18 Episode results for "Turtle Mountain Chippewa"

03-10-20 The time limit on accountability

Native America Calling

56:30 min | 1 year ago

03-10-20 The time limit on accountability

"Welcome to native America. Calling from Studio Forty Nine Albuquerque. I'm Tara Gatewood. The South Dakota legislature once again struck down a proposal to extend the statute of limitations on child. Sex Abuse Cases. Abuse survivors are among those pushing every year to remove the time limits on filing suit against organizations like the Catholic Church. Their efforts are so far unsuccessful. Coming up we'll hear about what's behind a push in what some other states are doing. We live right after national made of news. This is National Native News Amazon. Tonia Gonzales representatives from law enforcement agencies throughout New Mexico recently gathered in Albuquerque for a task force meeting on missing murdered indigenous women. Captain Aaron. Total Lena with the Gallup Police Department says it's key for law enforcement to be involved. I've been just under twenty years of law enforcement so we've come a long way from what used to be reported a longtime ago as far as the the stigma of YOU GOTTA. Wait twenty four hours. You're not a family member. Can't take the information so now the importance of that in what we're coming into the transition of that. I think it's awesome that what we're able to do now. Total Lena says jurisdiction challenges are of concern especially in border towns. Such as Gallup in our area we are surrounded by the Navajo reservation the Zuni reservation. We also are right there by the state line of Arizona and New Mexico so a lot of people come to our area Mike I said it's a place where people come to shop in. That's where the rat so they're going to want to report but then they were actually missing out of our area. We're still gonNA take that report so I think that's something that's really changed. The eleven member task forces collaborating with tribal governments law enforcement and the US Justice Department to identify barriers and improve the reporting and investigation of cases. The Task Force was established by New Mexico's governor last year and is expected to report findings to the legislature by November twenty twenty the Alaska legislature has passed a bill to establish march twelfth as Ashley Johnson Bar Day. The ten year old from cots you went missing in September two thousand eighteen and was later found sexually assaulted and murdered her case impacted communities across the state and led to calls for more to be done to address sexual assault and violence. The bill passed the House Monday. It's intended not to only remember Ashley but to raise awareness about sex abuse and help individuals and communities heal. The bill passed the Senate last month and now heads to the governor. The new at circum polar council is raising concerns about possible impacts of the corona virus if it spreads to the North leaders say inuit communities in the Arctic or at high risk because of a lack of basic infrastructure including indoor plumbing. The Council represents people in Alaska Canada Greenland and Russia leaders are asking governments to assist enclosing infrastructure gaps and prioritize housing water and sewer and to acknowledge the challenges and Inuit communities when establishing a response and preparedness to the Krona Virus and other infectious diseases. An exhibit of indigenous art from Yale University's vast collection is curated by recent graduates Melinda to WHO spoke with Co Curator. Just absorbing about the exhibit. They poured over the thousands of pieces held by Yale's peabody museum and by other institutions on campus and winnowed their choices down to ninety three pieces. These include items such as pottery clothing and moccasins made from animal hides and beadwork a hide a mask from current British Columbia and paintings by contemporary artists. I think seeing the way in which this exhibit was able to bring so many people together in terms of not only the community bringing all these institutions together into a single space but also reaching outside so thinking how we met multiple times with the Mohegan nation how we reached out to tipo officers the tribal historic preservation officers across the United States to talk about our work. We formed relationships with the works themselves. The Exhibit Entitled Place Nations Generations Beings. Two Hundred Years of indigenous north. American art runs until June twenty first at the Yale University Art Gallery in New Haven Melinda to. Who's national native news and Antonio Gonzalez National Native News is produced by Kohana Broadcast Corporation with funding by the corporation for public broadcasting like the circle of life. There is an opportunity that comes around every ten years a chance to participate and let our voice be heard it. Lets others know who we are and where we are the twenty twenty cents? This will be our opportunity to shape our future for generations to COME SHAPE. Our Future start here. Learn more at twenty twenty cents Dot Gov paid for by the US Census Bureau native voice one the native American radio network. This is native America calling. I'm Tara gatewood before we get started. I WANNA point out today. Show covers the difficult topic of sex abuse which may trigger intense emotions for some people. If this topic you'd like to sit out we support your decision for almost ten years. A group of women in South Dakota are among those who pushed to change the state statute of limitations on civil liability for child sex abuse. They're all citizens of the Turtle Mountain Chippewa tribe and attended the saint. Paul's mission Indian School in Marty South Dakota in their testimony. They point out the difficulty. Many survivors face in publicly disclosing alleged abuse or hurdle that can take years or decades to overcome in February. The South Dakota legislature rejected the proposal. This year twenty nine states are considering changes for child sex abuse statute of limitations. So we want to hear from you. What do you think about limiting the time? Someone can sue in organization like the Catholic Church or the Boy Scouts of America. Phone lines are open. The number is one eight hundred nine nine. Six two eight four eight. That's one eight hundred nine nine native today. We're going to start off in Minneapolis. Minnesota with us today is Michelle. Define a echoes. She is an attorney and advocate for child. Sex Abuse Survivors from native American boarding schools in a CO founder of the organization. Nine little girls and Michelle is Turtle Mountain Chippewa. My pleasure to have her with us. Thank you for joining us. Michelle thank you for having me in so Michelle tell us about the law about the proposed legislation You fight for seems every year now right so each year we kind of do an evaluation to figure out what approach we wanna take in this last year what we did was Two prong approach was to eliminate a provision in the Child Sexual Abuse Statute that was passed in two thousand ten which limits It basically blocks any survivor over the age of forty from suing anyone other than their directly but direct perpetrator so The way that the courts interpreted that was to Say that the Child Sexual Abuse Statute is not applicable to organizations Such as the the Catholic Church in so what happened was The women who Our organization is named after nine sisters from One family who were our child sexual abuse survivors from Boarding School What we've done is Gone in and tried to figure out a way that we could overcome this provision that was enacted during the While. Their lawsuit was pending. And then also there's a a window of time that would revive their claims That we advocated for also this year so there was a two pronged approach in order to remove that provision That blocked anyone over the age of forty and also blocks a suits against organization as well as reviving the window to open up People are claims for people who may have been blocked in the past into Michelle. What is the argument? Why this case in in those behind it filled that you should be able to sue an organization so There's several different Reasons why and we had a great expert testimony from Archie Hamilton this year from child. Usa DOT ORG and With University of Pennsylvania and they have studies and statistics behind them that talk about how reviving these windows of time to allow for these to go. Forth helps identify a child predators that may have been protected by the organization or may have been previously hidden to the public So that children won't be abused in the future. So a large part of this is for prevention of child. Sexual abuse in the future It also shifts the cost of abuse from victims to predators and those that hit them rather than The victims having to sustain the cost of abuse themselves for health care for all the other Ramifications that they're abuse Took a toll on them for the other thing. Is that it Educate the public about the prevalence gives them the wear awareness For the harm that child sexual abuse does to the families and the communities at a The whole And then another thing that it does do is offers Healing and justice to survivors offers. Them Avenue what we've seen happen is that The Catholic Church has admitted that they had this abuse occurred and they have been releasing lists of credible abusers they call them. But what I am. Finding is that on these lists are not listing the abusers from the native American community and so made of American survivors are being left out of that process of You know transparency from the church and that kind of thing and so. I wanted to make people aware of that. I did an open letter to the Vatican this year. explaining to the pope that that native American people are being left out of this process and that we need to be a part of it and without being part of that process. There's only other resources to go through the court system and we know that this definitely weighs very heavy on survivors and even family members and I did want to share this number of before we move ahead. The next national sexual assault hotline is one eight hundred six five six hope or one eight hundred six five six four six seven three If there are folks you'd like to contact to talk more about maybe some of these things that have affected you personally and so with that Michelle There's a lot of work being done to make sure that Those who are survivors have the ability to tell their story. Have the ability to protect a future generations in. So gimme a little bit about Some of the things that have happened this year with this case and pushing forward in wanting to open up limitations so We continue to push forward in the South Dakota legislature But we've been partnering up with a lot of organizations that exist nationally as a resource for native American survivors as well as survivors of clergy abuse. That large and so we've gotten a great deal of support For the survivors network of those abused by priests goes by snap and a lot of other organizations that are doing great work with the statute of limitations and other states like New Jersey and New York Pennsylvania Montana So that is really Given us a lot of hope and optimism and strength to get us through These legislative sessions. Which can be pretty brutal For us as we're we're shot down each year with these changes to the Statute. Thank you for that. And I do want to let people know that we did reach out to the Catholic diocese of Sioux falls and invited them to be on the show. Today they declined due to scheduling conflicts in so Michelle. Explain how the limitation is two years after the abuse. How it's discovered. What does that mean? Well the way that the Child Sexual Abuse Statute is written. Is that When a child is abused they have three years from the date that the time that their injuries caused from the abuse And if they're under eighteen and not those three years would start clicking from the time that they turn eighteen. There's another provision in that statute that allows for people time for discovery. So if you If you don't realize you're injuries A lot of times repressed memories are at play and that the average age of Someone actually reporting there abuse We've found out is fifty two years of age So there's a that time delay So the discovery rule allows for that time delay For three years from the time you discover it now the part. That's the problem is that there's that forty year old blocked anybody over. The age of forty can't avail themselves to that discovery rule and then the way that the Supreme Court has interpreted the statute they cannot apply this to organizations and so in a way to get kind of get around What statute of limitations apply to organizations in these cases the Supreme Court has said that you need to look to the personal injury statute of limitations. Which is two years from the date of majority so the court alternately found that these survivors need to go back. But were they should have filed back. You know to two years after they turned eighteen So essentially all of the boarding school survivors And all the native American boarding school survivors out of luck at that point and pursuing their claims against the church abuse works. Is this unrealistic? Oh definitely so. What even the states on studies show that children do not report their abuse until much later than the statue of limitations allow and Particularly you know the studies that show that Y- they often don't report abuse until they're fifty two so if there's a block against Pursuing claims at forty. It doesn't the statue doesn't match what's happening reality in so there's gotta be some consideration there in in in dealing with this such a sensitive topic with from with all it's it's not something that's typically you know how the law would typically handle something I I don't think the laws equipped to handle something like this that it involves such complex family and in countless emotions and and all of those different aspects of so The laws just really don't are are inadequate for this in so this also is a conversation for any state what do current laws state in terms of limitations on protecting survivors of sexual abuse You can give us a call. Share your thoughts. Maybe you're also working on the similar issue in your own Neck of the woods and What are some of the hurdles or Are there people who are listening in our considerateness? you can give us a call. One eight hundred nine six two eight four eight is number And maybe you are even following this case very closely. What do you think about this where the survivors have for years? Come forward ask for the statue of Limitations to be lifted and are telling their story What do you think about that one? Eight hundred nine nine six two eight. Four eight is the number What LAWS DO NEED TO CHANGE TO PROTECT? Our Children. Phone lines are open. We look forward to your call if you WANNA spend the night under the stars in a desert in a historic in near the California redwoods but you also want to support native business. You're in luck. There are a number of alternatives to posh resorts in hotel chains. And they're run by native entrepreneurs will hear about them on the next native America calling support for this program. Provided by the American Indian Higher Education consortium the collective spirit and unifying voice of thirty seven tribal colleges and universities for over thirty years. A heck has worked to ensure that tribal sovereignty is recognised and respected and that tribal colleges and universities are included in this nation's higher education system information on a tribal college or university near you at A. H. E. C. Dot Org. This is native. America. Calling interrogate would from a set of Pueblo and we are talking about the statute of limitations on child. Sex Abuse Cases Today. How long after the alleged abuse happens do you think survivors should be able to sue to determine an organization's accountability. The Boy Scouts of America the Catholic Church and the Church of Jesus Christ of latter-day Saints have all had child sex abuse lawsuits against them. And if you'd like to weigh in on this conversation today call us at one. Eight hundred nine six two eight four eight with us on the line today. Is Michelle The funding eccles attorney With the nine little girls she is also Turtle Mountain Chippewa. My pleasure to have her here and show the case that we've been discussing. Why do you think the South Dakota legislators don't want to pass this law I think that At this point I had different theories throughout the years and And this year I talked during my testimony about what my true thoughts are at this point. I think where the the the church is extremely powerful and we felt that power each year after year and And seeing it at work with the legislators and And so it it's it's really the I think that the legislators are following suit with what they think that the church wants and it probably largely due to campaign no donations that are being offered to them in so when we think about all this if the lower to change what would it mean for survivors. So if we were able to get a lot to change this would allow them to pursue claims in court that they haven't been able to have moved forward so this only gives them the opportunity to have their claims heard to allow their voices to be heard about what occurred to them. What abuse occurred and How organizations and how abusers abused their trust and as children and violated the law And it's up to them to they have the burden of proof Once they do get that access to the courthouse So merely what this does is give them an opportunity to be heard. Thank you for that and folks if you'd like to talk with. Michelle gives us a call. One eight hundred nine six two eight four eight is the number also want to bring in a voice joining us today out of Anchorage Alaska we have. Lc Boudreau and she is a child six abuse survivor and Elsie is Yupik Eskimo. She grew up in the village of Saint. Mary's it's our pleasure to have her here to share her story. Elsie thank you for joining us for another native America. Calling thank you and thank you and Elsie. I really appreciate you having the courage to be here with us to share your story and let's start there the question that I asked Michelle about the ability You know to to have these laws protecting survivors for you. Elsie the ability to be heard. Tell me about the power of that. Well I think there's so much power in that Just even as a sexual abuse survivor to be able to find your voice and to speak your truth takes a lot of courage and then on the receiving end having people believe you Does something in terms of healing that allows you to move from blaming yourself and That victimize victimize mind and heart and spirit Took place where you know that you did nothing wrong that you know. And and that's the wish for all survivors is to get to the place where they know in their mind and their heart and their spirits that they did nothing wrong. That would happen to them was not their fault and So the there's just a lot of healing in that and and you think about you know the generations of people that have gone through boarding school and the holding back of Or prohibit prescribing people from using the APP. This avenue to to speak their truth is Is more harmful and in the long run into Elsie when we talk about increasing the statute of limitations. Where do things currently stand in Alaska? What is the statute of limitations? Both criminal and civil you know I. I don't want to be the expert on this. Except I do know that in Alaska there are no statute of limitations on when it comes to child sexual abuse. That law changed And when when I went through the process and It was difficult to ascertain whether or not the law was retro. Active meaning Those p the people that I like myself who were coming forward. It wasn't clear as a lavas written as to whether or not it would apply to us After the changing law so that makes sense in Elsie. When you hear about other states in the big push going on in South Dakota what do you think about these efforts to reform statue of limitations? I think it's really really important Especially being that you know as just the nature of child sexual abuse and how secrecy keeps it so There's so much power behind secrecy. At some you know I always say Silence is deafening. When it comes to child sexual abuse and and for people that have gone through. This need to have an avenue where they feel That they can speak their truth and that there would be people on the other side that would believe them and so I think it's so important. You know it you know like you here as children. You know like Even even myself like I didn't even know the words sexual abuse and if you even as an adult I was in college and was asked if I had been sexually abused and I lifted my counselor and I said no like in my mind at that point. I didn't equate what happened to me. As sexual abuse because it wasn't violent And the person that abused me was a priest and so I looked at it as something that You know Even years later like just understanding how that has affected me like it takes a long time and I think for many survivors to get to that place where they understand The nature of the abuse. And how how it has impacted them takes time so Allowing for the statute of limitations to be lifted would give more people the opportunity to speak their truth into. He'll I agree elsie. I really appreciate you sharing your story and You know to hear that this is something that you have endured in. Your life weighs heavy on on me and hearing this in. I'm raises concerns too. I think to a lot of people especially in our tribal communities where often we hear. Our children are the target were year. That story of our parents are those You know who have come before us. And they're sharing the stories and Elsie. Sometimes this gets a loss when we start talking about these kind of issues that When it gets into the law or people are trying to break away from the statute of limitations. There are survivors who have to come forward and share their story. And how heavy is it to have to do something like that in a public space But but I know a lot of times you do that so that other people will not have to endure what you did but share because this is an easy to do Elsie. Well you know I appreciate the question and I think you know. Just looking back on my life and You know like it's been since two thousand three that I came forward. You know and like the four that time I would never ever ever even imagine speaking publicly about this and You know having gone through the process and having spoken my truth and and having people Believe me and I've gotten it's almost like my voice has gotten stronger and I can I you know I often say like even the media has been like an extension of my voice and you think about the little like being a little kid you know and how their voices are You know when when they're when they've dealt with child sexual abuse almost like their voices fragile. You know their spirit is fragile and Getting to a place where you feel contained and loved and held So it's almost like when you speak your truth your and you have someone believe you. It's almost like you're being held and And and I think that's really important you know Having that sense so that you know that you're not alone and what happened to you was not your fault fault and that You have a right as a child to be loved to be Safe to Not have to you know deal with the actions of the adults that are there to protect you and and when when you think about the boarding school and and I think about the nine little girls You know I I. I've had the the honor of meeting them and talking to them and I I'm really Ungrateful for them for having for taking this on and You know I think about them and think about how how much The experience that they've gone through has affected their lives in a way that No one can take that back. You know So I don't know if I'm answering your question. You definitely your and I think you know. Maybe you're even speaking directly to people who are dealing with this today In I wanNA share another hotline with you the child help. Usa National Child Abuse Hotline is one eight hundred four. A child Also the national sexual assault hotline one. Eight hundred six five six hope If they're folks at You want to talk further about this and You know just hearing some of this and knowing that there are people who are wanting to give more avenues to survivors Eight to be able to tell their story as well as seek justice for those who have created harm to them What are your thoughts and your hearing stories about wanting to change his statute of limitations. Do you think they should even exist? One eight hundred nine six two four eight is the number Elsie. Thank you very much I want to go to a caller. We have limit in eastern Washington joining us today. Thank you for calling in go ahead. You're on here thank you. Yeah I never understood why there was even a statute of limitations. I was pressured into sex at fifteen by an extended family member and I think that I Sexual intercourse at least twice. He he wanted me to give him oral sex and pressured me into doing that and In nineteen sixty eight I thought okay. This is You know I'm cool. And maybe it's okay but I really didn't want it and I have to say I'm sixty eight now and it really messed with my understanding of my relationship with NASA I subsequently Never told anybody. I was ashamed. Embarrassed I didn't want to be a victim either and You know 'cause I was mature grown-up right anyway I didn't realize later how bad that was. And I realized that subsequently my attitude toward men was okay. I just roll over for men and I'm pray and then I felt like pray like I was always pray I was very pretty and sexy and stuff and I was just a prayer and it was funny men off and I never ever ever thought even in my twenty why is there a statute of limitations on this. It seems so weird to me I mean. Why would you like? It's going to like the victim or so-called whatever we were are like it ends. It doesn't it goes on forever so that never ever made sense to me. It's still and I thought you know. I'm glad someone's advocating for reducing or eliminating whatever eliminating statue of limitations on child-sex-abuse. Because we know now you know it's it's not something that someone should just be able to do again and again that's what it is. It is horrible Lynette. A thank you for calling in. Thank you for sharing. Your story is well in Micheli. Turn it back to you because you know as we heard from the net you know. Why does this even exist What are your thoughts anytime that we hear arguments against lifting a statute of limitations? What is it? We're really hearing Well it's interesting Because this year while we were in front of the House. Judiciary Committee Advocating for bill One of the former chairman of the committee Timothy. John said you know we really just want closure with our laws so there has to be a time limit and I thought well. That's ironic that he and legislators want closure you know. And that's why either they're voting against our bill is because they want closure And how ironic is that because so many survivors? All just they would love to have closure but but can't it can't even get their voices heard because of these blocks that are happening in the in the statutes and in the litigation So that's often one of the things that we hear is that you know. The defendant have to have their right and they have to have a time limit because they can't go back and defend these claims. That are so old and that kind of thing. So there's a lot of arguments that we here we call it the playbook because everybody On the opponent side have had similar arguments That I just don't think hold any water to the type of damage that we as a society occur every time. A child is abused any form on especially a child sexual abuse so I'm definitely with college. Dispatched limitations needs to be eliminated for this. Well thank you for that. Of course again. Thank you to You know the folks who have the courage to speak their truth in telling us about you know how this is affected them in you know when it comes down to what we're talking about. Today's we're talking about lies or talking about people are talking about survivors As well as that intersection with the law. Maybe this frustrates you. Maybe you have run into some of this And you want to share some thoughts In parents to what do you think about You know what? This discussion is In speaking of this Being something that you've had to confront You know to protect your child. We want to hear from you. Two phone lines are open. One eight hundred nine nine six two four eight is a number and what more work can be done. What more needs to open up To make sure that Those in our communities are safe their thoughts on this give us a call one eight hundred nine nine six two eight. Four eight is number We do look forward to your calls. If it feels more comfortable to call him anonymously can liked the circle of life. There is an opportunity that comes around. Every TEN YEARS. A chance to participate and lead our voice be heard it. Lets others know who we are and where we are? The twenty twenty census will be our opportunity to shape our future for generations to come shape. Our Future start here. Learn more at twenty. Twenty cents is dot Gov paid for by the US Census Bureau. Thank you for joining us today. Here on native America calling and they're still time if you want to join our conversation. One eight hundred nine nine six two eight. Four eight is the number With us on the line today. is A couple of folks including Michelle Defy any ECCLES. An attorney and advocate for child sex abuse survivors from the native American boarding schools And she is a CO founder of the Organization of nine. Little Girls. Also here joining us today. Adminis- Minneapolis Minnesota is Christine Dean. Dc McLean and she is executive director of National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition and she is Turtle Mountain. Ojibway my pleasure to have her here with us as well and Christine. I'm I know you're doing work on on this issue as well And we also heard from a survivor in in. We'll continue to hear from them. Imagine as our goes in Christine just knowing what all of this means especially when the statute of limitations is a reason. Somebody doesn't get justice. What would you like to say We definitely support removing the statute of limitations I think this issue in particular focusing on the statute of limitations and the Access to justice highlights the larger issue at hand. Which is that Not only in cases of of sexual abuse at these federal Indian boarding schools or church run Indian boarding schools that we Haven't had access to justice but in large part Folks in Indian country have not had access to justice on on many issues. And so you know we have a I have mixed opinions myself personally about You know whether or not a lawsuit is really What what is needed when we look at Canada and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission that happened. You know granted you know. People have criticized some of the outcomes but that did Start as a result of a class action lawsuit four Residential School abuses. So there is that access to justice in that avenue but we know that it has to go beyond a legal court cases and And monetary reparations. What we're really getting is healing. What we're really trying to get at is the fact that we need acknowledgment from these institutions from our government. Who's this you know? This was the result of federal policy to take our children and put them in these institutions. Where they were abused and neglected So it's kind of a larger issue. Yes we want our survivors to be able to have access to justice and therefore the statute of limitations is is something that should be removed. We don't need that there. To protect these people who were the perpetrators and the abusers in fact we know for half we know for a fact that the Catholic Church Moved people around. They moved priests who were offenders. two different diocese and in fact. They moved them specifically to reservations when they became Offenders so we had higher concentration of these sexual offenders at Indian boarding schools and on our reservation. So yes they should be held accountable. Yes we should have justice but it needs to go beyond that in Christine. What do you think about the argument that this was in the past in? I'm sure you've heard some of that. Come UP IN COURT CASES ANYTHING TO SHARE. Oh Yeah we know for. We have both Anecdotal evidence as well as Empirical data that says You know that there are ongoing affects That you know whether it was in the past generations or in the past if somebody's life that it does continue to impact individuals families and communities Through through the trauma that they experienced in their lifetime or through intergenerational trauma which means that behaviors and trump trauma responses. Get passed down to people as well as The fact that you know some of these sex offenders are living in our communities. Which is one of the more harder and difficult issues to address is when it's you know it's in our community will thank you for being here with us today. I'm going to turn back to the phone lines. Were GONNA GO AHEAD? And Welcome in Regina. Who's on the line in Pine Ridge South Dakota to dinner on? Kfi Ally Regina thank you for calling. You're on air. Okay thank you very much. I went to school holy Rosary mission and I know that a lot of priests left the priesthood and I know of one that changed just made how many people how many priest who committed sexual offenses or molesting change their names when they left the priesthood. And could that be looked into by going to schools and finding out because there are a lot of victims? Who are still alive and I know some of some of them were already interviewed a long time ago back in the eighties or nineties when they first started trying to file and South Dakota rejected it so how many of them were former priest Morella Gina. Thank you for asking Christine any thoughts for Regina. Yeah that's a really good question. I do know of a website called Bishop Accountability Dot Org. It's An independent website That tracks abusers in in the Catholic Church and so that website You know has a whole database of priest who has Been Accused of abuse. And I don't know if it necessarily tracks name changes but I know there is a lot of information on that website. Thank you for that Regina. Thank you for calling we. Now go to mark in Pine Ridge South Dakota tuned in on. Kfi Ally Mark. Thank you for calling. You're on here. Thank you for taking my call My name is mark butter. Baroda retired Commissioned Officer in the Public Health Service I was a physician in the Indian Health Service for twenty years and spent fifteen years trying to get Patrick Weber removed from medical staff privileges. He was Raping Boys and his exam room in eight Oklahoma Browning Montana and for about twenty years in Pine Ridge South Dakota and finally he was arrested and convicted and his will spend the rest of his life in prison. But we were running into a lot of problems with the statute of limitations in terms of trying to get civil damages for His many victims and the government Is exceedingly hard to sue and the statute of limitations makes it even more difficult moreover There was an internal investigation of the Indian Health Service. That was just released Which is very damning and suggests that the cover up of Dr Webber for decades was done at the highest levels of the Indian Health Service however the Indian Health Service has chosen not to release the findings of that investigation. So even in an institution that Ostensibly there to serve native people There's much secrecy and much. Obstruction of efforts to get justice for the survivors of criminal like Patrick Weber and a lot of have been following that case too in mark. I'm your thoughts to those who who have yet to be able to speak their truth One of the things that was so emotional at the sentencing of Weber was the testimony of the brave Young men who were able to come forward and it was very emotional I broke down several times and I was I felt privileged that I had Stood up for them all those years. but I know there's more of them out there that have not come forward and those of us who are are concerned about these crimes will continue to seek justice for them because it validates them and and and gives them some chance of getting their lives back on track after What he did to them all right mark. Thank you for calling in We now go to Marlin in Fort Hall Idaho tuned in on Kyw. Su Marlin. Thank you for calling. You're on here. Thank you My name is Marlin Cisco and I was sixty two It was born and raised in Oklahoma Shan. But I've been All over the place Washington. Dc FOR THIRTY YEARS. Now there's been four hall but And I'm in recovery and I work with a lot of Recovering alcoholics fanatics over the years So one of the things I was molested I an older cousin. Starting from the age of about five until I was about eleven or twelve and He was six years older than me so It was the age difference. One of the things Difficulties is secrecy around family incest and the shame that it carries route difficult to talk about I can talk about it today. Only because I've been in therapy for at least twenty years And I had to go through a lot of phase two for healing I mean for a long time. I thought it was my fault. And that one of the difficulties of One of the callers talked about didn't know sexual Being sexually assaulted was a a term. And it's true for a lot of this who are victims of like we participate. So it's our choice and it's not violence against us so 'cause we chose it but my therapist took me out when they and had me look at a six year old sending next to twelve year old and he said who has choice and it changed my life that day. So the other part of this. I think everybody's I'm on the side of moving the specialist limitations and like the colors to agree that have to be more than just court cases and legal ramifications that has to therapy and I mean. That's what happened with me in a lot of times it. It takes a lifetime to heal to in a really appreciate you sharing your story. Marlin into Come to terms with this knows really heavy and a lot of times What ends up happening with the abuse. Our methods to try in quo The person who they've targeted from speaking in in learning more about The nine sisters case that there was some of that that was going on to and so Christina WanNa turn to you you know when we have this also being brought up in cases You know the the abuse it went on also sometimes includes others those that were in a row that that were also around Those who maybe were covering things up for the abuser. In you know are they ever targeted? Do we ever bring lawsuits against them Christine? Well so I not an attorney so I can't really speak to that What I do think when you talk about that though is how How there is a need for healing for all of us right so the Catholic Church in in the cases that we're talking about Specifically they should have done a better job of addressing the abuse in the abuser. Right what was going on with those people that they were abusing children and then you know taking that a step further and and when it comes to our communities and Our our own relatives abusing US absolutely. We need to look at the abuser and give them The support and the resources that they need for their own healing. That is the only way that we're going to move past this within our own communities will thank you for the Michelle any thoughts on that. I agree We it it's GonNa take a lot more Like you're saying and then just pursuing the statute of limitations because it just gets us in the door legislatively Are you know into litigation There's so much beyond that that we need for healing and I'm glad that there's so much being done. by NAB and Other organizations and I'm so proud of our survivors for having such courage to come forward and speak out which is really helping all of the other survivors around them to and also we're getting to a place where we can really get to prevention. So I'm I'm just happy with that. Things are moving forward And at the same time wish we could go farther and deeper faster you know with our effort in Christine. We've got a couple of minutes before we have to wrap up here in. Of course we're talking about adults here but even advice on how to spot win sexual abuse is happening Maybe even with children in our life any thoughts as we get ready to close out. I'm definitely not an expert I'm not a therapist or counselor but I would I would say just you know. Keep an eye on your children talk to them. Make sure that they Have other adults in their lives. That that you trust that they trust that they can talk to I know I was also sexually abused the child and you know didn't talk about it until I was in my thirties and in therapy and then I I still didn't WanNa tell my mother so So if it's your own children make sure that there's other people around them That they can talk to in in case they Are Not able to talk to you. Directly all right and Do WanNA share another resource. The darkness to light help line. is a place. Where if you're suspecting that child abuse happening You can call. They can help Req- to people in your area. It is one eight six six four light or one eight six six three six seven Light spelled out in so Michelle Any other thoughts as we get ready to conclude I think that We just if we can continue to work towards Our goal of prevention. And if there's anyone out there who would like to help In that or volunteer or just have some thoughts that you want to share the nine. Little girls is open to to that If the best place to reach us at facebook at the our facebook page which is the number nine and little girls and you can just send a facebook message and we'll get it there But I just want to encourage everyone and survivors and and people who may be aren't survivors. Don't quite understand. Listen to the conversations that survivors are having so that you get that full perspective and where people are coming from and what their needs are well. Thank you for that invokes rappaport. Our here again. If you'd like to reach out you can always find us to comments. At native America Calling Dot Com. Thank you to everybody that we heard from our Michelle define me ECCLES as well as Elsie Boudreau and Christine Dean. D.c MC leave. Thank you all for joining US sharing your expertise and of course our gratitude to all the folks who called in. I'm wishing on a lot of support in good thoughts to our survivors. Who had the courage to speak today and really appreciate Your Voice on these airwaves tomorrow? We're inviting you back for conversation about places to stay in need of America. I'm Tara Gatewood support by southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institutes Early Childhood Education Program Providing affordable pathway for the next generation of native teachers who will meet the unique educational needs of native students. Early Childhood Education. Associate's degrees an all inclusive program with mentorship for success in education in an intertribal learning community information and application at SL I dot. Edu under academics then programs some are application deadline is April Tenth Hamasaki picky ninety percent lie. Ep Okay Hippo. You'll Iowa Choker J. B. Hunt which shows any WHOPPI Lou Ha Hoi. Okay Law. Igwe LA calls on the while. Walk Yicky walk out your Niche Lil. Your healthcare dot Gov Nichelle Must Pyeho one eight hundred three one. Eight two five nine. Six level Hunecke Medicare no medicaid or. He'll call hedge it through. Native America calling is produced in the national native Voice Studios in Albuquerque New Mexico by Qantas Broadcast Corporation native nonprofit media organization funding is provided by the corporation for public broadcasting with support from the public radio satellite. Service Music is by Brent Michael Davids native native American radio network.

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Ep #8: Native Fashion

All My Relations Podcast

55:28 min | 2 years ago

Ep #8: Native Fashion

"Welcome back to another episode of all my relations where so happy that you've joined us today. And we just want to start by telling you that we love you. And we're grateful for you. And thank you so much for joining us on this podcasting journey. I think you're in for a real treat today today, something really special is happening and Adrian is going to tell you why. No, I I'm like so excited to share this conversation. Just because this was the very first episode that we recorded together he you can tell when you're listening to it. How excited we are about this project and just like joyful and full of this anticipation to be able to talk with our really good friends. Just come at Catherine, Jamie Kuma about their work in the world of Nita fashion. So I love listening to it because we've become friends only through this world of native representations. Like, it's not separate from the work that we do our friendship. So I love that. You can hear that long standing relationship that we have just through the excitement and our voices and the like laughter and the the way we use shorthand for a lot of things and kind of assume that everyone knows what we're talking about. But I think it's a beautiful episode. And it's fun to just hear that joy, and our voices as native women to get to sit and talk together about something we care about which is native fashion. Yeah. And also, you know, I think maybe not often. Do we get to hear the these sort of intimate conversations and the giggle on the love, and and like you said the shorthand expressions. But also, you know, this sort of the the way that we would naturally discuss these topics with one another, and so I think that in that way, you get this sort of fluid conversation that feels like you're sitting in your aunties kitchen with your with your cousins and getting the opportunity to just sort of like, giggle, and and reminiscent. And that to me is why this is so special. I love that. We're getting to come together with with women that we admire and love and respect. And and have a lot of fun with fashion is often relegated to this realm of being like, elitist or inaccessible. Title or expensive? But for native folks, like Jessica talks about this in her work a lot that our ancestors were stylish. She always says like we thought and think a lot about the ways that we represent our communities through the clothing that we wear to me, this native fashion movement is just an extension of that of being able to represent who you are. And where you come from. And do it in a really cool and of the moment way while also honoring your ancestors and your community and to me like really showcasing that kind of intertribal communication and trade like that is a Cherokee person can wear Navajo earrings that were made by Navajo designer or right now, I'm in some co-ceo schwann's by artists in Canada. So being able to like bring all that together and show how are communities relate with one another to. I think is really exciting. The cool thing about our. Conversation around native fashion is like there's this spectrum and range of like traditional clothing power Galea, and then sort of street wear like your everyday like clothes that you wear that our t-shirts or whatever, and then couture fashion, which is like the high fashion, the Handmaid's stuff and the ways that native design crosses all of those places. And so for me like earrings away that kind of brings together a lot of that I have earrings that are more in a hate even using the language of traditional versus modern. And I think that's what a lot of the designers are trying to challenge is being like, it's all one. I really liked the ways that it starts conversations with people. They ask me about them. And then I'm able to talk about which is I know it is where they come from. What community they come from? Why it's particular to that style of community. That's really important to me as well. I love that you bring up. The conversation about modern versus traditional it. Also brings up the conversation about authentic authentic, and one of the ways that I think about that being problematic and difficult in our communities is like, my aunties are all weavers, they we from cedar. And some people would will criticize them and say, well that's not traditional because you used ridi- and our ancestors didn't use ridi- our ancestors would've used berries to die this, cedar. And my my anti Judy was it will say something like, well, you think if our ancestors were here right now, they wouldn't use it. And you know, I I've often heard people say to me that my work because I'm a photographer. I is not traditional work, you know, because I'm using modern technology, and I've actually wanna tell them how to show in the Czech Republic. The the curator said that I was not, you know, when she introduced me one of the things that she said was that I was not a traditional artist because I wasn't practicing in a traditional form. But that I was a modern indigenous artists in what a what a treat that was. And I was sort of like really taken back in that moment that that was the way that she chose to introduce me because I don't think that being traditional or being authentic has anything to do with the materials that we use. I think it also has to do with our our frame of mind, and I reference and the way that we do the work like with a good mind in a good heart with a prayer. And and I think that our ancestors were the same way. And I think that that is what is that tradition that ways what's carried on? And this a really beautiful thing. But I think I was watching that ugly delicious, which is one of my favorite shows on Netflix. I love David Chang. He's my favorite and mama Fukuda's, like definitely one of my favorite restaurants. But I was watching this episode on pizza last night. And he was talking about how he hates the word authenticity when we discuss food because of course, when we say that we're we're like sort of. We're denying our own history that we innovate in Volve in my grade and intermarry, and there's this sort of like chance cultural ISM that happens in our communities, and that has to be okay. You know, we have to accept that are in communities in order to be alive and thriving are changing, and that is what's happening in this native fashion industry, and it's happening rapidly. And we're seeing it for the first time on social media as it's happening in the moment. And that is so cool to me. Yeah. The idea that there is some like historic past where we as native people were offensive and pure and traditional and now everything is just moving away from that is like a total construction by seller colonialism and white supremacy designed to keep us in that historic past and not allow us to be present and modern and therefore challenge their right to exist to me, it's by doing this. Work of remixing and retooling and taking tools from other communities to create art. That is from our communities is something that is really powerful from a perspective of doing de colonial work. It's not just that like, it's cool, and we're allowed to it's that we always have and will continue to like native folks have always innovated have always like used, tools and materials and things as they've come into our communities, and those then become part of who we are can you imagine any of the plains communities like beadwork is so huge in our communities and beads were, you know, something that came from contact. So I think that the work that's happening in native fashion is really about creating this present and future. That is also what we have always done representing. Ourselves through the materials and tools and relationships that we have available to us. Relation. Welcome to all my relations. Ladies, we super happy to have you for I native fashion episode. We have Dr Jessica Metcalf. Lou. And miss Jamie Kuma. So today, we're going to be talking native fashion, which is something that all of us are really excited about an interested in and both of you bring such incredible expertise. So for our audience, we're going to introduce you read some bios, and then ask you to introduce yourselves. Our first guest here is here in the studio with us is Dr Jessica Metcalf. She is turn them out and Chippewa from the lands that are currently known as North Dakota. She's leading a national movement to buy authentic native American made fashion just because the owner and creator of the beyond buckskin boutique, which is an online and now also brick and mortar fashion boutique, featuring work from native designers from all over the US and Canada. She also holds a PHD in American Indian studies from the university of Arizona, so we can call her Dr J, she's also a dynamo on the dance floor. The woman you want behind your fashion show or fashion event, a brilliant scholar friend and role model. And if you need to know someone in the native fashion world chances are Jessica is on first name basis with them. Welcome Dr Metcalf. Oh, I thank you, Dr keys. Doctors. Dr Masika back to that. Dr love. Talking about fashion and talking about. One in the same doctor J one in the same. We also have Jamie Okuma with us today from the World Wide Web Skyping in. So thank you Jamie for being here with us. You're having me ladies. Jamie has Lucena and show any Bannock, isn't as fashion designer. She creates Berlin intricate, creative works bead work with the tiniest beads you've ever seen while also simultaneously creating gorgeous cortra-, fashions gowns and begs as well as ready to wear fashion. She has won at least five best in show ribbons from both Santa Fe Indian market and the heard market, but let's just say she's never satisfied the next year. It's always more brilliant. She's an artist who refuses to find her nation. Stick to it. She's constantly evolving and trying new things and pushing the envelope. Let's just say one of the things that I love about Jamie is that she constantly collaborates with other artists, and she is so willing to be helpful and loving to so many people around her, and we have mad respect for you for that, Jamie. So welcome again to our show. Thank you again or humbling word. So if you just take a moment to introduce yourself the way you would to a large group of people. Usually, I just kind of say new testing the mic. My name is Jessica Metcalf. I am turtle mountain Chippewa from North Dakota. I keep it pretty basic like that. I am the owner of beyond buckskin, which is a business and website dedicated to promoting and selling native American made fashion. This has been a journey for me that started back in two thousand. Twelve before that two thousand nine before to got five it's been a journey of any. Many many many points. So this has been an amazing journey, and I'm so blessed to be here with with these amazing powerful women. So I'm excited to talk about native fashion. Yeah. Dry, jamie. Tell us a little about yourself. How many was Jamie Okuma? I am saying schone Bannock among some others. My live here where we're at right now on the late Indian reservation in southern California. And I am an artist fashion designer. That's not it. The name of our podcast is all my relations. We wanted to choose that because we're really interested in the ways that we relate to one another the ways that we have relationships with the land with our ancestors with the work that we do. So just this idea of being relational people as native folks, and the idea of the relationships that we hold and the responsibilities that come with them. So we're gonna be asking all of our guests on the podcast just how this idea of all my relations resonates with them or the ways that they think about relationships in their own life and the work that they do. So if Jamie, I don't know if you wanted to start just thinking about these ideas of relationships being relational people and how that translates into your work or your life. Oh, everything. I mean from. Our families our communities that we live in. It's it, all encompassing. I think within my work in may not see that. But when for myself when I look back at pieces, I can think of who I was talking with that day or certain significant things that happened along the way it's such an important part of Indian country anywhere you go. I think between here in Canada. I mean, you better. You will know someone who knows someone that, you know. And that's it's such a relational type of relationship. And it's a really really cool thing to think about when you go to conferences are shows or anything, you're gonna know someone who knows someone if not you're going to know them. So that's kind of what it maybe Inc. Yeah. Thank you. Yeah. I I'm with you on that one Jamie, the idea of and just knowing that in Indian country. There's always maybe at most two degrees of separation. And maybe, you know, in in the larger community, there's like six degrees of separation, but an Indian country, you just have to be careful who you snag because. Or your friend? Yeah. If you claim to be something you better know about. Okay. Exactly. Yeah. And also like I think it's really great to acknowledge that our our identities are inherently connected to our relationships. And so our relationship was land relationship with water our relationship with our grandmothers, and that that relationship hasn't been severed part of what makes being indigenous to turtle islands so prolific in different than than anything than an identity of a colonizing. You know, that we're all relationships have been rooted deeply rooted in this land. And it's it's fundamental to who we are. And so I would you like to touch on that subject. Oh, did you see me in deep thought? Yeah, girl. No. So when I made the decision to launch beyond buckskin, I was actually based out of Phoenix teaching Arizona State University rate in Tempe, and I was surrounded by millions of people literally surrounded by all these humans, and all these people all these bodies. But I never felt so alone in all of my life, and I had to move back home, and I had to do this. This business is is fashion in the main, you know, mainstream industry, it's it's it's not something that's rural considered rural. It's not something. That's is considered a little bit. You know, city flashy, whatever trendy, but I needed to go back home. Remember why I was doing this business? It was to provide as many opportunities to native people as possible. And I needed my own native community to back it and support it or else. It would be worth nothing whenever I did move back home. And we we opened the business we would have people walk in. And the first thing they would say who are you? Where are you from who's your family, the, you know, some version of those three questions depending on when when I would see them. But so so that's the way that we we figure out how we're going to talk to each other. How we're how this relationships gonna go who's your family where you from? So it's like, oh, my last name's Metcalf, which is not a very popular name back home, but my dad's last name is Persian. And then they're like, oh, okay. All right. And then just rate them than they know who you are what family you come from. And that is how this relationships going to move forward from here in a good way. Thinking about you, both are very immersed in this native fashion world, and the conversations that we have in native fashion feel both of you are kind of at the forefront of the ways that we talk about what fashion meetings. So for folks who aren't familiar with the native fashioned seen, do you think maybe one or both of you could talk a little bit about how you see defining native fashion at because you've both talk brilliantly in the past about like the ties to quote, unquote, traditional clothing or just coughed and says, our ancestors were stylish and the ways that we clothe ourselves, and how that is kind of evolved to this moment that we are in native fashion. Well, I wanted to get into the fashion world as a whole when I was younger. I would think about I didn't want to be the, you know, native fashion designer I wanted to be a fashion designer and. Kind of just be mainstream and be with everybody else. But I think getting older and maturing with my thoughts. I love the idea that I guess, I'm native fashion designer I love that. Because you can see native designs every season. Whether it's New York Paris Milan, you're gonna see native design not done by native. So I think we have it's amazing. We can do that. And it's it's often take it's real and nobody else can do it as well as we can. So I mean, I just I love what I'm doing and people resonate with it. And not just native people. I love I want to share my culture with people who appreciate it. Because they do. That's why they're doing it. But now you can have it from someone who knows where that came from or understands it. And so I just I'm very very grateful that I have an. Audience beyond the native audience, and it's I just I'm so lucky that I get to do this every day. Thank you. And to contextualize Jessica's thoughts before she launches into them. Jessica wrote her dissertation on native fashion and traced the history of native fashion and interviewed a ton of different designers for that project, and that's kind of the origins of beyond buckskin is through that work. So Jessica has this like very large kind of contextual view of the of the scene as well, personal note of a hub that. Time. I saw I met Dr J was you were giving a talk at the heard museum, and I had never heard of native fashion and somebody that got a studied that. Like, I can have it was like like my mind was blown and then she stood up there, and like this beautiful dress like these dangling earrings Redlands in her hair, and the whole thing, and like blew my mind. So I I just want to knowledge that. Thank you. So yes, I wrote my dissertation on native fashion, and whenever I meet people and tell them that I work with native fashion designers. The first thing that they you know, they kind of like, whoa. There's native American fashion. And and then, you know, I offered the opportunity to say, yes, you know, we've we've had native American fashion as a a movement since the nineteen forties and fifties. At least that's when we had Lloyd kiva knew who was a Cherokee fashion designer actually like label himself as a fashion designer. That's when it's really really kicked off and the movement has been going in waves since since since the forties and fifties, which is so cool. There was amazing stuff going on in the seventies and the nineties and now rate now, we are at this amazing moment where new designers are constantly popping up and just creating drop dead. Gorgeous things that we have to have because we've. I've never had this opportunity to express ourselves in this way in our lifetimes. And this is the first time in about a hundred years that native American made fashion is accessible, and if he comes of the internet, and it's because of our our mobility that we have we're living in a truly amazing time. And I love this this field that I'm in because it's endlessly, exciting and creative. Like, oh my God. I get to work with artists every day. Jessica when you were doing your dissertation in you're doing the sort of work. What was like what's something that just really stands out to about native fashion that you would like other people to be sure that they know. Well, first of all something that really stood out to this is probably not the answer you're looking for. But was the reaction to people? When when I said that I'm I'm writing about native native American fashion for my dissertation research. I think the majority of people don't see it as a legitimate field. And that's that's what I have a problem with. No, we've had our men and our women decorating our our bodies since the beginning of time. This has always been there for us. This is one of our most basic human activities is to decorate the body. And so that is something that I want people to know, we all engage in fashion. Even even if we think that we don't, oh, oh, I don't do fashion. I just put on clothes you picked those pants names. Pay your plan. Pick that shirts, sir. No, it is Spanish. And so that's that's what I want people to know. I clearly I'm someone who writes thinks about cultural procreation all the time and Jamie, you even brought it up on in your answer a little bit earlier about how every fashion season we see native designs on the runway, but they aren't made by native people. And so there's two parts of that. So first of all I'd love to kind of hear your thoughts in responses to kind of where we are in the cultural procreation conversation, and then also what the role of that is in our conversations around native fashion. Like, it often feels like we aren't allowed to talk about native fashioned without talking about cultural appropriation. So first part is just how you see this kind of cultural procreation conversation role in these days and the way said it intersects with what you do. So you got them it. If the double edged sword it really is. Because there are I I'm more to where they're gonna do it. You can't stop it. But you can make people aware of it. I don't get so. Upset is I used to unless it's blatant. I think is post maybe about a month ago. I mean outright, it's like a copyright situation. Where it's it's like down the colours. And so, but I think that's a different. That's a different issue as far as procreation. I. It's. Irritating. But I don't it's really hard because I have so many people now asking can they wear it. Can they buy? Whereas I didn't have that before. And of course, you can otherwise it wouldn't be selling it. We you know, we have to pick our battles. I think really really carefully. Do. We want to go there with someone who's doing for some, you know, some ridiculous. But then there is where's that line? How do you choose them? It's all a personal preference. I think, but we I think we do as whole have to be very careful, and I think we also need to change our language when we call someone out about it in a more educational understanding. And understanding that those people that are doing they don't know they really don't and attacking that person is not going to happen. Listen to you is they're not going to hear it. I you. I'm changing the way, or at least I try to when I get those questions. Those awkward weird questions rather than getting mad about it. You still live in TV's? You know, it's no more. WT fs. It's no there's an easier way to educate people. I think and I we all do that. I think it will get a little bit easier, and we'll see less of it if we're willing and people are willing to listen. And if we educate in a. Nicer way. I think. Yeah. I mean, it's hard. It's definitely like the frustration builds up from all of the times we've seen this in. It's all my God. It's the twelfth one. I've seen this week. But yeah, it's definitely these conversations are never easy for anyone involved. I think they're they're very difficult. And I did want to ask you because you have this talent for being able to find the source material. So like, maybe we can actually tell the story of the Christi Belcourt Valentino collaboration gone wrong. But Jamie, they were able to find the actual moccasins that they had ripped off. And you have sent me pictures before like once for museum collections, and so just curious about how do you have just the catalog of these pieces in your head are you able but do you go out and look to them like how does that work? Yeah. It's really weird when it comes to design, especially within our world on native art world. It's almost like I have a graphic memory things. And because I love it. I mean, I've been I with this since I was a little little kid. And I really if I see something in it can be like those pictures that I sent you Adrian they were like really tiny. You know, just then it was like they were on. Yeah. I mean, you know, they're little graphs on Instagram of a little tiny bag, and I know that design. Is in one of my books gonna find it. So yeah, it's it when it comes to design. I really do. It's it's it's all there won't I think that's better watch out. Yeah. I think that's what most non natives don't understand is that when we're talking about cultural procreation these designs come from somewhere like those moccasins belong to someone. They were beated by someone they belong to a community a family person and back gets raced. When it just ends up on the mass produce thing. And when you have that memory to be able to go back and find the original one it shows the power of that like that these are things that belong to people. And it's not just as Jessica calls. It the free been exactly yes, I've called it the freemen because for some reason with with our cultural stuff people think that it is it isn't owned by anybody. It wasn't made by any specific person. It's not owned by specific family. It doesn't come from a specific tribe. It's just in the free been for anybody to use and reach into and say, oh, I would love to you. How you have these beaded moccasins in my collection, and let's mass produce them. And I think this is coming out of the huge sweep in the eighteen hundreds of just mass collecting, our cultural stuff and just taking it from our people in from our communities during the huge assimilation push. So now, we have all of our stuff, you know, a lot of our stuff in museum collections. Raced from the artists erased from the family, sometimes it has a tribal affiliation on it. And if we're talking about providence, it's only the, you know, the white people who collected it is the provenance. It was collected by this white man who gave it to this other white man who gave to swipe woman maybe, and that's the providence. But no, it's not it's not it's it's our it's our stuff. You know? We can we have this huge, ROY. Shergar of when this stuff was taken away. So we're trying to remember what designs come from. What families are what communities are what tribes and we're trying to reclaim that stuff. And and it makes it so hard whenever you have these large brands that are confusing it more and making it worse even for our youth. Or are you native us that are are taking cues from pop culture of who they are as a native American person or of somebody of mixed descent. You know, what does it mean to be native? And that's why we we really need to reconnect with with the youth in and end our stuff and say, hey, you know, this this is this is valuable this is ours. This isn't meant to be repr- mass produced by people who have no connection to native people will not be giving back to native communities. We'll be profiting off of this stuff, and we'll be furthering their own careers. Yeah. I think that the conversation around misappropriation and cultural. Operation that really resonates with me as an artist is the idea of taking something that belongs to us profiting off of it. And then not giving back to the community. A good example of this company is Pendleton. You know, I mean for years you've had a woolen mills company that is taking native designs and not crediting any artists and then sending season desists to artists when they actually use your work in actual native designs, and then very like you're not involved in the community at all Pendleton. So they were actually found guilty are in violation of the Indian arts and crafts act. They are they're found in violation of that act and that act is a truth in advertising act meant protects native American artists from these other vulture culture, vulture companies that want to confuse consumers into thinking that they're buying authentic native American made goods, and so the fact that they were found in violation of that act is powerful and a lot of people don't know that they were good job of hiding. It was out of court. And after selling countless blankets. They ended up having to donate. What fifty thousand dollars to a specific school in South Dakota. That was what they settled on. And I think that that's incorrect because Pendleton has has built their little empire off of selling the native and confusing consumers into thinking that they actually work with native American artists and communities and give back to scale that they're that. They're not I've had these conversations with the family a penalty in. And they said that they would give me their document or show me their share their documents of what they give back to native communities, and I'm I'm waiting. It's been was I in Portland two years three years forever ago. Oh, yeah. Still waiting to see on what you give back well beyond that. Some native people to that would be great. Scraps. Don't ask we'd take some scraps actually put them into our design. Really give us some actual stress. It doesn't take much though to appease us. It really we we just want some respect and some honor and Adrian you've said this countless times there's no respect and honor in taking and not giving back and also took quote agent misrepresentation. Without representation in the podcast Adrian, tell us what you which won miss representation representation with house ago. I don't represent without honor. Or no, thanks. Like when you represent us without us. It's done to us. Oh. That's a phrase that I have borrowed from Australian indigenous folks, and they say nothing about us without us. So I say no representations of us without us. And yeah, 'cause I think that I mean that so just go you were nodding fiercely when Jamie said that it's a double edged sword. I don't know if he wanted to expand on that. Oh, yeah. I just I like, yeah. Jamie. No, I've talked to various designers about this behind the scenes, but anytime that there is an issue of appropriation or misappropriation in mainstream fashion. It actually helps native designers in the sense that this this there is a desire for consumers to access, you know, I don't know. Navajo patterns, you know, the the beadwork they there there is this. We're having this time right now where consumers want that. And so. When something comes out where it's misappropriation. Then we say, hey, there's actual native designers, and then there's a boost in sales. So this is kind of like a foot in the door for us in the sense that we can see who is interested in these patterns or these colors or the style or what we stand for and then we can access those consumers, those those allies those can be our allies. So I I mean, I've talked designers who have said like, hey that really sucked that artists are that designer ripped us off. But he kinda loose the Maceo a little bit. All right, cool. That's good. Because then we're able to reach people, and it's about it's about access accessing those markets, and so that's kind of where I see the double edged sword to and maybe I'm just being you know, rose colored glasses and looking at the sunny side of things, but I have been turned into a little bit of an optimist these days in that. I think that we we can turn this around. We could turn this into something amazing. Not get turned on Syria by with wits her with my with my lady. But and it comes down to just a lack of access from their side from the consumer side and also almost like a lack of education and this ignorance because when we did the Paul Frank collaboration, and I walked into their headquarters and saw just everybody looks the same except for there was one Asian lady. But everybody else looked the same. And I realized that I was the first native American that they were ever meeting in their lives, and it's just that we are the minorities of the minorities. And so sometimes it's just they don't have a personal connection with us. So we've just become this. This the stereotype. And then when they meet you and see you in all homo, you, touch your hair. You're real. So that's where the power is the power is in those personal connections. And I think that we can reach that through through the bad. We can barrel through the bad to get to the good side. The other day this this non Indian lady pulled me aside and somebody I've known for a really long time. And she said I bought this native beaded headband at a at a switch days, and I want to wear and everybody said that you'd be mad at me. If I wore it, and I was like people say that to me all the time. Okay. So let's just clarify that conversation. Yeah. So I'll tell you what I said, I said, you know, I don't think there's anything wrong with you wearing something. That's typically native made. I think the problem is when native people get cut out of of the say in their own work, and then somebody else profits, and then a non native wears it. And it's representing something that's very obviously tribal, and it would be really great. If you would you know, if when you're wearing that you just accredit the artists that it comes from. And that's beautiful, of course, where it by all of Jamie's beadwork. Where all of it. And we're proud and where it knowing where it comes from that, it has an origin, stone origin. But it hasn't an orgy story. What's your favorite bone? I know we don't have all the time in the world, Jamie. And so, Jamie. I'm just going to be the like think of this. I wanna talk to you about your boots and the shoes and the beating that you do so for the audience in for millier, Jamie beads on leather boots on Lubaton boots on high fashion expensive boots on beautiful shoes. Heels and does incredibly intricate gorgeous designs on them. And I would just love to hear the story behind that where that came from. And also love watching your YouTube, videos and Instagram videos of process, so. Just a little bit about that as well. Yeah. I started doing a lot of videos and things because I had so many people. Commenting. How are they are? They may in all those glued on. No, let me show you. I have been a clothes horse since forever. My mom is she is in love with risks stores. She doesn't know where the hell I came from. I'm like rodeo drive. Take me there. She's like, oh my God. So I mean, I've always been one of my most favorite online luxury shopping sites. I was just scrolling like drooling I need that need that. And my mom happened to be over. And my husband. We were just sitting there talking, and I don't remember which one of them said it was like, why don't you? You know, what about beating a pair of shoes? And I was like. You mean, I can buy. Great idea it just out of a random conversation. I thought. Yeah, that's pretty cool because I've always doored my buddy Terry Greaves work on her beated converse. And I just I always love footwear. And so I thought, wow, I'm gonna see if I can if I can do something on something that I always loved I can make this work, and it really has. And they they have described them as their myself portrait's, my love of my love of luxury fashion. And then my love of Mike culture all ruled into those shoes. And so I've been very fortunate people resonate with them. They love them. And I just have the best time because not only do I get to indulge addiction of shoes. Also, get to do what I love with them. So it's just it's a perfect perfect worked for me. A lot of these boots end up in museums and their displayed is fine art, which is amazing with we've seen in the Matt the heard the Smithsonian, and I got so many places. Oh, many places, and it's blurring the lines of what we see art, and fashion, but what are your what are your thoughts is fashion as whereab- art or a pieces for museum specifically. Yeah. I love the fact that I think all but two pairs are in museums. And none of them have ever been warring. But yeah, I think an I even have this. I don't know if it was. The hangup thinking wired to address hundreds of thousands of dollars. I never understood that. I mean, and I'm an artist until you actually look at that see how it's made. It's amazing issued be considered fine. Art. I mean, if you've ever looked take a. Should nell. They put out videos. I think every season of their tour behind the scenes, and you've got, you know, twenty or thirty ladies working on one dress beating it hand beating a handsome wing it. It's amazing. And I it's just incredible. And. There is such a difference in the shoes as well. I mean, you know, what I've got my first pair of Louis hawn's. I thought I've never spent that kind of money on a parish. Oh my God. But looking at them actually, having my hands on them. And you know, having a looking what I've been wearing prior to that. It's they are works of art in so thankful that museums and the general my audience can see that see the difference that the shoes turn into sculptural beinart, and it's really really great. Daime just tell us you just put out those sparkly red. Beets this morning. We all sell them and Instagram. All the world. How many hours you spend on those those are beautiful gorgeous. Oh my God. And how many beads do you think are on those boots? Choose it'll be right back. So well, maybe she's writing the booth gonna bring home. Oh my God. Back in just like, all right? Just had to see the kids. A second days than go off to their new home. Oh my God. I know the people who are listening to this are not going to be able to see them. So Jay describe them for us. Yes. They are a Giuseppi noti latte for booties, and they're completely hand beaded with thirteen's, which is small ones side. When site says holyoke him and Matijas been there where you took our family, pictures and the other side says wafted, and that's my clan. And so the whole idea behind these parent in the title is no place like home emit tickets heard this before but holyoke is where my people are from in that place still is in my family. We that's our land. And that's. It means everything to me that we still have that. And it's such a special place to me. And so that whole I d ah is wrapped up in these these is Mava for where are they going to Jamie going to the Crocker art museum in Sacramento have to make a special have to like. Don't have to try those on. NT just coming to visit them. What do you hope for Nita fashion in this next stage next chapter like, what would you love to see in the world of native fashion more that more of them more? Yeah. More people producing manufacturing and really pushing it. On all levels right lake street where the poor the ready to wear everything in between. We need the every aspect needs to get filled out. Yeah. Because I think with more I I've never we help each other out the more of it. It's more visibility. I. Yeah. We need more. I agree. Yes. I would also love to see more collaborations. I would love to see actually I would love love love love a slot during New York fashion week that was all just straight up native American designers. Just give us one twenty minutes lot. We'll show it will blow your mind. You know, each each not one of those sideshows like the real. No, no. Yeah. I'm not a sideshow. We've been on the fringes for too long look at that pun right there. I would love I I have my own thoughts. I would love to be able to walk into Nordstroem's to rodeo drive and to every major department store and like target and just find stuff made by Jamie Okuma or a number of other native designers. I I would love to see it. Oh, yeah. This is a call out. If there's any business person out there who would like to work with beyond buckskin on figuring out a way to chain it, I don't know how to turn it into a chain thing, I would be more than happy to talk to somebody. 'cause I'm like, I don't know the business size. That was going to be my follow up question is like what would it take to make this happen? Like, what still needs to be in place for this to happen? You need a lot of artists to work with not just one needs to be a lot of them needs to be a constant source or resource for new stuff because that's just the fashion industry the way it is. But it also. Needs to being tain that sense of connection. It cannot just turn strictly mass produced cannot because then it dilutes and this has happened in the past. We've seen it where commodification turns into like, you know, poor cocoa Pelley like. Nobody like coca Pelly anymore been over commodified, poor feller. You know? Work coca pally. So yes. Tell us where the audience can find you and how to best connect with you and support your work. So I run an amazing business called beyond buckskin. You can find us online at beyond Buxton dot com or you can shop the boutique at shop dot beyond buckskin dot com. We are on I think every social media platform. So like us or follow us on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, tumbler, Pinterest Snapchat, YouTube not up LA or come. Visit you in. Yes, we've got a physical retail store in the fashion. Mecca of Belcourt, North Dakota and the turtle bone Indian reservation come on down. You can also get your haircut at scalpels them, which is the barber next store. Right. Nixon years, and and beyond bucks in isn't necessarily in the GPS, but scalp him is. Yeah. Same on my website is jail Kuma dot com. And I say, I'm pretty much. I think all the socials as well. Either J Okuma or my full name, Jamie, Oklahoma. Yeah. Well, thank you so much Jamie for joining us. We were so happy to have you here. And I just I just wanna say again that I'm just super grateful for you. And appreciate you taking time out of your day to come in. Come and visit with us a Teague seed. Thank you. Thank you guys so much and thank you all that each one of you ladies, do it's amazing. I don't think I need part of how six by successive. Come is seriously. Because of what you guys are doing. I mean, your voices are so incredibly important, and I think you all so much for being you thing. Thank you. So so much to just cut and Jamie for joining us that was really fun. And I'm so glad that we got to have that conversation. If you're interested in supporting native designers or wanna see some cool native fashion shows there is so much going on in the native design world, if you wanna follow me or just co or Jamie on social media or any of the other folks mentioned in the episode. We definitely share out these events and encourage folks to go and be excited. So look out for that info Matik, and I were trying to make a list to share some of the designers that were most excited about it got too long. So we don't want to leave people out we wanted to extend the opportunity to all of you. If you're listening, and you head over to the all my relations, Instagram and wanna share in the comments who your favorite native designers are and give their handles and their website. We can build. This list together to point people to the other amazing folks, you can follow him by from and support and share and show off the amazing work. They're doing. Yeah. I mean, if nothing else I hope that listening to this episode today encourages you to buy indigenous there are so many incredible native artists designers, beautiful content creators, and they of always need your support. So like Jamie said to take this to the next level we need people to invest in the work in. So hopefully, this inspires you to find your favorite beater or designer and go buys them of their work rep it and give it as gifts to your friends. Huge widow. And thank you to all of our patrons on patriot. I can't even tell you. How amazing that is to see how many of you are supporting us and this work and thank you to those of you who continue to support us and other ways as well. Widow. We wanted to shout out. And thank you to max eleven for the music on his episode. And we're so full for all of our friends who keep letting us use their amazing music on the show. Thank you so much for listening. Please like share subscribe, it really helps us out if you rate us on I tunes and tune in for next week. We're going to be talking about native languages indigenous languages, resurgence vibrancy the struggles. And we look forward to sharing that story with you. Tig recede relation.

Jamie Dr Jessica Metcalf Instagram Canada Adrian Jamie Kuma Jamie Okuma North Dakota Dr J misappropriation Netflix Czech Republic David Chang co-ceo ridi Galea Judy Volve YouTube
11-23-20 COVID-19 rates on the rise

Native America Calling

56:30 min | 10 months ago

11-23-20 COVID-19 rates on the rise

"Welcome to native america calling from studio forty. Nine in albuquerque. I'm tara gate would a list compiled by the federation of american. Scientists put north dakota as having the highest covid nineteen telecity rate per capita in the world infection rates all over the country are spiking and tribes a reissuing strict shutdown orders to try and slow down the spread today. We'll get insights from tribal leaders and health officials about their hopes. Were fighting the new deadly wave of the pandemic bats after the news. Stay with us. This is national native news. I'm antonio gonzales. A judge ruled. The federal government was right to allow a southeast alaska tribe to organize hunt out of season due to covid nineteen as coast. Alaska's jacob bresnik reports state attorneys have sued to block future hunts arguing the special moose and deer harvest this summer was federal overreach during the early days of the covid nineteen pandemic. A federally recognized tribe on kuper island was alarmed by the high price and low supply of fresh meat. The organiz village of cake petitioned the federal subsistence board for hunting party to harvest five year. And two moose. Out of season and distribution meet within the community. It was green lit june. The state of alaska filed suit alleging. The feds illegally preempted the state's rights to manage wildlife. Assistant attorney general cheryl brooking says there are only narrow reasons for federal jurisdiction to trump state management. When alaska became a state. One of the main drivers of statehood was to get control fishing game management because the feds were making a mess of it she argued in court filings that the food security issue was never proven and the federal government exceeded its authority in allowing the hunt district court. Judge l gleason denied a preliminary injunction. That would have prevented special. Hunts in the future she wrote that federal officials had taken both conservation and public safety concerns into account when it reached its decision. She also noted that when federal officials reached out to state wildlife managers. They didn't respond. It's not the end of the case. The lawsuit will continue to move forward with both sides filing arguments before a final ruling but the upshot is that federal officials aren't blocked from authorizing out of season hunts in special circumstances travel leaders and cake. Don't see that likely in the near future. You know we just got them with our season hurt near season. So i think we're good for now. That's cakes tribal president joel jackson. He notes villas. Groceries are mainly shipped on the occasional steep ferry or barge. You know anything happens to those cranes down. There were being mode all the upcoming to alaska. We'd been a world of hurt. He says. Alaskan natives never voluntarily ceded their hunting and fishing rights on their traditional homeland. Of course we're in a real bad situation. I wouldn't hesitate to just a good a hunting party together. Go out and get what we need. You know so. But i want to stay within the into law and if we could be that that'd be great. The native american rights fund has joined the lawsuit on behalf of cakes tribe and the federal government in a friday statement. A staff attorney wrote alaskan native communities are facing hardships caused by covid nineteen and encouraged the state to treat tribes as partners not adversaries. It's unclear if any future special hunts are being considered federal. Wildlife officials declined to comment citing the state's litigation object breath nick tribal leaders water protectors and grassroots groups celebrated new klamath river dam removal agreement between tribes states and the damn owner last week leaders of the europe and karrueche tribes the states of california and oregon and the damn owner announced. An agreement provide additional resources and support to advance salmon restoration which includes a dam removal of virtual celebration was held friday hosted by the group. Save california salmon participants shared stories songs and pay tribute to water protectors vice chairman of the uruk tribe. Frankie myers moee so An how we got here. You know at the end of the game you know this was. This was twenty years at work. This water warriors activist clam justice pollution others coming together to really push it to the front line. Work continues to navigate the final regulatory approvals to allow the project to begin in twenty twenty two with a down removal and twenty twenty three. I'm antonio gonzalez. National native news is produced by colonic broadcast corporation with funding by the corporation for public broadcasting support by the center for indigenous cancer research at roswell park comprehensive cancer center dedicated to cancer research medicine and cancer care for indigenous population. No charge online risk assessment tool is available at roswell park dot org slash assess me native teaching aids collaborates with tribes to create games and apps which focus on language culture and history. Native teaching aids can create fun engaging materials for your community further information and online store at native teaching aids dot com who support this show native voice one the native american radio network. This is native america calling. I'm tara gate. Would the covid nineteen tracker the centers for disease control and prevention shows. North dakota and south dakota lead in the nation in the number of new cove nineteen cases and the number of deaths in the past week. A list by the federation of american scientists lists. North dakota is having the highest per capita fatality rate. In the world cases are surging across the country prompting state cities and tribes to issue closures and stricter public health measures. public health officials. Say now more than ever. It's important to wear a mask and avoid contact with people outside your home today. We'll hear from tribal leaders north and south dakota about how their tribes are doing during this new spike in infections. And we'd like to hear from you. Are you getting information from your tribal leaders about how to stay safe if you have. And maybe you even have stay at home. Orders or mask mandates. Do you follow them. Was welcome in the conversation today. Give us a call. The number to join is one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight today. We're gonna start off in belcourt. North dakota we have jimmy as your. He is the chairman of the turtle. Mountain chippewa trump germanischer. Thank you for joining us. Thank you for having me in. Good morning in german. We definitely one here. You know how things are going in your own community and you know. Rise of cases we see are happening in your state Give us an update of where things currently stand in. How much cove nineteen is. Impacting your tribe. How many cases are there. Go ahead all right now. Our tribe is directly in the centre of rolette county. And as of this morning rolette county has two hundred and forty active cases. It's a little hard to separate the county from the drive itself. But you know we're we're all one big community here so so we're all just trying to do our best in german just knowing you know what this means to the community to have something like this inter- you know um you also is is really important and i know you're hearing directly from the people in. What are you hearing from your citizens about about this and and things. They're hoping for on how to keep the community safe. Also it's a little splits. We have people on almost every level. You know we have people that are calling for complete closures and stay at home orders. We have people that are following the mask mandates that we've had in place since june or since july We've also had a curfew in place. But unfortunately in the last three weeks we have had a spike and we are moving on to a few more strict executive orders in what you know putting those orders in place. It's asking the citizens to participate in for you as a tribal leader when you do see citizens coming together in you know. Heating some of these orders. How does that make you feel. It's a little frustrating and it's a little you know you're always walking that line you know. We're sovereign nation. And once you start putting executive orders in place telling people to do the things that we've grown up. Not doing you know we were growing up. We grew up. We learn how to take care of our elders. We learn to. If you're faced with an issue you don't call in your family. Go see your family. Everybody come and you know we unite to combat. Whatever faces those. That's been the major issue in the major struggle with this virus in particular is that it is telling us to do all the things that we were brought up to not. Do you know it's telling us to stay away from our elders telling us to Stay away from our families don't congregate don't don't come together with a unified strength of a family and community so we're telling people you need to stand up part to unite and that is in direct conflict of everything that we are you know so. It's been a struggle and once you get to the point where you're issuing executive orders to stay at home and you know you can be prosecuted in the long term. You know worst case scenario if you were quarantined and you're leaving your establishment. You know these are all these are all things that we were growing up not to do. So we were not only fighting this global pandemic at that macro level but on the micro levels. We're also telling people to you know. Go against everything and that comes with affects to and i know that we're all dealing different things. Because of the pandemic and terminator you recently had a tribal building close For this month a building closure for this month and did you see rates. Go down as a result. Rents have declined but not at the extent that we need them to. And that's why within the next forty eight hours the turtle mountain chippewa tribal go to the next of trying to protect ourselves. And you know that will mean harsher curfews that will mean you know more closures non-essential closures and you know it's just very difficult because you start walking that fine line between a martial law executive order and that is something that site take very very seriously that i did not want to get close to but we have everything stacked against us here in the turtle mountains. We're in a very rural area. We're in a very harsh climates. We are hitting tomorrow. Could be negative fifty in our in our area you know when people people need to leave the reservation and come back on for basic necessities. You know. it's these are the things that keep their person up at night. I didn't doesn't matter if you're a tribal leader or if you're you know you have a family sitting at home that lives two doors down from you. you know. you're you're up all night. You're worried about what's what's going to happen and at this point we're still in. We're still in that phase where everything changes from week to week. It used to be day to day. No changes week to week month month and you know. There's no perfect answers to any decision that we make right now and that's the scary part chairman. I appreciate you being here with us and sharing some views. Maybe you have some views to share to one eight hundred nine six two eight. Four eight is a number. Are you concerned every time you see that covid. Nineteen rates are raising And then you know is their work being done to bring them down in your own tribal community one eight hundred nine nine six two four eight is how you join us today and chairman azure. What do you think about. North dakota having the highest covid nineteen mortality rate in the world. You know even with the turtle mountains we are the heaviest populated with the smallest land-based try and north dakota. We did a great job at the beginning of keeping it away but we knew once it impacted the turtle mountains that we were at a higher risk because of our dense population. We were always working behind the eight ball. Because we can pass every law that we want as an executive branch or the legislative branch of tribal government but without the surrounding townships and the states around us. Right off of our mortar's not following even close to the similar standards that we were putting in place for ourselves. It was inevitable that we were going to be impacted. And now we're seeing that and you know it's not fair to our people it's not fair to surrounding communities there's so many different levels of of Fear or concern that you know. We can't close our borders. You know we live in a very like i mentioned earlier. Vary rural piece of land in the center of north dakota. Right off the canadian border. Our food comes into a into this community on a us food struck. We cannot shut our borders. We are the we are already the the last rung on that supply chain. And i'm afraid that if we tried to attempt to close our borders that our suppliers will save well. It's going to cost us money here already. The last You're already last wrong food chain so we're just going to go somewhere else. You know these are the we have to wait. Every every decision we make has so many after-effects and it's it's it's mind boggling. It's worse off than with that comes a lot of intricate decisions and a lot of things that people around us do not have to do with and these are all things that we have to consider and way and we're getting to the point where we have to waive the if we make this decision the bad things that could happen and way that with making another decision in the bad things that could happen. So what's the worst of the after effects and now we have to go with a better of the bad effects you know. It's it's very hard to explain. But i don't know some some days you just feel you start feeling hopeless at a certain point but we still lease up our boots because we're the turn mountain band of chippewa indians. And we've been through everything in the past and we've already. We've came out of them stronger than stronger than we were before we had to face it and and i know that's what the outcome will be here. But when you see our elders becoming sick and you see our elders having to be shipped off in helicopters two and a half hours away and it's hard it's very hard. It's very emotional. It's very hard. We do not want to lose our generations. And it's we're not the only that's dealing with all of this unique in the aspect of where we're located but every single tribe is dealing with the same issues and it's we're just trying to wear best in trying to make the best decisions with what we have in front of us in you know a lot of great decisions are being made on behalf of the people as well In all of this in a really appreciate you sharing you know exactly what it is. Your tribe is facing in when we think of our own tribal communities in however a covid nineteen has impacted us and whatever rates. Are you know we think of how all of this affects the community and today we are hearing about different communities and how covert nineteen is affecting them We're hearing from tribal leaders will introduce you to another one coming up after the break but just hearing what is being put into place. What are your thoughts in. What more can be done If you'd like to share some thoughts eight hundred nine nine six two eight. Four eight is the number We look forward to your calls and even updates from your own community and if you need to call in anonymously wall take your calls to hang tight. Things are gonna be going on more as we continue in this hour but again that invitation. Is there for you to join us dialing now one eight hundred nine nine six two four eight is a number or native languages are key to our culture and identity are seen as gifts from our ancestors many tribes are doing their best to revitalize and keep their languages thriving. Whether it's one word at a time or an entire dictionary words we'll talk about meaningful native words and phrases on the next native america calling support by roswell park who know tribal communities face persistent challenges in health equity such as cancer and higher death rates the centre for indigenous cancer research at roswell park. Comprehensive cancer center is dedicated to advancing cancer research that will lead to translatable science medicine and cancer care for indigenous populations were wide. Are you at high risk for cancer. A no charge online assessment tool is available at roswell park dot org slash assess me. You're listening to native america. Calling interrogate would from slow pueblo. And we're getting update on the rising covid nineteen rates among native nations. If he liked to call us and report what is happening in your own community phone lines are open. The number to join us is one eight hundred nine nine. Six two eight four eight. That's also one eight hundred nine native with us today at belcourt. North dakota is chairman. Jimmy azure he is a chairman of the mountain chippewa tribe and chairman azur Just thinking about how our tribal nations connect to our states and you know we have many different connections and just being in the state and you see the regulations they put out. You compare those two. What's going on in your community or things you've issue issued and a lot of times. There's a big difference in recently. The governor of north dakota issued a mask mandate What do you think about this Being issued at this time and not earlier. I think it was really late. No the tournament wins. Put an arm mask mandate in july. And you know the thing with the tournament and we have fifteen thousand members that are either on or off reservation and i would say twenty percents of our population is right off the reservation. We have four townships that are within five. Miles of our reservation borders that many of our members that's where many of our members live so we have people going in and out of our reservation with city townships that had absolutely no precautions. Put in place and like i said earlier. It was just inevitable that we were going to be impacted We've let the governor's office no since july. We've let our senators no you know. What are our concerns were. I'm glad that they finally did move forward with some precautions. But at this point i mean it was a little. It was a little too late because we were already heavily. Impacted for two straight weeks before that mandate was passed by the state. Well you know just thinking about where things currently stand in and that relationship with the state in the new again. i'll throw that to our listening audience and you see what your community has done. what do you think about the comparison. Join us eight hundred nine. Six two eight four eight. Thank you chairman asia. I'll let's take a call. We have matthew in pine ridge. South dakota listening in on kate. I l i matthew thank you for giving us a ring your on air. Thank you i live. I live in. South dakota live on the reservation here and Back when the back into earlier dates of october where. I was in jail We there's a process where you have to go through where you test go through testing stage when you first come in you wave fourteen days international nice symptoms. Then you get moved to a part of the unit where you actually have to wear a mask and stuff so i was going through a process where it took days to finally get to the part of the unit where covid free and they're not time lake. We thought we were good. We thought we were safe. not As far as that Thou- october six Well two days prior before that they took us outside testing outside the joe and and then october six. They came into formula. That i caught karuna. And they're i'm like how. Could i catch covert when i was placed in the unit where there wasn't any code people under there. 'cause we were all tested negative. So there's about five of us and they sent us to quarantine site one of the many quarantine sites here on the reservation With all that happened. I was placed in a room. And you know of course. There wasn't a medical facility. The only place you in there because they don't want you infecting anybody so as that was happening I started experiencing the symptoms within the first week. Getting there I thought they were pretty mild. It's just to cough. Nhc throat then. As the second week several around the symptoms got worse and worse to the point where it was getting difficult to breathe and my chest on fire. So i called I call it to be taken to hospital and Yeah the average came and they took me hospital as i got up there to the people at the hospital told me that. Oh we don't have a record of you test positive on this date at the joke. So we're going to retest you. And they did that and they found out. That was simple matter. Quit the cova. Novell virus. So i was struggling with that that i was having a hard time matthew. I'm sorry to hear that how you doing now. I suffer from difficulty breathing For the after effects. 'cause wildly taken to hospital. They just send me back to the quarantine site and they said they couldn't do anything so i said okay then Two days later after going to the hospital My temperature was one on one point. Two and i was absolutely devastated. 'cause i was like what do i do. Those guys at the quarantine site the security there. They didn't know what to do. What running into these different places in you do have questions and when nobody can answer them. What do you do in a lot of this is going on in our tribal communities and just hearing your story matthew we do. We do have to think about the people in our community and what they're facing in coming into contact you know with different facilities you know in our different nations. There's a lot of considerations. And i'm wondering if you know somebody who was a tribal administrator your eyebrows or race hearing matthew's story in in what is it. Take to get some of these things To a point where we aren't seeing numbers raising insider facilities there so much to consider among go to another travel leader. Because i want to get his take matthew. I thank you for calling in in you. Know what a good thoughts to you and your health and just hearing you know how this journey that you've been on with covid. It's important to know your story to thank you for calling in matthew. We now go to white horse. South dakota We have herald frazier with us. He's the chairman of the cheyenne river. Sioux tribe chairman frazier. Thank you for being with us for another native america calling. I know you're a tribal leader of another nation than we just heard from of math different than matthews nation but hearing his story knowing how covid nineteen goes through the different facilities Even our law enforcement as well as our tribal jails. Is there anything you wanted to share or just giving us more information on when you as a tribal leader here things like this are going on. What do you do hoti get under control. Go ahead welcome. Thank you well. We've been doing a lot of things since the very beginning Race only Just like turn a mom we've Experience some Huge numbers We need that is going to be just a matter of time before it. Got into the center of our reservation. And we're at that at that point now so one of the latest things that we're doing is we're closing down one of our communities eager beep. It's it's kind of center hub of our reservation. It's where everybody goes. Not only for their tribal or i a businesses it's where hospitals located and So but right now we have two hundred and ninety five active cases and these past. Several weeks It appears that about seventy five percent of active cases are in this community so we started this last night at midnight. we closer down and This community will be closed down for ten days in the only people Able to move around or essential workers in and things like that so We've kind of Visited with some pine ridge. They did a day lockdown. And i believe their numbers drop from four hundred and fourteen to seventy nine so we know that by doing this action that it ain't gonna cure the virus but it is definitely going to slow it down and that's our main goal is to try to slow these active cases down. So that's kind of our latest thing that we've been doing harbor. We are doing here on cheyenne river in chairman. Frazier you know. We are months into all of this in. No that people you know. They're getting tired in another restriction sometimes fatigues them even more. What do you wanna say to people who are filling the fatigue of that or just even the fatigue of the pandemic know we've always You know way of life you know. We've always sacrificed you know. And that's what we've taught to do and and We are strong people and we just gotta dig deeper and just gets longer because it is true. I see a lot of that I myself too. I mean every day we Like somebody said. There's i can recall the movie about everyday the same old thing. So bad i dig deep and i know our people are stronger and i and and and you know and they just gotta dig deeper and just keep strong be stronger in your their prayers and and we could do this You know it's important. Like i said we've always sacrificed for others and we just gotta continue to do that And that goes deep especially in our traditions in german frazier. Check in with you. Last you were at head with governor christie gnome about checkpoints that were going on on the reservation. Can you give us an update. Where do things stand now. Well are checkpoints are still in place You know it's just unfortunate that You know and it's i see that on our reservation as well you know. There's pretty much a. I wouldn't say it's a fifty percents split but You know there's some people That reside on the reservation. Believe the way that She believes as well as President trump and they think You know several embassies in in in rights to you know the civil rights are more important than human life. And i've always You know that's one of the biggest challenges is trying to get everyone to work together. And and 'cause. I know that if we work together before united we could get through this a lot easier. So that's been one of the biggest challenges is you know. Convincing are people that you know that this is the right thing to do. And it really is because i always have combat that Saying that the greatest right is right to live. And you know. I was always told growing up that You know we always lived under god's law until treaties come to play then we start living under man made laws and and it's a man made laws. I gave out civil rights but you know Congratula gave us the right to live. And that's the greatest right that we need to protect and i've always kept that in the forefront of my thoughts and Continue to try to try to save everybody that we can intervene frazier when you see. Your state. numbers are going high. Your state ranks high in terms of Covid cases and infections. What goes through. Your mind is a tribal leader on. You know what needs to happen for the community. Any thoughts well. You know We've always. I've always tried to say that no matter what happened around us. We need to focus what we're doing here at home and and do the things that we need to do to try to keep everybody safe Every day i get a map of every county and top dakota and and For a long time. Every county in south dakota as their test positivity rate has exceeded five percent. That's what we look at that Counties that are less than five that their safety to travel to but these this past month has really been hectic and i think There was two weeks at a time that every county was about five percent then Couple of days where several counties were was beneath that. But now we're going on another week where every everything is about five percent and it's a big concern. I mean you know we we've got to and it's just unfortunate that on our reservation like many others you know that we have to go out and get some so many central supply so I've been really pushing to when you leave your home to visit a neighbor or just go hostile or central to follow the cdc guidelines of voice. Large groups gatherings maintain six distance from others. Wash your hands more frequently and above all out in public wearing masks so i pushed that every day. I i do a radio report every day at noon. And i always bring that up in german speaking of gatherings this time of year You know people that get together with their families We're heading into the holiday season even further. There's another time at the in december where people a lot of people plan to be with their families again in any thoughts about you know what's coming up this week. you know. it's the thanksgiving holiday any thoughts or or message to the community. That's something you know. And we've been from the beginning. We really pushed out to specially save our elders. The bonobo people you know there's other ways to communicate and that is a huge challenge because family is the basis of our culture. And it's really hard to do that. We've seen when we analyze and look at the numbers we see that about a third of them are coming from large gatherings. And you know every day you know. I've heard people say you know in our culture every a thanksgiving we always need your fangs. Every morning we wake up to be here another day and and give thanks for all the things that You know has been given to us so you know. Sometimes i hear that from a lot of people. This is in our holiday. Our thanksgiving every day. So you know. But i do know that. There's a lot of traditions and families. That have been ingrained in our our our people. And you know i respect that as well but We just gotta be extra cautious You know and i know that People are not intentionally infecting others. You know but You know if we truly got really careful and we can't let our guard down. I've seen stories where That's when people have gotten the viruses. They let their guard down thinking not. They're safe with family or safe with friends and and then they get it and then some unfortunately something really bad happened to so i you know. Just gotta try to. I know it's going gonna be a tough time but I think like chairman that we've been through tough times before and we're still here so we just gotta come Make changes to our lifestyle. Our way of life in chairman frazier any words to come into those who are. Let's say you are kovic positive. And you're doing all the precautions. You're quarantining you're doing all of that. You're making that sacrifice. Any words to those people. Chairman frazier got about a minute. Well you know. I just wanna say thank you for doing that because it's really important. Know i it's unfortunate that we've lost Several outages here on the reservation. That's a loss of our language loss of lot of our knowledge. I really thank you for per stepping up and doing the right thing. So i just can't can say more more and say thank you. I mean just a lot not all fours to really really be thankful for indeed. While i appreciate you being here you can join us to. Maybe you want to share some thoughts after hearing what is on the mind of two of the chairman of our great tribal nations. Maybe you're a tribal leader. You want to share some thoughts. Go ahead dial in one. Eight hundred nine six two eight four eight is the number we look forward to your calls and when you think of how our communities work who all is stepping up to the plate to make sure our community stay healthy You can give us a call about that. Maybe there's something that your tribe is doing. That's different and you see it. You see working. It's getting to people. People are understanding Is there a forum for the people to share their thoughts to when things aren't working if you'd like to share with us dial in we look forward to hearing from you today. One eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight is the number and you can even tweet your thoughts to us on twitter at one eight hundred nine native and you just type in native america calling if you're trying to find us on facebook or instagram hang tight. There's more head if you're hurting in your relationship and want to talk strong. Hearts native helpline is a confidential and anonymous domestic violence helpline for native americans available at one. Eight four four seven six to eighty four eighty three or connect with alive advocate by using the chat now button at strong hearts helpline dot org advocates offer support and referrals for resources daily seven. Am to ten pm central time. This program supported by the national indigenous women's resource center. Thank you for starting off your week with us. Here on native america calling tara gatewood. And if you'd like to join us we have space for you. The number to dial in is one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight and with us on the line today is chairman. Harold frazier of the cheyenne river. Sioux tribe also here to is german jamie asher of the turtle mountain chippewa tribe and chairman asia. Also wanted just give you moment. If there's any thoughts we know holidays happening this week. Any thoughts to your community. Well same thing as chairman frazier l. We just really trying to get the message out to people that you know this year and hopefully it's only this year that we we really limit the gatherings You don't want to unintentionally you know. Get anybody sick. You know where we all have our mushrooms and our customs and you know the best way to keep everybody safe this. This holiday season is to Unfortunately stay away from my property right now and i know it's hard to do in our culture but you know it's something that we need to do and one thing about native nation is we are masters of adapting so hopefully that. This is just a short term. You know Adapation but for this one year for sure that we need to just keep separated. Thank you for that in german. Frazier annoyed gotta get going here. Anything even leave with. No i just thank you. And i think again i. I think it's important that we we all work together. I know that by doing that. It's a lot easier because Blame me it's s. Not something we've been dealing with since the very beginning you know with other governments. You know things like that and and just a lot of Support from From bill interphase is made it pretty tough and i. I really wish that we could all be on the same page and and pages to save lives. Thank you for that. We should well thoughts to you in your community and then that invitation. You want to join us. Dial now. they're still time one eight hundred nine six two eight. Four eight is a number. We're gonna move over to telegraph oklahoma. We have bryan hail with us. He is the deputy executive director of external operations for the cherokee nation health services. He's a citizen of the cherokee nation. Brian thank you for being with us. Welcome thank you very much. Appreciate the opportunity in brian Please tell us you know what it is. You're seeing there on the cherokee nation. And of course worthing stan with covid nineteen rates. Thank you bye go ahead. So we are seeing Ira's and we've ever seen since the beginning of the pandemic are tests positivity rate the number of positive tests compared to the overall number of tests we performed for the last three weeks has been highest. We've seen it. It's been sixteen percents Which is really high. It shows that we have a lot of transmission community That no matter. How many more reaches that. The number positives continues to increase. So and then just the number of cases that are in our community Oklahoma if you look at the the map the entire state is in the condition lead or we have twenty five more cases per Per one hundred thousand and so you know we have basically uncontrollable spread of the virus in our communities and despite you know everything that we that we to do to try to keep us safe Right now we're we're definitely in the middle of surge here in cherokee nation in so brian. What can you share about measures. The nation is taking to slow the spread so we feel like we really got a Early start on this you know. We started our task. Force and activated are virtually operations center for health in early march. Wanna say mark second and we had a mask mandate early on. We hadn't shelter in place early on. That was a direct from chief. Hoskin and mask mandate was for all cherokee nation properties. And we've done really good about enforcing that on turkey. And now you can properties but you know. We are integrating within larger communities. They don't always take the same measures that we do. We also had through distribution and payments to elders. Try to help them some of their bills and actually the food distribution actually ticket to the elders so they didn't have to get out so you know we did a lot of things to try to protect the people that were most vulnerable elders in our speakers and just doing everything we can to protect those communities. Well thank you for that. You know. I've got a caller on the line You want to join us then. Just dial one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight. We got mona on the line. In eagle butte. South dakota tuned in on k. Ip mona thanks for reaching. Now go ahead you're on air to Ganesha it out on commend chairman frazier for Protecting and and Setting up the checkpoints. Early on despite the governor's Respect and Differences for our tribe doing that. Oh we had Protection from The covert by Him requiring and the council to require masks used in all stores and public service places and and that really helped to keep our numbers down But with this pandemic in the second wave coming through of course Raise three star numbers of by by hundred but He needs us to say I commend Our chairman frazier for standing up for people guinea tokala bike all the rest of the tokala from the nation and rosebud nation who set up their protection checkpoints and They they would not allow anyone in the state in the bhandari's of our reservation. Who were out of state and had no Members tribal members and They didn't like that at first. But sure you it raised. You know a lot of big issues in our tribal leaders things that they do Stepping up and pushing back you know that a lot of it does deserve a lot of You know our thanks in mona. You did it. I appreciate you giving us a ring. There in eagle butte. South dakota and brian you know our citizens are important in this. You know hearing from them today. We had a couple of call in share their thoughts and just even You know giving their words on the kind of actions that had been taken on in our tribal communities and making sure ears are open to our community. Members is a huge thing in brian Is there anything that tribe has done to make sure that communication is open. And you know you're hearing from citizens Even when they're pushing back themselves and saying hey we could do better here Any thoughts on how that inputs into some of the moves the cherokee nation is making so tradition leadership has been a lot on social media platforms videos and things like that trying to communicate. They definitely consistently goes two ways and one of the things that i'm working on right now is getting ready for the vaccine for a for a covid nineteen vaccine and we really wanted to make sure that we educated people they feel good about it. They knew how the vaccine you know. Worked how was approved and so we had a community focus group course. It was done virtually where we listened to elders kind of share their thoughts their sentiments about a vaccine and did the best. We could answer their questions and took what we learn from them and have kinda built some education. Try to make sure that people in our community you know. Maybe they didn't know about vaccines before they try to do everything we can to make sure that they understand how the vaccine in that you know whenever it's approved it'll it'll be safe and offer some protection that's also you know we try. We try to use it to to let people know that back scenes. Aren't the end all be all to this. You know we're going to have to continue layers of defense that it's it's gotta be in concert with testing and masking and still continuing to have some social distancing so is one of the ways that we feel like. We're trying to integrate what people know and what they wanna share with us in brian when we think of how services being given to tribal communities in just wondering you know where things currently stand In early on you was about. Do we have enough test coming to us. in the health care that's being provided in. Here we are again months later where things currently stand in administering medical services to the community Do you find that the community is there. Is there enough resources for everyone. Tell me a little bit about that. So far i would say the answer is yes and You know we worked early on to make sure we had protective equipment supplies medications. I will say that in. Ill service area office in oklahoma. It's been a good partner for us to get those resources We've had access to a lot of testing resources and are using some of those now to try to get testing more and more widespread. We use that to help. Keep a are sequoia high school open at least so students can go one day a week and they're tested you know each morning before they go to class and that's been i would say excessive but doing everything we can to make sure that testing is out there. The treatments are out there. I i believe that. At least within arco service we're providing some of the some of the best care possible for patients with could you know we have the rim desert here we have the the new monoclonal antibody treatment. That's gonna be coming out soon. Actually have that or just working on the protocols to make sure that we give that safely effectively and they were doing everything we can to make sure that our communities are protected from the flu So they don't have a double it. Keeping people healthy so if they do get kobe. They haven't already had their body weakened by the influenza virus and we've also use those influenza vaccinations as a dress rehearsal for when we do get a cogan vaccine using that to get ready for you know pushing it out to the staff and the mass humanization as well. We also early on you know we saw the vaccine was in the lead and had these ultra cold storage requirements. And so we started working early on to to make sure that we had some freezers. That could keep those vaccines stored at the ultra low temperature that it requires so what i will say though. Is that our intensive care. Unit here at the tribes hospital at school or step down unit is full or mid surge beds or close to halfway being filled and then on top of that You know if you look back timeline. Line when the lockdowns initially started We are having a record number of babies being delivered This month and is projected to last into next month as well so we're having to accommodate a large number of deliveries babies which is great news but it also. It is definitely a burden for the hospital at this moment trying to deal with the surge of kobe patients in and a surge in deliveries in brian. When you think of measures that have been taken on the health side. Is there anything that you feel has really been. You know i guess saving grace in all of this or something you would dislike to inform other tribal leaders or people who are listening of. We did this and we found. This was the best because we know that our tribal nations are all at different levels in different phases with dealing with this pandemic anything like that. You share brian. What are the things that we did. you know. Besides the masks is anyone that could work remote work remote and we've staggered shifts for people that You know we're coming into the office so that we kinda split things up and that we had a continuity of operations. If one team member got sick they had a counterpart that had been on a different shifting. Can continue to do that work so we tried to do. Some things to protect our workforce especially the most vulnerable and we also did a lot of telemedicine and we had been doing telemedicine before especially for behavioral health visit so we already had some of that experience and telehealth the with co. We definitely had to expand that. And the one thing i would say is that You know they kind of talk about telemedicine being this one-size-fits-all solution but you know in a lot of parts of indian country broadband access the big issues. And that's that's definitely been something that we've seen here to get the higher payment rate for telemedicine busy busy video component and you know the whole there's a lot of areas around here where there's just of internet access that allows that kind of Connection in so doing everything we can to increase access to broadband and no not just for telemedicine but also for education and you know a lot of studies that they that you know socio. Economic benefit and impact of having you know broadband access in the community in. Brian mentioned earlier. Holidays coming up but you know beyond a holiday that sits on a calendar. It's a very important time for our of nations even traditionally a lot of times this time of year. There are things that we do in our community that bring us together naturally and brian. Is there anything you want to share. You know we. We have customs and traditions. But we have this pandemic in. What are your thoughts about gatherings. So we come from this unbroken chain of survivors. Because we can adapt. And and i think this is the year that we're going to have to adapt our celebrations and adapt the way we observe and adapt the way that we interact with each other. And i know that our chief cheap boston asking everyone to follow the guidance from the the cdc in. That's avoiding gatherings for thanksgiving Doing everything we can to avoid those large gatherings and spreading it to our elders We know that you know people that over sixty five years of age and older they don't fare well with this and this also you know. This disease is impacting us because we have a lot of people with diabetes. We have a lotta people that have these other conditions that make them more susceptible to this disease and so you know we're just encouraging everyone to You know forget. We're go the usual holiday dinner you everything that you can't celebrate maybe remotely and So that way we have many thanksgiving you know to come in the sears ahead buying. What's your plan. I'm going to be spending thanksgiving with not immediate family and you know taking precautions. I think we're hearing that strong from all of these leaders in appreciate you being here today on our program a lot to think about in the beginning of the week got a lot ahead of us and we also have a lot of conversations ahead of two and we hope you will join us but before i tell you what's coming up tomorrow. Thank you to everybody. We heard from our callers as well as our guests. Brian hail Also chairman herald frazier and chairman jamie asher. Tomorrow we're back with the conversation about native languages. We'll be opening up the lines for you to share your favorite native word or phrase and we also want to hear about the importance of our language to our native survival. Start the conversation now online. Tweet your thoughts to us at one. Eight hundred nine nine native. i'm tara gatewood. And more information about us can be found at native america calling dot com Access this is daniele dookie and nay toe who nilo low history a docile. He who la here load shine in get out of your e a doctor who hitler atlanta hinna. Who is the hairstyle nissan. two gates. Each are your stettler. No her duniya a new done. Deca neccessity scheme noski you get stay at healthcare dot gov a one eight hundred thirty one eight two five nine six. He gets medicare elimidate in dasa. Native teaching aids creators of cards for decolonization is a company which collaborates with tribes to create games and apps which focus on language culture and history. Native teaching aids can assist in creating fun engaging materials for your community based in effective teaching methods all materials remain the intellectual property of the community who then decides where and how they will be distributed. A portion of every sale is reinvested in further material development more info and online store at native teaching aids dot com. Who support this show. Native america calling is produced in the national native voice studios in albuquerque new mexico by quantum broadcast corporation and native nonprofit media organization. Funding is provided by the corporation for public broadcasting with support from the public radio. satellite service. Music is by brent. Michael davids native native american radio network.

