11 Burst results for "Turtle Mountain Reservation"

"turtle mountain reservation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:24 min | 11 months ago

"turtle mountain reservation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Get lit with all of it Book club event. November was Native American Heritage Month. So we thought, what better way to celebrate than to read a novel by one of America's most acclaimed indigenous writers Louise Erdrich. Louise is a National book award winner and a Pulitzer Prize finalist. She is a member of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chip Walk. And while Native American identity has always been central to her work, her latest novel, the Night Watchman, tells a highly personal story about indigenous rights, one from her own family history. The novel just made the Kirkus Review Best of 2020 list for fiction, And it's based on the true story of Louisa's grandfather, Ah, Chippewa Council member who helped lead a challenge to a bill introduced to Congress in 1953. It would strip indigenous people of their land rights. His activism took him all the way from the Turtle Mountain reservation in North Dakota to the steps of the Capitol building. The novel also follows the story of Patrice, a 19 year old chip wall woman who runs into trouble when she heads to Minneapolis to look for her missing. Sister. Patrice is also juggling the feelings of two suitors, one a Chippewa boxer and the other his white coach. It is a rich and deeply moving portrait of a community and culture pushed to the margins but far from extinguished. I began the conversation by asking Louise about her grandfather, who served as the inspiration for this novel. I wanted to know. When was the first time Louise heard the story of her grandfather's activism. I always knew something about this. You know, I grew up thinking I knew it. But and I had these letters from him that my mother gave me because I was born the year these letters were written to them. You know, there's parts of the letters were like Greeting me as a baby. I mean, beautiful pieces of these letters that he wrote. And Only recently did I read them. In tandem with the history of what happened. With termination with this Extraordinarily destructive bill that passed through Congress both houses And threatened everything about being native people. What point did you decide that you wanted to work this in tow a novel? How did I decide this? I mean, what instantly came into my mind wasn't Very admirable, Really. I was having trouble with another book, Clyde. And I thought Uh, What now? And I started reading the letters over at that point. I thought this is what I'm meant to be writing now, and that's why the trouble is with the other book. Here's what I have to do. I know it's going to happen. I have it Z like I've been waiting till I'm this age till I have I mean, on some level, there might be some maturity involved with it. I don't know, but I I really couldn't have done it before. Now. I had all of this material, but I couldn't use. I couldn't. I couldn't really grapple with it. You didn't have the life experience. You think I don't think I am but the patience to put these things together and also I made friends with historians and they kept telling me Look at those letters, you know, and we went down to the National Archives in Kansas City on guess so here I have to just give up, shout out to libraries and archives and people who keep Pieces of history that Are so granular, so fascinating. And once I started looking for my grandfather's school, his boarding school you've heard a lot about government boarding schools. Perhaps he went to several government boarding schools. And including the one that my parents taught at. He went to that school. I found out all these things about him. From his boarding school files, and anyone who's native American understands that the government basically keeps everything you ever have done in boarding school. There's letters from him as a kid, and contrary to what a lot of people think like he really wanted to get into that school. Uh, times are very hard and a lot of people went For the simple reason that people got, you know, three square meals. They got health care. They got everything they didn't have to walk miles to school. So he wanted to be there. You know, one of our listeners and one of our book club members wrote to us on social media that they learned so much from this book about the boarding schools they had. They had never known this. They had didn't really understand it until they read this book, so I'm curious as you as a novelist. How do you decide? How much of what you write. Is going to be about education, even though that's not your job. And and how and when to just put that on the back burner and go ahead and write. I honestly don't think about the education at all. Because to me, these things are just fascinating. And I want to know them, though. I don't really think about whether other people want to know them. I'm just my method of writing is a lot about Engaging myself in a story and I'm I hope that if I engage myself Other people will come along with me. I didn't want to ask you since you mentioned historians and how important they were to this work, Can you Help us understand what was going on in the country at the time of this termination bill. Yes. So this was, you know, post war. United States in which there was You know the baby born.

Louise Erdrich Turtle Mountain Congress National book award Patrice Kirkus America Chippewa Council Chip Walk Pulitzer Prize North Dakota United States Louisa Minneapolis Kansas City
"turtle mountain reservation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:33 min | 11 months ago

"turtle mountain reservation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Covered in honor of Native American Heritage Month we're going to be reading a novel by an author who was a National book award winner and Pulitzer Prize finalist. Guardian calls her quote one of the greatest living American writers and our newest novel centers on one of the biggest fights for indigenous rights in American history. We are reading the Night Watchman by Louise Ergic. The novel is based on the true story of Louisa's grandfather, Ah, Chippewa Council member who helps lead a challenge to a bill introduced to Congress in 1953 that would strip indigenous people of their land rights. His activism takes him all the way from the Turtle Mountain Reservation in North Dakota. The steps of the Capitol building. The New York Times says the nightwatchman is and magisterial epic that feels like a call to arms. Ah call to humanity of banquet prepared for us by hungry people. Some of you already started reading a couple of book club members have posted on our Instagram, one reader wrote. I'm enjoying it. I live in Minnesota so fun to hear the landmarks. And then there was this comment. Great riding with metaphor, such as a smile like the dough in her lunch box, not even half fakes. Find out how you could read the book even bar. You're free E Copy thanks to our partners at the New York Public Library, head to W n y c dot org's slash get lit and mark your calendars for the evening of Wednesday, Semper Seconds at 7 P.m. will be joined virtually by Louise herself. Special musical guest. In the meantime, grab a copy of the Night watchman follows on instagram at all of it. W N Y C because that's where we host all of our book.

Louise Ergic Instagram National book award Pulitzer Prize Turtle Mountain Reservation New York Public Library North Dakota Chippewa Council Louisa Semper Seconds Minnesota The New York Times Congress
"turtle mountain reservation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:32 min | 11 months ago

"turtle mountain reservation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In honor of Native American Heritage Month we're going to be reading a novel by an author who was a National book award winner and Pulitzer Prize finalist. Guardian calls her quote one of the greatest living American writers and our newest novel centers on one of the biggest fights for indigenous rights in American history. We are reading the Night Watchman by Louise Ergic. The novel is based on the true story of Louisa's grandfather, Ah, Chippewa Council member who helps lead a challenge to a bill introduced to Congress in 1953 that would strip indigenous people of their land rights. His activism takes him all the way from the Turtle Mountain Reservation in North Dakota. The steps of the Capitol building. The New York Times says the nightwatchman is and magisterial epic that feels like a call to arms. Ah call to humanity of banquet prepared for us by hungry people. Some of you already started reading a couple of book club members have posted on our Instagram, one reader wrote. I'm enjoying it. I live in Minnesota so fun to hear the landmarks. And then there was this comment. Great riding with metaphor, such as a smile like the dough in her lunch box, not even half Biggs. Find out how you could read the book, even borrow your free copy, Thanks to our partners at the New York Public Library, head to W n y c dot org's slash get lit and mark your calendars for the evening of Wednesday, Semper Seconds at 7 P.m. will be joined virtually by Louise herself. Special musical guest. In the meantime, grab a copy of the Night watchman follows on instagram at all of it. W N Y C because that's where we host all of our book.

