18 Burst results for "Turtle Mountain Chippewa"

"turtle mountain chippewa" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

04:23 min | 3 months ago

"turtle mountain chippewa" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

"Cent treaty according to the nineteen eighty to report the report said eight million acres of the seated land extended from the present day north central part of north dakota to the canadian border in nineteen sixty four and and nineteen eighty the pam vinas were awarded additional compensation for the land seated in the eighteen sixty three treaty and more than eight million acres of land seated in the ten cent treaty respectfully according to the lawsuit website and the nineteen eighty to report these funds were or put into trust in the pembina judgment fund or the pj f at the request of tribal leaders and with the approval of congress per capita payments from the fund ranging from forty four dollars to fourteen hundred were made eligible to recipients in nineteen eighty four nine thousand nine hundred eighty eight nineteen ninety and nineteen ninety four according to the article published in the first two thousand six issue of the north legal review in nineteen eighty eight leaders of the turtle mountain chippewa band of chippewa indians quote were dismayed over the overall lack of money available for distribution close quote in the per capita distribution the article stated the tribe then requested an audit from the interior department of the inspector general and quote also hired independent accountants who confirmed to the tribe data on that on this issue. You don't need an accounting firm. You need a law. Firm close quote altogether individual members of the class action will receive a total of forty thousand nine hundred. Sorry forty million. My bad forty million nine hundred eighty seven thousand one hundred and twelve dollars and the four tribes will receive a total of brother. Okay Eight million four hundred thirty seven thousand Knelt that's eight billion. A billion i was gonna say right. Eight billion four hundred and thirty seven million two hundred seventy three thousand. And i guess that's sixty cents sixty two hundred seventy three dollars and sixty cents combat math you see so that figure according to the lawsuit website gray said the money for the tribes of towards economic development and tribal administration the lawsuit website estimates that had the individuals may receive as much as One thousand four hundred forty dollars depending on their eligibility. If i have that right brother You know one thousand four hundred and forty dollars the interior lot. What's that that's not a whole lot. It's not so that that breaks down all the way to the individual people yes. The interior department noted at this settlement builds on settlements made during the obama administration over tribal claims of federal. Trust mismanagement with more than With with more than one hundred tribes that totaled three point seven billion which it said was quote. the vast majority of outstanding claims close quote. The department of the interior is wholly committed to. This is a quote to strengthening our government to government relationship with tribes including rick Reconciling longstanding disputes regarding proper management of tribal assets as the interior an interior department spokesman said the department will continue to diligently execute. It's trust responsibility to federally. Recognized tribes and enact policies that promote sovereignty self-determination and economic self-sufficiency. Close quote so blah blah blah exactly so the settlement. Good okay. it happened but what you guys have to understand aside from you know just straight bobby occupation right of these lands by everybody..

eight billion forty million Eight billion one thousand One thousand Eight million sixty cents fourteen hundred four tribes forty thousand nine hundred forty four dollars eight million acres more than eight million acres more than one hundred tribes first two thousand four hundred thirty seven thou congress north dakota nineteen eighty nine hundred eighty seven thou
"turtle mountain chippewa" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:07 min | 3 months ago