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POWER: 1919 (Episode 100!)

Flash Forward

52:42 min | 1 year ago

POWER: 1919 (Episode 100!)

"This episode of Flash forward is brought to you by the bullet group. The bullet group is a media relations firm full of journalists politicos athletes social scientists and teachers all all turned master storytellers. They've been nominated for Tech Agency of the year for four years running by the Holmes report and this year they want it. Bullet believes that true innovation challenges the status quo and takes a risk and bring sci-fi to life by telling the human interest story behind the nuts and bolts to learn. Learn more about how the bullet group can help your company go to bullet group DOT COM. That's B. U. L. L. E. I. T. G. R. U. P. DOT COM Hello and welcome to flash forward. I'm I'm rose and I'm your host and this is officially the one hundredth episode of Flash Forward. I promise not to use the air horns horns sound effects for another hundred episodes but I am excited. One hundred flash forward is a completely independent Solo operation. It's just me if you had told me. Four years ago when I started I would get to one hundred episodes. I would probably have laughed at you and yet here we are I have a billion lean people to thank for this for the one hundred episode and I will do that in the credits anyway. Before we begin this episode I have a quick exciting announcement to celebrate one hundred futures. I have some exciting meeting new merch in the store. Did you know that flash forward had MERCH. We do t shirts stickers trophies all sorts of really cool stuff and today I am adding three really really amazing items to the store so one is a t shirt that says moon court in the style of the law and order logo. Please don't sue me. The second is a shirt that says ask me about the future and the third and this is so exciting is a special poster designed by the One and only Matt Lugansky. That does all the art for the show and they're Amisi I picked Out some of my favorite illustrations from the last one hundred episodes and Matt combine them into this amazing new poster. It is so cool. I love it so much. I got really excited when they design over And you can have one in your house or your dorm room or wherever and you're going to want to act fast if you want one because we are only selling one hundred of these posters since it's the one hundred episodes so if you want one get your butt in gear get over to the flash forward store which you can find flash forward POD DOT com slash shop or you could just follow the link in the show notes and if you do purchase a flash forward item. It does make me like very ridiculously happy to see photos of the staff out in the wild so like tag in a photo or send me the photo or something. I don't know it makes my day. Okay if this is the first I episode that you have ever heard of forward honestly maybe probably listen to a different one because this one is going to be a little bit weird from here on out so goes into into last week's episode. I you can kind of get a sense for what the show is and then you can come back to this one normally on every episode I investigate a specific possible or not so possible future scenario. I always start with a little field trip into the future to check out what is going on. And then we teleport back to today to talk to experts birt's about how that world that we just heard might really go down but for this very special episode of flash forward we are going to do do things a little bit differently this episode. We are going to start in the year. Nineteen nineteen a quick note that this episode includes discussion of racism. Some anti hate crimes. You can find the exact time codes for that content in the show notes. Okay let's go to nineteen nineteen all on a wall With the fight in Congress one after nearly forty years of effort advocates of women's suffrage today turn their attention to the various state legislatures three fourths of which must ratify the constitutional amendment before victory can be one. Although supporters of the measure are confident of final success. There's division of opinion among leaders as to whether the ratification by the states of the proposed amendment can be secured in in time for the women all over the country to vote in the next presidential. Election me all in Chicago after its fevered five days of killing and burning burning and looting. Is Striving hard to get back to normal. The rioting has passed. There wasn't a shot fired in the trouble areas today but the troops are still patrolling the south off-side streets and the police are still at work. Eh all in the first transcontinental motor transport corps. Convoy will arrive in Salt Lake Tuesday in the premier military test of the Lincoln highway which started July seventh from Washington. DC and is expected to terminate about September first and San Francisco. The test is momentous trial of the motor vehicle as an agency in peace times as well as war. The tour marks government recognition of the importance of good highways and dependable motor vehicles. In the Senate passed a Prohibition Enforcement Act over the President's veto today and made immediately effective effective machinery for preventing sale beverages containing more than one half of one percent alcohol. The vote was sixty five to twenty or eight more than the necessary. two-thirds thirds majority while there was a wrangle overtaking of the measures in place of the peace treaty. which had the right away? There never was doubt as to how the Senate stood it. It was overwhelmingly dry like the house which repast bill within three hours after the president vetoed. It I'm home. No ULITSA daddy's side. They all admitted that his doc may be all day. Can you hear me say people. She base come home. Okay like I said. This episode is going to be weird because today we are not going to the future. We are going to the past last week. I told you that time travel to the past is basically not possible but it is my one hundred episodes so I will do what I want. And we are specifically going to travel to a three thousand six hundred and Fifty Days Ago Aka One Hundred Years Ago Aka nine hundred nineteen not only is nineteen nineteen a nice even one hundred for our one hundred episode. It's also a super fascinating year and it's one that can actually tell us a lot about not just today. Hey but our future. So nineteen nineteen was pretty volatile year for the United States of America. One clearly of course is that the United States is a year out. Okay from having joined World War One and been on the Victoria side. So there's sort of the excitement of the end of the war lots of debates about the League of nations and of course it's also a year when women are working to try to get the boat. United States is reckoning with what what impact immigration and also internally migration is bringing on various communities around the country as a lot of racial unrest in the United States. Eight Jim Crow in the South through the Wilson Administration Nineteen Twenty is the point where the population of the nation as a whole shifts to half urban. And there's just tremendous candice social volatility. I think you could say in addition to a tremendous amount of energy going into the United States becoming a modern industrial technocracy eh. In the interesting you heard some actual music recorded in nineteen nineteen. You could find the song names in the show notes but the news reports were maybe obviously fake there there are no surviving radio broadcasts from Nineteen nineteen although there were experimental radio stations in New York City as early as nineteen fifteen in nineteen eighteen. Sixteen one of those radio stations called two x g became the first radio station to broadcast the results of A. US presidential election by spoken word word instead of by Morse Code. Woodrow Wilson beat Charles. Evan Hughes in case you don't have that particular election memorized. And what you heard in the intro. Were four excerpts from Real newspaper stories published in Nineteen nineteen each corresponding to one of the four events that we're going to talk about on today's episode. Suffrage prohibition the Chicago Race Riot and the Motor Transport Corps convoy. Each of these stories was big news in Nineteen nineteen and we are all all still living with the ramifications of every single one of these stories. Today I talked on this show all the time about how it's important to know where we've come from about about how the future doesn't just emerge fully formed from Elon Musk's forehead so on this episode. I want to show you how each of these four things that happened in Nineteen nineteen impacts us today and will continue to impact and shape the future. So let's get started shelly. We will start with suffrage In in Nineteen nineteen the the women's suffrage amendment to the. US Constitution is on the cusp of success. Women in the suffrage movement are seeing themselves as close to winning the fight this is Kathleen Kale. She's an associate professor of history at Penn State University in the summer of Nineteen nineteen the US House and Senate both both passed the nineteenth amendment which said quote the right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United United States or by any state on account of sex. In other words. You GotTa let women vote but just because the house and the Senate passes an amendment does not mean that said amendment will actually be added to the constitution. At least thirty six states have to ratify fight the amendment and for Women's suffrage getting thirty six states to ratify this amendment was not a given in fact nineteen nineteen ends. And it's not at all clear that this amendment is going to actually happen and essentially it gets down to the summer of nineteen twenty and it's looking really bad right. A number of the southern states have rejected it there at thirty five and they're kind of stuck at thirty five and they need thirty. Six and the governor of Tennessee calls a special session to address it so the state is flooded with suffragettes trying to turn the tides. In in Tennessee the amendment passes the Senate but the house is still split and the fate of this amendment comes down to a guy named Harry burn learn and it comes down to one vote right after all these years of all of this comes down to one vote. Harry Burn Burn is twenty four years old. He's from East Tennessee and he's long been against women's suffrage and write. The story is representative Burns had been an anti. He had been down on the list of anti is but that his mother had written him a letter and said do this for your mother rate. Help Mrs Catt. Put the rat in ratification and so he changes his vote at the last minute and with that vote the nineteenth amendment passes in Tennessee and thus the nation making it illegal to keep women from voting in the United States. Now you might know this stuff you might have heard about Susan B. Anthony or Alice Paul. Aw Or Carrie. Chapman Catt but the version of this history that most of US learned is incomplete. Most if not all of the women listed in Encyclopedia Media Entries and History Books about this battle for suffrage are white. What you might not know is that a lot of non white women were instrumental title in getting suffrage past and Kathleen Kahlil? You heard is working on a book project right now. That highlights the work of six different women of color in the US who fought for suffrage and who have mostly been forgotten. Women like Mabel Lee so she's born in China she emigrates to the United States when she's five years old her family comes in under one of the very few exceptions to the Chinese restriction acts or exclusion acts at the time. It was really elite. Really hard to immigrate to the United States from China but maples father was a pastor and her mother was a teacher and they were allowed in the lease. He's settled in New York. Her father founded a church and when she got older. Mabel got really involved in the women's suffrage movement in New York City she marches in the nineteen twelve New York City. Suffrage prayed which is one of the major moments and kind of a big deal for suffrage historians and. She doesn't just march in it but she is at the head of it. She's part of the equestrian group of about fifty suffragettes. Who Ride at the head of this parade and behind me? Bully are a bunch of white suffragettes from the National American Women's Suffrage Association or Nossa and those women are carrying a sign that says Naza catching up with China and this is a big deal. Remember because this is a time when the mainstream United States sees China as this horrible backwards place. They don't outlet Chinese people even move to the US except in very specific cases and white American suffrage. ISTS decide to use this contrast to shame American men to say look China which we think of is so backwards has enfranchised. It's women and you still resist this really modern modern move and so you should be ashamed and so maybe legal to lead this parade. She's a key activist for suffrage in the city. There our newspaper articles about her and she's invited to speak all over. And even after suffrage is passed Mabel Lee continues to be incredibly impressive in nineteen twenty one. She gets a PhD from Columbia in economics. And as far as I can tell she is the first Chinese woman in the nation to get her PhD and certainly to get an economics pitchy but Mabel was not the only woman of color who fought for suffrage. She wasn't even the only woman of color in that. Nineteen twelve parade in New York City but while Mabel was asked to lead the parade there's a group of African American women Who are totally unnamed in the coverage by the white press in fact black women had to fight over and over again for their place in these kinds of of suffrage events? Many white suffragettes did not want to include black women in their movement at all. The question of of black women voting is one that white suffrage ists are worried about. Because they're afraid that it will push white suffrage ists in the south out of the movement that they'll be too afraid that black women will vote and so they'll Gobi anti suffrage. The white women who headed up the biggest most famous suffrage suffrage organizations really tried to downplay the involvement of black women even though there were plenty of them involved in pushing for suffrage take Carrie Carrie Williams Clifford for example. And she's I mean all of these women are just so incredible. She is a poet and she's probably leave best known for her poetry but she's also involved in sort of all kinds of activism in nineteen in thirteen. The suffrage movement puts on another parade. There were a lot of parades but this nineteen thousand one. It's kind of like the big one. They decided that what they want to do is have have a parade and National Woman's parade the day before Woodrow Wilson's inaugural parade kind of disrupting him to to to to get even more headlines. suffragettes are really savvy about publicity. Now today it's common to hear about marches on Washington. But at the time this was a really new thing to do of a major march or parade in the capital is kind of unheard of and again black. Women like Carrie. Williams Clifford had to push for inclusion in this parade. The organizers wanted to the march to be segregated they wanted the black women to march in the back and these women had to really push to be included as equals so Carrie Williams Clifford for example marches with homemakers makers and so. It's really only because they insisted that this would be integrated that it was so mabel and Kerry have super super different experiences with the mainstream suffer just establishment and this is something that Kathleen found over and over again in her research the six six women she profiles they all have really different relationships with suffrage. There's Nina Otero Warren. A Latina woman from New Mexico who is fighting for both both suffrage and for the preservation of the Spanish language in the southwest. And she's a major player in advocating for suffrage rush in the state of New Mexico along with other Spanish speaking women and they insist that the campaign will be bilingual and that their concerns will be part of the discussion discussion now. Nina altera warrant traced her lineage. To the Spanish who colonized the United States and particularly the southwest and so they're kind kind of using their past as colonizers to make a claim that they're just as American as the women would be in the daughters ars of the American revolution and that kind of works so while Warren was embraced as a colonizer and therefore someone with a right to the vote. Native American women were embraced by white suffer. Just for a different reason while there are lots of stereotypes about native people as uncivilized or barbarous ariss. There are some positive stereotypes as well. This is sort of the the noble savage stereotype. which is that native? Eight women had power in their societies right that there were native nations that were matriarchal and they offer kind of an example of how how women can be in charge of things so it's like a positive example so for that big nineteen thirteen parade. That I mentioned the organizers asked one native American woman in particular to participate someone asks Marie Batna Baldwin. She'll create a float that represents native women. Marie bought no Baldwin a native American woman who has part Turtle Mountain Chippewa and part French and Baldwin comes to Washington. DC in the eighteen nineties with her father who is the attorney for the Turtle Mountain Chippewa so she watches him constantly. Negotiate the tribes treaties with the US government and eventually Baldwin herself becomes a lawyer. Royer she enrolls in a school called The Washington College of Law which was founded by feminists to train female lawyers who were excluded from all other law schools right. They wouldn't accept them because they were women and ultimately Baldwin gets really involved in protecting tribal able nations in the US and in the fight for suffrage for women and so in nineteen thirteen she gets asked to create a float for native women in this big important suffrage parade showing how great native people are respecting women and Baldwin. Says nope sorry. I'm going to march with the lawyers from the Washington College of Law and Baldwin claims that the reason she doesn't Organiz her own float this native women float that they asked her for is that she's too busy eighty which is probably true but Kathleen thinks there was another reason. I also think she deliberately chose to March there rather than Dressed up as rate what Americans imagined Indian women should look like which was in Buckskin beads and that kind of trapped in the past asked image and she rejects that and and really presents herself as this modern woman a lawyer. She's one of the first female lawyers in the nation. Let alone uh-huh. She's the first woman trained lawyer even without afloat her presence at the parade marching with her fellow lawyers. It makes the news She gets national press coverage and like Mabel Lee and some of these other women she uses that platform to talk about the issues that native women cared about how and this was true of each of these women. They used their platform as suffer just to not just push for the vote for women but to also bring attention to the issues news that mattered to them and to push for their visions of the future whether that was about racism or tribal sovereignty or Chinese politics and the other interesting thing about about these women is that in many cases they kind of predicted that they might be written out of history books. This history really matters and we know this history in many any cases because the women that I'm writing about made sure to write it down. They made sure we knew. Some of this and Carrie Williams Clifford is the best example of this when she marches in the nineteen thirteen suffrage parade. She knows that white newspapers never write about black women's participation in these things they get erased so she makes sure she writes an article for the crisis magazine. That says the black women were there and that we participated. She says we participated in this great national March and she actually names them by name to really kind of write them into the record so that that would be there for future historians. We we talked about this a little bit last week about how the writing of history matters and how remembering who did what and who pushed for these big social changes it matters and the sad thing is that despite these efforts in many places the legacy of these women has been forgotten while at the same time. The power of these voting blocks has increased exponentially next year. There will be a presidential election in the United States and many experts. Believe that the votes of women of Color and particularly black doc women and Latino women could make or break who wins and yet the women of color who fought for the right to vote in the first place are largely league forgotten looking forward into the future. I think we need to do a better job of making sure that history and that future incorporates the concerns of all of those communities even though the Nineteenth Amendment passed in nineteen twenty some of these women would never actually really got the right to vote me. Belief for example was never allowed to become citizen so she never got to vote. Native American women weren't allowed to become citizens and therefore therefore weren't allowed to vote until nineteen twenty four and too many black women in the United States quickly found that while the law technically said that they could vote. There were all all kinds of racist campaigns to stop them that went on for decades and even today there are so policies and campaigns to keep certain communities of color from voting. Okay so that is the first big nineteen nineteen event the second big nineteen nineteen event that I was going to include in this. Episode is prohibition on January Sixteenth Nineteen nineteen a handful of states ratified the eighteenth amendment pushing it past that thirty six state threshold from nineteen twenty to nineteen thirty three. The United States was technically dry. Now you have probably heard about prohibition and its impacts. You've probably heard about the gangs that took over the alcohol trade and about bootlegging and the species. But what you might not know. Is that the war on alcohol. Served as a blueprint blueprint for later political operations like the war on drugs the war on crime and the war on terror. Today's crisis of mass incarceration can can trace of its DNA to prohibition and if you want to hear about that you can on this week's bonus episode which you didn't get I becoming a patron at patriae triage dot com slash flash forward. I was going to include it in this episode. But we don't have. I had already way too much in here. So go to patriach dot com slash flash forward POD and become a patron and you. You can hear all about that on the bonus episode this week for now. We're GONNA take a quick break by gown all five dollars all day was making you ask the Donald Canola Cola. No more saying need by all rolled arrived arrive at Monte Harrison. The fee every Sunday towel dries win the down vote by a woman fed. Drive you three does just stop and think he goes. Okay so wait suffer just score a big win in nineteen nineteen but that's summer was also a really dark period for black Americans. Historians call the summer of Nineteen nineteen the red summer because there were at least thirty eight different incidents in which black residents were targeted and attacked by white people across the country in places like Georgia South Carolina Texas and Arizona and perhaps the most famous of these is the Chicago Riot Chicago in nineteen nineteen gene feels like many cities particularly in Asia and Africa and twenty nineteen in that Chicago has a reputation. Really globally as something of an instant city. This is Adam Green a professor of history at the University of Chicago in one thousand nine hundred ninety nine. The city of Chicago was changing thing. Once largely white immigrants. The city was starting to see its population. Shift the terror of Jim Crow in the south was driving black Americans north and many of them went to Chicago because of the increasingly important role of Chicago to wartime production during the last few years between Nineteen fifteen and nineteen nineteen. CHICAGO'S BLACK POPULATION is expanding dramatically more than doubling during this period like many the city's Chicago had a predominantly black neighborhood called the black belt. But not everybody could fit into this one neighborhood nor did every black person want to live in the blackbelt people began to sort of see African Americans trying to move close to Washington Park people so African Americans even moving to Hyde Park the neighborhood. That was the home home for the University of Chicago. But also the site of the 1893 Columbian Exposition so community. That was very symbolically. Important terms of thinking about the identity of the city at the same in time both white and black men in Chicago were just returning home from the war. Both groups had just risked their lives for America but they often had different ideas about which version of America and democracy they were fighting for over in Europe on the one hand. Black soldiers others believed that people returning who are African American had earned the right to be treated as as first class citizens but the white veterans had a different idea. The country that they had fought for was a country that was the country that had a largely emerged after the overthrow of reconstruction which was a country. Three in which opportunities were primarily reserved for whites on top of all of those elements. There were the rumors. There was a lot of disinformation. There is a lot of Innuendo and rumor. There was a lot of what we would call today. Fake News in terms of trying to characterize what was actually going on between different sorts of communities. He's what were the ultimate intentions of African Americans who were migrating into the city. Unions claimed that black workers were scabs. And that they were brought awed into break strikes people claim that black residents were sexual predators. Real estate agents claimed that when black people moved to a community housing prices immediately Lee went down. None of those things were true but that didn't really matter and of course leading up to that very day. It was very hot. During the this summer there had already been riots in other parts of the country notably Washington And there was a sense that you know basically Chicago like most north. American cities was something of a tinderbox waiting for a spark and the spark that set the whole thing off was the murder of a seventeen year. Old boy named Eugene Williams. It's it's July twenty seventh and like Adam said it's really really hot and Williams is at the beach with his friends floating on a raft in Lake Michigan and at this beach each. There's an invisible line between the area that black people are allowed to be in and the area that was reserved for whites and Williams on his raft. Unknowingly crossed that line in response. A white guy started throwing rocks at him and his friends. One of those rocks hit Williams on the head. He fell off his raft and he drowned now. This death didn't necessarily have to incite a city wide riot Riet. If the police had say arrested the guy who threw the rock things might have turned out differently but they did not the police officer on the scene declined declined to arrest the man who threw the rock instead. He arrested Eugene Williams friends for being agitators which drew even more attention to what was going on and a crowd gathered and things got even more he did and an officer fired a shot into the crowd and killed someone so one could say that that I was in many ways the action that tip things over the edge and moved on activities to appoint people began to move to their camps and Decide to engage in instances violence for the next four days. Chicago turned into a kind of nightmare. City white men roamed onto the streets in gangs looking for black residents who had strayed from where they were supposed to be. The police reacted not by trying to stop those white gangs but but instead by sending thousands of officers to the black neighborhood of Chicago to keep those residents in meanwhile white gangs were literally pulling black people off streetcars and beating them to death in the streets. In broad daylight I think one of the instances that really hit this home was surge on Tuesday morning. The spectacle of several many African Americans actually being assaulted to African Americans being killed by a mob again in the hundreds hundreds that included. A white returning servicemen in uniform many of them Navy sailors. But this was taking place in the loop of the city. This was the downtown of the city. This is the place where the subway trains run. That's part of the backdrop at least in some of the kind of cut away scenes for the Matrix tricks and other films that transformers I mean this is the iconic location of Chicago. Even at that point in time and it's a space in which mobs hundreds were terrorizing African Americans and there were two police officers on detail at the time that these attacks were taking place to because there were three thousand into police. Officers are twenty seven hundred. Sorry that we're tasked with establishing that cordon around the black belt by the end of the riots over five hundred people bulwer injured and thirty eight people were killed twenty three of them black and fifteen of them white and the reaction the punishment that was doled out for this violence since was uneven despite the fact that the majority of assaults casualties deaths that took place well over two thirds were of African Americans Americans across the board during the riot only a third of the people that were actually arrested and far fewer than that who were charged and convicted with crimes during they were themselves white. And I'm telling you this story on this episode for a couple of reasons. The first is that the nineteen nineteen Chicago riot is something that a lot of people don't know about. The second is that this incident left a lasting mark on Chicago and on the US. More broadly in a couple of different ways this it was really a moment where systematically African Americans as a community saw the police as an adversary and saw the police as a institution that was not knock disposed to cooperate with them so therefore they would not take great pains to cooperate with it along with release solidifying a very valid distrust of the police police in Chicago the riots then used to justify racist policies that shaped Chicago's present and future the city of Chicago that emerges After nineteen nineteen becomes a systematically segregated city in a way that is a model for almost any community eighty or any society across the globe. And you know that includes Nazi Germany or South Africa top to bottom comprehensive seven segregation of people on the basis of what they look like. Or what they they worship bore. You know how they're understood to be constituted after the nineteen nineteen eighteen. Riots policymakers and real estate agents formalized rules that barred black people from moving into certain white. neighborhoods the black neighborhoods were then systematically excluded from economic development education and infrastructure projects and that policy spread from Chicago outward to lots of places in in the United States that leaves us still a deeply racially divided society and in many cases also deeply racially segregated society and while we might want to pretend like one hundred years later we can totally move on from this legacy. We can't. It's still in the way. Our cities are are built and zoned. It still in the way people talk about black homeowners. Even Today People Repeat the myth that integrating neighborhood will cause property values to go down. Housing discrimination is still a huge problem in the US just last week Newsday published a three year investigation into real estate agents in Long Island. That found clear evidence of discrimination against Asian Black and Latino homebuyers and it's important for all of us to know how we got here and to know the truth about those nineteen nineteen riots because without grappling with that history. We can't really shape a better future. Everyone has an interest I mean. I think it's a it's an existential interest in learning the truth about events in episodes like this sharing the truth and reckoning with that truth it because we don't do that then we're susceptible to being driven by misinformation by on earns congratulations and exemptions and absolution solutions that. Leave US still with the same sorts of tensions that we had for so long in in our society and that we continue to suffer from I think Americans liked to believe. Even they're better angels and I don't care whether it's in terms of dealing with digital platforms dealing with social networks dealing with political partisanship hip dealing with implicit bias. We always have to remember that we are shaped by our were steamboats as much as we are by our better angels and if we are not in touch with the ways in which how easily those demons can be awakened by misinformation by prejudice if we don't find ways to protect ourselves from having those demons awakened then we're going to be driven to action by those demons as much as we are going. Would it be driven to action by our better angels. And that's the kind of thing that can destroy our society. Sit with that for a minute and we will be back after this quick break. Oh the Do we in wall All Okay so we have covered suffrage the race riot. A tiny bit on prohibition and it is time now for event number four from Nineteen nineteen that shaped our modern world buckle up we are going for a drive like metaphorically and also literally so by Nineteen Nineteen Gene. The model t is going to be the most popular car in the United States. But there's still plenty of luxury cars on the market and so the automobile business is really in full swing. This is Virginia Scharff a professor of history at the University of New Mexico. And here's a fun fact about cars in Nineteen nineteen. Some of them were electric electric. In fact it wasn't obvious even in one thousand nine hundred nineteen that the gasoline car was going to be the clear winner and the electric cars that existed in nineteen nineteen eighteen they were mostly marketed to women because electric cars at the time. We'd only go about fifty miles on a charge. They didn't go on bad roads. It's because they battery too heavy in there wasn't really enough clearance for that and they couldn't really climb hill. They didn't have enough power for that but women these these car manufacturers and they didn't have to go very far really in fact we're supposed to go very far so an electric car was perfect for them. I I find this particularly interesting because today's electric car. Culture particularly Tesla tends to veer a lot. More hyper masculine. There are multiple blog posts and marketing papers about how Tesla is successful because they market specifically to men and some scholars argue that one reason electric cars didn't take off in the early nineteen hundreds rids was because those early models were associated with women and therefore seen as less valuable and not worth improving but even in nineteen nineteen nineteen. Women did drive. They wanted to drive just like mended and the ways that women drove in the early nineteen hundreds actually shaped an entirely new type of community community in the United States. In one thousand. Nine thousand nine hundred were right on the cusp of the creation of the suburbs. Women's driving basically enables that whole suburban landscape landscape in that whole suburban infrastructure to exist because they are an unacknowledged invisible private transportation system that creates the possibility of having a suburban house on a cul de sac somewhere out on the edge of suburbia and the subtle technological and cultural the pressures that create those suburbs. They start right around. Nineteen nineteen but another thing happens with transportation in nineteen nineteen that helps reshape the country. And that's something called the Nineteen Nineteen Motor Transport Corps convoy which is a fancy name for something that was basically a military road trip across the United added states and has to do with controlling the continent and creating places and routes that are safe for for train and save for military our transportation and that create the possibility of people going out there and living permanently in the places that the roads go through today. So you can drive across the United States on highways that cut directly through this gigantic country. I have done it several times. I will never forgive the Corn Palace for not actually truly being a palace made of corn. Anyway if you really push it you can get from one side of the US to the other in just a couple of days. The fastest recorded trip across the country. Entry is an incredible twenty eight hours and fifty minutes but in nineteen nineteen. You could not drive on a highway across the United States. I can give have you a one word description of the state of the US highway system. At that time the answer would be nonexistent. So this nineteen nineteen road trip. It's a whole endeavor endeavor. It started on July seventh in Washington. DC and snaked across the United States all the way to Oakland California and then the whole crew took a ferry to San Francisco to officially complete the journey arriving on September sixth and it took them two months because the path from DC to Oakland was as precarious. The convoy was made up of almost three hundred people and eighty one different vehicles and it was kind of a nightmare. And just think about the idea of the four days of righty all of a sudden they're mired in mud on these dirt roads or maybe they get a wind storm or maybe they are on horribly rutted roads and all the vehicle start breaking down twenty. One men were injured along the way and did not complete the trip and nine vehicles didn't make it in in the two month trip. There were two hundred and thirty road incidents where they had to stop because of a breakdown or an accident two hundred thirty in wyoming coming alone. This one this back blew my mind if you've ever been to Wyoming and driven across what is now I eighty and Wyoming. which is the route that they were travelling? That is a very long boring stretch of road and the boredom is the best part of it because they had to repair in order to make their clanking way way. West Fourteen Woodbridge's just in what is in Wyoming. So think about every time that they get fifteen miles suddenly they. He comes someplace where the bridge was broken down. They'd have to build a bridge. There are some really amazing photographs of trucks stuck in the mud and these bridge repair jobs and all of it which I will post on the flash forward instagram account. But the reason that we're talking about this motor convoy is because among those nearly three hundred military guys on this trip. There is one important person. Although at the time he was not important at all the person who emerges as kind of interesting figure on this expedition addition is a young soldier named Dwight. Eisenhower yes that. Dwight Eisenhower. The one who then go on to become president of the United States before all of that Dwight was a nobody soldier on this bizarre road trip and in fact he caused some problems on this trip in the middle of Western Wyoming. Eisenhower started a rumor that they were under attack from a local tribe. They almost had to send a letter to the war department. A telegram to the war department asking king per reinforcements and before they discovered that this whole thing was a joke. It's amazing actually. There wasn't court martial for that kind of a stunt. The idea that native Americans might resist. This convoy was not at all unreasonable earlier. Trips like this had received a lot of resistance from tribal communities and and for good reason all of a sudden the US military was rolling through tribal land and claiming it and being like. We're going to build a road here and the local tribes are like you know who are you exactly. And sometimes those disagreements turned violent so Dwight's little prank was based on these real clashes. Which is why the convoy took him seriously seriously ultimately they did not send reinforcements and Dwight finished the trip without getting into any more trouble but going through this two month schlep across the country really impacted him? He really cements in his head to use a pun. I guess the idea that good roads are going to be beat both important to the military important to the economy and when Eisenhower becomes president he reaches back into that experience and pushes for or infrastructure funding. It's Eisenhower who managed to get passed in one thousand nine hundred ninety six. The largest infrastructure project largest public works urged works project in history of the United States up to right now. which is the interstate? Highway System in Nineteen fifty-six Eisenhower signed the Federal Aid Highway Act which authorized twenty five billion dollars for the construction of forty one thousand miles of interstate highways in the US. And it all might not have happened if he hadn't been on this weird nineteen nineteen road trip across the US and when it comes to the future of driving and end these roadways. It's complicated. We will be living with Dwight's highway system for a long time and the results of car culture where everyone has their own gas burning car. That is something. We're living with two in the form of climate change. Maybe if Dwight Eisenhower had been put on a public transportation project in nineteen nineteen eighteen. We'd have a different layout of the country with more trains and buses and hopefully in the future. We can get there so today. It's twenty nineteen one hundred years later and if you live in the United States all four things that we just talked about probably have influenced your life. In the last week you may be drove on a highway. Maybe you drove on a highway to or from a suburb. You probably thought about voting given the political news in the United States and hopefully you voted in your local elections which may have happened recently. You maybe had a drink or chose not to and you certainly moved through. Spaces is shaped by discriminatory housing policies. Whether in your city or in a small town or somewhere you were visiting all the things we talked about on this episode there in the the fabric of the United States. They're everywhere and they will continue to be as we move into the future so in future episodes when we travel to a future city or talk about future driverless car or think about a future politician all of these things all of these events from nineteen nineteen. They're going to be a part of of the future so if we really want to get ready for the future and really think about what it will be like. We have to know this stuff. We can't escape this history But we can recognize it and try to use it to change the future. FLASH FORWARD IS PRODUCED BY ROSE. The music is by a Sura. And at the ultra the music is by hustle on the art is by that Jansky the voices from the future this week were provided by Monica. Burn tomorrow Krinsky. James t green and Michael Arrest Weber. Who is the patron and I wanNA take a little bit of time in this out to thank a couple of people who have made it possible for me to get to one hundred episodes fush? Ashworth is a totally independent Solo operation. I report interview right. Produce edit mix and promote this show by myself just meat. There's no team here. It's just good old. Rose is in her closet for that does not mean that there aren't a billion people to think for their support in making this happen. 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Okay that's offer this future slash past. Come back next time we'll travel to anyone

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Episode 315 Maybe Peace and Closure Will Finally Become a Reality.

Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

2:09:06 hr | 4 months ago

Episode 315 Maybe Peace and Closure Will Finally Become a Reality.

"I'll prove you introduce him to this genocide. On to these things new there was a deep. Quite every company went a everybody going. You agree each native opinion. yes you have. We are an indigenous information and education. Radio show and podcast is time we check last time. We knew some people think that way of us which is great every week we talk about current affairs related to and from our own native american perspectives monuments. Michael kicking bear and the guy in the lustrous laugh. You just heard. That is mr david gray all morning everybody. Let's see. The room is open to visitors and participants. And whatever else you want to call yourself. Sayers no we. We haven't had any serious yet. There's always a first though. There is always first but sanders in chat. So it's sandra gets the hello and shout out and she's definitely not a naysayer so warning. Sandra do step seeing watch out. He's got a right. I mean it's good to be hurled at my head that goes but oh well actually as we were coming on the air here my my brother asked me he goes the stats going on in terms of covid in india and i said i haven't heard the latest death but i know i know it's a nightmare there. Yeah they lead the world with the daily kobe cases. I think they're up around five hundred thousand a day. it's insane. it's so bad over in india right now they run out of. Oh two or oxygen to give people and they're they're resorting to funeral pyres. I'll leave it at that. I won't go into detail as to what those are right right. But they're they're running their around the clock. The here's the scary thing whether it's not the the now i can say the regular kobe bias. It's one of the variance yup. That's causing such devastation. In india right now and i was watching. Cbs news this morning and they did run a story on it. But i i was. I was still in show prep mode. So i wasn't i was only half paying attention But what i did pick up on was yes variant. And then they started floating the term. We've heard before called booster shots. And when i hear booster shots. I hear you know. We're not quite sure. How effective the first. You shots you guys. Got one shot Whatever one you took but here we might have to give you a little bit more. And i'm not fully convinced that This injections that we just took our are effective against all the different variants. There might be out there now. You know. I'm not trying to cause a panic or anything but there has been such a push lately for normalcy in the united states. We now tout the lowest infection rates in around the world which is a good thing that made me wrong I worry about it being a false flag. Yeah i would. I would have to agree with you. Because all of a sudden we're becoming less affected by covert and other places around the world. Picking up larger reported numbers of cases Something's not right. And they can boost your until the cows come home and i'm not taking. I can't the first two deadly in. No i remember that here. You senator just said in chat. She said no rock semi bags for you guys except for the wants to give you to throw at idiots and one that i'm going to hear a lot is I don't know office. The proper title is prime minister but mody with leader of india who is india's version of donald trump and the idiot who thought it was a good idea to resume activities as normal in that country. Which is the reason quite. Frankly why they're in the hurt their in right now. Five iraq for him. Okay and there's others out there. I said this a couple of weeks ago. You have the idiot that professes to be leading the country of brazil. You have the idiot. That professor to be leading the the philippines and there's others out there all with the same kind of donald trump. Ask mentality. don't forget the idiot in florida. Yeah i i'm gonna i'm gonna put it out there right now. Charlie crist who used to be a republican governor in. The state of florida defected to the democratic party. And he's been he's been you know still in politics as a senator. The state senator. Your and charlie crist had his his things. I'll just say as as all governors do but he did a lot of good things for the state and he's going to be. I hope running against the putts in office now and which which puts would that be old governor governor level. I'm sorry sir. I was paying attention. It's just that just shut off. So that's totally understandable ipad. Quite a few of those episodes this week it feels so damn stupid right. Now go ahead. I'm sorry so. I'm hoping senator crist accepts the prodding various corners and sectors to run for office of governor. And i'm going to work for him if i if i can to help him get back to that. That position of i want to see the santa's gone. I want him to be a one and done nightmare to this. This state would be. Would it would put your state in a much better position but speaking of outsider much better. Hey cliff good. The cliff lee bit was you who sent. This goes back a little ways. I think an article called paleo con. I'm sort of starting to read that. Now so i just wanted to thank you for that and and more comments on that after i either listen to audio or or read. Read that article but thank you. Thank you thank you Says been no friend of the state or the people. There eighty five plus thirty five thousand. Excuse me plus deaths in the state from kobe. And he contributed to that by not putting in place mandate for masks and social distancing. That's that's pathetic of course so again if we still have examples where he still can't put a mask on so no no that's true. Nobody nobody on staff apparently as capability of teaching him either. So but i am. I'm going to work against him to help Charlie crist defeat him if he happens to run. I'm making it public. So there's no western and making that statement as a republican okay. I just saw. I've often wondered. You know when i when i hear defections like this. You know you know is is. Is it a play of revelant for desperation of revenue. So charlie crist has been. He's been a a reformed republican now for probably close to twelve years. Okay so yeah. This is an all of a sudden thing. Or i'm going to hop hop into the next boat because it's moving a little faster now. He's he's he left the party about twelve years ago. Okay then i'll leave it at that so as we always like to do. Here's how you can reach us on the show you guys you can. Email us hosts with an s. hosts that native opinion dot com. You can reach us out at twitter. You can reach us out at facebook. You can reach us through our website which is native opinion dot com. You can also call or text us at eight six zero eight hundred five nine five and Saturdays as you know are some of you know if you if you don't know we do a live broadcast here on the internet interwebs. Every saturday usually around ten o'clock but a lot lately it's been more like ten thirty eastern standard time And then the audio becomes a podcast like our wednesday edition which my good brother here does every single wednesday so you can go to any of the major podcast directories and Download and subscribe to the show there. And we really really appreciate your support in listening to two brothers here babble along. Well i'm wouldn't wouldn't wouldn't wouldn't rather babble with anyone else but you same but heels wants to babble with us. We will just babble along babble along with my brother mentioned. We produce a podcast twice a week. Our wednesday edition and our saturday live show and we want you our listeners. To know we appreciate every bit of support we received from you no matter what form that support zan and the financial support you. So graciously provide us with goes directly to our costs and expenses associated with this show and some of those expenses are things like website and podcast hosting music licensing content development and curation our daily business operations like marketing advertisement and more so if he would please join our. The wonderful folks have contributed to this show by becoming a patron. You can see those details on our website. At native opinion dot com forward slash support and on our facebook page. Just click on the learn more button and another great way to help is to tell your friends family and colleagues about the show and give us a five star review on itunes and again we think you offer listening sharing our show and growing with us. You mentioned what those conversations might sound like. Was that some listeners. Talking with their family and friends about our show always makes sense but did kind of make sense sometime. Check them out once once. Probably tons of people that go ones enough. We partook in what you're offering and dan but But for those men along for a long time for the ride. Which i know there are many of you out there. That are thank you thank you thank you. Yes thank you very much. We should greatly appreciated into we. Also wanna to think our our ongoing sponsor mohican ring post They make fine. Authentic mohegan handmade craft and beadwork. They do ribbon shirts embroidered hat. Dream catchers and other specialty items They're also creating cloth masks of different sizes despite the country's saying we're about out of the pandemic. Let's be careful about that. So if you need a mask or a couple of extra ones for family members may be guests or some guests. I'm sorry well. Yeah guess right Just check out what they've got there on the site and A little bird told me there might be an update coming to that site shortly so much that that ought to be interesting so can check out that and everything else that they have their at mohegan. Trading post dot com. They also make custom orders for people to I am told So you can always email them and They will get right back to you and Good good place and we really appreciate their support For quite some time now at least for two years going on two years you almost all right. So we're gonna roll into listener feedback now would see. You are up on that one brother. Okay this is from listener antonio he says i hello brothers. Hello antonio i write this with a heavy heart and tears in my eyes. This past week has been hard. I'm sorry to hear that. My friend. And i want to tell you about an incident that i experienced my girlfriend and i enjoyed a day off together as we try to do as they are far and few we decided to visit our place of employment to grab some food and visit with coworkers. We both entered the establishment and she noticed to regulars that frequent the establishment burden me. We struck up a conversation and decided to sit with these two caucasian gentleman after a while. One of them noticed. I was wearing a jacket that had many indigenous related patches and pins on it. I frequently wear this jacket as to represent our culture because of the pride. I have one my mescalero apache routes. That's when the racist comments ensued chief and other offensive things were said and i kindly ask for them to refrain from those types of comments in which they laughed and apologized with no genuine tone in their voice I know that all too well. What ensued next was appalling. When the check was brought to the table one of them picked up the check in was mad to the bill that they had racked up they starting to act angrily and said they weren't paying it and accused pudding items on their bill. Amazing which was not the case. We had our items on a separate bill. My girlfriend then tried. Excuse me to pick up the bill. In the caucasian male grabbed it from her hand and threw it across the room. Imagine that hey. My girlfriend then proceeded to get up and attempted to pick the check book up. He reacted and stood up to cut her off from doing it. My first instinct was to get in the guy's face. I did not know his intentions or mental state. The first thing that came to my mind was that he was going to physically assault her. I told him to pay his bill or and leave. He then grabbed me by the throat and pushed me backwards until the ground. As i was taught i prevented myself from taking. Any damage held his head controlling his posture and doing any further damaged. He continued to strangle me into a. I was able to push him away then he ran away. My girlfriend and i quickly gathered our things and removed ourselves from the situation and returned home. Still in shock of how the the clouds overnight went. We went to bed and walk up to her losing her job over what had happened. The two caucasian males wrote an email to the owner making up a story. How antagonize them and physically assaulted them. Ridiculous which was the furthest thing from the truth. The owners not ask or look into the matter further to get our side of the story. They let her go over something. We did not start nor were they willing to hear our side. that's typical. They also did not pull security footage which could cooperate our stories and proved they lied about it. It is sad that in this day and age we are still living with this one-sided system where people of color are still beat down while colona come up colonizers. Excuse me are believed with no proof. It's just sad how we were forced to remain quiet and just deal with it. But i refused to do so. Excuse me i. But i refused to do that. When injustices are still brought up on our people. You guys have gotten me through this week. I have no regrets for how i reacted to the situation. We did nothing wrong but we are still bastardize for our skin color. Sorry for the long winded story but had to get it out. Thank you for giving strength and trying to abolish the ignorant world. we live in much love antonio antonio. I'm glad you guys are all right after that ordeal Yes you're absolutely correct. This still happens and it doesn't have to happen for some reason. Non natives believed that it needs to sell app. And thank you for sharing this frightening. Ordeal ewing girlfriend went through. Wow yeah i was gonna suggest maybe Antonio if you could write us back of through email and maybe give us the name of the place where she worked and even the owner's name if you have them in maybe we could Fire off an email or so sure from the show and you know we can. We can share that with the listeners. To as a place to avoid If that's how they're gonna react that's how they're gonna treat their employees and if that's how they're going to support white racism white supremacy Than their business should Should suffer for that. I think but i agree. But we'll start with the diplomatic approach and maybe we'll send an email to the owners. Maybe they maybe they. They've had a some people. It's funny you know they'll think about it later right and then realize know. Perhaps they overreacted or the the reacted wrong. And but then their pride gets in the way and they don't want to correct the injustice right so they let it go. That happens a lot and You know maybe a- maybe they'd be willing to reconsider you know But at the same time you know maybe they don't deserve the talent of your girlfriend. You know that's true but But they they caused the they caused the unemployment situation in those two gentlemen should be at least brought up charges because always physical contact Koran based on what antonio road right and what's even more egregious. She had nothing to do with the altercation right. Exactly yep so. They fired her unjustly. According to the information shared with us she was fired unjustly. So that would've what guilty by association. Come on sue before we move on. I just want acknowledged a chat again in a welcome bath Again cliff sandra guys for joining us. A good morning breath wrote that there might be a problem once again with the speaker player on our face or on the post of our facebook. She said it didn't update to live. yeah without Going into a lot of detail we are. We are working diligently in the background to To change how we do live here. You guys and i'll just i'll just leave it at that for now but We'll we'll continue to to look into that. But thank you for that. Beth appreciate it. So all right We move on here so this next email from another michael so Michael wrote hi guys. I'm glad the the news article that i submitted via text on school mascots in washington state made it on the show that was. I think a couple of weeks ago right. I noticed an increase of news outlets here have been covering more native topics mascots. Tribal fishing hunting environmental impacts etcetera. I'd like to submit another article that i believe That i believe affect many tribes nationwide breath. Please let me know what you think. And so there's an audio link in it as well and thank you and keep up the great work that you do. Thank you nick. Appreciate it so yeah. I took a look at this article and is published through. Npr news So i want to make sure. I credit them properly and The audio version of that story. If i can play that brother then we provide a few comments after that. So here we go. Thanks for joining us on morning edition. I'm angela king. The indian health service has been lauded for the success of its vaccine rollout but there's one group of tribes that received no vaccines no testing supplies. And not the federal relief money. That's gone to indian country during the pandemic. kyw's leash. O.'neil joins us this morning to talk more about this. Thanks for your time. I least we appreciate it. Thanks for having me now. Before we get into the things. I just outlined remind us what did most tribes get from the federal government during the pandemic well most tribes got testing supplies that the indian health service sent to their clinics along with things like personal protective equipment that sort of thing as sovereign nations. They also got their own vaccine allocations that they could prioritize as they chose the same way that state's got to decide if teachers went first or if people over sixty five win first tribes also got to make those decisions with the vaccines they received and also all three relief bills passed by congress included some relief many for tribes most recently that most recent stimulus bill included about thirty one billion dollars for tribes and tribes were able to use that money for additional unemployment relief for their members for various expenses incurred because of the pandemic a lot of tribes. Had to shut down. You can imagine things like businesses like casinos aren't as safe during the pandemic so they needed some sort of an influx of money. While their business tribal businesses were shut down and in some cases tribes invested that that money in longer term infrastructure projects that will have an impact. On what the tribe has for for decades or generations. But there's this one group of tribes that was excluded from all of that. Why i mean what's going on well. The us government the reason most of these most tribes got resources during the pandemic. Is that the us. Government recognizes them as sovereign nations and has a series of obligations to them usually guaranteed by treaties. But there's a group of tribes bet for complicated historical reasons that vary from tribe to tribe the federal government doesn't recognize them as sovereign nations as tribes. Still live here in the united states. And that means they don't have their own clinics indian health service doesn't give anything to them. They don't have a protected right to protect important cultural landmarks for example or a protected to hunt fish and gather in their traditional territories by some estimates. There are more than two hundred. Unrecognized tribes in the united states. Allow two hundred. Gosh so what has that meant. For the tribe specifically in our state during the pandemic there are about a dozen. Unrecognized federally recognized tribes in washington. State three big ones are the duwamish tribe that occupied the land. that's now seattle. Snohomish tribe and should nation which straddles the mouth of the colombia river in his actually in washington and oregon and during the pandemic these tribes scott almost nothing from the federal government. The chair of the nation. Tony johnson told me because the jinked have they don't have their own clinics in their own communities some members for basic medical care during the pandemic for things like heart disease and diabetes and unemployment and social isolation got for everyone during the pandemic and those exacerbated drug and alcohol problems in tribal communities as they didn't other communities throughout the us and the chinook unlike federally recognized tribes. Don't have any money for drug and alcohol programs. For example we have lost folks in the community the last year that would not have been lost were to have been a federally recognized community and that is unbearable man. I least just listening to that. I mean that's absolutely heartbreaking and and especially when you compare that to what other tribes have been able to do with their covid relief supplies and vaccine coffers. I mean groups like the sukhois kwamash Tha layla actually helped vaccinate their surrounding communities in snohomish and kitsap counties. So i guess my question is what now for these other tribes. Are they going to be left. Hanging for the duration of the pandemic figuration of the pandemic probably but going forward. Some of them are still working on getting federal recognition. And it actually kind of. It's not really a partisan issue but some types that they have a better shot at federal recognition during a democratic presidency. So for example that you cook nation is has a big push right now to try to become a recognized tribe through an act of congress and they're trying to get both the washington and oregon legislators on board passing legislation that would recognize their status permanently going forward and make sure that in future crises. This doesn't happen again. okay. I lease you mention. This really isn't a partisan issue but there seems to be greater with democratic administration. So so what is the problem here. It's the why individual tribes aren't recognized is super complicated varies from tribe to tribe so there are a bunch of tribes in the united states if they were excluded from the initial list of recognized tribes than they could try to go through the bureaucratic process to become recognized as time went on that became more and more difficult process that started taking decades in millions of dollars to pay lawyers. Ethnologist can prove that your tribe. You've continuously been a tribe and that you have ice. Many of these types actually are signatories two major treaties with the us government but for whatever reason got left off that initial list of recognized tribes and then sometimes what happens is just conflict between neighboring tribes so for example that you know condition was briefly recognised at the end of the clinton presidency then the quilt nation objected to that and the recognition was rescinded under the bush presidency. And something very similar happened with the snohomish tribe and the tulalip tribe objected to this new homeless tribe being recognized. Okay so it sounds like it's more an issue between the tribes not necessarily the party's preferences to tending to some of the tribal issues. Right and people were very disappointed during the obama presidency. That he did not do more for this group of tribes. They had hoped that he would intercede some kind of organized way and instead he just kind of left the status quo and the status quo was not great. Okay and interest one other question if they haven't gotten that recognition thus far is there any way to expedite the process. I mean given the health emergency. The world is facing right now. No there's they're technically three ways to beat go from being an unrecognized tribe to a recognize tribe the bureaucratic route is a multi decatur process. The courts have mostly stayed out of it. The fastest route is an act of congress and they are trying to get that in the next before. The midterm elections. Is that chinooks goal. Alright k you will ws i- leash o.'neil thank you so much for filling us in on all of that. He's having me all right. I guess i'll throw to you first brother if you have any thing to comment on There's a lot to unpack their More time than i've got to to devote to it on air. All right yeah. There's a lot to unpack but Go to go ahead please. There are a few open ended things in my view I i i. I can't i wouldn't Because it's not appropriate for me or in my in my view anyone else to specifically comment on any Situations that might be occurring between Any the washington tribes or any tribes across the country. I was a little disappointed here Them even discuss matters. That don't pertain to them. Meaning npr in this case You know i know. I probably sound pretty negative about that but you know but that's just how i feel it comes from the it comes from this kind of vein You know what a family is going through internally. Is that family's business not not street business. You see what i'm saying so So leave it at that But what. I can comment on. Because i can do so generically But it's a real example is that Why tribes might object to federal recognition attempts In the past Have been where groups of people have attempted to form corporations and then turned around and call themselves tribes and then attempted to become federally recognized. We've had some cases of this and have put up resistance against that. And that should not be confused for example with the alaska native claims settlement act of nineteen seventy-one that act marked the culmination more than one hundred years of expressed concern for protection of land rights of aboriginal peoples within what is now known as the state of alaska Which actually goes back much further than that starting with the session. Treaty of eighteen. Sixty seven The federal legislation provided a cash as well as land settlement in in those in that situation and mandated the creation of corporations to manage those resulting assets and those corporations have boards and those boards by and large are The seats are occupied by alaskan native people But that is a different situation than a bunch of people getting together and going into it. Let's just call ourselves a tribe in attempting to in that case Rob the federal government and us of resources What the article was correct about is that there are in fact. Many different reasons why tribes are not fairly recognized some that she mentioned but drives have their own reasons for either pursuing or not pursuing federal recognition again. It's their decision now. I personally hate to hear about cova. Deaths that could have been prevented in our nonfederal recognized communities because not only is that a failure of the federal government system but it's also a failure of state systems as well because the way that Some states treat their indigenous citizens. Is that if if those tribes verbalize their sovereign in dependency it makes it a very convenient excuse for a state to ignore rather than helping us just humanity situation right. Ignore independence does not mean. Ignorance in these cases now state leaders will not say that publicly but their actions speak much louder than words in many of those cases. Now the mprp's In my view conveyed an annoyingly positive tone to their audience Which was that federally recognized. Tribes were empowered in making decisions for themselves about their vaccine rollouts and receiving personal protective equipment or. Ppe's like masks and other things but what they did not convey was that we didn't receive are approved. Federal funding the initial eight billion dollars allocation rolled out or carved out for federally recognized tribes for nearly six months after the initial congressional approval of the first one trillion dollar. Relief package for covid. Now that was the result of former treasury secretary. Steve mnuchin not providing direction and making tribes of priority equal as was made to the rest of the states in the country during the highest rates of infection of covid nineteen some of our tribes such as navajo nation had the highest rate of infection in this country. So no no disrespect to npr. But it wasn't a situation where federally recognized tribes just automatically got support so just felt that was worth pointing out and i think you michael for for sending that email and the story but yes. They need to balance the need to balance the boat and i also recognize that. Npr yes they did an interview. You know someone from the duwamish tribe but you have to interview other people and and and get and get a much more balanced perspective. Not not just non non recognized versus federally recognized. But just you know just pointed out one one fact that they never even brought up they made it sound like you know Tribes just got a bunch of money or got a bunch of support. You know call you know. Call up the office you know. Because it's such a large nation to talk to a navajo nation. Ask them you know. Hey you know. I was that rollout. You guys get funding right away. I can tell you distinctly. The answer is no even tribes with larger population counts. We struggled with my tribe at fourteen hundred Because we are a smaller try so the way mnuchin and company decided to roll out Initial benefits was from their vantage point. You you put the emphasis on those larger populations. I'm not faulting. Not necessarily but even with that that type of identification navajo nation still didn't get support for four months after the congressional There were lots of people in the united states that we're starting to get support but not indian country so balanced reporting it matters. It's important so it most certainly does. So that's say and again thank you. Michael appreciate that all right. Our next listener feedback from listeners. Steven or stephan in eagles onto say michael david myopia both doing well. I've been silent listener now for a little over a year. This is my first time writing in. Thank you for doing so. I love your show. It's a huge part of every week for me. Happy to know that. And i know my brother's happening now that to absolutely anyway i have some disheartening news that you may have already heard about but i figured i bring it up. I bring it up. A friend of mine lives out in moab utah and handles a great deal of national park merchandise design. She shared that the birthing. Rock petroglyphs have been vandalized with racist language. Indeed here that we that this is such a fourth right display of unapologetic anti-indigenous racism. Although this is nothing new for america. I found it. Nauseating indigenous erasure is often hidden behind a shroud of phony academia or academia or diplomacy. But this is just outright hatred. Sorry for such bad news. I just wanted to pass along the information. So you too can expose it further. Thank you for all the information you spread. I have so much respect for you. Both be well and have a great day steven steven. Thank you very much for that. I did hear and read about the the desecration and i'm gonna call it that the disc desecration of the petroglyphs. That burning rock. And it's happened to other petra petroglyphs sites across the country and it is as you correctly stated its anti-indigenous racism and it is nothing new for america. You know i. I can't begin to tell people who who listen or even care how many people i've had to tell to go use the f the f word in the last four years because some really ugly behaviors have come to the surface and it just highlighted the they love and embrace of the ideology of white supremacy in this nation and what stephanus shared with us. It's just another piece of that. That horrible ugly puzzle that that just keeps begging to be completed so the ideology can reign supreme. So you know my my my hope. It remains hopi journal that the ideology of white supremacy disappears like a mist in the in the bright sunshine. That's my hope. But it's going to take work to make that happen. So thank you step in for your feedback and we. We love the fact that we are part of your every week that that is just wonderful to know again. We're always humbled by stuff like that. Because he can we a lot of these conversations that we have in this show again. You know we're we're bird on couches so you know it's a it's it's always really really amazing amazing so i wanted to share some details regarding the situation seven breath through our tension So i'll give this a little fair warning and you're gonna hear this a few times in the episode today. trigger warnings. But i'll try to dance around the sensitive parts of a little bit here but from our source here is going to be the smithsonian mag dot com. I chose that were there were few outlets. Did report on this but You know being that the smithsonian also a caretaker to the national native american museum they They published This this this report in so states here. the unidentified. Criminals wrote quote white power and obscenities over Thousand-year-old indigenous markings on birthing rock and moab utah is as stephen pointed out Let's see here. I'm just trying to read some of this carefully. Brother you late sunday or early monday. Vandals wrote white power across burning rocks triangle-shaped anthem more fiqh figures misspelling and crossing out their first attempt at the word white really. Yes which okay. I guess i have to say more about that. Do i know Then someone drew a A a male part above snake like line in scribbled a sexual vulgarities on the rock They also did so regarding women's parts Understand too that. The landscape of the petroglyphs are part of its deeply and intricately connected to the indigenous community says angelo baca on anthropologist at new york university and the cultural resources coordinator for Utah's deny bitch la. I believe i pronounced that right grassroots organization that works to protect native lands and heritage to smithsonian goes on here to say for reasons that remain mysterious depends on who you're talking to when you say mysterious right but They write the ancestral lebanon's Forebears of today pueblo. Tribes abandoned sites like mesa verde about seven hundred years ago by fifteen hundred. Ad quote all traces of fremont culture had vanished from the archaeological record notes. The national park service. The first physical traces of the people who still reside in the region as the pilot mr schone and the tribes date to around the time of the formative era tribes departure so but again There isn't enough bodies that the national park service could hire To patrol right and these people get in and you know they they desecrate because they simply do not care they. They feel that All the lands of the united states are. There's simply because as you. You hear this all the time especially you know especially when in farming community that i'm not dissing the everything but they talk with pride about you know I'm third generation fourth-generation right and and not knowing or thinking that you know you can trace a family Lineage back to the beginning when they first arrived to the united states. And you have to understand that. That arrival affected indigenous people negatively and at the very homes that that these handed down generation after generation properties by and large are those that were taken forcibly and certainly without any kind of permission or and it was done so through a variety of different means from illegal land sales That was the case with my own people in so it's worth noting that you know Having to understand what. The inside is When somebody says. I'm an american born and bred. You hear phrases like that right well. You have to really understand what that means. And what the implications around that are. So i'm repeating myself but i'll just stop. Well you know. When people proudly exclaim their americanism in that they are americans their their in part correct but see they make those exclamations with just the united states in mind. They forget about the other part of the americas were. They haven't been educated in an either well. They probably haven't but i mean how. How much education does it take to know that when you when you spout the word central america or south america. How much education does it take to inform that individual that central and south america is part of the americas so those people are also americans correct he even though they may be and digits to their respective countries. Just like we are here in the. Us are you know you know individual entities of various states. So you know. I don't give those folks a pass when they try to forget about the other. Inhabitants of the americas. Oh i'm not. I'm not i'm not no no i know i know you're not very i know you're not but but just focus on north america just for a moment so i'm talking about the united states of america as well as canada and in mexico mexico right so we so we all right. I'm just gonna end up. Repeating myself just stopped. No you had another thought in there are heritage. Go ahead i do but it was just leave it there like i said because after night feel like a broken record on the show sometimes but there's a lot of factors as to why why this happens. Yes we can solukhumbu. At least it's racism but there's there's also a contributing factors to that such as a breakdown of the american education system when it comes to indigenous people yours no sensitivity to us because there's no. There is no formal education about such things and on and on and on right. So that's kind of. I hear you hear you want him. Bobby welcome everyone. That's joining us in chat. Welcome welcome we appreciate you guys coming in listening even if you don't agree with us you know it's okay. If you're like sandra and you wanna give us a bag of rocks right we in the distance dude. I'll find you a all right. We got some voicemail. Let's go to the so called inland queue this up here and get the so. Here's a badger. Had to say my brothers. Well it's little stormy. Here in northern nevada then pretty mild weather is a spring but scattered thunderstorms and windy. And that's not unusual. Wind in the high desert is pretty pretty normal anyway. don't have much else Hope everybody has great great week. And thank you for your show and for all you guys do. What can we end with. Okay don't trust the government. Don't trust corporation big pharma love god love mother earth and do what you can help your neighbor. Give him a hand or or a smile or whatever you can do. Is there like their load. A lot of people are having a tough time right now indeed all right truth and love my brothers indeed indeed on that last point that he just made about you know a lot of people you know struggling going through some things but a couple with that the fear so Cbs was running stories. This morning about you know how you know again. You know era for america in in its lower than everyone else's Presumably Infection rates and and In in vaccination rates right and then they transitioned to a story about how businesses are open or openning and they're having trouble finding people to work because people are still fearful of going out you know even if they have been vaccinated or not but of course they spun it sort of the non-vaccinated people right you because that's the trend now too is Who if you're evil if you're not vaccinated right which i just cannot stand but anyway even as vaccinated person i just don't like you know. I don't like that premise. Of you know you're of other ism. I just don't and american way. I know i know. And and then transitioned again to of course turtle right talking about reason why we aren't going door. Ragged are making no money at home under the government's done right complaining about that so Well you know what turtle man spewed out of his pie hole on the news and again. We're talking about senator mitch. Mcconnell when we say turtle manfred new orleans the new listener. You're not. I don't give a crap avenue listeners sleeve now but you know i. I've had some of the people on my friends. List and face booker almost spout those exact words verbatim. And it's like really. The government is not paying people to not work. That is not what's happening. And that's what turtle man implied. Exactly i don't know he says straight up. They had a soundbite and everything and it was like i. I can go find it. But i just don't care to one. There was an implication. It was that's he said. I would be our home. I dunno i dunno mitch. I've one of the lucky few. I guess i've been able to work from home. But i'm i'm certainly not taking money from the government. I can tell you that well the sad thing is you know. They're they're throwing this twelve hundred dollar figure out there. Is this big windfall from the government. You know they're paying you of this windfall. That keep you from working well if you do the math. It's still seven fifty an hour Truly but even so here. Here's my thing to mitch. So white people are hurting. And you're sad ass who doesn't have to work again ever in his life okay. People are hurting as badger set up and it just you know these people piss me off because what what. They're who they're really speaking for is corporate america. That's exactly what they're speaking. Okay we gotta get these people like to work. I gotta make a dr boards to satisfy. I have profitability margins. That i must meet screw you pretty much. People are scared. People have lost family members. Because of this. And you're crying about the fact that people are staying on or are getting a government check for a little bit longer until people can be safe. Are you freaking kidding. Me between him and the ice cream. Lady nancy pelosi. I'm done with you all. You just ruined the good humor. Man's image immediately. Just sorry. But that's how i see it. No no it's valid. It's the goal to stand there and complain to you that you're making too much money sitting at home if you happen to be collecting a check from the government unemployment or otherwise well his sad assets in washington collecting your tax dollars your tax dollars eto substantially higher rate than what you're making but he's going to tell you you're wrong he's gonna sit there and try to make you feel guilty. Screw you again mitch mcconnell. Yep that's what anyone else thinks like you absolutely every day i shake my head at the the. I don't even want to call him anymore. This book is the gop the grand cunanan party there you go but people pay taxes to the federal government every frigging year every year. You pay federal taxes. You're if you are working for an employer corporate or otherwise you don't get a choice you know i understand how tax monies us. Please don't send email at me. I don't understand the tax system. Yada yada okay. You don't have a choice. The money's taken every time you receive a paycheck and part of that money. Jim sorry brother and that part of that money that you get that that my brother just mentioned goes to fricken mitch get and all other countries gets the ice cream lady that although some well here. Here's what excuse me here's what makes me shake my head every frigging day. People pay that tax money that they have no choice in two people to pay people's paychecks like turtle man and they continue to vote against their own interest. That's what that means when people will say people say you're voting against your own interests. Well okay if you're paying somebody to continually rob your house and you wanna put them in offices the mayor of your town. That's what that is folks exactly. You're voting against your own interest and you know if someone is sitting out there right now and they just heard me say you don't have a choice paying taxes and they will your true. He wouldn't pay okay. I get that all right. So the money's taken out before you even your your take home pay is given to you all right. I get it yeah. Most people probably wouldn't especially given the behavior of the federal government or or individual state governments depending on the situation right and again. I understand that you have to have money to be able to go and fix bridges and stuff like that and infrastructure plan that nobody seems he can get done. But at any rate. I digress on that point but my my larger point is this to the naysayers that are have a problem with what i just said what the hell is taxes supposed to do for you when news international emergency what was that. I said the things that you just mentioned work on infrastructure state and federal. But but i'm talking about when there's a true national emergency like a health pandemic that too. Okay but this clown mitch. Mcconnell just sit. That just sat there on national television this past week and told everybody that the reason why businesses are suffering right now the ones that are managed to either stay open or have become open since I it seems to be a bit safer across. The country is because you're lazy. You're staying at home and you're collecting government check. I absolutely abhor that rationale. no absolutely. because it's like so really all right. I'm done on that point. But anyway we have another voicemail here unless you have another point brother know that was that was it just. It's amazing to me. Okay all right. And here's her next voicemail. Hi guys i spanish filmmaker. I listened to your podcast. And i'm calling you from los angeles from la I'm doing the research on The spanish california mission times in and the tribes of the natives native california's coty and In my research As a white person from obviously the part of the planet who stuttered it all Spain finding but i don't know how to refer and how contact is people this tribal people Because they lack the knowledge. And i like the history despite my research how would you go about opening dialogue For anyone wanting to dig the truth of events and see how we can heal from here. Binding ideas no matter what color i feel the responsibility of as a descendant of the spaniards to fix whatever i can fix my life because i live here and i love it here all right. Thank you for the show. So so we can identify the caller by first name but Thoughts brother yes. Actually i shake callers. it's okay. I appreciate the callers candid. Acknowledgement lily of his ancestral contribution to what occurred in this country. Funny that that voicemail came through. This is the first time. I've heard this voice mail but there's an article that will speak that. We're gonna talk about here shortly. That will speak to some of what he just talked about in his candid. Acknowledgement correct If you are able to make a connection to some of the california tribes I think you'll go a long way to contribute to the healing that you mentioned it sounds as though you're you're trying to create a documentary of some sort or film some sort of film to that effect if that's if unless my misunderstanding what's correct or incorrect. Excuse me but there are lots of ways to get a hold of the various tribes. You can Seek out information at a state level and you can also seek out information at a federal level By googling um you know federally recognized tribes and california say for instance the state. You're living in and do the research that way find out where these tribes are located in reach out to them and see if they're you know able to contact with you to help you in your endeavor or hear what you have to say. Those are a couple of ways that i can think of right off the top of my head anything you want to add to that well. It's relationship building in my view on that. And you know we always speak to trying to attend. When when they're available courses been difficult with the pandemic and all but cultural events You know that that may be hosted by Some of the tribes that you're trying to reach out to Dave mentioned googling. And of course You know lot of the tribes Do have You know official websites if you will. And if they're posting any any events going on there where you can actually get out and meet some of the community members That that's always that's always helpful as well Maybe i could probably provide some other resources for you but But if you could email the show at home with an s. hosts that native opinion dot com. And just kind of identify yourself as the as voicemail taller We'll see if we can get some other resources to you. I know a few people On me not necessarily in the la area but close and and see if they're willing to To work with you the other thing you have to be you have to understand too. And this is why i say relationship building in it that it takes time. often approached In in a by people that are trying to do documentary. I can't begin to tell you mean people wanna do a story about the peak watts right and it's like But they they. They just sort of understand when i when i say this. They come across his takers. As opposed to wanting to you know really really get to know the people that they actually wanted to to create content about right. And so we're we've most of us are rather good at Detecting to motive right other times. Not but it's a building process as a relationship process and especially in in filmmaking and content creation having somebody be there throughout the entire process not not somebody that you interview And walk away. And then um fill in blanks with what you think is right. You know so that that would be another question. i would give to you You know he. He mentioned spain. You know and i do understand that. I mean i would also seek out and try to try to see if you can build relationships with Author's book authors. That are out there. Such a stephen nukem who has written extensively about The doctrine of disco of christian discovery and and And the effects of that early. Spain had on on the continent You know there's other talk shows you can reach out to as well If if they're willing to talk to you may be john cain Who also has done an enormous amount of work in that subject in that area. But i know you wanna speak to tribes in that in that region so those are those are some potential suggestions. But as i said i could probably do more if if i hear back from the caller again so But thank you. Thank you for calling in and And we'll we'll see what happens from there. So i appreciate it. Thank you all right and one more voicemails from any any called in in always good to hear from her. And so here is her voicemail. Hey good afternoon. Michael and david. It's anti colleen checking in and just letting you guys know Well a couple of things. I am faithfully listening to your podcast and thank you so much for only information for the sharing and the education it just humbles me more and more and I just want to say again. How how much i regret you know. Just my last. Two voice mails ago so stupid. So insensitive You know i don't. I allowed myself to get caught up in the emotion and The tragedy that both of you Share about your people allowed myself to own that and be emotionally respond to that. And i don't have that right only posit there And i don't want to speak for you brother but you know When i when i talk about anything that's traumatic Relevant to the history of my own people. I it's it's At least from my perspective is something that either i feel is is fairly well known and and it's in it's okay to share their obviously a number of things that i don't share but But i don't i. I wouldn't want any anybody else to feel like. They're they've encroached in some way on something that i may have share. And that's the impression. I got just now about your brother. No i agree with that in to a large degree. Anything that you know. I share is pretty much common knowledge except for some personal stuff of course but i don't hold anybody alive now responsible for that so you know. I don't want people to feel that they're responsible. I do want people to become a stakeholder and stopping the behaviors that brought us to this point. I do want people to to do that. Become stakeholder absolutely to stop it but that's only you know doing what's right and acknowledging that you know. A lot of bad crap happened to to native peoples And applaud those that want to become stakeholders in putting a stop to it in correcting the injustices. I applaud you for that. But to feel that you're responsible for what ancestors may have done. That's no don't don't take on that that that responsibility that's not yours to carry exactly. Yeah i would say we're possible. We always we always want to put indigenous educators. I to educate other people. On you know non-indigenous people in particular about you know america or call the true american history which is which is just not carried forward. Unfortunately as we see time and time again You know but but but by all means also You know i think If you're trying to fill in the missing pieces for other people you know from things that you've learned from other indigenous people you know be you know a show like this or authors or anything like that You know within reason. I think that that's a that's a. That's a good thing But just recognize that you know they can speak better are are closer to it in that regard so in that way it's it's communicated the proper way so Thank you yeah i I paused it. Because i hadn't actually listened to all the way through this so i think what i'll do from this point brother is i'm gonna win our whole often the rest of this and then i can. I can share it At another time. And so. I hope you understand that as well anti but but anyway would please don't don't put on yourself like like davis saying we we understand and we also know in any works in a pretty pretty emotionally charged environment. Also right and so i personally respect you for for having for for being there and helping other people in the work in the field that you do so please please understand that for sure so and by all means junior to write and continue to send messages in you know so oh absolutely we appreciate that and continue continue. Fighting continued fighting. come like i said continued. Become a stakeholder to stop the injustices and help correct some of the wrongs. Because that's all you can really. Do you know that that's absolutely do i. Absolutely there's a lot of forces out there man that you know we are not in control of them and we can say and continue to try to educate but you know there are some people that just either refused to get it or i don't know are incapable game. Actually this is a good point in time for me to insert what i was talking about before. We started the show today brother my week right. So i will give the reader's digest. Condensed version of this. I will not name names With the exception of the agency that i've been interacting with which i have mentioned on the show time and time again of a frustration of mine with this agency and the agency is the bureau of ocean energy management which is under the umbrella of the department of the interior. I've been consulting on wind energy projects a since about two thousand eighteen. I've been very transparent with the agency about involvement there's been several education sessions Through tribal consultation. That i've engaged with with this agency and I've also been part of an invite in the agency. Visited our reservation with a very The number of Of leaders within the agency and And the first project that we were working on something called vineyard wind one out of matthew off the coast of massachusetts and the long the short of it is the agency released a memorandum of agreement Which spells out you know certain sensitivities that they're going to take part in which which is needed and as always a good thing And in that in that agreement they mentioned all the tribes that consulted on that project. Except mine except me. There is in my view. You can't call that an oversight when handed in written comments on that project. So why are we try to educate and we try to communicate our concerns about a particular project or maybe our agreement on a project we continue to say and we continue to maintain a at least you know from our tribes point of view that we're not against renewable energy. We're just have concerns about where The devices used to generate that power. Go and in this particular case this agency a race. The mashantucket pequot tribal nation from this document. So it's not over. There will be additional discussions with this agency. Not only about that situation. But about other projects that i will be. I will continue to be involved in But there are a lot of at work to execute on the joseph r biden infrastructure plan which includes a big piece of the renewable energy. Push and again. I understand that. I understand the framing that they're trying to use. Which is you know we. We have to get off fossil fuels in complete agreement with that and i also acknowledge and understand that we all will not agree with how we do that. You cannot erase the indigenous voice when we are trying to convey a concern to you nuke so that was I went through a range of emotions over the last forty eight hours regarding this But say you know that You have not deterred me from continuing to voice our concerns in this area. If anybody from the agency happens to listen to this program and It has gotten back to me a few have and do good so And they won't be surprised way. They shouldn't be surprised what our positions were anyway and our positions are in alignment with other tribes so But we will continue to consult with with this and many other agencies so so good. That's where we're knowledge a couple of comments in check as well as a lot of the other day acknowledge all the comments made in chat by the way folks. But i think you meant what i said. When i say anti that it wasn't hearst carey. In how how road. I think about this all the time and although getting more educated it's important i often find. It doesn't change much for me to be more aware and ended up thinking what more i could do to make a bigger impact. Well how. I hope you're sitting down because it it did. Change a lot freeview to to become more educated because you made the comment right here and chat. What more could you do to make a bigger impact so that that indicates change made a change for you in you once. I can rockets taken off. Seven forty seven up and dave backyard man. Yup worries upper. Yeah i've got to change that fan out. I think it did make a change for you because of the comment that you made. What more could you do to make a bigger impact and just by by the mere fact that you made that statement. You're making a bigger impact because you're letting people know. I'm aware and i want to do what i can do to help. So that spoke volumes. My friend more than you. You may have realized so you continued to become more educated and you continue to wonder what more you see there that you can do because you will come. You will come to conclusions and answers to your own question just by talking to other people like i'm sure you do about you know the the plight of native people that makes a big impact your planting seeds and you're watering them changing other people's perspectives. So yes you're doing more than you may may be aware of that. You're doing definitely and i applaud you those like yourself who doing the very same things you're doing. You're doing and wondering the exact same things you're wondering just keep doing. It's not always something that we do with our hands. That makes a difference. Some of them biggest good. just sometimes. it's you know a bigger impact can be made in the things that we we say or the information that we share with others. sometimes that is an even bigger impact. So thank you for sharing this with us because it spoke volumes where it spoke volumes to me anyway and i you and everyone else. That's doing the same thing and and asking the same questions and and wondering the same things that you are. Thank you right well. Let's transition to. I guess to remain content here guys so again as we mentioned. You're listening to episode. Three one five may piece enclosure. Maybe please enclosure will finally become a reality. The title of this episode and We We want to let you guys know. The some of the content today is going to be Emotional and and So just wondering to forewarn folks. we will We will let you know as we go throughout this when some content is going to become a sensitive case anybody wants to fast forward or something But the rest of the episode. We're gonna be talking about some emotional things just so you know all right so today we're gonna talk we we recognize something which which within denied for a long time and that's the wrong and injustices committed against in people. It's a our first article The second article we're going to share with you is. The interior secretary is forming a commission to study the crisis of missing and murdered indigenous women and girls Weeks after launching a unit to investigate cases so they are moving right along with that Some remains were found in north carolina in a north carolina. Storage unit identified as A person of turtle mountain a turtle mountain chippewa woman who was apparently missing for fifteen years and and another article A niece spending almost forty years searching for her aunt shirley in so. Say all right that there. You are up thank you. I'm before i continue on your second article in other news. That first part is error on my part. I didn't clean that up for some reason. So okay anything from speaker down. It's what that article is is supposed to supposed to be. Okay no problem. My guys okay. Alrighty so mexico marks and of last indigenous revolt with apology and this comes by way of associated press for written and posted eight in indian country today dot com. Okay on monday. Mexico marked the anniversary of nine thousand nine hundred one battle that ended one of the last indigenous rebellions in north america. Okay they issued an apology. For centuries of brutal exploitation and discrimination president andres manuel lopez. Obrador world was accompanied by president alejandro. Okay many of guatemala and that was the neighboring country that had a majority my population so today they recognize something that they denied for a long time. The the wrongs and injustice committed against the mayan people now history speaks of the mayenne people as extinct. Truly one would get the idea that the mind people don't exist anymore by the way history positions them but they are alive and well during the eighteen hundred. The myers were forced work. Surf conditions on cecil plantations cecil and hennequin were fibers used in making rope camp Some were even tricked. Into virtual slavery and sugarcane feels in cuba like many other indigenous peoples quoting for centuries. These people have suffered exploitation and abuse said insterior secretary cordeiro today. We recognize something which we have denied for a long time. The wrongs and injustice committed against the my people quoting again we today. We ask forgiveness in the name of the mexican government for the injustice committed against you throughout history and for the discrimination which even now you are victims of in quote quoting again. We realized that we have a great history that we are held up as an example and people make a lot of money off our name but that money never shows up in our communities and that was the coat from activists alfayo yam canal. The ceremony was held in the hamlet of t- whole hosue. Sco -til suco in the mayan township of philippi joe with though okay the headquarters of the rebellion it comes amid broader commemorations of the five hundredth anniversary of the fifteen nineteen fifteen twenty one spanish conquest of mexico and two hundred years of mexico's eighteen to twenty one independence from spain. The port was once known as china's crews and it's considered the mayan capital because it was the center of the rebellion. It held the temple of the speaking cross an apparent ventriloquist trick that counseled the mayas to rise up against their oppressors. The mayas of kintana ru who fought in eighteen forty seven to nine thousand nine hundred one man. That's a long rebellion against mexican settlers and the government known as the war of the cast. Still live on the caribbean coast. The rebellion was finally ended when mexican troops captured the port between fourth and fifth of may nineteen one. So i'm glad this acknowledgement happened. It sounds like it's been long a long time coming five hundred years and the people s the mayan still exist. They're alive and well so when you're reading your history books. Please don't think that the mayans are extinct. They are not and i applaud the governments of water malla and mexico for again reaching out acknowledging what they've done and acknowledging that a lot of this abuse is still going on so. I'm hoping that they'll start making strides to correct thing labral. No indeed you know. Um i mentioned a moment ago about a racer in. That's largely what what needs to happen on a on such a large scale right correcting history. Certain things i've been race feed on purpose or inadvertently right so because both can't be true. Right gonna move on the x article now. Okay our next title up Reads deb howland. Is plowing ahead with tackling violence against native women. And as we know deb. Helen has been on the job for only about a month right but interior secretary. Helen is already clear about one of our priorities. Which will be addressing the scourge of violence against native american women and girls Take this opportunity though to also mentioned that you know we have missing men as well absolutely and and you know it's not meant to diminish them and at this point i'm also going to make a podcast suggestion for you guys It was mentioned by one of our guests while back and That podcast. I just wanna get the name correct. 'cause i've been listening to the red justice project. they They share stories of missing people. Missing indigenous people men and women on their podcast of for affected people from like robertson. County north carolina and other places so We'll have a link to their show in the show notes. And i'd love to get them on the show as well brother the the the hosts As they continue to Elevate some of these some of these stories in these situations to try to hopefully bring some resolution if you would send me a link as to how to you know to the show and we can tag team trying to get him on sure. Absolutely sandro could probably speak to some of the things that are happening in robeson county as well That's kind of downing her neck of the woods yet. You need a need now. As interior secretary is forming a commission to study the crisis of missing murdered indigenous women after the weeks after searching After launching excuse me a unit to investigate these cases native american women and endure appalling levels of violence about eighty four percent of indigenous women experienced domestic violence in their lifetimes more than fifty percent experience sexual violence. According to the national institute of justice hundreds of native women are mysteriously disappearing being Mysteriously disappearing or being killed at least five hundred six crazy figure indigenous women and girls have gone missing or been murdered in seventy one cities including more than three hundred and thirty since two thousand ten according to a twenty eighteen report by the urban indian health institute and that's likely gross undercount given the limited or complete lack of data being collected by law enforcement agencies. Ninety five percent of those cases were never covered by the national media and the circumstances surrounding many of those deaths and disappearances are still unknown yet. So you see when we mentioned many times throughout various episodes that the the media doesn't cover you know indigenous people that are missing we. We weren't bashing the media it's true it's a fact i'm bashing him well because only bashing them i'm that's what i mean we johnson i just bashing them to bash them but it's the truth bro. Yes they deserve being bashed. And and and i pulled no punches on that because prior to more and more videos starting to show up of of police activity against Black america right okay. We were even more invisible and and You know. I'm glad that there has been so much more attention in the media about The problems that are going on against people of color in this country but we are still very much invisible and given the amount of resources that an average median network has reason exactly yet. They can't they can't put a missing persons case on television that comes out of one of our communities. It's like they. They chew round the subject. Now i'll give you an example. They ran a cbs around a story this morning about the whole opium nation because it's a border and immigration story. It's not a missing indigenous story. So there's no excuse and by enlarge whenever they were talking about and trying to remember who had would phrase it this way but this person was absolutely correct. You see When when in that works by and large have stopped doing this almost altogether but remember the numerous stories of a white girl goes missing. Oh my goodness you know. The entire town is searching. At least that's the way the media portrays it quite. If it's a person of color no attention nothing. Nothing nothing media-related now. It's better for black. Americans in terms of attention on missing cases but not for indigenous americans so from my perspective in this is probably where my mouth is gonna get me in a little bit of trouble and if i get some email i hope people can understand from the context. We should be. I not last. Because his country was sprung upon us and then african people were brought here against their will but now as we roll the clock ahead. How how old is the country. Rather two under sixty some years. I think up to sixty seven somewhere around there. I'm absolutely glad that that some attention is being properly. You know placed in terms of problems that are going on for people of color in this country except us. Follow me. I do so. That's that's a frustration of mine. I mean how hard is it for the news media to you know bring in some indigenous women's cases if the president the current sitting of the united states has such an emphasis to To have better conversations with tribes across this country those conversations inevitably must include missing and murdered cases and with the power of the presidency of the united states. Why can't there be more discussion of bringing some of the top people in some of these media companies and have a sit down and say as part of my agenda and trying to improve relations with tribes. You must start having regular conversations with tribal leadership in this country and putting some of these cases on your news. Networks seven done loop. They sort of assume that it will happen and it doesn't why because what is the population vote count per black communities in the united states versus indigenous right. That's why so. I don't pulling any punches in these areas. That is the truth and again if these if president biting serious about you know again trying to improve these relationships. That's a great place to start. Help jalan out with the power some media and also yes empower her to be able to get proper funding to go to. You know the manpower. That's needed. Because i know that that's that's a real problem. The process the cases. Because you just we just shared a figure with you. Five hundred six indigenous women and girls gone missing in seventy one cities That's a problem folks a big problem. So i if if the biting administration is serious about trying to help their statistic that you can sink your teeth into if you will and helped help deb jalan. Gather up some support which includes mainstream news media. Because that's what they should have been doing all along so moving on in the article. Here it says jalan announced thursday that she's creating a joint commission led by the department of the interior in the department of justice to identify in curtail violent crimes targeting indigenous women. Her action stems from the enactment in october of not the invisible act senators lisa murkowski a republican from alaska and Catherine cortes may stroh democrat of nevada led the senate's effort last year to pass the not invisible act. Howlin was a lead sponsor of that bill when she represented new mexico in the house and now she's Interior secretary and she's not wasting any time as she begins to address the situation quote a lack of urgency. Transparency in coordination is hampered our country's efforts to combat violence against american indians and alaskan natives. She said in a statement quitting her again in partnership with the justice department and with the extensive engagement with tribes and other stakeholders interior will marshal our resources to finally address the crisis of violence against indigenous peoples close quote. I am so glad she used the word crisis and not issue. Oh my god i'm so. Tired of republicans having a problem with that word in certain contexts like global warming going decrease. Your doesn't report. Yes a dozen doctors. And sodas the use of the word crisis in this situation because it is a crisis when you have five hundred plus and they said that that estimate is way under served so double it a thousand missing people if they have a problem with the word women i don't know. But but even if we want to generalize and say thousand people are missing in this country digital people. Yes i guess. They're afraid of that. Were to maybe. Academia is but i. I digress victims grits. I'll stop allen will work with attorney general carlin another great places to start and work to set up the commission they will appoint twenty seven members. The group will hold hearings take testimony and gather evidence to help come up with recommendations for the government to combat violence violent crimes against indigenous peoples. Okay is it too much to ask beyond that to To to get congress off their asses and and stop having to renew the violence against women's act every talk show often yep like. Why can't you guys just make that fricking permanent. Here's an example of one group of people indigenous women. Five hundred plus missing pressure pretty much convinced that missing as a result of violent acts but there's violence against other women to and you guys got to sit there and think about it every five years. That's sad but that's what they're communicating to the rest of us. That's absolutely what they communicate. So maybe part of that conversation. With attorney general. Maher merrick garland can include that and say. Hey congress absolute justifiable reasons from from the justice department's level to make that act permanent and funded permanently quote. It's so frustrating that for so many years there was no federal strategy in place to assist women girls and families at the worst families pan. Tastic gazette includes us a men that have been affected by this facing unspeakable violence in harm. Close quote cortez mastro said in a statement quoting again too many too many families have faced unspeakable loss as native women have gone missing murdered or traffic did and led down by the complex law enforcement system in place. Close quote murkowski said in a statement. She added quote. This is one more step towards healing an open wound which plagues native communities close quote. And i think senator murkowski senator mastro for their work in this area and others There's there's been some senators that have thus left. The congressman's that also worked on on similar issues. We have to thank them. We do You know. I i know. We throw a lot of spears toward congress on a variety. Different issues around indian country. But you know when they do right. We've gotta acknowledged that in so so absolutely all right in other news. I'm going to issue a trigger warning on this this article because it's it's necessary to do so and the title of this article is And if you wanna fast forward ahead for about three minutes Feel free to do so but the the content of this article is what we've been talking about this for a good part of the program Finding and giving closure to families and this is just one more piece of a a huge puzzle of missing and murdered indigenous women that been found remains found in north carolina storage unit identified as turtle mountain chippewa woman missing for fifteen years. This article written by darren thompson for native news. Online dot net quoting. We must remain vigilant until no more sisters are stolen from their families and communities and quote again remains found in north carolina storage unit have been identified is a turtle mountain chippewa woman missing for fifteen years in two thousand sixteen. An online article was published about an unidentified woman in durham being discovered in a plastic tote. Durham to work in. Durham north carolina. Durham north carolina. Oh okay 'cause it says remains in. North carolina story out. There remains were found in in north carolina. But she was from durham. No she was. I don't think she was from dorm. Unidentified woman in durham being discovered in a plastic tote. I'll maybe she wrote. I took from somewhere else. I'm sorry i durham. Quite well us work there. I lived in raleigh. Buddy i worked. There ain't go ahead Concealed storage unit. Mris point had suspicions that the personal was our sister who had been missing for more than ten years. According to the news article the woman's body had been at the scene for up to a decade before being discovered it is unclear. How long the remains may have been hidden in the unit in durham county. But the you will. Unit was rented by the same person since twenty. Ten police had named her dorm. Jane doe a name given by law enforcement when the true name of a person is known as being intentionally concealed and illustrated her as a white woman with with white white skin. And red hair said jessica quoting the woman had the same gap in her teeth. As a my sister did and we knew it was my sister in quote jessica told native news online quoting again but police wouldn't believe us when the police announced the debt that was pers- presumed suspicious but there was little evidence pointing to the identity of the victim or how she ended up in the story june quoting. I have no idea we were told by the police that are death. What suspected as a homicide in quote and that was a comment from Jessica the mri sister. The during police department announced on november fifth nineteen twenty last year quoting melissa and pointer poitras contact with her family for many years and they are trying to locate her in quote on the city of dorms website. They said that she was known to frequent the east dorm area and are seeking for the public's help in locating missy who was last seen in the city and late twenty five. It wasn't until november last year. Twenty twenty that police identified the remains discovered in october. Twenty sixteen as being a native american of native american descent. Durham police reached out to mris. Father kerry poor tra two matches. Dna sample against the remains of a jane doe in north carolina. Tuesday april twenty-seventh last month. Durham police identify. Durham jane doe as melissa and poetry through a dna test. North dakota was the first state in the country to pass legislation aimed at addressing the epidemic of missing and murdered indigenous. People representative buffalo introduced a package of six bills to combat missing and murdered indigenous people in her first term twenty nineteen and they passed almost unanimous unanimously. Excuse me with bipartisan support. So i applaud north dakota for their efforts and being the first state to pass legislation. I'm glad this young lady was finally brought home to her family. So that family can have some closure and gain some piece. I know that in In in situations where remains are found But not identified. I in this particular case they were not just of being of indigenous descent but specifically a family member. Okay when when remains are found. And i'm talking specifically of Nag process now. The native american graves. Repatriation act if if they are indigenous People in a tribe A federally recognized tribe Wants to claim That person to for repatriation meaning of proper reburial through ceremony usually the determination that that the remains are from an indigenous person that that has to be established first and then And then there's a process that that's followed again that's for people that are not identified. On this particular cases person was identified and so The family ooh make that decision You know For themselves Whether or not the community gets involved. I think is probably going to be You know again. A decision with the family but I'm just glad she was found very very sorry for the family that they've lost her and trying to Now now now the work of trying to find the person responsible or people responsible has to has to continue you know. We just have to keep hoping that secretary. Helen's efforts will put an end to the epidemic that is missing and murdered indigenous women and children and that a lot of families we will be able to get closure and find some peace Family members are returned. Okay next article and again. We're we're giving another trigger warning okay for you guys. On the title. Reads california's jane doe identified as a missing cree woman Her niece spent nearly forty years searching for her aunt. Shirley ann so say in this particular case so this not mistaken brother. This crosses the border as well this case all right so if you wanna fast ahead again i'll give it more than three minutes i would say. Don't try tremor like five win. Start this read in three two and one accre woman known for decades as jane doe number five kern county in california has been identified through collaboration with her niece. United states sheriff's office in a not for profit. Dna matching project that focuses on unidentified remains the woman was found stabbed to death in an almond orchard near delano california on july. Fourteenth of nineteen eighty. She has now been identified. As shirley and sue say from samson cree nation moscow weeks territory and albert canada by kern county. Sheriff's office in california and the dna doe projects again cross-border her niece violet. Sue say has spent almost forty years searching for her aunt shirley. She said she is dealing with a lot of mixed emotions. After the discovery was revealed to her twenty twenty. This another case from last year suze said in her said her aunt left the reserve in her early twenty s and began working in edmonton. She then went to vancouver where she made her permanent home. The last time violent violent recalled seeing her at home. It was when she was seventeen after her oldest brother passed away in nineteen seventy seven quote. I asked her if she was going to come home now. She said quoting again. She said she was going to go back to vancouver and visit someone in seattle close quote in twenty twelve suspected. Serial killer wilson chow. St- was convicted of killing though authorities. Still didn't know who she was. Claus was also convicted of another unidentified woman murdered in ventura county california around the same time the last time the family from shirley was in nineteen seventy nine suze tracks. The families bloodlines to the famed scatcherd on plains cree chief big in the eighties and that information was uploaded to ancestry dot com in two thousand and eight in two thousand nineteen. She said she saw an ad on facebook asking for information about a missing woman. That dna doe project attract back all berta scotch run and manitoba. She connected with the project and her dna match quote. That's how i found shirley. She said it was thirty. Nine years later i found her close quote. Dna towed excuse me. Dna doe team leader. Gina rather said the project uploaded shirley's dna to a service called ged match to find relatives after being contacted by the kern county. Sheriff in may of two of two thousand nineteen. The dna doe project was founded in two thousand seventeen as a not for profit organization and they have been. I never have identified more than forty. Five jane doe. Jane and john does while they currently have seventy cases ongoing and fifty five researchers man support them. If they're not already. I would imagine the they should get in touch with deb hound in work real close with them. That would be. That would be great. They also they will also help. Or agencies fund genealogical re searches quote shirley has been so difficult to find because we never thought she would be in california close quote. She said quoting her again. There are a lot of unknowns unanswered questions as to how she ended up How she ended up to be down there. Close quote when an eller. Ask you to do something for them you. Have you have to do your best to live up to it. Close court she said. Now we can put shirley To rest in our proper ceremonial ways and ensure her spirit is not stuck in this place. She said she had to walk away from her laptop when she got the news. That shirley's dna matched the kern county jane doe because she didn't expect all those emotions to come up. One was shock. She said then. A whole range of emotions. There was anger. There was happy that there was relief and there was sadness and grief my grandmother. Her mother used to used to receive birthday cards and christmas cards from her and they just stopped. She said my grandmother knew something had happened. Said she made a promise to grandmother to never stop looking for shirley quote any and anywhere. We could think to look for her. She said adding her aunt bell would join her quote. We would always hit roadblocks with regards to privacy laws. When we uploaded her she had zero matches in the database she said and september of two thousand nineteen we had. We had a new uploaded. We hit we had a new upload to ged match who turned out to be half second cousin meaning. They shared one great grandparent. She said once they have they had that lineage be found. That second cousin had one indigenous greg grandparent. We knew we were on the right track. She said in february of twenty twenty we put out a public plea on facebook and asked anyone who lived in that area and may recognize her days later. They were contacted by vara violent. Susa trish Bruce a member of a coaching first nation in northwestern ontario worked as a volunteer researcher. On shirley's case quoting her i have i have so many loved ones that are affected by missing and murdered indigenous peoples in canada. She said it dawns on me some days that it could be me. I would like someone to put the effort in to find me. She said that she hoped shirley's case inspired law enforcement in canada to help identify jane and joe's here quote. If there are other cases in canada. I would encourage authorities to use dna. Doh project to help resolve them. She said if people have missing loved ones and they have not reported them missing or have followed up. Get them into the law enforcement system so that they are known close quote and finally for violet. The discovery is just the beginning of our search for answers. She said she has finally been able to fulfil her promise to her grandmother. That alone is a huge huge relief. Yeah thing then it is. It is tough. I can relate to both of those stories. One of my grandmother's youngest sister's Disappeared in that same way. She was going to new york visit relatives and never came back whenever brummer. I can relate absolutely brother to you. Know think sandra and chat or wrote the name dot gov database also contains forensic info. Anybody needs another resource. It's n. a. m. u. s. dot gov. Thank you check that. Thank you senator. Appreciate our brother. My bags empty mine is will we appreciate that. alluded earlier to Some changes coming. I don't have a timeline yet I know i talk in a lot of open-endedness but But there will be some Some changes coming in terms of the live show Nothing is going to change for the podcasts. Of don't anybody panic about that But we're going to be experimenting with a couple of different options for For doing the live show on We'll get people have noticed. You guys know When when we are going to start to implement that so it's one point that out to you guys as i play us out here so again. I want to everybody chat for all the great conversation that you always provide. Thank you all and we think everybody who called in and also cintas messages. We have more feedback that we've received as well. We'll get that to out to you guys in a in a future episode here shortly and so we thank you very much for all the contributions you can also email us this show at hosts with an s. host that native opinion dot com. We really do appreciate all the mail that we receive. You can reach us through facebook. It's facebook dot com forward slash native opinion podcasts or through our twitter channel out there at native opinion. My name is michael kicking bear. I'm a citizen. The mashantucket pequot tribal nation here in the state of connecticut. Guy over there. He is david gray alice. Citizen of the cherokee tribe alabama residing in south west. Sunny florida with the hitting. I'm sorry with the seagulls and right now it's hotter than satan snot down here. So is it really. Oh it's in the mid nineties today. Thanks well stay cool. Stay warm where we are. We'll talk later. Bye bye safe.