Louise Ergic Instagram National book award Pulitzer Prize Turtle Mountain Reservation New York Public Library North Dakota Chippewa Council Louisa Semper Seconds Minnesota The New York Times Congress
"turtle mountain reservation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"turtle mountain reservation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"N. Y c independent journalism in the public interest, 93.9 FM and AM a 20 NPR news than the New York conversation. Today on fresh air. Terry Gross talks with Jack Goldsmith, co author of After Trump reconstructing the presidency, the book considers the difficult questions the next president will face about the much change presidency Trump left behind. To net to on 93 point out of him or ask your smart speaker to play. This is all of it. If you want to take a break from the news and stop scrolling, escape into a really good book, get lit. With all of it Has you covered in honor of Native American Heritage Month we're going to be reading a novel by an author who is a national book award winner and a PLO surprise finalist. The Guardian calls her one of the greatest living American writers and her newest novel centers on one of the biggest fights for indigenous rights in American history. We're going to be reading the night Watchman by Louise Er, Eric. The novel is based on the true story of Louise's grandfather, a Chippewa Council member who helps Lee a challenge to a bill introduced to Congress in 1953 that would strip indigenous people of their land rights. His activism takes him all the way from the Turtle Mountain reservation in North Dakota to the steps of the Capitol building. The New York Times says the night watchman is a magisterial epic. It feels like a call to arms. A call to humanity a banquet prepared for us by hungry people. To find out how to borrow your free E copy. Thanks to our partners.

Louise Er national book award New York NPR Terry Gross Lee Jack Goldsmith North Dakota president Turtle Mountain Chippewa Council The New York Times Congress Eric
"turtle mountain reservation" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

08:14 min | 1 year ago

"turtle mountain reservation" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

"Com check everything out there and we appreciate them very much for being an advertiser here on absolutely native opinion. All Right Well, we have a little bit of listening feedback. We do think this is from listener jol. We haven't heard from Joel a while we have in this is this is pretty sad stuff right here. and Joel says hello brothers. Sorry. I. Haven't been in touch for awhile and it's OK brother we understand Oh yeah. Life gets in the way because. We've we've been good just busy with live APP. See there you go. But just in case you guys haven't seen this yet I'm going to paste a gofundme me link for this man's family to cover his funeral expenses and hopefully end up with some extra money to help with their kids. That now does not have a father. I'll paste article link as whale which he did. Thank you. A COP on Turtle Mountain res- killed a native man for little backstory as to what Joel was talking about. I just know it's partner and two children need some help. It's really sad it's it's depressing man. Every day it seems like the cops kill native or black person. Like people. That have their backs turned in no weapons, but anyway, guys take care and the link will be posted in the show notes. Yeah. Let me let me give you guys a little bit of this year Turtle citizen killed on Turtle Mountain Reservation. Officers suspended. So we gotta be. Officer involved. In the family is left in the dark and what they mean by that is they're not giving up any information. Atypical kind of stuff. re real brief here it says the FBI is investigating the fatal shooting of a Turtle Mountain man by police officers last weekend on the Turtle Mountain Indian reservation and Belcourt North Dakota the man who was killed as being identified as Brandon lead sewer thirty. Turned to mountain tribal citizen from Belcourt he was a father of two children a boy in a girl. In, an email to native news online who published this article? FBI spokesperson, Kevin Smith shared that an officer involved shooting or O. I s happened at private at a private residence in Belcourt late Saturday night August twenty second and into the early morning hours of Sunday August twenty third. The FBI was called to respond to Elias and the north. Dakota Bureau of Criminal Investigation assisted with processing the scene according to the email. The FBI reported the law enforcement agencies involved in the incident where the Bureau of Indian Affairs the Rolette County Sheriff's Office, the Rolette Police Department and the. In the roller police departments. phone calls to the Rolette County Sheriff's Department here. Here's here's where here's where it goes off the rails and and. The spin begins okay. This is phone calls to the role Rolette County Sheriff's department the Rolette Police Department, and the role of police. Department were referred to the Turtle Mountain Chippewa Tribal Office. So they're like you guys. Go Talk to them. So, then the receptionist there at at the phone number provided for the Bureau of Indian affairs at a sorry that receptionist at backing up here at Turtle Mountain Chippewa Tribal Office there receptionist shared a phone number. Excuse me with the Bureau of Indian Affairs Turtle Mountain Agency. To be a stated over the phone that any questions should be directed. So here's another deflection directed to the FBI field office in Minneapolis nearly five hundred miles away and shared the phone number of the FBI's Minneapolis Minnesota field office. So. If you're if you're a family member and you're trying to get information about this case, they're going over there. No, you don't talk to us. You Talk to those people over there and hop this stuff around absolutely inexcusable. and. The rest of this will be in the show notes but our hearts go out to the family. It's crazy. Crazy. Crazy. We have a couple of acknowledgments I'm sorry we finished I am done I'm sorry I was just going to say we don't have any voicemail this week you guys but but thank you. Couplet knowledge we want to express our deepest condolences. To the family of actor, Chadwick? Boltzmann. Who played several is in Hollywood movies. which includes Baseball Great Jackie Robinson James Brown in most recently marvel's Black Panther. Mr Bozeman passed away after a four year long battle of colon cancer. He will be deeply missed. Yes indeed. It was. That was shocking to hear this morning. I was trying to finish some touch up on for the show no boom this news came down so. I didn't even know he was sick. I anoint battling cancer. Nope, most pie from what I've been reading most people didn't know it wasn't something that he you know publicized. Sure. Widely, just you know kept trucking right along with life doing what you wanted to do and supposed to. Yep. Yeah and It's. Can't cancer the tough thing is how I lost My other father might my wife's dad died of stomach cancer and so I I I, I understand that battle very very well. so Again our thoughts, prayers and everything going out down to the family for sure right? Absolutely. On a lighter note. I want to say Happy Birthday to Silver Wolf. Silver Wolf is my father. Who Turns Seventy eight today? And we're going to be going over there shortly. Hug Kim with masks on because I can't stand not being allowed my parents. So. Birthday CER-. Yes and they will be wearing masks as well. We always, we always take precautions because we're in their home and their. For most of us, it's our sanctuary. We try to keep her homes the safest possible from code. So. So Happy Birthday Dad. Appreciate. Yes. Yes. Absolutely worry great man. Thank. There were times as a teenager, my brother, my biological brothers and chat today in good morning everybody in chat. He'll tell you. How? Challenging Boulevard could be for our parents. There were. There were moments as we say. That anyway, maybe one day we'll share stories I don't know I like to hear some of those stories. So. We'll see. We'll? You know some of them brother but the well that's true. But there's many of. You know. Just how it goes? All right. Why don't we get into native news on this is GonNa? Be Kind of extended a little bit today but but go ahead and kick us off if you will brother yeah no problem. Thank you. Okay at first Article I, just shake my head and laugh that's that's all you can do at this point Yip. Republicans Open Presidential Convention. I can't even call it that it's not. A clown slash dog and pony show that's what it was. With familiar anti-tribal messages from fool in the White House and my words and this was. Written by AC ago, for Indians Dot Com..

