearing directly in the flight line are the the the flight path of these planes at kinda reminded me of the tic tac case where this tic tac went to the cap point of the dave frazier was supposed to head toward did you get the same impression oh well in this case i say just exactly why that's vodka the airplane was returning back appeared in front but i must say that was giving because the goal was to land okay i misunderstood there is a reference in one of the articles to marshall tito who was the the ruler of yugoslavia at the time was he did he take an interest in this oh yeah the show went general calama which in rather station was there and she was leaving this medication of the airplanes interception alexander shows because that's actually she was preparing reports and the president teach all the time was in the eagle that was a place near velika sometimes he would spend free time there and there was a zone of security around came and the saints cables relatively clone school general calama which would pick up these reports that they would re rights and they would go to president tito and cost yes the president received these reports however we don't know what racks involves and what for the discussions but yeah the president of the country received the ufo reports my mom would that be the kind of thing that marshal tito would have passed along to the russians who were sort of you know they were the top dog in the eastern bloc in those days i i know in one of the articles i read about your work it references colonel bora sock lob who was the he was the the russian ministry defense source that i had contacted i in nineteen ninetythree who was sort of at the in charge of the russian military's on ten year long ufo study and i wonder whether yugoslavians of told the russians about this then possibility won't be learned that yugoslav air force actually had a small committee and actually worked you learned it was led by a colonel venco my storage however he is alive anymore but generally switch from belgrade's the game is a concept number of the story on who knew him and also from widget sources she told me that it seems that this committee should information not only russians but also beat united states because they were sloppy our sorts of like a country between two blocks you know always lock kate's relationship so there was some kind of rumors there but it's hard to confirm because the main participants are not alive unfortunately anymore we've got a couple of folks on the phones that have questions or comments for you let's go to the international line i norman toronto hey norm you're on with juliana hi everyone my question is this i was wondering if your guest sees any difference in the way that events at insincere handled between europe and the us and by extension canada and the uk from official sources my classic example is the phoenix lights where initially governments came out and made fun of it and then later on they came supposedly clean and said it was a serious incident and they're kind of looked upon with favor and kind of looked upon with heroes but from my standpoint that kind of mixed up obscured everything so i was just wondering if you're i guest has any opinion on that thanks very much okay yeah well for children the situation i can say a lot because actually we don't have prominent cases so that's all recorded the recently also we have to take into consideration the size of the country's now republic relatively small size and the frequency of these incidents it seems of course we will never know from defied but nothing leaked so far towards me but i can for sure tell you about the yugoslav you so wendy's incidents were happening dachshund civilian pilots would report them to and journalists swirl interested they would cover design coast i'm noxious day will send the questions air force and you will force would didn't want to confirm the military type of incidents they would say nothing is coming up speaking getting on the radar butts regarding civilian cases at least down in public domain david articles so.