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Author Louise Erdrich On Native Peoples' 'Long, Brutal Fight For Survival'

Fresh Air

48:21 min | 1 year ago

Author Louise Erdrich On Native Peoples' 'Long, Brutal Fight For Survival'

"From whyy in Philadelphia. This is fresh air. I'm Dave Davies in for Terry Gross. Today Louis Urge Rick the main character of our new novel. The night watchman is based on her grandfather. Who was chairman of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa in the nineteen fifties? He fought against the congressional initiative to move native people off their land and into cities policy. Urged Rick says amounted to tribal termination termination was outweigh to finally resolve. What Congress thought of is the Indian problem though he had an eighth grade education or grandfather built a local coalition to resist the move and organized a trip to testify before Congress. I believe what he did inspired other tribal nations to fight back against termination and it was a long brutal fight for survival also. John powers reviews the Brazilian film Bach. Arou- that's part political fabled part horror thriller man. He says funny. Our guest today is author. Louise Urge Rick in a career. Going back to the nineteen seventies. She's published seventeen novels and more than thirty books in all including children's literature poetry and nonfiction. She won the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award for Fiction twice earlier is a member of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians and much of her writing is centered on the experience of Native Americans. Her new novel set in Nineteen Fifty. Three and is inspired by her grandfather's role in resisting. A congressional effort to withdraw federal recognition from her family's tribe. The book is called the night watchman. Louise urged Rick. Welcome back to fresh air. It's been awhile Thank you you say. In the acknowledgements to this novel that you tried to write several books before getting underway on this one and that your impetus had disintegrated. You kind of weren't getting anywhere. Which is kind of a shock to me. Considering how prolific you have been Wh-what shook you loose and got US started on this book. I went back to reading my grandfather's letters which were written during the year. I was born. Nineteen fifty four so of course those years are somewhat mysterious to me and I knew that he had Thought Termination during that time but I never put together his letters and the details of what it was like for him to work as a nightwatchman. I never put that together with the timeline for the termination. Bill and what effect it had on the first five tribes slated to be terminated. A lot of this story is about this effort which your grandfather lead in which the main character in your book Thomas Leads. Which was this effort to oppose an initiative in the United States Congress to effectively kind of terminate the existence of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa which he was chairman of you. Want to explain what this proposal was. What its impact would have been termination was out way to finally resolve the what Congress Thought of as the Indian problem and that would be to move everyone off reservation land because it wouldn't be reservation land anymore. Turn over their Land Sutherland. Move everyone to cities and the most important part in doing that was to abrogate. All treaties in these treaties have been made since the beginning of our country on a nation to nation basis with every tribe and they all contain these words as long as the grass grows as long as the rivers flow so the original intent and purpose was to guarantee the land. That was that was agreed upon by the two parties. The two nations those were thrown out the window by both Houses of Congress and to simply Declared the existence of Indians or native American or American Indians a non non issue and to not recognize tribal nations all federal assistance to the Terminator Rec to terminate all federal assistance and all federal recognition of who native indigenous indigenous. People are and were the reason for termination was not just to get rid of the problem that they the the Indian problem but to To acquire the lands that in many cases were covered with some of the most beautiful stands of virgin forest in the country so the first tribe slated for termination the menominee and Klamath and the intent because of the because of the post war housing boom was to get those big stands of timber which they did and we should note that the resolution couch this as the emancipation of the tribes right. Yes so that was the thing that was so hard to grasp I mean people had Come out of government boarding school learning some English for instance my grandfather Who who wrote letters which I found later at the planes archives wrote to get into boarding school only finished the eighth grade and he was. He was tribal chairman at the time and he had to assemble a delegation and go up against Congress within a matter of months in order to try and save his triumphant from termination which meant all the land would be lost because that would be all they would have to sell. This was a remarkable part. The story is fictional. But this part of it is true absolutely issue and with an eighth grade education. Assemble this group and wrote letters and yeah couldn't be March About that's what started and I couldn't believe knowing what he went through as the nightwatchman trying to stay awake all night and by day writing letters. Going to meetings Traveling around the state of North Dakota wherever he could doing whatever he could to assemble a delegation I couldn't believe what his life was like. He said he he had twelve hours of sleep. Most weeks well for those of you. Who Don't know your story as well tell us just a bit about your background and your connection to the Turtle Mountain Band of the Chippewa. I well so my mother is Turtle Mountain Chippewa as was my grandfather. And so am I. I am an enrolled member a citizen of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa. It would be impossible for me to say that if termination had indeed won the day so my father is German. I'm a very mixed person and yet being a citizen of a nation within our nation gives one a certain sense of It it changes your life. It means that I I care deeply about my people. My Mother's people and I grew up knowing who I was and accepting all parts of myself and this is a part that I realized would not have existed. Had My grandfather not fought for it. Did you grow up speaking Is it is it a job where the language that the chippewas speak. It's Gibb Way Moen or initiative. Avi Moen or at the time that my grandfather was speaking at just plain Chippewa. I didn't grow up. He was the last fluent speaker in the family. And I am very proud to say. My daughter is the next fluent speaker because she is teaching at an gibb way immersion school. Water could adding in Wisconsin on the Likud. Ray Reservation on an art art or Chippewa and ojibway synonymous. Are they different terms for the same thing? Yes they're all versions of the original word initial Abi you Grew UP IN MINNESOTA is. That did not on a reservation right now. I grew up in Walkerton. North Dakota okay. I'm not that that's on on the border of The Sedan Dakota reservation. It used to be within the borders but I didn't grow up on the Turtle Mountain reservation. I was visiting grandchild right. And your did your parents both teach in bureau of Indian affairs schools to have did my mother and my father taught at the same school at my grandfather attended while boarding school in Washington. You know that brings us to a reading. I'd like you to to share with us This is a bit of history and I guess it talks about sort of what you can set this up. This is about when your grandfather ended up going away to school when you want to set this up and give us this reading from your book. Sure before my grandfather went to the Watan boarding school he went to a school that was somewhat closer fort. Totten it known as Spirit Lake now and in that time one thing for sure was that every classroom was decorated with flags. Flags were everywhere. This had been a former military fort turned into a boarding school for children so it was still run in his time as a military school and this is about when he leaves for school and this was a very common experience for children who left it was It was known that they would have to have their their heads shaved their hair cut. And that was one of the things that was most difficult for children in for their parents because their hair was personal and in many cases or many tribes many families allowing your hair grow long was a symbol of your long life. Cutting your hair is a symbol of grief. So for that to happen was always very disturbing for the family that year his father was gone. His cheekbones jutting out. Thomas was always hungry. They were down to desperation food then. A bit of bannock smeared with deer fat. The day schools on the reservation gave out just one meal. The government boarding school would feed three meals for taught in boarding school was days wagon ride. If you started well before dawn. Thomas's mother Julia or a one wept and hid her face as he went away she had been torn whether to cut his hair herself. They would cut his hair off at the school and to cut hair meant someone had died. It was a way of grieving just before they left. She took a knife to his braid. She would hang it in the woods. So the government would not be able to keep him so that he would come home and he had come home and that is our guest. Louise urge reading from her new novel. The night watchman you know. What's striking about. This is that people often send their kids away to school. For Opportunity the impetus future was really starvation. The impetus was starvation and the reasoning behind the best schools being far away was to assimilate native children to train them to live in a culture. That was very different from their parents. So that when they came home often children couldn't speak the language that their parents were speaking. I'd say right here. That boarding schools are often characterized in sort of a lump definition. But they're all very different and the government had secular boarding schools which underwent a real sea change in the nineteen thirties and became much more supportive of native culture while many of the boarding schools which were run by. Religious groups did not and remained hostile to native religion native culture. You know it's interesting when Thomas. The character in this book does as your grandfather did and write a lot of letters to local and state and national elected officials and eventually organizer Group To go to Washington to testify in Congress against this so-called Emancipation Bill. One of the chief backers of the bill was a senator from Utah. Arthur Watkins you want to just tell us a bit about him and his role. In all this Arthur v Watkins grew up on Indian land. His family had settled On a piece of property that had been tax forfeited so that was another way of dispossessing Indians. It was the allotment era when native people could get their citizenship if they accepted one hundred sixty acres for a man. Sorry women got only eighty acres So if you accepted your lot more often than you you got citizenship. But it was a way of saying well all of the members now have these parcels. Let's sell off the rest of the land or you know at the time. The extraordinary poverty that people lived with caused them to sell their land their ads in all the newspapers of the time advertising Indian land cheap. And that's what happened but that wasn't enough are there. Watkins would withhold monies. He did everything to coerce the the menominee and the shoot people to relinquish their lands a lot of the time. Native people did not really understand what they were being forced to sign are. This goes way back but this this was something that can really be documented They didn't understand that because they spoke their languages. They spoke their native languages. Many of them didn't understand what he was saying. What they were signing only understood that like with as with a treaty that they would receive monies if they signed but these monies were supposed to go to the tribes. Anyway it was that he held them up and so there was all sorts of ways to coerce people into allowing their lands to be terminated. So a lot of his prosperity and career were built upon essentially the dispossession of native Americans. Oh completely yeah yeah He in the He questions Thomas the character in the book and I'm sure he questioned your grandfather about this And one of the questions. He asked almost everybody. According to the story is just how much Indian blood is in you and this was something that the people from the Turtle Mountain Band found puzzling right. Because there is it's in some respects a hybrid of mini cultures. Rydin people identify as they identify. This is something that Really it really surprised me in reading back and doing the research when people he always questioned the the native person he was talking to and most often the native person could not really reply or gave some sort of long story trying to figure it out on the spot. And that's because everyone knew who was native who is Indian who wasn't and it wasn't something that native people took on as some sort of identity and now everybody knows down to the fraction how much how much quote unquote Indian blood. They have you know. There's a moment in the story here where this group from the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa go to Washington to testify in Congress against this proposal to essentially terminate the tribe and they patiently and respectfully answer all the questions about you know. What's what's happening in the tribe. They're the real state of their own economy and poverty and then afterward Thomas the guy that you're is inspired by your grandfather actually goes to the office of Senator Arthur. V Watkins the prime sponsor of this effort and has a personal encounter and he said he wanted to thank the senator for the opportunity to speak to Congress and for the senators attention at the hearing. Do not this actually happened. This was real. There's a number of things that really happened in the book but this was absolutely real and I. I found a tiny. Ps On a letter to my parents on an onion skin copy now those carbon copies where he decided to write what what actually happened afterward. And he said he'd gone down to thank Arthur v Watkins and at that was so liked him. My grandfather was extremely polite. That was one thing he and he didn't hold any. He didn't hold anyone's attitude toward him against them he'd found that making friends was the most important skill in this process and keeping friends and meeting people on a very neutral polite basis. And that's what he did right and who knows but that might have been important in the outcome. Which was that? This proposal didn't happen. I know I I don't know they also were able to assemble a very persuasive. Set of objections That was very important and due to do it in just a few. Few months was incredible. I mean this was this was enacted immediately and nobody had copy machines. Everything had to be retype. They couldn't even find a copy of the bill and They raised money themselves. They had a boxing match to raise money for them to go to Washington because they couldn't take money from the way they had no money to go anywhere right. Now it wasn't they didn't have any control. This was the deer of their own influence over their sovereignty. They had no sovereignty. They had answer to the Bureau of Indian affairs at every turn. And although this isn't in the book I might just add that dillon. S Myer who had overseen. The incarceration of the Japanese during the forties was now the Commissioner of American Indian Affairs in Washington. So he was now overseeing termination Well Louise `ordre is our guest. Her new novel is the night watchman. We'll talk more after a break and later. John powers reviews the Genre Busting Brazilian film. Bucker row which won the jury prize at Cannes. Last year. I'm Dave Davies and this is fresh air support for NPR in the following message come from Delta Airlines who believes that the miracle of flight has nothing to do with Flight Delta flies to three hundred destinations around the world and even with miles and cultures between us we can all relate to that guilty pleasure TV show the love of cooking for friends and family and even the feeling of Sunday scary as before work flight is about the journey that connects us who we meet along the way and realizing that we are actually more similar than we are different Delta keep climbing we're speaking with Arthur Louise urge rick who's published seventeen novels many centered on the experience of Native Americans. Her new novel set in Nineteen Fifty. Three is inspired by her grandfather's role in resisting congressional effort to withdraw federal recognition from her family's tribe. The book is called the Nightwatchman. There's another key character here. Who Sort of who drives a whole part of the plot parise parental do? I have that name right. Well it you you do. But it would be called. Printout pronounced front homebodies parental parental so. Tell us about Patrice and her family. Patrice has one of the much coveted jobs at the jewel bearing plant and That's where a lot of women worked at the time and we should just explain. Jewel bearing means you're making these tiny little bearings for watches and other machine machines made out of jewels. It's technically not horaces yet. We're not talking about jewelry here now. Now it's their bearings for Watches and gunsights and I knew I had patrice as a character when I read the line. she did things perfectly when enraged. She is supporting her mother. Her brother and she has this great job. She's incredibly proud of her job. At the jewel bearing plant many women were hired there because they tested very highly on manual dexterity tests and she knows that if she makes one false move if she gets sick. She doesn't make it to the job on time. She could get fired so she's always living on this edge and when something comes to throw her off. The stakes are very high You know one thing that I I was really impressed about in the way the story unfolds. Is that the poverty of the PRONTO. Family is something we become aware of. Gradually I mean Do you want to describe the circumstances they live? They live in. What was very common at the time? Which is a Poll and Mighty House with a dirt floor sometimes linoleum would-be laid down to cover. The floor was stepped down underneath And they it's heated by a wood stove that's often made out of a can of can from some grocery store You know it's and there is nothing but what is. There's no transportation. There is very little to hunt left. There is Some people had gardens but Jeanette and her family live in a very traditional way so she gathers a lot of food. They trap a lot of food. This my mother did although they did have a fantastic garden she still knows how to snare rabbits and So they they lived on a they lived on the edge at all times They bought nothing new. A pair of shoes was lasted ears and The only person who could really keep them alive on their subsistence level was Pixie or patrice. She wants to be called Patrice. Everybody falls back into calling her pixie. Even me Patrice is the name by which is ambitious. She believes she will rise in the world right right. You're it's interesting. There's a high school math teacher. Lloyd Barnes is taking her brother. Pokey home at one point and you write that. As he approaches the house he didn't realize it was an edifice for humans. He thought it was a place for animals. Yeah I mean they're very simple structures and the barns were often made of the same sort of materials they were the these were indigenous materials. You know right from the woods and right from the ground it was at that time however that people could also get these newly built sort of prefab a one bedroom houses. I I have pictures of my own grandparents house. Arriving on the back of a tractor you know people could get these through the tribal housing at the time but somehow they never did so they were still living in in this sort of house and that was uneven housing up through the seventies no running water. Now `electricity you said. Your mother knew how to snare rabbits and maintained a garden. Did she grow up? In these kind of circumstances this counterpart no my grandfather was one of the most enterprising individuals on the reservation. My Mother's family lived with very very little but they had a lot of security and they all went to school every day. It was a point of pride for my grandfather that he read everything his children read when they brought the books home so they had a very different kind of life. There's a member of the Pratt family who is not there and this story and that is the older sister Vera. Yes who has left for cities as it's called. That's Minneapolis Saint Paul. This is a fascinating part of the story and she had left with the help from the relocation office you would explain what that was and what role it played in the departure of people like Vera. Relocation was a a program that interlocked with termination. You see the idea was. After the Tribe was terminated. They would be able to sell their land and be moved to an area quote unquote of Greater Economic Opportunity. Which would mean a city so they were setting up this move during the fifties with this relocation program. You would a person who wanted to move would get some training some stipend for a short amount of time and then basically be turned loose in the city. I've been asked by people well. Why wasn't that great widen? People just want to move away from their reservation and become like everybody else. I've been asked that question. It's a fair question and the answer is because native people aren't like everybody else and native people want to stay who we are right. And that's because the government made very firm decision not to put money into the infrastructure on reservations not to keep the treaties the treaties stated that they would provide for health education and the General Welfare of native people as they struggled into this new form of existence and that was basically rent for all that the rest of the country enjoys all of the lands. All of the rivers all of the places that no longer belonged to native Americans. This young woman vera leaves the family and goes to Minneapolis. Saint Paul and one of the things that happens in your novel is that her younger sister. Patrice goes to find her because they've lost touch with they haven't heard from her in months and it turns out. She's in a city where there are criminals and sex traffickers who play on prey on women from the reservations. Was this a pattern. Back than in the fifties. It's a pattern that was established from the first contact between native people in European people. And now there's a lot more awareness about missing and murdered indigenous women and it hasn't of course it hasn't stopped. It's probably gotten worse. But yes T- question is that a an issue that you or others. Have you know. Been in active in advocating on Yes yes indeed It's an issue that's been. Public awareness has been growing. There's enormous movement in the in the twin cities On Valentine's Day they're women and man marching in red to symbolize our sisters who who have been missing and may have been murdered or have been murdered and are missing in that way. We're speaking with. Louise urged her. New Novel is the Nightwatchman. We will talk more after a short break. This is fresh air. This message comes from. Npr sponsor capital one with the capital one Walmart rewards card. You can earn five percent back at Walmart on line. Two percent at Walmart in-store restaurants and travel and one percent everywhere else. When you want all that you need the capital one Walmart rewards card. What's in your wallet? Terms and exclusions apply capital one and a High. I'm Jay Marotta and I am the new host of NPR's Ted Radio Hour. I am so excited because we are working on. A bunch of new amazing episodes were exploring big ideas about reinvention making amends and the psychological effects of climate change our first show drops March thirteenth. Please join me. I'd like to view to share another reading with us from the novel. The night watchman this is this involves Patrice Pronto. This young woman who is one of the main characters and it involves a terrible experience. She'd had in high school where some boys had gotten her into a car and taking her out and had sexually assaulted her picked. This guy named Bucky she managed to extricate herself before it went too far and flee but she lost her shoes there and I'm going to mention that her mother appears in this reading her name. Jeannot and this reading begins with where she has gotten back from this terrible experiences and she's beginning to choose in bed and she's kind of collecting herself and looking at her injuries that night she took a lap behind the blanket and looked at the scratches. The bruises there was even a bite mark on her shoulder. She'd felt none of it but she could still feel where his hands went. She was shaking squeezed. Her eyes shut crawled under the blanket. The next day more bruises had surfaced from under her skin. There was that phrase they got under my skin. She showed these marks to her mother and told John Everything that the boys had done and they had only pair of shoes. Her mother had let her breath out sharply two times then. She put her hand on her daughters hand. Neither one of them said a word. It was the same thing with both of them. And they knew it later when Patrice heard about becky's twisted mouth and how it was spreading down his side. She looked at her mother's face serene and severe for a clue but Patrice knew that she herself had done it. Her hatred was so malignant. It had lifted out of her like a night bird it had flown straight to bucky and sank. Its beak into the side of his face and that is Louise's urgent reading from her novel. The night watchman. Yeah this guy who perpetrated this assault. Bucky has essentially a paralysis on one side of his face and it is widely believed that Patrice. His Mom Jeanette had done this And this is where maybe he had bell's Palsy everything that I write like. This has to have another explanation. Well that's that's a rule for me. Okay well this is. What's interesting because this is one of many moments in the story where we see things that could be regarded as potentially supernatural. Right or spiritual or magical. I mean there. There was a case when Patrice goes looking for her sister in in Minneapolis and in encounters horrible place and a dog tells her a clue the dog speaks to her and I wonder does she think she hears the dog Told me about that and whether this was part of the kind of things that you heard from your family yes you know there are also people have experiences if you have a group of people and you ask has dream ever come true. Have you ever had an experience where you thought you were in the presence? A supernatural presence. Have you ever heard a voice? That didn't seem to calm from anywhere. You'd get so many stories and I like to ask people this question because I always get interesting stories. So many things happen to us that we immediately Explain away and so I'm just not explaining away. What's that's all it is. It's not magical realism. This is a very rich story with many plots and a lot of characters and it's really fun reading but you know it is based upon this really consequential event which was this attempts to as you say terminate the you know the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa which was in the end defeated because your grandfather managed to mobilise with meager resources a delegation and an a persuasive case and take it to Washington and after the end of the novel. At the end of your acknowledgements you have a paragraph which Kinda capitalizes Mona share. That with US I would love to and This is why I wrote the book now at this time if you should ever doubt that a series of dry words in a government document can shatter spirits and demolish lives. Let this book erase that doubt conversely if you should be of the conviction that we are powerless to change those dry words let this book give you heart really inspired by what your grandfather did. Weren't you I really was. I couldn't believe I'd gone through life. Not Knowing about his job knowing about him and knowing about termination by never put it together until a few years ago this sounded me and I'm grateful to him for what he did but also I believe what he did inspired other tribal nations to fight back against termination and it was a long brutal fight for survival. Not Until the seventies did Richard Nixon Antrim Nation and proclaimed that the new the new order of the day would be sovereignty that started us on an entirely different path. You're enormously successful rider with a great following and you've continued to live pretty near where you grew up. You're you're in Minneapolis. Right Y immune. Why have you stayed? Where do you go up I have a bookstore there for one thing what would I do? I can't move my quick move birchbark books but this is the sort of thing that people would be told like. Why don't you live in? Minneapolis among the financial elite. Right or somewhere else I mean. I feel that I've really moved into an entirely was born in Minnesota by grew up in North Dakota. That's that's where I continually go back to my parents who live there in Washington and my brother and my sister there so no I would. I was miserable when I had to live far away from my family. I I never wanted to really go. I and I found it difficult to get back. I would never leave my I love. I love where I am. So so you're bookstore birchbark books. That's in Minneapolis is at right now. That's where do you actually run the register and Run the store. Are you GonNa Make Me Laugh? Nobody lets me near the register. You don't WanNa hear I mean we. We would be in terrible trouble if I tried to take hold of that part of the operation now. Everybody kind of warns me up. I'm there to help I'M UP. I help run it in different ways. My daughters all have worked behind the register. Of all worked lugging books appear back fourth two different events and and I'm at different events but I I mainly I mainly a may very strong cheerleader and friend. The My colleagues at the bookstore my favorite people and they're part of family. There's not a lot of independent bookstores around anymore. What compels you to keep this going. Well we're a growing subset of Amazon. I suppose but we're there are an increasing number of small bookstores. And the reason we're we're surviving and in many cases thriving because we can what people begun to realize that we pay our taxes. You know that we offer community services like bringing in and Supporting local school systems and supporting literacy. You know that we do a lot for for our communities and we also are We romantic you see. I don't know how many proposals have happened in our bookstore. But they do and how many acts of forgiveness of also happened because we have a confessional in our bookstore and all you need to do is touch it and yet in your sins are forgiven. It's become a forgiveness booth. So there's these things that an independent bookstore can do there. That are also supernatural. I mean it's a magical realism place. I GUESS WE'LL LOUISA. Drake thank you so much for your time and for your writing. Appreciate your talking to us and you thank you so much. Lewis urge new novel. Is The nightwatchman coming up? John powers reviews the Brazilian film buck. Arou- that's part political fable part horror thriller and he says Funny. This is fresh air support for NPR and the following message. Come from all birds your quest for a naturally healthy and well balanced life drives a lot of your decisions. What you put on your body is as important as what you put in it for you. And for the planet all birds shoes are made from premium natural materials like Z. Q certified Merino wool and Eucalyptus fibers. Making them. Something you can feel good in and good about. Find your perfect pair today at all. Birds DOT com this message comes from. Npr sponsor indeed when it comes to hiring you need help getting to your shortlist of qualified candidates fast with indeed DOT COM. You can post a job in minutes. Set up screener questions than zero win on qualified candidates using an intuitive online dashboard. And when you need to hire fast accelerate your results with sponsored jobs. New USERS CAN TRY FOR FREE AT INDEED DOT com slash fresh air terms conditions and quality standards apply offer valid through March. Thirty first twenty. Twenty all right this is Felix from NPR musics or Latino podcast as part of our black history month coverage we take a look at the Afro Latin root of reggae tone and its rise over the last decade to become one of the most listened to musical genres on the planet to check it out download outlet Dino from wherever you get your podcasts. The Brazilian Film Corral which opens Friday tells the story of a small town in northeast. Brazil whose very existence comes under threat. Our critic at large John Power says that while it's plot may make it sound like a grim drama rooted in the country. Social problems movie is anything but the other day I went to a party and wound up talking to some millennials who big surprise are backing Bernie Sanders. The conversation turned to the movies parasite and joker and one of the wondered if the popularity of their shared theme the abyss between the Haves and have nots. Meant we might be returning to the rebellious nineteen. He would find further evidence for this thesis in Baku neuro a funny violent unexpectedly moving Brazilian movie. That won the jury prize. It can last spring written and directed by Clever Mendosa few as Yuliana journalists but Kuro is John Robust Entertainment. That wants a portrait of a community. A horror thriller in a timely piece of political filmmaking. The story is set a few years from now in the huge area of northeastern Brazil known as the Serta an arid hardscrabble backlands akin to our wild west as the action begins a thirtyish woman named Theresa played by Barbara Colon returns to her tiny hometown of Baku row to attend the funeral of her grandmother. But Chorale is one of those poor isolated slightly magical Latin American towns like Gabriel Garcia Marquez. Macondo this just bursting with the stuff of life from music and brothels to museum rich with local history. At first things seemed normal in bulk. Arou- WHO's tolerant life? The filmmakers show a slowly and affectionately. The grandmother is buried in a heartfelt ceremony. The Duke of Doctor Played by the wonderful actress. Braga dispenses medicine when she's not formulating drunkenly and theresa hooks up with a folk hero Crook put. Kotane played by Hunky. Thomas Aquino who's crimes are shown on a big screen. Tv in the center of town. Everyone's main gripe is that the smarmy regional mayor named Tony Junior has diverted the local water supply. Then ominous things start happening buck around disappears from Google maps a UFO keeps flying overhead. A water truck is riddled with bullet holes. And what do we make of those mysterious American tourists staying in a house outside town? It can't be a good sign that their guide is the German actor Udo Kier. Whose brand is immorality hear. These two go over their plans for something I always the thing jennings situation it's jammed. The signal is down and they're literally a map. Mckrill were complaining about the signal and the place was not on the map so it works electric around the mobile. There will be coming back with battery powered short after shutdown by by then some panic set in our drug trucks really the local contractors skim through good on the road all the road is blocked. Nobody's coming from severe allergy because of the people were paying to do it local contractors. Yes all right. The the local contractors also there is no street market for the next few days so we're clear and I play. Doh Police here. No Buck Arou- is one of those movies like parasite or Mendoza's brilliant debut neighboring. Sounds where you're never quite sure where it's heading and just like parasite it's one of those rare movies that manages to be both devoutly national and universal on one hand. The film is unabashedly Brazilian from its opening song. Tropicalia Shantou's Gal Costa to its nods to Brazil's Radical Cinema Novo movement of the nineteen sixties. Brazilian audiences know that it's tweaking. Their President Desire Bolsonaro a very early anti liberal populist who makes Donald Trump look mellow viewers. Here will have no trouble following Bucharest. Kakai plot enjoying it's excellent jokes or understanding the power dynamic it's portraying though Americans may be startled to see a film in which we are the bad guys not. This is any kind of anti-american screed. Mind You well. The Not. So fond of Gun. Crazy Yanks. It's clearly steeped in a passion for American pop culture. If you've ever seen a Western you'll know. The action is building to a grand showdown. When don't endure? Hilas make not just exciting but politically charged faced with danger from outside the community band together to fight back against whoever is coming after them grabbing. Weapons older new. They draw on their long local tradition of resistance as a political fable buck. Arou- isn't what you'd call subtle though it is emotionally satisfying in its Tarantino. Fantasy of history's outsiders fighting back against those who've been crushing them but unlike Tarantino the filmmakers are driven by an underlying moral seriousness. Their use of violence isn't heartlessly. Gleeful you feel the human weight of people dying and the movies point isn't the killing. In fact beneath its exploitation film trappings buck. Arou- was actually a film about dignity. It takes a backwater community whose members are normally seen as simple or marginal and treats them with the respect. They deserve critic at large. John Powers reviewed the new film. Buck Arou- on tomorrow show. Our guest will be the Washington Post's Greg Miller. He tells the astonishing story of a Swiss company that sold encryption technology to governments around the world for decades. What leaders of those countries didn't know? Was that the firm was partially owned by the CIA which was using the devices and software to steal their state secrets. Hope you can join us. Fresh Air's executive producer is Danny Miller. Our engineers Adam Santa Chassis associate producer for digital media. Is Molly Seavy Nesper? Roberta shorrock directs the show for Terry Gross. I'm Dave Davies turn

Turtle Mountain Patrice Pronto Thomas Aquino Louise `ordre Washington Nightwatchman Chippewa Congress Buck Arou John powers Fresh Air Minneapolis NPR Dave Davies Arthur Watkins bureau of Indian affairs North Dakota MINNESOTA
Native Peoples' 'Long, Brutal Fight For Survival'

Fresh Air

48:12 min | 5 months ago

Native Peoples' 'Long, Brutal Fight For Survival'

"From whyy in philadelphia. This is fresh air. I'm dave davies. Infra terry gross today writer. Louise urge rick. The main character of her novel the night watchman is based on her grandfather who was chairman of the turtle mountain band of chippewa in the nineteen fifties. He fought a congressional initiative to move native people off their land and into cities policy. Urged says amounted to tribal termination termination. Wise outweigh to finally resolve like congress. Therapists the indian problem though. We had an eighth grade education. Our grandfather built a local coalition to resist the move and organized a trip to testify before congress. I believe what he did inspired other tribal nations to fight back against termination and it was a long brutal fight for survival. And they've it'd be in. Cooley reviews mayor of east town a new. Hbo series starring. Kate winslet our guest. Today is author. Louise urge rick in a career. Going back to the nineteen seventy. She's published seventeen novels and more than thirty books in all including children's literature poetry and nonfiction. She won the national book award and the national book critics circle award for fiction twice earned. Rick is a member of the turtle mountain band of chippewa indians and much of her writing is centered on the experience of native americans. Her latest novel the night watchman is said in one thousand nine hundred ninety three and is inspired by her grandfather's role in resisting congressional effort to withdraw federal recognition from her family's tribe. It's now out in paperback. i spoke with. Louise are drik ago in march. Will louise urged rick. Welcome back to fresh air. It's been a while Thank you you say. In the acknowledgements to this novel that you tried to write several books before getting underway on this one and that your impetus had disintegrated. You kinda weren't getting which is kind of a shock to me. Considering how prolific been. What shook you loose and got you started on this book. I went back to reading my grandfather's letters which were written during the year. I was born. Nineteen fifty four so of course those years are somewhat mysterious to me and i knew that he had Thought termination during that time. But i never put together his letters and the details of what it was like for him to work as a nightwatchman. I'd never put that together with the timeline for termination. Bill and what effect it had on the first five tribes slated to be terminated. A lot of the story is about this effort which your grandfather lead in which the main character in your book. Thomas leads which was this effort to oppose an initiative in the united states congress to effectively kind of terminate the existence of the turtle mountain band of chippewa which he was chairman of. You wanna just explain what this proposal was. What its impact would have been termination was out way to finally resolve the what congress Thought of as the indian problem and that would be to move everyone off reservation land because it wouldn't be reservation land anymore. Turn over their land. Sutherland move to cities and the most important part in doing that was to abrogate. All treaties and these treaties have been made since the beginning of our country on a nation to nation basis with every tribe and they all contain these words as long as the grass grows as long as the rivers flow so the original intent and purpose was to guarantee the land that was that was agreed upon by the two parties. The two nations those were thrown out the window by both houses of congress and to simply declared the existence of indians or native american or american indians a non non-issue and to not recognize tribal nations all federal assistance after the determination to terminate all federal assistance and all federal recognition of who Native indigenous indigenous. People are and were. The reason for termination was not just to get rid of the problem that they the indian problem but to To acquire the lands that in many cases were covered with some of the most beautiful stands of virgin forest in the country so the first tribe slated for termination the menominee and the klamath and the intent because of the because of the post war housing boom was to get those big stands of timber which they did and we should note that the resolution couch this as the emancipation of the tribes right. Yes so that was the thing that was so hard. To grasp i mean people had Come out of government boarding school learning some english for instance my grandfather Who who wrote letters. Which i found later at the planes archives wrote letters to get into boarding school only finished the eighth grade and he was. He was tribal chairman at the time and he had to assemble a delegation and go up against congress within a matter of months in order to try and save his tribesmen from asian which meant all the land would be lost because that would be all they would have to sell right. This is a remarkable part. The story is fictional. but this part of it is true. It's absolutely true and with an eighth grade education. Assemble this group wrote letters and couldn't be more true a that's what started it. I couldn't believe knowing what he went through. Has the nightwatchman trying to stay awake all night. And by day letters going to meetings Traveling around the state of north dakota wherever he could doing whatever he could to assemble a delegation I couldn't believe what his life was like. He said he he had twelve hours of sleep. Most weeks you for those of you. Who don't know your story as well tell us just a bit about your background and your connection to the turtle mountain band of chippewa. I well so my mother is turtle mountain chippewa f. As was my grandfather and so am i. i am an enrolled. Member citizen of the turtle mountain band of it would be impossible for me to say that if termination had indeed won the day so my father is german. I'm a very mixed person and yet being a citizen of a nation within our nation gives one a certain sense of It changes your life. It means that. I i care deeply about my people. My mother's people. And i grew up knowing who i was and accepting all parts of myself and this is a part that i realized would not have existed. Had my grandfather not fought for it. Did you grow up speaking Is it is it. Ojibwa the language that the chippewas speak. It's so gyp way moen or initially be mowing or at the time that my grandfather was speaking at just plain chippewa. I didn't grow up. He was the last fluent speaker in the family. And i am very proud to say. My daughter is the next fluent speaker because she is teaching at an gibb way immersion school. Water could hiding in wisconsin on the likud array reservation an art chippewa and ojibway synonymous all the different terms for the same thing. Yes they're all versions of the original word initial you Grew up in minnesota. Is that right. Did not honor reservation right now. I grew up in walkerton north dakota. I'm not that's that's on on the border of The sisson dakota reservation. It used to be within the borders. But i didn't grow up on the turtle mountain reservation. I was visiting grandchild right. And your did. Your parents both teach and bureau of indian affairs schools to have. This did my mother and my father taught at the same school at my grandfather attended boarding school in washington. You know that brings us to a reading. I'd like you to to share with us This is a bit of history. And i guess it talks about sort of what you can set this up. This is about when your grandfather ended up going away to school when you want to. Just set this up and give us this reading from your book. Sure before my grandfather went to the watterson boarding school he went to a school that was somewhat closer fort. Totten it's Known as spirit lake now and in that time one thing for sure was that every classroom was decorated with flags. Flags were everywhere. This had been a former military fort turned into a boarding school for children so it was still run in his time as a military school and this is about when he leaves for school and this was a very common experience for children who left it was it was known that they would have to have their their heads shaved their hair cut and was one of the things that was most difficult for children for their parents because their hair was personnel and in many cases are many tribes. Many families allowing your hair to grow long was a symbol of your long life. Cutting your hair is a symbol of grief so for that to happen was always very disturbing for the family that year his father was gaunt his cheekbones jutting out thomas was always hungry they were down to desperation food then a bit of bannock smeared with deer fat. The day schools on the reservation gave out just one meal. The government boarding school would feed three meals for totten boarding school. Was a days wagon ride if you started well before. Dawn thomas's mother julia. A one wept and hid her face as he went away she had been torn whether to cut his hair herself. They would cut his hair off at the school and to cut hair meant someone had died. It was a way of grieving just before they left. She took a knife to his braid. She would hang it in the woods. So the government would not be able to keep him so that he would come home and he had come home and that is our guest. Louise urged rick reading from her new novel. The night watchman you know. what's striking about. This is that people often send their kids away to school. For opportunity the impetus was really starvation. The impetus was starvation and the reasoning behind the best schools being far away was to assimilate native children to train them to live in a culture. That was very different from their parents. So that when they came home often children couldn't speak the language that their parents were speaking. I have to say right here. That boarding schools are often characterized sort of a definition but they were all very different and the government had secular boarding schools which underwent a real sea change in the nineteen thirties and became much more supportive of native culture while many of the boarding schools which were run by. Religious groups did not and remained hostile to native religion in native culture. You know it's interesting. When thomas the character in this book does as your grandfather did and write a lotta letters to local and state and national elected officials and eventually organizer group To go to washington to testify in congress against this so-called emancipation bill one of the chief backers of the bill was a senator from utah. Arthur watkins you wanna just tell us a bit about him and his role. In all this arthur v. Watkins grew up on indian. His family had settled On a piece of property that had been tax forfeited so that was another way of dispossessing indians. It was the allotment era when native people could get their citizenship if they accepted hundred and sixty acres for a man. Sorry women got only eighty acres So if you accepted your allotment often than you you got citizenship. But it was a way of saying well all of the members now have these parcels. Let's sell off the rest of the land or you know at the time. The extraordinary poverty that people who lived with caused them to sell their land their ads in all the newspapers of the time. Advertising indian land cheap. And that's what happened but that wasn't enough are there watkins would withhold monies. He did everything to coerce the the menominee and the utah to relinquish their lands a lot of the time. Native people did not really understand what they were being forced to sign are. This goes way back but this this was something that can really be documented The didn't understand that because they spoke their languages. They spoke their native languages. Many of them didn't understand what he was saying. What they were signing only understood that like with as with a treaty that they would receive monies if they sign but these monies were supposed to go to the tribes. Anyway it was that he held them up And so there was all sorts of ways to coerce people into allowing their lands to be terminated. So a lot of his prosperity and career were built upon essentially the dispossession of native americans. Oh completely yeah. he in the story He questions thomas. The character in the book and i'm sure he questioned your grandfather about this And one of the questions. He asked almost everybody. According to the story is just how much indian blood is in you and this was something that the people from the turtle mountain band found puzzling right. Because there is it's in some respects a hybrid of mini cultures. Rydin people identify as they identify. This is something that Really it really surprised me in reading back and doing the research when people he always questioned the the native person he was talking to and most often the native person could not really reply or gave some sort of long story trying to figure it out on the spot. And that's because everyone knew who was native who is indian who wasn't and it wasn't something that native people took on as some sort of identity and now everybody knows down to the fraction how much how much quote unquote indian blood. They have you know. There's a moment in the story here where this group from the turtle mountain band of chippewa go to washington to testify in congress against this proposal to essentially terminate the tribe and they patiently and respectfully answer all of the questions about you know what's what's happening in the tribe. They're the real state of their own economy and poverty. And then afterward thomas the guy that you're is inspired by your grandfather actually goes to the office of senator arthur watkins the prime sponsor of this effort an has a personal encounter and he said he wanted to thank the senator for the opportunity to speak to congress and for the senators attention at the hearing. Do not this actually happened. This was real. There's a number of things that really happened in the book. But this was absolutely real and i. I found a tiny. Ps on a letter to my parents on an onion skin copy. You know those carbon copies where he decided to write what what actually happened afterward. And he said he'd gone down to thank arthur v watkins and that that was so like him. My grandfather was extremely polite. That was one thing he and he didn't hold any. He didn't hold anyone's attitude toward him against them he'd found that making friends was the most important skill in this process and keeping friends and meeting people on a very neutral polite basis. And that's what he did right and who knows birth. That might have been important in the outcome. Which was that. This proposal didn't happen. I know i don't know they also were able to assemble a very persuasive set of objections That was very important and to do it in just a few. Few months was incredible. I mean this was this was enacted immediately and nobody had copy machines. Everything had to be retyped. They couldn't even find a copy of the bill and they raised money themselves. They had a boxing match to raise money for them to go to washington because they couldn't take money from the ba. They had no money to go anywhere right now. It wasn't they didn't have any control. This was the name dear of their own influence over their sovereignty. They had no sovereignty. They had to answer to the bureau of indian affairs at every turn. And although this isn't in the book. I might just add that dillon. s myer who had overseen. The incarceration of japanese during the forties was now the Commissioner of american indian affairs in washington. So he was now overseeing termination Well we'll hear more of my interview with louise urged rick after a break and david. Cooley will review the new h. b. o. series mayor of east town. I'm dave davies and this is fresh air on. Npr's consider this podcast. We don't just help you keep up with the news we help you make sense of what's happening like why. The housing market is wild right now. What safe looks like once you're vaccinated and how an increase in border crossings is testing the biden administration all of that in fifteen minutes every weekday. Listen now to consider this from npr. We're listening to the interview. I recorded last year with author. Louise urge rick who's published seventeen novels. Many centered on the experience of native americans. Her latest novel upset in nineteen fifty. Three is inspired by her grandfather's role in resisting a congressional effort to withdraw federal recognition from her family's tribe. The book called the night. Watchman is now out in paperback. There's another key character here who sort of who drives a whole part of the plot paris. Parental that name right. Well it you do but it would be called. Printout pronounced front homebodies ferencz so parental so. Tell us about patrice and her family. Patrice has one of the much coveted jobs at the jewel bearing plant and That's where a lot of women worked at the time and we should just explain. Jewel bearing means you're making these tiny little bearings for watches and other machine machines made out of jewels. It's technically tiny. They're not horses. Yeah right. We're not talking about jewelry here now. Now it's their bearings for Watches and gunsights. And i knew i had patrice says a character when i wrote the line. she did things perfectly winning raged. She is supporting her mother. Her brother and she has this great job. She's incredibly proud of her job. At the jewel bearing plant many women were hired there because they tested very highly on manual dexterity tests and she knows that if she makes one false move if she gets sick if she doesn't make it to the job on time she could get fired so she's always living on this edge and when something comes to throw her off. The stakes are very high. You know one thing that. I i was really impressed about in the way the story unfolds. Is that the poverty of the pronto. Family is something we become aware of. Gradually i mean Do you want to describe the circumstances they live. They live in what was very common at the time. Which is a Poland mighty house with a dirt floor sometimes linoleum would be laid down to cover the floor mean. It was stepped down underneath And they it's heated by a wood stove that's often made out of a can of can from some grocery store you know it's and there's nothing but what is there's no transportation there's very little to hunt left there's Some people had gardens but jonah and her family live in a very traditional way so she gathers a lot of food. They trap a lot of food. This my mother did although they did have a fantastic garden she still knows how to snare rabbits and So they they lived on a they lived on the edge at all times They bought nothing new. A pair of shoes was lasted years and The only person who could really keep them alive on their subsistence level was pixie or patrice. She wants to be called patrice. Everybody falls back into calling her pixie. Even me patrice is the name by which is am vicious. She believes she will rise in the world right right. You're it's interesting. There's a the high school math teacher. Lloyd barnes is taking in her brother pokey home at one point and you write that. As he approaches the house he didn't realize it was an edifice for humans. He thought it was a place for animals. Yeah i mean they were there. A very simple structures and the barns were often made out of the same sort of materials they were the these were indigenous materials. You know right from the woods and right from the ground it was at that time however that people could also get these newly belt. Sort of prefab One bedroom houses. I i have pictures of my own grandparents house. Arriving on the back of a tractor you know people could get these through the tribal housing at the time but somehow they never did so they were still living in in this sort of house and that was uneven housing up through the seventies no running water. Now 'electricity you said your mother knew how to snare rabbits and maintained a garden. Did she grow up in these kinds of circumstances. This kind of harvard know my grandfather was one of the most enterprising individuals on the reservation. My mother's family lived with very very little but they had a lot of security and they all went to school every day. It was a point of pride for my grandfather that he read his children read when they brought the books home so they had a very different kind of life. There's a member of the family who is not there in this story. And that is the older sister vera. Who has left for the cities as it's called. That's minneapolis saint paul. This is a fascinating part of the story and she had left with the help from the relocation office. You'll explain what that was and kind of what role it played in the departure of people like vera. Relocation was a a program that interlocked with termination. You see the idea was. After the tribe was terminated they would be able to sell their land and be moved to an area quote unquote of greater economic opportunity which would mean a city so they were setting up this move during the fifties with this relocation program you would A person who wanted to move would get some training some stipend for a short amount of time and then basically be turned loose in the city. I've been asked by people will. Why wasn't that great widen. People just want to move away from their reservation and become like everybody else. I've been asked that question. It's a fair question and the answer is because native people aren't like everybody else and native people want to stay who we are right. And that's because the government made a very firm decision not to put money into the infrastructure on reservations not to keep the treaties the treaties stated that they would provide for health education and the general welfare of native people as they struggled into this new form of existence and that was basically rent for all the the rest of the country enjoys all of the lands. All of the rivers all of the places that no longer belonged to native americans. This young woman. Vera leaves the family and goes to minneapolis and saint paul and one of the things that happens in your novel. Is that her younger sister. Patrice goes to find her because they've lost touch with her. They haven't heard from her in months and it turns out. She's in a city where there are criminals and sex traffickers who play on prey on women from the reservations. Was this a pattern. Back in the fifties. It's a pattern that was established from the first contact between native people on european people. And now there's a lot more awareness about missing and murdered indigenous women and it hasn't of course it hasn't stopped. It's probably gotten worse. But yes T question speaking with louise urged rick. Her new novel is the night watchman. We will talk more after short break. This is fresh air this message for. Npr's fresh air is sponsored by szott mattresses sought sought-for provides a fresh take on how mattresses are sold online starting by never smashing them into a box. That's because the thoughtful classic has two layers of coils one for support and the other for comfort. Those two layers could never be stuffed into a box like other online mattresses that are mostly foam to learn more check out all the benefits of the socks classic by visiting sada at s aa tv. A dot com slash. Npr whether you're looking to discover a new series to binge find your next great read or check out that movie everyone's talking about npr's pop culture. Happy hour podcast is your guide to all things entertainment. Every weekday. We keep pop culture in high spirits. Listen now to the pop culture. Happy hour podcast from npr. This is fresh air. And we're speaking with writer. Louise drik she has a new novel called the nightwatchman. I'd like to ask you to share another reading with us from the novel. The night watchman this this involves patrice pronto. This young woman who is one of the main characters and it involves a terrible experience. She'd had in high school where some boys had gotten into a car and taking her out and sexually assaulted her. Particularly this guy named bucky. She managed to get herself before it went too far and flee but she lost her shoes there. And i'm gonna to mention that. Her mother appears in this reading. her name is gene. Not and this reading begins with where she has gotten back from this terrible experiences and she's beginning to choose in bed and she's kind of collecting herself and looking at her injuries that night. She took a lamp behind the blanket and looked at the scratches. The bruises there was even a bite mark on her shoulder. She felt none of it but she could still feel where his hands went. She was shaking squeezed. Her eyes shut crawled under the blanket. The next day more bruises had surfaced from under her skin. There was that phrase they got under my skin. She showed these marks to her mother and told john everything that the boys had done and they had her only pair of shoes. Her mother had let her breath out sharply two times then. She put her hand on her daughters hand. Neither one of them said a word. It was the same thing with both of them. And they knew it later when patrice heard about becky's to monmouth and how it was spreading down his side. She looked at her mother's face serene and severe for a clue but trees knew that she herself had done it. Her hatred was so malignant. It had lifted out of her like a night bird it had flown straight to bucky and sank. Its beak into the side of his face and that is louise urged reading from her novel. The night watchman this guy who perpetrated this assault bucky has essentially a paralysis on one side of his face and it is widely believed that patrice his mom john. It had done this and this he maybe he had bell's palsy that right like this has to have another explanation. Well that's that's a rule for me. Okay well this is. What's interesting because this is one of many moments in the story where we see things that could be regarded as potentially supernatural rider. Spiritual or magical. I mean there. There was a case when patrice goes looking for her sister in minneapolis and encounters a horrible place. And a'dog tells her a clue. The dog speaks to her. And i wonder does. She think she hears the dog Told me about that and whether this was part of the kind of things that you heard from your family yes you know there are also people have experiences if you have a group of people and you ask. Has a dream ever come true. Have you ever had an experience where you thought you were in the presence. A supernatural presence. Have you ever heard a voice. That didn't seem to come from anywhere. You'd get up so many stories. And i like to ask people this question because i always get interesting stories. So many things happen to us that we immediately Explain away and so. I'm just not explaining away what's happening that's all it is. It's not magical realism. This is a very rich story with many plots in a lot of characters. And it's really fun reading but it is based upon this really consequential event. Which was this attempt to as you say terminate the turtle mountain band of chippewa which was in the end defeated because your grandfather managed to mobilise with meager resources a delegation and a persuasive case and take it to washington and after the end of the novel. At the end of your acknowledgements you have a paragraph which kinda capitalizes this. We want to share that with us. I would love to And this is why. I wrote the book now at this time. If you should ever doubt that a series of dry words in a government document can shatter spirits and demolish lives. Let this book erase that doubt conversely if you should be of the conviction that we are powerless to change those dry words. Let this book gives you heart. You really inspired by what your grandfather did. I really was. I couldn't believe i'd gone through life. Not knowing his job knowing about him and knowing about termination by never put it together until a few years ago. This sounded me. And i'm grateful to him for what he did but also i believe what he did inspired other tribal nations to fight back against termination and it was a long brutal fight for survival. Not until the seventy s did richard nixon and trim nation and Proclaimed that the new the new order of the day would be sovereignty that started on an entirely different path. You're an enormously successful rider with a great following and you've continued to live pretty near where you grew up. You're you're in minneapolis right. Why why have you stayed. Where you i have a bookstore there for one thing what would i do. I can't move my quick move pushback books but this is the sort of thing that people would be like. Why don't you live in. Minneapolis among the Financial elite right or somewhere else. I mean i feel that. I've really moved into an entirely was born in minnesota but i grew up in north dakota. That's that's where. I continually go back to my parents who live there in washington and my brother and my sister lived there so no i would. I was miserable when i had to live far away from my family. I i never wanted to go. And i found it difficult to get back. I would never leave my i love. I love where i am. So so you're bookstore birchbark. That's in minneapolis. Right now. that's where it is and you actually run the register and run the store how you're gonna make me laugh. Nobody lets me near the register. What i i you don't wanna hear i mean we. We would be in terrible trouble if i tried to take hold of that part of the operation now. I mainly a may very strong cheerleader and friend. The my colleagues at the books are my favorite people. And they're part of family and there's not a lot of independent bookstores around anymore. What what compels you to keep this going. Well we're a growing subset of amazon. I suppose but we're there are an increasing number of small bookstores and the reason where we're surviving and in many cases thriving. It's because we can that we offer community services like bringing writers in and Supporting local school systems and supporting literacy. You know that we do a lot for for communities and we also are We're romantic you see. I don't know how many proposals have happened in our bookstore. But they do and how many acts of forgiveness also happened because we have a confessional in our bookstore and all you need to do is touch it and and your sins are forgiven. It's become a forgiveness booth. So there's these things you know that an independent bookstore can do there. That are also supernatural. I mean it's a magical realism place. I guess we'll louisa. Thank you so much for your time and for your writing. Appreciate your talking to us and you thank you so much. Louise recorded a year ago in march her novel. The night watchman is now out in paperback her minneapolis bookstore. Birchbark books is still open though only for online and phone sales on april twenty fourth and twenty fifth. they'll celebrate independent bookstore day with an outdoor market coming up david b. and cooley reviews mayor of east town the new. Hbo series starring. Kate winslet as a detective in a small pennsylvania town. This is fresh air. This message comes from. Npr sponsor capital one with no fees or minimums on checking and savings accounts banking with capital. One is the easiest decision. Kind of like taylor swift choosing a cardigan on a chilly day. And with their top rated up you can deposit checks entrance for money anytime anywhere making capital one and even easier decision. That spanking reimagined. What's in your wallet. Terms apply capital one a member. Fdic this message comes from. Npr sponsor tele doc tele doc offers access to licensed therapists by phone or video to help those dealing with stress anxiety personal or family issues. Tele doc is committed to quality confidential therapy from the comfort of your home available seven days a week matching members to therapists counsellors and psychiatrists tell dock. Therapy is available through most insurance or employers and individual plants are also available download the app or visit tele doc dot com slash. Fresh air to get started. Today it's been ten years since kate winslet starred on. Hbo mini series remake of mildred pierce. This weekend she's back playing the title role in another very somber. Hbo drama mayor of east town. This time she the lead detective in a small town in southeastern pennsylvania who is haunted by an unsolved case as well as her own past our tv critic. David been cooley. Has this review. Mayor of his town is both a mystery story and a character study. Hbo provided only five of its seven installments for preview. So i don't know precisely how it's central mystery concludes much less how satisfying that ending will be. But based on the five hours. The begin rolling out on sunday. We do get to really learn about and care about many of these residents of east town so well in fact the by the time the camera pans across their faces as they all sit in church. Listening to a sermon. You can almost hear their individual thoughts. What takes longer to learn are their secrets. And they're hidden pasts and they all seem to have them including mayor. Mayor is a former member of the towns basketball team that won a championship decades ago. Thanks to mayors buzzer beating winning shot. There's a silver anniversary celebration. Being planned but mayor is focused on a different anniversary. It's been one year since the daughter of another member of that same team went missing mayor. Now the lead detective of the east town police force is haunted by that past event but also by tragedies and our own past which are revealed slowly throughout this miniseries and then suddenly there's another case for mayor to deal with when a young woman is found. Dead mayor brings dylan the girl's boyfriend and the father of their baby named dj to the station for interrogation. This town is so small. And the people's lives so intertwined that when dylan cell phone vibrates while they're talking and a woman's first name comes up. Mayor guesses instantly who it is and doesn't let up. You can tell a lot about mayor and her personality and attitude by the way she keeps pushing. Dylan's buttons during the interrogation. Here's kate winslett. As mayor. With jack mulhearn as dylan said. These aren't really good between us right now. So brianna rasa she your new girlfriend or have a new girlfriend. What time did you leave the woods around the night. I asked asked you what time you left the woods. Well if i go around midnight then i probably have the woods at eleven forty five. You can ask my mom mom because she was awakes. Okay if you wanna go ahead and get that you can. I was she was in the den and she was feeding dj and because his teeth hurt and she wanted to give some milk and she asked me to get someone. I know where he was and keep mine the fridge. Well the kitchen fridge full so we usually keep some extra out in the garage fridge. So that's where i listen. Do you have anything to do with our staff last night. No because look things right now. You're the only person with a reason to commit. This crime didn't kill aaron. You're not going to put the dummy. I didn't kill her mind. Mayor is very good at asking questions because she seems to go through her. Whole life interrogating people in keeping them at arms length. That's true even of her mother who's played here with yet another of her recent fabulous performances by jean smart guy pearce who co starred with winslett in mildred pierce a decade ago plays a potential romantic interest but mayor is much more wary than interested and evan peters from the x. men and american horror story franchises plays a county. Police investigator paired with mayor on the new case. She's even more wary of him but like everyone else in eastone. They have their own issues. Motives and perspectives. Brad ingles be created. Mary's town and craig zobel directed it with different perspectives in mind from the start the way the camera lingers when mayor leaves a room get to see the wry smile or annoyed frown gene. Smarts face as mayors put upon mother is almost like giving other characters equal time and that goes not only for mayors mom but at other moments for maher's daughter corrects and and almost everyone else in town yet. This writer director team holds back as much as it gives many scenes. You'd expect to be showcased. Happened off camera instead. And what is shown on camera no matter what character is being followed is more likely than not to be bleak. Mayor of east town is a drama. That draws you in but the world is drawing you into is a dark one. Mayor of town is reminiscent of some other recent. Hbo mini series dramas about murders and hidden. Secrets starring actresses who were taking time off from the movies to explore longer often more challenging roles on the small screen. Hbo alone is given us several powerful dramas about women investigating or harbouring sinister secrets in their own small towns including reese witherspoon and nicole kidman in big little lies and amy adams in sharp objects like both of those mayor of east town is relentlessly somber yet increasingly captivating and features a bold brave leading performance mayor. The character played by kate. winslet isn't always likeable. Or even relatable in this new series mayor has made some bad mistakes in our life and is about to make a few more but though the character of mayor is flawed. The miniseries mayor of east town is not added to. Hbo's increasingly long list of excellent mini series showcasing some equally excellent actresses david cooley as a professor of television studies at rowan university in new jersey on monday. Show we hear from julia lippincott hans. Who's best selling book warned parents about the dangers of micromanaging. Their kids lives her new book. Your term has advised aimed at young adults trying to cope in today's world and we'll talk about her powerful memoir true american about the emotional and cultural challenges. She faced growing up as a mixed race child. I hope you can join us. Fresh air's executive producer is danny miller. Our technical director and engineer is audrey bentham with additional engineering support from choice. Lieberman and julian herzfeld. Our interviews and reviews are produced in by. amy salad. phyllis myers sam brigger lauren renzo salon theresa madden and marie ball. Denardo they challenor. Seth kelly and kayla lattimore our associate producer of digital media. Is molly seavy nesper. Roberta shorrock directs the show for terry gross. I'm david this message comes from. Npr sponsor ford the all electric mustang mach e and twelve foot rocket. Take off the rocket launches into the atmosphere while the all electric pony takes off toward the horizon at four speed visit for dot com for a new perspective on range.