FBI Turtle Mountain Turtle Mountain Chippewa Triba Bureau of Indian Affairs Turtl Rolette Police Department Bureau of Indian Affairs Joel Turtle Mountain Reservation Rolette County Sheriff's Depar Officer Rolette County Sheriff Belcourt Dakota Bureau of Criminal Inve Rolette County Sheriff's Offic Belcourt North Dakota partner colon cancer Minneapolis Yip Republicans
Red Lake Nation election includes measure on marijuana

Native America Calling

03:59 min | 1 year ago

Red Lake Nation election includes measure on marijuana

"The National Native News. I'm Antonio Gonzalez. The Red Lake Nation in Minnesota is holding an election. Wednesday citizens are being asked whether or not the tribal council should legalize the production regulation and distribution a medical marijuana. Voters will also pick four tribal council representatives. Absentee ballots are available in a video message. Monday chairman Darrell. Zeki informed the community in person voting will be held as the tribe is under covert nineteen emergency orders as a Monday. There were no positive cases of Cova. Nineteen on the reservation. The North Dakota Department of Transportation will be at five reservations this week to provide photo identification cards. Which can be used for voting the? Id's will be issued to North Dakota residents who do not have a driver's license or ID the non driver ID card is free to people. Eighteen and older and will be mailed to residents within five days. The first event is Tuesday on the Turtle Mountain reservation. The Transportation Department is asking people to take Cova nineteen precautions including wearing a mask. The events are being held as the states. At June primary nears the business arm of the Cherokee Nation announced plans Monday to address safety measures to Reopen Casinos. The plan includes enhanced cleaning temperature checks for employees and guests and the suspension of buffets and banquets the tribe operates ten entertainment destinations in Oklahoma. A date for reopening casinos was not announced but the tribal government has started a semi opening with more phases to reopen throughout the summer. Meanwhile a number of other tribes in Oklahoma have already opened their casinos with Cova nineteen safety precautions in Juneau Alaska. A weaver has created a piece of art to reflect Cova Nineteen. The cat weaving documents history and stories as owes Elizabeth Jenkins reports lily. Hope is a weaver. And she's been busy creating a commission. Chilcott blanket a process which can take upwards of two years but recently she made something else on a much tighter deadline at home after she learned about an opportunity to create art about. What's going on right now. In early April First American art magazine sent a call out for indigenous artists to create masks similar to the ones worn prevent the spread of Cova Nineteen. It was so intense to weave it on my floor with my children around me. Her piece is called. Chill cat protector. It's made from Merino Wool. And Cedar Bark Warp. To ermine tails grease the cheeks. The mask covers the nose and the mouth in their place are the distinct ovoid shapes of the chill cat face an expression. That's confident and reassuring. The Mask isn't something to be worn in the grocery store. It's a work of art. Reflective of survival hope says it also represents foundational thinking to clink it Haida and Simpson people and really like my aunt set at the best that the musk's serves to record that we took care of each other during this time. The pieces received an enthusiastic response online and hope proceed. Judge's Choice Award from first American art magazine and while she was happy her mask was recognized in the exhibition. She thinks the art world still has a ways to go until fully accepts. Chilcott weaving into the fold. A carved mask wins over the beadwork over the quilt work over the weaving. And I I love I American art for putting it into the world but I'm like that is the constant conversation. Men's work is fine art and recognized as best of show and women's work is still hustling to catch up. But she'll CAPRA. Tekere seems to be changing that. The Burke Museum in Seattle recently acquired it and hope says for the first time in her career. She's created a commission calendar for other museums. Which have shown interest in her weaving another Cova? Nineteen inspired mask. I'm Elizabeth Jenkins and demand. Tony Elkins all

Cova American Art Magazine Elizabeth Jenkins Oklahoma North Dakota Department Of Tra Antonio Gonzalez Red Lake Nation Marijuana Transportation Department National Native News Minnesota Burke Museum North Dakota ID Tekere Zeki Cherokee Nation Chairman Chilcott
"turtle mountain reservation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:39 min | 1 year ago

"turtle mountain reservation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is fresh AIR weekend I'm Dave Davies in for Terry gross our guest today is author Louise Erdrich in a career going back to the nineteen seventies she's published seventeen novels and more than thirty books at all including children's literature poetry and non fiction she won the National Book Award and the national book critics circle award for fiction twice rhetoric is a member of the turtle mountain band of Chippewa Indians and much of her writing is centered on the experience of native Americans her new novel is set in nineteen fifty three and is inspired by her grandfather's role in resisting a congressional effort to withdraw federal recognition for her family's tribe the book is called the night watchman Louise Erdrich welcome back to fresh AIR it's been a while thank you you know you say in the acknowledgments to this novel that you try to write several books before getting underway on this one and that your impetus had disintegrated you kind of weren't getting anywhere which is kind of a shock to me considering how prolific you have been what should you loose and get you started on this book I went back to reading my grandfather's letters which were written during the year I was born in nineteen fifty four so of course those years are somewhat mysterious to me and I knew that he had fought termination during that time but I never put together his letters and the details of what it was like for him to work as a night watchman I never put that together with the time line for the termination bill and what effect it had on the first five tribes slated to be terminated a lot of this story is about this effort which your grandfather lead in which the main character in your book Thomas leads which was this effort to oppose an initiative in the United States Congress to effectively kind of terminate the existence of the turtle mountain band of Chippewa which he was chairman of you want to just explain what this proposal was what its impact would have been termination was way to finally resolve what Congress thought of this the Indian problem and that would be to move everyone off reservation land because it wouldn't be reservation land anymore turn over their land seller land moved everyone to cities and the most important part in doing that was to abrogate all treaties in these trees have been made since the beginning of our country on a nation to nation basis with every tried and they all contain these words as long as the grass grows as long as the rivers flow so the original intent and purpose was to guarantee the land that was agreed upon by the two parties the two nations those were thrown out the window by both houses of Congress and to simply declare the existence of Indians or native American or American Indians a non non issue and to not recognize tribal nations and to terminate all federal assistance into the terminator Aladdin was wrecked to terminate all federal assistance and all federal recognition of who indigenous people are and where the reason for termination was not just to get rid of the Indian problem but to to acquire the lands that in many cases were covered with some of the most beautiful stands of virgin forest in the country so the first tribe slated for termination with the Menominee and the Klamath and the intent because of the post war housing boom wants to get those big stands of timber which they did you know for those of you who don't know your story as well tell us just a bit about your own background and your connection to this the turtle mountain band of Chippewa I will so my mother is turtle mountain Chippewa as was my grandfather and so my I am an enrolled member a citizen of the turtle mountain band of Chippewa it would be impossible for me to say that if termination had indeed won the day so my father is German I'm a very makes person and yet being a citizen of a nation with in our nation give this one a certain sense of it it changes your life it means that I I care deeply about my people my mother's people and I grew up knowing who I was and accepting all parts of myself and this is a part that I realized would not have existed had my grandfather not fought for it did you grow up speaking is it is it jeep with a language that that supports me it's a cheap way Melin ordination optimal line or at the time that my grandfather was speaking at just plain ship what I didn't grow up he was the last fluent speaker in the family and I am very proud to say my daughter is the next fluent speaker because she is teaching at an on chip weight immersion school water could hiding in Wisconsin on the on the career reservation at art art or Chippewa and Ojibwe synonymous with the different terms for the center yes they're all versions of the original word in addition I pay you grew up in Minnesota is that right did not on a reservation right no I grew up in Wahpeton North Dakota okay I'm sorry that's not that's that's on the on the border of the Sisseton Dakota reservation it used to be within the borders but I didn't grow up on the turtle mountain reservation I was visiting grand child right and you're but did your parents both teach and bureau of Indian affairs schools have this yet my mother and my father taught at the same school that my grandfather attended while putting school on Martin you know that that brings us to a reading I'd like you to to share with us this is a bit of history and I guess it talks about sort of well maybe you can set this up is about when your grandfather ended up going away to school if you want to set this up and give us this reading from her book sure the former grandfather went to the Wahpeton boarding school he went to school that was somewhat closer fort Totten it's not a spirit lake now and in that time one thing for sure was that every classroom was decorated with flags flags were everywhere this had been a former military fort turned into a boarding school for children so it was still run in his time as a military school and this is about when he leaves for school and this is a very common experience for children who laughed it was hot it was known that they would have to have there have their heads shaved their hair cut and that was one of the things that was most difficult for children and for their parents because there was personal and in many cases are many tribes many families allowing your hair to grow long was a symbol of your long life cutting your hair it is a symbol of grief so for that to happen was always very disturbing for the family that year his father was gaunt his cheekbones jutting out Thomas was always hungry they were down to desperation food then a bit of a panic smeared with dear fat the day schools on the reservation gave out just one meal the government boarding school would feed three meals for Totton boarding school was a day's wegen right if you started well before dawn Thomas's mother Julia or a one wept and hit her face as he went away she had been torn whether to cut his hair herself they would cut his hair off at the school and to cut hair meant someone had died it was a way of grieving just before they left she took a knife to his braid she would hang it in the woods so the government would not be able to keep him so that he would come home and he had come home and that is our guest Louise Erdrich reading from her new novel the night watchman you know what's striking about this is that people often send their kids away to school for opportunity the impetus was really starvation the impetus was starvation and the reasoning behind the best schools being far away was to assimilate native children to train them to live in a culture that was very different from their parents so that when they came home often children couldn't speak the language that their parents were speaking I have to say right here that boarding schools are often characterized in sort of a lump definition but they were all very different and the government had secular boarding schools which underwent a real sea change in the nineteen thirties and became much more supportive of native culture while many of the boarding schools which were run by religious groups did not and remained hostile to native religion in native culture Louise Erdrich new book is the night watchman we'll talk more after a break and John powers will review the new Brazilian movie Pakal row which he says is at once a portrait of community the horror thriller and a timely piece of political filmmaking I'm Dave Davies and this is fresh AIR weekend.