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"twelve hundred w" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"twelve hundred w" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Is newsradio twelve hundred w a i welcome back luella zondo i wanna ask you a little bit about some of these other cases like tic tac you know you had the nimitz which had these encounters off and on for several days and then you watch that video and you listen to the testimony of of dave favor and and some of the other witnesses and it seems like this tic tac was you know these things just going about their business not really paying attention to us at all and and at some point they kind of oh there's somebody else here and they kind of react as if gosh we we didn't know anybody was paying any attention to us and then they display this incredible technology i is that sort of the sense you got about what was going on there this cat and mouse and is that sort of what happened with the other tic tac encounters have heard there have been a dozen maybe two dozen similar incidents off the east coast i know there are limits on what you can say can you give me a general sense of is that tic tac encounter similar to what other tic tac absolutely there's some there's some there's some congruency here that that are striking some of these haven't been brought to light so i you know i have to be careful i i keep reminding folks i signed a nondisclosure agreement and you know boy i tell you one word in the wrong direction and i could find myself in a whole lot of hot water so i want to be very deliberate what i say and how i say it sure so i think i think there you said these things were playing catandmouse with us it's a lot like maybe walking down the beach and you see a and i don't know what's going into mind of these these phenomena but i can only imagine you're walking down the beach and you see a stray dog at the end of the beach and you don't really pay much attention to it and you're doing your thing and as stray dog starts to get a little closer and closer again you're probably not really worried about it you have dogs at home you love animals but when this stray dog that you don't know and you realize it's a pretty big dog starts to get kind of close to you maybe you start getting a little bit nervous maybe start keeping your on a little bit more maybe take a bit of a defensive posture right just in case so i wouldn't be surprised that as we are flying our our aircraft and our assets near one of the things you get to a point where you cross a certain primitive and all of a sudden now the thing begins to say okay you're a little bit too close for comfort i wanna make sure we maintain a safe distance between you and me and so that may very well be you know keeping that that that degree of of operational distance freedom of movement certainly not uncommon that we would see in in in foreign adversaries aircraft and frankly anything that that we encounter you know you you go to africa and you you you see these tv shows where they're flying helicopters in darting the wildebeest down below when the helicopters far off in the distance man the wildebeest don't really do very much but when that helicopter gets right over them boy they sure run in all directions and that may that may very well be what we're seeing here they're just trying to keep a safe distance from us i had heard that there was something like two dozen tic tac type encounters off the east coast in period of months i know you probably can't get into that and you know in in looking at the records of other countries which i know the bass organization collected information from other countries in russia the russian ministry defense had an order a standing order lead these things alone because in the words of their commander of their air force they could have incredible capacities for retaliation and that's an exact quote i imagine you can't say whether we have a standing order like that but is there any order is there any policy about how to engage with these things well that's that's why i'm doing what i'm doing we need we need policy on it you know silence.

twelve hundred w
"twelve hundred w" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"twelve hundred w" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"News radio twelve hundred w o ai luella zondo before we leave the topic about all sap and and how these things fit together also i guess that the bulk of the money that we're talking about was spent by a private contractor by bass did you coordinate with them did they did you have access to what they did and vice versa yes and so would you have seen skin walker ranch material for example yes that's about as far as you're going to go on that one yes okay let me ask it let me ask a different way the words those terms a tip and also having words like threat and weapon that sets off alarm bells for a lot of people who think this is let's say a ufo study gets renewed or recreated and it it is sold on the premise of these visitors tic tacs the gambles represent a threat whereas alien friendly folks like us would say these aliens are not hurting us wherever they're from they're not attacking us they're not using laser beams to wipe out our cities you as a military guy how do you react to that well i don't necessarily agree or disagree understand that the function of the department of defense is national security it is designed to look at threats even when we look at things like hurricanes or even some cases disaster relief is to stop a threat is to stop either the spread of disease or to stop some sort of threat that could potentially affect our nation so it is the job of the department of defense and it's titled department of defense to to look at things from the optic as a ab pose a potential threat now i would certainly say that if you have something that is operating let's keep going back to the example because that's what most people are familiar with the despite being doesn't more obviously but let's stick with an image if you have an object that is flying in and near and around a nuclear carrier group and that is displaying some very advanced capabilities and.

twelve hundred w
"twelve hundred w" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"twelve hundred w" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Just ask your smart speaker for us alexa play twelve hundred w o on iheartradio that sounds like a pretty good choice to me john.

twelve hundred w
"twelve hundred w" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"twelve hundred w" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"This is newsradio twelve hundred w is san antonio and i heart radio station ninety five's about where we should be this time of year a quick look cartha mamata should be around that if you're in the middle of the afternoon that's where expected to be generally sunny today tonight a few clouds seventy five tomorrow mostly sunny ninety five sunday few clouds around into the upper nineties upper nineties are probably going to take us through the.

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"twelve hundred w" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"twelve hundred w" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Alexa play twelve hundred w away i on iheartradio that sounds like a pretty good choice future i thank you speaker round zero.

Alexa twelve hundred w
"twelve hundred w" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"twelve hundred w" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Up with twelve hundred w away i on iheartradio is that system the kid want from the city.

iheartradio twelve hundred w
"twelve hundred w" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"twelve hundred w" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Wake me up with twelve hundred w i on iheartradio crazy okay title.

twelve hundred w