congress chippewa east town rick patrice Louise washington watchman dave davies Infra terry gross louise national book award and the na turtle mountain band of chippe drik thomas north dakota kate winslett Cooley bureau of indian affairs schoo minneapolis
Episode 248 "They Lust For Injustice And Inequality"

Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

1:59:33 hr | 1 year ago

Episode 248 "They Lust For Injustice And Inequality"

"How This genocide unsavoury. To these things new. There and there. Was a deep quite. It's a Saturday. You've have reached native opinion. We are an indigenous information and education radio show and podcast every week we talk about current affairs related to and from our own. Native American perspectives. My name is Michael. Kicking bear the guy on the other end of this thing of course he is. It agree else you'll. She'll everybody good morning, Good Morning Willard. How are you? I'm doing well, thank you, I'm going to Sandra and Chat Good Morning Tundra. She says good and sad morning. Wonder. What's going on I? Know I know well. It's not like. Every we have bad news, right, but it's Some other stuff going on here. I know what she's referring to. Okay. And Let's see here. All right. So we welcome you guys very much if you're just starting to an end or. Or if you If you Are Listening in this podcast later we appreciate you listening for sure. got a pretty full show for everybody today. So we're going to kind of kick right into this. So how to reach us here in the show, you can email US hosts with an S. hosts that native opinion dot com can reach us through twitter at native opinion out there we have a facebook page it's facebook dot com forward slash native opinion podcast and our website, of course, native opinion dot com. You can also subscribe to our podcast at releases as soon as the broadcast is over and. Go to any of the major podcast directories out there and in. You can subscribe that way. So you know what they are. It's apple podcast Google podcast stitcher he got spotify a number of them and The will all work in. You have to do it once and you'll get the audio delivered to your favorite mobile device automatically. You can also leave us a voicemail. It's eight, six, zero, eight, hundred, five, five, nine, five again that number eight, six, zero, eight, hundred, five, five, nine, five, right. Thank you. And as you know native opinion produces podcast twice a week. Wednesdays and Saturdays and Saturday being rely broadcast but gaining at around ten am and we do thank you for listening. We want you to know we appreciate the support we receive from you. No matter. What form that support in. The financial support we receive goes to wreck to our cost and expenses associated with producing the show. And those expenses our website and podcast hosting. Music licensing content development, and curation daily business operations, marketing, and advertisement, and more. and. Please please please join the one full folks who have contributed to the show by becoming a patron. Defined the details on our website at native opinion dot com forward slash support. And on our facebook page, just click on the learn more button. And as always another great way to help it's telling other people about the show and again, we thank you all listening. And sharing our show it really really does help us grow. And you're listening to episode two, four, eight, they lust for injustice and inequality. They sure do and Yes. Thank you. Guys very very much for all your support and sharing the show and it really does help Also one what you know about Mohegan trading they are a sponsor. For our episodes and we appreciate them ever so much. curation of final fantasy Mohegan made a craft and beadwork they produce ribbon shirts. Embroidered hats, Dream catchers, another specialty items, and they're now offering, of course, cloth masks for all sizes during this time of pandemic. The massacre made from one hundred percent pleaded cotton, two different styles and various different printed designs they can be washed and reused, and again those are. The real advantage over disposable face coverings so Custom orders for many products are also available by request if you email them and so again, if you visit Mohegan trading post dot com check everything out there and we appreciate them very much for being an advertiser here on absolutely native opinion. All Right Well, we have a little bit of listening feedback. We do think this is from listener jol. We haven't heard from Joel a while we have in this is this is pretty sad stuff right here. and Joel says hello brothers. Sorry. I. Haven't been in touch for awhile and it's OK brother we understand Oh yeah. Life gets in the way because. We've we've been good just busy with live APP. See there you go. But just in case you guys haven't seen this yet I'm going to paste a gofundme me link for this man's family to cover his funeral expenses and hopefully end up with some extra money to help with their kids. That now does not have a father. I'll paste article link as whale which he did. Thank you. A COP on Turtle Mountain res- killed a native man for little backstory as to what Joel was talking about. I just know it's partner and two children need some help. It's really sad it's it's depressing man. Every day it seems like the cops kill native or black person. Like people. That have their backs turned in no weapons, but anyway, guys take care and the link will be posted in the show notes. Yeah. Let me let me give you guys a little bit of this year Turtle citizen killed on Turtle Mountain Reservation. Officers suspended. So we gotta be. Officer involved. In the family is left in the dark and what they mean by that is they're not giving up any information. Atypical kind of stuff. re real brief here it says the FBI is investigating the fatal shooting of a Turtle Mountain man by police officers last weekend on the Turtle Mountain Indian reservation and Belcourt North Dakota the man who was killed as being identified as Brandon lead sewer thirty. Turned to mountain tribal citizen from Belcourt he was a father of two children a boy in a girl. In, an email to native news online who published this article? FBI spokesperson, Kevin Smith shared that an officer involved shooting or O. I s happened at private at a private residence in Belcourt late Saturday night August twenty second and into the early morning hours of Sunday August twenty third. The FBI was called to respond to Elias and the north. Dakota Bureau of Criminal Investigation assisted with processing the scene according to the email. The FBI reported the law enforcement agencies involved in the incident where the Bureau of Indian Affairs the Rolette County Sheriff's Office, the Rolette Police Department and the. In the roller police departments. phone calls to the Rolette County Sheriff's Department here. Here's here's where here's where it goes off the rails and and. The spin begins okay. This is phone calls to the role Rolette County Sheriff's department the Rolette Police Department, and the role of police. Department were referred to the Turtle Mountain Chippewa Tribal Office. So they're like you guys. Go Talk to them. So, then the receptionist there at at the phone number provided for the Bureau of Indian affairs at a sorry that receptionist at backing up here at Turtle Mountain Chippewa Tribal Office there receptionist shared a phone number. Excuse me with the Bureau of Indian Affairs Turtle Mountain Agency. To be a stated over the phone that any questions should be directed. So here's another deflection directed to the FBI field office in Minneapolis nearly five hundred miles away and shared the phone number of the FBI's Minneapolis Minnesota field office. So. If you're if you're a family member and you're trying to get information about this case, they're going over there. No, you don't talk to us. You Talk to those people over there and hop this stuff around absolutely inexcusable. and. The rest of this will be in the show notes but our hearts go out to the family. It's crazy. Crazy. Crazy. We have a couple of acknowledgments I'm sorry we finished I am done I'm sorry I was just going to say we don't have any voicemail this week you guys but but thank you. Couplet knowledge we want to express our deepest condolences. To the family of actor, Chadwick? Boltzmann. Who played several is in Hollywood movies. which includes Baseball Great Jackie Robinson James Brown in most recently marvel's Black Panther. Mr Bozeman passed away after a four year long battle of colon cancer. He will be deeply missed. Yes indeed. It was. That was shocking to hear this morning. I was trying to finish some touch up on for the show no boom this news came down so. I didn't even know he was sick. I anoint battling cancer. Nope, most pie from what I've been reading most people didn't know it wasn't something that he you know publicized. Sure. Widely, just you know kept trucking right along with life doing what you wanted to do and supposed to. Yep. Yeah and It's. Can't cancer the tough thing is how I lost My other father might my wife's dad died of stomach cancer and so I I I, I understand that battle very very well. so Again our thoughts, prayers and everything going out down to the family for sure right? Absolutely. On a lighter note. I want to say Happy Birthday to Silver Wolf. Silver Wolf is my father. Who Turns Seventy eight today? And we're going to be going over there shortly. Hug Kim with masks on because I can't stand not being allowed my parents. So. Birthday CER-. Yes and they will be wearing masks as well. We always, we always take precautions because we're in their home and their. For most of us, it's our sanctuary. We try to keep her homes the safest possible from code. So. So Happy Birthday Dad. Appreciate. Yes. Yes. Absolutely worry great man. Thank. There were times as a teenager, my brother, my biological brothers and chat today in good morning everybody in chat. He'll tell you. How? Challenging Boulevard could be for our parents. There were. There were moments as we say. That anyway, maybe one day we'll share stories I don't know I like to hear some of those stories. So. We'll see. We'll? You know some of them brother but the well that's true. But there's many of. You know. Just how it goes? All right. Why don't we get into native news on this is GonNa? Be Kind of extended a little bit today but but go ahead and kick us off if you will brother yeah no problem. Thank you. Okay at first Article I, just shake my head and laugh that's that's all you can do at this point Yip. Republicans Open Presidential Convention. I can't even call it that it's not. A clown slash dog and pony show that's what it was. With familiar anti-tribal messages from fool in the White House and my words and this was. Written by AC ago, for Indians Dot Com. The Republican Party kicked off its national convention with no visible native presence opening a week of events that stand in marked contrast to the Democrats trying to unseat the fool in the White House my words from office. Roll call of state delegations on Monday morning was touted by the Republicans. Sure it was. As a showcase of truth. The true face of. America. Melissa. With. There weren't any actual representatives from tribal or urban. Indian. Communities admitted attempts by some states to highlight contributions of native people. Originally Delegation Chairman Michael. Ward spoke of the Navajo Navajo Code Talkers whose DNA language help the United States secure victory in World War Two. But. It won't be until Tuesday evening that the party sees someone from the Navajo nation when Myron liser Lizard. The Tribes Vice President is scheduled to address the Convention A. Reserve. Comment. And instead of highlighting the twenty one other native Indian nations excuse me with homelands in the state or the native Americans who accounted for five point. Three percent of the population ward boasted the miles and miles and miles of big beautiful wall being built through the to hone. Oh ODEM nation. Over the tribes objection. Representing South Dakota Governor Christie Noam. Ovalles pronounced Loara right did not fare all that better when it comes to try and their sovereignty after receiving a huge round of applause when she introduced herself, she pointed out that her status, the home of the sacred Black Hills and of sitting bull. A revered leader from the nation. Police but in thanking President trump their words the full in the White House, my words for quote bringing fireworks back to Mount Rushmore and quote she did mention how sitting bull's people continue to fight the ongoing desecration of the Treaty Treaty Territory by the US government. One of them. Nick Tilson. The president of Indian collective is facing seventeen years after being arrested on his own homelands by state authorities over the July four holiday quoting he's brought jobs to our talent and he puts America first each and every day in quote Noam said of the fool, my word who is being sued by Cheyenne River Sioux tribe after she threatened to get the full to shutdown coronavirus checkpoints on the reservation. She made similar threats against the Gla Sioux tribe is she did immediately following domes roll-call the fool my words made his first appearance at the convention where in-person activities are taking place in Charlotte North Carolina. He didn't highlight tribal nations either instead promoting actions and policies that have gone against their interest. That's absolutely correct from what I've read. So they do they did a great job you know touching on obviously a very obvious weaknesses from Indian country spur perspectives relevant to the full in the White House. And all the various cronies from. Christie known to too many many others. WanNa share a few highlights with you guys from this This show I'm GONNA try to go with my language today but I'm not gonNA make a guarantee. And so Before, we get into some of the speeches in things said that during the convention itself I wanted to issue a correction from last episode I believe I incorrectly stated. That the DNC and the RNC would not put any indigenous people on Prime, time. So Primetime they had what I understand, various different speeches, online that that would happen during the day. But when I say primetime, pretty much coverage as far as most of the new, the major news networks that make up the bulk of American households began at seven o'clock at night and ran until pretty late until close to midnight each night, and this is for both conventions now. All right. And I had said that I doubt very seriously that either convention was GonNa put anybody on during prime time well, I was proven wrong and you know that's good but. We could almost say they had to write. In in the sense that people are gonNA notice and say stuff if they didn't. But so I'm glad that I was that I was incorrect on that But today we're going to focus more on the aren't see more than more so than the Democrats because these are the people that want to be in charge of this country. Not to say that Democrats don't. But but these are the folks that are. Clinging. Desperately. In some cases depending on the either the Senate seat or of course, the presidency, right they're clinging desperately to hold onto power. So that's what I'm referring to. but therefore. We're actually going to start with deb Haaland. WHO'S Is the one of the first indigenous women ever elected to Congress. and here's her presentation, but discourse was from the DNC not the RNC. So I just WanNa make that that known. So here is her full presentation. Good evening. I'm Congresswoman Debbie Hart. I'm grateful to be with you here on indigenous land. The promise of this country is older than our constitution over five hundred years ago thousands of Indian tribes were vibrant democratic societies with rich cultures and traditions and communities that had sustain them for Millennia on lands they loved and respected. By people the Pueblo Indians migrated to the Rio. Grande Valley and the late twelve hundreds to escape droughts. We were led to the Great River and its tributaries where we established an agricultural tradition that continues to this day. My people survive centuries of slavery genocide and brutal assimilation policies. But throughout our past tribal nations have fought for and helped build this country. There were those like my Laguna grandparents who worked on our country's railroad and those like my mother, a Navy veteran who served this country with honor. I stand here today a proud thirty, fifth generation, New Mexican, and what are the first native American women ever elected to Congress I'm a symbol of our resilience as the embodiment of America's progress as a nation. I know we can't take our democracy for granted especially now as people are dying our land as abused as our constitution is under attack, we must work for it by getting involved by registering voters by voting. Voting a sacred why people know that we weren't universally granted the right to vote until nineteen, sixty two and that fundamental right is more important than ever. Whether your ancestors have been here for hundreds of years or you're a new citizen no. This whether we vote and how we vote will determine if our nation's promise of social racial and environmental justice will outlast us. Joe, Biden and Kamala Harris respect our past and understand our present. They will see us through this crisis of leadership that is plaguing our country and they will help us to build a better future. Thank you. All right again and congresswoman deadpan. That's that's. What she presented at the DNC you know because I wanted to try to play somebody from our native folks that that did speak. now too much to cliff in chat his dismay. The rest of these clips are gonNA come from the RNC. Cliff wrote David and Michael. If you're going to run audio from the RNC I'm going to have to bail for a bit and do something fun like a home root canal or maybe trim my toenails with a chainsaw. Use the fine tooth chainsaw. About that man. But a we never claimed that the show is easy to listen to. Be. Going to, be honest and straight right. Eric got to admit that was funny. Absolutely. All right. So again, for the remainder of this segment, we're going to be We're going to stay with a presenting against some highlights from the NC Beginning with. The presentation given by Myron Lizard the vice president of Navajo nation. And we're going to provide some deconstruction of some of the statements of from these clips. Excuse me one moment. Crap in my throat today I, don't know why. And So it again here's here's a Mr Lizard of presentation from the RNC. Yacht. I'm Myron liser the vice president of the Navajo Nation I give this address from the majestic rock spires ship rock sabit. Or rock with wings known by our DNA people. It is here as well. Many of our ancestral leaders sought to govern and lead a nation within a nation. They sought to lead their people into the promises of a better way of life where their children's children. It is also where they have not been as successful as the rest of America are first nations people the host of the land. We are still here our creator placed us here and new for such a time. As this, we would have an opportunity for an appeal to heaven. You see our people have never been invited into the American dream. We for years fought congressional battles with past congressmen and senators that were part of a broken system that ignored us. That is until president trump took office president trump delivered the largest financial funding package ever to ending country they billion dollars cares act funding to ending country was a great start in alleviating the devastating. Effects that the COPA nineteen pandemic has inflicted on our Indian tribes. The Navajo nation once led the nation in per capita positive cases because of the health disparities that previous administrations failed to improve whenever we meet with President Trump, he has always made it a priority to repair the relationship with our federal family. Recently, president trump signed the first ever presidential proclamation officially recognized missing and murdered. Indians and Alaskan natives he established a task force called Operation Lady. Justice to address the problem. The president also provided two hundred, seventy, three million dollars to improve public safety and support victims of crime in the native American community. As a result cold-case office was recently opened on the Hilo River Indian community. The president has reactivated the White House Counsel on native American Affairs to promote economic development and rule prosperity in Indian country president trump also strengthened the supreme court by nominating strong conservative judges like Neal Gorsuch. Native American rights thank you for the opportunity to be here. Tonight I'm excited to endorse President Trump's re election and Mr President. Forward housing very soon come visit our land we call didn't top. Thank you very much. All right. So it's worth noting that now AHO nation president because Myron is the Vice President Jonathan. Nez spoke at the DNC. And so you know A number of tribes Try Not to play political favorites. Shall we say so Just wanted to try to that off just just a little bit but again, it's within the right of any nation of which political party or both parties or no parties that they wished to affiliate themselves with you. So. So that was that was Myers address. So let's let's let's delve into this a little bit so. what I did with these to assure accuracy. Is I got transcripts of each of the clips that we're gonNA play here today. Okay So Mr Liser said quote you see our people have never been invited into the American Dream True Right. We've for years have fought congressional battles with past congressmen and senators that were part of a broken system that ignored us until president trump took. took office president trump delivered the largest financial funding package ever to Indian country he states. A billion dollars in cares. Act Funding. For excuse me a should have been eight billion dollars in cares act funding for ending country. So all right. Let's look at a fact. Trump signed the bill. Yes he did. But the money was held up. By his own Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin for months. Instead of making it available to all of Indian country I didn't tell you that mortell that Republican audience that Titi. Okay Another quote. Whenever, we meet with President trump is always made it a priority to repair the relationship with our federal family. Close quote. Well, not before making references to Elizabeth. Warren. As Pocahontas. After countless requests by ending country for that behavior to stop. So you know. We've got to balance the boat a little bit. Shall we say? He also took it upon himself to us, that racial slur. Amidst some of MR lasers elders. At a at a presentation given for Navajo Code Talkers when they were they're asking for funding for museum that they would like to build. He still is her didn't mention that either. Another quote. Recently president trump signed the first ever presidential proclamation officially recognizing, missing and murdered American. Indians and Alaskan natives. He established a task force called up the Lady Justice to address the problem. Fact this is true. He did. And on August sixth of this month assistant secretary of the Interior, terrorist swinney announced the opening of the third of seven offices established under the Operation Lady Justice Task Force to investigate cold cases involving missing murder indigenous Indians and Alaskan natives. The truth is that it's simply too early to know the effectiveness of Lady Justice, but to be fair at least that action has begun. Other offices have opened in cold cases have begun to be worked on, which is also good. The more details can be found on the website and will provide a link to that for you guys say that you can get an update on where that stands at least according to the trump administration. So you have to take it with a grain of salt, right? another quote. The president has reactivated the White House Counsel on native American Affairs to promote economic development and rural prosperity ending country close quote. All. Trump is also the one responsible for shutting down the council in the first place and as taking credit for its existence, which was actually started during the President Obama's administration. So, anyway, those are some points where deconstructing and again with all due respect to Vice President Laser we do thank him though for his representation of Indian country to a Republican audience shall we see? You WanNa comment on any of that brother. He's away from the MIC I don't have anything positive to say. Okay I'm going to not seem thing all. like I said earlier, I'm going to reserve comment on the gentleman's praise of the fool in the White House. I understand. Completely. So I just will. Kind of. Wish wish the tribal well that's probably do okay. Not a problem at all. All. Right. So now we're going to transition. Let's see to? Let's see. How about? The head of the RNC. That's chairwoman. Rhonda mcdaniels. Throughout the course of the week there were many speakers. there. Were approximately I would say seven to ten people of Color. That's book this event. Props. But again, we'll start with the we'll start with the chairwoman. So I'm not gonNA play all of this is about four minutes long because kind of cliff I can only digest so much. But using a chainsaw no I'm not either So here is I'll probably play maybe sixty seconds to two minutes of this hero and as we kick off this historic convention. As we speak to you tonight, we send our thoughts and prayers to those facing terrible fires in California, recovering from storms in Iowa and preparing for hurricanes in Louisiana and the Gulf coast. Democrats started their convention last week with Evil Goria a famous Hollywood actress who played a housewife on TV. Well, I'm actually a real housewife and a mom from Michigan with two wonderful kids in public school who happens to be the only only the second woman in one hundred and sixty four years to run the Republican Party and unlike Joe Biden. President trump didn't choose me because I'm a woman. He chose me because I was the best person for the job four years ago president trump started a movement unlike any other and over the next four days, we will hear from a few of the millions of hardworking everyday Americans who have benefited from his leadership. If you watch the DNC last week, you probably noticed that Democrats spent a lot of time talking about how much they despise our president but we heard very little about their actual policies. All right. So That's enough. So. So I love how this this tennis match happens where each side of complains about how they're attacking the there are other there other candidate, right? Right. And I agree with you brother I could not listen to that voice for hours on end. All right. But again we're about nuance and whereabout deconstruction here. Right So let's break down some of the things she said that you just heard. She said quote I'm actually a real housewife and a mom from Michigan with two wonderful kids in public school who happened to be the only the only she emphasizes now. Second. Woman in history. Exceeding second woman in one hundred and sixty. Four years to run the Republican party she said. So. There's your proof. That corporations run political parties. She just said it. Time and time again Dave has pointed out to you guys about. The DNC and the RNC they are not government agencies government anything. And she just said she runs the party. Second Point. She stated clearly the horrible record of the Republican Party. In that, it has only elected to women in one, hundred, sixty, four years. So thank you for. That acknowledgment. Now, what about a person of color running the artsy? That's even worse. Only one Michael Steele from two thousand and nine through two thousand eleven. But to be fair, the DNC isn't really doing much better either Tom Perez is the current chair Hispanic man who was seated in two thousand seventeen. So. You guys put a Hispanic. Man. As head of your organization after your terrible loss that you should never have lost in two thousand sixteen. So. Any thoughts on that when I do. I do. Good because I'm tired of talking. No. The I'm glad that lady opened her pie hole and say what she said about her running. The. RNC That's you know. She put it out they appoint blink. She's a housewife at the head of the DNC. RMC Excuse me so. You know it can't be any more plainly of an admission than what she which he just gave. So she admitted before her her followers that. We are not a government agency. Again, as you pointed out, they are political private organization. Good. Second Point that she kind of stepped on her you know what's with was that she was the only the only second elected woman in hundred and sixty four years that says a lot about the party. It. Says a lot about the party? one, hundred and sixty four years think about that. They only placed to women. Or elected to women as their charters. leadership. That's a pretty sad. That's pretty sad. It is the the DNC isn't much better. You know they've had Wasserman Schultz which I shake my head at that one but. It. It's really sad that these political organizations not government organizations, but private political organizations have been doing business as usual. With This kind of call it as call it as it is with white supremacy as the motivator for their charters. You can't tell me that. And misogyny to be to be exact, you can't tell me that there haven't been qualified women or people of Color. That could have headed these organizations before now. I refuse to believe that. I refuse to believe it. Stir. And I won't get all the facts absolutely correct. But what I'm going to point fingers again at the DNC a little bit you mentioned Debbie Wasserman, Schultz. Debbie Wasserman Schultz if I remember correctly used to run Hillary Clinton's campaign. And she. And then she? Left the campaign and then suddenly blink becomes the DNC chair. Great and then when she was DNC chair and Hillary Clinton decided she was going to run against Donald Trump. She Conveniently says, whispers in Tim Canes here who represents Virginia? I think she's going to make you VP. But after if you're for not. Successful. Give you the chair seat back for the for the DNC, because because he used to be the chair. The DNC. So these are the Games people play. So it's not just the Republicans I want to defend them. But this grammar rotten to they're all rotten exactly. Which is again why I continue to hammer the point that parties salk they suck. Okay. Because of stuff like that. All right. Points are made. Next on her it gets worse. Kids sadly. Next. We're GONNA. Play some of the speech from Congressman Matt. Gates. Now now he represents Dave state down there in Florida. Sorry brother. Know when he's safe. No. One is safe. So. Here's some. No we won't. No, we won't settle for violence in our neighborhoods or read our border. WE WON'T SETTLE FOR DECADES BAD decisions by basement-dwelling Joe Biden. We settle a continent. We know that the frontier the horizon even the stars belong to US Donald. Trump. Like all builders is a visionary that which is built in the mind is even more powerful than the brick and mortar that holds it together I comes the mind. Then the making first comes the vision then the work Washington Lincoln and Jefferson are immortal precisely because of the poll they have on our imagination. You cannot cancel a culture that loves its heroes. My grandfather was a railroad man as a Florida man. I watch rockets routinely send the brightest beyond the heavens with our flag in our hope. America is the greatest country that has ever existed. Don't let any celebrity athlete or politician tell you otherwise. President trump sometimes raises his voice and Ruckus. He knows that's what it takes to raise an army of Patriots who love America and will protect her. We must win this election. If we cherish our country's much as we should for there is no place to run no refuge for freedom. Should we fail? America's not just an idea or a constitution it is our home. We must protect our home. Okay word substitution time. That a whole actually said this. We settled a continent. We know that frontier the horizon even the stars belong to US close quote. But no, the party is an arrogant or racist, right? Right there two examples of it in one sentence in his speech. Do, we need to say any more honestly. This guy is proud of America's history of kid killing indigenous people. NGOs statements like this do not bring a country together people. They create more division. The only people who buy into his BS. Word substitution. Are those who benefit from it. Then, he says this quote. Donald trump like all builders is a visionary. That which is built in the mind is even more powerful than the brick and mortar that it holds together. First comes to mind then the banking. First comes the vision then the work. What does that even mean? What fantasy gate selling just dream it and it becomes a reality, right? Can. You say disconnected from reality. Then in his wrap up, he says quote. America's degraded country that has ever existed. Close quote. You know on these I always respond with says who? Have you. Matt Gaetz ever lived in another country to make that statement. You can't make claims like that without an experiential reference. Saying. It doesn't make it true. Okay. Oh. Yeah I forgot he likes builders. So I, guess he has to build up a delusion of American exceptionalism, right? So. Tired of this guy seriously him and. What said other retard. A? Come to me I can't. Yeah. There is. An you know. These people name because of all the various different hearings I've watched but anyway. Any thoughts. Well. Yeah. I didn't vote for the full. You know his his appeal was to white America Period Yep. That's what is appeals to. White America I don't give rat's ass. What anybody else says her thanks. Your opinion. Otherwise to refute what I just said is valid. And if you think that is his appeal, wasn't the White America go listen to it again please. Exactly. Okay You know the other thing that they try to paint him as this non-racist because he apparently adopted a Latino young man. Okay. And Look I caught anybody that wants to become a parenting in through adoption. I I honestly do. All right. But when you sit there and even if he didn't write that speech. You endorsed it and you delivered it. So you know. How am I supposed to quantify the to? How am I supposed to balance the boat if you will You don't to be a racist why are you standing in front of millions of people? With a speech like that. I. Let me go read some of the responses in. In the chat. Sorry. Sandra Rote effort if word. Must Header I'm taking your lead. Nam Doing Word Substitute I'm doing pretty good so far. Know. Then she wrote I just imagined myself hitting him in the head with the frying pan. And Standing Florida roads what what a nightmare sounds like a cult leader then cliff writes this is all crap. My word based on Norman Vincent. Peel very true. The name, the name it, and claim it prosperity religion. Yup. Tackling ya so but yeah, that's That's what it is. Okay. Well. Got One more for you guys. Because like I said, there is a lot and you know we could do the entire episode on all of these but but we've we've got more stuff to get to so. So Now. Let's focus on the economy a little bit. All right. So. Trump desperately wants the economy to rebound because it was the one thing. that he thought encountered onto point two s success for his administration, right? So to attempt to paint a rosy and positive picture, the RNC sends out. Larry cudlow trump's director of National Economic Council. Here's a Kudlow said. Inheriting a stagnant economy on the front end of recession the program of tax cuts, historic rollback of onerous regulations that rippled small Biz. Unleashing energy become the world's number one producer and free fair and reciprocal trade deals the Balser Manufacturing, agriculture technology, and other sex. Economy was rebuilt in three years. Unemployment fell to the lowest rate of three point five percent. Blue. Collar African Americans Hispanics women all groups benefited enormously everyone was better off a rising tide lifted all boats. Then a once in one hundred year pandemic. It was all for health and economic impacts tragic art ship and heartbreak were everywhere. But presidential leadership came swiftly and effectively with an extraordinary rescue for health and safety excessively fight the Cova virus. Great bipartisan rescue also save the economy right now our economic health is I'm back with emergency spending and ascot's Americans are going back to work or a housing boom. There's an auto boom a manufacturing boom a consumer spending boom stocks are in record territory a v-shaped recovery is pointing to better than twenty percent growth in the second half of this year. All right. Let's breakdown this delusion of BS. Quote. Blue Collar, African Americans Hispanics, women of all groups benefited enormously everyone was better off he said. What group isn't specifically mentioned. Indigenous People. No of course no, we're we're lumped under all groups. Okay. But how have the folks that he mentioned benefited? Well you have to define the word, right? Notice that he didn't give specific examples of how. How did trump administration policies help benefit people. Know he's spoken January generalities right Remember he's supposed to be selling trump's economic accomplishments. And? You know to use his word. Benefited American people right. He's supposed to be selling that and failed to do so right. So we'll drill into these little bit more. He swung into the pandemic and talked about it as if it were past tense and then he lied about the recovery, he said this quote. Then came once and one hundred year pandemic. It was awful. Health and economic. Economic Impacts were tragic. So here. Can Pass now, get it I. Get it. He's talking about. The trump administration shall we say career today but? Pandemics not over folks. But he's talking about it as if it's done and over with right so I'll read it again then came a once and one hundred year pandemic. It was awful health and economic impacts were tragic hardship and heartbreak were everywhere were everywhere. He said is well over one hundred, thousand dead with families that lost family members. K.. Almost two, hundred, thousand at this point. But he goes. Heartbreaking and Tra hardship and heartbreak were everywhere. These people aren't coming back. Then comes some more bs but presidential leadership came swiftly and effectively with an extraordinary rescue for health and safety to successfully fight the CO vid virus he said. More BS. Great bipartisan rescue also save the economy. Right, now our economic health is coming back with emergency spending and tax cuts he said. Americans are going back to work. There's a housing boom there's an auto boom, a manufacturing boom, a consumer spending boom stocks are in record territory he said. Quote. Look presidential leadership. In. This country. Continues to be non-existent. Countless missteps and developing in conveying a troop consistent nationwide approach to handling them pandemic is the truth. and. Any quote consumer spending boom. Is a result of people needing to buy supplies and food with money that they did not instill by large do not have. Perhaps Mr Kudlow never saw the endless food lines. The people waiting to get just a little bit to eat. Or people that are well off enough to have cars sitting in their cars. To be able to pick. Up, packages. Endless lines and there's still going on. But no kudlow wants you to think and this president wants you to think. That the pandemic is over. PEOPLE BETTER WAKE UP Here here's something for folks to think about. During the Great Depression. Excuse me the gross domestic product fell by an estimated fifteen percent. That helps spur the Great Depression. What they're lying to you about the economy. Is Everything is rosy. Not. It is not rosy. The GDP. For the second quarter of this year twenty twenty. Is Three thirty one point, seven percent. They're not bothering to tell people that we are in a severe recession that does not mean a booming economy. I don't care how you. WanNa paint it. That is a recession. Correct. Straight up. You know it's twice. It's almost twice that what it was during the Great Depression of twenty. Nine. So. That gives you an idea as to where we have votes folks. We're headed in that direction again. What no no foreseeable way out. I'm not painting doom and gloom. These are the figures from this fool administration corrected they're hiding. Exactly. That are available. To take the time to go and hunt, but they know most Americans won't. That's what they're counting on. They're counting on that nobody's going to go online or go to any of the federal agencies and dig up the data. The counting on that. That's exactly what they're counting on. So. All right. So thank you guys for listening to our deconstruction. That's that's pretty much all we could. Pull and and stomach. And just just to take a break here. WE'RE GONNA play a music track just to kind of. Get into a different mindset not that we have. necessarily better news but but that was that was enough for now. Say. At least it was for me personally but anyway so anyway, I got Robbie Robertson queued up here This is the track hall does sacrifice I. Love This track. So we'll be back with you guys as soon as this is done. So here we go. We have. A million or more stories that can be told. John. Sacrifice your prey. Language. Off Your. Reply. Stranded in. My name is go fear. Of quota. Nabi. And living in the United States country, which is a swiftest growing Indian reservations in the country. I've been in prison. Thanks seventy six. And incident. That took place. Shootout members over the American Indian movement. FBI. Local shares. Burst. Ask Cute. Three of us, were card the debts. I engines cody. President. Not Guilty. Why Don't. My case was separated. I was guilty but. It's not. The prosecutor stated that they did not know who killed their agents nor did he know what participation Leonard Help here may have played in it. But someone has to pay for the crime. A. Can't. Understand. Why Hell this hell. That I've been going through twenty one years. Sacrifice your. Way Thank. Signed. A. But he had I know in my heart that. has to pay the doctor. Make things better for people. Provide. It should make a bottle. Compared to when people years ago or? Twenty five years all. Shot Game. Lies. Standard Children, Dieter. Arms. Compared to go. Too far now to start bracket out. I don't give. Not might be our. Free. Them. jacker voice. I I sacrificing more. Robbie Robertson. In the tax called sacrifice pretty obvious. They are somebody that Trump will never pardon right Here. There's some people. In Indian country saying that he's guilty. He should stay right where he is but. Large part of. Population disagrees with that. They say he. Should never been there to begin with. But. We just know that this president likes to pardon. Position at this way true criminals. Your Roger. Stone's. You're. There's others but anyway. Yeah. Hopefully it is. You will come to an end sooner than later. I wish they could boot is sorry. You know what our office No on November, the fifth but. The Ernie No. I mean looking trying trying to look a bit positive. Let's say he is. Elected out of office you know that's going to be TV worth watching. When it comes time for where whomever it may be to take over the presidency. Cameras going to be pointed directly at the White House. They want to see this guy walk out. Of course the across, it won't happen though the the walking through some back underground corridor. I received of scouting to another country. That, that's what I foresee. Why do I say that? He knows that New York. State's going to be waiting right there with a portfolio full of subpoenas and indictments. He notes that. True. So I I I see him a scouting to another country whether the countries like Russia or China will take him I have no idea. But that's what I foresee happening. Let's see. Trying to find something real quick and I you know. I think that's part of the reason he's built this this compound. There used to be the people's House. It's along the People's House. It belongs to the fool in the White House. Sadly. That's the only way I can describe it. But I think that that. He's I. Think he's going to flee the country. Well, given the heat coming on him presumably wants he does exit whenever that is. there are definitely people with axes to grind. Much more powerful than. Myself, I'm sitting here going through Netflix's I'm trying to find a documentary that I just finished watching unfortunately I can't seem to. Find it but. You know how deep some of this stuff goes it had to do with. New York City organized crime. And of the people that. was being featured in this was Rudy Giuliani. Because he was. The head guy of the southern district. Of New York. He was the attorney, the Attorney General for the Southern District of New York. And, they were talking about how the Mafia at the time was controlling construction in the city of New York. And how any construction company that. Had A project that was going to be inaccessible two million dollars I, guess. which is pretty low. You'd think about in terms of construction job. Had to be filtered through eight approved construction companies. That were mob controlled. And what was funny was even though they didn't come right out and saying is they kept focusing on the trump tower. Because this was this all took place in the eighties. And so I find it. So very funny that Rudy Giuliani. Who was credited for taking down five Criminal organizations in the mob. Okay So embiid with trump. Here's here's here's an idea as to why that's happening. The fools organization is one of the ones that didn't go down yet. Well I'm just saying Giuliani still connected. He knows all those people in southern district sure he does. So you know. Does em anything worrying about I guess is my question coming out of the White House out of southern district. I think they're keeping that close to the best. Okay. I think he does personally but I think they're keeping that close to the vest. And that? I don't know whether they're. Trying to pay back favors that may be Oh, two Giuliani. And not putting his name out there. But I think he's in the thick of this. And it's not to bring the full in the White House down. I. Think he's in the thick of this because he is going to be named and some of those indictments. Very. Possible. Telling me live chat wrote trump and concrete. mafia well. It was actually called apparently the commission. And the commission controlled Everything, pretty much all the head, all the heads of the Organized Crime Families sat on this commission. And And My brother just texted me says it's effing pouring outside. Meaning rain, I can't tell from down here but anyway. Yeah so so There's definitely that connection and so that's why I raise that question you know. How much heat is he actually going to? Be Facing. Once, leaving office. So anyway, throwing it out there. Are, GonNa totally, Change Direction here was still in native news and. The title of this article and you know you've heard me make. Comments in the past you know about. That we have constant flights over in Indian country, and this is yet another one. The title reads Alaska Tribal Groups Oppose States lawsuit over hunting. And Auto. Juneau Alaska this. Is An AP story Published through Indian country today. Dot Com. Article reads. Lucca tribal governments and organizations have asked the state to withdraw a lawsuit alleging a federal agency overstepped its authority by granting and I'll Alaska native village in a special hunting permission during the coronavirus pandemic. The lawsuit opposes. the special action granted to the organized village of Cake. By. The Federal Office of subsistence assistance. Excuse Me Management Alaska's energy desk reported. The. Federal Agency granted a request for Kate, residents to hunt up to two moose and five male. SITKA BLACK TAILED DEER Alaska Fishing Game Commission Doug Vincent Lang said the department was not opposed to indigenous culture but did not agree the action was warranted. A STATE? Emergency Command unit deemed no food security issue had emerged cake officials said food scarcity is not the only issue nothing. The village also want to ensure the health. All US give me on noting that the village also wants to ensure the health of its elders and provide culturally nourishing foods during the pandemic. Richard Peterson President of central. Council climate and Haida Indian tribes of Alaska said he was disappointed by the states lawsuit quote. I think our state should have better things to do right now than to sue its own people in communities during the time of pandemic he said. A statement issued by Peterson and other tribal leaders called the lawsuit quote a disgraceful continuation of dated exclusionary recess management practices. Close quote. Quoting again. They should be working with US Peterson said, they shouldn't. They should have been applauding a community tribe providing four community during this time. For most people the Coronavirus Causes Milder Ma, moderate symptoms such as fever and cough that clear up in two to three weeks for some especially older adults in people with existing health problems, it can cause even more severe illness including the Monja an death. The number of infections is thought to be far higher because many people have not been tested and studies suggest people can be infected with the virus without feeling sick or what is called known to be a symptomatic. So. Yeah. So once again, I I agree with that sediment they got they don't have better things to do. Than a bunch of indigenous people. For doing something that. They Always, had the right to do. Their true. America. What a segue brother Because they didn't have acute, but they're you're going to have to have that. When a welcome everyone in chatted just recently joined us more than Bobby. Brother I'm sorry. What did you say? I said, basically, I was humming the theme song because I don't have a cute so. I was like all right. Right into racism in. Segue Atari. Grab it real quick. It'd be no no no, that's okay. I just didn't didn't hear what you said. Oh. Shoot I missed that one. Okay. Okay. So right Europe. COPS demand. Black. Businessman prove he owns his own store. and. This is written by Brad read for Raw History Dot COM And I you know just. Every day I'm just. Dumbfounded every freaking day. With the stupidity that comes out of this country? Yup. Pelisson. Tiberius in California were caught on video this week. Demanding that a black businessman prove that he owned his own store even though the story itself featured his photograph hung on the wall. Now. I'm going to stop right there for a moment. The cops in that town? No. Every frigging business. In every frigging business owner in that town. They have to. Most cops know every business and every business owner in their jurisdictions if they're not some major metropolis like New York or La Or something like that. But me smaller towns it's hard to not know who these businesses belong to. Well even if you're even if you're part of a major city, okay you you know the units are broken down you of different police. Precincts, and so you know especially if if you grew up in in the community that you're that you're covering okay which which is also the case often enough unfortunately but but it's also the case and they you know it's part of the community outreach you you just get to know the businesses that are there. So yeah. It's true. No matter the small town or or even a larger larger metropolitan city in my view. So. Going on local news station ABC seven reports that here. Here's a clue as to why harassing him reports that Yima Khalif. Owner of. Yemen clothing brand store was approached by local police while he was working late. Inside his business at around one am on Saturday. Quote quote this particular day we just received a huge inventory and we just wanted to come out and put inventory out before Saturday morning in quote. He explained ABC seven. And a video filmed by one of police friends the officer can be seen implying that it's suspicious for Khalif to be working at his own store. Quoting, again, make it up, make it up. This, street closes at nine o'clock at night, and there's never anybody here in quote the officer said. The street closes at nine o'clock they roll the streets up at nine o'clock and anybody that's out there gets arrested. There's no frigging curfew well, see if you play this out. All right. Let's say we believe them. We believe their justification, right? That there's no normally there and stuff like that what they're what they will claim and worried about that as they hadn't approached. And then got stolen they'd be accused of while you're not doing your job. Right. Well here's here's the thing I'll take that one. Step. Further. Here's the thing. They're working inventory. So the lights are on, they're not working in the dark. The lights are on. So if you would stop and think formante anybody that's going to do something fierce inside of business, they're not going to do it with all the lights blaring in the store. No absolutely. I'm just saying you know. They're they're using the excuse that if they were Trying to, they're trying to use flipped philosophy. They're trying they're trying to say. Look we have to we have to react to everything that we see because if we don't, then we're accused of not not doing our job, but the problem is, and this is what people continue to say in these cases over and over and over again when we're talking about defunding the police or whatever the case may be or training officers is that they overreact. and. So And trained to overreact to every situation hence, it was suspicious. Right. So. This officer kept digging kept digging his whole. Quote this isn't regular business hours. There's no customers in there. Is. It your store that's all we want to know I want to know what you doing in the store at one o'clock in the morning in quote. So he just kept digging the hole deeper. Mr Cleveland replies if I tell you, it's my store then what that was a quote. In author says. Then show. A that it's your store. And mystically responded and I quote I do not have to show you nothing. And the officer goes on to say. That he should be grateful. That, we're being diligent as we are to look out for the street. But let me let me play devil's advocate here just a little bit. I understand you know with with all the you know everything that's going on in the country right now especially especially towards police. I think. Probably going to get hate mail for this but I think also. There has to be a level of responsibility and people to. And and you know I don't think it's unreasonable to ask you know. Can you prove that this is your store? His reaction was I to show you nothing Right. Because of what anger over other justify in other situations where people have been killed needlessly. Take by your silence you disagree with me on that. No I was just letting you finish. Okay. That's all I'm saying is like sometimes I, think there are situations where you you know. That much cooperation I think. Maybe something would have gone better but. Not. I'm not in the situation I'm just being it as an outsider but. I'm just going based on what's in the article. Right now. I'm positive. I. Ain't I'M GONNA Steph out on a limits they I'm posited that. Those. Officers had to know that that business was owned by that gentleman. They had to know. It doesn't sound like it's a large town. It sounds like it's a small town or a smaller town. And if if they really wanted to know who own the business, if they weren't sure all they had to do. And this is what I would have done. Any reasonable police officer would have done the same thing I'm going to step on lamb and say that. If. They wanted to know who own the business all they had to do is call dispatch asked dispatch to see who on that store now I agree with that but let me let me finish. Once they had that information. They could have walked up to that gentleman in the store and said. We understand the stores owned by Mr Blah Blah Khalif. Are you Mr. blow-black leaf. And the guy would you know I'm sure he would've approached. Worded his response to differently I know I know I would. If somebody said excuse me are you Mr so and so is you know we're we saw the lights on we're stopping to make sure everything's okay. So I'm putting the on on the cops here. You know and I don't blame Mr for being upset saying he's not gonNA show them nothing. But. If. They really wanted to know what was going on and they had the tools at their disposal to figure out what's going on. They have those tools at their disposal. They could have gone in better informed. Than what the article up implied that they did. And So, therefore, they saw Brown faces in a store. That they did things belong there because all up the streets at nine o'clock. Yep totally. Get it. So, points. Well taken that lights are all on their inside working that kind of obvious. They're not doing anything nefarious. You won't no argument from me there whatsoever all I'm saying is that in normal police interaction, there are looking for I d. I agree with Molly. If we follow what you're saying and they they call dispatch and they said, okay, the owner's name is x. they're going to try to match it to an idea. In my situation. Now that's my Esther Khalif. Said I showing you nothing. Working they go with that at no no, and I get data talk understand that but had they handled it differently I'm sure the business owner would have said, wow, these guys are looking out for my best interests. Yes I'm Mr Khalif. Here's my information, Yup? I hear that too I do. Talk. But know they go in with this attitude? It's it's right there in the cops words they they do many times. No bright they're. They're either yeah. Yep that's what I mean. By reaction they go in they go and the worst. And you will not get an argument from me on that at all. You don't have they have. They handled that differently I'm sure this wouldn't have been in our racism in America segment. I mean how many if they've sat there and just watched and see what was happening in the store? I'm sure they would have seen. The employees Mr cleave putting clothes on a hangar in putting them in racks. I don't know many thieves that go into people's beds, businesses and sort their inventory and hang it up for them. I. Don't know any criminals do not. Look at everything. Okay. But neatly. But. I'm just I'm putting on the cops because. You know by their own by their own admissions by their own words. They handled it very badly and it made it look like this man was being racially profiled. Because the owner of the store is a black man. That's the honor of that storage. Again. This to me there's you know. There needs to be more information the article that that wasn't there, and if all that transparent way you just said then yeah. Then they handle it wrong. That's the way transpired according to the article and according to the quotes that were in the article. You know I don't blame the man for being. Resistant to them asking him if this is your store, prove it. Get Out of. My store. Start there. I don't need your help. And then bad stuff happens later. Very. Would you go shore? To. Put. You know to sort of like your point and you know how? People how how? Cops in interact with their environment you know. Look at the case with the kid that shot those protesters. Okay White Kid. Full automatic rifle walking down the street. And the COPS. Give. Him. Water. And then later realized. Oh Wait. He's asustek suspect, right? Like like they're in disbelief that is white kid could be a suspect because two reasons he white and his age. So. I totally ignore the fact that wait why is a? I think the report is seventeen year old. Why is a seventeen year old carrying an assault rifle that doesn't even get questioned By the COPS. By the COPS. I think they gave him water. Yeah. That's why I was joking last last episode like are you a parched? From all the walking dead. I in one of the videos that shows him holding up three fingers in according to the information. It says, he says `I shot three people. That's as he's approaching the cops. Okay that should have been the biggest red flag that I can think of where you mean shot three people. But again, we see this we see this time and time again, what it is because these folks are white. The cops are under some false notion that they have a permit to carry. Depending on the state. Because there, happened to be white just in something that resembles military fatigue. And handling and looking like they can handle weapon. Okay. But as I said. This kid. A cared. Younger white he's not even dressed in fatigues kind kind of sort of. And they don't even question that. They're worried about him being thirsty. So. There's some pretty incriminating comments. I sent you a link in facebook or about. A compilation someone put together. There's some pretty incriminating comments within those those. Those videos. Now there are they finally got to see a bunch of them yesterday. Okay. Thanks to our good friends at the young Turks. But Another another very, very valid point that I still haven't heard mainstream news media bring up. Seventeen and he's not a resident of that state. So What is he to seventeen year old doing with a weapon that he's not even legally allowed to own in the state he's from. He's broken. So many laws they're not gonNA. They're going to try to bring out the best best possible light they can for this boy. And that's that's wrong. First of all, he was carrying a weapon underage. That's. You know that's that's the biggie. says. I'm being too generous to somebody who might being too generous to I'm not being generous to anybody I'm asking very pointed questions like why aren't the? Police that were present questioning the fact that a young kid is walking around with a frigging assault rifle. How am I being generous in that statement? First of all, he's open. Caring underage. Possession of a weapon. That's that's not not his second or if it is his. He doesn't have the age qualification to to own it your. Second of all he transported. A weapon that he's not legally capable of owning across state lines. Misdemeanors those are felonies. I understood felony I understand Beth I'm asking, I'm referring to how am I being generous to the police that were present I wasn't I'm being very pointed towards them as far as them being irresponsible in their duties. They should've picked that kit immediately. We. Anyway. I don't get it. Well, I think when he made the proclamation that he held up three fingers and says, shop three people. That should have been the end of it right there they should have. No there were police interactions before he even shot anybody there was there was absolute and nobody picked him on is my point. No Note was there's plenty interaction before that and you're right nobody did pick him up. I. Think. Wade's gentlemen. This is America. This is why I think is mother should be held as as. Guilty. Is He. Yep. I live in Connecticut. Okay. All right and when I saw a bunch of kids get gunned down by kids that wasn't much older than this kid. In Sandy Hook. Similar questions in the sense not so much with the police but the fact that you have parents that question like, how did he get access to that? were. A child that age and that's what I'm calling them because they're under age child at age is not supposed to be brandishing any form of a firearm period in this state. So, yes, there's responsibility of parents as well. Oh yes there is absolutely. I guess, some of these other states it doesn't matter. Sadly people people lost their lives because of. because. INABILITIES or or or willful failures to comply with loss. So. But you know. Beth is right and some of the videos that people were yelling at police stopping he jumps somebody they absolutely were. Ignoring that too they they did. They totally ignored that. And they just they kept driving past. And one of the videos. They, the police are heard saying we glad we're glad you guys are here. There was a I saw another video about maybe you saw this to. Know it either misunderstood you Beth or something but. The police. I Apologize I didn't mean. GET UPSET is the I'm upset at the police in this situation that's why I'm upset with. And I'm upset with this kid because he killed two people because he's under some false belief, a narrative. That has a right to do so because this points back to my. Damn stuff I keep talking about the Second Amendment crap that they keep protecting I saw A. I had enough of that crap through the RNC as well. Stop. Telling me that you have a right to own a weapon in this country. Not Sorry. I I'm sorry. I'm not laughing at you. Know. Sandra, just wrote him. Michael needs us the or releases. Be Rugged Today I. Need a cookie or something you know I've been a good boy. Virtual cookie, chocolate chips, and all. Thank you. Shoot but I mean it's just I'm just I'm just tired of these these gun arguments I really am. And I know you differ with me slightly on a brother and I never recognize that to recognize that there are. There are tons of responsible gun owners out there my father's one of them. Okay. All right but. But I'm talking more about the political arguments that are such BS. There were exactly that. And Beth Road Day. That's exactly what I was thinking about I think the police knew he was a white supremacist and that's why the left him alone I didn't know they did know he was part of a militia group. That's what I was starting to say for blue going go but there's video were there. The interpretation of this video which I tend to agree with is that. White militia have ident- identified themselves to the police force in advance of the rally. And the police said we're glad you're here and basically anybody that approaches US meaning protesters largely people of color if they approach us or sending them to you. Can that was that was intimated by one of the people in one of the videos that that's why he client that's what the cops told him. Exactly. I saw that video. I mean. So. We'll let you deal with that. You deal with our hands don't get dirty because there's enough heat on today. What kind of responsible law enforcement officer says that none there's no, they're not responsible. They're not good cops shall we say? That's why it said there's a lot of incriminating. A lot of incriminating statements in that. In those videos lots. And the prosecutors. Feel with this. And See, the word people are using is in fact militia. And this is why I'm bringing you up in the context of the Second Amendment. These people have interpreted that. The way the second amendment reads as if and only if there is a loss of government. Can people have the right to bear arms and protect themselves? That is in essence the spirit shall we say of the Second Amendment? Just because there's protest doesn't mean you're city government, your state government or your federal government have lost control. But. These people have taken it upon themselves. And I think in one instance who might not correct brother in in that scenario. The mayor was asked to deputise people and he refused to do so. Right. So if you're if you're the mayor of a city and you are refusing to deputise people in essence created them on militia, you are you have not gloss control. Correct. And I continue to make the same. Second Amendment arguments like this. And what do I get back? You're infringing on my rights you Dan left is. Shut up right Ri-. Yeah it's just. This whole thing is you know this this whole mess has spiraled out of control and the match to the fuse is a fool in the White House. He's GonNa. He's GonNa own that until he draws his last breath and then history is GonNa make sure he owns it is these rolls in his grave. Created this this behemoth of of of A. Of of racial inequality to the point that it is right now. We are those that like the foul history we are back to the Jim Crow era. In some instances. In some instances. and. If you think I stake can do the research. Do. The research I'd have. I'd have to find the statistic. I can put it in the show notes if I if I remember to do it but. There's a statistic out there. That shows what the per-capita of of guns that people even know about in this country versus other countries of basically of similar size. And it's. Like five to one. Is, the is the estimate roughly in terms of ratio. Finals are in relation to what other in other words the number of. Somewhat known guns be it registered owners or whatever the case may be. Then entered will never be accurate because of how many illegal guns are are in the United States. But the the the the figures that people can sort of point to for the United States versus another country that is of similar size is like five to one meaning there are there five times as many guns in the United States, as there are in in another country of comparable size? Owned your in possession of citizen. Because of one. Clause in the constitution. I guess, my brother, my my biological brother disagrees with me but okay. We can have that discussion later but. I'm going to say to my brother and chat remember. Sandy Hook. I'm not about to tell one of those parents. That they're overreacting. When they have a dead child. So. Our Jones will tell you the. Result that folly for doing that. It Yup. Going on with racism in America we have one more. Shake, your head piece of. An example. How black teens who were victims of a knife attack had guns drawn on them By deputy lawyers say and the video or the photos that accompany the articles show just that. Los Angeles. County Sheriff's deputies detained three teenagers at gunpoint last week he works here teenagers. At gunpoint last week by after bystanders called nine one one to report that the teens were being attacked by a man with a knife. And a twenty, four, hundred teens family said Monday. Quoting I can't I just can't believe that the only way to handle this was to approach it with guns drawn in quote said Civil Rights Attorney Robert Brown Robert Brown who specializes in cases of police misconduct. The Sheriff Alex Villena waiver sit in a videotape statement on Monday that he had quote concerns regarding the tactics employed in quote and that the incident was under investigation the incident is under investigation. On Tuesday Department wrote on twitter. That it would be conducting an in depth review of its patrol rifle, deployment policy and training. There's the old soft shoe shuffle. The teens two of them black were sitting with their skateboards at a bus. Stop Friday on Soledad Soledad Canyon. Road in Santa Clare I'm sorry Santa Clara Rita. When a man approached and asked if they had any crack Brown said. When they told the man to leave them alone he pulled out a knife and began thrusting it at them. Prompting the teams to reach their skateboards as shields Brown said. Multiple people called nine one one to report the incident. But when the deputies arrived, they treated the teens as criminals Brown says, again, Brown represents the family of Tammy Collins Sixteen year old son. Who who was one of those detained Collins posted eleven minute video of the tencent counter on instagram on Saturday. So, there's an video that's accompanying this. Particular article. In the video at least three sheriff's deputies can be seen approaching the bus stop with their guns drawn and pointed at the three teens. They instruct team to walk backwards towards them one who was made to kneel on the ground. All three teams handcuffed input into squad cars. Quoting doing all of this time, you have bystanders telling them that in fact, they teens are the victim Brown said. And the deputy still seem to be quite so responsive, these are quote trim to any Brown. In response, the deputies can be heard saying they actually detained the teens in response to a different call. Sure. One reporting someone being assaulted with skateboard in which they say is considered a daily Web, a deadly weapon gay and every new skateboard was daily weapon gets a can be. Quoting a call for service was received regarding a felony assault. And the deputies detain those alleged to be involved. Villanueva. said Monday quoting again, the matter is currently being. Investigated it wasn't clear whether the man who allegedly. Teens with a knife was detained. Just. It's just amazing that. This stuff happens. And the you know. I it just does it just continues to happen day in and day out. Day In out. You know have you have witnesses that are standing there when the cops get there and telling them what went on? And you know. I saw enough episodes when it was still on the air of supposedly live PD. Right. And always reacted you know very much to you know I always use that as an example for people use hallmark remember. Because, there were certain cities where you know with very clear. Of A bias. How the police would react to people of Color in certain in certain cities one, one city that I always picked on was Was Lawrence Indiana. And but by and large I would say looking at. All the cities that were covered. when the police would do an investigation of a situation and they would start to collect witness statements and whatnot they were looking for consistency and story, and then when they got consistency in store or they would, they would in some cases Fleiss people under arrest. So when you look at this particular story and they they had witnesses saying they're the victims. And The. person who assaulted them is elsewhere. That should have ended it. Right. But There you go. Right. Okay. Were right onto in other news. Appreciate it. Thank you. This is. This this article. kind of made mention of this this. person's comments last last episode. But the title lives RNC speaker said it would be smart for police to racially profile her biracial sign because of statistics. And this was written by John Halt Wagner Languor I'm sorry. John Halsey winger. For News Dot Com. Yahoo my nude, whatever Yahoo News. This a person. One of the speakers at the are in. Yeah I have her audio but anyway. Abby Johnson, anti abortion rights activists with top speaking spot on the second night of the dog and pony show. My words in a video posted on Youtube in late June, condone the police racially profiling her biracial son. That's sick. Quoting statistically statistically numbers compiled by people that aren't Brown or black. satistics my son Brown sign is more likely to. You. GotTa sit down before I. Say this folks because you gotTa fall over when you hear what this lady said. Are you sitting if not I warned you I've been sitting and I've been a good boy in eight, McCook? You got us. Bob Even sent you too. Thank. Thank you everybody who sent me virtual cookies I appreciate. Appreciate it. Appreciate us. All right. Here's what this lady said about her son. Statistically, my brown son is more likely to commit a violent crime I. I'm sorry to commit a violent offense over my white sons in quote. That's that's what the lady said. Statistically Brown son is going to be a criminal more than my white son. What kind of crap is that? It's a Republican crap. What it is statistically. Never said that she didn't. She didn't say that two nights ago. No. In front of millions of people. Although I don't know how many. Views that video has but I bet it's up there. Oh I. Bet it is. Let's go on quoting I recognize that I'm going to have a different conversation with jude that I do with my brown haired. Little Irish Very Pale skinned white sons as they grow up. Great. Couldn't just said my other son's yeah. Glad you're not my mom. She described her son Jute as quote an adorable perpetually Tan looking little brown boy in quote. Quoting again, but one day he's going to grow up and he's going to be a tall probably should sort of large intimidating looking maybe brown man made she says an. Unbelievable. And my other boys are probably going to look like. White guys maybe don't have. An accent this stu I don't know. Yeah In the video Johnson appear to be appeared to defend the disproportionate rate in which black man are arrested and incarcerated ignoring the centuries of past racist policy making that led the US to this point. You can't make this crap up almost say the s word which you can't make it up folks. These are the idiots out there among us and people are worried about the apocalypse. You don't have to worry about Zombie apocalypse the zombies looking for something that's going to be nourishing. These fools don't have anything upstairs. That's nourishing I- im- instituting right now. A swear jar. And it's half full. So you have a lot of credit brother. So if you ever have to use a word that's DARTY. All you have to do is take a credit out of the chip. Out of the swear jar and you're covered you covered. Okay. Thank you. Speaking of switch, I had a friend that I challenged one year. That every time they swore they had to put money in a jar Br. Beth is on record. Beth is on record. She says, come on guys sit the words. That I know you came in late but it's like I've been very, very good today. Deserves another Cook Naven to right into the rundown. Notes to myself not to swear here. been. Challenge this friend to you know. To Stop swearing saying one particular word. So, this friend swore up and down I can do this. Don't problem I said. All right. We'll see now granted I had one of the biggest jars that you could find out I. think a Quart Jar is the biggest you find. So I said nickel, we'll make it easy nickle every time to use the F. Word. Well the JAR was full. In a month. When you get to hold it up and shake and go. Can you imagine how many nichols it takes two full a quart jar. Lunch man. To. Launch for ten people. Yeah, exactly. alrighty. Well Anyway. So. We're going to break out of the politics now. Thirty last story, and then we're going to at the happy trail here but. this title read. To Manage Wildfire California looks to what tribes have known all along. NPR story. and. It reads on a cool Friday more. Excuse me try it again on a cool February morning around sixty people gathered in the Sierra Nevada foothills to take part in a ceremony that for many decades was banned. Men and women from native American tribes in Northern California stood in a circle alongside university students and locals from around the town of Mariposa. Several war bright yellow shirts made a flame resistant fabric. For the next two days, the group will be carefully lighting fires in the surrounding hills. Also sprinkled throughout the crowd were officials from the state government, which essentially ago had largely prohibited California tribes from continuing their ancient priors. When they used The. Clearly, this wasn't written by indigenous author, but anyway. Awful Hustle sprinkled throughout the the crowd were officials from the state government which a century ago had largely prohibited California's tribes from continuing their ancient. Practice of controlling of controlled burns. Fire. Has always been part of California's landscape but long before the vast blazes of recent years, native American tribes have held controlled Burns that cleared out underbrush and encourage new plant growth. Now with wildfires raging across northern California. Joining other record-breaking fires from recent years. Govern officials say tackling the fire problem will mean bringing back quote good fire close quote much like California's tribes once did. Yeah. So you know Donald trump is not going to solve your fire problem either. You know. This always comes to mind when I see non native incorporating. Measures to to address problems that they think are are going to solve. What's what's before them? If you just stop for once and talk to the stewards of the land that were here before you. I can't just stop. Last night I'm trying very hard not to use the word stewardship anymore. I know yeah. But. Why Yeah I. DO I know why comes? For the audience a case you're not up to speed, it comes from John Muir. Was a raging racist and who founded the Sierra. Club a very. Tight knit in quote unquote environmental group. And they used the word stewardship. and. The position you know as well, the native people were always stewards of the land in we've now taken over. It's Because they think they can do it. Better. Apparently. The. Original inhabitants correct. The original happens who had been taking care of this land little centuries before. You know. The Europeans learn how to build ships and float on water. Centuries before. When they got here, the lands were lush they were beautiful lands. Full of wildlife full of plant life. And they thought they could do it better. We'll roll birth, roll the camera and the books forward to the twenty first century and here we go. Well, maybe we should have listened to them all along. Maybe should have. That's all I've got my bag is empty. My bag is empty as well, and we appreciate you guys listening Let's see to Beth who came in a little bit late and I'm not trying to see you out but hey we. Hi. How good to see we? We did a a deconstruction of a few clips from the RNC. So if you want to check that out, audio will be available here in a couple of minutes on on our website. So, again, guys, we appreciate it. Thank you very very much for listening. Play us out here absolutely again, joining us. Yes. Thank you very much. So if you want to comment on anything that you heard here on the show today, you can email US hosts with an S. O. Host that NATIVE OPINION DOT com. You can reach us through with twitter. You can reach us through facebook, which is facebook dot com forward slash native opinion podcast can email us also through our website at native opinion dot com. Or you can also leave us a voicemail or text message via our service eight, six, zero, eight, hundred, five, nine, five, again it's eight, six, zero, eight, hundred, five, five, nine, five my name is Michael kicking bear. It peak what tribal nation here in the. State of Connecticut I don't know why pause right. there. Their state of Miami. Ever. got. The Gay right there. You know him you love him. He is. David out from the Children Chair tribe that I'm a proud citizen up from Alabama I'm not from Alabama but that's where the tribe is. All right. So we appreciate you guys will be. You'll get an episode from us, for Wednesday, but we will not be live. So please have great upcoming week and we'll see you later bye-bye.

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03-05-20 Book of the Month: The Night Watchman by Louise Erdrich