Dave Davies Louise Erdrich Terry
"turtle mountain reservation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

13:18 min | 1 year ago

"turtle mountain reservation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In for Terry gross our guest today is author Louise drank in a career going back to the nineteen seventies she's published seventeen novels and more than thirty books and all including children's literature poetry and non fiction she won the National Book Award and the national book critics circle award for fiction twice rhetoric is a member of the turtle mountain band of Chippewa Indians and much of her writing is centered on the experience of native Americans her new novel is set in nineteen fifty three and is inspired by her grandfather's role in resisting a congressional effort to withdraw federal recognition for her family's tribe the book is called the night watchman the Louise Erdrich welcome back to fresh AIR it's been a while thank you you know you say in the acknowledgments to this novel that you try to write several books before getting underway on this one and that your impetus had disintegrated you kind of weren't getting anywhere which is kind of a shock to me considering how prolific you have been what should you loose and get you started on this book I went back to reading my grandfather's letters which were written during the year I was born in nineteen fifty four so of course those years are somewhat mysterious to me and I knew that he had termination during that time but I never put together his letters and the details of what it was like for him to work as a night watchman I never put that together with the time line for the termination bill and what effect it had on the first five tribes slated to be terminated a lot of this story is about this effort which your grandfather lead in which the main character in your book Thomas leads which was this effort to oppose an initiative in the United States Congress to effectively kind of terminate the existence of the turtle mountain band of Chippewa which he was chairman of you want to just explain what this proposal was what its impact would have been termination was way to finally resolve the what Congress thought of this the Indian problem and that would be to move everyone off reservation land because it wouldn't be reservation land anymore turn over their land seller land move everyone to cities and the most important part in doing that was to abrogate all trees and these trees have been made since the beginning of our country on a nation to nation basis with every tried and they all contain these words as long as the grass grows as long as the rivers flow so the original intent and purpose was to guarantee the land that was that was agreed upon by the two parties the two nations those were thrown out the window by both houses of Congress and to simply on the clear the existence of Indians or native American or American Indians a non non issue and to not recognize tribal nations and to terminate all federal assistance to the terminator allegro wrecked to terminate all federal assistance and all federal recognition of who a native American indigenous indigenous people are and more the reason for termination was not just to get rid of the problem that they the the Indian problem but to to acquire the lands that in many cases were covered with some of the most beautiful stands of virgin forest in the country so the first tribe slated for termination with the Menominee and the Klamath and the intent because of the hope because of the post war housing boom wants to get those big stands of timber which they did and we should note that the resolution couch this as the emancipation of the trucks right yes so that was the thing that was so hard to grasp I mean people had come out of government boarding school learning some English for instance my grandfather who who wrote letters which I found later at the plains archives wrote letters to get into boarding school only finished the eighth grade and he was he was tribal chairman of the time and he had to assemble a delegation and go up against Congress within a matter of months in order to try and save his tribe and from termination which meant all the land would be lost because that would be all they would have to sell right this is a remarkable part of the story is fictional but this part of it is true he is absolutely true and honest way to cation assembled this group and wrote letters and yeah I couldn't be more true that's what started it I couldn't believe it knowing what he went through has the night watchman trying to stay awake all night and by day writing letters going to meetings five traveling around the state of North Dakota where ever he could doing whatever he could to assemble a delegation I I couldn't believe what his life was like he said he he had twelve hours of sleep most weeks well you know for those of you who don't know your story as well tell us just a bit about your own background and your connection to this the turtle mountain band of Chippewa I will so my mother is turtle mountain Chippewa as was my grandfather and so my I am an enrolled member a citizen of the turtle mountain band of Chippewa it would be impossible for me to say that if termination had indeed won the day so my father is German I'm a very next person and yet being a citizen of a nation with in our nation give this one a certain sense of okay it it changes your life it means that I I care deeply about my people my mother's people and I grew up knowing who I was and accepting all parts of myself and this is the part that I realized would not have existed had my grandfather not fought for it did you grow up speaking is it is it jeep with a language that that supports me it's a cheap way Melin Ornish not a moment or at the time that my grandfather was speaking at just plain ship what I didn't grow up he was the last fluent speaker in the family and I am very proud to say my daughter is the next fluent speaker because she is teaching at an on chip way immersion school water could hiding in Wisconsin on the on the career reservation at art art or Chippewa and Ojibwe synonymous with all the different terms for the center yes they're all versions of the original word initially not pay you grew up in Minnesota is that right did not on a reservation right no I grew up in Wahpeton North Dakota okay I'm sorry that's not that's that's on the on the border of the Sisseton Dakota reservation it used to be within the borders but I didn't grow up on the turtle mountain reservation I was visiting grand child right and you're but did your parents both teach and bureau of Indian affairs schools would have to do it my mother and my father taught at the same school that my grandfather attended while putting school on Martin you know that that brings us to a reading I'd like you to to share with us this is a bit of history and I guess it talks about sort of well maybe you can set this up is about when your grandfather ended up going away to school if you want to set this up and give us this reading from your book sure the Formica and father went to the Wahpeton boarding school he went to school that was somewhat closer fort Totten it's not a spirit lake now and in that time one thing for sure was that every classroom was decorated with flags flags were everywhere this had been a former military fort turned into a boarding school for children so it was still run in his time as a military school and this is about when he leaves for school and this is a very common experience for children who laughed it was hot it was known that they would have to there have their heads shaved their hair cut and that was one of the things that was most difficult for children and for their parents because there was personal and in many cases are many tribes many families allowing your hair to grow long was a symbol of your long life cutting your hair it is a symbol of grief so for that to happen was always very disturbing for the family that year his father was gaunt his cheekbones jutting out Thomas was always hungry they were down to desperation food then a bit of panic smeared with dear fat the day schools on the reservation gave out just one meal the government boarding school would feed three meals for Titan boarding school was a day's wegen right if you started well before dawn Thomas's mother Julia or all one wept and hit her face as he went away she had been torn whether to cut his hair herself they would cut his hair off at the school and to cut hair meant someone had died it was a way of grieving just before they left she took a knife to his braid she would hang it in the woods so the government would not be able to keep him so that he would come home and he had come home and that is our guest Louise Erdrich reading from her new novel the night watchman you know what's striking about this is that people often send their kids away to school for opportunity the impetus was really starvation the emphasis was starvation and the reasoning behind the best schools being far away was to assimilate native children to train them to live in a culture that was very different from their parents so that when they came home often children couldn't speak the language that their parents were speaking I have to say right here that boarding schools are often characterized in sort of a lump definition but they were all very different and the government had secular boarding schools which underwent a real sea change in the nineteen thirties and became much more supportive of native culture while many of the boarding schools which were run by religious groups did not and remained hostile to native religion in native culture Louise Erdrich is our guest her new novel is the night watchman we'll continue our conversation in just a moment this is fresh AIR this is fresh AIR and we're speaking with writer Louise Erdrich she has a new novel the night watchman you know it's interesting when Thomas the character in this book does does your grandfather did and write a lot of letters to local and state and national elected officials and eventually organizer group to go to Washington to testify in Congress against the so called emancipation bill one of the chief backers of the bill was a senator from Utah Arthur Watkins you wanna just tell us a bit about him and his role in all this our third V..

Terry Louise
"turtle mountain reservation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:48 min | 1 year ago

"turtle mountain reservation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Temperatures today seventies to around eighty inland clear tonight in the bay area then partly cloudy maybe some patchy fog after midnight clear tonight in the Sacramento Valley lows forty four to fifty another sunny day on the way tomorrow this is fresh AIR I'm Dave Davies in for Terry gross our guest today is author Louise drank in a career going back to the nineteen seventies she's published seventeen novels and more than thirty books in all including children's literature poetry and non fiction she won the National Book Award and the national book critics circle award for fiction twice rhetoric is a member of the turtle mountain band of Chippewa Indians and much of her writing is centered on the experience of native Americans her new novel is set in nineteen fifty three and is inspired by her grandfather's role in resisting a congressional effort to withdraw federal recognition for her family's tribe the book is called the night watchman the Louise Erdrich welcome back to fresh AIR it's been a while thank you you know you say in the acknowledgments to this novel that you try to write several books before getting underway on this one and that your impetus had disintegrated you kind of weren't getting anywhere which is kind of a shock to me considering how prolific you have been what should you loose and get you started on this book I went back to reading my grandfather's letters which were written during the year I was born in nineteen fifty four so of course those years are somewhat mysterious to me and I knew that he had bought termination during that time but I never put together his letters and the details of what it was like for him to work as a night watchman I never put that together with the time line for the termination bill and what effect it had on the first five tribes slated to be terminated a lot of this story is about this effort which your grandfather lead in which the main character in your book Thomas leads which was this effort to oppose an initiative in the United States Congress to effectively kind of terminate the existence of the turtle mountain band of Chippewa which he was chairman of you want to just explain what this proposal was what its impact would have been termination was way to finally resolve the went Congress thought of this the Indian problem and that would be to move everyone off reservation land because it wouldn't be reservation land anymore turn over their land seller land moved everyone to cities and the most important part in doing that was to abrogate all trees and these trees have been made since the beginning of our country on a nation to nation basis with every tried and they all contain these words as long as the grass grows as long as the rivers flow so the original intent and purpose was to guarantee the land that was that was agreed upon by the two parties the two nations those were thrown out the window by both houses of Congress and to simply on the clear the existence of Indians or native American or American Indians a non non issue and to not recognize tribal nations and to terminate all federal assistance into the termination of a lateral wrecked to terminate all federal assistance and all federal recognition of who a native American indigenous indigenous people are and more the reason for termination was not just to get rid of the problem that they leave the Indian problem but to to acquire the lands that in many cases were covered with some of the most beautiful stands of virgin forest in the country so the first tribe slated for termination with the Menominee and the Klamath and the intent because of the hope because of the post war housing boom wants to get those big stands of timber which they did and we should note that the resolution couch this as the emancipation of the tracks right yes so that was the thing that was so hard to grasp I mean people had come out of government boarding school learning some English for instance my grandfather who who wrote letters which I found later at the plains archives wrote letters to get into boarding school only finished the eighth grade and he was he was tribal chairman of the time and he had to assemble a delegation and go up against Congress within a matter of months in order to try and save his tribe and from termination which meant all the land would be lost because that would be all they would have to sell right this is a remarkable part of the story is fictional but this part of it is true he is absolutely true and honest way to cation assembled this group and wrote letters and couldn't be more true that's what started it I couldn't believe it knowing what he went through has the night watchman trying to stay awake all night and by day writing letters going to meetings five traveling around the state of North Dakota where ever he could doing whatever he could to assemble a delegation I I couldn't believe what his life was like he said he he had twelve hours of sleep most weeks well you know for those of you who don't know your story as well tell us just a bit about your own background and your connection to this the turtle mountain band of Chippewa I will so my mother is turtle mountain Chippewa as was my grandfather and so my I am an enrolled member a citizen of the turtle mountain band of Chippewa it would be impossible for me to say that if termination had indeed won the day so my father is German I'm a very next person and yet being a citizen of a nation with in our nation give this one a certain sense of okay it it changes your life it means that I care deeply about my people my mother's people and I grew up knowing who I was and accepting all parts of myself and this is the part that I realized would not have existed had my grandfather not fought for it did you grow up speaking is it is it jeep with a language that that supports me it's a cheap way Melin Ornish not a moment or at the time that my grandfather was speaking at just plain ship walk I didn't grow up he was the last fluent speaker in the family and I am very proud to say my daughter is the next fluent speaker because she is teaching at an on chip weight immersion school water could hiding in Wisconsin under liquid re reservation at art art or Chippewa and Ojibwe synonymous with the different terms for the center yes they're all versions of the original word initially not pay you grew up in Minnesota is that right did not on a reservation right no I grew up in Wahpeton North Dakota okay I'm sorry that's not that's that's on the on the border of the Sisseton Dakota reservation it used to be within the borders but I didn't grow up on the turtle mountain reservation I was visiting grand child right and you're but did your parents both teach and bureau of Indian affairs schools would have to do it my mother and my father taught at the same school that my grandfather attended while putting school on Martin you know that that brings us to a reading I'd like you to to share with us this is a bit of history and I guess it talks about sort of well maybe you can set this up is about when your grandfather ended up going away to school if you want to set this up and give us this reading from her book sure before my grandfather went to the Wahpeton boarding school he went to school that was somewhat closer fort Totten it's not a spirit lake now and in that time one thing for sure was that every classroom was decorated with flags flags were everywhere this had been a former military fort turned into a boarding school for children so it was still run in his time as a military school and this is about when he leaves for school and this is a very common experience for children who laughed it was it was known that they would have to there had their heads shaved their hair cut and that was one of the things that was most difficult for children and for their parents because there was personal and in many cases are many tribes many families allowing your hair to grow long was a symbol of your long life cutting your hair it is a symbol of grief so for that to happen was always very disturbing for the family that year his father was gaunt his cheek bones jutting out Thomas was always hungry they were down to desperation food then a bit of a panic smeared with dear fat the day schools on the reservation gave out just one meal the government boarding school would feed three meals for Titan boarding school was a day's wegen right if you started well before dawn Thomas's mother Julia or all one wept and hit her face as he went away she had been torn whether to cut his hair herself they would cut his hair off at the school and to cut hair meant someone had died it was a way of grieving just before they left she took a knife to his parade she would hang it in the woods so the government would not be able to keep him so that he would come home and he had come home and that is our guest Louise Erdrich reading from her new novel the night watchman you know what striking about this is that people often send their kids away to school for opportunity the impetus was really starvation the emphasis was starvation and the reasoning behind the best schools being far away was to assimilate native children to train them to live in a culture that was very different from their parents so that when they came home often children couldn't speak the language that their parents were speaking I have to say right here that boarding schools are often characterized in sort of a lump definition but they were all very different and the government had secular boarding schools which underwent a real sea change in the nineteen thirties and became much more supportive of native culture while many of the boarding schools which were run by religious groups did not and remained hostile to native religion in native culture Louise Erdrich is our guest her new novel is the night watchman we'll continue our conversation in just a moment this is fresh AIR support for KQ weedy comes from Alonzo king lines ballet presenting their spring season grace for decades of creation April tenth through nineteenth fed why BC tickets available now at lines ballet dot org.