Native America Calling

56:30 min | 1 year ago

03-05-20 Book of the Month: The Night Watchman by Louise Erdrich

"Welcome to native America calling from Studio Forty nine in Albuquerque. I'm Tara Gatewood Louise Eric. Grace's readers with her latest novel. The night watchman. It's based on the life of her grandfather. Who in his own right was an extraordinary man? This fictional story takes readers through the threat of tribal termination an exploit patient in a bustling urban environment in just a moment pool here why Louise decided to open up this narrative stay tuned for our March book of the month. This award winning native author National Native News is next. This is national native. News Amy on Tony Gonzalez Montana and other senators on the US. Senate committee on Indian Affairs have voiced their concerns over the Indian Health Service decision not to release a report examining the scope of child sexual abuse committed by one of its former doctors. Aaron Bolton has more Dr Stanley Weber was convicted of abusing young native boys on Montana's blank feet Indian reservation in twenty eighteen and more recently on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota last fall after the Wall Street Journal and frontline jointly reported on how. Ihs officials allegedly ignored signs of Weber's abuse. The agency commissioned to report to investigate the claims Montana. Public radio was denied. A copy of the report in early February. I said the report contained protected. Private Information Montana. Senators Steve Daines and John Tasker. Sit on the Indian Affairs Committee in took issue with what they call the agency's lack of transparency. Late last month in response I just said it would provide lawmakers with what it called an executive summary outlining broad findings and recommendations for National Native News. I'm Erin Bolton they you Mattila tribes at Wild Horse Casino in Oregon reopened Wednesday. It was closed for forty eight hours for a thorough cleaning. After employees of the casino was diagnosed with Krona virus and a statement tribal leadership said they reopened the facility after reviewing an inspection report from the tribes environment and safety and Health Departments Wednesdays Corona virus update from the tribal health center to the community states. There are no known positive cases of Corona virus on the Tiller reservation. The employee was being treated in Washington State Falling Mondays. Alert about the exposure. A tribal emergency command center was initiated as a response tribal leadership also closed schools and a senior center for cleaning and counseled tribal events for the week as a precaution as tribes across the country. Prepare for the corona virus. Us lawmakers Wednesday introduced more than eight billion dollar emergency spending package to tackle the corona virus in the US. According to the National Indian Health Board forty million dollars set aside specifically for tribes tribal organizations and urban Indian organizations. The House cleared the bill Wednesday. The National Indian Health Board is seeking assistance from tribes in assessing corona virus impacts in Indian country. Federal agencies are taking part in a national conference call Thursday to provide tribes updates on the corona virus. A federal official recently visited the wind river reservation to discuss it rural broadband access Wyoming Public Radio Savannah. Mar Reports Federal Communications Commission. Chairman Agit Pie met with northern Arapaho tribal leaders and representatives from the tribally owned company. Wind River Internet his visit came after the FCC awarded more than four million federal dollars to a broadband expansion project on the reservation. Pi said that when river internet which is carrying out that expansion is one of only a handful of tribally operated internet providers in the country. They're doing incredible work because they've got to work against odds. Some of the geographic demographic challenges I talked about the in many cases access to capitals limited. And so we're doing everything we can to help. Those tribally owned telecom companies data from the. Us Census Bureau shows that just over half of native people. Living on reservations have access to high speed Internet on Wind River. The number is closer to one third. The FCC's grant is expected to benefit around eight hundred homes on the reservation for National Native News. I'm Steve Anamar demand. Tony Gonzales. National Native News is produced by Broadcast Corporation with funding by the corporation for Public Broadcasting Support by the American Indian Higher Education Consortium working to ensure tribal colleges and universities are included in our higher education system Info on thirty seven tribal colleges and universities at a HEC dot support by the Oscar Chambers law firm championing tribal sovereignty and defending native American rights since nineteen seventy six with offices in Washington. Dc New Mexico California and Alaska native voice one the native American radio network. This is native America calling. I'm your host Terry Gatewood. So much life happens in Louise urges latest book the night watchman this Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians author takes readers to the termination era. Were the threat of losing. Land in a tight. Something important is firing up. One of the characters was inspired by the life of this author's beloved grandfather in the book we follow this character named Thomas as ams up to share his words in Congress on the pages we also meet a cast of characters which includes strong indigenous women who define resilience of their time although set some generations. Back this story. Informs Present Day indigenous struggles including exploitation of our women racism and attacks on sovereignty and the land that are native nations connect to. I look forward to hearing how you're gelling to the story. And we invite you to join the discussion with their march book of the month. Author Louise and thanks to harpercollins publishers. The first ten p the first ten people who make it on air with a question or comment. We'll a copy of the night watchman. Our phone lines are open now so go ahead and dial in. We're at one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight. It's also one eight hundred nine nine native and today joining us from Washington. Dc is Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa author Louis Surgery. She is a National Book Award and National Book Critics Circle Award Winner and she was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. She lives in Minnesota with her daughters and is the owner of the small independent bookstore. Birchbark books my pleasure to have her here. Louise Welcome thank you so much. It's my pleasure. Tehran I'm delighted to be here into Louise. I really appreciate when our authors teach us about our own history and sometimes that history includes troubling times until this book takes us right to the heart of what termination the threat of termination losing the ability to say that we are a sovereign nation. Your characters take us to this moment in so I'm set the scene for us a little on just how much it's impacted not only the characters in the book but of course your own tribal nation. What would you like to say about termination? Well first of all I. I BELIEVE. Termination was a long time in preparation. You know when you look back through the history of what was happening just before you see that there was a big housing Bob. Postwar housing boom so termination came out of The the narrative of dispossession The government really wanted some very large stands of timber and those were on the cliff and the menominee reservations and they were among the first terminated. So there was five that were on the first light and turn on the Turtle Mountain Chippewa Band of Chippewa was one of them. So it didn't come out of nowhere. There had been some plans in the making and they got the perfect interface with two houses of Congress under Republican control and also the President Eisenhower Republicans so they had a sort of a clear shot termination at that point and the person who is the commissioner of Indian affairs at the time was a guy named Dillon s Myer and he had presided over the incarceration of Japanese American people. Right right during the war. So we have this Guy Dylan Myers. Who's all set up knowing exactly how to he? He was going to relocate everybody right that was the plan. That's that went hand in hand with relocation and then there's Arthur v Watkins who who was Passionately for termination. He had grown up on Allotment land that went into tax forfeiture and his family. Got It so he. He's the other person the main person and then Then there's the people who suddenly got this notice that your tribe is going to be terminated or emancipated. The word was you. Get your freedom. That's how it was couched. Those are the phrases. Did that make you feel it? Being compared to this that you are now mandated. You no longer have to be a native. It's it's so it's so it's so of all of our times I mean this is the language that is used when Dispossession is the real motive. flowed out some high-sounding kyw principled words and let people think I mean. They thought they were going to pull this over a native people right and not. My grandfather had an eighth grade government boarding school education but he got it immediately and he and I think most people did but the the the kind of shock is that this kind of rhetoric would come out with the expectation that native people would not even understand that there was nothing to emancipate that freedom meant freedom to lose all of their their land and their their treaty guaranteed privileges as long as the grass grows and the river. Shell slow you know that those words would be would be meaningless because Both houses of Congress had voted to abrogate treaties that have been established since the very beginning of this country and something that went hand in hand with this was also relocation in you really unpack some of the truths about relocation Even and I really appreciated the characters when they were talking about wall when I go back home or when we go back home in thinking about You know relocation not really being something that Supported people who are coming to the cities and so any words on Just what relocation is and how you will that into your story and of course folks if you'd like to talk with Lori Louise Call Right now. One eight hundred nine six two four eight. Go ahead well. I began to see relocation in a different light after after reading into termination and relocation at the same time you know of course anyone who wants to move to a city and and work there or do whatever they want. That's great but what the government did what their plan was Was very was very much less great. They decided not to put money into infrastructure on the reservation but solving the quote unquote Indian. Problem would be better served by just getting people off their land and away from their families. You know away from family ties. That kept them From being fully assimilated so in their in their imaginative world. Engine native people. Nobody was saying native at the time. in the book everybody's Indian Native people would be transported into the workforce and would just so much rather have this kind of life you know that this was the ultimate way of life that the the ties and the culture and the language is that people people had were without value. But what was of value was again? The land and the resources and relocation was very much the same as It was again. A same basis of disposition was was underlying relocation in so the characters. They play paint some truth. That may be a lot of people. Don't really know a lot of times when we hear of these times. We hear MRIs terms termination relocation But what they really mean to the people and the lives and the generations came after is really important. We'll hear more about that But let's go ahead and hear from one of our callers. We have MARLA. Who's in Pine Ridge? South Dakota tuned in on kyw ally Marla. Thank you for giving us a ring. Go ahead year-on-year. Good morning and thank you so much for having me. It's such an honor to Be Able to speak to Louise Eric. I've read all of your will. Most of them whichever ones I could could find but I started out with love. Medicine and Just always thought the characters June capshaw and the capshaw family were just fascinating. And what I'm really intrigued about with this book is how the the Federal Indian law is woven in with The characters I. I haven't read the book I'm really looking forward to it at but I think it's great. I'm a semi retired lawyer and well-versed in federal engine law and it's just to me it's just fascinating to be able to present this to The general public the Circumstances that that native people have had to endure through federal engine law while you are certainly going to have some fun Marla just seeing a narrative that goes along with some of those things that maybe you knew all too. Well thank you for giving us a ring there in Pine Ridge South Dakota and we're also giving away copies of the book. Get on air. Ask Your questions chatted up. You'll get it the book the first ten one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight Louise Anything you WANNA tell Marla real quick. Well I thank you MARLA. I think that's exactly what I was hoping for me. This book is for us because we and our grandparents and our parents we. We've lived through what these times and live with these times. They fall out from these times determination. Is You know like the last The last Of the Indian wars. It was it was supposed to be the last battle you know it would completely level the playing field. Somehow that was that was the intention was completely get rid of the Indian problem and yes. It was complete. It was illegal but unfortunately that didn't matter at all. And you've seen this time and time again that Something that made if people know and understand to be completely legal is Throw it up in the air and it comes back down in pieces rusher in intense. Hang type folks. Those who started the year with new Diet plan might be questioning their decision. Now that we're three months into the year whether you're working on popular plans fasting. Kito and whole thirty eating wells important all year long talk to registered dieticians and other experts on the next native. America calling liked the circle of life. There is an opportunity that comes around. Every TEN YEARS. A chance to participate and lead our voice be heard it. Lets others know who we are and where we are? The twenty twenty census will be our opportunity to shape our future for generations to come shape. Our Future start here. Learn more at twenty. Twenty cents is dot Gov paid for by the US Census Bureau. This is native America calling interrogate would from subtle Pueblo and it is our march book of the month and we are featuring the night watchman. It's the latest by author Louise. Erlich she's here on the line with US getting the details. We're getting the foundation. You're about to meet some of the characters but if you'd like to talk directly with her give us a dial right now. One eight hundred nine six two eight. Four eight is a number. She joins US today from Washington. Dc. She's on location And if you have questions to because we're going to hear a little bit more about How these time periods affected our need of nations again join us one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight is number Louise. We have definitely set the foundation in so now let's meet some of the characters Patrice Aka Pixie Aka. All the other names She is definitely a somebody that I'm sure. A lot of people can relate to especially her resilience and her take on the world You describe her go ahead. Well Pixie was someone who came up. A and announced herself to me is character. My main character Thomas Was very much like my grandfather or inspired by him but Pixie was different and she's a person who a woman who works at the jewel bearing plant. Now that's a real place. That was a real place in Raleigh North Dakota right off the reservation and most of the people who work there women The government ads about this where Because they are good at making these tiny children's because of their Indian blood and because they are good at beadwork but Thomas thinks no because of their sharp is and Turtle Mountain women can spirit with glance. And that's how Pixie is. She's she's working there And suddenly as I was writing her I came to this line. She did things perfectly when enraged. I thought wow I know that person maybe I am that person so then I just started writing Pixie. I really enjoyed writing her and I had to crack up because I was thinking of the different names that when somebody is named Patrice they have all kinds of side names in thought. Wow it's so funny to just see how her name is kind of almost You know this own narrative in its own in wind. She wants to be called a certain name in so really interesting on that and so she takes us to Some of the side of relocation and of course exploitation anything you want to share about that and in what I wrote that in intro that there are things in this book that mirror what we're facing today in our native communities especially in urban settings that was one of them. Tell me more go ahead Lewis. Sure well I wanted to start I wanted to say how how this started so long ago. I mean it started in fourteen ninety. Two the exploitation of native women but relocation was a real chance for this to become something that Something that was more common easier and supported by a government program. You know women would come down to the cities and you didn't get much support you've got a little bit of training and and a little bit of housing and then we're basically set loose. And so women were very vulnerable and are very vulnerable and And picks his sister. Vera is This is something that spend been part of the garden of truth which is a a study done by the Minnesota Indian women's Resource Center. You know they've talked about what the trade what. The trade routes is our for trafficking and so I I used that in in talking about what happens to vera and it's really gets heavy when we learned the truth of various story in her sister who's also pursuing her. She has her own run. In with exploitation. I don't want to give anything away but you tell us a little bit. About some of that police well the skid row area of Minneapolis is really based on a book called King of Skid Row and also on some movies that were taken at that time. There's some movies that you can find online about skid row. Minneapolis and in it. There are heartbreaking pictures of videos of women who are Who are being exploited and there there Obviously there's there's photographs in of them are in video of them and they have a black eye. You know. They'RE PUFFY. They've been they've been hurt and they're in that movie and It it's the thing that that that is so tremendously disturbing is that it only has increased. We only we have so many women we hear every single day. If someone's gone someone's missing and in my experience. This all of this is underreported. Because I know very very few native women who had not suffered in some way from abuse or exploitation in just thinking about it and you even wrote this in the character Mir after after your grandfather of Thomas when he heard of the truth of what was going on in the city and how much it shook him and just how heavy the stories way when even somebody just in our community is among this population or the numbers or the missing numbers in a really appreciate that opening up that this also affects our communities the people who are quote unquote back home There's a lot going on in really appreciate the ability to be talking about some of this because we're talking about a creation from one of our great writers of our time and indigenous writer. Louis if you like talk with her dial in right now one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight we. There's lots of folks want to talk to you. I'M GONNA go ahead and connect them now. We're GONNA hijack who is in the neck Alaska tuned in on Katie LG. Jack thank you forgiveness ring. You're on Air Thanks for taking me. I just had to call in Because when I first at the beginning about the language of dispossession It ring a bell with what's been my natural path of seeking and where I've reached is a in my my quest is But it ends up about culture and at the same time in this in this day and age where we see all this happening going on where you're talking about the trafficking and you look at politics and the generic way to be now. It's no wonder that that from what I'm learning about. The natives I live around and I'm not native but I've been noticing for a long time since I was a kid And how I'm not making it in the world and what it is that's stopping me and it comes to this way way. Secure you're saying because Dispossession itself and when you when you mentioned the language of dispossession essentially is what it is that ring a Bell World War Two and the Third Reich us as they called it office and it was a way to and down responsibility and not holding that is Saudi level and make people do what you want him to do. Pass off things which we ended up in in the history of Germany so that Struck me hard and and I haven't read any of her books but I'm certainly going to investigate because I think it rings true with all people. It's not just about who's siding but he's on it's about the spirit and that's the question that I've been on and that's what I see is a battle in front of me and I guess I'm at a point where my life it's about fighting But being able to express as a fundamental thing that I've learned and so to have somebody right not stuff that to me cut class culture and reaches the spirit is Really Fundamental and certainly. Will Jack Thank you for giving us a ring and Louise? I gotta give you moment anything you want to share with that This really speaks to me too. I think that We're also facing Dispossession that comes out of the incredible greed of giant corporation so giant corporate interests are really interested in the oil and gas. The timber everything on On on native land I mean these things are the these are lands. Were supposed to be the The very last pieces that that the United States wanted but it turns out that they have the yet. Have something that a giant power structure does want so now I think that knowing Indian law and standing up for For the right to say what happens on our sovereign territory is more important than ever indeed in even even our identity and our women. You've brought some of that out. Thank you for the call to Jack. we're going to hear now from Sean in Albuquerque New Mexico tuned in on. 'em Thank you for giving us a ring. Sean go ahead. You're talking to Louise. Hello Good Morning I think you need to call in It's good to hear from I Emerge retired teacher here Aps Albuquerque Public Schools Red Bull. Your works used them in my Courses taught native American Studies here helped curriculum For School district And I just WANNA to against Halo and say hello to my friend. Marla from South Dakota who called in Am looking forward to reading the book and I just wondered. Also stay that I enjoyed your your novels because in a way they're kind of like a a novel there firsthand or firsthand interpretation of account And we can learn a lot about history from Works like yours. That's pretty much all. I want to stay. Hope you're having a great one. All Right Sean. Thank you for giving us a ring. We now go to Omaha Nebraska to say to cassie listening in online. Thank you for giving us a call. Go hit your on here. Hi Hi thank you for having me on the program I'm looking forward to reading her. Latest book I began reading her books from. I love medicine and read several her. Not Novels We have a native book club here in Omaha Nebraska and we have read a couple of books and we have discussed them and I think she's just one of the greatest native writers That we have today in reading about our urban communities is so important and also about our genealogy important for us to know where we came from who are people are and to be able to connect to the past like that. So thank you very much for for your wonderful wonderful books. Louise thank you. Thank you and Now we'RE GONNA go to Allen Oklahoma to say hello to Gloria who's tuned in on Casey. Npr thanks for calling. You're on air. Hello what an honor. It is to Be Able to say hello to the both of you and Louise. I'm a real fan of yours. I have read in a book club. And then everywhere. We read The antelope life. I just love it and my favorite Chapter is almost soup and we read. I read it to my husband and we laugh and laugh. You have a guest such a gift. You can make us laugh and we cry. We mourn the horrible the horrible things that have happened to us as people. And there's just a way that you have a touchy our hearts and good ways. They're all good ways but they all there's also that you tragic part of who we are native people in complex if you're not a native person or you don't really. You've never really embraced opportunities to get to know Indian people. You don't people who live outside of that have no no understanding. And so we are. We are invisible. And we've been I think at the mercy of this government for so long and I remember. My father used to tell me when we were small he was They're both full blood now. The whole I'm full but now he said don't forget he said you are second class citizens he said you'll always be second class citizens because you know the government will always watch our land. You must be very careful. CanNot Trust them and yet he was a war hero. He was a Navajo Code Talker. And but he would warn us and we knew he didn't mean we are a second class because we weren't a person like everyone else in we were God's creatures God's creations but he meant that in the way this government sees people and how we would they would be willing to take advantage of us and I think we have to be so careful now I just want to. What is your advice to Indian people today in this political climate that has become so polarized? Okay Gloria thank you in Louise. We've got about a minute before break. Go ahead so I can answer glad we got Maria. Thank you This this really moves me. What you say Any advice I have would be keep your eyes open and think about all the things that are happening it. It's so hard sometimes. We just want to pull the pull the blanket over our heads and hide from some of this. You know keeping our eyes open and sticking together. I think the most important thing is stick together and I know that as a people we are going to come through this but I do I if I have time I want to read you. Something very Important that I feel like my grandfather said this in what? We'll do that right after the break in. I'm excited to hear what words that your point pointing out to us In you know when we think of these literary works actually being something that we can turn to to understand the world that we're living in the challenges that we're facing. I think we're gifted something special in this month. We are getting that gift from Louise. Erlich a she is here with us today. the name of the book that she has recently put out is called. The night watchman It's a novel and as you hear it is taking us through some really important times In our tribal history And there are other things that she covers to even talking about The Way Communities were affected during the fifties. Of course we've said relocation termination But also you know what happened when assimilation was pushed very heavily on our communities or either coming into this generation With assimilation being. Something that was on the agenda for native nations. A we'll talk more. We'll get to hear the words that she's GonNa share But you can also talk directly with her at one eight hundred nine nine six. Two four eight is a number and you can also share your thoughts on line two. If you're finding this in one of our podcast you can post directly on our website native America calling dot com. You can even tweet things to us at one. Eight hundred nine nine native but today were live. Louise's with us if you'd like to chat with her. Please call in now. Don't wait till the end. 'cause TIME'S GONNA. Fly One eight hundred nine nine six two eight. Four eight is a number. This is your invitation to join us for our March book of the month. There's morehead hang tight support for this program is provided by the SISSON Walkerton or Yati Tribes Dakota Western Corporation and S W O plastics. A native owned manufacturer of commercial strength and environmentally friendly. Trash can liners available in thirty sizes from three to sixty five gallons for industrial use by casinos. The I H S and more information and online purchasing available at Dakota Western Corp Dot Com. I'm Tara Gatewood from his letter Pueblo. With today's Louise earn rate. She's the author of fifteen novels as well as volumes of poetry children's books short stories and Memoir of Early Motherhood Today. We're featuring her new book. The night watchman. Dial into one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight enjoying the conversation. She joins US today at Washington. Dc IN LOUISA. Turn it to you. In the words you'd like to share our last caller asked me if there was some advice that I would give you know and this book is in itself an act of advice from my grandfather. He made friends with everybody. He got together a coalition of people to fight termination. And that I think is the advice I mean he would make friends with everybody of every stripe and show them why this needed to happen. Why termination had resisted. And you know they were able to beat back. Congress on this they were able to go as completely impoverished people. They had to raise money by having a boxing match. They they went to Washington and they presented an unassailable argument against themselves being terminated. And I think I have to think that that also helped other people to resist. And that's why I wanted to write this book now because we need these stories. We need these stories of people who fight together fight in in unison and understand the terrain like the beginning. I mean Pe- we have so many people who know exactly what is happening and know how to resist it and So I'm GonNa read these these really the last words of the book. I was going to save until the end but it seemed that her question really called for these words if you should ever doubt that a series of dry words in a government document can shatter spirits and demolish lives. Let this book erase that doubt conversely if you should be the conviction that we are powerless to change those dry words let this book give you heart and so it was reading about what my grandfather did really gave me heart in. He is somebody in based on how you've presented you know his memory in this book especially through the character Thomas. There's a lot of layers and and it was just really interesting to meet This character in no that he resembled somebody real in your life. His ability To beat diplomatic his ability to understand what is community was filling feed that into his decisions. I mean his determination. Um to work as a night watchman all night then maybe take a nap and then get up and then run the tribe. That's a lot there in Louise. I know that there are so many things that Thomas teaches us And there's even a large part of the narrative That reminds us of the things that we have is indigenous people Even our connection to our ancestors who sometimes just kind of show up I appreciate that in Louise. I'd like to connect you to more people who WanNa talk directly with you. So let's go ahead make that connection. We have Melvyn in Santee. Nebraska tuned in on Casey Y que. Melvin thank you for calling. You're on your morning I'm here santee. Our neighboring tribe paupers were also terminated during that time and we kind of watched how that was going to go because nominee lady charge. I can't remember her name but she was very instrumental in fighting this Termination but at the same time that it was all happened after World War. Two and it came to pick Sloan AC where they took all our best farmland. All our timber flooded it. Then moved all those families out and those families are the ones that ended up in the cities too so relocation and in the seventies it was in around Michigan and I run into all kind of Indian families over there that came during the relocation period. Came right out of Flan Jew that went right to Michigan work in motor companies and That's all this happened. It's around the same time period. Then they mixed in that they give Indians Able to drink alcohol in public places. All that happened right during that. Same time period in Melvin. It sounds like this is wync in a lot of memories up and I bet it will continue to week. Memories for many of our listening audience today especially Talking about you know what those times how they feel what's going on in her own tribal communities today. There's a lot mellon. Thanks for reaching out. let's go ahead and go now to Gallup New Mexico say hi to Monte who's tuned in on K. Gop Monte. Thank you for calling. You're on air. Thank you Monte Louisa. It's okay it's okay. There's some heavy stuff we're talking about here so I understand Go ahead money. Well thank you very be out again. I always Kinda lose it. Because they've been let's take and this is Joe. Does the work you do is so important an avid someone on like what is so special? Because they have. Your work is so amazing. I followed you for years. Louise and I have I've had a subscription to the New Yorker magazine for years. A lot of your stuff gets publish. Their your your most recent book. The night watchman was reviewed in in the magazine not too long ago So I've looked forward to it and and I just want to express my sincere. Thanks for your life. Will Monty Monty. I really appreciate it stay strong. Let's go ahead and take another. We got Ginette in Tucson Arizona Who's listening online? Janette go ahead. You're connected hello. I'm grateful to have this opportunity to appreciate both of you. This program the entirety of having an author of indigenous background creates such a bookstore. So great have option to thank you. Well thank you for reaching out. Ginette and illicit more. We got margin. Warm Springs Oregon tuned in on K. W. S. O. March. Thanks for calling. You're on your good morning. You two Louise and Tara I wanted to congratulate. Nc are native America calling for bringing up authors who are touching base with our people. I'm so glad I'm listening to entrance grabbing elder re recordings right now and I'm listening to their stories and my understanding is limited of their background. What they're telling the story and after I listened to Louise's explanation of her book This is going to be so good for me to read so I can understand what my elders are talking about in their recordings very nice march. That sounds like a wonderful project. Wish you the best with that and sue Louise There's so much more in this book so many other characters and I definitely want to let people know in the book. We don't just spend time in Urban Setting Warren Congress. You also take us to the community and we learn you know how strong culture is even that connection to ancestors they even visit Anything more you want to share about what people find in the book or or if you'd like to share more word from it well I will and I. I also want to say that You know the things that are are happening in every community I feel like every community There's there's growth and and and we've done so much and and that one of the biggest things that happens is language revitalization. My grandfather was the last person who fluently spoke They should not be mowing in our family and he felt very alone. He didn't know that there would be that one of his great granddaughter. That's my daughter. Persia would be part of the language revitalization movement. She is at a school called Waka. Dotting and that school is on the Likud array reservation in Wisconsin. And I just WANNA shout out to all the language revitalization people working in communities and working to bring back language because I think that so much of Kui are resides in the language the language each word has a spirit and h word can help us indeed and so when we think of Vissel also being that foundation of knowing who we are ability to Even know the medicinal plants that still exist in how they subpoenas There's what they're in. You explore some of that. Even through pixies mom which was another character. That stood out for me Lewis is there. Anything more you'd like to share about you know these connections or what happened when you started writing either with a panel or tapping on a computer. Anything more you want to share. Well one thing. That surprised me was that I came up with this name for Thomas and his last name is wash. And that's the word for Muskrat and I didn't think about it when I named him and I'll just read this little bit here. Thomas was named for the Muskrat. Waspish the lowly hard-working water loving rodent. Muscovites were everywhere on the flu dotted reservation. I'll donor washburn for numerous an ordinary. They were also crucial in the beginning. After the great flood it was the Muskrat who had managed to help remake the earth and that way as it turned out thomas was perfectly named and in the creation story the initial ave creation story. There's four divers who the Creator sends down and the last one is really the most humble of them. And that's the Muskrat and he he or she. Whatever the Muskrat manages to bring back a tiny clump of earth pot in that way the Creator makes the Earth. Now that tells me so much about our our ancestors in our people because humility was and it's in that story. Humility was the way people operated. You know my grandfather never He didn't even take money for his work. The fabled share chairman was paid thirty bucks a month at the but the tribe was broke and so he didn't take that money And people were working and people still work out of this sense. This is part of our cultures. Part of part of this is that we work not for ourselves alone but we work for people and and and that was contained in in that story so I wanted to share and really important in so hearing about your grandfather. Louise can help it. Ask Your in Washington. Dc right now the things that you wrote about they went down in DC Are you having nostalgia where it was there a moment? You know recently where you thought this is where it all happened. Oh Yes yes I. I'm very conscious of that and You know I looked over at the White House that Congress at the National Mall and it just struck me how overwhelmed that was the first time that the P. This is not just say this is not my just my grandfather's all the people who worked on this and the Turtle Mountain people who went along to Washington. How overwhelmed wound. They must have been and how afraid of walking into these giant buildings and having to speak to people you know reading the Congressional record people who treated them as though they were much less intelligent and couldn't understand the first thing about what they were doing. This kind of talking down to people I quoted in the book because it's real the the Senator Watkins had this paternalistic But very It it really made me so upset and angry to realize that my grandfather had been treated that way in the halls of Congress but he did something got. I learned from one of his letters he did but it was surprising to me. You know he was incredibly polite person and although he'd been treated poorly he went down to the senator's office. At the time you had to go down some stairs and he wrote about it in this letter he said. I just decided that I would apply a little banana oil. I don't know what that means. He went down any thanked. That Senator Senator Arthur v Watkins and what was astonished. He'd never been thanked before but my grandfather did that because he wanted to. Sort of turn the tables you know and say I'm capable of decency and humanity even if you are not. That was a big moment for me when I read that and that some advice. I think we can all take away from this too end so Louise Were at the end of our our a really appreciate you being here with us. We know that You have some events coming up Where you'll be sharing your words Where can people keep track of where you'll be where you'll be talking or if they just even wanNA reach out on our website at birchbark books? Birchbark BOOKS DOT COM I'm posting little pictures or things that happen. And also my daughter is put up the And Antony who's also working on this? They're posting everything. We possibly candidate putting up some funny things you know. I'm trying with a lot of hand. Sanitizer and giving up a out a lot of clerks white clorox wipes. That's how that's how you make friends on the plane these days and And so everything's posted there on the website birchbark books dot Com all right. Well we appreciate you being here with us and sharing some of this and We also know you'll be visited us here. March twelve in Albuquerque. Of course you can always find out like she said by taking a look at that link. We'll make sure we'll get that up on our website to Louise Eric. Thank you very much. Our guest today are March. Book of the month author. Also thanks to harpercollins publishers for providing copies of her book. The night watchman to our listeners today and we hope you'll join us again tomorrow as we talk about finding the right nutrition plan. Have you tried all kinds of diets? Go ahead and Ask questions about them when we sign on air tomorrow. Thanks so much and of course you can always find this program. In our archives at Native America Calling Dot Com. I'm your host Tara Gatewood and we do encourage you to also sign up for our weekly newsletter so that you can get all the details on who will be joining us as well as what will be covering. You can do all that on our website again. Native AMERICA CALLING DOT com. Thanks so much. We'll meet you here tomorrow. Broadcast Corporation announces the Alaska. Native art auction will take place. April second at the denied a Convention Center in Anchorage. This event will include a wide variety of art work from the Alaska Native Community. More than three hundred business leaders and decision makers attend this annual event information about contributing artwork reserving a table or acting as a sponsor of the Alaska native art auction can be found at K. N. B. A. 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06-18-21 Native dads: funny in their own mind

Native America Calling

56:30 min | 3 months ago

06-18-21 Native dads: funny in their own mind

"Welcome to native america calling studio eight six nine minnesota pueblo. I'm tara game. Wood working father's day was celebrating our men. In their humorists. Their jokes can often follow on the corny side with real unst. Inkers get big groans like this one. I had to fire the guy who mows my lawn because he just couldn't cut it. Is your dad or father. Figure always ready with a silly joke or funny one liner. If so we're waiting for your calls get into the lineup. Favorite dad jokes or humorous bed story. We live right after national native news. This is national native news. I mean antonio gonzalez secretary of the interior deb holland says president biden's proposed twenty twenty. Two budget make significant investments in indian country holland. Testified this week before a senate appropriations subcommittee about the budget. Request for the department of the interior holland says four point. Two billion dollars will go across all indian affairs programs. She highlighted funds for land consolidation public safety and water settlements during questioning. She talked about tribal broadband needs infrastructure improvements and making sure funding gets in the hands of tribes tribal nations no what's best for their communities far better than we could say. And that's why we have been adamant about tribal consultations we. We'd like to see direct funding. Go directly to tribe so they can make the decisions that they need to make holland says climate issues and investing in clean energy. Our priorities but she was pressed about oil and gas development alaska. Senator lisa murkowski says she was struck. That holland did not recognize production on federal lands in her seventeen. page statement. murkowski says alaska's arctic national wildlife refuge is at the top of her list questioning holland if she would follow the law and hold a li cell. Do you believe that you are required by current law to hold a lease sale in the teno to area of anwar. Twenty four senator. Thank you for the question. And of course. I know we've spoken about this even at my confirmation hearing and i emphasize that i will always always follow the law. Murkowski says she was encouraged this week by court decision. A federal judge in louisiana says the biden administration's pause on new oil and gas leases on. Public lands is illegal earlier this year. The administration put a pause on new leases pending a comprehensive review of permitting and practices as the principal chief of the muskogee nation and homo told lawmakers thursday. There's an urgent need for his nation for courts and incarceration facilities. David hill testified during virtual hearing on examining federal facilities in indian country and a house natural resources subcommittee. He says. The lack of investment and infrastructure is more apparent for last year's. Us supreme court. Mcgirt decision affirming. The reservation and providing jurisdictional clarity hill says the nation has already taken immediate steps to respond including expanding law enforcement increasing efforts to coordinate with state a municipal agencies and leasing additional facilities for judicial services. He says the mcgirt decision does not change. trust obligations or federal responsibilities are making substantial investment. But we need the federal government to live up to his art of the barnum and fulfilled. Its trust responsibilities by jesting and building permanent capacities that reflecting the new law delaying the opportunity of provides and nays that come with it way acknowledged there have been challenges post mcgirt i ever let me be clear. We are fully capable willing and actively responding to these additional responsibilities says currently only juvenile incarceration facility is more than an hour away and the facility for adults as more than two hours away. He says the nation has one courtroom and the supreme court decision has increased case filings saying the nation needs at least four additional courtrooms. The mescalero apache tribe in new mexico is observing the new national holiday juneteenth to commemorate the end of slavery. Tribal businesses closed friday and will resume monday. President biden on thursday. Signed a bill to make juneteenth a federal holiday. I antonio's gonzales from national. Native news is produced by cornick broadcast corporation with funding by the corporation for public broadcasting this reminder to get your covid in nineteen vaccination is provided by the association of american indian physicians and the centers for disease control and prevention. Who support this show info at aarp dot org or cdc dot gov slash corona virus support for ramona farms offering wholesome and delicious foods from our airline crops as our contribution to a better diet for the benefit of all people we honored to share our centuries old farming and culinary traditions online at ramona farms dot com native voice. One the native american radio network. This is native america calling. I'm tara gatewood joining new wife from my homeland. Assure do are men have a special place in our hearts especially the ones who raised us. Many of them are the strongest people we have in our circle and many of those who we call dad uncle or brother helped us get through life with a lot of humor so as the country approaches father's day. We're celebrating all the time. These men and other father figures has cracking up or shaking their heads because of the joke or the funny story they just dropped and this includes the ones on super corny side which even have their own name in the laughter circle dad jokes. You know the ones that are super silly like this. What did the buffalo say to his son as he walked out the door. Bison is that one of your favorites dial in now in share at one eight hundred nine nine native and tell me about your dad father figure or the men in your family. Do they have a special kind of humor. Or are you the guy i'm talking about. Who just can't resist a bad pun. And if you have a dad joke ready to go make these phone lines light up at one. Eight hundred nine six two eight four eight. And today we're gonna start off in window rock. Arizona with us is ernie sosie the third. He is an actor and a comedian and he is also the father of four and ernie is navajo. Our pleasure to have him here ernie. Thank you for joining us for another native america. Calling thank you. It's always good to be on the on air with you for. She thinks well. We appreciate you being here. And ernie dad jokes dad humor. Maybe we have your kids on the line. Tally given us some bit exclusive on what it's like to have a funny dad but you definitely A lot in in especially the times that we visited and talked about humor in its role But when jokes come from our dads when funny stories comport out of their mouth. There's something special something unique and so ernie. I wanna hear a joke. Your dad and i just. I would love for you to prove me true. That dads have that kind of humor. Any jokes for us. Okay yeah sure do. And speaking of corny jokes. here's one. That's pretty corny. What do you call a dad who enjoys walking punchline nature all boy and so you know you can keep this rolling to. I want to hear your dad jokes. If your dad you have jokes go ahead and call in now. One eight hundred nine six two eight four eight is the number but you gotta keep them clean and so ernie Being a father in dropping your jokes in front of your kids what happens. Well usually i just get a If it's not funny this kind of like yeah. They won't they'll let me know if it if it's not funny or not. So they're kind of my gauge as far as funny Really funny and they crack up. Then that's when. I know i got could joke. You know so. And tell them that. I'm telling them a joke. I just kind of throw it out there. You can stop get so that's kind of how i my my my Funny my joke funny gauge. If you will and what's your feedback. Did they ever give you advice. Not a good one. Dad keep it. Keep trying anything like that. No i have two younger. Boys eat a freshman in a fifth grader right. So they're kind of like yeah. That was funny. And they're pretty honest. But i have two older kids the on and i usually kinda renovate them to and they'll tell me if it's yeah that's new or maybe try this or tweak that kids can be very useful if you're a comedian dad in louisa. Funding the funny. That's out there and there's something special to sharing your humor with your kids for you when you see them cracking up or even see them groaning or turn their nose up and walk out of the room. How does that make you feel. It makes me feel good. Especially if i'm if i'm if they're maybe they're they're bugging me or something and not in a maybe i'm just kinda give him a little jab with a cheap joke. I mean My way of getting back at them for forgetting that me. Somehow i mean in my family to we like to kind of like a like burn each other i mean in nine really mean way down but we like to get get the if each other as far as humor goes and and even printing each other right now my wife and i had inside print going on and we call it. The salk the infamous stuck and it started with the this sock. My wife that was mine was even mind. She put it in my suck my secure now. Who the heck who suck this. So i put it back in response door right and now the sock is popping up everywhere and i think i'm getting my kids including on this in somewhere where they can find it next. That's funny well. Maybe one day it'll show up at studio forty nine thirty. Yeah you never can tell you know and the humor also goes to just dad's in general in in some of the things they do. Have you cracking up Or just kind of antics in this also extends to Our uncles and brothers and many of them raised us too. So you know there included as well or maybe there is a father figure You have somebody in your tribe and you know when you see him. He can ardy see like their eyebrows kind of starting to raise or that head and that certain posture. When they're coming your way you know a joke is about to drop in. And maybe that's why you seek them out or you just check in with them because you need a new joke. You can share your thoughts with us. One eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight is the number and so ernie when we think about this especially jokes coming from our fathers and a lot of times our fathers or father figures are the ones who are headed up the household Keeping us protected all of those kinds of things but yet here we are seeing this softer side or or this silly side in. What do you think about that you know. Does that provide something special. Yeah i think it does because you know. Naturally we look at our data is maybe maybe our first superheroes right And when you see them kinda messed up or maybe ticketed chip in. Roll down the hill or something you know and it shows that they're just as human as rest of us you know even though there are fathers and You know most ants are are being invincible. I mean so it's cool to see them also be human and make mistakes and and do fun things like that you know. My my dad is as one of those two where i looked up to him. Always and then one time. We were hunting right. And where had just bought me one of those old school at christmas story and ryder. Bb gun right. You pour two hundred fifty. Bb's down the tube in the and i lower my be getting all the babies growth in wrench rattlesnake. At that time when i was like democracy choir still know that. They're already like gin. Gin i i raise. Maybe gonna he's like come on acquired in. I mean there's plenty to see him get frustrated like that and he's the one that bought me the beginning first place you know so he was probably started by me that kid all the animals we buy you know so. That's my dad. You know that's the human side of him you know And i think that's cool. You know shows there vulnerabilities you know that. They're they're just the restless and ernie any good dad jokes Or just You know something that you may be revamped into your own routine. Anything there Well you know when when it comes to comedy. They've got the they say you know. The pain is comedy. You know later down down the road and so so i grew up in My dad bless him. he's a. He was an alcoholic into early parts of my life. A lot of my choice comes from his alcoholism. You know But he's been still very forty plus years now so. That's some commie stuff. There you know like a joke. I talked about my dad getting some good advice when it comes to drinking. He told son. Don't you ever ever ever bring alcoholic booze in family. And then he took a shot of whiskey chase down with a beer. You know what. I mean and stuff like that you know and Just you know things that were were painful back in my childhood have now become you know comedy. And that's kinda how i deal and and Can heal from that part of my life as a as a surviving child of hollick. He kind sometimes last book about my. You know in things are happening in our past Especially not childhood. Yeah and so. That's kind of how any work my All the negative stuff that happened to me as a kid You find the humor in it and put it to use them. That way in healing humor has healing. And there's something about Father figures to in our lives. And sometimes it can see how you're acting they can see the look on your face or maybe even how your stomping around and they know they know when to just kind of throw. Those one liners in whether they be corny or not and it changes things. And i think this is a part of that kind of healing. That humor can bring. What do you think ernie. Yeah i i believe you're correct your hit the nail on the head. Because know i do that with my own. My own sons now especially my nine year old. You know he's at the age now where you know saying When he's on. I know when he's not motivated to do his school homework. And they have to get in there and and they can laugh. You know 'cause i. I was his virtual teacher for a whole year. You know what. I mean that hard job man. Give up to all the teachers out there listening. Thank you very much for doing what you do. And then this past year independent Might have to be home schooling. My my my son you know and there was time when he was not motivated you know and and i had to use humor to to break him out of that that funk you know in and get him to get into school and enjoy and like you know so. Humor is awesome tool in that sense. I went for example reading reading a story. Right and i like. I'll go into character and outs my nablus in your you know and and put something like the three little beers came home to hogan and you know or whatever you know they were you know. Just just just go off line character totally and he says cracking every you. And then if you know he's he's he's ready to go and he's ready to do his his schoolwork. So that's kinda how. I work humor as well with the with the kids. Wow lucky kids and humor dad humor. Oh boy i know you got something to say about it Maybe even a joke that you retail and you share it with us today. God keep them clean but you know what you can make us laugh. Give us a ring. Phone lines are open. One eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight is a number or maybe there is A dad in your life. Who just always has you laughing and you want to share or just even paid tribute to what they do. You can give us a ring. One eight hundred nine nine six two eight. Four eight is a number dad jokes. Let him loose right here. One eight hundred nine nine native. There's a big change in the recommendations for when you should get screened for colon cancer. Native americans have a higher risk for colon cancer than the general population. We'll learn about the new recommendations and other ways to protect yourself from colon cancer. That's on the next native america calling if you're hurting in your relationship or have been affected by sexual violence. Strong hearts native. Helpline is a no charge. Twenty four seven confidential and anonymous domestic dating and sexual violence helpline for native americans. Help is available by calling one eight. Four four seven six to eighty four eighty three or by clicking on the chat now icon on strong hearts helpline dot org. This program is supported by the national indigenous women's resource center. You're listening to native america calling. I'm tara gatewood from a subtle pueblo and we are talking about dad and father figure humor jokes today. Are your men funny. Do you have a dad. Maybe even an uncle or man that you look up to in your tribe who has a collection of corny jokes. Try on us today. Give us a ring and share one. Eight hundred nine nine six. Two four eight is a number here with us on the line at a window. Rock arizona is ernie sosie third and he is an actor and a comedian and ernie is navajo. He's also the father of four end. Grandpa to one ernie. Thank you for being here with us. And also here to at of livingston. Montana is my jedi and he is an indian education specialist with the montana office of public instruction but he is also a bad joke teller Also the father of two and a member of the spirit lake dakota nation or pleasure to have him here with us mike. Welcome to native america calling. Or i should say thanks for joining us for another round comic. Takia p Pet to wash their My relative aside. I wish you a good day out there. Thanks again for having me on terror. It's a real honor to be on the show and share a few things When i greeted you as traditional dot com degree to talk yuppie. Hello my relatives and my dad always said greet people as relatives that we get them up for cash. Later on dog mike. I'm broke mazda scotto on each other you know. That's a dad jamie and has no money so but you know thinking about. You're you're mentioning education to the end using some humorous education. I have to do a lot of Workshops for teachers and you know when i was a high school teacher in junior high my students when i taught it talk any school out of china river had me start out every class with a jetty joke and so i had to have at least one hundred. Eighty one liners ready to go. You know just start out every class period so i got a rolodex of bad jokes. You know if you're throw out a topic probably got some you know humorous late into it but I'm sitting outside a grocery store right now. We're heading down yellowstone park for a little vacation for the weekend for father's day but here reminding me of my dad. He said when he was younger he could go to the store with a dollar and you could get a pop and some bread and some milk. Maybe candy bar. He says you can't do that nowadays. Because they have security cameras. Well you know what mike today is your day. This is your stand-up day and you know what we got. The famous comedian ernie sosie third. And ernie i know you know how to do. Great introductions some let you introduce my jedi. And we're going to give the mic him to drop some of his one liners now. Don't forget he's standing. In front of a grocery on his way to yellowstone. Mr mike jetty from the spirit lake dakota nation. Ernie go ahead introduce him. And then mike we want you to take the mic and give us your comedy. So go ahead ernie. Okay folks we got here are next comedian. All the way from montana standing in front of a grocery store wishing you had a dollar to spend with the best. One liners the best. Cheap bad jokes here is without further months to. We got mike jedi game for charity. Pedometer you nice. Warm welcome you know. Last time i was down there navajo country Ran into guy. And i said boy i feel at home because a lot of you guys. They're short like me. And he said yeah he said we're around brown and low to the ground so i saw at home down there in navajo country but You know yeah just heading down yellowstone park and you know you mentioned A bad joke at the beginning. So you guys know. I never see a buffalo hiding in a tree. Because they're really really good at it so she's going. Yeah well you know west sitting in these workshops. I do a lot of You know public speaking. And i get to hear a lot of other teachers present but i'm going to school cafeteria sitting on the bench in one of my teacher. Friends system mike. I've been sitting in this workshop. Show workshops so long my My butt cheeks asleep. And i said yeah. I know i heard him snore. So not the real bad when. They're yep oh i have to do that was good man to suffer. You know these Since zoom has been our new format doing presentations. My poor family has to suffer through these workshops presenting the different groups. But i often tell some of the same jokes and so they know what kind of presentation i'm giving depending on. What kind of joke coming up. So if i'm doing a workshop on indian identity you know out some blood quantum jokes and stuff you know last time. I actually went tighter side to give some blood and told the nurse i said. Hey don't take too much. I don't wanna get dissed enrolled down there. You go on one or keep it going mike. Anyone about that is. I ran into this guy power and he had one of those old necklaces with five of those indian head nichols on and i said hey. What's the story behind your necklace. He said i'm trying to be a quarter indian date. We need cricket and youtube winter. Really wish for sound to fix it. Mike got anymore got to. That's one thing i need again. I guess is my own laugh track. You know like the old shows were released. You could throw up from fake laughter. You know if you really have a bomb dropped. So i'll give you know another another piece of advice in my dad was a. He said you know you should never criticize someone until you've walked a mile in this box. And i asked my dad y and he said well that we can be a mile away. Plus you got is moccasins. So lord vice some more advice for out there. So ernie honor roll you the this may be your new opener kidding good. I'm not open for him very nice. You know what and coming up next on this. Stage is a caller. We have j. In spooner wisconsin tuned in on w. o. j. b. j. things are giving us a ring. Go ahead i hear you have something to share. Yeah i got dad jokes. So what's the difference between dubai and abu dhabi. I don't know well in do by the people don't like the flintstones but in abu dhabi do boy we're going gonna get some calls jay. Thank you for your call. There in spooner wisconsin dad jokes. They're dropping you want to drop went on us. Give us a ring. One eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight so gentlemen just thinking of dropping. Sometimes these jokes you have mixed audiences and what do you do when you drop something and somebody in the audience as hey or or their push back or gone too far Any thoughts on that starts off ernie man. Yeah that's a that's a good one. 'cause yes sometimes you do get the flu at all you know me. I just kinda kinda say she just kidding. The old deal apple apple job. You know i do. It'll be. He just came in real getting along here man where he had make it a turn into one of those or like all right. Thanks for letting me know. I went to par but doesn't happen very often though so Happy for that and mike. How did that feel we gave you the stage. You did it. Hey you did very well so Give you kudos for that. But how did that feel giving your humor knowing somewhere out there. Somebody was laughing your thoughts. Yeah well you never know when you throw something out there. Someone's gonna laugh or not so if you can at least make one person sort of grown you know then if you move somebody in some small way you know just thinking about You know context in my job. I get to work with I get. It's the honor to work with all these folks and different tribes tribal educators and cultural leaders. And so you hear jokes in different languages and my friend. Big little bear northern cheyenne. He's all saying you know jokes are way funnier. And cheyenne and they are in english. So when some of these jokes you know you can be in black fy country and have to use a good black. You know browning accent if you tell that joke if you're down at crow crow fair and you're telling stories you make sure you wanna throw in a good crow accent so it kind of depends on where you're at. What tribes you're you're talking to depend on. What kind of the joke to throw out there like him. Standing outside my dog barking here right so the yellowstone i learned i learned as the crow word for dog is usually gonna really use a good croats and deals you men here. My friend was teaching that we're todd. He's like now. Sit real slow mike. And so i go d. o. g. Tease you guys are no good you know but he really use a crow accent. It almost sounds like crew. Do not just You know knowing that language and like the crow word for ten issue is Dido's on dita's you just gotta have that right accent tossing black. I'm standing outside a street corner you know. And here's a black sea. And i love the black feet language. Okay and needle hello little brother but when black people they drive up to stop sign the kinda interpreted to black feet and they look at it and they go steal p straight inside jokes mike. I know some ears are perking up. Now go ahead. You can battle. Mike with your joke colleen right now. One eight hundred nine six two eight four eight and you know dropping. Those jokes Cross tribal jokes and and you know making fun But mike with all of this to it's about respect sometimes when you are the center of the joke Somebody is showing respect. What do you think about that. Oh yeah that's a lot easier to make fun yourself to the real funny stories. Come from is you know the the truth things that acted so this to combo yourself up on like here's a story from yellowstone park I'll sit up in this little tree stand singing and these old ceremony songs here. These banners came one morning. And and you know kinda nervous but they they were close and underneath me and so i kept singing after a while. Those bears went away but rows back in south dakota telling the story of the drum and Like yeah it was real powerful moment. You know these bears comes. I'm singing these old ceremony song from one of my buddies dull and he's like jedi. Those bears came over. There was like no because you're probably sounded like a wounded rabbit. Boy man. I feel for your kids. What did they tell you. They just shake their heads at me. Like no not that one or they do actually. Sometimes they have favorite jobs. You know they'll say tell that one so but one time i was what i got the. Mc around dance helena. After it was over. I was telling my daughter guy. They paid me two hundred bucks just to tell jokes since he said dad still paid even domas gnashing into really started seeing we. We tapped into the heart of native america and that laughter coming from it. Courtesy of our engineer marino. Appreciate that and mike just thinking about our ability to just lose ourselves the jokes especially jokes or dads till. I think that's another kind of love. What do you think totally You know thinking about this is one of my dad's favorite stories when he first got married. He's a you know to devil's lake spear licked dakota my mom's turtle mountain chippewa so there's a lot of that teasing going on. But when they first got married they're living on the crow creek reservation and dad was mowing the lawn. Said it was about one hundred degrees out here. Here's here's my mom. Came out there and she said take a rest buddy and give glass iced tea and she sat him down by fan and the living room and he started mowing just at that moment here. My mother-in-law comes over now my grandma. And he's sitting in the house by the fan with the ice tea and their daughter out there and hundred degree long long he says. What are you doing sitting in front of this fan drinking tea and your lifestyle volunteers on the hot weather that says well because the sewer smarter than two chippewa and she said you sue aren't smarter. She said you're just lazy. So lot of teasing that went on when i was growing up between dad and grandma. He's really joke around. So i saw a lot of that kid Now now here's another special relationship. That fathers have mother-in-law's any mother in law jokes. Well maybe i don't know. I wanna go there mike. Well you don't my mother-in-law she's over at the house the other day at we have a good relationship and i told her i said carol. I said my house is your house. He said really. I said yeah then she says it will end. Get the hell off my property or any mother-in-law's go man i love my mother-in-law have no jokes for about her other than she's just awesome. Very gentlewoman you know. And she razor an awesome daughter. My wife and say i really don't. I really don't have any mother-in-law jokes man the o. Eill mothers lots there. You are awesome. You're you're you're you wonderful. And i love you all not putting you down the way he wants to eat tonight. That's right. it's hot out here every hearing arizona. I'm gonna be inside and any anything you wanna add. Keep it rolling why. I was listening to Mike makes good stuff man and he's he's the best some competition right there but he was talking about. You know just to the fathers in for me like I appreciate all the ladies you know. Lend us dads think that we're in charge. You know because my dad was he. He was a man of the house right. I was not a kid. I talked about him know. Hey don't you talk to me on the man of the house. I will whip you. Hey don't you take turned to my mom right. Hey can i think the commission to speak this kid right. He thought he was in charge. The mom is the one that was in charge. So thank you for that. And as men think we are in charge of the house and we know the truth. And maybe you want to celebrate these fellas that we're talking about today or Dad uncle brother. Whoever father's day is this weekend to you can throw those greetings into the mix too but we're talking about the humor you heard some of it and maybe you just want to talk to mike ernie And keep things rolling and of course if you got you got one that you wanna share on air. Do it gives us a ring right now. One eight hundred nine six two eight. Four eight is a number. We'll take all the jokes any funny stories and even those corny ones the dad jokes Dad's were yet. Give us a ring. We want to hear from you. Kids talk about your daddy today. Give us a ring. One eight hundred nine six two eight four eight is a number everybody's welcome. Maybe you just have some comments on some of the things you're hearing today. One eight hundred nine six two eight. Four eight is the number. And if you're finding this program in our podcast online in our archive you can also share your thoughts to by tweeting them to us at one. Eight hundred nine nine native and you can even post directly on facebook and on our website to were at native america calling dot com. It's all about dad humor today. Give us a ring again. We're ready for your one liners dialing noun. Don't wait phone. Lines are open. Support by amazon's indian countries. One hundred percent tribally owned insurance partner. Amarante works with tribal governments and their business enterprises to provide effective commercial insurance coverage strengthened. Native american communities protect tribal sovereignty and help keep dollars in indian country. More information on property liability worker's compensation and commercial auto solutions at amazon dot com. That's a. m. e. r. i. n. d. dot com. Thanks for spending your day with us. Right here on native america calling We appreciate you tuning in today and we are celebrating our men. Is there a man in your family. That always makes you laugh if you want to acknowledge them. Give us a ring the number to join us his one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight. It is our pre father's day celebration. We want to hear from you today. Wanna hear your best dad jokes to a call in calling with the corny. We want to hear from you. One eight hundred nine six two eight. Four eight is a number or maybe you have a story to share In something we haven't mentioned pranks that kind of pranks dad's play on their kids. We want to hear those stories to go and give us a ring. One eight hundred nine six two eight four eight. Let's take a call. We have tom in pine ridge. South dakota tuned in on i l. I thinks are giving us a ring tom. Year on air go. Hey though called. i'll bet you watched day. You'll hop all. Oh i like to say that in my tongue. Good day to you all. i just want to give All you fathers. That are doing the job as a father. It makes me happy. I'll bet your computer ha. I have a good hartford. Thank you My grandfather always taught us day up. He you know now when you talk meaning when when when i grow up to be a father or man all the children in my community my children so that's part of the be. It doesn't matter if it's your children or if it's your sister children or your neighbors children as long as they have someone to look up to you know day we talk show. I liked to the ones that are really doing a superb job Being there for children because as men as exchange tasha we carry a prayer and that prayer blogs star children so they could walk In a strong way in good ways good old ways in the future that tokat chuck gooky. You know now. He's who'd cooked. So i just like to thank all you guys. I'm just sitting here. I i had to take a break from my garden near me and my kids made a garden. So that's my hands off listening to the radio. His feeling good. I liked jokes too. So just to say that uh-huh tucker talk each other talk. Okay all right tom. Thank you for your call. We now go to joyce in wounded knee. South dakota tuned in on k. I l. i. Joyce thanks for giving us a ring go ahead. You're on air would be that gifts folk. I am very grateful for the comments that he shared because they're always very comments that buying guide us to share with people and there's a dictator jewish that keep a court in pack with nature because we may be free to do what we want but that is is nature shop. I in whatever we do they con. Can't great yeah Call that come from nature and we got caught. The people i weigh coach to teach and for our joke And i pay when my fis you would joke around with us the meal time we find it and make your meal will come to but then when five wish gone that they stat of the joke that he told us we coward to your family. But it going you frazier. Because he's gone. And that the have christie i feel is acting from a native americans that we are show much into society that we get a whole I asian in caps each. I agree with you joy. Good to hear your voice. And i really appreciate you giving us a ring. They're out of wounded knee. South dakota and you can envoys to this conversation to give us a ring. One eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight us today on. The line is newly honored comedian. Mike jetty. who's here with us. He is from the spirit lake. Dutta nation You might know him on the circuit He plays in many different places including the montana office of public instruction our pleasure to have him here with us also here to is ernie sosie third and he has taken comedy to all kinds of places even to his kitchen table in front of his four kids We appreciate him being here too and also coming up out of more. Oklahoma is darren brown. He's a senior content producer for cheyenne and arapaho. Tv and darren is pueblo end choctaw. He's a father of two and how we give him the stage. Welcome thanks for being with us. Darren in we really appreciate you being here in. Got any jokes for us. Welcome Well i have to say is i heard them flooring Heard that joke about reynolds. The road and doc died dr pepper out of my nose. Man you guys chronic and me and your brothers here. He said something about the it was like the crew. The crew worked for dog and it just hit me in In china rob who country to cheyenne orchard. Dog has lunch. No concern that guy. Well thank you for the year. I i would just crack up and You know i was. I had two. Kids are twenty. Three hundred twenty. Now my daughter's taylor. She was twenty. But i tell you when when she was about nine or ten man we were. We were dad. Joe crazy She had a little at the street he used to play with and every day they would come in with some stuff like You know what the cats favor color her little. And but you know lately i i know you know that i've been you know. Did they pretty say kids. Show called freiburg flats in eighteen and And i have been working with The guy i work with adam young bear who does all animation. And he's he's creating we're working on stuff to kind of Kind of indian is the These these these old fairytales like Instead of goldilocks he's created one. Golden mocks or you know. Someone's been eating my corn soon. You know and this one is okay. This kind of chunky but this one is just pin by you. Know stuff like that and I don't know if like if i shared it with you. While back we had the At the puppets publisher in the show as well. And there's one where they they called order a pizza but the guy who's taking the order is a powwow. Emc so he's trying to give them all these In special things like the guys. He said he wants some talks with that. And he's like what do you mean taylor has now man. We got kinda ties traditional ties with a time. We're we're trying to. Yeah there's there's my slash is we're we're trying to expand on that like Maybe next time for next season guy's gonna call and i'll tell you want special grant entry pizza. What's that you said. Oh man it's got all the toppings like kidneys and buffalo burger but you gotta order like eight hours you just because it never cooks on time. You know we this guy from haskell who who's the here's the power l. c. And he's you know. I really think jokes he recorded for but yeah I i was telling somebody Active you know. I'm i'm certain not a comedian but i do get to do some public speaking and mc type stuff here there. And i said man. I would always work rather working big huge crowd that a smaller. Because if you're gonna tell a joke and only ten percent of the people even laugh. I mean ten percent of five hundred is much better and fifty. I so anyway. Happy to be here. It's great to have you here. And then we're kind of bonding goes on when when you drop some of these bad jokes with her even with your kids or your favorite the big audience. Oh you know you know what. I think i what i love. Is that many many die you know i. We know each other fairly well through the native american journalists association. But you know you accords you when you hear one and there. I'm like i think people appreciate the effort You know you. You can't just tell a joke. Just right you gotta get you gotta get animated and they got really into it and i think you know if i tell a joke in front of big crowds and i get this Clap clap clap. No but you can tell there some people who wanna laugh but they don't wanna get made fun of people appreciate the efforts because The worst thing you can do is find a bunch of people to a bigger room and then not entertain hello. Let's had seen desperado where the guy just clapping game through the roof. The word well you know what. Let's try on another joke. I think we have a caller wants to lay went on us. Let's go ahead and say hi to shell in fort hall. Idaho tuned in on chaos. You shell thinks are giving us a ring. You're on here. I should good buni tariff dave. This this Young young guy. He was going to ask his Grandpa for some money is grandpa is hard of hearing uses eight. Grandpa you got five dollars and in these grandpa's is what he grandpa. You got ten dollars. Grampus is i should have heard you the first time and then he just other young guys seem his dad downtown in downtown he said They uncle you got a you got some money. Maybe ten fifteen dollars in this is how you gonna pay me back. He stoked shop a hus- up This is window black hills. Payments comes in which will never come in. So he's never gonna pay him back and another one was What do you get when you cross the a part of why to me in chickasaw chickasaw and a pot of water me and pie. You get a chicken potpie All right make the phone lines. Light up we want to hear from you shall thank you for those appreciate it appreciate that medicine you through on us all of you for bringing us to a good place today with all this humor and you know we're going to keep it rolling couple minutes. Dial fast now. One eight hundred nine six two eight four eight to get yours in and darren something also throw out. There were pranks. Dad's like the play jokes. A lot of times. Anything you want to say about pranking dad pranks You know i had no. I i the best of those but i was talking about my daughter and You know i was talking about the time. She was around ten and she I guess i think it was a class thing but one day. She came in with a note from her teacher. And it said i got i got detention. I'm like what in the act. And it said i talk back the talk back and slaps my teacher and i was like what are you thinking girl turned over. I said what sort of what she's turn the slip over. And i didn't realize you fools and man. Yeah she got the 'cause like i know my daughter had a temporary every day but Yeah 'cause i'm not the best cranks but I work with some guys people in full there and Let's throw it throw it the other way. If you print dad you can call it t. Yeah nine nine. Six two eight. Four eight and darren go ahead continue. Oh no i was just gonna say i have you working with the cna's now for nine years and throw you know. I'd never worked for to. And i you know the first year i was like man that guy every time he comes in here manages banking on me it was like oh i took must figure out that means current been adopted. You know So i mean. I had to learn the lingo. And so you know it's like i said you know every little things that i had to. It's it's takes a while to get the perfect and tired of you know. I don't want a you know you can act rugged but it's not really rugged as rut guests with a t you now so i i had to learn. Of course every every tribe. I'm sure you have the little That the just the things they say. It's it's just so beautiful that you know you gotta get in. I hear you and you know what i think. We should give awards to all three of these dads for being nice and funny for us today. We appreciate them being here. And we have to start wrapping things up but mike. I gotta get one more joke any. Give us one to take us on the road. Sure you know. Some folks in my lock-up the country. So you know lock coat. The word for friend is cola coladas friends and how you see. Enemy is uncalled on. And if you've got a buddy trying to lose weight you call him diet cola. And if he's got a sore throat you call him recall off. So i a couple a joke for shot up a country out there so things up thank you. So much. Darren brown mike jetty ernest dozy. The third thank you for being with us here today and a special wish to all of our men out there who will be celebrating father's day this weekend We really appreciate everything that you have given us our communities and especially this humor in this one tribute to of you and you know. We'll keep things rolling here on native america calling the laughter going to you. Got some more. You still want to share with us. Maybe a little shy today reach out to us. You can send us an e mail comments native america calling dot com and tweet it to us to at one eight hundred nine nine native and as we think about fathers day special shout out to all those men who have helped raise me and brought me many good things still got more and thank you for all your jokes and join us again next week for another lineup of different topics. Our executive producer is used senior producers. Monica brain associate producers. Eddie murphy and marino. Spencer is our engineer. I'm tara gatewood. Support by the su- trading boost proud to provide traditional and contemporary american indian craft supplies from feathers furs and hides to conchos fringe shells and beads all available. Etsu trading dot com support by amyloid indian countries. One hundred percents tribally owned insurance partner. Information on property liability worker's compensation and commercial auto needs at a m. e. r. i. n. d. dot com homage occupy key. Are there oughta hoenig capello. Whoa e wyan kick cockiness zana. Ot elche nyayo la kohl's danica were okay etc healthcare dot gov your initial up. Call one eight hundred three one. Eight two five nine six lit. What kinda key medicare medicaid or below. Native america calling produce annenberg national native voice studios in albuquerque new mexico by kwon broadcast corporation and native nonprofit media organization funding is provided by the corporation for public broadcasting with support from the public radio. Satellite servants. Music is by brent. Michael davids native voice. One to native american radio network.

ernie ernie sosie mike tara gatewood america holland spirit lake dakota antonio gonzalez deb holland president biden department of the interior hol yellowstone park Senator lisa murkowski colon cancer biden administration Mcgirt President biden cornick association of american indian
08-24-20 Virtual Vision Maker

Native America Calling

56:30 min | 1 year ago

08-24-20 Virtual Vision Maker

"Continued of America calling from Studio Forty nine in Albuquerque I'm Tara game would. Coming up audiences will be able to choose among dozens of new indigenous films and no cost. This year's vision maker Media Film. Festival is taking place online for the first time. Throughout the festival, filmmakers will also participate in discussions about what it means to create films for healing and learning. In the next hour, we'll talk with some of the petered filmmakers about their work. Join US right after the news. This is National Native News Antonio Gonzales the case against a Lakota or Who's part of a July action near Mount Rushmore is headed to trial Nick Tilson the founder of Indian collective faces, three felony charges, and for misdemeanors. Lee, strube injure reports, Nick Wilson says, he will not consider a plea deal on Oh, we're going to trial when we're not take. A PLEA DEALS These charges are all unbounded Tilson faces three felony charges. One alleges that he stole a shield from a National Guard soldier. Another charge claims that guard member was afraid of quote by injury, the third felony charges for allegedly directing van towards a police officer protesters used three vans to block the highway leading up to Mount Rushmore before the fireworks show in July, the state says those individuals were outside a protest zone established and keystone east of the monument. Brendan Johnson is one attorney representing Tilson, he says, they want a jury to see the entire picture and that is what we will be emphasizing that there were a group of other protesters there that were behaving inappropriately including a behaving inappropriately to law enforcement. This was a situation that we don't believe needed desk late in the manner in which it. Tilson supporters have collected more than fourteen thousand, five hundred signatures asking the Pennington County state's attorney Mark Vargo to drop the charges they handed over those documents after a preliminary hearing. Fargo says, he doesn't comment on pending cases. Something of a disadvantage, I don't get to have a conversation with you about the WHYS and the wherefores. But I will certainly take this seriously and will review. These petitions and other outreach that we've received. Tilson faces up to sixteen years and thirty days in jail. Hearing or trial dates have been set for national native news I'm least Drooping Jupiter in rapid city vice president Myron liser of the Navajo Nation is among speakers listed to address the Republican National, convention which kicked off Monday and Charlotte North Carolina, the trump campaign released a list of convention speakers. Sunday wiser recently greeted Vice President Mike Pence at the International Airport in Arizona he spoke with pence about. The tribes fight against covid nineteen and requested a deadline extension for the use of cares act funding in a statement from wiser. He said the meeting with pence was a chance to speak face to face with. White. House leadership and an opportunity to strengthen partnerships. Wiser mentioned the visit during a recent Navajo nation virtual town hall. The other day was with Vice President. Pence. In that, we make sure that. Our family and our congressional delegation know that we need attempt to advocate for us are running. The Nation is about relationships and we've certainly development work Berry hard to establish what we have now in only lose it. would be something that would be terribly hard to to overcome. So we'll take those opportunities as they come. There was also among tribal leaders invited to meet with President Trump in Arizona in May to talk about cove nineteen and missing and murdered indigenous women and girls. Now, the whole nation President Jonathan Nez was among seventeen leaders in the US to deliver a keynote address. Last week at the Democratic National Convention Wiser is scheduled to speak. To Republicans, Tuesday also expected to speak Tuesday is Nicklaus San man, the teenager who is at the center of a viral video controversy involving an encounter with the native people at the National Mall in DC last year meanwhile, Mondays Convention agenda included a roll-call officially nominating president trump as the party's choice for president delegates took part in the roll-call both in person and by video president trump is scheduled to speak to the Convention on Thursday. I'm Antonio Gonzalez. National Native News is produced by Colonic Broadcast Corporation with funding by the corporation for public broadcasting. As an American Indian or Alaska Native, you've elders, young people and native businesses. When you exercise your right to vote November third, your vote makes a difference in Washington DC and at home go to native news dot net for more information brought to you by the Carnegie Corporation of new. York. Support by the Oscar Chambers law firm championing tribal sovereignty and defending native American rights since nineteen seventy, six with offices in Washington DC New Mexico. California and Alaska. Native voice one the native American Radio Network Mrs, Native America Calling I'm Tara Gate would. Vision makers, media vision maker Media's indigenous online film festival kicks off a week from today and last five weeks. For the first time. It's an online only film festival. The good news for viewers is that access to the indigenous films comes at no cost. There are documentary dramatic features, historical films, and animations to name a few. The lineup even includes a Lego version of the classic Powell highway. We are getting an early look at the festival this hour, and we'll talk with some of the filmmakers and we'd like to hear from you too. Are you a native film Fan Call in Joyner celebration until y native film is important to you. We're at one, eight, hundred, nine, six, two, eight, four, eight. That's also one, eight, hundred, nine, nine, native, and a bit of disclosure. Maker, media is an underwriter of our parent company Broadcast Corporation and Kohnic is one of the sponsors of this year's film festival, and with that, we now go to Lincoln Nebraska. We have Alana Stone with us. She is the project coordinator for vision maker media. She is see Changle Lakota, our pleasure to have her here alone. Welcome. Thank you for having me. And so I had a chance to take a look at the lineup as well as view some of the films that people are going to be able to access and what a lineup it is really diverse in the folks that you have bringing to the table as well as different subjects that are being covered in. So for you Alana. What do you think about this year's festival and in what it is packing? So for the first time vision, make your media will be hosting an online five week long celebration of American. Indian ALASKAN. Native worldwide indigenous films and the some festival he from August thirty first to October fifth, and it will be held on our website vision makes her media dot Org and as you said, the festival is free each attendees will have to sign up on our some festival page and prior to the. Start of the film festival, you'll send emails to every person that signed up for updates, and they will receive a log in and password that will let you bill the films on our website, and there are a total of thirty four indigenous films that will be available and they will be available for a one week period and each week we'll have about six to eight films that will be released from categories such as. Empowerment History and Environment Lgbtq way plus activism and do you. Then additionally each penny ball able to sign up for as with filmmakers and people featured in the films, and we are also holding five filmmaker panels for any aspiring filmmakers that maybe an audience. And so how does it work? Is there a deadline to sign up to be able to view this? So seen go to our website vision maker Media Dot Org and you click on the film fest panel at the top of the page you will get a pop up ad that will take you to our film festival sign up page on Survey Monkey Okay. So if you catch the film halfway in, can you still sign up? Yes you can. Okay and then there are times listed safer instance August thirty first eleven eight am does that mean that the film is only going to be screened at eleven or that's when it goes live. That is when the film goes live August thirty first eleven a. m. won't be our women's empowerment week. So the films will all be live at eleven am central standard time, and they will be immediately taken off of our website on September. Seventh at ten fifty, nine am central standard time. Okay. Well, there is a little bit of how to get into the film festival. Now, let's show you what's just in it and right now we have a clip from one of the film's remain creation featuring Marian del Ron here she is introducing her work. I created a show called it an quality and the IAGO on go on. Joke Language and cultural. Center here and gone to Wa- give originally it was just to puppets and. I think it's it's almost like they want the whole town to be in the show. We probably have twenty puppets now. More. So. Let's get deeper into this film joins. US now from. New York is Gudgeon Junie got g Jimmy Fox and she is the director and producer of remain creation and Gutty Ginny. Thank you for joining us and please feel free to further introduce yourself and your tribal nation. Sure. I para. Thanks for inviting me. My name is Jamie Fox I am From aquacise name territories, which is right on the imposed border of Canada and the US. And I'm a director producer filmmaker I'm also educator in our dish so. This morning. Represent remediation. In so first of all, that name definitely catches your ear and I'd like you to explain that but take us to what we just heard and exactly what is going on in this film. Okay. So we did a series of ten short films on different very inspiring, native women from across Turtle, island, and the ones that you're listening to, as Mary deller on, and she's from our sister community. Which is in Quebec? and she does a lot of work in language. She produces a puppet show called the quality which is geared towards you during language the. Language. Also, is a second language learner and she is hosted a radio show for a second language learners. And she's also an artist and animator sexually did animation for myself. That's coming out soon calls without a whisper. So she's a very multi talented, young individual. That's doing work in the language. And so this series, it carries the name remediation. What does that mean go ahead? Well remain creation is actually a kind of a new word and I think recently it's been putting the dictionary. we. I work with another producer image Michelle Shenandoah Polish and she's Neider. And, she started native women's Online magazine called Remai- trees and. And it's it's the word like usually you hear repatriation. Like giving things back. But in the from the mail, you know give repatriating things back but it's Kinda scene from a male perspective. So the title for her online format then is remain creation like giving giving that power back to the I. Guess is what we're getting with the title repatriation. For the series that we did is part of the work that she's doing trying to empower needed women and to share our stories into to move our voices forward. And what do you feel that this set of stories are really important to get out there especially featuring native language in some of it. I think it's I think it's vital with everything that's going on right now with the environment and. Social Justice and climate that that we hear the woman's voice and hear the stories of the women the things they're doing because a lot of times that's women that are behind a lot of these movements that are going on. we have a kind of a diverse. Group of women that we chose to to focus on for this year is like the one you just Marian dollar on. But. We also interviewed We have one on Patricia Michael is a fashion designer from the southwest Joanne Shenandoah who is a singer very well known singer and songwriter she's From here she's hugging schone. Makiko Wilbur who's really well known for her. photography and the project that she does project five six to China. highlight different native tribes, all over Turtle. Island. we have a artists from going to walk cartilage hemlock who's a very well known fabric artist and she. She touches on a lot of controversial issues in her. Delina other bowl who works with domestic violence in in New Mexico. Angie Ferguson who works with sustainable agriculture and shaving feeds. The we turn the clan mother from our community that's working with youth to and part of women. Fancy Smith who was a choreographer and a dancer from six nations. and Randall outfielder feel left on the seminole nation. WHO's a young person working fabric cards so those are you know the ten women that we have in the series and they're all very different bra but very important. In for you, what do you feel is a connecting message between all these green individuals. I think like all of them have different talents that they bring forward but I think. One of the underlying message that I seen like like going through the edits and listening all the material is that these are all women have really found their their gish and following their reasons for being here on the earth like why they were sent here. And they really are really driven and. Sharing the what they have to offer with everybody. That's you know that's what I noticed like. Telling these stories, listening listening to them as we're interviewing them and following them around and. Seeing some of the things that you know these really. Important. Things that they're doing in their communities and even sharing with other people in the world. And so good Eugenie I had a chance to watch that remains creation feature that is in the festival, and it was about seven minutes or all of the features about that length. There there they differ there between seven and ten minutes. So, in that in that Ballpark, we didn't we didn't stick to like a certain format where they're all exactly the same. So they're around seven to ten minutes each one. Right. Let let them be what they need to be I understand that, and so we are featuring some of the films that you might tune into with this year's vision maker. Media's film festival. It's gone on line will continue to get more details, but that's just one they're more films that we're going to learn about in this hour if you have any. Questions go ahead and give us a ring one, eight, hundred, nine, six, two, eight, four, eight is a number, and as you hear about the different themes that go across these different films, what do you think about storytelling in this form you can share some thoughts one, eight, hundred, nine, six, two, eight, four, eight is the number, and maybe there's just A. Native film that you also want to tell people about or if there's anything going on featuring some of these moving images, you can share some thoughts to one, eight, hundred, nine, nine, six, two, eight, four, eight maybe you have a plan to do a watch party of your own and You can tell us about that too but when we are able. To access stories like this, and when these stories are able to be put out there in the world how does that change things in our daily indigenous lives? You share some thoughts on that go ahead and dial in one, eight, hundred, nine, nine, six, two, eight, four, eight is a number we look forward to hearing from you as we kick off our week. Y-. Efforts to clear for oil in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge cleared another hurdle. The trump administration expects to sell oil leases by the end of next year some tribes in Alaska native corporations are applauding the move others are firmly opposed. We'll learn more about this on the next native. America calling. Support by AARP fighting to protect voters fifty plus and making sure their voices are heard on issues like protecting social security and Medicare and lowering prescription drug prices. AARP is helping American's fifty plus from working parents to family caregivers to seniors in nursing homes to vote safely from home or in person more information at Aarp Dot Org Slash election twenty twenty. That's AARP DOT org. Slash. Election Twenty twenty. You're listening to native America calling target Gatewood from Peta Blow, and we are talking about some of the native films in this year's vision maker media's indigenous online film festival, and we like to hear what you think about some of these films that were going to present to you today you can share some thoughts, one, eight, hundred, nine, nine, six, two, eight, four, eight, we look forward to hearing. From you Alana Stone is on the line with us from vision maker media and Alana a No. You said the website go ahead and give that link Oh in case people wanNA stroll through some of it, and if you find a title on there that you're curious about now, you can get more details from Alana. Alana. Thank you for being here and again go ahead and share how people connect. Yes Oh, the film festival will be hosted on our website, which is vision maker media, Dot Org, and the festival is free at starts August thirty first and goes until October fifth aero be about six to eight films released every week that'll be free for the public to watch. It'll be worldwide with a couple of them only. Available for US viewers, but they feature themes such as women's empowerment history and Environment Lgbtq a plus. Activism and you. And the Film Festival web page again is vision maker Media Dot. Org. In. So we just heard that film or a little bit of the background on it in that one is actually going to be premiering of the week of August thirty. First, we're going to go to a film here who that premiers September the week of September fourteenth blood memory, and Alana before we hear a little bit from it anything you want to say and maybe even why this film was chosen. So blood memory is a production of vision maker media. We actually gave money for this film to be produced. So that is why it was chosen as one of our films and it's it's a recent film. I think it is just going on PBS this year. All right. Well, here's a moment from blood memory were Sandy White Hawk AC- Changle a a woman who was adopted out speaks about her experience. You know you heard the race adoption. And it's a phrase that I would like to be used when we talk about when people were systematically taken through adoption prior to. We don't have an a phrase for it. We don't even refer to it as anything if anything they say pre EQUA. And it's an era it was an actual time where. Literally social workers drove into driveways took children on reservations. I. Mean. It was pretty horrendous. So I was adopted in Nineteen fifty-three by white missionaries. They were called to work with the Indians from Illinois and they moved to winner South Dakota, which is a border town to reservation. My mom was very abusive. She really broke down my identity as a native person because the only thing she had was negative things to say about it. So, we have to remember that wants the adoption decree is sign and finalized. Nobody goes back into that home to find out if that child is indeed safe, is he being? Molested is he being beaten? Is it a healthy environment for that child and yet? We say we've done this for the best interest of this child. no-one goes back into find out if it's true. And so now we go to the director and producer of blood memory who joins us today at a Pittsburgh Pennsylvania drew nichols is here with us drew. Thank you for joining us. Thank you for having me. Into drew this film blend memory. It has packed with a lot of information especially on the indigenous welfare of our children and so when you set out on this what was your hope? What did you want audiences to learn about the situation when it comes to the welfare of our young children? I think sort of A. Kind of a very layered question because you know I came at it from not knowing anything about the history. So initially, you know as being a white guy from the east you know my initial idea it was like, how is this possible and? This came out of the boarding schools as well and one of the first. Boarding Schools was here in central Pennsylvania Carlisle. And all this history was right in my backyard. So my initial perspective was How do how is this not taught? How how did people not know about this but then as I started to talk with Sandy and explore the subject and really get to know. You know the the impact this is having hill to this day. You know the idea of you know telling white mainstream culture about this history was sort of the secondary aspect it really became about. What's happening in communities having this conversation that what's happening around the healing work that that sandy and many others are doing and how are you know those who've been removed as they're coming home? Are they opening up conversations that are starting to address this trauma and how is that still sort of impacting? You know that's the angle that that the story really started to take on. In so who the person we heard from earlier, Sandy, she has taking a journey of her own to reconnect with her own birth community, and then she is guiding others on their return home and you documented that tell our listeners a little bit about this journey and exactly what you feel it reveals. Sure so the particular thing that we filmed You know in a live action was was two, thousand, fifteen Rosebud in south, Dakota decided to host a welcome home ceremony and Sandy had returned to Rosebud for the first time in her thirties and has since been going on her own healing journey, which we document and her husband and many of the people in her have documented that process. So. There's a lot of archive footage of VHS, footage of her sort of taking those steps and in showing how the ceremony gets organized and the role that sandy plays as a key organizer that and bringing the community together and just sort of de stigmatizing it and making it welcoming and making a place of inclusivity for those who've been removed and the families who lost children. You know we retail sort of the common struggle that that is similar. In. Many of the narratives that we heard, and then toward the end of the film, right before the ceremony you get to There's there's a very heart wrenching gathering where those adoptees who came home or sharing their stories of what their adoption experience was like and and it's not too dissimilar outside of Rosebud across across. All of North America. In. So there are about two hours of content and drew. You could probably tell everything that's in the film, but it even watching it again you get so much information. You also take us to the courts and you explain equal of course they would equal is but share some of the things that. People do get to view or just kind of a booster into the knowledge would happened in the courts with the welfare of our native children. So Yeah Juxtaposing Sandy Story of communal healing is the story of Mark Fiddler, who is a child welfare attorney and member of Turtle. Mountain Chippewa in. North Dakota and when I first met mark. It was post the Baby Veronica case in two thousand thirteen and he was one of the attorneys who represented the adoptive couples in that case. And Hearing, him speak on that panel that Sandy at actually organized really opened up the subject and and and. There are so many legal political pieces at play here that are factoring in that go way beyond you know indigenous child welfare to just indigenous land rights you know and just in indigenous identity you know in in the eyes of the law in the eyes of you know the Constitution in America you know and it can go on, could do a whole on it but really what's happening right now is there's there's There's a legal A group of lawyers who are challenging the constitutionality constitutionality of the Indian Child Welfare Act and. Forty years after was passed in Nineteen, seventy eight, which took ten years to get it passed They are saying that it's more harmful than it is positive and so that that is A. A worm hone itself. But basically, through March experience, you get to see what are some of the challenging perspectives and we tried to take much of a non-bias than neutral view on it as as we could and. Allow that his voice to be heard and I think what? What we sort of discovered as the filmmakers as the theme that SORTA connected his story to stand story. Many of the others who are represented in the film is that we felt much of his decision making. is coming from a place informed by. His own family impact with the previous era of boarding schools and and the relocation era and how those philosophies and those on a similar views maybe playing out in his own lineage and maybe sort of influencing. His decision making motivations. and. So when you go that deep into a subject like like this, and especially digging into different sites of this drew for you as a filmmaker why is it important that you continue to just keep learning and building and? Growing this thing till basically you're you're sending it to the final stage important to do that drew. Oh. That's a that's a heavy question for me I think that's just sort of that's just that's just it for me I mean that's what drives me that's. That's what don't making is about to me is just you're uncovering. Uncovering You know more learning more about about yourself about the the world you know I really don't necessarily know how to put that into words You know I will say that this film took ten years to do and started when I was in my early twenties and I'm now in my early thirties and it has significantly Influenced me as a as a you know person who's growing, and now I can't look at the world and can't look at filmmaking without you know the. The impact that. You know the the community of St you know that surround. Sandy and that was in Rosebud and who shared these stories and how we had to alter our perspective incoming into an indigenous community and working with the indigenous community. has changed how approach filmmaking completely and I. Can't look sort of looking back on it. I can't imagine. Not Having that perspective now So I guess that's sort the you know the the creative process continues to grow. And I think this is one of my favorite parts of a film festival not only often do you get a chance to screen the film but then you talk to the people who are putting this together the people who are being featured to just understand why this story had to be made, and there's going to be some of that going on with this particular film festival and of course. If you miss anything in program or you tuned in and wanted details or wondering what else featured, you can always find this program, Inner Archives Native America Calling Dot com well drew Nicholas thank you for being here with us the film we were just talking about was blood memory, and now we go onto another film. Here are some of the young boxers voices that are featured in the boxers of brutally. Job. I wanted to be the rocks until because Israel has to stand up for. I try by. Reservation. I people. I see their penis I see what they're going through because I used to be in their position and I just want them to know that they're not alone. That are worth something. And again, that was a moment of the film boxers of Brule and here with us from the shinnecock reservation in New York is sinead bullock and she is an indigenous business owner and she is shown o'clock our pleasure to have Shannon with US Shimmy. Welcome. Thank, you thank you so much in that bit. We got to hear where some very young but very strong voices come into us from an indigenous nation, and then they turned to boxing as a way to figure out their place in the world I'm and to take hold of it, and so talk to me a little bit about how this film came to be in. It is really interesting. How close the look that we get into everyday life of indigenous people should he go ahead? Well it's actually kind of interesting how I kinda got involved in the sound The director is just the Adler documentary hume filmmaker with roots in fine art and photography sociology and she actually this was her directorial debut actually met Jesse. In Standing Rock I actually can't for six months at standing rock Right along. Side, who Josh Camp I was camping with, they help on who are very closely related to the coup Josh an adequate Josh camps to hurting like you know the daytime we'll be splitting wood. Shun Noah who was actually featured in this film. was training at the time for boxing. And Jesse had actually been coming to the camp. So the three of US had actually met in about a year and a half later, this film comes about. Jesse contact is me. told me about the film had me watch it and then I had actually been contacted by the TRIBECA Film Institute to actually create the curriculum for the film. So she's crazy crazy. How Creator kind of put also have us mean each other's past you know I was literally like fighting the front lines right alongside Shino who went back to her community and created this boxing group with these young girls to help channel. Some of the challenges you know and many of us women you know come from different. Backgrounds whether you're from like you know from the actual reservation live on the reservation or even understand that just a minority you understand oppression with that can do to your mind what that could do to you so. Me Being Native, and actually my consulting firm is. Moxie to consulting Ironically Jesse. Actually was going to connect me with the TRIBECA film Educational Director to write the curriculum but they had reached out to me in search of someone who's indigenous to create basically the curriculum and so the curriculum. that I created was basically just a guy to help people to understand you know the interpretation of the film summarising it whether they're an educator administrator parent or student, and you know what's to learn an chimney having this kind of guide through this I think is really important especially of different concepts that come up in the film including suicide in just understanding to our communities into take you know a responsible look at some of this often a lot of times when that film comes in or some of the coverage that comes in is different hang tight. There's more ahead. Support by Amarin Indian countries. One hundred percent tribally owned insurance partner. And works with tribal governments and their business enterprises to provide effective commercial insurance coverage strengthen native American communities protect tribal sovereignty, and help keep dollars in Indian country more information on property liability. Compensation and commercial auto solutions at Amazon DOT COM. That's A. M. E. R.. I.. N. D. DOT COM. Thank you for tuning into native America calling I'm Tara Gatewood and we are highlighting vision maker media's indigenous online film festival. Are you planning to watch some of the native films being released over the next couple of weeks? You can tell us about it or if you're just hearing about it and got some more questions dial in, you can share and you're hearing about some of the films. If you WANNA, talk to any of the filmmakers that we've introduced you to today dial now one, eight, hundred, nine, six, two, eight, four, eight is the number Shin-. Bullock is here with us telling us a little bit more about the film that is being featured the boxers of Brule and social. Creating that curriculum and was really important to you, and then when you present this film, put it out in the world especially beyond our tribal nations it's important that people understand our stories, the context in which they come in is there anything you want to share about how you feel this film takes US Beyond Poverty Porn Actually what was awesome about not only developing the curriculum and working with the TRIBECA Film Institute as well as Jesse Adler. We implemented the curriculum in the school system of New, York City show the majority of the city of the places that we went to the passions that we were and you know we're in. Brooklyn you know they were you know very public schools almost like over twenty kids in one classroom and so. What's happening in the film in many ways resonates with the young people in the class. So being able to help the teacher implement some of these like you had mentioned earlier, you know You know prevention for aside you know and how culture is prevention That's one thing that we and a lot of our communities and so here's a film to talk about positive things that young people can do to become role models whether it is boxing maybe it's just running maybe it's rent racing you know maybe it's our. That healthy way of coping. This is something to pretty much teach young people how to do it and it was really engaging and they were very uplifted and it happened during native American heritage month, which is coming up in November. So it was really insightful to really get young people not only to look at that to also think about the fact that native people are still here myself being a tribal member of the Shinnecock and also a member of the mantra community in Long Island New York. We're only an hour forty, five minutes away from the city. So that Kinda brings like you know the consciousness of what's happening in Indian country and helping people know that it's not just. west of the Mississippi that you know it's right here in their backyard you're So that was really awesome. Inch name what is your message to all those young people that were featured in the film? They might even be listening right now. Yes and I hope they are well, just keep telling US story and just knowing that like what they're doing their testimony and the struggles that they are going through and the fact that they're a chain I mean, no. Like achieving their goals, whatever they are Their goals are inspiration how they're going through. That is an inspiration for people all around the world you know especially as young as they are I, mean their stories are reaching the world and continue it an inspiration to me and others you know and it's a compagnon. What the insured lot of inspiration in that film and even those words that we shared with you from. Shinola of letting those young people know that you're not alone that you are worth something we need you really strong message and you know often that's where we receive some of the best information or really strong messages to understand the world that we're living in connecting to is from the films we watch we are sharing some films that are going to be featured. In a film festival is online and again that invitation anything you're thinking about some of these moving images that are going to be going out, go ahead and calls right now one, eight, hundred, nine, nine, six, two, eight, four, eight, and right now we're going to hear about another feature. This one is going to be premiering the week of September fourteenth when we just talked about is premiering the week of August thirty first Sarah deer a Muskogee Creek Educator and author speaks a lot on the issue of violence committed against native nations. She is also featured in the film sisters rising here she is creating some of the framework for why this type of violence happens on native soil. We don't have jurisdiction over non-indians in terms of criminal, authority tribes can't prosecute most non-indians for things they do to native women on the reservation. Now, most of the perpetrators of violence against native women are non. Native. So really significant fact because most crime in America is intra racial. So Women is more likely to have a white perpetrator and the only exception to that general rule is native women and tribes don't have jurisdiction over those men. The irony is that the federal system simply has ignored native women they are the responders and they don't respond. So it has created sort of a jurisdictional vacuum it it's it's created sort of a protection for these. These non native men largely white men who commit crimes against their wives or girlfriends, strangers, neighbors, and the tribe can't do anything to stop them not that because my great grandmother and my grandmother and my mother were raped I will be raped because perpetrators know that great grandma and grandma and mom's case was never prosecute. In with US Today on this film feature, a we have on the line today from Guilford Vermont is Will Ferrell she is a director and producer of sisters rising our pleasure to have her here today will welcome. Thanks for having me. And so willow a topic that has come up a lot on this program is legislation is introduced as more things continue to happen because violence directed at our women and children. And I guess. At our communities in general and so this focus is really heavy in I'd like you to share just you know exactly when we set aside some time to take a look at this and in really understand how much this impacts our nation's what do you think you know we are teaching our own communities about what is happening? Well I. I I feel like I came to this project as a feminist and also the one who. Gendered violence has been in my family through the generations and also at the white person I felt really. Compelled to do something hearing about the what Sarah Dear just spoke about the interracial violence as opposed to interracial violence and having never heard about the high levels of violence that native women in the US compared to the rest of. American women I was just horrified when I found out about that and folks held to do something So I. Feel like to change the situation obviously we we embarked on the film project partly to investigate like why is this happening and we had some ideas but echoes of colonial. And Patriarch in Misogyny and racism. That basically is enacted on on native women's bodies You know that needs to change or gently and I feel like it's such an intersectional issue it's so it dovetails with environmental violence. And I don't know if I'm really answering your question. Well I think takes us to more inquiry into this film and why it is. So we are introduced to several strong indigenous women who have a view a take experience on some of this violence and just give us a preview of some of those voices and and some of the things that introducing us to in the film. Yes. So we pack fix incredible women into one hour film which would not totally recommend in in retrospect it was a lot But the women are all incredibly powerful survivors fighting for. personal and tribal sovereignty and restoring tribal sovereignty and ending violence against native women and so we have dawn white from the Fort Berthold reservation she's ricker and she is a army veteran. And at Tribal Law Enforcement Officers Sergeant UNFORT- birth than she kind of. She's I sort of boots on the ground in that in that setting, you know in the Balkan oil boom and just is fiercely protective of her community and She's kind of one of our through lines in the film. Along with Sarah Dear and then third year is the is the woman that you played the clip from. She's brilliant MacArthur Genius Lawyer Activists Advocate Professor an expert on tribal law and this helps. include provisions for native women and the Violence Against Women Act reauthorization. And she is like the only person I've met who can really break down. tribal law and the way that it interfaces with state and federal law in a way that actually makes sense to me because it is incredibly confusing. and then we have Snyder who's also from the Fort Bertha preservation. She's Mendon had out said she introduced the first tribal code on a reservation to combat sex trafficking and other forms of? Trafficking. And And then we have Petty Stone Fish Utah Indigenous Wins self-defense classes, workshops, and Lauren Lacroix advocate, and Lisa Brunner who's just a fireball of intelligence and frosty she's from white. Lake. nona wait. Waiters Minnesota and. She is an advocate and. also does some legislative working as an artist activist as well and I think my missing someone. I think that's I think that's the six when. In Su there are some really heavy subjects even some of the women talk about you know what their experience was and sometimes it's important to make sure that people understand. that. There is content that may trigger different things I'm including you know being survivors of sexual violence and when you're making a film like this, especially when you have a group of people who are willing to share something that happened to them, that weighs heavy on their heart and mind what is what you? What is the approach to make sure that you are you know sharing their story but not really victimizing them you know what is your thought in was your approach as a filmmaker to tell something like this? Yeah that is a question that was in the front of our minds. The whole time filming and I feel like the answer to that with probably can be reduced to a twofold answer, which is one just listening to the women and taking direction from them. In terms of what do you want this film to be about what you wanted to say what you want it to reveal and We made sure to share it with everyone in the film before it was released to the public. And and then also just listening with. Total openness and empathy I think So Brad Heck, my partner, my co director and producer and I were both cancers born in July we're super emotional. So I mean I think you know one thing you don't see when you see a finished film. If you don't see, you don't hear usually the director producers like talking to the people in the film. But when we did an interview interviews usually lasted like four hours minimum, they were really intensely long and it ended up being often sharing to like I would share about my share my stories and and the woman in the phone share their stories. Then it was sort of like building trust step-by-step step you know and also Just. I think I don't know when I share something vulnerable with someone. You can really tell on a gut level whether they care or not whether they're really listening to me or not and. I think that we just tried to approach this incredibly sensitive material with. Completely open heart and. You know empathy. In something that also another sub or it's connected to the main one talking about violence tour, indigenous nations especially tour women of the issue of men. Kemp's comes up to me a little bit more about that will. Yes. So man camps are kind of a phenomenon that happens in oil boom areas, and so most of our films sisters rising takes place on the reservation which is surrounded by the Balkan oil boom in northwestern North Dakota and what happened basically is that it was it was a huge economic oil boom. And men from all over the US even outside of the US were flooding into the area to get to take these jobs on the oil. Area cracking jobs, driving jobs, etc, and and there wasn't actually enough infrastructure to house all these new people to the area. So the sort of ad hoc RV towns popped up all over the period and in the badlands the don't have an address you know it might be a farmer leasing out land to people with rb Campers and even guys sleeping under trucks and. So. There's there's been a lot of reports of violence to women and specifically indigenous women in these in these men camps and. It's very hard for law enforcement to respond to to these instances because they don't even necessarily know how to find these men camps. They're not necessarily they don't really have an address you know, and then you add in the difficulty of the fact that tribal law enforcement often can't really safely respond to a call that involves not native people because they can't. Really. Arrest Them Or. apprehend them you know of course, it's very complicated things shift from state to state whether it's a public lachey state like it's very complicated but essentially. I mean Don Don White at one point we were we were with her in dispatch and the police department on Flavor sold and she got a call that a guy was being threatened by some other an oil rig worker with being threatened at night by some other oil rig workers and he was scared and. the local county sheriff wasn't responding because they were too busy and so called tribal law enforcement. But none of the people involved were tribal members and so she said I can't really respond I can't do anything you know if I come here I'm putting myself in danger so it was just INCR-, it kind of had a feeling of the wild west. That's what a lot of people said, and that's how I felt I while I was there. It is really important to hear these stories and I'm sorry we got to wrap things up and you know especially on this conversation in just how much it impacts our native nations and so a lot of these different films are this I. Look at Huger issues that are affecting our communities are native lives in the dialogues that come from it. I- thinker just as important to glad we were able to dialogue a little bit about it today to there are. Many different films featured in this festival and there's also a look at youth and I mentioned earlier maybe even a lighter side of beings like Powell highway via Lagos Powell highway the Lego, movie that one is going to be premiering the week of September twenty eighth. There's many more to explore. We thank you for joining us today Tara. Gatewood. Is My name and we will meet you here tomorrow. Thanks again for our look at this year's vision maker Film Festival. Smoking gave me COPD, which makes it harder. For me to breathe I, have a tip for you. If your doctor gives you five years to live, spend it talking with your grandchildren explain to him that your ground personnel can be around anymore to share his wisdom and his love I haven't figured out how to do that yet I'm running out time. COPD makes it harder and harder to breathe and can cause death you can quit for free help call one, eight, hundred quit now a message from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. How we talk you picky. Where a mask save a life contact your local health care provider for more information visit healthcare dot. Gov or call one, eight, hundred, three, one, eight, two, five, nine, six, a message from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Ho. Native. America, calling is produced in the. National Native Voice Studios in Albuquerque New Mexico by Chronic Broadcast Corporation, and native nonprofit media organization. Funding, is provided by the corporation for public broadcasting with support from the public radio. Satellite Service. 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US America director Alaska Sandy Alana Stone producer TRIBECA Film Institute Tara Gatewood National Native News Nick Tilson Mike Pence Jesse Adler Washington Albuquerque attorney Centers for Disease Control an
04-24-20 April in the News