Sacramento Valley
"turtle mountain reservation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:49 min | 1 year ago

"turtle mountain reservation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"O. O. M. A. dot com the Supreme Court a major challenge to abortion rights advocates say the arguments offered by abortion opponents are a wolf in sheep's clothing well the state of Louisiana says the wolf is the doctors these are not safe places we'll look at the case and the results from super Tuesday this afternoon and all things considered from NPR news weekdays starting at four on W. NYC this is fresh AIR I'm Dave Davies in for Terry gross our guest today is author Louise drank in a career going back to the nineteen seventies she's published seventeen novels and more than thirty books in all including children's literature poetry and non fiction she won the National Book Award and the national book critics circle award for fiction twice verdict is a member of the turtle mountain band of Chippewa Indians and much of her writing is centered on the experience of native Americans her new novel is set in nineteen fifty three and is inspired by her grandfather's role in resisting a congressional effort to withdraw federal recognition for her family's tribe the book is called the night watchman the Louise Erdrich welcome back to fresh AIR it's been a while thank you you know you say in the acknowledgments to this novel that you try to write several books before getting underway on this one and that your impetus had disintegrated you kind of weren't getting anywhere which is kind of a shock to me considering how prolific you have been what should you loose and get you started on this book I went back to reading my grandfather's letters which were written during the year I was born in nineteen fifty four so of course those years are somewhat mysterious to me and I knew that he had fought termination during that time but I never put together his letters and the details of what it was like for him to work as a night watchman I never put that together with the time line for the termination bill and what effect it had on the first five tribes slated to be terminated a lot of this story is about this effort which your grandfather lead in which the main character in your book Thomas leads which was this effort to oppose an initiative in the United States Congress to effectively kind of terminate the existence of the turtle mountain band of Chippewa which she was chairman of you want to just explain what this proposal was what its impact would have been termination was way to finally resolve the what Congress thought of this the Indian problem and that would be to move everyone off reservation land because it wouldn't be reservation land anymore turn over their land seller land moved everyone to cities and the most important part in doing that was to abrogate all treaties in these trees have been made since the beginning of our country on a nation to nation basis with every tribe and they all contain these words as long as the grass grows as long as the rivers flow so the original intent and purpose was to guarantee the land that was that was agreed upon by the two parties the two nations those were thrown out the window by both houses of Congress and to simply declare the existence of Indians or native American or American Indians a non non issue and to not recognize tribal nations and to terminate all federal system to to the to terminate trilateral wrecked to terminate all federal assistance and all federal recognition of who a native American indigenous indigenous people are and more the reason for termination was not just to get rid of the problem that they the the Indian problem but to to acquire the lands that in many cases were covered with some of the most beautiful stands of virgin forest in the country so the first tribe slated for termination with the Menominee and the Klamath and the intent because of the hope because of the post war housing boom wants to get those big stands of timber which they did and we should note that the resolution couch this as the emancipation of the tracks right yes so that was the thing that was so hard to grasp I mean people had come out of government boarding school learning some English for instance my grandfather who who wrote letters which I found later at the plains archives wrote letters to get into boarding school only finished the eighth grade and he was he was tribal chairman of the time and he had to assemble a delegation and go up against Congress within a matter of months in order to try and save his tribe and from termination which meant all the land would be lost because that would be all they would have to sell right this is a remarkable part of the story is fictional but this part of it is true okay it's absolutely true and what a nice way to cation assembled this group and wrote letters and yeah it couldn't be more true that's what started it I couldn't believe it knowing what he went through it has the night watchman trying to stay awake all night and by day writing letters going to meetings five traveling around the state of North Dakota where ever he could doing whatever he could to assemble a delegation I I couldn't believe what his life was like he said he he had twelve hours of sleep most weeks well you know for those of you who don't know your story as well tell us just a bit about your own background and your connection to this the turtle mountain band of Chippewa I will so my mother is turtle mountain Chippewa as was my grandfather and so my I am an enrolled member a citizen of the turtle mountain band of Chippewa it would be impossible for me to say that if termination had indeed won the day so my father is German I'm a very next person and yet being a citizen of a nation with in our nation give this one a certain sense of it it changes your life it means that I I care deeply about my people my mother's people and I grew up knowing who I was and accepting all parts of myself and this is a part that I realized would not have existed had my grandfather not fought for it did you grow up speaking is it is it jeep with a language that that supports me it's a cheap way Melin ordination optimal when or at the time that my grandfather was speaking at just plain ship what I didn't grow up he was the last fluent speaker in the family and I am very proud to say my daughter is the next fluent speaker because she is teaching at an on chip way immersion school water could hiding in Wisconsin under liquid ray reservation at art art or Chippewa and Ojibwe synonymous with the different terms for the center yes they're all versions of the original word initially not pay you some grew up in Minnesota is that right did not on a reservation right no I grew up in Wahpeton North Dakota okay I'm sorry that's not that's that's on the on the border of the Sisseton Dakota reservation it used to be within the borders but I didn't grow up on the turtle mountain reservation I was visiting grand child right and you're but did your parents both teach and bureau of Indian affairs schools have yet my mother and my father taught at the same school that my grandfather attended while putting school on Martin you know that that brings us to a reading I'd like you to to share with us this is a bit of history and I guess it talks about sort of well maybe you can set this up is about when your grandfather ended up going away to school if you want to just set this up and give us this reading from her book sure the former grandfather went to the Wahpeton boarding school he went to school that was somewhat closer fort Totten it's not a spirit lake now and in that time one thing for sure was that every classroom was decorated with flags flags were everywhere this had been a former military fort turned into a boarding school for children so it was still run in his time as a military school and this is about when he leaves for school and this is a very common experience for children who laughed it was Sarah it was known that they would have to there had their heads shaved their hair cut and that was one of the things that was most difficult for children and for their parents because there was personal and in many cases are many tribes many families allowing your hair to grow long was a symbol of your long life cutting your hair it is a symbol of grief so for that to happen was always very disturbing mmhm for the family that year his father was gaunt his cheek bones jutting out Thomas was always hungry they were down to desperation food then a bit of a panic smeared with dear fat the day schools on the reservation gave out just one meal the government boarding school would feed three meals for Titan boarding school was a day's wegen right if you started well before dawn Thomas's mother Julia or one wept and hit her face as he went away she had been torn whether to cut his hair herself they would cut his hair off at the school and to cut hair meant someone had died it was a way of grieving just before they left she took a knife to his braid she would hang it in the woods so the government would not be able to keep him so that he would come home and he had come home and that is our guest Louise Erdrich reading from her new novel the night watchman you know what's striking about this is that people often send their kids away to school for opportunity the impetus Fisher was really starvation the impetus was starvation and the reasoning behind the best schools being far away was to assimilate native children to train them to live in a culture that was very different from their parents so that when they came home often children couldn't speak the language that their parents were speaking I have to say right here that boarding schools are often characterized in sort of a lump definition but they were all very different and the government had secular boarding schools which underwent a real sea change in the nineteen thirties and became much more supportive of native culture while many of the boarding schools which were run by religious groups did not and remained hostile to native religion in native culture Louise Erdrich is our guest her new novel is the night watchman we'll continue our conversation in just a moment this is fresh AIR.

O. O. M. Supreme Court Louisiana
"turtle mountain reservation" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

16:43 min | 1 year ago

"turtle mountain reservation" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

"People. Yeah what people. I want people the next day. The move back to North Dakota why. I don't know weird economy that can get a job there in late. Nineteen fifty-two Leonard's grandfather died of pneumonia. The family struggled and in Nineteen fifty-three landed resentenced to wop Heaton Indian school. Aw We've never done an episode Indian schools but essentially they put a native American the long weird hair here. That's not yours chin. That's my ears. Okay essentially it was to completely strip them of their native American that should not because Indian school forced assimilation indoctrination nation to white American culture by forbidding any native American in culture upon arriving I mean that is so that really is like I mean it's been done in history it's slow at slow erosion of this shit but it's so you I mean were you around in England when you were a kid when they he would not say the names of Irish things on the television and it would just be not lame enough to remember I was I think when they talked about the IRA you are or they certainly do not allow Irish to speak their native tongue right So it would it would just be a blank nothing happening on the TV V.. Like I it's it's historical. It's been going on forever. You don't let people speak lanes you don't let them have their culture and you break them. Same thing they did in Wales breaking the cycle except in this way. It's your personal history upon arriving quote Our heads were cut military style. Next week was cut cut. Okay heads. He's head yeah. I just want to clarify because otherwise military style head cut. Seeing the looks of those is not great. Isn't that a great look next we were stripped and DDT was poured us. Jesus Christ and then we were marched in a line to wait for turn to shower. This is a school. Yup if there was any dirt or dead skin in left when we were finished we were turned around and given a few hard wax with a school roll ruler and told to go re wash so essentially prison prison. Yes right right it sounds like prison. Yeah but again. The family cannot feed their kids and they feel the only thing they can do but arrive to send them to. The students were beaten for climbing trees. Jesus for making their beds too slowly and for speaking their native language right. That's cool. Yeah it is cool. That's cool because their kids. Yeah it's not scary. That's right right. After four years at a while Heaton Leonard graduated in nineteen eighteen fifty seven. He moved with his mother and in grand forks that winter they were low on fuel. And we're worried they would run out as a storm was approaching. Okay so thirteen year old Leonard and a friend drove to an army reserve depot. To steal some fuel they were caught. Siphoning fuel from trucks and Leonard spent the next two weeks in jail thirteen when he was like. This is better than school. In mid nineteen fifty-eight his father took him back to the turtle. Mountain reservation tribal meeting Leonard saw an old Jeep Aji Bois woman pleading for for someone to help because children were at home and they were slowly starving to death. Nineteen fifty eight quote. She asked if there were no more warriors among our men. She said if there was why did they not stand up and fight for the starving children that day. Leonard vowed to help us people for the rest of his life that we go by nineteen fifty-nine as part of the government's termination policy. Jesus Christ to phase out reservations Turtle Mountains Bureau of Indian Affairs announced it would stop supplying free food. Wow so it seems the opposite of a termination policy. Yeah the G.. DEBA- took the bureau of Indian Affairs Superintendent hostage in his office and the bureau relented. Glad it worked. Yeah we'll take it but this is what he's seeing right so raise a young teen and he's seeing the boot of the white man on the throat of his culture and then how you respond right right and then yeah that you can actually via violence and threats get somewhere seventeen lesson. Yeah it is very good lesson seventeen. Gene Leonard moved to Seattle when he was there he got in a fight and his job was broken. He was supposed to wear a brace but he didn't. His jaw was broken. Okay Okay and then when he was partying and he got into another fight no and his house broken again. It's fixed only. She fixed it quote but this time the muscle didn't heal properly and my jaw came out kind of stiff. Yeah the rest of his life is jaws. A little stiff letter joined the Marines to fight in Vietnam Viet Nam okay but he was discharged his jaw now okay. I didn't actually dig into that but I'm betting it was a financial thing I just can't imagine I mean maybe it wasn't the reason why joined. Yeah I just can't imagine him. Based on who I know the person is but you know may maybe I'm wrong okay. He worked as as a welder and construction worker in Seattle and by jaws getting close to that flame by nineteen sixty five the twenty year old Leonard Co owned a Seattle Auto Body Shop. He turned the second floor into a halfway house for native Americans who were struggling with alcohol and who had people who had just gotten out of prison because they're all struggling reservation. Yeah someone somebody new him. At the time and later said quote Leonard always had girls and money in his pocket because he's a real good worker and people liked him. He's always been good hearted. He just liked to laugh and tease. He's in nineteen sixty eight. President Johnson ended termination policy and began the long process of restoring sovereignty to over one hundred tribes. Okay it's there's so little there's still tribes struggling for sovereignty particularly in California A Los Angeles also I believe tried. does not have sovereignty the native tribes here That ear the American Indian movement and which I will now call a. m. was founded as leaders. Were a g blah. Dennis Banks Gwala LAKOTA. Russell means and in nineteen seventy eight letter took part in his first action a takeover of Fort Lawton outside Seattle Leonard. Thirteen others were beaten by police and arrested and then beaten again in their cells. Leonard refused to leave the jail until the others had all been released. Allow one later one later. Seventeen I really the the depth of character to do that is crazy. I'm going to be like you're free to guys like fucking he's got one later. said he was already a leader. Well we can't have brown leaders in America. Leonard attended an am meeting thing in Minnesota where Dennis Banks said if the AM wanted to be taken seriously they had to cut down on all the drinking drugs partying groupies and the quote Saturday night warriors. Okay I don't know what that is. I feel like that's like a party. Yeah Party Litter Leonard. quit drinking on the spot. Well in nineteen seventy one. He returned to Turtle Mountain but He was missing the activism and he moved with banks thanks to Los Angeles but Leonard did not like la quote. It