Native America Calling

56:30 min | 1 year ago

04-24-20 April in the News

"Welcome demane of America. Calling from Studio Forty Nine Albuquerque. I'm Monica Brain. Belinda Lakes Company quietly removed the Indian maiden image on their butter packages. But did you know the graphic was created by the artist? We'll hear more about that story. Also native artists came together to make krona virus. Public Service posters about the importance of staying home and graduates can't get together for commencement but some native grads are making it happen. Virtually all that and the human history of the Jingle dress coming up right after national native news the National Native News Antonio Gonzalez Alaska native corporations can receive shares of the eight billion dollar tribal set aside in the cares act. According to the trump administration eleven tribes have filed a lawsuit against the US Treasury over the matter hearing was held Thursday morning in Federal Court as Attorneys for Tribes and Alaska. Native corporations waited to hear from the trump administration and a brief filed. Thursday evening the Treasury Department issued its determination the ANC's are eligible tribes are concerned the ANC's could take more than half the funding amd believe it should only go to tribal governments another hearing scheduled for Friday afternoon. The government brief also opposes emotion by three Sioux tribes which also seek to block and sees from the funding. The date for the disbursement of tribal cares. Funding is Sunday this week. In Rapid City South Dakota community members held a drive by car caravan to think Indian Health Service. Employees China Lock. It has more people. Honk horns wave out car windows and hold up signs thinking essential employees healthcare workers lined the sidewalks and wave back. There is grinning behind their face. Nuts Richard Richards organized defense. We just wanted to find a way to thank and honor our friends and relatives who are working up here on the Suzanne campus including the IHS Yacht the house center employees and everybody else. That has a job up here which it says. Healthcare can be especially stressful right now since people still have to show up and take care of medical issues not related to the pandemic. He decided the busy employees needed. Morale boost and merely thirty cars showed up under good rally like this and showing support for them. It's GONNA lift them up. Lift their spirits up and give them a little extra motivation. Common show up like they do on a daily basis. Gerling church is the president of the Great Plains. Tribal Chairman's Health Board and Health Center on the Suzanne campus. Our job as administration is to give our frontline workers the support and the resources that they need to stay safe at to fill supported because they're providing that to the community and they need that the Suzanne campuses taking steps to direct patients showing potential symptoms. Kovic nineteen to designated areas to prevent spreading it for national native news. I'm trying to lock it in rapid city. The American Indian Graduate Center has partnered with American indigenous business leaders to help distribute care packages to native elders. Angelique Albert is the executive director of the American Indian Graduate Center. Based in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have a fund set aside to help with community type projects that his name deckert founder. John Rayner so we decided to take that initiative and put towards this also. We decided to help with seed on the ground with our students in those communities. Already they will be partnering with the. Able students in those chapters to help them deliver food our elders. She says taking care of elders as an important tribal value. This initiative is particularly important. Because you know elders. Were our first educator so really they continue to be keepers are with them our culture. Our languages tribal ecological knowledge. When it comes to those things we have so much to learn and it's so important that we keep them healthy so that they continue They can continue to teach us. There's a lot. There's there's all you there but also you know going back to our sense of community and we Taking care of each other. I'm very honored to be a part of this project. Food Water and cleaning products are part of the care packages. The Graduate Center has committed ten thousand dollars to the project. I'm Antonio Gonzalez. Natural Native News is produced by Broadcast Corporation with funding by the corporation for Public Broadcasting Support by the American Indian Higher Education Consortium working to ensure tribal colleges and universities are included in our higher education system Info on thirty seven tribal colleges and universities at a HEC DOT org for native Americans affected by domestic violence. The strong hearts native helpline offers peer to peer support and Resources. It safe confidential. An toll free at eight four four seven native program support by the National Indigenous Women's Resource Center native voice one the native American radio network. This is native America. Calling Monica Brain. If you're struggling to listen to the news these days you're not alone. Journalists are bringing us vital information about what's going on but truthfully sometimes I just want to watch videos of otters playing with a ball so today I'm bringing you news that you can feel good about most. If not all students are who are graduating. This year will not get to walk across the stage. Pinna feather on their mortar board or have a big family celebration marking the accomplishment but a group of native. Educators isn't going to let that stop them a week from today. We've got the virtual indigenous graduation happening. I'll get to the details in just a bit. Also Native Realities Publishing House commissioned a handful of native artists to make posters about staying at home I really like the illustration of sequoia saying Wash Your hands by Roy Boney Junior. We'll talk with Francis about the project and you may have seen some jingle just answers on facebook. They are answering the call to dance and pray for everyone will learn the history of the jingle dress dance and its connections to another time when sickness plagued native America also land lakes butter recently removed the Indian maiden from their packaging. We'll get the story behind the picture but first let's talk about money and from the eight billion dollars that's going to tribes from the cares. Act Nick Martin from the New Republic wrote a piece titled Corona Virus. Emergency aid has become its own disaster in Indian country and nick is supposedly welcome back to native America. Calling Nick. Thanks so much for having me. Yeah Yeah it's time you so tell us a little bit about this piece. We had a whole show yesterday where we talked about the. There's the little bit of a controversy because some tribes are Speaking out and saying that they don't believe that the Alaskan native corporations should be getting funding From the Cares Act so you sort of went into an analysis of this talked about it. Yeah I mean basically what we it's what I was seeing As it's kind of developed over the past I guess two weeks now was throughout the consultation process that All translations were having with the Administration and the trump administration and the Department of Treasury and the Department of tear your They were just not didn't seem like they were aware that antsy we're going to be roped in As part of that eight billion and so I think I saw the very fairly harsh reactions from tribal leaders Because has been continued communication issue but then it kind of developed and as it moved along. What I saw was in what we try to Report at the New Republic was just this larger kind of history of ANC's and how they operate within the full context of Indian country and the lower forty eight tribes. And it's complicated is what I found. You know being from lower forty eight drive. I don't admit to be an expert on it but I just tried to listen and speak with people who were and what I found was that you know I it. Just this thing it ultimately comes back down to the causes that are in my opinion. It comes down to You know what we see. Our modes of sovereignty you know so we have a reservation systems and the lower forty eight and they have. Anc's in Alaska. And we just haven't really I think a lot of people including in country People in Indian country you are not. I would say incredibly well educated on. Anc is not of their whole or anybody's fault But just it's you know it's not part of your life you're not going to know about it. And then in the middle of this pandemic it became this huge political battle but we just wanted to take a step back and just lay it all out there. Yeah I mean I don't think it's the is black and white as just they have this and we have this because you know there are two hundred. Plus federally recognized tribes. It's the villages and in Alaska as well who can also who also qualify to apply for the funding and I I really want to encourage folks to listen to the show. If you didn't get a chance yesterday we had folks from different perspectives. All over sharing why. They felt the way that they did about this. But Nick the thing that I thought was really interesting about your piece that you Instead of really taking aside on well antsy shouldn't get the money or tribes or wrong. They just don't understand what's going on. You really turn it back around onto the trump administration and talk to us about that. Yeah I mean again. This is like a. It's like we can go through this Just in terms of arguing one side or the other. And you could do that all day. Long and people have But what I was really more interested in is that this is not so much an issue. I mean first of all I think is an issue of underfunding. The tribal nations initially asked for twenty billion and the trump administration wasn't going to include them at all in the cares act. So you have people in Congress. Pollen Tom Cole. Mark Mullins Reese David and lots of other non native legislatures fighting and they finally got they got eight billion carved out so you're already dealing with the smaller Pie than what travel nations were initially Anticipating in terms of relief. And then what happened was this is just a lack of communication. I. It's what it is in a lot of it. Also I think just as an aside here it became this kind of political thing that centered around Harris Sweeney who were is the assistant secretary of the Bureau of Indian Affairs and so her and you know being an Alaskan native having on In worked for a for formerly worked for an ANC there was a lot of I think very personal rhetoric aimed at her. When I think you know and everybody that I've talked to that is reasonable about this it it does. It's not about terror sweeney. It's about the trump larger trump administration's failure to communicate with tribes to properly consult with tribes and also to adequately fund Indian country and promotes opportunity in a way that aligns with how we think and Indian countries not a model is such a set we but leaders feel that that these funds should be dispersed. And so that's where I kind of saw I saw. As the trump administration driving a wedge between Alaskan natives and lower forty eight is when we were all part of you know we're all dealing with this endemic. We faced similar struggles. I mean the money and the way that it gets to us. It's going to go through different routes but really I think that the trump administration that made this far more complicated and messy that that it needs to be. Yeah I read that in your article I I also think that you you did something that native journalists do frequently which is To put a historical context into things so I pulled this one paragraph out and Right towards the end you wrote Where you end up after all this is tragedy. The opportunistic gripped that these systems foster is not an accidental outcome. But the only logical endpoint the model set up by the United States to ostensibly help native and Alaskan native people achieve independence and sovereignty. Be they the reservation system or an sees too often. Turn out to be tools for further colonization. That just really struck me that that last piece right there. Yeah I mean. It's just something that I think about really often. And in terms of like how we can define ourselves and because that's what trump sovereignty is is not define yourself by somebody else's measure measures. Its defining yourself and what you want your nation to be in what you want your community and I think that within systems like obviously done talking about a utopian right. I think you know within our current you know within the world we live in it. You know it's imperfect and you know those two models are imperfect but there are ways that you know whether I'm thinking about you know extractive resources whether I'm thinking about just you know modes of economic models. That don't really help. All of the community members That but maybe help people outside of Indian country you know it just is something that I'm constantly trying to. You know because my readership is majority like I do have lots of native readers and I had a lot of really wonderful feedback from this piece and not just wonderful in terms of praising I mean I got critical feedback things that made me think about it. Anc's and That model in a way that you know just growing up in North Carolina. I never thought about before and I mean to this piece. I just think it's something that I it speaks to a larger desire by people to not be defined not have their success defined or or restrained by the American government. And that is what has been the case for a very long time In in terms of both of those so yeah well. We still don't know Deadline this Sunday to distribute the billion dollars and it looks like because of the lawsuit That that's that deadline is definitely not going to get met. Is there anything else following up with us on the story I mean no? It's just following up with all the the travel leaders. It's also following up with You know people on the ground and seeing how you know. They're doing an absence of that critical funding. I know we've seen different like like I know today. The eastern band of Cherokee Indians Was directed some of their resources are fun to Navajo Nation. We saw the state of New York. Do something similarly Yesterday you're seeing other You know Funding resources kind of popping up absence and absence of federal. But I do think that you know that is ultimately the whole. That's the whole shame of it. The local in the sense that you know we have There's this big you don't have the communication from the administration that ENC's are going to be included. And as a result you have this litigation that just delays the funding that everybody needs. And so that's the that's the most frustrating part for me. Is that now? Tribal leaders feel like they have to do this litigation because they don't want to blur the lines for future congressional appropriations but the pandemic demands that we act quickly that we act. Suddenly we have seen. What a delay in days or delay in weeks can mean communities especially travel. Well we'll keep an eye on this story for sure we're GONNA go to a short break after break more news Kobe. Nineteen remains a serious health threat especially for some populations and age groups still more than ninety percent of people infected with the novel coronavirus survive. We'll hear from some of them and discuss the treatment and recovery methods on the next native America calling support by dreams. Bring a nonprofit community lender for over twenty five years dream. Spring has been increasing access to business credit for entrepreneurs across New Mexico Arizona and beyond dream spring offers loans for self employed entrepreneurs startups and large established enterprises information about flexible credit requirements affordable rates and customized lending available by calling eight hundred five zero. Eight seventy six twenty four or online at Dream Spring Dot Org. You'RE TUNED IN NATIVE AMERICA. Calling senior producer. Monica brain. And it's a regular news roundup. Show if you've got something you'd like to share gives call number one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight eight so I promise you good news. Well some might think this is good news. Others might not The land lakes butter quietly removed. The Indian lady that was on the package. It actually happened About a month ago possibly two months ago but it's Recently got into the media into the press and so i WanNa Bring Dalton Walker in. He's the national correspondent for Indian country. Today and he's a Red Lake Ojibway Dalton walk back to native America Calling Monica megrets for having me in New Orleans for all you do inform native people. Thank you I appreciate it. You too man. This is a big time for journalists. A lot a lot of work going on for sure so okay. So what was your initial thought when you heard that the some are calling it. The Indian maiden was taken off the land lakes butter well. It was a nice to take a break from all this covert nineteen coverage which is very important. Yeah but it was nice to that little break and being able to write this story unto legacy of Patch. Bizarrely wasn't honor This is the type of story is is what I got into journalism in when I heard about this butter. The butter story this via social media. I was curious to know what happened. So basically I look I look into it and I saw a digital nonprofit Minnesota Lord about that approach that the change happened and when there's change involves native people specifically controversial change my first Goto. The journalist is made of twitter. A lot of people have a voice and they said Okay Perspective on to change and that was it caught fire and some some media outlets was able to catch it a little bit of that capture a little bit of the change as well but the bigger picture. I know there was another story. There did you. Did you know that the like third version of this? This woman on the butter Was painted by a native artist. I remember growing up. I grew up in Minnesota I remember that that specific packaging and that type of butter when I would see it and I and I recall. I'm not sure if it was my mom. Are someone else but some invention to meet growing up as a kid that there was a native artists behind that specific specific piece of art. So I I guess I did but being a kid going up you really this kind of move onto the next thing. I just everywhere so not one of them right so tell us about. Tell us about him about the artist. When I was Kinda looking on social media to see what people were saying one specific person caught my attention. His name is Robert Zarley in yours talking about his dad. Patrick and going up Minnesota on the Red Lake reservation dessert dessert leave last name. I'm familiar with so I. I knew that there was some connection there. I'd probably knew of someone that was related are something that extent so I was Kinda following. What Robert The sunless thing about his dad and he was kind of making some great points about the coverage that was happening so reached the chat a little bit knee shirts. Great stuff and I reached out to his sister. Sure I mean. And she shared a lot of stuff and it wasn't necessarily the same stuff. Was this more perspective. Which is Great? Which is what I was hoping to get because I wanted to learn as much as I could about their dad and when I learned firsthand this man about his artwork. I thought it was beautiful. Art The begin with. Yeah sure when he knew he passed on. But I wasn't sure win in learning that he passed away way before his time. Actually he was barely in his fifties and a nineteen seventy in for what he did. As it was a job he was part of this AD agency. How how much shock waves that sent over the years later? It was this amazing. Yes so he he Somebody else originally did the Indian maiden and then they decided to do like a new version of it and that's where he came in and and the version that we have been seeing recent until recently that was his version. Is that right? Yeah so I attempted to a couple of times to reach out to Landau late for clarification couple questions because they published a news release in early February announcing that they were going in this specific direction to celebrate one hundred years and they didn't really mention the native character or any other native artists. They basically kind of moved on when you read between the lines where you're like what what's going to happen with the with the maiden so. I was trying to get some clarity. They respond but they just for reference back to that Specific News. Release but yeah. I had a lot of questions regarding holidays. Form though that the idea behind it but around in nineteen fifties. I didn't see Patrick worked. Worked FOR Workless land-o-lakes and he basically had a chance to I guess upgrade the image to what he thought would work work better in he did and you can kind see little things that are kind of separate the one before. If you didn't know much about even native culture or Jewish culture you probably really notice much of a difference but talking to a Senator Robert Robert explained the key differences in when you learn about the key differences like the water or trees. The designed floral patterns like it. It's a lot different. Was the family sad to see her. Go from the butter Robert initially he was. He was glad he said it was about time. They had to move on but then he started to get more feedback from his acquaintances friends people. He mentally met along the way and they talked about how much that specific packaging meant to them. Going up native so that was part was interesting and then his sister. She wasn't she didn't sound like she was upset. She was more interested in having her father's story be shared beyond the butter part that it was a part of it and going up. She didn't really Like that image was always there for her as she knew her. Dad Did. I think she's eighteen when you passed away so once she should go grocery store she would notice it but it wasn't really a huge deal and then anything was that once you learn to change. She actually went to the grocery store recently to see she could find anything I did too. I went and I could see. It was about half in half there was you could tell they were still like cycling out the old stock and And then the new ones and I picked up the one without her on it And finally I guess able to buy some land lakes butter. A lot of folks have released. Broken out about it because it's They say that it's sort of over. Sexualize is native women presents native women in a way that you know and and of course the whole conversation about mascots and having natives as token images to sell things as well. Did you think much about that as you were working on this piece? Oh yeah that was kind of Perspective that I've seen a lot with From a lot of native people especially a lot like you've been elected officials. I saw that they were happy. And how much impact? This design like this can do in harm native people so I knew that was a part of the story in when I was looking into it. I I wanted to make sure I could include it the best I could while how how important that perspective is but the same time trying to wrap around the story of the artist so I Had a chance to talk to the North Dakota State Rep Ruth Buffalo briefly she. She was one of the first to comment about the change and she received some feedback. Mostly not really great feedback about her comment so she kind of press release more detailed at really explained her thoughts and I thought that was a good perspective and I made sure I included it in the article. Yeah well we'll put a link to the article on our website native America calling but if you WANNA follow Dalton Walker. You can find all of his stuff at Indian Country Today. Dot Com Dalton. Thanks so much for joining us today. We really appreciate IT IN Q. How can we can you to right? Now let's go on to some more native artists joining us. Right now is Dr Lee Francis the fourth he's the CEO and founder of native realities and director of indigenous pop ex and he's from the Laguna Haley. Welcome back. Hey thanks for having me you can hear me. I'm good. Yep Sound pretty good pretty good so so you had almost pretty quickly after. Things popped off with corona virus. These posters showed up online Tell us about them. Yeah so I just I was gonna say it seems like a million million years ago that I was talking about US having to cancel the digital pop right and and now we're kind of back Yeah it was You know it was one of the responses that I had because I started to see a bunch of stuff floating around online and I try to look at ways that I could support made a creative especially since with a digital backs going down with a bunch of the other vending opportunities going down. I was trying to figure out a way that I could. You know Showcased the talent of the artist as well as get some money into their pockets You know and I always been fascinated with you. Know the You know the the propaganda posters one of our books that we have at the shop. That tells us code talkers. We made these old style propaganda posters around burning language. That went with that so I thought this is a time that we really need that sort of old style right. Deterrent like awareness. Posters aren't like you know like You know just like a You know like here's what you need to do these. I was like no. We need to go with the straight old style. Which is like telling you what to do like treat your brain right so so I started coming up. I started like sitting there. I was with my notebook and I just started writing down copy of like you know like context like protect your elders and like you know all the things that we're talking about now right because I could just see some of the stuff happening online in our communities. There was this there. Was that whole thing like we're really resume like we're resilient people will make it through and I was like okay hang tight you know that like we. Yeah that's great. We did survive. Use survive that would ten percent of the population. Yeah this survive from the initial wave of you know genetic and germ warfare on our people. That doesn't necessarily like you can't do that. And I'm certainly not gonNA PUT GRANDMA GRANDPA risk nor communities so like. That was the one of the first things. I wrote was resilience. Means COMMONSENSE. A little tricky. It's a little tricky leave because you are strong and resilient people but at the same time just because I took one karate. Class doesn't mean that I can walk around nights not worried about what's going to happen or something that we're resilient but we also have to be reminded from time to time because of the saturation of social media and colonization that we're also smart. People I think propaganda serves in some ways. It's a reminder of being like. Oh that's right. We are not dummy you know. Like don't let don't don't be like don't be like the outsider remember. We are smart people and we did survive because we learned we learned how to survive right. But that's kind of what we were angling towards. Which is you know. Don't do this is not the time for Bravado The kinds of take care of your family and your community. And that's why I really spirited because it is propaganda in that sense like you don't don't do this thing you need to do this other thing and this other thing means that you you know be smart. Wash your hands you know. Do physical distancing. Take care of your families like you're not doing this for us. You're not because you know maybe the wrong way you can make this. But you're doing this for for your grandma and your grandma and the seventh generation. Yeah so right. So that's that was the whole idea behind it. We came up with the copies and I reached out to a bunch of the native illustrators that I know we'll show you a arrogant star You Know Vanessa Boeing worst android junior as the first round You know and and basically just was like. Hey you guys you know. I've got a little bit of a little bit dollars. I can get to you but you WANNA make a cool poster right. GonNa put up a poster together for us with your talent and can do it like you do a week and You know they turned it around and I put you know. Put in poster form you know. Put put the words on that what we had and And then we unleash the wild and it took off like crazy. It was amazing. Kim picked up on it. Can you actually get like a physical poster if you wanted one because it you know? Of course it's all over online but like something are you printing things We we are anything's well You know and it's available for anybody that you know any where on the social media's You know it can it can. There's there's printing options there's digital options. We just wanted to make an open for anybody making it easier. Not so wherever you find it online you can trace it back to where you know to us. you know the work that we've been doing and anybody you know anybody can find that and those links so all right. That's great Lee You know you've been hearing from artists Talking with them. What are you hearing about how they're weathering this storm Difficult is difficult for a bunch of You know the main thing that we're hearing is really like and and you know it affected us too but you know we were a little bit different because we have an organization you know. We've sort of set a different pattern. So we're having to weather a different type of storm especially like you know. The planet isn't open. Currently you know a lot of this stuff that the COMECON was. Shut down the extra shutdown like all that kind of stuff but you know our day to day artists not just our pop artists but like you know it'd be our aunties uncles and these folks rely on gigs like I- PX or a the you know the trade shows and Indian market going down like bats really tough because you know and this is what we're hearing back from. A lot of our native creatives is that it's just like this is where a lot of folks made their money or at least made you know You know a couple of months to three months worth of you know rent and food and utilities and all this stuff all the things they need to do. And that's all gone and then a lot of these gigs were in play. Also were on. I mean I'll I'll tell you personally. I had word travel. Gigs disappeared this last month for the month of April right again. It's not you know I mean we're not taking a huge toll on our end but like that's you know that's something that could definitely be helpful in terms of trying to you. Know what we're doing getting the word out because a lot of those were like travels to locations where I'd be like. Hey and look at native creative writer so that's kind of hard for us and I. It's hard for you to yeah. Plus it's hard for you to just sit still Lee so I imagine you're you're going a little stir crazy in your house. I got a I got a little home schooling You know with the with the family going on here. So it keeps me keeps me occupied but Definitely definitely I was like well I got another. I have no meetings today. I don't know what to do with my time. I guess I'll go back and I was like if if one of those things where I've said You know prior to this. I was like man. I wish I had more time to right now. I'm sitting here being like I have all the time right right right. You know I hear you fine right. I mean for real well Lee. Thank you so much for joining us today. If you WANNA check out these posters there at native realities of we'll have a link after the show on our website and Take Care Lee. Yeah thank you so much for everything guys. Doing and hanging in there are pushing this radio. South thank you. We'll be right back. Hey Ivan good to see you two. What brings you here. I'm informing people about the twenty two thousand census the senses. Yeah everyone knows about that. They don't they really don't but I do. And when we participate helps determine funding for things like grants and programs in our communities cool. That's good to know. The census is for all American Indians and Alaskan natives shape our future. Start here to complete this sentence. Twenty twenty census dot gop paid for by US Census Bureau tune-in into Native America. Calling Monica Brain. And it's our regular monthly news. Roundup today if you have something you'd like to share gives call eight hundred nine six two eight four eight so it's graduation season and usually we end up doing a show about students who are not allowed to wear feathers at graduation or Regalia But it doesn't look like a lot of graduations are going to be happening this year. I think that most schools have closed for the rest of the school year. So I wanNA talk with a native educator about what they're trying to do for missing out on that graduation joining us now is Melvyn Monette Barajas. He's the president and Executive Director of Indigenous Education Inc and he is Turtle Mountain Chippewa. Welcome back Melvin. Thank you Monica. It's good to be here. Yeah how you doing doing well doing? Well here Stand quite busy with this initiative. So excited okay. So tell us about this virtual indigenous. Commencement that's correct We were trying to figure out what we can do for our families and for our students are grandma's GRANDPA's aunties uncles growing up in the turtle mountains and the spirit lake reservation. Every transition has been a celebration so we put together. Our staff got together with a number of partners her doing some other work and we decided that we needed to celebrate these commandments. Rather than let students Bill sat down about what they're missing. We needed them to know that. We're GONNA celebrate them. We're going to celebrate with them and for them Families can't get together right now because of the social and physical distancing we wanted you know. Grandma's an Auntie's an uncle's and family members tribal leaders to see their students virtually celebrate them and enjoy them So we came up with the virtual events virtual indigenous commencement For that celebration okay. So what actually will be happening Well first of all when is it? So may I at noon. We're in Albuquerque so mountain standard time noon We will be starting with trying to follow a traditional commencement format. We will have an invocation. We have an drum group. We have a commencement speaker We will be posting as many student graduate names as we can collect. There is a Google Doc Out on social media that students and family members can enter the name of the graduate so that gets on that scrolling video There will be on our songs. We have a presentation from one of our partners and musical presentation. I'm it's going to be a few a couple to a few hours of just celebrating graduates at any level. Did you get this idea? From the Social Distance Palo. That wasn't inspiration that was one of the inspirations for What was going to be happening. So who's going to announce the names so the names won't be announced? We decided not to mess up anybody's names to enter their names digitally Google farm and they'll be on a scrolling video throughout the day and we'll be playing that throughout the summer because we know that there was some summertime anthems have already been canceled. I know that was that was because working in radio We work really hard to get everybody's names right and I always think about during graduations and the the person announcing you know like student's names it's so important to get the names right so wise. Move on your part I think for sure. Thank you you know. I know that this isn't a substitute for this particular for that. That feeling of walking across the stage and having your family there so excited for you and this big accomplishment and we know the numbers we know the numbers native students in Indian country whether it comes to graduating from high school or college or Secondary Postsecondary. It's it's it's so and so I was wondering if you could speak a little bit more about The importance of this and being able to really honor our graduates. What is important because we do know that our students tend to be disproportionately represented in either stop out or the dropout rates The completion mates and our partners And I can you know. There's a list of them on our website but college horizons American Indian Graduate Center. Ace is the College Fund National Education Association and I A. We all agree that in order for students to be able to complete they need to see others completing and so we wanted to do this event so that community members brothers sisters cousins. Everyone can see those folks gone before them One thing we're doing along with this initiative is right after. Commencement we are asking our partners. American Indian professionals leaders to post Images small. I'm short videos of congratulations. So that these young people can see the next steps and their journey and they can hear from professionals that although we are in this time right now it is going to get better and you are going to be working and arguing to be continued to be celebrated in high school. Students will continue to move onto your next steps whether it's the military college vocational school wherever you choose to go from here It's just really vital that they be seen that they'd be seen by younger people behind them. Melvin always great to hear from you we have a we'll have a link to the indigenous virtual indigenous commencement on our website native. America CALLING DOT com. Thanks thanks melvyn grant you so much. Have a great weekend. You too all right joining us now. From Minnesota Minneapolis. Minnesota's Doctor Brenda Child. She's a professor of American Indian Studies and American Indian of American Studies and American Indian studies at the University of Minnesota. And she's Red Lake Ojibway. Welcome back Dr Dr Child. Thank you happy with you. Okay so I talk about online and just Melvin was just sharing with us about this virtual. Commencement that we're going to have so important to to celebrate with our scholars or graduating The other thing I saw this popping up. Is this jingle dress dancing going on online and I wanted to know what your thoughts were when you saw when you saw it happening. What made me really happy to see that going. On the virtual powwows and the way that people are finding ways to connect even during this Pandemic terrible pandemic in the United States. Absolutely you know the Jingle Jingle dress dance and the songs And the dress. It's all part of a healing and so I was hoping that you could share just for listeners. Who may not know about this? Whatever you feel comfortable sharing about what you've heard about the origins of it and How it's a healing healing dance right. Well I I learned about the Jingle Dress dance for my grandmother in Red Lake. Who was you know born in the early twentieth century and who was herself with Jingle Dancer so I've always known about the tradition but it really wasn't until you know maybe ten fifteen years ago that I started looking into the history of the Jingle Dress. Dance tradition which as you say is a very important hewing tradition in native communities that originated in the Great Lakes. So I started looking at I for photographs and I was rather surprised that I couldn't find a single photograph of what you would call a jingle dress from the United States or Canada before Circa nineteen twenty so I and it wasn't until I think I was sitting at power one day and as they do in in Minnesota often tells the story of the First Jingle Dress dancer who is a little girl who is very ill and her father Fears that she's going to you know fearing the worst he has a vision and makes or. Here's someone else makes this dress but the little girl who recovers her health and that story is very commonly told here in Minnesota. When I heard the story I thought to myself That sounds a lot like influenza. And it got me thinking about the big global pandemic of nineteen eighteen nineteen that was very devastating around the world but was also felt in Indian country. It was Very bad in the South West where you are very badly Great Lakes and terrible and Alaska and so i. I thought that something very big must have happened That created this whole new hewing tradition around the time of the first global Pandemic I wouldn't say it's the first global pandemic but certainly the first one of the twentieth century did did her so From the story I heard that her father had made the dress for her. What did he make the the jingles out of well I can only assume that they were the material that we see quite often in jingle dresses from the early you know the Nineteen Twenties and the Nineteen Thirties and commonly we have the Copenhagen snuff can leads today. They're often manufactured but often in those days everyone of course was making everything by hand and they re using these Copenhagen snuff can live. We have an exhibit about them. Elax museum and Damian Minnesota to commemorate the hundredth anniversary of the wrinkles dance traditions. So it's kind of coincidental that we're having another global pandemic just a century and while this exhibit is still up You know namie Minnesota but that exhibits shows addresses through the decades. And it's interesting to see them because I think a lot of us today. Have an idea of what is a real true jingle dress but in fact the dresses evolved and often followed women's dress styles of the era so the dresses from the nineteen twenties tend to be very slim Shift simple dresses with often. Just a couple of rows of jingles and those look almost like the flapper dresses of the nineteen twenty I'm excited to see how a jingle dresses might change for the next hundred years in terms of following the fashion trends and things like that. I know there was an elder who loaned his mother's jingle dress to the exhibit Can you tell us a little bit about that? Yeah we were really happy about that. Some of us. In Minnesota and Wisconsin many of us know Lee Staples who's a spiritual leader in that region? Ozan is what we call him and Ozan When we're getting the exhibit together. He said well. Would you like to have my mother's dress than your exhibit so And it almost is the case that two separate exhibits are at the Malak Cesium there the historic dresses behind Behind the glass and then there are contemporary dresses that the community members brought in and so leaves mothers dresses on display as well. It's very pretty yet has It's sort of distinguish by having a long zinc zipper. Up The side which means that it was actually purchased in a department store In the kind of Mid Twentieth Century so it was purchased in a department store and when we looked at the jingles they were all read inside and appear to have been made from baking soda cans. Even that dress tells us maybe That single dress tells us that You Know I. It may be goes against some of our ideas of what historic jingle dress. Were like I love it. There's a there's a young woman from the first nation in Canada who is making her own jingle dress lids and selling them and she developed her own design on them because she wanted. You know we've mostly moved away from the snuff can lids and I think there's a lot of folks Particularly work in public health. Who are glad to see sort of that trend. Move Away. And she's also got these red cones that she for commemorating the missing and murdered indigenous. Women what else would you like to share about the dingle dress? Well I've heard of this young woman I think she's up in Manitoba Who has this company that makes the jingles and I love the idea of her making the red shingles this year to commemorate and just think about and create awareness around missing and endangered women and So that was really kind of an exciting innovative thing. But it stands. I think very much in line with what we've been seeing around how women have been using the jingle dress dance tradition in modern protest movements as and I don't know more in Canada and of course there were jingles dressed dancers at standing rock as well Yeah speak just a little more about that is as a form of protest. You know I I'm really interested in that. Well I think that what's interesting about the protests and I always call the jingle dress dance tradition a radical tradition and. It seems like you know you might think Oh. Yeah it's been that way since I don't know more or what's going on with women now using it protest movements but I really believe that it was a very Radical movement from its beginning. Because you remember that ended really nineteen twenties that infamous dance order came from Washington D. C. That forbid ritualistic dancing at the Pueblos in on reservations in the United States. And so imagine that at the very moment right it was all about assimilation native languages. Were being suppressed spiritual traditions even dancing. Which today we think how could why would someone want to suppress that tradition? But all these things were threatening in some way in the United States at the time that jingle dress tradition was born and so at the very moment that these traditions are still being suppressed women in the Great Lakes create this whole new healing tradition And and practice it and it has stayed with us a century later. We know that in the nineteen eighties. Something very big happened. It moved out of the Great Lakes into the other Native communities of the United States and Canada. So it's exciting to think about that. Revolutionary beginning to the jingle dress dance that still with us a century later. I love it. I absolutely love it. You know. We had to be quiet and not do our ceremonial dances and practices. And these women said Nope. You're gonNA hear my dress. I'm going to put jingles on it. Unfortunately we've reached the end of our hour. I WANNA say. Thank you so much to all our guests. Nick Martin Dalton Walker Melvin Monet. Barabbas DOCTOR BRENDA. Child and leave Francis the fourth. We're back on Monday. We're going to talk with folks who've recovered from Cova. Nineteen our executive producer is our Hughes. Our host is Tara Gatewood. Our associate producer is Andy. Murphy Marina Spencer is our engineer. Nola Dave's Moses is the distribution director and Bob. Peterson is the network manager for native voice. One Clifton Chadwick resource development specialist Antonio Gonzalez is the anchor and producer for national native news. Charles say there is our chief of operations and president and CEO of Quantum Broadcast Corporation. Is Jacqueline SALITA ANTENA PRODUCER? Monica brain have a good weekend? It's the circle of life teaches us to take care of each other to use our voice when we are in need like the circle of life. There is an opportunity that comes around every ten years a chance to participate and let others know we are and where we are. The two thousand twenty cents. This will be our opportunity to shape our future for generations to come shape our future start here. Learn more at twenty. Twenty Census Dot T. O. V. paid for by US Census Bureau. Lucy Commute to got to got on. Should sue was VIC mutually LAVAR BUCKS'LL HEALTHCARE DOT. Gov Look one eight hundred. Three one. Eight two five nine. Six Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services on native America calling is produced in anniversary national native Voice Studios in Albuquerque New Mexico by Quantum Broadcast Corporation and native nonprofit media organization funding is provided by the corporation for public broadcasting with support from the public radio satellite. Service Music is by Brent Michael Davids native voice. Native American Radio Network.

United States America Dr Lee Francis ANC Alaska Albuquerque Minnesota Antonio Gonzalez Jingle Dress Monica Brain Nick Martin Dalton Walker Melv Administration American Indian Graduate Cente New Mexico Great Lakes Nineteen Twenties producer Canada Indian Health Service
Best Of: Author Louise Erdrich / 'Watergate Girl' Jill Wine-Banks

Fresh Air

50:53 min | 1 year ago

Best Of: Author Louise Erdrich / 'Watergate Girl' Jill Wine-Banks

"From whyy in Philadelphia. This is fresh air. Weekend I'm Dave Davies in for Terry Gross today writer. Louise Urge Rick. The main character of her new novel is based on her grandfather. Who was chairman of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa in the nineteen fifties? He fought against a congressional initiative to move native people off their land and into cities. A policy urged Rick says amounted to tribal termination termination was outweigh to finally resolve. What Congress thought of is the Indian problem. Also we hear from Jill wine banks. She was a young lawyer in the Special Prosecutor's office during the Watergate investigation after she cross-examine Nixon's former Executive Assistant. Her home was burglarized police. Investigators summoned the FBI and they found that the screws in my phone had been tampered with and that there had been a bug but it had been removed and John Powers reviews the Brazilian film Baku. Royale which he says is a political fable. That is both violent and funny. This message comes from. Npr sponsor. Indeed when it comes to hiring you need help getting to your shortlist of qualified candidates fast with indeed DOT COM. You can post a job in minutes. Set up screener questions then. Zero win on qualified candidates using an intuitive online dashboard. And when you need to hire fast accelerate your results with sponsored jobs new users can drive for free at indeed dot com slash fresh air terms conditions and quality standards apply offer valid through March. Thirty first twenty twenty. Our guest today is author. Louise Urge Rick in a career. Going back to the nineteen seventies. She's published seventeen novels and more than thirty books in all including children's literature poetry and nonfiction. She won the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award for fiction twice or Drik is a member of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians and much of her writing is centered on the experience of Native Americans. Her new novel is set in. Nineteen fifty three and is inspired by her grandfather's role in resisting a congressional effort to withdraw federal recognition. From her family's tribe. The book is called the night. Watchman Balui urged Rick. Welcome back to fresh air. It's been a while Thank you you say. In the acknowledgements to this novel that you tried to write several books before getting underway on this one and that your impetus had disintegrated. You kind of weren't getting anywhere. Which is kind of a shock to me. Considering how prolific you have been what shook you loose and got you started on this book. I went back to reading my grandfather's letters which were written during the year. I was born nineteen fifty four so of course those years are somewhat mysterious to me and I knew that he had fought termination during that time but I never put together his letters and the details of what it was like for him to work as a nightwatchman. I never put that together with the timeline for the termination. Bill and what effect it had on the first five tribes slated to be terminated. A lot of this story is about this effort which your grandfather lead in which the main character in your book Thomas Leads. Which was this effort to oppose an initiative in the United States Congress to effectively kind of terminate the existence of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa which he was chairman of you. Want to just explain what this proposal was. What impact would have been termination was out way to finally resolve what Congress thought of his the Indian problem and that would be to move everyone off reservation land? Because it wouldn't be reservation land anymore. Turn over their Land Sutherland. Move everyone to cities and the most important part in doing that was to abrogate. All treaties and these trees have been made since the beginning of our country on a nation to nation basis with every tribe and they all contain these words as long as the grass grows as long as the rivers flow so the original intent and purpose was to guarantee the land. That was agreed upon by the two parties. The two nations those were thrown out the window by both houses of Congress and to simply declared the existence of Indians or native American or American Indians. A non non issue and to not recognize tribal nations Federal Assistance Terminate Travel Admiral Rec to terminate off federal assistance and all federal recognition of who indigenous people are an were. The reason for termination was not just to get rid of the Indian problem but to To acquire the lands that in many cases were covered with some of the most beautiful stands of virgin forest in the country so the first tribe slated for termination where the menominee and the Klamath and intent because of the postwar housing boom was to get those big stands of timber which they did you know for those of you. Who Don't know your story as well tell us just a bit about your background and your connection to the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa. I well so my mother is Turtle Mountain Chippewa as was my grandfather. And so am I. I am an enrolled member a citizen of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa. It would be impossible for me to say that if termination had indeed won the day so my father is German. I'm very mixed person. And yet being a citizen of a nation within our nation give us one a certain sense of It it changes your life. It means that I I care deeply about my people. My Mother's people and I grew up knowing who I was and accepting all parts of myself and this is a part that I realized would not have existed. Had My grandfather not fought for it. Did you grow up speaking Is it is it. Oh Gee where the language that the chippewas speak. It's Gyp Way Moen or initial Ottoman or at the time my grandfather was speaking at just plain. Chippewa. I didn't grow up. He was the last fluent speaker in the family. And I am very proud to say. My daughter is the next fluent speaker because she is teaching at an gibb way immersion school. Water could adding in Wisconsin on the Likud. Ray Reservation an art art or Chippewa and Ojibway synonymous different terms for the same thing. Yes they're all versions of the original word initial Abbey you Grew UP IN MINNESOTA. Is that right? Did Not on a reservation right now. I grew up in Walkerton. North Dakota okay. That's that's on on the border of The SISSON Dakota reservation. It used to be within the borders but I didn't grow up on the Turtle Mountain Reservation. I was visiting grandchild. And your did your parents both teach in bureau of Indian affairs schools to have my mother and my father taught at the same school that my grandfather attended while Boarding School Walkerton. That brings us to a reading. I'd like you to to share with us This is a bit of history and I guess it talks about sort of what you can set this up. This is about when your grandfather ended up going away to school when you want to set this up and give us this reading from your book. Sure the for my grandfather went to the wotton boarding school. He went to a school that was somewhat closer. Fort totten it's Known as Spirit Lake now and in that time one thing for sure was that every classroom was decorated with flags. Flags were everywhere. This had been a former military fort turned into a boarding school for children so it was still run in his time as a military school and this is about when he leaves for school and this was a very common experience for children who left it was It was known that they would have to have their their heads shaved their hair cut. And that was one of the things that was most difficult for children in for their parents because their hair was personal and in many cases or many tribes many families allowing your hair grow long was a symbol of your long life. Cutting your hair is a symbol of grief. So for that to happen was always very disturbing for the family that year his father was gone. His cheekbones jutting out. Thomas was always hungry. They were down to desperation. Food thin a bit of bannock smeared with deer fat. The day schools on the reservation gave out just one meal. The government boarding school would feed three meals for taught in boarding school was days wagon ride. If you started well before dawn. Thomas's mother Julia or a one wept and hid her face as he went away she had been torn whether to cut his hair herself. They would cut his hair off at the school and to cut hair meant someone had died. It was a way of grieving just before they left. She took a knife to his braid. She would hang it in the woods. So the government would not be able to keep him so that he would come home and he had come home and that is our guest. Louise urge reading from her new novel. The night watchman you know. What's striking about. This is that people often send their kids away to school. For Opportunity the impetus future was really starvation. The impetus was starvation and the reasoning behind the best schools being far away was to assimilate native children to train them to live in a culture. That was very different from their parents. So that when they came home often children couldn't speak the language that their parents were speaking to say right here. That boarding schools are often characterized in sort of a lump definition. But they're all very different and the government had secular boarding schools which underwent a real sea change in the nineteen thirties and became much more supportive of native culture while many of the boarding schools which were run by religious groups did not and remained hostile to native religion. Native culture. Louise urge new. Book is the Nightwatchman. We'll talk more after a break and John Powers will review the new Brazilian movie. Back Row. Which he says is at once. A portrait of community a horror thriller and a timely piece of political filmmaking. I'm Dave Davies. Medicis FRESH AIR WEEKEND. This message comes from. Npr sponsor. Better help the online counselling service dedicated to connecting you with a licensed counselor to help you. Overcome whatever stands in the way of your happiness. Fill out a questionnaire and get matched with a professional tailored to your needs. And if you aren't satisfied with your counselor you can request a new one at any time for charge visit better help dot com slash fresh air to get ten percent off your first month. Get the help you deserve with better help on a secret. Military recording a sound so haunting one scientist believed it could change. The world. Mind was racing as I listen to this and I thought this this is the way joined. Npr's visit Delia for the first episode of our new season. We're speaking with author. Louise Urge Rick. Who's published seventeen novels? Many centered on the experience of Native Americans. Her new novel set in Nineteen Fifty. Three is inspired by her grandfather's role in resisting congressional effort to withdraw federal recognition from her family's tribe. The book is called the Nightwatchman. There's another character here. Who Sort of who drives a whole part of the plot parise parental do? I have that name right. Well it you you do but it would be called. Printout TORONTO PRONOUNCED FRONT HOMEBODIES FERENCZ print. So tell us about Patrice in her family. Patrice has one of the much coveted jobs at the jewel bearing plant and That's where a lot of women worked at the time. And we should just exclaimed jewel bearing means you're you're making these tiny little bearings for watches and other machine. Machines made out of Jill's right. Technically tiny they're not horses. Yeah right we're not talking about jewelry here. No no it's their bearings for Watches and gunsights and I knew I had patrice as a character when I wrote the line. she did things perfectly when enraged. She is supporting her mother. Her brother and she has this great job. She's incredibly proud of her job. At the jewel bearing plant many women were hired there because they tested very highly manual dexterity tests and she knows that if she makes one false move if she gets sick if she doesn't make it to the job on time she can get fired so she's always living on this edge and when something comes to throw her off. The stakes are very high You know one thing that I I was really impressed about in the way the story unfolds. Is that the poverty of the PRONTO. Family is something we become aware of. Gradually I mean You want to describe the circumstances they live. They live in what was very common at the time. Just a a poll and mighty house with a dirt floor. Sometimes linoleum would be laid down to cover. The floor was stepped down underneath And they it's heated by a wood stove that's often made out of a can of can from some grocery store you know it's and there is nothing but what is there's no transportation. There is very little to hunt left. There is Some people had gardens but Janet and her family live in a very traditional way so she gathers a lot of food. They trap a lot of food. This my mother did although they did have a fantastic garden she still knows how to snare rabbits and So they they they lived on a they lived on the edge at all times They bought nothing new. A pair of shoes was lasted years and The only person who could really keep them alive on their subsistence level was Pixie or patrice. She wants to be called Patrice. Everybody falls back into calling our PIXIE. Even me Patrice is the name by which is ambitious. She believes she will rise in the world right. You said your mother knew how to snare rabbits and maintained a garden. Did she grow up? In these kind of circumstances this kind of poverty know my grandfather was one of the most enterprising individuals on the reservation. My Mother's family lived with very very little but they had a lot of security and they all went to school every day. It was a point of pride for my grandfather that he read everything his children read when they brought the books home so they had a very different kind of life there's a member of the plateau family who is not there in this story. And that is the older sister Vera. Yes who has left for the cities as it's called. That's Minneapolis Saint Paul. This is a fascinating part of the story and she had left with the help from the relocation office. You don't explain what that was and what role it played in the departure of people like Vera. Relocation was a a program that interlocked with termination. You see the idea was. After the tribe was terminated they would be able to sell their land and be moved to an area quote unquote of greater economic opportunity which would mean a city. So they're setting up this move during the fifties personal wanted to move would get some training some stipend for a short amount of time and then basically be turned loose in the city. I've been asked by people will. Why wasn't that great widened? People just want to move away from their reservation and become like everybody else. I've been asked that question. It's a fair question and the answer is because native people aren't like everybody else and native people want to stay who we are right. And that's because the government made a very firm decision not to put money into the infrastructure on reservations not to keep the treaties the treaties stated that they would provide for health education and the General Welfare of native people as they struggled into this new form of existence and that was basically rent for all that the rest of the country enjoys all of the lands. All of the rivers all of the places that no longer belonged to native Americans. This young woman vera leaves the family and goes to Minneapolis. Saint Paul and one of the things that happens in your novel is that her younger sister. Patrice GOES TO FINDER. Because they've lost touch with her they haven't heard from her in months and it turns out she's in a city where there are criminals and sex traffickers who prey on women from the reservations. Was this a pattern. Back in the fifties. It's a pattern that was established from the first contact between native people in European people. And now there's a lot more awareness about missing and murdered indigenous women and it hasn't of course it hasn't stopped. It's probably gotten worse Is that a an issue that you or others have been active in advocating on. Yes yes indeed Public awareness has been growing. There's enormous movement in the in the twin cities On Valentine's Day they're women and men marching in red to symbolize our sisters who who have been missing and may have been murdered or have been murdered and are missing in that way. This is a very rich story with many plots in a lot of characters in. It's really fun reading. But it is based upon this really consequential event which was this attempt to as you say terminate the you know the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa which was in the end defeated because your grandfather managed to mobilise with meager resources a delegation and an a persuasive case and take it to Washington and you know after the end of the novel. At the end of your acknowledgements you have a paragraph which Kinda capitalizes this. We want to share that with us. I would love to This is why I wrote the book now at this time if you should ever doubt that a series of dry words in a government document can shatter spirits and demolish lives. Let this book erase that doubt conversely if you should be of the conviction that we are powerless to change those dry words. Let this Book Gerhard. Really inspired by. What your grandfather did I really was. I couldn't believe I'd gone through life knowing about his job knowing about him and knowing about termination by never put it together until a few years ago this down to me and I'm grateful to him for what he did but also I believe what he did inspired other tribal nations to fight back against termination and it was a long brutal fight for survival. Not until the seventies did Richard Nixon enter my nation and proclaimed that the new the new order of the day would be sovereignty that started us on an entirely different path. You're enormously successful rider with a great following and you've continued to live pretty near where you grew up. You're you're in Minneapolis right. Why why have you stayed where you go up I have a book store there for one thing what would I do? I can't move my quick move birchbark books but this is a sort of thing that people would be like. Why don't you live in? Minneapolis among the Financial elite right or somewhere else. I mean I feel that I've really moved into an entirely. I was born in Minnesota but I grew up in North Dakota. That's as I continually go back to my parents who live there in Washington and my brother and my sister lived there. I was miserable when I had to live far away from my family. I I never wanted to really go. I and I found it difficult to get back. I would never leave my I love. I love where I am. So so you're bookstore birchbark books. That's in Minneapolis is at right now. That's where it is right. And then you actually run the register and Run the store how you're GonNa make me laugh. Nobody lets me near the register. You don't WanNa hear I mean we. We would be in terrible trouble if I tried to take hold of that part of the operation now. Everybody kind of warns me up. I helped run it in different ways. My daughters all have worked behind the register. Of all worked lugging books appear back fourth two different events and I'm at different events but I mainly a May vary strong cheerleader and friend my colleagues at the bookstore. My favorite people and they're part of family. There's not a lot of independent bookstores around anymore. What what compels you to keep this going. Well we're a growing subset of Amazon. I suppose but we're there are an increasing number of small bookstores and the reason where where surviving and in many cases thriving because we can what people begun to realize that we pay our taxes that we offer community services like bringing writers in and Supporting local school systems and supporting literacy. You know that we do a lot for for communities and we also are We're romantic you see. I don't know how many proposals have happened in a bookstore. But they do. And how many acts of forgiveness also happen because we have a confessional in our bookstore and all you need to do is touch it and it's in your sins are forgiven. It's become a forgiveness booth. So there's these things that an independent bookstore can do there. That are also supernatural. I mean it's a magical realism place. I Guess Louisa Rick. Thank you so much for your time and for your writing. Appreciate your talking to us and you thank you so much louise are drake's new novel is the Nightwatchman. The Brazilian film. Bawku row tells the story of a small town in northeast. Brazil whose very existence comes under threat our critic at large John. Power says that while it's plot may make it sound like a grim drama rooted in the country's social problems. The movie itself is anything but the other day I went to a party. And one. Talking to some millennials who big surprise are backing Bernie Sanders? The conversation turned to the movies parasite and joker and one of the wondered if the popularity of their shared theme the abyss between the Haves and have nots meant we might be returning to the rebellious nineteen sixties. He would find further evidence for this thesis in Baku Arou- a funny violent unexpectedly moving Brazilian movie. That won the jury prize. It can last spring written and directed by Clever Mendosa few as Yuliana Danila but Kouao is a genus busting entertainment. That isn't once a portrait of a community. A horror thriller and a timely piece of political filmmaking. The story is set a few years from now in the huge area of northeastern Brazil known as the Tau an arid hardscrabble backlands akin to our wild west as the action begins a thirtyish woman named Theresa played by Barbara Colon returns to her tiny hometown of Baquero to attend a funeral if your grandmother but corral was one of those poor isolated slightly magical latin-american towns like Gabriel Garcia Marquez. Macondo this bursting with the stuff of life from music and brothels to museum rich local history as I think seem normal in Boca row. Who's tolerant life? The filmmakers show a slowly and affectionately. The grandmother is buried in a heartfelt ceremony. The vocal doctor played by the wonderful actress on your Braga dispenses medicine when she's not formulating drunkenly and theresa hooks up with a folk hero crook put cocaine played by Hunky. Thomas Aquino who's crimes are shown on a big screen. Tv in the center of town. Everyone's main gripe is that the smarmy regional mayor named Tony Junior has diverted the local water supply. Then ominous things start happening buck around disappears from Google maps. A UFO keeps flying overhead. A water truck is riddled with bullet holes. And what do we make of those mysterious American tourists staying in a house outside town? It can't be a good sign that their guide is the German actor Udo Kier. Whose brand is a morality. Hear these two over their plans for something. I always the thing jamming situation. It's jammed the signal is down. And they're the off the map people in Baku complaining about the signal and the place was not on the map so it works electrical showdown. Tomorrow there will be coming back with battery powered short after shutdown by by then some panic set in drug trucks really the Local contractors came through good on the road. All the road is blocked. Nobody's coming from savagery. Because of the people were paying to do it low contractors yes sorry the the local contractors and also there is no street market for the next few days. So we're clear no police here. No no buckle row is one of those movies like parasite or Mendoza's brilliant debut neighboring. Sounds where you're never quite sure where it's heading and just like parasites. It's one of those rare movies that manages to be both devoutly national and universal on one hand to film unabashedly Brazilian from its opening song. By Tropicalia Shintos Gal Costa to its nods to Brazil's Radical Cinema Novo movement of the nineteen sixties. Brazilian audiences know that it's tweaking their president. Jaya Bolsonaro a really anti liberal populist who makes Donald Trump look mellow yet viewers. Here will have no trouble following buca rows cockeyed plot enjoying. It's excellent jokes or understanding. The power dynamic is portraying though. Americans may be startled to see a film in which we are the bad guys not. This is any kind of anti-american screed. Mind You well. The movies not so fond of gun. Crazy Yanks it's clearly steeped in a passion for American pop culture. If you've ever seen a Western you'll know the action is building to a grand showdown. When Mendosa Enduring Hilas make not just exciting but politically charged faced with danger from the outside the community band together to fight back against whoever is coming after them grabbing? Weapons older new. They draw on their long tradition of resistance as a political fable buck. Arou- isn't what you'd call subtle though it is emotionally satisfying in its Tarantino. Fantasy of history's outsiders fighting back against those who've been crushing them but unlike Tarantino the filmmakers are driven by an underlying moral seriousness. Their use of violence isn't heartlessly. Gleeful you feel the human of people dying and the movies. Point isn't the killing. In fact beneath its exploitation film trappings but corral was actually a film about it takes a backwater community whose members are normally seen as simple or marginal and treats them with the respect. They deserve critic at large. John Powers reviewed the new film back. Row coming up we hear from Jill wine banks. She's a legal analyst for MSNBC and she has a new memoir about her days in the nineteen seventies as an assistant special prosecutor on the Watergate investigation. It's called the Watergate girl. This is fresh air weekend support for. Npr comes from whyy presenting the pulse. Podcast that takes you on adventures into unexpected corners of health and science plastic in the guts of deep sea creatures crying after anesthesia building. Your own Internet. Each episode is full of fascinating stories and Big Ideas. The pulse available. Where you get your podcasts. Or at WHYY DOT ORG support for. Npr also comes from whyy presenting the podcast and amplified and adventure series. Kids love here reporter. Eleanor with crafty villains and solve mysteries as she travels. Look Low to get the big story available where you get podcasts or at whyy dot org my guest Jill. Wine banks is a familiar face to cable TV audiences. She's appeared frequently as legal analyst for MSNBC often commenting on the Muller investigation or the impeachment and trial of president trump. But turn back the clock a few decades and you'd find her on the inside of another historic investigation into presidential misconduct as an assistant special prosecutor on the Watergate investigation. She confronted associates of President Nixon in court and extracted evidence from White House. Records and presidential tape recordings as a young woman. In an overwhelmingly male legal world she faced demeaning comments and offices courtrooms and the media including New York Times profile of her titled a lawyer in Miniskirts and while she was investigating the Watergate break in and cover up her. Own House was mysteriously burglarized twice F. B. I. Agents said a tap on her phone had been installed then removed her new memoir details her experiences in the Watergate probe and her personal struggles with a failing marriage. I spoke to her about the book. Called the Watergate girl my fight for Truth and justice against criminal president. This excerpt of my interview with Jill wine banks focuses on her confrontation with President Nixon's longtime secretary and Executive Assistant Rosemary. Woods will jill wine banks welcome to fresh air. Let's talk about your experience in the Watergate. Investigation. You were hired at the age of thirty for the Special Prosecutor's office. You're an attorney with some experience. You'd you'd done criminal prosecutions for the Justice Department. You were I guess. The only woman trial lawyer on the team there. How were you regarded by all of these other men the attorneys the agents others? Well it depends on what part of my career talking about. When I first started at the Department of Justice Again I was the only woman trial lawyer and no one really knew how to deal with me because they weren't sure whether to call me a a woman lawyer which is something. I've always objected to. I think that distinguishes me in a way. That's unfair from any other lawyer. I was a trial lawyer. Not a woman lawyer and so I've always corrected people on that particular thing. I really ended up being very much accepted in the Department of Justice Organized Crime Section. But it took me over a year to get my first trial and that was because I was not even aware I had no role models and no one to look to and it took me a while to realize that the men I started with were starting to try cases. We all start doing appeals. But they had moved onto trials and I hadn't and so I had to confront my boss and say how come and he said well. Because you're a girl and you'd be much more vulnerable in a courtroom in appeals. You're just with lawyers but in the courtroom you'd be with Mafia members and I simply said well. What didn't you notice about me when you hired me as a trial lawyer? And that's how I got my first trial when I got to Watergate. I had only a few years of experience but they accepted you once. You're on the team. Oh at Watergate. I never felt unaccepted. There were a number of episodes where you'd have to say gender played a role Judge Ceriga made several. I would have to say sexist comments one was during my questioning of Rosemary. Woods when he said now ladies. We have enough problems in his courtroom without two women arguing and that was while I was cross examining her not arguing with her He also said during my cross examination of one of the defendants Robert Mardian. Mr Martin. Don't you know you can never win? An argument with a lady and part of the trial strategy for Cross examining him was to get him angry and to get arguing with me because we really felt that if he yelled at me and showed his true personality it would definitely hurt him much more than if he yelled at Rick. Benveniste and my strategy had worked. He was getting angry. The jury was hating him and Judge Circus. Stopped him my Law School I went to Columbia in New York. The students there wrote a letter to him complaining about his treatment of me and he did apologize for that. You end up in a couple of confrontations with probably the only woman among the Nixon insiders Rosemary. Woods tell us about her rosemary. Woods was eventually called his executive assistant At the time she was his secretary but she had been with him from the time he was elected to the Senate. She had met him when he was in the House of Representatives and had been very impressed with how he turned in his reimbursement forms. He thought she thought he was extremely neat. And Accurate. And he was impressed with her as well and was one of the first people he hired when he became a senator and one of the first people he brought into the White House after he was elected and she was much more than an assistant to him. She really wasn't adviser and listening to the tapes That aren't relevant to the criminal prosecution. You can hear a lot of conversations between them that show their close personal relationship. Her brother by the way was the sheriff of Cook County and he Joe Woods Exchange suits with Richard Nixon and she exchanged clothes with Pat Nixon. She was known as aunt rose by both of the Nixon Girls Tricia and Julie and she was really a part of the family. Now she ends up being a very important figure. In this case people know her name because it turned out that one of the critical conversations just a few weeks short time after the break in conversations in the Oval Office had eighteen and a half minute gap where only appears on the tape very suspicious A lot of people in the White House had access but she ends up on the stand. Having to explain this and you were the one cross examining her. Tell us about that. Rosemary Woods was basically thrown under the bus. By the White House counsel. They said we have now discovered as part of the drip drip drip of bad news. After the hearing on the first two missing tapes they came back On the day before Thanksgiving and said whoops. There is a problem in a third tape. There's an eighteen and a half minute gap and only Rosemary. Woods can explain it and we can find no innocent explanation for it which was really a dramatic announcement and I had cross examined her when she first testified about the two missing tapes as basically just a chain of custody witness because she had handled them and she was tough wasn't she. She was placed e for sure We definitely had a situation where I knew that nothing that I got from her would be easily obtained that I was going to be very precise and careful in my questioning to get information but at the first time she wasn't suspected of having done anything I buy. Some amazing coincidence asked her questions. That turned out to be devastating. Once we found out that she had possibly erased eighteen and a half minutes of tape because she had told me about working on it for twenty nine hours at camp. David that very tape without ever mentioning that. Oh by the way. There is an eighteen minute gap in that tape and also I had asked her about precautions that she had taken to avoid erasing and she basically screamed at me. Well I used my head. It's the only thing I had to use and it turned out. That wasn't very effective. Obviously because the mistake was made and when she finally was called the second time to testify I had to give her her Miranda warnings which is something that lawyers seldom ever do but she was now a suspect in a criminal investigation and so I had to do it before I could ask her any questions right so she ends up giving this explanation of and people who remember Watergate. We'll remember this. That the seems the only way she could have erased this. She said the phone rang and she went to pick up the phone but somehow kept her foot on a pedal that was connected to the recording. And then that's what caused the erasure. But what's remarkable about this? She says well it was different in my when you made a comment about. That's awkward. And she says well it's different in my office and then you get what I said. Well then let's go to your office and continue the questioning and for some reason. The court agreed. The White House lawyers agreed and her lawyers agreed and so we went to the White House. It was my first time ever in the White House and she demonstrated the White House would not let us bring in a photographer. So I had to rely on Ollie Atkins. Who was the president's White House photographer and the pictures are dramatic? Proof that her story didn't hold up also just to make it clear. She said she had to make to mistakes. She had to push the wrong button. And keep her foot on the pedal which was a physical impossibility certainly for eighteen minutes. You might have been able to do it for one second but not for any prolonged period of time so it just wasn't possible. The pictures made her basically a laughingstock. There were a lot of cartoons about the Rosemary. Twist or the Rosemary Stretch That were really hard on her. I am sure it must have been very devastating thing for her. I got a lot of mail from secretaries around the country saying I've used that same equipment and it's not possible. No one could do that. It wouldn't work that way and then to make it even worse when the court ordered that we have the tape investigated. We hired a group of professionals in this field. First of all hoping that we could recover the erased material but we couldn't but also what they discovered was that it was not one erasure. There were multiple erasures now. This photo ironically taken by White House photographers kind of made Rosemary. Woods a laughing stock because it showed her in. This incredibly contorted position where she's stretching holding her foot on a pedal and reaching for a phone. It just seems kind of ridiculous. Did you have sympathy for her Probably at that moment I didn't I have an ability to compartmentalize and I was really compartmentalized. On what questions do I have to ask while listening to her answers? So that I can follow up. And make sure she's not invading my questions In retrospect I definitely have sympathy for her because I know that she may actually believe that she did that. But she certainly didn't and I feel badly that the president let her believe that she did it that the White House blamed her. She was represented. Initially by White House counsel. They withdrew that and made her hire a private attorney and which is probably the right thing because if they actually were blaming her ethically they shouldn't represent her but I'm sure that was a an expansive an embarrassment to her. She was certainly more deflated in the second hearing than when she had been called in the first time to testify about how she handled the tapes and the eighteen and a half minute gap was never officially explained. There was a lot of speculation about it. You write in the book that you have a theory that places Richard Nixon himself as the prime suspect why. There's a lot of reasons why he has the motive to erase it because it was the very first tape on our subpoena likely in preparation for whether he was going to give them to us or not. He listened to the tapes and logically. He would have listened to that one. I my theory. Is he listening went? Oh this is bad. It shows that I know everything just a few days after the break it. I can't let people hear that. So he races then he goes to the second tape and goes oh my gosh. They're all bad. I can't erase them all so I'm just going to have to stonewall and refuse to turn them over eventually the special counsel's office asks for sixty four more tapes and there's a battle that goes all the way to the Supreme Court and eventually the court rules that they must be turned over and that meant that you and the special counsel's Office got the tapes. You could hear them themselves. I'm just wondering you write in the book about the people who listened to them both you and women who are employed by the FBI later who had to transcribe hours and hours of them. The emotional impact of listening to these tapes. Just share that with us. Even to this day I remember how devastated and disappointed. I was listening because imagining can. Never be as bad as actually hearing the president committing crimes. And it's not. Just the expletives deleted language that was disturbing but it was the fact that in the Oval Office these conversations were taking place about paying hush money to make sure that the Watergate burglars never said that they were hired by the White House in the committee to re elect that they were told to commit perjury they. One of them was told to leave the country And as they planned all this and used unaccounted campaign money which led to legislation. That's been undone by citizens united the Supreme Court case They had so much money that they could spend it. And it's just very disturbing because I was raised to respect the president and the presidency. Even if it wasn't someone that I agreed with politically and so that was a what I now see as a childhood vision. That was justice listening to the president committing crimes. And you mentioned that some of the women who were transcribing tapes literally had tears on their G. They take they did. They cried because they couldn't believe what they were hearing as they listened to this horrible series of conversations and it's available to anyone who wants to listen through the National Archives. You can listen to these tapes. And it's proof beyond doubt of the president's culpability. You have a poignant description of rosemary woods after Nixon resigns after the Supreme Court insists. He turned over the tapes. And it's clear he doesn't have the political support to survive a trial in the Senate. He resigns she's around a bit. Tell us a bit about what she does. She was moved out of her office. Adjacent to the Oval Office to a remote office in the executive office building where she maintained a shrine to Richard Nixon Until she was eventually under President Ford moved to a separate building a little town house on Lafayette Square across from the White House. And she wasn't allowed to send mail to the president or with him and eventually became. She said it was like being a B List. Celebrity instead of a-list It's ironic but she lived in the Watergate complex and had a nice lifestyle eventually moving back to her hometown in Ohio and basically being out of the limelight. You said that she had when she was at the executive office building in the days. Following Nixon's departure that she maintained a little shrine to Nixon. Wh what was it? She kept all of his personal belongings exactly as they were including an ashtray. With a half smoked cigar which you'll wind banks thank you so much for speaking with us. Thank you. It's been a pleasure. Dave Jill wind banks is a legal analyst for MSNBC her new book is the Watergate Girl My fight for Truth and justice against criminal president. Fresh AIR WEEKEND IS PRODUCED. By Theresa may add fresh. Air's executive producer is Danny Miller. Our engineer this week is Adam Stanishev Ski. Our interviews and reviews are produced an edited by Amy Salad. Phyllis Myers Roberta shorrock. Sam Rigor Lauren Crandall Heidi Soman Moods. Eighty thea Challenger. And Seth Kelly Molly Seavy Nesper is our associate producer of digital media for Terry Rose. I'm Dave Davies.

President Nixon Rosemary Woods president White House Louisa Rick Watergate Chippewa Turtle Mountain Louise Npr Thomas Aquino Nightwatchman Patrice Dave Davies Congress John Powers Dave Jill Minneapolis White House
11-27-20 November in the news