seemed to me like kind of a jungle fair concrete one. He moved to Milwaukee to help the Indian community there with alcoholic issues. Okay I'll be using because the words he's okay just get in October. Nineteen seventy two. The am organized the trail of broken treaties while which was a car caravan from the West Coast to Washington DC to gain attention for the AM and its plan for justice from the American government. Okay Leonard was in charge charge of security in DC and when they got their president. Nixon refused to meet with the leaders so the AM occupied the bureau of Fairs the headquarters for five days. Wow seventies were great. They caused property damage and took documents. They said proved government discrimination the nation. Wow five days like today think of how long that would actually last year along with that last there were so many thirty minutes back then. Yeah no no yeah. Well I mean just in general like sit ins and shit where it was just like where you are right. They are expressing themselves. And they would let you do it and now they would like have a battering Ram and drag you out and and and you know the left the left back then. There's not well. There was a left. Yeah well I mean I think it back then you would consider a lot of Democrats the left but now I don't think you would so because they're the right. So Leonard returned to Milwaukee and on and November twenty second nineteen seventy-two Milwaukee and. Trust me in November twenty second nineteen seventy two and a French restaurant when two white men started pointing and laughing at them. I'm not from there. I didn't let it said quote. What the fuck so funny? Great As you're supposed to do when someone's pointing and laughing share you throw the pebble. Yeah the white men pulled out their guns but the guys behind view the other guys fine. Because you're laughing pointing the guys behind your orange laughing at not pointing. which is you turns out? These were plainclothes enclosed cops. But even then there's zero justification for fire you stick it to tell cops you still going to say no cop you should. You'd be able to say to Carbon America. What the fuck so funny but it will? In some instances get you killed and a lot of instances get you arrested. Wouldn't have a while ago like you could mean things. Things have changed. But I mean if you're brown you're always getting right and that is the difference but if you're white guy back then you could probably get fuck you. Hey settle down. I mean they were busing. A lot of heads you know. We're Vietnam so a letter was handcuffed and put into a paddy wagon. One of the COPS COPS started quote beating on me like a stepchild. That's not a great. I mean it's telling telling way of putting it and in all the other would be like if you went out with someone who's pounding a lot of booze you drink like a father and then all these skirmishing around my coke gets ripped open and this. It's old piece falls out hell. It was an old busted. Brenda couldn't even fire. I had just given a guy twenty bucks for it as a favor figuring I might get it fixed some time. One of the COPS claimed Leonard took it out and pull the trigger twice but it did not fire. Ladder was charged with attempted murder. The cops girlfriends now the cops go for later say day that he had previously waived a right before. This had waved a photo of Leonard at her while claiming he was going to quote. Catch a big one for the FBI. A UH Milwaukee they can catch a native American off guy eating people in his apartment by the way native American name of the town in every city their native American. They're like get him. Leonard served five months and they caught by the way some other guys got eaten after after that they could they come look come on named one clue then the naked guy running screaming please other clue. Please help me not even a guy a young team yes he yes I believe. He was Laotians. I was going to say okay. Yes okay something running in the street naked. Yeah saying please God help me. Yes and the cops laughed it off up and let has came over and said this guy's on drugs. He's been drinking. Come on you. Don't let me tell you went to college. The junior never a friend who ran down the street naked screaming. Help me help me help me. Because he was afraid of the man who had a skull shrine in his apartment. GET OVER YOURSELF MR after you can cast a lot of dispersions if you like but let me tell you something. The police force in Milwaukee was right on top Dahmer at the right time. They caught him after he ate only thirteen. Get over it. Leonard Serve Regular Chocolate factory worker worker. Leonard Serve Five months before the was able to post his bail during that time. The pineridge tribal council president president. Richard Wilson created the Guardians of the agglomeration. Okay also called goons okay a white security force on so literally goons calling the organization goons and created by a native American. WHO's in in charge will well? It's and we're seeing it now. Let's go versus young score a serious breakdown and but the idea. What is the the the native American Eric? In who he wa- He wants to have a white force authoritarianism controlling the reservation. Okay Hi seems didn't really look in them because there was a lot going on here Wilson was rabidly against the AM. Okay so the goon squad attack native America ponant opponents on the Pine Ridge Reservation This led to fighting and an armed takeover of wounded knee by am and Makoto the men and the year again. Is this fifty nine. Seventy two seventy two seventy two and what you just said was that there was a white invasion of a reservation an invasion. He just hired a bunch of we'll still like a essentially. I mean the whites already control it. They just walking on a reservation controlling it was a seventy one day standoff between basically. AM The LAKOTA The guns the tribal council and And the FBI law enforcement on the side right When Leonard got out out he headed straight for wounded knee but it ended before he arrived he did not think he was going to get justice in court for the you no fake I wanNA shoot me charge so he went to Seattle and missed his July pretrial hearing making him a few right on October Seventeenth Pedro Bissonnette who was at the takeover of wounded knee was killed by the bureau of Indian Affairs Police? Who claimed you a resisted arrest? That'll that'll chestnut the classic then October. Twenty first a car registered in Leonard's name took part in a shootout with police near Bissonnette funeral okay. To officers officers received minor injuries. The car got away so they couldn't say who was in it okay. On September Twentieth Leonard was arrested near Seattle with other. AM members charged with with possession of illegal weapons. Leonard gave a false name skipped bail and went underground. Nice Dot com remember. You.

Heaton Leonard Seattle Milwaukee America Heaton Indian school Indian school FBI North Dakota Wales Bureau of Indian Affairs Richard Wilson pneumonia bureau of Indian Affairs Polic president Turtle Mountains American Indian movement England American government Dennis Banks Gwala