Native America Calling

56:30 min | 10 months ago

11-27-20 November in the news

"Welcome to native america calling from studio forty nine in albuquerque. I'm monica brain. We're shopping around for the best news stories. Today we've got a reporter from the navajo times to give us an update on an alarming rise in kobe. Nineteen rates as well as details about an fbi raid of a massive cannabis farm on the navajo nation. Also will hear about increasing covid threat in north dakota and get perspective from a state representative and possible. Native names considered for president elect. Joe biden's cabinet all that and anita nerd pop culture update. We'll be right back. This is national native news antonio gonzales the art work of a clinker artists from juno alaska will be featured on a new post stamp set for distribution next year henry show with cage. Ns reports rico. Lana world is the founder of trickster company a design shop based in juneau that incorporates traditional northwest coast art into everything from t-shirts and stickers to skateboard decks and basketball's he says that an art director for the us postal service called him up one day he had apparently discovered some of Tricks are companies are work at the national museum of american indians. Gift shop in dc and That's sort of where our discussion began about. Making this design happen world decided to go with the scene from the traditional story of raven setting free the sun moon and stars for his design and he says he kept a national audience in mind in other so many depictions of of raven. The box of daylight story It almost a little bit like silly to do it again. But i felt like it was an important kind of desire kind of story that that gets a gateway for people to to learn about cricket culture. His design depicts raven escaping through the chimney as he is transforming back into human form. It's an exciting and chaotic scene. There are stars stuck in his feathers and the sun is in his mouth. Orel says he believes the decision to include. His art work on a stamp is part of a wider movement for better representation of native stories. I think the usps is sort of in line with everyone else trying to figure out how to enable indigenous people to tell their own stories. And so it's it's just an honor to be able to be a part of that and to represent. According to sealaska heritage institute the postal service had planned to unveil the stamp at celebration twenty twenty but the event was cancelled because of the pandemic. shi is working with the agency to hold a release ceremony next year. In hanes. i'm henry leash across the country covid. Nineteen rates are hitting all time highs. No one knows that better than the healthcare workers fighting the pandemic on the front lines. Kale c. c.'s. Brian bull talk to his sister. Traveling nurse who's just recovered from covid. Nineteen my sister. Tracy and i are both proud members of the nez perce tribe or as we call ourselves than ame- pu we're also both essential workers during this pandemic though to be fair tracy's put herself in harm's way almost daily since nineteen came to the us still. She was surprised when she tested positive herself. I did a lot of sleeping but looking back the whole first week and a half was a blur it was an early november and thankfully tracy's case came at a later time in the pandemic one knowledge treatments. A covid nineteen or much better than on its earlier stages my sister got the same regiment as president trump. Actually but she says things got tense when the texas hospital. She does stain him. Tried to discharge her after only four doses of remdesivir contrary to cdc guidelines. I feel that they were trying to discharge me because they needed the hospital bed. And i told her no that i would not leave until i receive my sister. I insisted on it. Tracy's now out of the hospital ready to see her grandkids in montana. She says everyone needs to wear masks and appreciate healthcare workers. I'm very relieved. And of course proud of my sister be well. Keep doing great work and i love you. Happy thanksgiving thank you. I love you too. Brian and happy thanksgiving for national native news. I'm brian bowl. And tony gonzalez National native news is produced by broadcast corporation with funding by the corporation for public broadcasting support by aarp fighting to protect fifty plus voters making sure they're heard on issues like social security and medicare prescription drug prices and ensuring that fifty plus americans can vote safely from home or in person more information at aarp dot org support by the center for indigenous cancer research at roswell park comprehensive cancer center dedicated to cancer research medicine and cancer care for indigenous population. The no charge online risk assessment tool is available at roswell park dot org slash assess me native won the native american radio network. This is native america calling. I'm monica brain joining. You buy skype from my remote home studio covid. Nineteen rates continue to surge across the country on the navajo nation. Infection rates are up and stay at home. Orders are back on in north dakota. The rates are so high that the federation of scientists put the mortality rate as the highest in the world. Today we'll talk with a reporter from the navajo times as well as the executive director of the north dakota indian affairs commission also president elect. Joe biden is picking beginning to pick his cabinet and some native names are floating around. We'll talk with. Richard monette a former tribal chairman and former official with the bureau of indian affairs about the prospect of native members of the biden administration and vincent chilling from indian country. Today we'll drop by and run down what he is currently narrating out about. If you want to join our conversation phone lines are open. The number is one eight hundred nine nine. Six two eight four eight. That's also one eight hundred nine nine native joining us. Now is our listen basenji she is a reporter for the navajo times and covers the navajo nation council and the office of the president and vice president and she is dna. Welcome back to native america calling lissa. Hi thank you for having me. Well i wish we were talking about better news but rates are going back on the navajo nation. What can you share about The navajo nation's government's response to this. Okay so right now. The navajo nation is experiencing its second wave as opposed to you. Know the rest of the country experiencing third and In on in september we actually had our first zero case for twenty four hours and we all thought that was really great news because then on it was single digits couple of double digits here and there and then all of a sudden after labor day and into october the number starts rise so now we are last night we were at two hundred and twenty six kobe cases right now currently has two hundred and forty five deaths and we're in a first wave We hit a record. Had a record of two hundred thirty eight just last week. We've had two days in which she had over three hundred cases so this second wave is is a is worse than the first by by far the right now we are. We are in three week at home. Order lockdowns we have our mask mandate which you've had april and you know for a time The businesses which as the gas stations on the weekends when lockdowns what happened even the gas pumps will be will be turned off. The people were be guessing up and going here and there but right now what going on is essential. Businesses are still open but they're only open seven. Am to three pm and Are essential government. Workers are the only ones that are are working and the rest of the government for most part is shut down again and for their also. Shut down to wow. That's i mean that's a lot going on with that What can you. i understand. There was a push to reopen. The casinos can share about where that stands. I think well what happened was our chino's happened. Close you know they. They were fine closing back in march as the president had asked and as a not only the president but their department of house and they were closed for up until for since march and then they started eating money and they received about over twenty million compares funding from us or from the government and they were able to get there get their employees back on administrative leave with pay but now they they need to make more money there. If they don't open out doing They're going to have to be commission so definitely Over eighteen hundred jobs that are going to be lost about eighty percent of those are navajo employees and the council had passed legislation to open these to see. Note that fifty percent capacity but then it got to the president. Hasn't he vetoed it. So we don't know i don't know. This is a popular out of our council when our president veto something they override it and if they override it sixty votes in the four council delegates in order for it to go through. When i spoke to brian. Perish the ceo of the casinos of navajo gaming enterprise. He just said you know. We're we're trying to stay afloat East how's it is that we have. They have enough cash reserve until the end of the month. And by after that they're just gonna have to start commissioning but He said there was talks. Between about among council overriding. That down veto. But right. now it's an air and was there any discussion about how to if they do open like what kind of safety precautions. They will take things like that. Yeah actually we have a navajo gaming subcommittee at is a different council delegates and during their presentation on why the downpl nations should council should vote to open. These casinos was. Because some of the members of the subcommittee and scheming subcommittee out to casinos in phoenix. Which is talking casino. And i forget the other one but there's to them and they looked around and see how see how they are operating and see how their safety procedures are and they were. They were really fired by it. I guess so. They came up with their own procedures to go by is like over two hundred of them and so there's going to be like every other song she will be taken out. There will be no nope. Blackjack or no Car games or anything like that. No people games and will be always like sterilization of of of the slot machines. And you know just things like that so it seemed like they thought that it was it was good. They got you know it would take all the precautions and make everybody wanting to go go with his plan but when it came to it only fifteen had voted for this legislation to reopen and eight Voted it down so in within the council. They're still very shaky about what what they should do. So it barely passed then is what you're saying. Yeah all right well Let's switch gears and talk about another story that's making national news on the navajo nation. So there's a there's hemp farms and you've been reporting on this for quite some time you in fact broke the story on this That Recently search warrants executed on On these hemp farms. Let's go back a little bit and tell us about What's going on here. Are these legal. Hemp farms these federal warrants at had an implemented and. You know the feds came in win over to these these Farm they found out they found. Let's see about two hundred sixty thousand live marijuana plants and processed an estimated of sixty thousand pounds of of You know marijuana within hampton marijuana all along and we everyone knew it. The community knew it. police knew it. But it's just the process of getting the evidence and and getting everything in control to make sure that it doesn't happen again as well as making sure that you know. If they do it right he can. You can't get away from it. You can't do the navajo nation and you know it's just making sure that everything is just done correctly and And they're standing right there and who's running these farms didn't even know he was. He ran for and how many president during the eighteen election and he was also the former president. Joe shirley vice president picks back in two thousand fourteen and so now he's currently or he was the san juan river farm board president and these farms that are that have been having the marijuana farms. They're all under his his jurisdiction as a standalone president. Juan farm president. So that's how he was able to. Just you know do what she had wanted to do right. So he's he's ushering. He's allowing for these. I guess we should say so hemp farms. Because i know that there was another news outlet didn't investigation and they They actually had some of the product tested and found that it was. it was marijuana. Not hemp Well you know. What are you looking into with the with these the hemp farms and coming up with this so well one thing about the breaking of the story was was after the police had initially gave an acknowledgement of these ten because they were getting so many concerns and concerned calls from community members about it. They wanted to put an acknowledgement to them and so they sent out a press. Release saying we understand. This is what's going on and we're doing our best to to To i'm sorry Address a talk with folks. Yeah because i mean i understand. There was like accusations of human trafficking going on there is lots of people from the outside. the commuters. very concerned about this. I even saw some pictures of people protesting with signs and things like that. I've been the summer protests that it was a protest against the hemp farm. So you know after the nomination. Police had this had Sent out press release. Didn't that the. oj has their own press. Release stating okay. We're gonna we're about to do. And even ali and his two companies in order to stop this. That's backing me. And so me and two other local outlets around here saw those press releases and we wrote about it and then then on those other to kind of just didn't go as much as into it as i did and i've been on it since the beginning of summer. And when it comes to the farmers the farmers and everything there are non navajo farmers that had worked in these Farms but they thought it was a legit job. They really did. I'm said that they had Stalls up the advertisement for these jobs and they called and then they came out and ask for human trafficking. I can't really say much to that. i guess searchlight has had found right and we want to learn more about this definitely will keep following the story but are lissa percent he thank you so much for joining us today from the navajo times. It is our monthly news. Roundup if you want to get in on the conversation. The number is one eight hundred nine nine six. Two eight four eight. We'll be right back Author hide eric's latest book of poetry. Big little bully. Ask big questions like what is truth. Now and who are we now. A national poetry award winner urged. Rick is an interdisciplinary artist. Working with video theater and art curation. She's our native in the spotlight. On the next native america calling the indian arts and crafts act protects authentic american indian and alaska native artists and craftspeople and their art and craft work under the acted as illegal to market art or craft. Work misrepresented as american indian indian native american or alaskan native made or is the product of a particular indian tribe reporting potential act violations can be done at d o. I dot gov slash. Iacb or at one eight art of fake support provided by indian arts and crafts board. You are tunde into native america calling. I monica brain and today is our monthly news roundup. I'm joining you today from my home studio through skype on the line. We have richard monette. He's a professor of law and director of the great lakes. Indian law center at the university of wisconsin law school and he has turtle mountain chippewa. Welcome back to nir calling richard morning. How were you or good afternoon. I'm doing good. I'm doing good. Did you have a good thanksgiving. We have a nice day yesterday. I speak healthy Thankful turkey and we were thankful to absolutely. That's great well right now. President-elect biden and his team are making decisions about who will be on his team. What kind of conversations do you think are going on right now about who will serve in key positions like secretary of interior conversations. Going on about who can get confirmed. Who's best for the job. We have our tensions out in india countries. So they're playing out a bit. You know we. We know that this position secretary and assistant secretary. You're actually sort of inherently conflicted right. I mean we like to think of these good times that they deal with and engage the tribes and tribal leaders but fact of the matter is of course their federal officials and so they. They're there to carry out american law which is not always You know friendlier on our side. So they get they get conflicted. This person has to know that going in. They have to understand all that. It's a it's a big. It's a big matter actually. Yeah and so. I mean you brought up this really interesting phrase who can get confirmed What does that mean like people who have skeletons in their closet. it might not make it. Well yeah i think that's given. Although sometimes the skeletons in closets might be the ones that are most easily forgiven. Actually people know the history. If you're talking about a native that actually lived the history especially in one of the reservations where life is has been difficult them or for a lifetime Sometimes those could be forgiven. It's more really you know Like i say because of this conflicted Position and sort of serving two masters a bit It's more that the person has to have kept really below the radar. Kept the headlock You know you don't necessarily get somebody who's taken some radical positions and writing being asked secretary assistant secretary and it might be nice if we if we did. Don't we don't get back. Well i know one of the names is congresswoman deb haaland. That's been floating around as she was on the show on wednesday. And here is what We are host hair asked her Thought about her name being up for secretary of interior. Here's what she had to say about it. I worked extremely hard and native. Americans played an extremely important role in ensuring the election of Our president of and i feel like it's you know we're moving into A four year administration of where we could to be united where we have Folks are going to care about racial injustice environmental injustice economic injustice. Repeat where we're going to make climate change One of the most important issues in this administration. He we know that already By President like biden Picking the folks. He has so far to lead his administration Regardless of where i am i am going to make sure that this administration is successful and And i mean that with all my heart. I'm honored and proud to to represent the first district of new mexico. I love my state and the people in it and well always Whatever i'm doing will of work to that end to make sure that our state is successful. If that's you know that's what creator has in store for me. I'll just wait and see and that was congresswoman deb on the show on wednesday and You know richard what she shared. It was definitely. There was a lot of like not saying a whole lot in terms. Of what i guess. You just can't come right out and say yeah. I want this job. I better get it. What do you think i suppose. Humble approach is best. But you don't want to be taking positions because this this can be dicey. I mean if you think that there's Being confirmed for the supreme court is rather dicey you know. Paying the head of the indian offices in dc can be rather dicey. I mean you know the tribes sit on vast amounts of coal and oil and gas and You know they swinging elections and various states and so let's not act like they don't have their finger on our pulse and so her her humble approach is is is i think the right approach and let me just say that. I think she would be an excellent Pick all in all. I think You know her house seat is probably safe for democrats so if they brought her over to be filled with the democrat. I know from people just asking. I don't know grant not even know if i've ever met him but i know that she's maintained ties to indian country and and that's important You know we have our own inherent tensions there. I mean we here lately that the non offer as population has grown more than the than the honors population and now perhaps surpasses it and Sometimes when you read that on the blogs the next thing you hear some anti-tribal government you know sorta tirade and then coli cow. We might be our worst enemies. We might be the ones that this destroy ourselves you know. Put that final nail. In the in the sovereignty coffin so this person has to be able to straddle that. And i think from what i've read about her background how she understands of both i think she will. Are there any other names that are being floated around for cabinet positions. Native folks that you. You're particularly excited about or that. You're keeping an eye on you know though i'm not gonna name names probably by name name. It might sound like the -dorsements than they won't get it for sure. I mean there are a couple of hold-overs for frankly from obama administration. That indian country ought to see was the and using the experience that they got then They did some bad things but they did. A lot of good and And i think By would be wise to reach back into that. Well i think and and take advantage of that you know they. There's a lot of work to do here. You know. I mean you know with you. Know trump administration going out. So it's it's it's hard to go down pretty much. The trajectory has to go go up almost But make no mistake. There's a lot to do. I mean you know they need. This person has hit the ground running half to have an agenda of legislative agenda. They have to have administrative agenda and to deal with the tribes. They have to talk about government to government sort of sovereignty relationships at the mean it talk about the tribes constitutions. Get out of their way when they fix some you know they need to try to deal with the self governing self determination and really urge drives do that get some money for it gets provided technical assistance. Finally get these promises done Sometimes the tribes are reluctant. That's why even say they need to kinda urge i'm trying to. You've gotta do this before it's too late. And there's just a lot of peo to eighty and you know the peel to eighty state so indian country we know the terms sometimes. None indie country. They don't but wisconsin one minnesota california oregon washington alaska That needs to be fixed. That's increasingly just a mess you know and then we have regional things. I made alaska's issues oklahoma's issues. Those are going to be tough to deal with. There's there's a lot of competing forces and this person has to know you know what's going on and merton oklahoma and that you know This case is about territory and sovereignty and the fact that there's none needs in that territory. How complex that makes this. But it wasn't about property which is seems like even all the native lawyers. I can say so Every to justice courses his language about property. This has to be about territory. And so you know. There's a big agenda cases. How about hicks and cotton petroleum and plains commerce bank coming fixing those you know getting to congress and seeing if that could be fixed because they can be so there should be a big jet dr. Ncaa is on it. I've had some discussions with people to the extent that bill de listen and did you say yes calling to you for what would you say. Yes if the administration biden administration i. I don't have skeletons in my closet. I about old cemetery. No yeah You know it would be nice. I wish somebody did have a little bit of the soccer east in them. That i Always say about myself and that would be nice if we would get that. Made sovereign lista. We supposed to do that next day shirt. Well how will these picks be different from. The trump administration's picks well. I mean they're gonna be. I think Less beholden to the idea of just the whole commerce side of the political equation You know sort of. I'm sorry if you're hearing that can getting an email you know they. I mean they're going to be. I mean like we said earlier. Indian country has big commercial issues and opportunities with again uranium coal gas. And certainly. that's the kinda person we got as the last secretary of interior I happen to have just met david. Bernhardt a couple of times. I actually think he's a. He's a good person i think and i think he met. Well look that's his. You know back stats his agenda. And that's was the trump agenda and it's certainly a part of indian countries agenda. Just not not the lion share you know and and We're not there yet. Some tribes are getting there and it's nice to see but we got a lot of issues out in indian country tough you so and i think the trump administration didn't focus on that We haven't had a lot of focus on that but I i think that that this is presented to joe biden. well Just from what. I know about him. I worked in the us senate. I also be as legislative affairs director. I met joe biden a couple of times. I'm sure you know he doesn't remember me. I think it testified in trying to one of his committees. One time. I met his his chief of staff. Ron clean when ron was on the judiciary committee and i remember. We're working on the federal death penalty act and how it should or should not apply to indian country Those are good people. And i think this is presented reiten thoughtful. And you know carefully strategically. I think even with a republican senate. Some things get done. I think north dakota's senators chairman of the indian affairs committee. Senator hoven and you know it's on hogan this no dummy and so and i think stands that quite often indian country and not any country especially the small state like his. You know the same water folks both of those votes. And i think he knows that and so i think he quite often more often than not. We'll do what we what we think would appreciate let alone the right thing and so i think he's a good opportunities really really good opportunities for this administration. I think it's really interesting that it comes down to a question of doing the right thing verses doing the thing that may swing you votes in some states and things like that and You know it's it's we'll see as all of this sort of unfold Richard what are you going to be keeping an eye. On as this administration incoming administration starts well as usual I'm always interested in how they interact with with congress and So you know how. How do we you know. How do we work in agenda. Through congress that is Maybe finley majority in favour of dealing with the tribes. And i really think that there would be opportunities. Cotton petroleum state. There's no reason straight. Sorry there's no reason for the states to be taxing. The extraction of oil from the three affiliated tribes or from hickory patchy coal. You know there's no reason for that none and if there is some well then let's set something that makes them those tear highways and all this and that but this is indian country from indian country. Generally reserved lands the states. The try was there before the state even existed and somehow state has some sort of police power taxing authority that came just flat out wrong and hicks case. Just flat out wrong. An easy fix. I mean there's a lot of tentacles in there and leave them along but requiring state police officers that When they're not not pursuit when they're executing warranty etc to use the official sort of sovereignty machinations of the tribe tribal court tribal enforcement. There's everything right to to fix that and would not be that difficult you know. Say they like that plains commerce bank. I mean you know it's a tribal courts You know we're in america so believe it or not every once in a while. 'cause of action comes into our courts that it's based on on a federal law or the federal constitution and i say they punted cheek because unfortunately most of a heck a lot of them do and and to sort of you know. Sort of extract that Those two ideas of art from each other this tribe and tribal gourds for the tribe. And you don't have a voice buying or building the contours of central. I think it's that's i think. Also fixable and so those things that would be just a nice agenda at the c. Let let's get after this stuff right. Americans they want to fix this stuff. So let's fix it. Well richard thank you so much for joining us today. We really appreciate it. Always great to talk with you. Thanks for inviting me on. I appreciated heavy. Hope you had a happy turkey day. And i hope you're staying healthy with all crazy with yup absolutely and It's our monthly news. Roundup joining us. Now as scott davis. He's executive director of the north dakota indian affairs commission. Scott is enrolled standing rock sioux. And he's a turtle mountain ship descendant. Welcome back to native america calling scott monica. Thank you for having me today and happy. Yup yup you bet. Happy thanksgiving Lot of to be thankful for out there in in the country today too so thankful for everything absolutely me too Real quick you know. We're about to go to a break. But the federation of american scientists is putting north dakota's mortality rates at the highest in the world. What do you think about this. Yeah well there's a number of factors. I think that our contributed that. I think You know In bad challenging. As well i think You know it's very high on our radar others see with our governor who i work for an also trouble later. So you know we've we've we're battling hard you know. I think we've made some Some great steps in a couple of weeks To hopefully curb that and also probably most importantly is just the the i guess the behavior or the you know the citizenship whether your travel are north dakota citizen to really Start using masking following those. Cdc rules rules that are created by local jurisdictions and also obviously trouble jurisdiction diction masks. You know social distancing Stayed at home especially now during this weekend Those are things that we really really got to start doing as as a relatives and so hopefully they'll all those things that are coming to come to come. They had here and start. Curbing this thing in making these numbers go down. What are the rates for What are the rates for north dakota for the tribes well. That's that's the interesting thing that you brought up because we do have data sharing agreements with or five twelve nations share and as scott. Just sorry so sorry. Hang on just one second. We are going to a short break. And i want to hear more about these rates as well as what. The state is doing to Work with tribes on this issue. If you're just joining us it's native america calling. It's a monthly news. Roundup and phone lines are up and we're live if you wanna give us a call. The number is one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight. That's a one eight hundred nine nine native and We're going to go to a short break. We'll be right back support. By the association of american indian physicians and the samsa sponsored opioid response network working with tribal communities across the nation to address the opioid crisis. Breaking the cycle starts with preventing opioid misuse treating opioid use disorder with medications and counseling and recovery support during all phases of recovery. If you or a loved one is challenged by opioid use disorder. You can find additional information at a p dot org. You're listening to america calling. Monica brain and we are doing a regular monthly news. Roundup for the record. Talk with scott davis. He's executive director of the north dakota indian affairs commission and scott. Sorry cut you off there What are the rates. Four tribes in north dakota the covid nineteen rates. Yeah that's a good question and and You know data. We're sharing data agreement with between our state and our tribes. And if you know. Dad is very very sensitive and very protected Among our trouble. Nations here north dakota so we respect that and honor that can give you some general aggregate data across the state Not going not going to try by try but some aggregate numbers search too. But when you look at the tribes and north dakota here. We're roughly about twenty percent positivity rate or hospitalization rates about six point a little bit about six point percent growth rates about one point five so those are just some numbers you know where we're at right now with some of those percentages Across the tribes. Go up but interesting to look at You know the the numbers of age groups particular I'm looking at Some of the age groups that are the highest is the twenty to thirty year olds Twenty two twenty nine and also the thirty thirty nine is very high then by gender More females testing positive versus mail Sorta about fifty seven percent g mail testing positive versus the males. Then lastly just the Type of spread jaipur spared that. We're seeing here in. North dakota and trouble nations is community spread and also close contact. So i think those are just some general numbers that i can provide. Aggregate numbers for now but You know it's concerning the tribes are working very very hard you know on on these cases and they have the more in depth End up numbers that were shared with their communities but in their districts segments. But you know it's it's a it's a tough tackle you know for not just stay with the tribes until we've been communicating With our data up here regularly every week Those are ongoing. You know we we start even from the get-go when we started the emergency declaration. What the tribes starting. What's the you know the ep equipment tribes still get a tons of that every week when when requested through the state. Testing is ongoing. We've done thousands and thousands of tests. In fact i think. I'm trying to give an aggregate number two bucks test. We've done here. I think we're hovering around seventeen thousand tests we've done with the tribes here that started and tribes had a choice to work with the state or work with Work with the federal government is that right and and the tribes chose to work with the state. Good point on that monica. That's true under the dirk. Racial fema trips can opt in or opt out with the with the stafford act and To our communications with the governor and in my office you know we convinced them. Hey i think you'll have a better better chance of receiving quicker and more recently. Ppe like testing on a consistent basis versus going through the feds. You kind of in line. And i've been on those calls with the i a the interior and i h s and you know and listen to in the country on the phones and a lot of them are still Kind of at the end of the line. So that's always a concern me as a as trouble members. So so by doing this with the state you know it's expedited a lot of resources more quickly like that like the testing p and now even with the vaccine. That's coming coming through Here soon you know this. Our state was awarded a cdc study designation of one of the vaccine available. How could we work with the tribes when the vaccine was coming so i'll just see we're we're in. We're in that we're very near of getting that vaccine allocated and again. It was the choice of the tribe whether or not they want to part with the state or not on the vaccine and sort of the five tribes that we have now to have agreed to partner with the state when the vaccine becomes available so again. That's the sovereignty and that's their choice travel nation. You know speaking of sovereignty. the north. The state of north dakota didn't have a mask mandate until just recently because of the rates going up. What do you think about this effort to mandate behavior change particularly as it comes down to. It seems to becoming a political party line issue. A good client Monica you know. We always know that whether you're travel eater trouble government or state or local you know legislative is really really tough And i've seen that. I ten out of the with the tries with With their own mask. Mandates curfews You know Community spread big gatherings. I mean there was a lot of Tribal you know i Before the state implemented their their laws in You know and it's tough you know. And i've talked to number of trouble liters who Who are frustrated like me of not following those rules and then here recently as you as you noted governors should mask mandate but again when you think about statewide you know you have local jurisdictions local control. And we're really big on that here in north dakota you know i'm a former city. Commissioner here mandate and you know. I'm elected to you can make those local decisions and in that's one thing that Our governor and a lot of our state legislators That local control whether you're city or county whether or not you're gonna you know Pass a mask mandate or what but what. I think what really made the decision. More concrete was hospitals as we've seen these numbers spike in grow and grow up. Then we're communicating with our local hospitals here Again i'm on i'm on the board here are stanford health board here in inner city to now. We're at the point where sometimes we're in diversion. And what does that mean. That means that if you know those referrals coming up from from my tribe you ambulance that has cooling related you know. Is there a chance that that person could be turned away or transferred to this case in fargo many many miles away so so those are putting stress on these beds on our equipment on our ventilators and most importantly to is our staff. Our nurses and our doctors are being really inundated to the point where we had to call in the The air force nursing staff. So they're here for a number time to give some some relief but i think Aside from the politics on the Stepped up here in north dakota and said hey. We're being inundated here. We we can only take so many colbert related and also we've got to keep the doors open for other health concerns with accidents and all these other things that are happening with health. I think it really changed the political mindsets of somebody's leaders. North dakota well scott navis. Thank you so much for joining us today. We really appreciate it. We'll keep an eye on what's going on in north dakota at monaco. Thank you thanks all right and now. Let's finally let's talk with concealing. He's associate editor of indian country today and he's akwa saas me mohawk walking back native america calling vince guy. Good i think. I already sent you smiling just so excited to talk about not covid. I mean you know. My prayers are going out to indian country and I hope everybody is staying safe. But there's something about being able to get into some pop culture to get into a movie to get into a tv show and really just nerd out especially especially you know when a native person is on the screen. Okay so tell us what are you excited about. So oh my gosh. You're so much excited about right now. you know As you know. I i do a native nerd column Do reviews and things like that but they have also some personal things going on. That are gonna be you know highlighted a lot of ways but You know the first thing that came out last week is the new mutants Which got terrible reviews. I was really upset about it and people are. It's the latest. Marvel universe installments This is based on the mutant universe but the reason why this is significant to indian country is the new mutants Back when i was a kid. And i opened up the magazine. I hear i'd look in. There is a native american woman as one of the heroes on the cover. I'm like what is going on. Her name is daniel moon star and She is a mutant and it was kind of a diverse cast of characters on this new comic called new mutants created by chris. claremont. Back back in the day and it just came to fruition as the film you know and just got released video on demand as of i think it was last week sometime You know and one of the things as a reviewer. As i'm really really lucky in that a lot of places will send me films to review etc free screeners and i could have got it free to watch. But i couldn't wait. I bought it. So like i watched it and i loved it. I think the reviewers are just jaded. I'm like there's a. It was a great movie and it was really really awesome to see you know. Blue hunt is the actress. Who plays daniel moonstone by the way. Her father is adam. Beach in the film may not have known And it's a great great film. It just just just awesome. I just i really enjoyed it. Because the immune is the x. Men world right right yes excellent world and you know actually the x. men world and the avengers world are actually going to be merging now because disney has all the proprietary license etc so they can actually afford to merge all this stuff now the only thing that can't really is kind of standing on the outskirts spiderman franchise which is owned by sony. So that's why venom didn't have the spider Insignia on his chest when the movie came out but now spiders joining that universal licensing issues etcetera etcetera. But yes there mutants you think is the the bad reviews are because people just cling onto some like hold in high regard. These franchises like x. men and marvel universe and stuff like that and so it the expectations just get higher and higher and higher and eventually not just star trek world book. But here's here's my answer that question because it's a very astute observation and yes so people expect you go to a mutants movie and or or a marvel universe movie and from get go. It's going to be blasters and flying and phasers and all these things people just going at each other million miles an hour with billions and billions of dollars special effects but see. The thing is for me as a comic next growing up with comics. Reading comics is the x. Men universe has always been profoundly mental psychological. The the driving force behind what makes us as human beings tried to strive from moment to moment. There's always a struggle inasmuch as you may have superpowers you also have the psychological implications of what would it be like to be ostracized for being a superhero. So there is this really super super mental psychological aspect to being a super villain or a superhero in the mutant universe and these kids who are in a sanitarium of sorts or a hospital of sorts. Deal with these really really hard core mental psychological issues. And i thought it emulated the x. Men and the x men universe better than than any film has up to date. I thought it was just brilliant. And i'm just i'm actually really ticked off at some of the really. There was a reviewer who call it the worst marvel movie yet. i was just like you just jaded. I mean do any of these reviewers enjoy movies. I mean i just was like gosh. I'm like oh my gosh. I think you get more kudo or more points for being. You know the really hateful review or something. I don't know. I just didn't get i. You never gonna get famous that way because you're you're usually a here. Reviews are often very glowing. Especially when i actually enjoy movie reviewer. That actually enjoys movies. I think everyone else. Out there. like this grinch reviewers or something you know. Well there have been terrible terrible movies. Sometimes i'm just like i just can't even review it because i just i just not even worth the time even bless them but couldn't do it. So josh director it was i i liked it. I liked it. There is one really interesting thing about it. on your taylor. Joy plays magic's who who's you know there was. Some people. Were pretty mad. Because she says some very racially hardcore things against danny moon start like okay standing rock and all these really really nasty like anti native sentiments. People were angry about that. And i'm like and i can understand that and i certainly wouldn't like say. Hey that's not okay but you know what at the same time. I'm like that type of behavior does exist and it is reality as much as it may stink and in that sense i. I'm not saying. I'm sitting here liking someone being called a native name. That's derogatory or stereotypical. 'cause i don't but there is some reality involves there and and and things come around you know so i. I just wanted to at least acknowledge that some people didn't like that aspect of it. Yeah i hear that. Well i understand you some personal news that an marvel about the marvel okay so to taboo of the black. Ip's as well as early. Every reagan is another martial artists I consulted on the where we'll finite project. They called me and they're like. Oh so. give us some insights. Here's what we're writing a writing. This marvel comic and so as a surprise they created tribal officer schilling that appeared in the of numb number. Two i cannot wait. I'm glad it's going to be. It'll be my twitter profile profile pic and just a few few hours. Because i went out and got a got it. They'll put a video of me going to get the comic. They told me. And i was just like you as a nerd. I mean come on. Come on this yes benz like a beat so you are now officially in the marvel universe events. And i'm like. Oh my god i said i am one like uranium accident away from being superhero. How did you imagine appear on the black talking and stuff so yeah so and you made a tiktok humidity talk about thanksgiving so a about a week ago. Maybe five or six days ago i was like So you heard of the true now kicked talk. I don't know if people know but it is lit it on fire for native people. There are so many native creators right now tiktok. It's incredible and just even even on the tiktok homepage you can go and swap swipe down on the hash tags and one of the main ones as native family. It's so huge there. So i was like. Hey i was really joined. I'm like. I really liked to so you can talk as you can post up to anywhere from fifteen seconds to one minute videos with background etc and and so. I did a video just a minute video saying. How do you know the history of of thanksgiving which happens to deal with you. Know english major Saying there's a peak what was killed. They burn white man was killed so they they burn down the quad villages killing men women and children and then william bradford. The governor plymouth came out and said let's celebrate thanksgiving every year for the next hundred years to celebrate this victory and So thanksgiving started as the massacre of the peak while people. So i put that on tiktok and within four days it went completely viral with over one hundred twenty five thousand views in just a couple of days and then we can we find you on if we just get your name. Vincent chilling find you on tiktok issuing a c. h. I l. venturing on tiktok vince. Unfortunately about out of time but thank you so much for joining us today. It's always great to talk to you. Also thanks to scott davis richard monette and our lissa santee. We're back on monday with our native in the spotlight hide erred. Rick and our executive producer is art hughes or hostess tear gatewood. Our associate producer. Is andy murphy reno. Spencer is the engineer. Nola dave moses is director and bob. Peterson is the network manager for native voice. One clifton chadwick is our resource development specialist and tony. Gonzales is the anchor producer for national native news. Charles there is our chief of operations and the president and ceo. Wannacry task is to increase on a on on to cook county Nuku had clue shoddy unionized and he indian health care provider. Cooking could true healthcare of cut. The spain cut you one eight hundred three one eight two five nine. Two centers for medicaid medicare gw tonka native. Teaching aids creators of cards for decolonization is a company which collaborates with tribes to create games in davos which focus on language culture and history. Native teaching aids can assist in creating fun engaging materials for your community based in effective teaching methods all materials remain the intellectual property of the community who then decides where and how they will be distributed. A portion of every sale is reinvested in further material development more info and online store at native teaching aids dot com. Who support this show. Native america calling is produced in the national native voice studios in albuquerque new mexico by quantum broadcast corporation and native nonprofit media organization. Funding is provided by the corporation for public broadcasting with support from the public radio. satellite service. music is by brent. Michael davids native voice. One native american radio network.

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56:30 min | 3 months ago

06-14-21 The cicada invasion is a traditional food bounty

"Welcome to native america calling from studio eight six nine in a slow pueblo. I'm turkey foot. Insects were once a big part of different native american diets. There were source of protein and are abundant with colonization. Came a move away from using insects food but now native chefs and cultural barriers are promoting insects as a way to connect would insist real food ways. The extensive swarms of cicadas in some parts of the country are helping propel that discussion join us for talk about traditional insect. Eating after national made moose is national native news. Megan camera can for antonio gonzalez. At least one. Large canadian city victoria has decided to cancel canada day celebrations on july. The first as dan carpenter reports the decision comes in the wake of the recent discovery of the remains of two hundred fifteen native children at the site of a former residential school in british columbia. Plans have now been shelled for the city on vancouver island to host a virtual candidate a celebration. The decision came after a unanimous. Vote by victoria city council. Instead officials say they will create a broadcast focused on the larger canadian history with guidance from local first nations. The broadcast will be released later in the summer. And focus on what it means to be canadian. Here's victoria mayor. Lisa helps right now. the likud nations are grieving And so it's very difficult for them to come and sing and dance and celebrate context change when those two hundred and fifteen children's bodies were discovered and and they are reeling and everybody is reeling. And so we're all just doing our best to figure out how to move forward. Some residents of vancouver island agree with the decision saying it might be best to cancel the celebrations this year and instead remember all residential school survivors and the victims. There have been similar calls across the country to cancel the national holiday celebrations. Many first nations held ceremonies to honor the two hundred fifteen children whose remains were discovered in may at the site of the former kamloops residential school for national native news. I'm dan carpenter. The discovery in canada of the children's remains prompted us interior secretary deb holland to write an op. Ed in the washington. Post calling on the us to do more to address its own. History of abuse in boarding schools holland is the first native american cabinet secretary and her department maintained many of those schools. She writes that. Tens of thousands of indigenous children in the united states were forced into boarding schools run by religious institutions in the us government including her grandparents and her great grandfather. She notes this attempt to wipe out native identity. Language and culture continues to manifest in challenges communities face today including cycles of violence and abuse and premature deaths holland writes that indigenous people deserve a federal government that works to promote tribal languages culture and mental health she notes the biden administration has made those investments in the american rescue plan. The american jobs plan in the fiscal twenty twenty two budget the hill reports. The budget includes a request of one point. Three billion dollars for the bureau of indian affairs an increase of over one hundred and ten million dollars the last budget though it is uncomfortable to learn that the country you love is capable of committing. Such acts holland writes the first step to justice is acknowledging these painful truths and gaining a full understanding of their impacts so that we can unravel threads of trauma and injustice that linger at least two native. American writers are among the pulitzer prize. Winners this year natalie. Diaz who has mojave and in in the he'll indian tribe took the prize in poetry for her book postcolonial love poem in which he weaves her indigenous and let next identities. According to the arizona republic diaz told the paper that an indigenous lens is also important for non indigenous peoples. We're all fighting for our water. She said we're all fighting for this earth. For one another against injustice. Louise urge rick then enrolled member of the turtle mountain. Chippewa won the fiction prize for her book. The nightwatchman the new york times reports that follows members of the chippewa in the nineteen fifties. A time when congress moves moving to quote emancipate indigenous people from their lands and tribal affiliations. The main character is modeled after urge. Drake's grandfather who sent numerous letters to washington officials to try and save his tribe. No prizes were awarded and the cartooning category but among the finalists was mardi to bowl senior. Whose work gives a native american perspective on news and events. He is oglala. Lakota and his work appears in the lakota times for national native news and make an camera. National native news is produced by broadcast corporation with funding by the corporation for public broadcasting this reminder to get your covid nineteen vaccination is provided by the association of american indian physicians and centers for disease control and prevention who support this show info at a p dot org or cdc dot gov slash corona virus as kobe. Nineteen vaccines are becoming available. You can learn who's eligible when where and how to get it and what you might want to discuss with your doctor at aarp dot org slash vaccine info. Aarp supports this program. Native voice one. The native american radio network. This is native america calling. I'm tara gatewood coming to you. Live from my homeland. So sure do last week. A swarm cicadas delayed a white house. Press corps plane from taking off in washington. Dc and at least one car crash is attributed to one of the insects flying in the window and distracting the driver billions of these loud droning. Insects are emerging in the eastern half of the country. After seventeen years underground. They give many people the creeps. These particular cicadas called brood. X can grow up to two inches long and they're full protein and her delicious when fry with a little butter and salt according to some native people who are currently harvesting and snacking on these winged bugs. Cicadas in insects like ants. Grasshoppers and crickets are a traditional part of different indigenous diets. Insect either is no longer common practice. But it's still around and important to those who are focused on revitalizing indigenous culinary culture in this hour. We'll talk about insect eating and you can join us to do you harvest insects or include them in your food. Do you have need of traditions. Maybe even food traditions that include insects. You can join us by calling one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight. That's also one eight hundred nine nine native and today we're going to start off in minneapolis. Minnesota with us on the line is shift. Sean sherman and he is the founder of the sous-chef and natives which is north american traditional indigenous food systems. And he is oglala. Lakota our pleasure to have him here thanks for joining us for another native. America calling sean. Thank you for having me. And so shaun. The bugs insects. People are buzzing about them. And so let's just talk a little bit about cicadas. Do you have any knowledge of indigenous people connecting to them and and maybe even how they taste anything there. Sean yeah well you know. We just really believe and looking at indigenous who systems and then defying our ancestors reheating And looking at all the different pieces the wild foods so all the different plants around us now. Various regions agriculture. Of course when it comes to teams you know insect is a thing that's so commonly seen so many different regions a still today in many parts of the world but it was completely normalized in many regions around us before conversation. So we just really want to as we kind of worked towards getting back to really understanding the indigenous diet to the past and applying it to now to being able to utilize and come up with recipes and find out. How do we move forward Mutilating this is part of our food source. And so i've been doing some reading and seeing that the on the nation re uses the cicadas. Remember time Of some hard times in. How the cicadas help. Get them through Have you heard of any of that. Shown yeah i mean there's been very various pieces in history here and there of of exactly that kind of situation but there's also been lots of communities that Just make it a part of their system completely. You know and it's normal like you cross over into mexico you can go to market and see huge amounts of different kinds of grabs and grasshoppers and locusts and things like that that people Enjoy immensely and even here in minneapolis where we have our indigenous food lab And we have some mexican descent workers that are alongside us. I grew up with them and love working with them. So we have them in our kitchen today and we're always gonna playing around with new ideas how we can present them to today's population. And so sean. Thinking of insects is another color in your cooking. Pellet your thoughts about incorporating them into more of this Indigenous infusion or waking up Indigenous food ways. Yeah we just see we really wanna help Normal life foods in general whether it is utilizing all the amazing plant diversity around us then You know working to find More indigenous producers helpless for a lot of these pieces that are natural to our region You know insects are a big part of that and you just really want to make sure that as we're you know creating new menus and especially having really public spaces like the new restaurant that we have coming up from downtown minneapolis. That there will be places on the menu to feature And just you know a lot of people to experiment and try and just begin that normalization process and for you are there any specific dishes year cooking up or or thinking about. Hey we could put some. You know different types of insects into this dish. We've been doing just kind of practicing like where can we put it to make it a little bit easier for people. Because of course it's know easy to put like a some chilies and oil and salt and just put things into tacos and stuff like that but We're also looking at other reasons the same as always man but he's got kind of Indigenous seed granola mixes that is using toasted and seasoned insect proteins to like the location grasshoppers. And we have a shooting enough. Cicadas coming into very soon So we're real excited to play with those and see what we come up with with our creative team in just foreseeing that they're on their way. Are there any special spices year. Very excited to try with them. I hear people in the east coast are using old bay. Seasoning about you Well we like to really make our own indigenous pantries. So i will just using the pieces that are natural around us so we have a lot of indigenous pantry items in our kitchen so it could be something with like stag that. All around us we use a lot of the conifers. Because we're in this forest area so there's a lot of fear in boston for There's a lot of dried berries from choke cherry to choke bury the own. Yeah to Elderberry and we'll try those out desk those out And do you see a lot of different kinds of spices. He has things like bergeman shops. Which has liquor she flavor Or the all the wild mustard around us and just all sorts of things that we can be kind of playing with as a kind of see which flavor profiles and combinations work and how we can present it in the way that Well you know get people curious and get them to wanna try it. Well wonderful sean. This is definitely an exciting time to be checking in with you because you are getting ready to launch something. There in minneapolis opened the doors. Serve the people Indigenous cuisine in anything you wanna share about that and listeners. Who might just even be interested in. Maybe one day visiting. Yeah so we are opening up a restaurant right downtown. Minneapolis right in front of a very sacred space for these beautiful waterfalls used to be And those waterfalls with call it a while by the dakota which meant place with the following swirling waters and our restaurant overlooks at exact location. So the restaurant itself is named alami knows a lot of calls. We're so sacred to the dakota people living here that they named the entire mississippi river the river the falls and we're really excited to be able to teach this food that we're going to be creating such sick and beautiful space and just really kind of introduced so a lot of the work that we've been working on for so long To the public to showcase what a modern indigenous healthy food business can look like. They're they're just really are excited to share that vision. Buddy mom excited to sean. Where can people find out about and special events they can always follow us on our regular website. Which is shocking. It's sl x dash. Show dot com. They can look up the work of our nonprofit with native addition speed by that and i s s dot org which is that acronym for north american traditional business create systems And they follow us on social media. Of course we have a big presence on instagram and facebook and twitter In the air always just releasing a lot of fun adventures. That were having all these different. Created in sean for you. What does it mean to be. Introducing people into an indigenous cuisine or Connecting them with things that our ancestors ate before colonization and even insects. You're changing the way. Probably people think about our native nations food Anything you wanna share about that. Yeah we're really hoping to change the conversation to what is true. North american foods and really understanding the immensity of diversity that we have there across all of our amazing indigenous communities and really exploring like what are true foods that truly represent us and how for those foods in the future And there's just so much in the purchasing from indigenous producers. I just really want to help. Elevate because i mean just showcase you know utilizing these teams that were building to come up with all sorts of new creative ways to help evolve through the next generation Into really you know. Just think about how impactful that can be if we can get. Somebody's healthy indigenous foods back into indigenous communities. So it's normal to find a lot of ceremonies and celebrations sound and gatherings utilizing a lot of the foods that are really traditional who i am and just being able to celebrate that and normal time. 'cause it's been it's too often. That would find too much. Processed food At a other gatherings and we just feel like there's so much opportunity for us to make positive changes in follow to really identify again. Like what are chu indigenous foods of our regions in that truly represents us you know so. I think there's just so much to be able to do for the future. There is in re introducing nutrients. I always like to ear those kind of conversations to about things that we have been missing in her diet but traditionally they were things that were on the table or things that we were able to pack away and go long distant go long distances with There's a lot of stories that come out when we start thinking about this. And the people who are the knowledge keepers who can take us directly there and tell us the stories of why we were giving these certain foods or how we came to know them. There's a lot of information there and one of the foods that we are spotlighting today are insects. And maybe you know him by another word Sometimes when you say eating insects people cringe or a different thing. But maybe traditionally when you think of it and you call it by its traditional name. Something else happens. Maybe it makes you hungry If you would like to share your tribe story of Connecting with different types of these beans and putting them into your own indigenous cuisine. We want to hear from you. Phone lines are open. One eight hundred nine six two eight. Four eight is a number and has something happened recently. That made you want to incorporate this party tradition eating insects give us a ring. One eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight is a number phone lines are open. Go ahead and give us a ring. Were ready for your call. Native deaths from covid nineteen already disproportionately higher than the rest of the population but the numbers from official sources like the centers for disease control and prevention or likely much higher than what is being reported. According to an indigenous reporting project will learn more about it. On the next native america calling support by roswell park who know tribal communities face persistent challenges in health equity such as cancer and higher death rates the centre for indigenous cancer research at roswell park comprehensive cancer center is dedicated to advancing cancer research that will lead to translatable science medicine and cancer care for indigenous populations. Were wide are you at high risk for cancer. A no charge online assessment tool is available at roswell park dot org slash assists me. You're listening to native america calling tara gate with from this little pueblo and we are talking about eating insects today. Do your native food traditions. Include them join our conversation by calling one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight. That's also one eight hundred nine nine native. We look forward to your calls and also here with us today. Out of minneapolis. Minnesota is chef. Sean sherman and he is the founder of the sous-chef and natives which stands for north american traditional indigenous food systems. He has oglala lakota and it is a pleasure to have him here for another one of our programs. And if you'd like to talk to him directly go ahead and give us a ring. One eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight is the number also hear from valentine nebraska is dr wyatt back and he is an associate professor of entomology at oklahoma state university. Welcome to native. America calling dr holbeck. Well thank you very much and and you prefer wyatt so wyatt. Thank you for being here. And we heard a little bit from Sean sherman and connecting to indigenous food ways. And is there anything you'd like to kick us off with when you understand Indigenous relationships to food and also insects. Is there anything you want to add to that. I'm so excited for the opening of that restaurants. I think i need a long road trip To try it out. So and oklahoma state university oklahoma is actually home to thirty nine recognized tribes and we have the largest number of native american students earning for your degrees outside of the travel college system and so in my classes. There's ten to fifteen percent. Native american students. And i teach a really big class called insects and society about six hundred students a year. Learn about the rules. Insects played with humans. And one of the things. I feature is intimate foggy eating insects So i'm trying to reach students. Who are otherwise afraid of insects. think they're disgusting and teach them about the importance that insects play for us and how they can even be included as a food item. And this is just a great opportunity I have eaten insects. And i can tell you that periodical. Cicadas taste like venison They actually have a flavor whereas most in sex except for ants. Really don't taste like anything except for the spices that they're cooked in and so This is just you know. People are interested in what insects are like. I think view insects in the way that people viewed sushi. Uh if years ago when there was only two sushi restaurants in the us and Now acceptance of insects is is starting to grow. And it's really a great opportunity to provide more food security Better proteins More natural foods and so It's great that this show is is talking about it and the chef from minnesota is is actually opening a restaurant that will feature insects on the menu. Indeed and wyatt when we talk about trian are there certain nutrients that you know of that Certain insects have that maybe even higher content of something than other sources of food. Is there anything you can share again. If you'd like to join us one eight hundred nine nine six two eight. Four eight is a number also looking for your food traditions. That include insects one. Eight hundred nine six two eight four eight. Go ahead white. Yes and that's a great question. It turns out that insects have an equivalent amount of protein. So for six ounce of Beef or steak. Six ounces of insects has the same amount of protein but they have less fat and they have more vitamins. Red don't contain a lot of Vitamin a or d insects do and in addition to those nutrients insects have their shells and the shells are not just by us so they become fiber in their diet so an insect is like eating a steak and a salad at the same time. That's interesting and does any of their properties in these nutrients. Go away when you cook them or or something else go ahead. They are fairly stable A lot of the research has shown that cooking insects doesn't remove any of the nutrients However if you cook insects that does remove Things like the venom in singers. So you're are able to eat wasps or ants By cooking them it gets rid of the venom that a person might think of when they are worried about a thing or wash sting. Well there you go. I know you've got questions now. So go ahead and dial in esque way. One eight hundred nine nine six two eight. Four eight is number. Let's go ahead and take a call. We have ricardo in albuquerque new mexico tuned in on k. Unm ricardo. thanks for reaching out your on here. I- tara good morning and good morning to the chefs just wanted to relate and experience that i that i have and you can have it right now today. If you go to the open markets in central and southern mexico you will find that they have large baskets of fried grasshoppers that are then sprinkled with red chili powder and they are a a well-known foodstuff for many mexican people be the indigenous or non-indigenous. And when i was in oaxaca very southern mexico went to a restaurant staffed by mexican ships and they made a salad with thin slices of hickama that were lightly sauteed and then they toothpick around a a line of fried grasshoppers and then a few slices of fresh tomato and then avocado cream dressing over it. It was absolutely wonderful. And i'm glad that we're talking about using insects as a food stuff needs to happen and the rest of the world knows about america of course is behind anyway. Thank you very much for the show. Tara are listened to you often and you guys have a great day. Well we appreciate you on the other ends of these need. Airwaves airwaves ricardo. Thank you for giving us a ring in it. Sounds like it made quite an impression on you and sean. I know that you are well. Traveled is well In anything you wanna add or maybe you even seen a some of this inaction. Yeah absolutely I lived in mexico for almost a year at one point. Two new state of naree on the pacific coast and it was pretty normal to see the chapel. Lena those those grasshoppers and some of the market's down there and again like it's just. She's pretty normal to find them on some of the menu across especially in some of the rural areas or even the cities of course but Yeah it's just. I've had experience with them In india even exist to this indigenous food conference in india were dishes people from all over the world and i was working with chefs from different parts of the world that were showcasing. The different insects. That were a part of their diets. So we tried everything from grubs grasshoppers to even edible spiders And some of those Insects were really tasty. Remember those Some of the grubs kinda like green apples. They were super tart. Which is kinda surprising I think you know it's just opening up people's minds a little bit more. 'cause insects can be an extremely sustainable protein choice and You know should be more normalized off their opening people's minds That's an interesting one. And even a ricardo's comments of the world knows america needs to catch up Is this the biggest hurdle when it comes to accessing this food source a why. It'll start with you any thoughts on that well. I'd like to add with the shelter. Lena's the major league baseball team. The seattle mariners tried them out on their menu and sold them for four dollars a cup and they sold out very quickly and then they got more than they sold out again. So the fans going to the mariners Stadium we're really interested in trying them. And that's the biggest hurdle is to get over the the ic factor to actually give it a taste and then as long as it tastes good people are very accepting of it And we can think about normalized foods in america that are actually pretty gross Things like raw oysters right Royster is not something that you would normally just pick up from the environment. And i think oh this is a delicacy but restaurants have convinced people to try it and once you try it People find that the taste is good and and and it's an enjoyable part of the meal and so the the same thing with insects and We did some surveys of different age folks from the us and found that the younger generation is far more accepting They can recognize that insects are better for the environment and they're able to Use them you know is a a benefits as long as they don't taste that interesting and the effector Shown you know your thoughts too about this of of how some of our traditional foods Got that factor on it and some of the things that were suppressed. Because it got a bad and label or or colonial society didn't jive with what we were eating with Your thoughts on on that and other reasons why some of our traditional foods have been seen as something that is peculiar. Anything you wanna share. Yeah i think that that's been done Not only here in the americas but all over the world you know you see the same situation With the average communities in australia new zealand and to know how their diets were frowned upon and looked at as much as when actually they were extremely nutritious. Really healthy diet. You know and i think that's again. The the western palate has had very little room for a lot of diversity especially when it comes to france and proteins. I'm gonna feel like there's just so much options to explore when you think about the diversity that we have from an indigenous lands and all the different pieces that can be including 'cause there's just so much more plant diversity within indigenous mindset and i So much more nutrition because of that and again because changes are using you know. There's there's so many other proteins that that doesn't happen to be a cow chicken and there's a lot of stuff out there and so for us when we are developing With our business entities. Whether it's the nonprofit are the the restaurant that we've removed a lot of those pieces just a showcase. How much diversity is still out there. So we're not using before chicken. We're not using dairy wheat flour cane sugar and we are using things like like the insects using lots of lot more plant diversity number utilizing a lot of trees and While they're in pieces like that. So there's just there's so much to just to think about the as we rebuild indigenous food in nutrition culture And just try to think about. How do we move forward in the future. And john when we think of our ancestors they really understood what it meant to eat your environment In a lot of indigenous nations were very mobile and they had to be Really conscious of what they were packing with him. What they were carrying what they were asking their animals to carry as well In for you thinking about insects and they're kind of everywhere in seeing that they're kind of snacks just waiting to happen. No matter where you go Is there anything you want to add to. That of our ancestors ate and Even begin about insects being at a destination spot where people knew they would have something to eat. Is there any knowledge that you have or or thoughts thinking about you know. They really ate their environment. Because we were all just so deeply connected to the environment in the world around us to the animals to the plan to the insects of birds fish. You know and especially if you're on the coastal regions where you just have a whole other food starts right off shore and there's so much there and just deep connection having that privilege of having thousands of generations before us to teach us what to do with all those plants have such immense beautiful knowledge that we're working really hard to train understand today like how can recover a lot of information knowledge. That was taken premise. You know not that long ago at the end of the eighteen. Hundreds sporting school systems arose and You know. Western education system overtook her indigenous education systems. so there's so much to reclaim. There's so much to understand And it will benefit. All of us various. I starting to bring back the knowledge of our hands sisters and apply it real world today and especially when it comes to nutrition because the most important part of how can you live with our environment And how can the environment can provide so much for us. This is a brand. And i think even reframing how we talk about all this to a lot of times you hear the term Food desert and that could be taken as an offensive thing for those who are from the desert. No there's all kinds of food Growing everywhere in abundance to sean any comments on that absolutely so i've utilized that scenario in nevada talks able to give them different regions. But you know because you look at the term food desert but as you just said people who are in the desert region saw nothing but food and medicine all around the knew very well that you know they had so much There was so much to offer them might there And so if i think of the desert i think of a suburb that has a bunch of chain restaurants with very little nutrition. Now we have to just reframe the way we think and talk about foods and you know we just really believe that we can get back there. And that's part of the work for non. Is we want to build to utilize ourselves this training center to teach indigenous communities how to implement modern day indigenous culinary into their community to bring back recipes and menus that represent them their language their land space And to be able to utilize a lot my because so much health will be able to come out of that and we can really save a lot of our culture for the next generation and you know some of the convincing to happens within our own nation And thinking about traditional foods and if we go specific to insects If you knew your tribe traditionally consumed different bugs As a part of their daily meal or when they were hunting What about now. What about re-introducing those ways. is the reaction You know do you get the big eu or or you know. The people shy back or Excuse themselves real quick till the dishes. Gone what about that side of this too. We know we're talking about Mainstream america and their thoughts to indigenous foods. But what about native people to their own food Is that also something that is a hurdle and maybe you're working on something that helps people get around that maybe even educating why it was important Maybe the cicadas are. One are are one Insect that teaches you about tradition if we have any onondaga in the listening audience. In you know this story maybe you've used it to teach your younger generations about the resilience of your ancestors. We sure hope you'll call in our phone lines are open. One eight hundred nine nine six two eight. Four eight is a number and we have shared. There are different tribes who turned to insects as meals as ways to survive. Maybe your tribe is one of them. If you'd like to share some thoughts on any of this go ahead and give us a ring. One eight hundred nine six two eight four eight is a number and we have to knowledgeable gentlemen on the line with us today if you would like to ask a question about any of this. Go ahead and give us a ring. One eight hundred nine six two eight. Four eight is a number tribal leaders where you at. I want to hear you weigh in on this too so go ahead and give us a ring. One eight hundred nine native support for journalism that raises the awareness of child wellbeing to citizens and to policy makers provided by the annie e. casey foundation building a brighter future for children families and communities information at a e. Cf dot org support by the suit. Trading post who special selection of dried herbs or chosen for superior quality than many sage sweet grass braids and red willow bark and cedar or wild crafted all available at sue trading dot com. Whoa pila thank you for tuning into native america calling tara gatewood and we are talking about insect eating today and do you know of a time when there are a vibrant part of your indigenous diet. And what do you think it'll take to change attitudes towards eating insects. There is still time to join the conversation. Dial in at one eight hundred nine six two eight. Four eight is a number. That's also one eight hundred nine. Nine native with today is chef. Sean sherman. also. Dr wyatt holbeck. Who is an associate professor of entomology at oklahoma state university. A gentleman thank you both for being here with us in sean. All toss some some of that To you that we were talking about before the break about having to even convince people within our our own native nation about turning to traditional food ways or even incorporating insects and maybe the biggest fear factor is with our tribes themselves Any thought sean. Yeah i mean. I think that once people open up their minds a little bit and you know You know try and you know. I think chefs can be so implemental. I think that we're seeing more and more native chefs coming out every year You know some of them are going to come up with really fun creative ways to introduce insect protein into people's diet and i think people will be more You know probably lean towards trying those pieces as As we see more and more creativity come out of out of that kind of work. So i feel like it's just using that influence for good And just you know opening up the doors for you know someone more people to hopefully Try something that's a little bit of their realm but You know maybe make it a little bit normal for the next generation very nice. Things are that sean We got a caller on the line. Let's say hi. To bruce. Who is in idaho tuned in on k. I y e. Bruce thanks for giving us a ring. You're on air hello there I was just curious about the infestations of the crooked. And i know that they poisons of crickets to try and get rid of does the. There's a poison. Stay in crickets once once a government or a agriculture or whoever is poisoned these insects. How long does the poison state. Wonderful question bruce and also a cautious some part of the conversation that we should be having to about thinking about. Okay you're gonna do in six but where those insects been. What have they been eating been sprayed with and is it safe to eat those great question. Bruce why it'll turn to you anything. You wanna share with bruce. But yeah that is a great question. in most of the western. Us grasshoppers are considered to be pests because they eat a lot of the range land forage that cows also eat and so there are programs where pesticides are applied there's different types of pesticides and some kim impact. Humans and others are more specific to the insects. So there's a class called an insect regulator that affects how they moult and that's not too harmful to vertebrates like us but our normal organophosphate pesticides Will the insect to die right away. you'll notice it's like spring raid. They flip over on their back and their licks kick and that poison can also affect us. So if you're considering eating insects you wanna make sure that you're getting them from a certified source The places raising insects for animal food for feeding pets for example often raise them in in good conditions and make sure that there's no accidental toxins Sex most of the ones that you find If they are normally have not been exposed to some type of toxin. But it's a good idea to know what's happened on the land where you're looking for the insects and also pay attention to their behavior again. Bruce thinks that question. Maybe you have one two. We hope you'll ask it today. But dialing in one eight hundred nine six two eight. Four eight is a number of take another call. we have alita in albuquerque. New mexico tuned in on k. Unm alita. thanks for reaching out. You're on here. Hi thank you for of life. My name is saudis That we looked at the for the mini. And i they will abou- and rachel carson about the insect and she's in the book very much so In the name of the book is silent. Spring and seeing court is so much to be said that insects because they contribute so much. Vitamin is spot of everything. Difference them vitamin as we pull in started. My say please. Don't step on this and don't do this don't do that and let's kinda did let us fight it in the last two now in the in the patio wherever it so for i am. I don't mad. I am not going then my child. He's okay we disagree so they use it so i have mixed feelings about this now. Ooh alita you called in. Because i think this is an important aspect too and I want to turn to sean and when we think about this. There's also teachings that go along with this. You don't just gobble every single thing up in sight but you do it in in just enough kind form in way to say l. Let you say better Sean anything on that that you'd like to offer to alita. Yeah i believe that there's so much tradition involved and respect going to the different kinds of foods and we look at you know just our ancestors now. A lot of these traditions have carried on so there's still a lot of prayer ceremony and songs that are sung for things that are being harvested and processed And there's just you know. I think it's really important that we hold onto a lot of those traditions and even create new respectful traditions to the next generations about you know giving respect back to anything. That's coming to us. Inform nutrition to sustain our bodies and our livelihood. I think that that's that's a really great in business. Perspective of just maintaining that connection to where our food comes from. And why it's important and celebrating. That in sean differently to about not eating all the source anything you want to share about that absolutely i mean and it's really eating things In a sustainable fashion so it's just like foraging knowing you're out there and you're harvesting berries or something you don't want to take out the whole area Everything something for the plants for the birds some for the animals. And you know it's an or ramps or another good example because you wanna make sure that you know how the plant works exactly and how it reproduces. You're not clear cutting entire colonies. But you know just being very selective leaving a lot of the ritz in the ground and taking news. You know as much as you can and it's just you know just thinking about it from that perspective that you know it's the that we have to be symbiotic after thinking that level and that we have to put a lot of respect back in a very careful from overharvesting. Thank you for the had to end why to turn to you. Another point that alita brought up of the important role insects play in in the environment and even balancing Things and if you start wiping them out you might be wiping something else out anything. You wanna add or anything you want. Share with the leader of that is a great perspective. And i'm thrilled that she is practicing This was influenced by rachel carson and his teaching her children that Do play a role in the environment. And even though many people don't think of insects and animals they are But fortunately they're also different kinds of animals than what we're used to thinking of as an animal so there different than rabbits and deer and turkeys they produce large numbers of offspring. And they have short life spans and this actually is an advantage if we start producing insects as a food source because they take up less space they use less resources and they provide more nutrition. If we're collecting insects. We definitely want to honor that. They are alive and that they play a role in the environment. And we don't want you take all that we can find and and use them indiscriminately so there's a really great point again. Alita thank you for reaching out and giving us a ring out of the k. u. n. Listening community couple of minutes. Left if you wanna squeeze something in dial now one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight is the number in why while we have you here and while we have the time we know. Cicadas are definitely something. A lot of people are taking a look at and in thinking about as a food source. Is there anything you want to. Just drop some knowledge on when it comes to cicadas their resting period or just even their nutrition. Anything more you want to share another great question. So the cicadas that are coming out on the east coast. Right now are called kyrie article cicadas and they take seventeen years to complete their life cycle so the adults that are out right now singing. The males are singing they find females. They lay eggs in the tips of tree branches. There's eggs hatch pretty quickly and the larvae go into the soil. They feed the tree roots and it will take them seventeen years before those larvae crawled back out of the ground Leave their shells and the trees and becoming adults. So using cicadas as a regular part of your diet you're going to be hungry for a lot of years Because they're only out number seventeen And there's different broods around different parts of the united states. But we don't have any. Cicadas being cultured. You know a factory raised or anything like that. There's another type of sucato that everyone sees every summer and it's called the dog base takeda. They usually come out in august. They're much larger But there's much fewer up some so there's only A few that come out instead of the millions of the periodical data and So they could be gathered as you know an occasional food source. But there's not enough that you could live on them for very long anyway in thinking of seventeen years to have to wait to connect with indigenous traditional foods. I think that's something interesting. Insignificant to also. Just take a moment with as well. And sean just thinking about different things that are incorporated in the indigenous diet. Sometimes there are things that you only get once in a while Or you think of the rotation of berries in how long it takes for them to actually produce berries Is there anything you want to share just from an indigenous perspective to about waiting seventeen years to taste traditional food. Yeah i mean. I think you have to put a lot of that respect into that just understanding how that full life cycle of things work And i think it's just really important that we don't just overlook the uniqueness and special the special occasion of when this happens and you know. Celebrate this with you know a little bit more Impassioned just embassy when it comes down to it and it's like that for a lot of pieces because we've lost a lot of access to a lot of our traditional food laze in general. This things like the perry turn-up tim salah that. I grew up with In south dakota plains that in be really hard to find sometimes because of all the cattle ranching that moved in or industrial agriculture that took away a lot of the diversity of the planes and just the complete loss of bison help spread those Those those plant pieces really far area so again like we have to be very careful With pieces like that. And hopefully we can start to recreate a lot of land space To harvest more of those kinds of things and when it comes to these cicadas Particularly it's just Appreciating About about full cycle of life happens and how special even being never to try them can be in. Oh the days of being. Feral is always remembered. That line from your book sean. Crack me up. When i read it when you used to be fair when you were little I related to that and Why do we have a little more time. I'm curious about ants and eating ants That this is a tradition among different tribes. Is there anything you want to share about their protein source or or just even harvesting them shores so are known as you social insects they form a colony and the answer that you see crawling around on the surface are the workers. So they're not able to reproduce their out providing resources for the colony down deep underground or log There's the queen. Ants and the queen is the only one reproducing and so as long as the queen is there and there's enough workers colony will continue. But it's special times of the year when the colony has gotten large enough and got enough food then they make more reproductive they make future queens and kings and these insects emerge with a lot of teams They have the wings they fly They are the most nutritious of the insects. But of course you can't collect all of them because they're the future ant colonies as well so With aunts they actually get their scientific name the for the family from a type of acid that they produce called four mc acid in for acid is a little bit bitter Little bit citrusy. So you are an insect that actually has a flavor that's like different than most other insects. That tastes kinda like corn meal and They can be really delicious They can also be kind of strong. And you think of the importance of smell and in how you know they live off of that and are able to find their way back to where they need to because of that and just thinking of that and then how important smell and taste is when we think about food Just still more curious about that. And if there are native nations who turned to this Being as a food source and you'd like to further the conversation you can always reach out. We know that many communities have a lot of respect for our aunts into and the role that they play. So maybe we could do a whole show on ants I wonder But there is so much more and we look forward to the way you will explore some of this information maybe even on your own or around your own dinner table and remembering food traditions. That used to be that. Maybe you're going to do something. About bringing back and hats off. To all of our folks are bringing these indigenous food ways back reviving them making them stronger reintroducing them to places to even urban bustling settings like minneapolis or has definitely go off to you and our hats off to our guest joining us today. Thank you for your time. Chef sean sherman and also dr wyatt holbeck. We hope you'll join us again tomorrow for discussion about an investigation into cove mortality statistics for native americans. Thanks again just kicking off the week and if you'd like more details on everything that we have planned for the entire week you can find it on our website. Native america calling dot com. I'm tara gate with thank you for starting your week off with us and if you feel like reaching out and again carrying on the conversation find us on facebook at one eight hundred nine nine native on twitter or native america. Calling dot com. I'm tara gatewood will meet you here tomorrow. Support by western governors university online university for working adults and underserved populations at wg. You students apply what they already know. Learn at their own pace and graduate sooner with little or no debt with bachelor's and master's degree programs in four fields business. It teaching and health professions including nursing information and application at wg dot edu slash degrees squeezed. A yeah we all star in the dega. Chickeny lillo star c. d. nitsa low. His celena he go teha Dan data exists these with tano hatani area Yellen new don dak- an excess de ski nas key stella at healthcare dot gov a- one eight hundred three one eight two five nine six. He ought to know. Seh medicare medicaid in doshisha. Native america calling is produced in the annenberg national native boy studios in albuquerque new mexico by kwon broadcast corporation and native nonprofit media organization. Funding is provided by the corporation for public broadcasting with support from the public radio. Satellite servants. music is by brent. Michael davids native voice. Blunt native american radio network.

Sean sherman sean america dan carpenter minneapolis roswell park tara gatewood Megan camera antonio gonzalez victoria city council vancouver island kamloops residential school fo deb holland american cabinet biden administration bureau of indian affairs lakota times wyatt
06-25-20 Keeping elders safe and engaged

Native America Calling

56:30 min | 1 year ago

06-25-20 Keeping elders safe and engaged

"Woken to native America, calling from Studio Forty, nine in Albuquerque unterrogation would. Elders are at an increased risk right now. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says people, Sixty five years, and older are more vulnerable to complications from covid nineteen, and the pandemic is far from over. Today we're going to hear from a few different organizations that are working to keep our elder, safe and healthy. And, elders, you're invited to the conversation as well. We live right after the news. Stay with us. The National Native News Making Camera. Kim for Antonio Gonzalez tribal governments have joined environmentalists Labor activists sent a lawsuit against new rules that rollback federal, clean water regulations, earthjustice filed the lawsuit on behalf of the possible Yawkey tribe of Arizona bad river band of Lake Superior Chippewa the on Indian nation of Washington State, the Fond Du Lac band of Lake Superior Chippewa of Minnesota. The menominee Indian tribe of Wisconsin and the tonal autumn tribe of Arizona. A C central reports, the suit contends the new federal navigable waters protection role actually weakens expanded protection for streams and wetlands that were put in place by the Obama Administration. The new rule took effect this week. It eliminates intermittent and ephemeral streams from bodies of water, protected under the Clean Water Act. The possible Yawkey tribe is concerned. The rollback will lead to damage of a major water source state officials in Arizona have supported the federal rule change, even though environmentalists warned the state could lose protections for more than ninety percent of its water bodies under the new rule. In Canada charges have been dropped against northern Alberta first nations chief who is the subject of a violent arrest a couple of months ago as Dan Carpenter Chuck reports, the arrest caught by police dash camera led to anti-racism protests across Canada chief Alan Atom of the ATHABASCA one first nation, no longer faces charges for resisting arrest and assaulting a Royal Canadian Mounted Police officer. Adam was the subject of a violent arrest in March. Police Dash Cam video showed him. Him, being tackled and punched in the head, he had been stopped for an expired license plate a statement from the Alberta. Prosecution Service says it had reassessed prosecution standard based on an examination of the available evidence, including the disclosure of relevant material and has withdrawn the charges. The arresting officers are under investigation over the incident chief atom says he's overwhelmed that the charges have been withdrawn having that it's time to move on a sign of relief in regards to. The whole ordeal that. Transpired under early mornings of Mark Steyn. And described that put aside in. Time to move on and continue on. Supposed to be doing. Adam called on Ottawa to address injustices against indigenous people, and said Canadians must open their eyes to the reality is that indigenous people have lived with for decades, the national chief of the Assembly of first nations welcomed the dropping of charges, but said it's clear that racism is embedded within most public institutions, especially the police Adams lawyer also said the decision throws a spotlight on systemic racism that has gone on for too long unchecked in Canada for national late of news I'm Dan Carpenter? In South Dakota the Cheyenne River Sioux. Tribe filed a lawsuit this week. Against the trump administration of what it says were threats to impede COVID, nineteen relief funds, and to take over policing on the reservation. The Grand Forks Herald reports. The tribe set up checkpoints leading into its lands in south. Dakota in April to protect tribal members from the spread of the corona virus. The lawsuit says pressure from Washington DC came after pleas for help from the state's governor and congressional delegation. The tribe is asking the US District Court for the District of Columbia to block the federal government from taking over tribal policing and forcing it to remove its checkpoints. On the Navajo Nation this week president, Jonathan, Nez and Vice President Myron leuser issued a proclamation to fly all flags at half staff to honor Navajo. Police officer Michael Lee who passed away to covid nineteen on June nineteenth Nez said lease saved many lives during his twenty nine years of service, and give his own life to serve and protect the community the funeral for officer. Lee is being held on Thursday June. Twenty fifth in Chandler Arizona. For National, native news I make an camera. National Native News is produced by Broadcast Corporation with funding the corporation for public broadcasting. Support by the American Indian Higher Education Consortium. Working to ensure tribal colleges and universities are included in our higher education system. Info on distance learning at a I H, e c Dot Org. Support by the Oscar Chambers law firm, championing tribal sovereignty and defending native American rights since nineteen, seventy, six with offices in Washington DC New Mexico California and Alaska. Native won the native American Radio Network. This is native. America calling! I'm Taraji would elders are valued across our native nations behold a place of honor, and often our leaders within the tribe, but the covid nineteen pandemic is putting our elders endanger the centers for disease. Control and prevention put adults age sixty, five and older in high risk category for developing complications from covid nineteen. The most effective way to prevent spreading the virus to elders is to avoid contact with them, but that isn't always easy. Particularly when elders depend on family members for support, there's also the loss of personal connection with elders and many mishearing their wisdom about what's going on and to start the show. We're going to hear from elder senior producer Monica brain talk with Marcella. The bow cheese one hundred years years old, a World War Two veteran, and she is Cheyenne River Sioux. She is somebody that many really turn to for advice in different times and Um, we get to the ability to hear her today. She says she hasn't seen anything like the pandemic response before. Hundred Years Old. Now you know I I was slated except for my grandchildren who come in to see me. Commitment they all believe and they're satisfied on our reservation Cheyenne River reservation. The Travel Chairman Paul Frazier has set up checkpoints. On most of the highways coming in twelve reservation, and they have deputize tribal members to monitor these places and I believe it's happening. We have six concern tastes now in some have recovered. And today we are talking about caring for. We also WanNa hear from our elders who are also listening in. How're you doing? What do you think is important to know right now? And of course any thoughts go ahead and dial in one, eight, hundred, nine, nine, six, two, eight, four, eight is a number, and if you'd like to share your own story to of making sure, your elders are safe taken care of. During this pandemic, you can tell us all about it. One, eight, hundred, nine, hundred, six, two, eight, four, eight hundred number. That's also one, eight, hundred, nine, nine, native and today. We're going to start off in Economic Pueblo. It's our pleasure to have governor. Brian Video with us today? Governor. Thank you for joining us. Good morning and thank you. Tara And Governor many people saw your visit to elders recently there in the Pueblo of course. When you hear about some of the safety precautions, you took to go and check in. But why did you make this a priority to make sure that they were safe to even just be there and let them hear your voice, or let them know their governors behind them. Go ahead and tell me a little bit about that decision. Thank you for the question. Tara and thank you for the invitation to participate in under today's discussion. I certainly hope that. Everyone who has tuned in and all of you on the program are well today, and your families and communities are well during this challenging and very unprecedented time. the the people of Alabama. You had been monitoring. The developments around the coronavirus in since the end of Two. Thousand and nineteen and the first case appeared in. The United States in January of this year. And we're really. Optimistic that you know. Would not be spread of the virus in the United States and certainly not into our area of the states and. You. Know not into our community. but as The virus was You know really. Laying, it's on course. We knew that we had to be proactive and have as much information available to us as possible to to protect our our people, our lands and all of our resources. And so in March for the year on March thirteenth the day that new. Mexico reported its first case the people of Alabama. Through my office did issue. A health emergency declaration. and. we began to mobilize. Our held command center. And also take initial steps to ensure that. we had a level preparedness internally within the tribal government organization to them. Take some next steps. And some of which included closures of our government operations our schools. Our senior center. and eventually some of our trouble businesses. so we try to be proactive as we could be and as informed as we could be and communication with the appropriate state and federal agencies to understand the virus as much as we could at that time. And you know as we were having these conversations within their tribal government. Here you know we. We were concerned of course for entire community safety. But we also. Paid special attention to. Our resources, human resources are elders who are the keepers of culture and our our oral histories. Our teachers. Are nurturers or support mechanism. And also looking at the future. And safeguarding or other resources valuable resource which are our children? And so our accents to follow what's included an executive order that mandated closer if our Pueblo and other restrictions Really mandates I wouldn't call them restrictions, but mandates for our community members went into place. And one of which was a prison that did not allow the did not authorize. Elders A to leave the PUEBLO. Unless it was for medical appointments and or allowing non residents, non native and non Atma individuals to enter the reservation. to provide medical services to some of our elders. And so we we try to and I believe we have been successful at. A forty hour elders and their families, the opportunity to still in in store that the elders were are taken care of, and they have all that they need during this pandemic and these closers in our Pueblo. So that they they are healthy and they are cared for. Governor I understand what an acid our elders are and just hearing. All of these different provisions to make sure that they were safe or to make sure that there weren't coming into compromise their own health, and so we have been months into this. And what do you think about these different precautions that the tribe has taken to protect elders in? Maybe you even heard feedback especially when you went and visited them anything you want share about that. Go ahead, governor. Thank you That's an important question. Tara and Having. The expectation was that you know it's going to be temporary. We hoped. but you know these accidents remain in place today. and. You know about a month ago, we began to having have much more centered conversations about the impacts of all this on the mental health of our community, and especially on our elders, and so you know what we have been doing since the communicating with our community I produce a series of videos. to our some that are specifically Addressing our elders in our own language. And just providing them with some reassurance, and it really is our. Our objective has been. To provide them reassurance and to remind them that we value them and that we are doing all that we can to protect them. but even while we are doing that these proactive kind of media, and outreach efforts. We realized that these the fear has set in the. has set in and some elders, and their families have come directly to expressing that they are having some significant challenges with with some of the elders and so My administration and I Felt it was very important for us to go and physically visit with our elders, and so we identified some time to. actually come out of our offices and. go out into the community. We're being driven around in a headstart school bus so that we could maintain social distancing among ourselves. The five of us. and I felt it was really important for me as the governor of the Pueblo to take the canes. which are the symbols of our? Leadership that have been part of our culture. since time immemorial but also that include the canes gift it to us by various sovereigns, including Spain Mexico and the United States. and taking the some symbols of authority which are held sacred in our community. And to take him with me, and to so that they to the canes themselves, and all that they embody. Could go and bless our elders, and so it was very a moving day. It was mostly a little mini levels. And and one of the things that I must say is that. These are elders are incredibly incredibly strong individuals. They had only good things to say to us they had. Advice to give to us. They've offered US guidance and encouraged words of encouragement. And so, even in a time of a pandemic and even. As we could see in their eyes and through their words that there there is fear that there is anxiety. They are carrying out. Their role has the nurtures as the protectors. In Governor Governor I would like to hear the kind of relief. Maybe you even felt. Being able to be face to face or be there and you're wearing. You're completely you know in in clothing, protective clothing in and I just WanNa know. How did it feel to be able to see these elders that by this time we have been together so many times because of our gatherings, and now it's been paused. When here about that type? Folks join us at this break? Ya. The Navajo Times halted publication. Because staff members tested positive for the coronavirus, also a news investigation found a major hospital siebel now pregnant native women for Corona virus testing. We'll get an update on these stories and more on our news roundup on the next native America calling. Support by Western Governors University and Online University for working adults and underserved populations at WGC. You students apply what they already know. Learn at their own pace and graduate sooner with little or no debt with Bachelor's and master's degree programs in four fields, business it, teaching and health professions, including nursing, information and application at wgn. EDU SLASH DEGREES You're listening to native America calling interrogate with from his letter, Pueblo and we are talking about our elders today. And what are you doing in your community to support your elders through this pandemic going and give us a ring one, eight, hundred, nine, six, two, eight, four eight with us today is governor Brian Bio. He is the governor of academic. Pueblo our pleasure to have him here and governor. Go back to you just. What did it feel like being able to see your elders? Era People Right now. Who have been doing social distancing. And people who have elders in different types of facilities. They've had to see them through the window and. Many. People are waiting to be able to see their elders. Give them a big squeeze and hear their voice up-close What did that feel like? Go ahead, governor. Tarot. The feeling of just seeing our elders again was Really uplifting. But at the same time heartbreaking. but as I was saying earlier, you know the hearing them speak to us in our language and giving thanks and offering advice and guidance. was was just so uplifting. It was incredible. And I really appreciate it. They're they're. They're they're and their care and their their wisdom, and even in this time, and in these circumstances being willing to offer that to us, not surprising because you know our elders any community. Are just amazing people, and they they. They're so uplifting but it was also a time to Really assess you know. Are we doing as best as we can't doing the best job that we can be to provide for elders, and so we're? Filming some questions along the way as well trying to learn from them firsthand, you know. Are the services. We are providing. Are Those helpful, are they? Are they? Are they useful? Is there something more that we can be doing and so it was really good to to hear directly from them. Some had some very specific suggestions and While others were just generally thankful for for the support that we've been able to provide to them. And many of them were caught off guard, and not prepared for our visit. We didn't announce this ahead of time so it was a surprise for many of them, and not only did. We meet with the elders, but it's you know word got around to the community, and so you know not only where the elders coming out to to see us, but. Their entire families who might be? Be Part of the household were also there to to share with us. and you just have some discussions with us and. We have a lot of elders and I'm very grateful for that, and unfortunately we didn't get to each one of them, but are. The days ahead we will have the opportunity to meet with more. Of them and You know it's it's really been wonderful and. you know cove. It unfortunately has taken three of our elders. And the loss of the first elder was so devastating for all of us. And You know we're. We're all praying that Our elders and all of our people will remain strong and in good health and. That, the impact will Of this virus will be. Lifted soon. Community, yes, in us are hoping for much of that and by Oh. No, you gotta get going here but anything you WANNA leave us or even direct message to the elders in your language. Go ahead. Thank you, Tara well, you know we hear this from all tribal leaders. MEET MYSELF GROWING UP I? I was fortunate enough to. Hang out. With elders, I was always around. And that was just a significant gifts that was Such a blessing. And I just encourage all of us to, and especially in this time to make sure that we are checking on our elders elders, we are accountable to elders. We are giving them an doing for them during this time. Let's talk to them. Let's ask them questions and as much as as appropriate in our respective tribal cultures. They are a significant asset and. let's value their life, their lives and celebrate their lives with us. So insurance I Chris that among all of us and to my. Elders. In my language I would say. Nice the Cool Papa, it's not. Though I. Can See starbucks and the guy finally steer sticking at the almost Scotto. Nash Obama even though in the. Throes Ti. I, it's the must seat. Trucco the Alaska. School. I it's. Not Look on the the almost see sny. Dom Three schools. It's. It's but straight trust. They almost ultra. Ultra, my hope and mood I'm on my thesis on this they next few tim attainments wake sleep the hotel. And it's these tonight. Teams spotty thoughts come see host. The autonomy needs to tell the truth. That's Donald ask you to. In the Todd Sam crew transparency Tros to you. Always hope. Governor. Governor Value Thank you very much, and of course you know share the same sentiment of respect and. Wishing them. The best, and if that message straight to you and your an elder, you understood all that and you have a comment anything you want to share with the governor one, eight, hundred, nine, six, two, eight, four eight, is number I'll give that one more time. One, eight, hundred, nine, six, two, eight, four eight governor via. Thank you for being with us today and we are doing that. We are making that time for our elders today we know a lot is had to change in our communities, and if there's something you'd like to share of how you're keeping your elder safe Support it you can call in and share your story to one, eight, hundred, nine, nine, six, two, eight, four, eight is a number and elders. We want to hear from you to what would you like to say during this hour one, eight, hundred, nine, six, two, eight, four eight Let's take a call. We got Clifford. WHO's in Pendleton, Oregon tuned in on the U. Mattila reservation tuned it on Casey uw Thanksgiving a clifford year on air. Talks mainly. How's it going? It's going good, and how about you Clifford? What are you thinking? Doing good I'm being I'm doing fine right here in the crazy world. Pandemic. my oversee the senior center here in the the showy. Humid, Tiller Indian reservation. So we have just started opening up around here and You know it's not. It's not normal myself I. I pretty much, even though things are opened up I I stay home. we try to encourage our elders to stay home. We at right now we have A. Re going on right now. We have about five hundred. We have about five hundred mills pushing out every week. We are not doing congregate, mills. As of yet, even though our casino open. But we are, we will be the last to open up here under reservation pending. Cases. If they if they rise in, we'll probably just stay. Stay shut down, but for now. We're providing bill delivery. and. I know that meal delivery is really important for a lot of our elders at times even before this pandemic. You know that was the maybe one time that they got to see anybody outside of the household and then making sure that they are being fed is another big one because it isn't easy to just hop in your car and go to the store sometimes when you're when you're an elder in, maybe you. You don't drive anymore, so these meals understand are truly important and Clifford. Thank you for giving us a little bit of view on what is going on there in you. Mattila Maybe you WANNA, give us a view of what things are happening in your community to help our elders, one, eight, hundred, nine, six, two, eight, four, eight is a number, and maybe you are social distancing in. You haven't been to grandma or GRANDPA's. GRANDPA's house or one of your elders, and you just WanNa. Share some thoughts you know what it means to have to put their safety I put it before that urge to WanNa go and see them. You can share thoughts to. Maybe you have a special message to your elder that you know at eleven. O'clock mountain time turns on that radio and his listening to what they're talking about. A native America, calling they're going. Going to hear it go ahead and dial in one, eight, hundred, nine, nine, six, two, eight, four eight right now. We're GONNA, go to Washington. DC WE HAVE CYNTHIA ACCOUNT with us. She is a director of the Office for American Indians Alaska. Natives and native Hawaiian. Programs administration on Aging and it's with the Department of Human Health and Human Services and she is Turtle Mountain Chippewa our pleasure to have her here. Welcome Cynthia. Thank you very much great to have you here also on the line to and Albuquerque New Mexico's Larry Curly. He is the executive director for the National Indian Council on Aging and he is Navajo my pleasure to have him here Larry. Thank you for being with US welcome. Thank you as well? And so the two of you head up to organizations that are looking a lot when it comes to keeping our elders safe, and especially during these times and so Cynthia I, WanNa talk to you about maybe some of the different programs that were implemented because of the pandemic or things that just seem to get more robust on efforts to D. to support our elders. Go ahead Cynthia. Thank. You very much I'm excited that Clifford from Mattila called in because that is one of the programs that we fund and also I. Want You to know that Chris Cla Bundy's from Anchorage. He'll be talking later. is another of the programs that we fund so I I? Want folks to really listen because those are the the folks on the ground for what I'm doing out here in DC. And we knew that with elders isolating at home. That, we would have increased mates for cleaning supplies for covert. We knew we would have increased need for food. meals for as long as we keep our kitchens open and provide them and for food, the delivery of food so that the elders aren't having to leave their homes and communities and go out to the Walmart eighty miles away or the big grocery store eighty miles away. We want to deliver everything to keep seniors safe and living in their communities. And so that has been. That's up to the tribes. One of the beauties of the program that I get to manage is that it's truly tribally determined so Mattila can decide how they're going. Tau They best serve their elders Navajo can do the same and my relatives up in Turtle Mountain can do the same, so every program is really really different. That's the best. We are also very concerned about isolated or excuse me isolation. And, so we've been putting out a lot of efforts in the programs around the country, and when I speak I'm speaking in summary of the two hundred and forty two programs that we administer out of administration on Aging to tribes that really reach four hundred five tribal communities in Alaska the lower, forty eight, and then out in Hawaii as well. And in summary, some of those activities socialization that they're doing are really some great things were having Carla. BINGO's just imagine a parking lot at the local clinic where cars are appropriately socially distanced. And the senior program staff are handing out cards in Ziplock bags that they have sanitized slipping in through the windows. Everybody is remaining in their cars. The staff is up front with a microphone. Calling off the numbers. People are using their horns. It's a great activity. Bring people out in their own vehicles, keeping them isolated, but still letting them look at a there's and being part of a game. That's one of my favorite activities that we're doing and I know time is limited so i. just want to run through a couple other real quick quickly. We are able in the pedal six programs that I manage, we are able to use some program money to purchase. Speeds beads to purchase leather to purchase. Items to make drums with or whatever it is, we want to do if we're living in intergenerational households and many of us do this. Cova time is a perfect opportunity to have the look have the program up in in Browning or the program down in window rock purchase some some supplies so that we can make outfits and talk to our kids about our culture, so we can do some really creative things we can also by sewing machines out of. Of Our program and we have spent, we can buy fabric. We've been sending that home to elders and asking them to make masks for the community. And when we deliver our food and our meals, we can pick those masks up. Leave another batch of material and we're. We're involved in the community, so our programs are really a great great opportunity to take care of our elders promote that that isolation, but still doing some socialization. We can send out. In Montana had a coloring contest. And so has some of the tribes Nevada where they send out pictures that they found online that can be colored, and the elders do a contest and win prizes. They collect them again and send them back with the food deliveries. So there's so much. There's so much that you know when you start opening up this innovative side to make sure that our elders aren't. and then maybe you even put in a little bit of things that have connection to. The culture in in you mention sewing. We know sewing. It's a very big thing. in a lot of our community, especially when we are making the different things that we wear for ceremonial use or even the powwow circle in so the hearing these ideas in that Bingo one. That is a great idea wondering how many people are hearing that and are thinking. You know we should do that in our community, and when you share ideas like this That's how things start You know maybe. Maybe even resonating, maybe even bringing healing to are different communities in so I'd like you to share to. What are some of the things that your community has done to keep your elders going making sure that isolation doesn't bring in other things or or worry that our elders are having If you set something up, you can give us a ring. One, eight, hundred, nine, nine, six, two, eight, four, eight and Cynthia. We've got about a minute before. Break anything more you. WanNa share glad. I WANNA. Share quickly link that some of the programs in Wisconsin have been doing with the local tribal schools. When the schools are sending out assignments, they would also send out some construction paper and some colors, and some whatever so that the kids at home could make cards and letters that would then come back to the school be picked up by the senior center and be sent out to other seniors. The same meal deliveries that's also a great opportunity for programs to send out any information or for tribes to send out any information as us our programs because we have constant contact with most elders use us as a vehicle to spread the news and information and good things happening in communities. Thank you so much in the India word. People contact you for that. I can be reached in Washington DC Cynthia. DOT, La Count at AC. L. Dot h h s dot gov. we also have a link on facebook for older Indians, so go to our facebook older Indians link and you can connect with me through. They're all right there. You go more connections. Go ahead and give us a ring. Maybe have questions for Cynthia dial in now one, eight, hundred, nine, six, two eight. Eight four eight is the number and We are looking forward to also hearing from our elders today. This is your special call out. Now's the time to call in. Go ahead. Pick up the phone and dial in one, eight, hundred, nine, six, two, eight, four, eight, is the number and you know we want to hear those stories, and in how you're taking care of your elder during this pandemic hang tight. Support by Amarin Indian countries. One hundred percent, tribally-owned insurance partner Amarante works with tribal governments and their business enterprises to provide effective commercial insurance coverage strengthen native American communities protect tribal sovereignty and help keep dollars in Indian country more information on property liability worker's compensation and commercial auto solutions at Amazon Dot Com. That's A. M.. E. R. I. N. D. DOT COM. Thanks for connecting to us today here on native America, calling him Tara. Gatewood and if you'd like to share some thoughts with us today on our conversation about elders, taking care of our elders, this pandemic, the number to call us is one, eight, hundred, nine, six, two, eight, four eight. Here with us today at Albuquerque New Mexico is Larry Curly. He is executive director for the National Indian Council on Aging. He is Navajo and Larry Want to give you a moment to to give us a check in on some of the things that Nicola is working on making sure that our elders have what they need during these times. Thank you. My name is Larry Curly and had then with the Nash Lending Council on Edgy from the very beginning in nineteen, seventy six. The organization is made up of twelve tribal. How people that were selected from the twelve regions of the Bureau of Indian affairs. We have been doing had been listening in on some of the discussions that have been happening One of the things that we have been doing is working with the administration for community. Living Administration on Aging. when co fit nineteenth started out, we were involved in doing a Broadcasts teleconference with all of the titles such directors across the country. And bring them up to date on what's happening with cove nineteen? What are some of the things that can happen on the various programs and this conversation between? Night COA and the federal government and tribes went on for about two months every Friday afternoon at one o'clock. by the way that conversation is still going on every Friday afternoon at one o'clock at least here in New Mexico time. To discuss some of the issues that tribal programs are facing and I think just the echo somewhat. Cynthia mentioned in that the The programs are responding The old paradigm have really shifted. how services are being provided, are no longer the standard way of doing things, and I think that in that sense. If, there's any silver lining in a during this time. Is that the creative and innovative ideas that have come out? This period during this time. I, just for example there was one tribe that mentioned that they wanted to use some covid nineteen funds to buy chickens. So that that would be a source of food and for the people because they're lot of tribes have desert's out there and and it was That was very innovative and there's some really great ideas. That are happening out there. We have continued as a national organization to continue to advocate on behalf of older Indians and tribal governments. To increase funding for these programs and making sure that tribes have the services that they need obviously with the reauthorization fielder American Zach recently that has provided more funds for tribes to begin to continue to provide those services, and in some instances increase their services. I think one of the things that we have also been doing just to take a look at. Where are the elders? Where are? What is the The the mortality rates an Indian country among our elders, and it's very difficult to find that information because they're not collecting. In some instances, we heard one state. Where Indian people who have passed away are being classified it either Hispanic or other races or Plug in other on, so we can't. seems like a very difficult time to get the correct kind of and accurate information on on the impact that it has had an Indian country, especially among our older population I think that one of the things as well has been the fact that this particular instance in this particular era. We're finding that tribes are really exercising. What has been there in sovereign right? Right to exercise their sovereignty for example you know when some of the states are opening up, some of the tribes in those states are saying no, we're not going to open up because we want to take care of our elders. Contrary to what the state so might be moving ahead with the tries are saying no. We're not going to be following your early. We WanNa take take care of our elders. Take care of our communities, and in some instances as Marcel mentioned earlier. This Cheyenne River close off reservation. There are a lot of chives out in country that are doing the same thing just to protect their elders, and which might be contra indicated indicated from what the governor's various states are. Are wanting to do about opening? And? Even, just hearing from one of our tribal leaders of making our elders a priority with especially early on win, this pandemic was really starting to touch down here in the states in that warning that elders are vulnerable in when we think of the different actions in our tribal leaders have taken. What do you want to say? You can join us to one eight, hundred, nine, six, two, eight, four, eight is a number, and we know that things aren't always some sunshine and smiles. Maybe there have been some things that have not been what you would consider to be the best approach when it comes to taking care of our elders. If. There's anything you want to share about that. You can give us a ring to you're more than welcome. Call in anonymously as well and the number to reach us. One, eight, hundred, nine, six, two, eight, four, eight is the number and Larry. Thank you for all the thoughts and just kind of you know. As we spring out we we started off just hearing about one community I'm hearing from one elder, and when we think of this is going on across the nation I think we're also seeing things about what our local leaders are doing beyond our tribal circles. And how do we make these? These connections better In of course we keep going back to how do we keep? Our elders best served Appreciate your thoughts on that and we're also going to check in with Voice Anchorage Alaska. We have Chris. CLA Bundy a he is a manager of the elder program at the Southcentral Foundation and he is F-. Baskin Chris our pleasure to have you here with us and just hearing. What's going on around the country? Take us to Alaska in some of the programs and things that southcentral foundation is doing to make sure elders are well taken care of during this pandemic go ahead Chris. Sure Thanks for having me I. Think To to go back just a little bit pre pandemic and really our focus here was to. You know to promote aging in place We want to stay in their home and and be around their families as long as viable and do that and to enable that is. Really we offered. Congregate meals and all kinds of social interactions, and so our focus was has always been to to promote you know socialization, and then you know all of this happened, and so we have to. We have to switch everything. so went from kind of again. An program activities and meals to to you know make Herculean efforts to keep elders in their homes. So what we did, was we? We transformed our facility from from kind of a This program setting into. into you know kind of a shipping and receiving department where we could receive goods, make sure that they're sanitized and then stored appropriately, and then, and then distributed so so it's been an interesting adventure, and with a lot of supporting and help from you know the employees here as well as the community at large, and especially within you know the Southcentral Foundation Our Nukus System of care has been really interesting and and admirable in terms of how we are able to still maintain. Kind of clinical services and sure that people have rides when they need them, but also you know we. We went to hey Were you know there's no need to go to the store or there's less need to go to store ideally not, but so we're delivering. We're delivering food along with two meals a day so we have a lunch that goes out and then we also have a cold dinner. That can be microwave to reheat it for dinner that night. Because this is you know in in so many instances, the only the only kind of full meal that people will get. Today so. yeah, it's been. It's been an interesting ride and really interesting to see how relationships have come. And support throughout the community. To come in and enable elders to to stay in place and to stay safe in their homes. So. Also curious too about when we talk about meeting. The needs of our elders also means that they are receiving healthcare that they need many of our elders. They had that direct connection with their local health facility. For appointments and medications and then. We'll many things have now turned telemedicine in wanting to be on zoom, call and overnight. Having an elder be zoom call expert. Sometimes that means you know asking a lot in talk to me a little bit about just making sure that bridge is is there or meeting the needs of our elders in this time, and especially with telemedicine or anything you WANNA share on meeting. Their healthcare needs Chris. Certainly. Yeah, so I think that you know within the clinic you know. They took steps. through different levels of of response to to deal with with appointments and and everything else so are you know within the supporting clinical needs and kind of the healthcare side was really to work within the the What we call the integrated care? Teams that provide medical services and also behavioral services and Dental Services and everything else that. Go along with it right? Right because even though there's a pandemic happening, there's still you know. People need routine checkups, and and all of the things that that go along with that and and medication refills so so it's been really remarkable to work with with our partners on the on the more clinical side to ensure that these things are still occurring and so that means you know medication, drop-offs or you know facilitating telehealth appointments especially on the behavioral health side You know loneliness and depression are are certainly anxiety, or certainly things that are are occurring probably at higher rates, and so the trains. The I think a lot of elders are much more adept in a tuned into technology than than maybe we give them credit for so it's it's been interesting to talk with folks and you know here that they had a. you know a facetime call. with their relatives or their kids, or whatever that might be as well as you know the employees here's are using technology, so it's been The the resiliency and in the creativity to find solutions has really been something that I I could not have envisioned as we have gone through this. And so Chris? The interaction that you have had with different Alaska. Native elders Um whatevs. Wha, what's been some of the dialogue or some of the things? They've shared with you or maybe even things that they're concerned about. Go ahead Chris. Yeah I think well I. Mean Right now it's summertime, and so there is you know. The the subsistence activities that are occurring or that normally traditionally have occurred. are are limited, and so you know it's. It's quite common for elders that live in anchorage to travel back to their home communities to participate in fish camper. Whatever that is, you know whatever activities that they that they have and so and so this year. Really you know in some cases they're choosing not to go, and so that's that makes things you know. That's a kind of a loss for everybody, but I think the the idea, there is to you. You know to to to stay healthy, and so you can do it again next year so I think that you know the the big things that that I've run into are going to be again like people being bored people being lonely and then also this this kind of just missing the connection with with with subsistence activity, so you know in an effort to minimize that I know it's not being able to go out and do it, but you know we've undertaking a lot of effort to to distribute substance foods that we have received so you especially. Wildlife does a great thing where they bring a seagull legs are. You. Know Pretty important food, and so when we received, those were able to distribute those out. you know in melts and hooligans, and so we're coming into salmon season, and and all of I think that they are missing the being outside and and the opportunity to go and do those activities, but we're going to do our best to make sure that that they can still at least receive the bounty of it. you know in their homes and and stay safe during that time. And any critical contact numbers to learn more about what southcentral foundation is doing for our elders or opportunities or anything like that? Where do people go to find Info like this Chris? Sure so you can go to the southcentral foundation website, which is southcentral foundation dot com. I believe I'm GONNA. Get in trouble for that But you can look up if you are in the Anchorage area, or in Alaska, nine, zero, seven, seven, nine, six, five, zero, zero is our main phone number and we'll. We'll do whatever we can to assist anybody that that might need. might need it. For that, Larry Curly is here with us to with the national, Indian. Council on Aging Larry just a couple minutes before we wrap up. Of course, police give context to give more information how people can find resources, and if there's a particular resource you and tell people about go ahead got a couple of minutes. Yes thank you I. Think one of the things that I'd like to just turn the dealing with the issue of. We happen to work with an organization lifeline. UCLA and the AARP. to get access to telephones for our elders. And at project is now ongoing, and we are in the process of formulating how we go about doing it and we have. That resource will be available. I'm hopeful within the month we'll find out just because what the details will be and so contact. for us is naturally the council on Aging Night Coa and I see away, dot, Org, thank you. All Right? Thank you for that and that's going to wrap it up for our program today. if any of those resources that you missed in the our, you can always hear this program in our archives. It is housed at native America calling dot com also offered his podcast on Itunes stitcher and But if there was something that you wanted to share, you can always reach out to us. This invitation will always go out to you, but we really mean it if there was something that you to share a didn't have time to get to a phone, but you wanted us to know something about this discussion today. REACH OUT! Out To us you can find US comments, a native native America, calling dot com you can also find us on twitter at one, eight, hundred, nine, native, or on facebook to we appreciate you tuning into Dane. Of course that appreciation also goes to all the voices that we heard from today. Cynthia. Account Larry Curly Governor. Brian Value Chris Co Bundy and more Silla Lebow tomorrow. We hope you'll join us again for our news roundup for June. That's going to wraps up today. Thanks again for sharing your time with us. And if there are other conversations that you'd really like to hear on this program, you can suggest showed topic. Reach out to us on our website. I'm Tara Gate will meet you here tomorrow. Support by Ameri Indian countries one hundred percent tribally-owned insurance partner Amarin works with tribal governments and their business enterprises to provide effective commercial insurance coverage strengthened native American communities protect tribal sovereignty and help keep dollars in Indian country more information on property liability worker's compensation and AUTO SOLUTIONS AT AMAZON DOT COM. That's A. M. E. R. I.. N. D. DOT COM. The Co Hunt Network Swim can certainly as Kentucky Tom, Caucus Sam Moody inculcates. To Lessen, skelly natural. Markets Out, met. In. 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Alaska America Chris Cla Bundy Cynthia I Tara Albuquerque Pueblo Washington Larry Curly Centers for Disease Control an New Mexico United States Southcentral Foundation WanNa Cheyenne River Wisconsin National Native News facebook Michael Lee Arizona
03-09-20 The plan to transition away from fossil fuels

Native America Calling

56:30 min | 1 year ago

03-09-20 The plan to transition away from fossil fuels

"Welcome to native America calling from Studio Forty nine in Albuquerque. I'm Tara Gatewood. Transitioning fossil fuels to renewable energy won't happen overnight but when it does a group of native advocates to have a plan they want the process to be fair for tribes need of individuals. Some ideas of the transition movement include subsidize retraining for oil workers and compensation for tribes moving out of extractive industries. We'll learn more about it right after the news. The National Native News Amazon Tonia. Gonzales community organizers on the Cheyenne River Reservation in South Dakota are working to create new foster homes for native children to keep kids close to extended relatives and to their culture China lock. It has more the nonprofit simply smiles has collaborated with Cheyenne River reservation and the State Department of Social Services on this project for a few years to native American foster parents live in the house with six kids under the age of Eighteen Marcel. Gilbert is a member of the tribe. She's been working with the nonprofit since two thousand seventeen and helped initiate the foster facility. Gilbert says the goal at Cheyenne River is to build a safe place for children. We're creating something here. That is very unique. It's it's a new model. We certainly don't know everything you know. I'm sure we're going to stumble along the way but that's how you make it well. The state pays the facility a daily rate for each child that money covers housing costs food and provides a stipend for the foster parents. Gilbert says some of today's Lakota adults were forced into boarding schools as children and grew up without any examples of healthy parenting instead. They often faced abuse in the schools. She says that experience created dysfunctional dynamics for some LAKOTA families and so we have several generations of being removed from our LAKOTA. Parenting skills parenting abilities. That's why it's important that we have more than just a mom and dad. You GotTa have the Antes. You gotta have the grandparents cousins. You know everybody involved because everybody has a role that protects everybody else in that family. She says that only works when kids are kept on their reservation and close to extended family after they are taken out of their home. The plan is to build five more group foster homes over the next few years creating homes for thirty six kids. I'm trying to lock it in rapid city. Citizens of the Oglala Sioux tribe in South Dakota will go to the polls Tuesday to vote on an alcohol and marijuana referendum enrolled members will decide if alcohol should be legal only at the tribes to casinos. Voters will also decide if recreational and medical marijuana should be legalized forums. Were held Friday and over the weekend to allow residents to discuss. The measure. Polling sites will be set up at all nine districts an elder of the confederated tribes of warm springs will be the first census count in the state of Oregon according to the tribes ninety-year-old lifelong resident of the warm springs reservation. George Angular senior will complete the census Thursday at his home privately. Thursday's the first day households will begin receiving official Census Bureau information on how to respond online by phone or mail. Tribes Native organizations and other tribal partners are working with the Census Bureau for an accurate count of American Indian and Alaskan native people census data impacts federal dollars for health housing education and other services tribes across the country are continuing to monitor and prepare for the corona virus. The redcliffe ban in Wisconsin will host a community formed Thursday at its health center to share information and to answer questions. Redcliffe health officials have created an emergency response plan. Health officials say. Currently the risk in Wisconsin is low. Meanwhile tribal leaders and organizers of native events are assessing travel and safety measures for upcoming gatherings the Navajo nation has issued travel advisories as well some South Dakota tribes including the Cheyenne River Sioux. Some tribal colleges have opted out of taking students and staff to Albuquerque next week for the American Indian higher. Education Consortium Conference and organizers of the National Indian Gaming Association say they're closely monitoring the corona virus leading up to their national convention in San Diego March. Twenty fourth. I mean Antonia Gonzales. National Native News is produced by Colonic Broadcast Corporation with funding by the corporation for Public Broadcasting for native Americans affected by domestic violence. The strong hearts native helpline offers peer to peer support and resources it safe confidential and toll free at eight four four seven native program support by the National Indigenous Women's Resource Center support by the Oscar Chambers law firm championing tribal sovereignty and defending native American rights since nineteen seventy six with offices in Washington. Dc New Mexico California and Alaska native voice one the native American radio network. This is native America calling. I'm Tara gatewood advocates. Say there will come a time in the future when oil and gas coal and uranium will be gone or using them will no longer be feasible. That day may be some time off but our guest today say planning to make the transition needs to happen sooner rather than later and they want. Assurances Switch to renewable sources of energy is equitable particularly for indigenous people and other underrepresented groups. The concept is called just transition organizations including labor unions call for retraining workers in extractive industries. So they can move on without crippling poverty. The indigenous environmental network is among those with the list of principles guide the process when the time comes for the US to transition away where will fit into the process particularly tribes invested in oil gas or coal phone. Lines are open. Everyone is welcome to join the conversation. The number to reach us is one eight hundred nine. Six two eight four. That's also one eight hundred nine native today we are going to start off in Sandia Pueblo here in New Mexico We're going to say hi to Julia. Bernal she is the Environmental Justice Director of the Public Action Alliance and Julia is Scindia Pueblo. Ut In creek my pleasure to have her here. Julia thank you for joining us for another native America. Calling thank you. Let's go to the back on in Julia. Lit starwood just defining just transition. How do you like to define it? Well a lot of the conversations right now around just transition is really more conversations around environmental sustainability. So you know. We're hearing just transition in terms of transitioning from non-renewable Energies like oil and coal. And you know all of the other natural gases that New Mexico is really rich in To renewable energies like solar and wind. And we're actually seeing a lot of that happening here in Mexico among the Pueblos for example pickering's Pablo is one of the smaller Pueblos in New Mexico but have gone completely solar But just transition isn't just about energy transition I think for Indian country In general just transition is really about protecting and Strengthening tribal sovereignty In terms of like what are Energy grid and what our energy economies are GonNa look like in the future. And how are these newer programs going to help you know our communities and I think that's like one things that tends to be midst On more of a federal level When it comes to legislation that's for you know A sustainable future is like where where do try like fit into a sovereign nation? In when you start talking about where tribes fit in. Are you already seen roadblocks? I am because You know we're we're in a very At tense political climate right now. And so you know when we're reading things like the green new deal or even even like state legislation for solar projects. Or what have you There is very minimal language on you know these programs really protecting or really uplifting are self determination our sovereignty giving more tribes the autonomy to decide you know what types of cleaner energies or And Virginia Connie's they want to enter like in the future in our resources for that coming from or do they need to be built right. And that's an. I'm glad you say that too because that's another concern that I think everyone should really have when we're when we're entering you know The you know the The electoral politics that are happening right now. We have a lot of candidates that are like you know let's go toward Non Renewable Energies. But we have to like be careful because when we're entering this newer green economy Resource extraction could look very similar to what it does right now in terms of oil and gas so if we're You know really into cultivating and exploiting resources like oil and gas. What other types of resources are we going to be exploiting when we're trying to Build solar panels or you know like like what do you call electric cars. You know for things like that. Like where all of those resources coming from. And typically they're going to be coming from From other indigenous areas all over the world. And what do you think about that? It's It's a little bit frightening to be honest You know everybody is just such in crisis mode right now. We're like you know everybody needs to go green. Everybody needs to drive electric cars. Everybody needs to stop using plastics. And you know. There's just this urgency to do something about climate change that we're not really looking at how these solutions are GonNa Affect Frontline antigens communities so when we're talking about just transition really need to look at it in a bigger picture and not just think about. Oh we have to go green now like there needs to be a plan in place so that communities aren't going to be continuously impacted as we're as we're going for more greener solutions in so. I wonder how many tribes are thinking about this. Is there a plan? Give us a call. One eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight and of course if you have any questions for Julia you can calling to one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight We'RE GONNA go to San Diego California to say hello to Jose Bravo. He is the executive director of the just transition. Alliance my pleasure to have him here. Jose welcome thank you very much for having me and Jose I guess you know just giving you a moment to is there anything more you would like to define When we say just transition just transition goes from something that's unsustainable dirty polluting towards something that moves of into clean and Regenerative economy I just wanted to mention that so Part of that discussion has been that some workers. I guess in in chose them. Workers are looking at You know transitioning out of their dirty jobs but also workers are also wanting Get to get resources to start. Small Businesses Others within five years of retirement would like to get an early retirement and then some of these workers would also want to transition into a four year or even a master's degree Education I wanNA talk numbers Right now we are subsidizing. The energy industry by from ten to fifty two million billion dollars annually. And I and I would believe that. That's our money That our tax money. That's our that comes from us and I think that the goal here is to redirect those subsidies that dirty energy gets and put them into projects that make sense specifically impart in in places that have been historically targeted for dirty energy either mining of of uranium and such and targeted for disposal of dirty energy. And I'm talking about in in many of these tribes. The other piece that I wanted to mention too is that we have to make sure that we understand that. Using fossil fuels is shifting the burden we shift the burden on the global south with programs in the UN as red red plus and those programs are literally land grabs in indigenous communities in the global south. So I believe that we wouldn't want to be complacent. I mean complicit with that type of process in those where did the term just transition come from the turn just transition came from worker that Work for a union. The Oil Chemical Atomic Workers Union. His name was Tony Masaaki. He was thinker and a worker and later on in life he just became kind of like thinker and he said look at some point we have to build a fun to transition workers away from what they produce what we're producing as a union and they were producing everything from A. B. to a nuclear weapon and ninety thousand chemicals in between so they knew as workers that they had to at some point transition because the things that they produced should probably not some of those things should probably not be produced on the face of the planet. So that's where that comes from. But they also when they met with the Environmental Justice Movement in nineteen ninety seven. We met in Chicago Part of that discussion was that we needed to amplify not just taking care of workers but also taking care of the communities that have been living the legacy of contamination since the inception probably of the industrial revolution here in the United States. In so to see how far it has come in you know even having dialogue like this on a native American radio call in show a thinking about transitioning away from coal oil or natural gas and then moving into renewable energy. What do you think about all of this? What are your thoughts one? Eight hundred nine six two eight. Four eight is the number. Have you ever considered win? Maybe we might transition away from these non renewable energies in moving to renewable energies. Your tribe already working on that Give us a call. Do you see some of this happening in your lifetime. In your own tribe one eight hundred nine six two eight. Four eight is the number You can share your thoughts. You can share your comments Maybe you currently work in one of these industries. What do you think About transitioning into renewable energy? What kind of training would it take And do you think that You know our tribal leaders are ready to make some of these transitions. Go ahead and give us a call. We want to hear from you and of course tribal leaders. If you are out there listening today make this day. You call in and share your thoughts. Dial one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight is number. We'll continue our conversation with Julia. Bernal and Jose Bravo if you have any thoughts for them. Now's the time to dial phone. Lines are open. Many states are grappling with the issue of how long child sexual assault survivors are allowed to week before seeking legal recourse in South Dakota several members of the same family all citizens of the Turtle Mountain Chippewa tribe have pushed for ten years to get the law changed. We'll hear why next native calling like the circle of life. There is an opportunity that comes around. Every TEN YEARS. A chance to participate and lead our voice be heard it. Lets others know who we are and where we are? The twenty twenty census will be our opportunity to shape our future for generations to come shape. Our Future Start here. Learn more at twenty. Twenty Census Dot Gov paid for by the US Census Bureau. You're tuned into native America calling him target with from his letter Pueblo. We appreciate your joining us today. As we talk about moving from coal oil or natural gas to renewable energy as the process happens who will benefit and who will get left out our guest today say native people and other underrepresented groups need to have a seat at the table. Do you think about the concept of just transition. Phone lines are open. The number to join us is one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight and of course we'd like to hear from folks who come from nations In this kind of transition something new What about tribes where oil coal and Ah Their Forms are the place or are what the tribe depend on. How would this change your tribes economy ability to provide for citizens any thoughts? One eight hundred nine nine six two eight. Four eight is number with us today on the line. Is Julia Bernal? A she is the environmental justice director for the PUEBLO. Action Lions also here to is Jose Bravo the executive director of the just transition. Only thank you both for being here with US and Jose wanted to ask you At the beginning of the hour we talked about advocates saying they will come a time when the future In the future when oil gas coal and uranium will be gone. Talk to me about that and the evidence of it well. According to the actual oil workers themselves In Two Thousand and sixteen is the one we hit. Peak oil that means that the reserves Around the planet are now Dwindling and ultimately there needs to be a change. This is from the workers. Because oil is not indefinite. I do not know anything around uranium. I've never heard that it's Been mined out or coming to also a peak and the same with fracking gas or gas in this case but we can say that the the peak peak oil was reached in Several years back into a motor your thoughts in explaining some of this too especially our tribal nations. Where right now? Let's just say oil is something they really depend on to keep their economy going. What are your thoughts about this? I think that part of the way that I would see just transition in such a situation would be that Their oil revenues they take pieces or parts of that oil revenue and start thinking about. What would it be that? The tribal members Would like to see that tribe transition to doing and and I do WanNA mention one thing. I think that this whole conversation around just transition has been Put into a situation where these workers would work in the renewable industry. That's not that's not the case worker should have the option to like. I said before. Go TO SCHOOL. Start a business. These industries have been doing business in our communities for well over a hundred years and we need to get the resources to get people to do other things other than work on extractive industries in San Jose considering the current economic system in this current administration. How likely is it? That just transition will happen We wish that we could get a just transition From where we're at politically and at the same time. I believe that there isn't a place now At this moment where this administration would push for. Just transition But the writings on the wall and as long as people are making billions of dollars And other people are suffering You know that the the billionaires will win will win out for the moment and at some point. I believe that we need to do away with actually globalized economy and move towards regional economies. That will serve the people in those areas as well all right. Thank you for sharing. You can share to at one. Eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight. Julia turned to you. Any comments Yeah it's It's kind of hard when when you have very Very addicted system like addiction to fossil fuels. Because of how much money they generate especially like here in Mexico oil and gas royalties from the state have really surpassed the billion dollar mark. So considering that we're one of the poorer states are so to speak in the US The dependency on oil and gas is very crucial And very crucial than provide resources for like what Jose was saying for like students in school and things like that is a big conversation happening in New Mexico. Right now But just to tie it up. I do agree. There needs to be a move away from like the globalization of natural resources and again give communities more autonomy and say over what they want their energy to look like in the future. What are your thoughts if there are nations that are saying we don't want to transition? We're going to keep doing this. What are your thoughts? It's tough because You know the it's not a one size that all scenario Each tribe just transition is going to look different and some may be ready to think about Moving away from fossil fuels and sometimes maybe more focused on health care. They may be more focused on housing They may not be set up to really have these types of conversations about renewable energy just yet so We do it like I said. It is a tough question but If we are able to allocate resources for our tribes to build up their economies and build up their healthcare systems. And you know help help out with school and how being That's just the a part of just transition itself it's not just about the noble energies or clean energy. It's A shift in the economy. And maybe moving away from A capitalist system and look for more community based solution all right. I appreciate your thoughts on that. I'm GONNA continue to grow this conversation. We're going to go joliet Montana right now. Candy White is there and she is the native energy and climate campaign coordinator for the Indigenous Environmental Network. And she is a citizen of the mundane had data in a nation. My pleasure to have here candy. Thank you for joining us for another native America calling. Hi Pat. Thanks for having me back and good to hear your voices. Two Jose Angela Info Candy The indigenous environmental network. How does it define just trenches transition while not to repeat anything? That's already been said because I do agree with what's been said already. I just wanted to add to the conversation around indigenous dot and so we also think about this as the healing process. You know we have to understand. Our Own. Historical trauma are internalized oppression and really decolonisation which leads to this way of thinking around our lifestyles and lifting up original instructions that we have and that are not gone. You know we have a legacy. We have a history. We have a lot of rich cultural knowledge that we can rely on and turn to and remember and so it's part of that education process As well that goes along with this idea of just transition and I wanted to also add beyond just the definition. This conversation almost sounds like it's something in the future and it's absolutely not It's happening now. You know in different communities around the country and around the world and I think that's really important don't into candy understanding about tribes where they stand with this And nations who are looking to oil and gas as a way to build their economy. What are your thoughts? What is really mean for tribes like that? Well as you may know I am actually from new town North Dakota and right in the heart of the information that is been something that's been happening since around. Oh I guess two thousand six or so And what needs to happen is a much higher degree of education. We have we want to change. The economic system is Julia was saying. But how do we do that? In a system that was set up through capitalism Set up for failure and only set up for continued growth. Which is not sustainable. And the answer is we. Don't that has to shift the way our tribes were set up Needs to shift to more of a mindset of our our seventh generation thinking for example. And so it's not impossible. It's not that it can't be done and in fact I I. I have hope because at home. People are looking at alternative resource Energy resources instead of the oil and gas you know they're not just saying oh this is the way it's GonNa be forever which is kind of how it started out Back in two thousand six two thousand seven. It's finally breaking through the educational programs. The just transition workshops that we've had in our community are empowering people giving people the knowledge to see that there is a better way to Jose. Said take some of that money invested. Well that's what's happening you know Some of our tribal council members are looking into investing into solar energies into investing into our own housing. Our Own Earth. Lodges that we used to have which is also something that the indigenous environmental network has been trying to do. And so it's really exciting and powerful to think that we can move in that direction and that there isn't just this one. One level thinking of darkness people are Waking Up to the education and through decolonization processes in candy. Would elders think about this? Have you ever had a moment to just kind of have a moment with a room full of them in their thoughts on this? I talked to elders all the time. And it's it's a really good way for me to educate myself to understand that history and understand what they went through as kids. Which for me. My elders went through. You know boarding school systems. They went through this this trauma this this level of disruption in their lives unlike anything ever before which made it easier for the industry to come in and to target. Us and to to make us believe that we needed to do this. Like this was the only thing and now they have an understanding as elders that. That's what happened to them. And they don't want that cycle that negative feedback loop to continue. They want us to maintain the sacred hoop and to bring back the goodness in our hearts and the goodness of our thinking and so I think that's very powerful to have elders news. Come together because they are on the same. A lot of folks are on that same wavelength and it's a really powerful beautiful thing to see that happening our communities in so there are things to be celebrated in. Maybe there's some thoughts maybe your own community has made Moves in the just transition movement any thoughts one eight hundred nine six two four eight is the number in candy when we talk about challenges sometimes it is our own tribal administrations a more even just the tribe deciding to continue with extractive industries. What are your thoughts when a try has information like this and still decides to move forward with this with them extracting nonrenewable well first of all? It's very frustrating. There's a level of why don't you understand where the common sense here because to me? It's always been common sense but then also taking a deep breath taking a step back and trying to understand where this person is coming from where this council is coming. From what are the systems of IMPR- oppression that are in place that are leading to decisions in the first place so like Julia said earlier? Big Picture thinking that's why we cannot just leaving the now and in the moment we think about what got us here so for four BERTHEL. For example for the man had the nation's it started in the late eighteen hundreds getting put on the reservation as three separate tribes as individual nations that have had our own cultures. We had our own ceremonies. We have languages and here we are. You're all together on the same reservation. Make it work. And here's your tribal government system. You know Indian Oregon Reorganization Act in the early nineteen hundreds. This is what you're GonNa do we need to rethink all of what was placed upon us in order to heal from that and move forward and it's not a process as you said earlier. That happens overnight. This is a long term but it is happening. These next generations of folks that are looking at coming up into being on the tribal council have a have a grasp of that. Have an understanding of that. And so it's it's it's a shift into a new process of thinking and it is happening and I know Julia said something earlier about or maybe it was Jose about how we need to retrain Individuals and so with the indigenous environments and that worked for example. We had our first guest transition assembly At haskell Indian nations university to lead into an actual program within the university system that allows people to take a course and to get Some training on what that would actually look like in the workforce when you get out of school so when I say these things are happening and our exciting. That's what I'm referring to is having Curriculum around just transition so that. It's not something foreign that it's something that's ingrained. Within within India's I-in do work specifically with tribal leaders to educate or even maybe provide options for just transition so I am works predominantly with the grassroots grassroots community members that are within tribal nations. And so it's it's a process it's a process of doing listening sessions and the communities. What would you like to see? What is the just transition? Mean for you. it's it's something that's going to be different for everybody and so for us. For example people are like well if the federal government for example would work with our tribal government and make it easier for us to grow hemp in North Dakota and not have so many restrictions and policies and red tape that could be a huge economic boom for us. We could get all kinds of things. There's over twenty five thousand uses out of the hemp plant that we could grow but they need to work in coordinate together and so then we encourage tribal members to take these kinds of ideas and thoughts to their tribal councils. As opposed to US coming in or parachuting in somewhere and saying Hey. You need to do this. It's it's an education process. It's a listening session and then it's an empowerment to say. Hey I'm a tribal member here. I'm going to go talk to my tribal council. I'M GONNA go to council meeting and I'm GonNa make these proposals to them because I believe that they can happen here into when we think about this candy in. Get your thoughts on this coming up after the break but when we do say that when this time comes tribes need to have a position at the table what are we really mean when we're saying that in may be lessons learned from other Things that have gone with tribes and histories What can we take from those lessons to make sure that native nations do have a seat at the table? We talk a lot about this when we say consultation. But what about something like this? What would it mean Maybe that's something you'd like to share some thoughts on what can be done now to make sure tribal voices are heard in the future When it comes to bringing more Renewable energy to our need of nations. Are they doing a great job right now? Can they be the leaders in some of this? Got Some thoughts on that. Go AHEAD AND DIAL IN ONE. Eight hundred nine nine six two eight. Four eight is a number. We look forward to your calls and those questions to go ahead. Dial in support by southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institutes Early Childhood Education Program providing an affordable pathway for the next generation of native teachers who will meet the unique educational needs of native students sippy early childhood education associate's degrees and all inclusive program with mentorship for success in education in an intertribal learning community information and application at SL dot E. D. U. Under academics then programs some are application deadline is April tenth. This is native calling. I'm Tara Gatewood and there is still time if you would like to get involved in our conversation today about transitioning away from non-renewable energy and you can give us a call the number to join us as one eight hundred nine. Six two eight four eight just before the break. You Heard Candy White She is the native energy and climate campaign coordinator for the Indigenous Environmental Network. My pleasure to have her here and candy your thoughts on when we talk about tribes need to have a seat at the table. What needs to be happening? Now there's different processes on different levels. There's a local level the federal level and the international level and so within the United Nations for example. We do a lot of work Around the United Nations Commission on Climate Change Tribes Need to be represented so they understand what decisions are being made that ultimately impact and affect us. And if we're not there don't understand that we don't understand the process of the United Nations Declaration on the rights of indigenous peoples for example. That should be something that all tribal nations have in their back pocket and have read and understand their rights to free prior and informed consent. F Pick. It's called to be able to decide for themselves. The energy That they have on their tribal lands. And so I'd only happens if they're educated and understand that these processes occur and they're allowed to be Brought in on these conversations which can happen quite easily through a simple invitation And so those kinds of things and then at the federal level you know just going to Washington once a year or something. Isn't Apple Opportunity. There has to be a much broader opening of understanding if we tribal nations are truly sovereign are see at the table should be always there for us. It shouldn't be so hard to to get that or to understand that it exists and that's kind of how it is now so again education around the process of what is available because we don't WanNa be sitting around wondering what happened to us if all of a sudden the everything just tanks and we're sitting here going out which is why right now. I N is working on a community scale solutions with community gardening. And it's not just us. I mean we're working with native movement up in Alaska they're having. They're just transition summits and workshops and working within their communities in their villages. You know here. In Montana. We have the center pool that is working to build sustainable buildings to feed their communities through food banks to to look into aqua panics to feed people Going DOWN TO THE SOUTH. You're looking at the home of Nation. Who was doing food sovereignty through Community Gardens? So there's examples all over there's pockets of. I would say like kind of like resistance to this capitalistic economy. But they need to be resourced up and Jose Bravo had a brilliant idea. Why are we giving all these subsidies and all this tax money fifty? Something Billion Dollars to the oil industry are tribes and our leaders need to look into that and to say no. That has not okay. You know there are things that needs to change on that level also to be able to ship the resources back into communities like South Dakota LAKOTA Solar Enterprises Henry. Red Doing amazing work for a number of years and getting some recognition but not nearly the amount of resources and funding. They should be getting for. How AWESOME THEIR PROGRAM AND SOLAR? And then lastly care. Can I just say that we need to look at energy and how we use it not just to continue to using it and wasting it the way we are now but to go back to more simplicity and less waste when we talk about solar or wind. Even we often talk about small scale decentralized systems on each home even for example so that it doesn't become Goliath. Corporate thing with harmful distractions that come along with that as well in so candy. One of the items in indigenous principles of just transition is creating an indigenous base index for living. Well tell us about then. Of course folks. There is still time anything. You want to share. One eight hundred nine nine six two eight. Four eight is a number. We are talking about just transition. What are your thoughts on it? Go ahead dial in Kennedy co-head sure and so for the listeners. Tears referring to our indigenous principles just transition which you can actually find on our website at. Www Dot E. N. dot org. You can download it We have hard copies that we can send to communities in some cases if you want to share them with your communities and The the index portion really is about what it means for us as indigenous communities. And so what is it going to look for food or health our housing and our economies to be sustainable? How is that GonNa make sense? I'm one of the simplest ways that I like to explain an index for living. Well is that you're not only just surviving. You know sometimes paycheck to paycheck or wondering being that Hustle of work but you're thriving as as a individual as a community as a family so for example if I can work at home working on sustainable projects like gardens and I'm with my child my children and I'm out in the garden. You know planting and harvesting and providing food for myself that. I don't necessarily have to have so much money to go to grocery store to get that food. I'm actually re -freshing my life instead of worrying about having to work leaving my children at daycare and not having time with them not being happy and then having to go on vacation to feel happy having to go to Spain to have a Siesta in the afternoon when that kind of lifestyle could and should be replicated right here in the US. That's kind of what it means. Ball what does it mean to you? One eight hundred nine six two eight four eight is a number also here today. Is Julia Brunell environmental just director for the Pebble Action Alliance Julia? What do you think of this concept? Any thoughts Yeah I was really happy. That candy was speaking to the cultural important of what just transition looks like while it's also protecting tradition You know when we're having these conversations about renewable energies of course like even by trading we're going to have these very technical conversation but what's really important About what's really vital is that we have indigenous people that are innovators and thinkers like was saying in St thinkers and we have a perspective on water on air on land. We have a perspective that so much more holistic than anyone else because we're land-based people that is something that needs to be constantly integrated into the conversation and it's also very vital because if we're trying to have these conversations with our tribal leaders who you know. Have so much going on. I mean they're not just doing Work on within our communities but it can't be listening you know they they're state law. There's federal law international law They're focusing on other things. So if we're constantly integrating the cultural significance and importance into just transition conversation. I mean we're providing a whole other dimension to the conversation on just transition and I think that's something that's really important to to cultivate really and to be empowered by A lot of our young people that we work with you neural. Who who want to see a better future not just for themselves but you know all of the generations behind them. We have to like work hard with them to To practice are traditional ways and to to make them feel proud of who they are. We've been we've been an oppressed people for so long that we really need to start like Kenny was saying this healing process and we have an opportunity right now to you know. Start about healing process When it comes to you know being indigenous people and creating environments to where and we can just be like we can just enjoy being indigenous people. Not Having to worry about not have to worry about you. Know sturdy systems that could You know they could take away our cultural our culture. I really all right thank you. Julia got a caller on the line. We're going to bring in. We have princess in Fairbanks Alaska tuned in online. Thank you for dialing in Princess. Go hit your thoughts must each. Oh thank you so much. I'm really enjoying the conversation and Thank you guys for lifting at the work of Native Movement up here in Fairbanks And I WANNA say like this is such a relevant and timely conversation. If you look what's happening right now. In many ways mother nature is forcing that grounding US literally to stay put and this community scale work and looking at our local economies is critical I just think about you know. We have an elder who passed. Maybe Howard Lucan. She always asked us. You know what's in your cash. What's in your cash? How are you preparing yourself? And the indigent people It is Our values and our connection to the places that we live that is really going to lead the way and like how we are going to to transition. And I'm so grateful for the work that's happening And this this movement for because I think people are finally recognizing the immense value and how critical This transition workers for communities across the globe in Princess. Is this a hard conversation to have their in Alaska because as we know There's a lot to depend oil there. Any thoughts no. I think. It's a a timely exciting conversation. Actually and people are very much you know open to having that conversation look at the price of oil just like dropped again And so we need to see that that is that is a thing of the past and it needs to stay in the ground in order for us to move forward in this also know also concerns people who are working with the Arctic Wildlife Refuge. What are your thoughts on this? What would just transmission mean for the Cariboo? Oh yeah absolutely. I mean that is our that is our spiritual connection livelihood as which in people is to the porcupine Caribou herd into the longevity them. And we've always said you know we cannot exist without the health and wellbeing about heard. We're all connected across the globe and so we have got to be using. Arkansas resilience and determination to do everything that we can sustain life this planet so it's all connected in princess any context for the movement going on there in Alaska. You'd like to share. Just you know we just had a lot of people that are really you know fired up and have their their heart in our been rolling up their sleeves to to really see this through and make it happen and Like I said you know like these community scale gardening. Be You know working on housing. That is fit to our environment and sustainable. You know working on you know how we re visit local economies and like you know what it means I think all of that really exciting and and it ties into to the work that happening on the ground right now. Phone all right. Thank you for dialing in Princess there in Fairbanks Alaska and Julia of course if they're context in we are getting close to the end of the hour. Any final comments. You WanNa make sure people here. Thank you Sister Princess Yeah it's she said it. I mean it's A. It's a data industry oil gossip thing of the past it's in the same thing with You know Like Carbon Carbon Pricing. I mean that's GonNa be. That's like something that I Has Been really working. I'm not You know we have to be careful of what all solutions are going to be like for US future so As oil is becoming Less and less valuable We're GONNA START THERE'S GONNA be more kinda ventures into other sort of commodification whether it's air or water and so you know Indigenous People. We really have to be at the table if we don't if we're not invited to bring on C. You know we really have to fight to make sure that our sovereignty and self determination and our and our our homeland sexual and stuff protected features so Thank you all right. Also here to is. Jose Bravo With the just transition alliance Jose any final comments. Yes as as candy in and Julia were talking. All these light bulbs for lighting up in my in my brain here and shadow the princess as well. I wanted to mention that There's there's nothing in history that has been my economic that means just one source of economic Money Flowing Has Ever survived so you we have to think about that. So we have to diversify make things better and then adjust transition things have things as From cradle to cradle and if a process poses harm or produces harm or exploits workers or anything. Then it's not a just transition so the Caribou if it poses harm to wildlife it's not just transition If it poses harm to mother earth it's not just transition. I think we we need to just really think about that in that sense. And I can't think of anything that I've heard of and probably the callers and your listeners Where the fossil fuel industry has not caused any harm so we should really think about that all right. Thank you Jose and Candy White Real quick less than a minute. Any final thoughts. I just WanNa employer everyone to knock it stuck in apathy and not get scared feel overwhelmed all of these little baby steps that we can take really do make a big difference so go and get your hands dirty this spring and plant a few seeds with your kids and get into the soil and reaffirm your connection with the sacred don't be trapped indoors and inside all the time because that's a big part of the problem is that disconnection that we have and also I just want to send my love and prayers and thoughts to the Baker family back home today last a really good man who believed in a lot of these visions and values and So sending up to you guys today all right candy. Thank you for those words of encouragement to and that's going to do it for our program Candy white with the environmental or the indigenous environmental network As well as Julia Brunel with the Pueblo Action Alliance and Jose Bravo with the just transition. Alliance live links on our website if you want to follow up with any of them and Tomorrow we are back with the conversation about the statute of limitations for child. Sex Abuse We'll hear from folks who are trying to make it longer and if you have thoughts on this you can even start that conversation right now. On our website native America calling dot com. Tweet it to us at one. Eight hundred nine nine native or post directly on facebook. That's GonNa do it for our Monday. Show today But if he liked the full lineup go ahead and visit us at our website. Native AMERICA CALLING DOT com. I'm Tara Gatewood and thank you for sharing your thoughts today. If there are other programs are discussions that you have just been waiting to hear on this program. You can always reach out. Suggestions are always welcome. Email them to comments at native America calling DOT com. I'm Tara Gatewood like the circle of life. There is an opportunity that comes around every ten years a chance to participate and let our voice be heard it. Lets others know who we are and where we are the twenty twenty cents? We'll be our opportunity to shape our future for generations to COME SHAPE. Our Future start here. More at twenty twenty census dot Gov paid for by the US Census Bureau ninety percent. I thought about calling cancer much Sophomore Archer more. He'll give us a dorky up with mum. Tortuga cancer will put some all. I'm one hundred eight Gawk at the Marquee Mama. Cry Healthcare Dot Gov Guan Eight hundred three one eight two five nine six. I'm by choice. Macci dommage at him. Centers for Medicare medicate. A chip native America calling is produced in the Annenberg National Native Voice Studios in Albuquerque New Mexico by Quantum Broadcast Corporation and native nonprofit media organization. Funding is provided by the corporation for public broadcasting with support from the public radio. Satellite Service. 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United States Julia America Jose Jose Bravo Tara Gatewood New Mexico Indigenous Environmental Netwo US Census Bureau South Dakota Julia Bernal Alaska National Native News Albuquerque San Diego California Mexico Oregon
Episode: 328 The Goal: Deny Any Opportunities.

Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

1:34:08 hr | 3 months ago

Episode: 328 The Goal: Deny Any Opportunities.

"How through your with genocide on slave introduce them to destroy. There was quite every day. Another saturday but you know what i'm i'm happy to be here. You have reached opinion. Whoops davor like. I don't know what happened there. I'm back fats. Being strike again. It's not a problem at all good to have you back brother. Thank you good to have you back. Yeah i know my my life is a wee bit chaotic right now but but Happy to be back on the show here with all you guys and hopefully everything went out to the interwebs properly here in. We're also were also simulcasting to to our our new partner life sixty five when there's a player on that Homepage there if you guys want to check that out And everything. Everything looks like it's working pretty good. Oh good i like it when everything works but kuku all right you guys as always how you can reach us here on this show. This is actually quite a number of different ways you can email us hosts with an s. hosts at native opinion dot com. 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So please join over the wonderful folks who have contributed to this show by becoming a patron and you can see how to do that on our website. At native opinion dot com forward slash support and on our facebook page. Just click on the learn more button and another great way to help. Its by tilling friends. Family and colleagues about the show and give us a five star review and i tunes and again we thank you for all for listening sharing our show growing with us in helping us grow and this week We'd like to acknowledge our newest patriots. Leah leah thank you very much for becoming a patron and thank you so much. We have supported and being a listener. Yes thank you very very much. We appreciate in. Hopefully everybody is trying to transition. That's the word. I keep hearing the media. Use transition away from cove it. I don't know what that means. But as far as i'm concerned you know we're still not out of the woods yet so long boy tread tread cautiously as we like to say we also want to Thank mohegan trading posts our sponsor and Find makers of authentic mohegan handmade craft and beadwork ribbon shirts embroidered. Hats dream catchers other specialty items and of course because we're talking about kobe Masks they also produce masks so Please check out all their stuff at mohegan. Trading post dot com. A little bird told me. They are in the process of Updating their website so there be some new things coming fairly soon so so nice all forward to it. Yeah keep an eye out for that. And as my brother said you're listening to episode three to eight and we're gonna be talking about in this episode The usda will forcefully defend Debt relief for farmers of color after a judge's order Also a class action lawsuit brings fifty nine million dollars to the descendants of the pembina band of chippewa indians. And guess what. The department of interior's bureau of indian affairs has well indians in it. Talk about what we mean there so you wanna welcome the folks. The joined us here in chat could see guys. Thank you very much for tuning in yes. Welcome all and don't mind me. If i'm a little chaotic him like monitoring like six things or ones right now. I didn't even know my brain was capable of more than more than two things. They say men can't lake multitask as well as women. And you know what i gotta say. I believe it because name struggling with. I struggled to things little one of my looking at your three four things. So it's like. I don't know i don't know ladies have it on us for sure so amazing. What a little go juice will do for you. Yeah yeah yeah. Thank you caffeine sip. A little bit more. Oh you know what. Why don't you launch us into the first storey brother. I've got a actually closed. The studio dorm here at back. Sure are no problem all right first. Bit of news are native new segment the us day. Usda excuse me while forcefully defend debt relief for farmers of color after judge's order the payments were aimed at chipping away at more than believe it or not century of unequal discriminatory treatment under usda programs so for year farmers of color have been getting the shaft from the government in relation to farm loans. Or if they were able to get farm loans they would get a minute. Share of the lion's share to try to eke out meager existence. and now. This bit of information was written by lena. Boston boston miller eve it for politico dot com. And i'm surprised was printed and political They article states that. The agricultural department is defending its historic move. I'd say it's historic to issue. Some four billion debt relief payments to thousands of farmers color after a federal judge in wisconsin temporarily halted the payments on thirsty now for the. Usda to be fighting this judges Halt of the payments should be historic especially after the usda spent literally decades of holding farmers of colored back when white farmers have been able to get the lion's share of funding Through farmland with very little hassle. So i i'm going to applaud the usda for doing a reversal. I'm sure there is a a a few factors involved in someone building a fire under their but and getting them to do. What's right this time. But we'll talk about that as we get into the article more now the payments were mandated as part of a sweeping kobe. Bill that congress passed in march and they were supposed to be aimed. Chipping away at more than half a century of unequal and discriminatory treatment under usda programs. Now you figure the. Us department of agriculture would be more amenable to helping farmers regardless of their skin color. But that wasn't the case now some white farmers however have the department it arguing. That issuing federal aid based on race is unconstitutional. Well you know. That's just i that just smacks of greed and racism. And if you are the words that i can't say on the air that it shouldn't say on the air do it. No no no. No white farmers a crying the blues because farmers of color getting some some relief and some aid. You know that that's rich. That's just rich. White farmers already have all the loans that they could possibly want and could get them. You know relatively easily but they're whining because they're not getting it all they they don't want those those colored folks to get any now a temporary restraining order halting those payments was wish. What's issued by judge william greece back. Or whatever it's called of wisconsin's i don't know that's the way it looks like it spell the when i thought to judge if i mispronounce last name i you know. Hey i'm sorry right you might want to change it. Wow the spring. Your birth name sucks. Change it of wisconsin eastern district. And that's a joke. Just just better of correction at the joke. Yes wisconsin's eastern district in response to a lawsuit filed in april on behalf of farmers by the wisconsin wisconsin. Excuse me institute for law liberty. Which bills itself as here comes. Here's here's the rub. A conservative group focused on individual rights. That smacks of dog whistle. All over the place again. When when's again you know not to determine the article but you know we could have again a week. Long discussion on the origin of the word rights correct and and how many thousands of different ways that's currently being interpreted so. Oh absolutely so on friday. The usda said that it disagreed with the judge's order. And you know they. They rightly disagreed with the order There's a quote quoting. Usda will continue to forcefully defend our ability to carry out this act of congress and delivered debt relief to socially disadvantaged borrowers in quote a department spokesman said in an e mail quoting again when the temporary order is lifted usda will be prepared to provide the debt relief authorized by congress and quote. Now reading that quote. Reminded me of something that general miley or some people. Been out to mealy Said to congress when he was called to testify this week on critical race theory. I'm going to let listeners. Do their own research find that. And here general miles words for himself all i will say as he tore a whole lot of new butthole in that hearing there are people that wish they had never decided to to attack him publicly and a congressional forum he ripped them a new one and and i applaud the general for that. I applaud him for that. I i was literally surprised to hear it. Actually but i applaud him for his testimony. Well you know in an environment of liars right. It's it's nice for wants to hear you know the truth and honesty. It is You washington is full of liars. Unfortunate and those liars. our policymakers. Yeah so you know it. It's so when you hear when you hear some truth. Change stands out like you know swollen thumb. You know painfully swollen. Exactly look like maybe. Maybe it's like a form of other ism in the right way. Here's one truth bearer. God you know so. So yeah i you know general if that is your heartfelt belief god bless you because you know you should have stepped on the previous fool in the white house a long time ago more than you did. Now it's not clear if the order is just a blip in the rollout or if it's the beginning of a drawn out legal fight over the the biden administration's most visible racial equity initiative. But we'll we'll see the debt. Payment program stems from language. That and i'm not surprised by this. Senator raphael warnick secured in the kobe. Bill a few weeks after taking office at guys firebrand after he helped democrats win a razor thin majority in the senate. What the program does under the usda's debt relief program black native american alaskan native asian american pacific islanders hispanic and latino farmers qualify for payments up to one hundred and twenty percent of their outstanding. Usda loans department estimates sixteen thousand farmers of color qualify for the aid which is designed to cover any taxes owed on the loan forgiveness program now the initiative has been touted by the agricultural secretary Tom vilsek as a way to end. Quotes advance equity an address. Systemic discrimination in the us da programs in quote. So you know by mr ville saka making that statement Denotes turn around for him as well. And i'm just wondering if you know these these folks have seen seen the light through divine intervention. Or whether it's all kabuki theatre to lead toward a towards something else that we don't see just yet but they'll sack was never all bill sack was part of this. Usda crap that helped deny farmers of color equity in in gaining usda loans. He was part of that So like i said. This is a turnaround for him Why it may be that yet to be seen. But i'm gonna. I'm gonna applaud you this time mr sack and we'll see If you continue to that it was delivered. I mean the last name full name vilsek back and we'll see if you call them sack ideas. We'll see if you know your change of heart is genuine and it continues but going on in the article. Black farmers have faced particularly egregious well-documented racist treatment and barriers accessing credit and other usda programs which are often crucial to farming operations and nineteen twenty black farmers owned fourteen percent of all farms. Today the number has dwindled to some one point six percent according to the us agricultural census. So i'm going to keep my eye on this one as well as many others. I'm keeping an eye on. And i want to see if this one lawsuit is going to derail the program to set things somewhat right that little four billion dollars. I'm going to do much it but it's a start. It's a start so we shall see indeed indeed indeed. So i mean i mean i have some comments i you know i started thinking about this and then i wanted to dig into it. Just you know a little bit more not not a whole lot. More than what we've been discussing but But to try to add some it maybe maybe some additional context or maybe maybe. My context is way off base. But i'll let you in the audience be the judge brother So you know again as we've been discussing in the article It's a good example by people trying to right a wrong correct Of past racist policies laws and the intentions behind them So those efforts Are directed to help long disadvantage people of color in this case of poor farmers and where yes The so-called dominant culture in america Do not happen to qualify for that particular assistance. I think it's important to point that out but unfortunately you can always count on this country To elevate people who are trying to claim or apply the term reverse. Racism just land. Whenever i hear that term to to a claim like that like reverse diarrhea. Kim one such person is cable. News talk show host tucker carlson. Oh i'm sorry. Let me interrupt you for a moment here. Speaking of carlson he got on tv. One of the news channels played his vehement disregard for general miley. He just called miley all kinds of horrible names. So yeah i could not believe it. Even that's low even for fox news and for tucker carlson. Well if he follows. Certain media circles Carlson is like digging his nails in trying so hard to hold onto whatever he thinks. He has there Would you guys have got to understand about. I don't wanna make about carlson in actually own. Wrote this in my in my commentary piece but Used to be a democrat first of all for many years. Carlson i call him a folk crack and you know. He carved himself a niche with his cute little bow. Tie as reframing conversations. Let's say he's actually a master added. Give them that. Even though i vehemently disagree with everything he says on the air okay. in and that's that's literally what he's done here so He found one of the plaintiffs mentioned in the article that we just presented. Adam faust is a disabled wisconsin. Dairy farmer Who's part of the lawsuit suing The biden administration over the covid. Nineteen loan forgiveness program They're alleging that it's of course. Racists because whites aren't eligible for that program so here is a portion of carson's interview With this gentleman on fox news here we go. I will now have got the wrong thing. Queued up guys my that. Hang on here this emerick. Thanks both for coming onto adam. Just summarize for us why you're filing the suit if you would Well basically just because racism. Racism against anybody is wrong and we can't have a government that's being picking and choosing who they're going to give any program to based solely on the color of their skin so you grew up in this country. I can tell by your accent. Weren't you taught all along the way that that was contrary to the constitution to federal law to martin luther king's vision of america. You surprised by this. Extremely i mean like you said everything that we vote. All learned growing up as racism was wrong and now all of a sudden the federal government seems to think that racism is acceptable in certain ways. And yeah should never be acceptable. No it shouldn't and if you complain about it you're a white supremacist. So again we're going to pull martin luther king out of thin air right and we're going to apply it to our conversation and or going to assert reverse racism an unfair system against The dominant culture in this particular case By re framing it this way so Again this this is why fox news keeps them around tucker carlson because again that ability to refrain conversations to benefit again the dominant culture the white culture that watches his program on fox news But this isn't about tucker carlson. As i said nor is it actually about adam faust or the other white farmers Who may or may not be disabled. You know physically mr mr. Mr houses has two prosthetic legs and yet he's still runs his farm. You know This lawsuit is about using reverse racism as a tactic to keep white power. It is to keep people of color or minorities or the disadvantaged however you want to choose through label the rest of american citizens and tribal people it is about keeping the rest of the citizens down and in place being able to control them. Now if we take a look at the core complaint the lawsuit of course doesn't make a claim of reverse racism that simply my assertion As it being a motivating factor the lawsuit alleges that the biden administration is unconstitutionally applying a covid nineteen loan forgiveness program to advantage. Black farmers will say the plaintiffs in the suit. State this quote. We are plaintiffs eligible of for the loan forgiveness They would have the opportunity to make additional investments in their property expand their farms purchase equipment and supplies and otherwise support their families and local communities. This is what they're alleging if they were eligible. They could do those things. This is what they're saying. But let me pose this. Am i to believe that. There aren't other aspects of that forgiveness program that they can qualify for. Am i to believe that. They can't find other programs to find money to and once again i quote make additional investments in their property expand their farms purchase equipment and supplies and otherwise support their families and more broadly again the local communities see as as david pointed out historically the chance of a minority farmer versus a white farmer. Getting expansion loans has been slim to none. How many more How many well. Let's look at this. How does the federal government actually define the word minority. Let's start there when it comes to loan and grant programs here in the united states I quote a minority can be defined by ethnicity or race certainly including hispanic americans african american asian americans and native americans and in fact a large number of grants are strictly reserved for native americans and indigenous north americans who may live within reservations however the term quote minority may also apply to women especially in the realm of scholarships and small business funding and loans. That actually comes from federal grant. Wires dot com If this program were to be found unconstitutional. I argue this. What about these other. Long-standing loan and grant programs found From these additional sources. Grants dot gov. What about the small business innovation. Research and small business technology Programs available the sba t t what about the usda role business development grants and those loans. What about the usda water and waste disposal. Land loan and grant program. Is that unconstitutional then. How about the minority business development agency. What about Sba eight loans for business development so my fear is if they find a friendly district court judge to rule in their favor. I can see this easily going all the way to the supreme court justices but i wish him luck with that. So i'm gonna move on here. I i think i'd davis stepped away from the microphone for for a moment So go to the next article title. Reed's class action. settlement brings. Oh you're back brother. Yeah fat fingers strike again. No i was just gonna say you know the case shouldn't have any merit because it's already documented Within the usda that the practices have been in existence for one hundred years. So you know. The judge had no no basis to halt The program from going forth if if he had just bothered to look at what the. Usda is already stated that they've been doing for the past hundred years he would have said. Oh you know you guys don't have a complaint here. Yeah i am. I didn't research this find when the judge took his post but And i always have to be skeptical about the political motivations behind a lot of this anyway. You know Beyond the reasons. I'm already brought forward but but yeah My fair was or my contention would be that lucky. And then you gotta you know if you're gonna call this one program and as as you know in in the scheme of of billions and billions outwardly. If you're if you look at you know what there are wrestling with over a infrastructure budget right now in washington which is in the trillions of dollars and k. Four billion is a drop in the bucket right But like. I said i think you you would have to open up a discussion about all of these other programs Or at least if you if you wanna keep 'em grants set aside that's fine you know. As far out of the conversation you still have tons of loan programs through the federal government right for a hate the term minorities. Well that are aimed at at you. Know helping the aggrieved. This judge. greece back is A bush appointee so okay so So really i mean if it if it were me in you know i could see counter lawsuits coming from you know communities of color in the farming communities just as easily as you know these these folks have brought forward you know their problem and easily be taken to the supreme court then if suddenly all suddenly all loan programs that are subdivided groups of people are now going to be under scrutiny. Nba called unconstitutional. I just wanna say good morning to everyone in child but yeah you know they say i'm not i'm sorry i just don't see flying a no me either me either but moving on moving. It's all i had to say from our next article up says. Excuse me again. On the subject law class action settlement brings fifty nine million dollars to the descendants of the pembina band of chippewa indians. And this is Released through native news online written by andrew kennard. Your article here goes on to say out of washington fifty nine million Settlement in the peletier videos holland a class action lawsuit alleging trust fund mismanagement and failure to account By the department of the interior will go to four tribes located in the mid west and northwest united states and more than thirty nine thousand beneficiaries on june tenth. United states depar- District court for the district of columbia finalized the settlement which was reached in the court of federal claims with chippewa cree tribe of the rocky boy's reservation of montana and turtle mountain band of chippewa indians of north dakota the little shell tribe of chippewa indians of montana and the white earth band of chippewa indians of minnesota the interior department announced the tribes were represented by the native american rights fund according to the website designated for the lawsuit absolutely nar go north they always kick ass and take names. Love it Quote it took them way too long and it's way too little said gerald grey chairman of the little shell tribe of chippewa indians. The lawsuit has its roots in land ceded by the pembina band of chippewa indians to the united states government in unfair treaties throughout the nineteenth century on october set a second eighteen sixty three the red lake and pembina seated about seven point five million acres of land in the red river region of north dakota and minnesota to the federal government according to a nineteen seventy-one report from the committee on interior and insular affairs and nineteen eighty to report from the senate committee a committee on indian affairs in nineteen o five the pam vinas seated roughly ten million acres of land west of the red river area to the government for price of ten cents an acre as part of what is known as the ten cent treaty according to the nineteen eighty to report the report said eight million acres of the seated land extended from the present day north central part of north dakota to the canadian border in nineteen sixty four and and nineteen eighty the pam vinas were awarded additional compensation for the land seated in the eighteen sixty three treaty and more than eight million acres of land seated in the ten cent treaty respectfully according to the lawsuit website and the nineteen eighty to report these funds were or put into trust in the pembina judgment fund or the pj f at the request of tribal leaders and with the approval of congress per capita payments from the fund ranging from forty four dollars to fourteen hundred were made eligible to recipients in nineteen eighty four nine thousand nine hundred eighty eight nineteen ninety and nineteen ninety four according to the article published in the first two thousand six issue of the north legal review in nineteen eighty eight leaders of the turtle mountain chippewa band of chippewa indians quote were dismayed over the overall lack of money available for distribution close quote in the per capita distribution the article stated the tribe then requested an audit from the interior department of the inspector general and quote also hired independent accountants who confirmed to the tribe data on that on this issue. You don't need an accounting firm. You need a law. Firm close quote altogether individual members of the class action will receive a total of forty thousand nine hundred. Sorry forty million. My bad forty million nine hundred eighty seven thousand one hundred and twelve dollars and the four tribes will receive a total of brother. Okay Eight million four hundred thirty seven thousand Knelt that's eight billion. A billion i was gonna say right. Eight billion four hundred and thirty seven million two hundred seventy three thousand. And i guess that's sixty cents sixty two hundred seventy three dollars and sixty cents combat math you see so that figure according to the lawsuit website gray said the money for the tribes of towards economic development and tribal administration the lawsuit website estimates that had the individuals may receive as much as One thousand four hundred forty dollars depending on their eligibility. If i have that right brother You know one thousand four hundred and forty dollars the interior lot. What's that that's not a whole lot. It's not so that that breaks down all the way to the individual people yes. The interior department noted at this settlement builds on settlements made during the obama administration over tribal claims of federal. Trust mismanagement with more than With with more than one hundred tribes that totaled three point seven billion which it said was quote. the vast majority of outstanding claims close quote. The department of the interior is wholly committed to. This is a quote to strengthening our government to government relationship with tribes including rick Reconciling longstanding disputes regarding proper management of tribal assets as the interior an interior department spokesman said the department will continue to diligently execute. It's trust responsibility to federally. Recognized tribes and enact policies that promote sovereignty self-determination and economic self-sufficiency. Close quote so blah blah blah exactly so the settlement. Good okay. it happened but what you guys have to understand aside from you know just straight bobby occupation right of these lands by everybody. Non-indians have enjoyed the benefit of these lands in perpetuity and our tribal people have not so to assess a financial figure which is needed. And i'm not faulting. Not in you know. This is money that's going to go back to the tribes. It's a drop in the bucket. Guys absolutely okay. For a number of reasons from from development to resource extraction. You name it that this country has benefited from that. Had no business taking in the first place so again you know basing this off the article to turn around and hand and fourteen hundred dollars to these affected tribes and go were square is s. Okay it is. If i'm being honest is bs and they they know it. They know that it's bs. And so you know hearkens back to when l. cobol from a black nation sued the federal government over trust land mismanagement and how they drag their feet and those estimates were twenty times higher. Then both the eight billion dollar figure that was awarded here. And what the Glenn beck and the article here and what. The obama administration considered Total outstanding Debt owed which was only three point seven billion. The i'd have to go back and look and look at the figures but the estimate that came back finally during the elway's cobol case was well over. I believe it was one hundred and fifty billion dollars. Was that much. Yes okay and and fifty nine comes to mind. But it's probably a lot more than that. And the and one of the things that stood out with a statement that came back from representatives of the federal government during that case saying that they can't pay that full claim because it would bankrupt the federal government. Yeah that burned my butt and said and to that i will say this belligerent statement. I don't give a crap that burn my. But when i read that i apologize for not having the actual figure in front of me. But you know it. All i'm saying it was substantially higher than than than the highest estimate out of the simple lawsuit. Which again. I commend north For for getting You know a restitution payment made to these tribes know but there is so much more that has to be has to be done and and yet bring this up again. The united states federal government has not apologized to any tribal nation that continues to effect. They won't even take that action now. Mark charles ca located an actual apology. That was supposed to be delivered. I believe by president obama. And either i'd have to go back and and you know find find his statement but mark ended up having to read it on the steps of the capitol building because it was never made public apparently or at least not not any major public forum. Shall we say cowards america. They won't even. They won't even take that step a canada at least has done that. I'm not saying it's it's you know it's it's fully accepted but in fact i think they've done it on more than one occasion. The problem the problem in canada is that you know. They say they're sorry and then they continued to insult in in an effect the first nations people i'm sets it's like while you're killing somebody job so there's that all right i'm going to play a music track so we can take a break and i put it i put it there okay Shorter track about four and a half minutes long This is a track from the women's group. You lolly and the track is called mother here. We go ads a fight whole way. Ah oh wrong way ally much more you lally project features purify faith whose twist qarora. Layla lock earlier. Who's tuscaroras and charlie. Laurie who has just toss corre founded fifteen years ago with original members. Fear pay purify. Excuse me jennifer cries. Berg and sony marino Yuli project is the first indigenous women's group to create their own sound from their strong traditional roots and personal contemporary styles. They have created a new genre of indigenous music and inspired the creation of other indigenous. Women's groups you can find out more at pure purify dot com and spelled p. u. r. a. f. e. purify dot com forward slash. Jalali spelled. you l. A. l. i. dash project or you can listen to him on our upcoming indigenous peoples music. Radio show am spotify podcast on july eighth. Yeah shameless plug. I know but it's coming so beautiful music we think is good. Yes indeed indeed. Thank you guys very very much as we move through the rundown here all right or last Item today and up before. I do that though i wanna i wanna share what is saying chat because it's very very true and important She says yeah. Those struggles aren't getting us drinking water skiing. I said that wrong because my screen is a million miles away from me. I'm so sorry. Sorry to is he to She says the those apologies aren't giving us drinking water. It's not bringing back the children buried in mass graves on residential school grounds. Which by the way. I believe another site was found. I don't have the details in front of me but we will share that with you Once i do Apologies and promises without actions means nothing absolutely And is goes on to say also isn't a contract signed under Under duress considered null. I'd say treaties apply to this scenario and should be and should be avoided since basically none of them have been honored a is entities Very true route through very true. You know it's frustrating to say the least you know the you're saying there's over a thousand children found to date yet so it's like if you think about in the context of of the north american continent you have you have one one federal entity that refuses to apologize at all and then you have another federal entity that chooses to apologize as going through the motion spray much about and then they allow business like the catholic church to come in and decimate. Yep people's lives in the name of gaul done. I'm sorry. I i'm not trying to throw a dig at antibodies religious faith but never mind. The church is business. It's actually it's funny. You said that The play that That i've been in at. I participated in Called crossing which is actually a story about Scottish emigrants right but I play a scottish priests. This might sound might sound odd but It's a musical so there's a song i sang. The song is called the business of religion which is very very true. Yeah i play a scottish priest. Who likes his liquor. So now that a hint as to what might be in your your folger's roast. No i i i personally do not drink at all. No i know you out but But yeah well the reason. I say it's a business. It is truly. It is a business any religion that has to have Laws by the books fall is got to be considered a business. It's the vatican is a country. How many people know that. The vatican is a country. I'm not gonna get started. Because i've had many heated conversations with people in the past couple of weeks over this very thing. There's something that exists. Called the code of canon law. How many people know about that. Most of the practicing catholics don't even know about it from indigenous perspective. Okay i you know i. I don't go any farther than you know. A full fundamental understanding of the doctrine of christian discovery perpetrated by the very people. You're talking about yes. So but i m spain or did you. That's okay but You know. I just i shake my head at people who are so entrenched into the beliefs of religion. And i'm saying this as a religious scholar that holds a doctorate in theology and religion. I just. I can't believe that so many people are still so entrenched and and loss created by man. These laws aren't created by who they're supposed to be worshiping worshiping they're created by man. Come on people you know. These laws have been responsible for millions of deaths. Millions of deaths. But i i can be what i hate is if you challenge organized religion. I'll speak at least here in the united states. You're you're automatically labeled an atheist. I'm not an atheist. I believe very heavily in my creator very much so but my belief system includes in the fact that mike creator doesn't order my followers to kill human beings. So you know it's but this is well documented by very people who committed these crimes it is. It is all documented against largely indigenous people. The they tortured other people to get it. But you know. But when we're talking about colonization and we're talking about the you know. This is the context. I'm trying to keep this in since we've been talking about you know The rest of the supposed land restitution. You have to go back in history and you have to understand that understand what the mentality was and still currently is depending on who you're talking to. These people believe that white people with christian faith deserve more than the rest of you christian doctrine of discovery. Those lanes are ours. We've willed it because we believe. Our god has enthralled us to be as such santa rosa for sure kick in bear creator rocks but religion needs to be hit with rocks. Me will not argue that you know and and so well he called me an atheist or whatever you know. I don't know but here's the rub all of the atrocities that have been committed against our people here in this nation Call the us and canada and south america and central america and mexico. All of those atrocities have been committed under the guise of saving people souls of you know making humans out of savages. you know you've heard all the idiocy and it's based in religion and the remaining and the interesting. The interesting part about that is religion. Created by man is being reinterpreted by other men of the original out of the or the original religion. Nor you know what that's called ladies and gentlemen that's called denomination. You know what i call it. Cook kabuki theatre. While i'm just saying now. I know i know rely in in that in the sense of in the sense of religious denominations. It's because you don't quite agree with that religion over there but you're not going to publicly say that that religion is wrong so create your own and live by those principles of whatever was created when whoever whoever started that particular denomination sounds a lot like political commentary to me. Get kabuki theatre. Though when it's you know it's just. I don't know i just have to shake my head. At how many people are okay with destroying other people's lives in the name of something they they profess to be so profound and life changing that they wouldn't they wouldn't dream of doing anything like that but you're doing it. You're doing it in the name of your beliefs if they would again. I believe i believe this was posted. The current pope where yes. The church still refuses to apologize for its sins against indigenous peoples to forget forget forget these governmental entities. The your own church won't do it. Your own church won't determined tone no of course not to its own sins against indigenous people so anyway putting it out there for for what is i know. Many people disagree disagree with me. clothing You know my my my family members in some cases to makes it kind of lonely sometimes But oh i hear you but it's just it's just how i feel. I can't reconcile in my mind. Putting the passed away or ignoring the past insane. Today's a new day. We're going to move forward without to use the word. reconcile that history to me starts with a former. He's absolutely it does. Here's what people fail to acknowledge and refuse to acknowledge brother. Is they talk about you. Know get over the past you know. Let the past lied what. People don't wanna acknowledges the future is based on the past truly. It's based on the past. You can't build a house without a foundation. No that's going to withstand the test of time as they say and so we're talking about a religious foundation which is which is supposed to be guiding principles that are that are brought to us from a superior power the creator however whatever label man wants to give that person that entity that supreme power at is not of this earth and you must start with a foundation of principle that says those actions were wrong in the past well again. There's no future without a past. Nothing that will happen in this future will exist without a basis of the of our past nothing less it. Something just totally created out of something that never existed before now. If if you think about it you use of foundation as an analogy okay. People had to learn to build better foundations. So that's that's in the past so in the future. Foundations are more secure. The same thing you know you can't you can't heal. You can't move forward from where you are until you see acknowledge except and correct the things for the past. It doesn't happen. There is no there is no workable future. You just keep spinning your wheels going in a different direction thinking that it something new. It's not sanders says. This foundation is cracked a flawed design and permeating our lives. Absolutely and again also chat room. Is he says you know for more information on the Origins or colonization look up terra nullius and And knows. Yeah tell to people built right in the in the papal bulls over regarding the doctrine and discovery. Correct if you read Stephen nukem again or listen to john. Keane's podcast Because they often work done research together. you know. Look and listen to their work When they when they discuss the doctrine of discovery in also mark. Charles done plenty of study on it. They don't those they. I admit though publicly here. They don't always agree with each other Stephen and mark. But i just appreciate the fact that you know there are people out there. Trying to elevate the truth regarding this country's history and how and what it found itself on murder in justifying under their god so all right. Let's see other news in other news and really the last last thing lasting to discuss here Let's talking about the department of interior here in the united states. A little bit and it's bureau of indian affairs. Guess what scott indians in it does. Who would who would talk with thunk. It with the with the recent appointment of brian newland as its newest principal. Deputy assistant secretary indian affairs. It now appears that The by itself may have for the first time an all american leader on all native american leadership team here. So we thought we'd briefly walk you guys Through the people who are currently leading this agency interest to put that screen brother. But i just closed it. Sorry guys like. I said trying to do too many things that i'm not capable of doing it the same thing all right so If we look at the leadership page now of the Of indian affairs for the united states department of interior. We see that The director now of of the bi is darrel. Leconte a member of the turtle mountain band of chippewa indians. North dakota And again he is the director of the bureau of indian affairs an agency within the united states department of the interior We have for the bureau of indian education. Tony dear men who is the director. Tony dehrman is a member of the cherokee nation of oklahoma and is the director of Bureau of indian education again Also out of the deal i Bureau of trust funds administration is jerry Giner jared near as a citizen of the sault sainte marie chippewa tribe and as director of the bureau of trust funds administration. So we got indians in the house folks and You know again if we round leadership as we mentioned brian. Newland is now the be as a newest principal. Deputy assistant secretary the long title right but rather than reading his bio We thought might be better if you heard from him directly so off from his confirmation hearing which was back on june ninth of this month. Here's mr newland discussing his background Including his credentials. Very very very very good stuff. Will i will now swear in the nominee. Mr nolan please rise and raise your right hand do you solemnly affirm that the testimony you shall give. Today she'll be the truth the whole truth and nothing but the truth under penalty of perjury. Thank you please be seated. I want to remind you that your full written testimony will be made part of the official hearing record Please keep your statements and no more than five minutes. So that members have time for questions before we go on I just wanna say. Because i had the video here in front of me that with. I'm playing the audio from it and Mr dwellings rocking The four colors of man Beated a medallion necklace and And of course he's he's before the senate on indian affairs of the united states in k. Please let my words be heard to the united states supreme court who continues to refuse to allow our people in full regalia inside the chambers of the united states supreme court to cut that crap out very tired of hearing these stories about our people being turned away at the door when they have legitimate reasons to be there in full regalia if you can allow somebody to become a member of your cabinet. Allow somebody to occupy positions of authority under the department of interior. Marine pieces of rigali are otherwise or things that are meaningful to us in our culture. You can certainly do that. In the united states. Supreme court newly allow them american flag. That'd be warn Just saying here we go with more. Mr nolan please begin a neat mitch. Thank you chairman. Shots vice chairman murkowski and members of the committee. I i wanna thank Senator peters for his arm and kind introduction and his leadership For the state of michigan and his friendship as well. It's an honor to be here today. As president biden's nominee to serve as assistant secretary for indian affairs at the department of the interior an important position That serves as a leader for the us trust relationship with tribal nations. It's also a privilege to serve with secretary holland at such an important time for indian country. I'm so happy to have my wife erica. here with me We grew up together on the bay mills reservation and she's been my partner strategic advisor and most importantly my designated humbler every step of the way together. We have to incredible children radna meredith. Who are also here as are my parents. Gordon and vicky newman. My parents had made a age under difficult circumstances and worked hard to raise my brother robert. My sister holly and meet they also had long careers in public service in instilled those values in us. And i wanna thank them for that growing up on our reservation. I saw how federalize in policies affected the lives of everyday indians commercial. Tribal fisher's exercise treaty protected fishing rights to feed their families. I lived up the street from the bay mills community college which was the first tribally controlled community college established. In the state of michigan. Our family also lived in tribal housing which is supported by federal funding. My parents were fortunate to each have jobs which allowed them to get a land lease so that we could move out of tribal housing and purchase a home. We lived in a single wide trailer for several years while they waited for the bureau of indian affairs to approve their mortgage that mortgage was finally approved. My parents became the first people on a reservation to have a mortgage finance home. Their experience with the b is time consuming mortgage approval process in the delays. They faced was an experience. I would stick with me. I attended michigan state university and the msu college of law where. I was the first native students who enroll in the indigenous law and policy program a graduated there in two thousand seven and started in private practice but soon after i had the opportunity to serve in president obama's administration at the department of the interior within the office of the assistant secretary there. I was lucky to have mentors. Like larry echo hawk and del lavender. We worked to reform leasing on indian lands so By putting timelines in place so that other families wouldn't face the same delays in circumstances. My parents did. We worked with members of this committee to see the bipartisan enactment of the heart putting tribes back in control of leasing in home mortgages on tribal lands. After that i returned home and use my experience to serve my own tribe to teach indian law to aspiring native attorneys and to advocate on behalf of other tribes in two thousand thirteen. I was elected as chief. Judge of the bay mills tribal court in that role. I heard heart wrenching cases about families in crisis. And i also enforce criminal laws in a deliberate and fair way in that position. We worked to establish the bay mills healing to wellness court. It's a substance abuse treatment court that has helped reunite families provide job opportunities and housing to people in need and to maintain our tribal connections to one another in two thousand seventeen. Our tribe elective mita service tribal president and we set about to make bay mills a better place to live. We were making progress when the pandemic struck and that became an important life or death. Focus of mine through our partnership with the indian health service. We established community surveillance testing for covid. Nineteen we saw disproportionately low rate of infection on our reservation. Thanks to nonpartisan coordination with local state and federal officials. At the same time we were able to expand our tribal businesses develop a new health center and grow jobs and incomes at bay mills which were important goals for our community. I know first hand the experience or the connection between us and the lives of others. When you live with the people you serve. You can't escape that connection. If you make a mistake you see it. And if you don't see it there's sure to be an anti or a friend there to remind you if confirmed i will bring that perspective with me to the department of the interior. We must help indian country build back better after the pandemic. We must respond with urgency to the violence against indigenous women and children across indian country and we must lay the foundation for the next generation of native children to succeed. I believe that tribal governments rather than federal agencies are best suited to respond to the challenges their communities face our job is to be a collaborative trustee and ensure that indian country drives our work with your consent. I'll be a leader on those important efforts. I wanna say migo which again thank you for the opportunity to be here today and for your service to our country and i look forward to answering your questions. Thank you right. So as you can see. Mr noon comes with receipts and And is a welcome addition to the ba in my opinion There was something right at the end. There that i'm watching carefully that i'm seeing in the federal space and that is the reciting of the meam build back better. I'm finding it appearing in written narrative As justification for policy for a reason the government or one of its agencies is doing something and i say that i'm watching it because when there are things that are going to hurt our cultural heritage. I can't justify it under build back better and we. We endured for years of make america great again. I'm i'm personally tired. I'm just talking off the cuff here guys and to you brother. I'm personally tired of everything. Having to be driven from a meme from our federal and state level we saw it also pushing covid nineteen vaccinations as well. I get it. It's easy to remember something as a as a principal but i. I'm just very careful. When i when i when i hear amine being repeated in eventually finding its way into In this particular case federal policy for for justification. I understand you know if you're being considered by You know the current administration that okay you have to show solidarity relevant to The policies of ladder administration but for ending country in my opinion They're still has to be limited because again if something is being billed as build it better regardless of who it hurts. Well i can adopt that. So that's my only caution to our our indigenous brothers and sisters that are making their way into washington. And i thank them for their service. But i'd like them to keep that in mind. Some things aren't better because you built something over the top of it. So that's all. I really wanna say as a a half morning i guess but I don't know if you have any thoughts on that or if you notice that yourself brother yeah it it. It brings to mind the imminent domain. When i hear that build back better. That's what it reminds me interesting. Yeah i hadn't thought of that way. Yeah yeah but every time. I hear it. It's like yeah. Imminent domain eminent domain in warning warning will rogers because what i'm what i'm referring to more specifically What when my days are consumed with as of lately against wind energy and this push to electrify the united states. I've heard it phrased that way as well and just because a decision has been made in the halls of washington or the halls of some state. Capital doesn't mean you get to do whatever to me and my culture So you know. That's what i always get concerned about. When i see these very very large scale efforts to push an agenda and in this particular case i'll be honest that will financially benefit other people including people that are investors from outside the united states but On what because this has been a threat of a theme episode today on our land now submerged this is something that people need to keep in context of the original gold rush of the eighteen hundreds. There's golden their hills. Remember that but see that gold is for some people and the prophets of that gold was not for some people. So i don't know where my head is at with build back better. Well you gotta kinda you kinda have to keep an eye open because when these slogans get tossed around like that there's usually a downside somewhere Somebody is is. It's being shortchanged somewhere along the line. Better okay show me how. You're going to build back better without it. You know destroying people's lives or hurting somebody build back better and you know. Show me how it's going to be inclusive of everybody instead of a select few build back better. You know who who who was left out. I wanna know all those things political circles every like i said everything seems to revolve around a meme You know Clinton hillary clinton better together right something like that obama. Yes yes we can look guys. We don't need a slogan what we need we need is to get people around a table and discuss the pluses and minuses in terms of wind. Energy tribes. Not had that true opportunity and you know what unless they do. I does something about that. It's not going to happen. No no no. We're on it. But no i i know but i'm just making the public statement that You know unless the dealer does something to hold feet to the fire. In regards to the the companies that are wanting to construct these farms the tribes are not going to get a collective say in that sadly. That's my public statement and your public statement is right so morning. Amanda is joined us some. Fortunately we're we're about the close. The show out here but in sandra says bill back better gets lost in the translation. Yes fell again. It depends on how it's being applied right. You know not. All things are bad under bill. Back better Certainly certainly not. But you know. But i get i get concerned about also reinvention of terms in the past. The fight was about equality and they retooled it to equity say totally different meaning. And sometimes i feel like. I'm not so much on the show brother-in-law with you but but beyond that i feel like you know i'm screaming in the wind Oil you know. I i have a memory you know. I don't know but you know it's interesting you. You brought that that Point up brother. I don't know how many other people realize but when they started using equity to change the narrative from equality. It's like wait a minute. That's two horses of two totally different colors. Look up the word equity and look up the word equality right and you'll see the big difference. So it's it's it's like wait a minute. It's also been tools. And of course i i live often unfortunately in federal policy and you know when i when i looked at the efforts by biden administration to again you know Reassert so to speak better relations with our tribes have framed that around equity in terms of tribal consultation. I need a redefinition when i need. First and foremost is action right now. There has been some action as as transpired in. That's good but Let's dispense with the slogans. Just just keep getting some action. Done and make sure it's meaningful in way can be meaningful. As far as native american tribes are concerned is gotta get you gotta get us around the table. And yes appointments like brian newman. But just you just want bryan and other people right on up to deb. Howland understand living in a minefield. Oh yeah so. What real quick. Here's here's why. I keep a wary eye when they use the term equity now according to webster marian webster. It has a number of different connotations It has a couple of different connotation stuff. I want is justice according to natural law or right Specifically freedom for bias or favoritism. that's not that's not the frame they're using everybody again. Correct the other the other word. The other form is the money value of a property or of an interest in a property in excess of claims orleans against it and then it goes on to list a few others. That's how i think they're using the word equity here they are. We just demonstrated one an article today. Yeah covid nineteen loan forgiveness program. Okay they would have framed am bitchy dig dug deep deep deep enough brother or if we listened when when it does go to trial. We're gonna hear that word. Come absolutely that. This is part of the vitamin ministrations efforts to providing equity for disadvantaged communities. You watch it almost rephrased. Exactly like that right. I believe it. I totally believe it so well. That's all. I have my bags on my my mind as well guys thank. Thank you for listening to us today in some of my rambling and things like that. This is going to work for us your brother but so yeah just just stuff to think about See senator says clubs out here saw a mean today. That red seats around the table represent diversity but breaking the table using it for firewood and invent an inviting people to the circle represents decolonization interesting. Our guys You feel free to reach out to say any number of ways again. Host with an s host at native opinion dot com. Is our email where you can leave us a voicemail it eight six zero eight hundred five nine five. My name is michael. Kicking bear from the mashantucket pequot tribal nation. The guy over there he is david grail citizen of the cherokee -cribe alabama. Thank you for allowing us to be here with you and thank you for being here with us. Be well out there. Where your mask please. It's still necessary that variant coming. And if you haven't been unoccupied yet please get inoculated. All right. You guys again thanks again. We appreciate it. Bay will till next week. Take care bye-bye.

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