"turtle mountain chippewa" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Boy we're going gonna get some calls jay. Thank you for your call. There in spooner wisconsin dad jokes. They're dropping you want to drop went on us. Give us a ring. One eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight so gentlemen just thinking of dropping. Sometimes these jokes you have mixed audiences and what do you do when you drop something and somebody in the audience as hey or or their push back or gone too far Any thoughts on that starts off ernie man. Yeah that's a that's a good one. 'cause yes sometimes you do get the flu at all you know me. I just kinda kinda say she just kidding. The old deal apple apple job. You know i do. It'll be. He just came in real getting along here man where he had make it a turn into one of those or like all right. Thanks for letting me know. I went to par but doesn't happen very often though so Happy for that and mike. How did that feel we gave you the stage. You did it. Hey you did very well so Give you kudos for that. But how did that feel giving your humor knowing somewhere out there. Somebody was laughing your thoughts. Yeah well you never know when you throw something out there. Someone's gonna laugh or not so if you can at least make one person sort of grown you know then if you move somebody in some small way you know just thinking about You know context in my job. I get to work with I get. It's the honor to work with all these folks and different tribes tribal educators and cultural leaders. And so you hear jokes in different languages and my friend. Big little bear northern cheyenne. He's all saying you know jokes are way funnier. And cheyenne and they are in english. So when some of these jokes you know you can be in black fy country and have to use a good black. You know browning accent if you tell that joke if you're down at crow crow fair and you're telling stories you make sure you wanna throw in a good crow accent so it kind of depends on where you're at. What tribes you're you're talking to depend on. What kind of the joke to throw out there like him. Standing outside my dog barking here right so the yellowstone i learned i learned as the crow word for dog is usually gonna really use a good croats and deals you men here. My friend was teaching that we're todd. He's like now. Sit real slow mike. And so i go d. o. g. Tease you guys are no good you know but he really use a crow accent. It almost sounds like crew. Do not just You know knowing that language and like the crow word for ten issue is Dido's on dita's you just gotta have that right accent tossing black. I'm standing outside a street corner you know. And here's a black sea. And i love the black feet language. Okay and needle hello little brother but when black people they drive up to stop sign the kinda interpreted to black feet and they look at it and they go steal p straight inside jokes mike. I know some ears are perking up. Now go ahead. You can battle. Mike with your joke colleen right now. One eight hundred nine six two eight four eight and you know dropping. Those jokes Cross tribal jokes and and you know making fun But mike with all of this to it's about respect sometimes when you are the center of the joke Somebody is showing respect. What do you think about that. Oh yeah that's a lot easier to make fun yourself to the real funny stories. Come from is you know the the truth things that acted so this to combo yourself up on like here's a story from yellowstone park I'll sit up in this little tree stand singing and these old ceremony songs here. These banners came one morning. And and you know kinda nervous but they they were close and underneath me and so i kept singing after a while. Those bears went away but rows back in south dakota telling the story of the drum and Like yeah it was real powerful moment. You know these bears comes. I'm singing these old ceremony song from one of my buddies dull and he's like jedi. Those bears came over. There was like no because you're probably sounded like a wounded rabbit. Boy man. I feel for your kids. What did they tell you. They just shake their heads at me. Like no not that one or they do actually. Sometimes they have favorite jobs. You know they'll say tell that one so but one time i was what i got the. Mc around dance helena. After it was over. I was telling my daughter guy. They paid me two hundred bucks just to tell jokes since he said dad still paid even domas gnashing into really started seeing we. We tapped into the heart of native america and that laughter coming from it. Courtesy of our engineer marino. Appreciate that and mike just thinking about our ability to just lose ourselves the jokes especially jokes or dads till. I think that's another kind of love. What do you think totally You know thinking about this is one of my dad's favorite stories when he first got married. He's a you know to devil's lake spear licked dakota my mom's turtle mountain chippewa so there's a lot of that teasing going on. But when they first got married they're living on the crow creek reservation and dad was mowing the lawn. Said it was about one hundred degrees out here. Here's here's my mom. Came out there and she said take a rest buddy and give glass iced tea and she sat him down by fan and the living room and he started mowing just at that moment here. My mother-in-law comes over now my grandma. And he's sitting in the house by the fan with the ice tea and their daughter out there and hundred degree long long he says. What are you doing sitting in front of this fan drinking tea and your lifestyle volunteers on the hot weather that says well because the sewer smarter than two chippewa and she said you sue aren't smarter. She said you're just lazy. So.

two hundred bucks south dakota ernie ten issue Mike One first yellowstone park marino mike hundred degree eight hundred cheyenne about one hundred degrees native america one person one morning one two chippewa jedi
"turtle mountain chippewa" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

02:52 min | 4 months ago

"turtle mountain chippewa" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

"Of a a huge puzzle of missing and murdered indigenous women that been found remains found in north carolina storage unit identified as turtle mountain chippewa woman missing for fifteen years. This article written by darren thompson for native news. Online dot net quoting. We must remain vigilant until no more sisters are stolen from their families and communities and quote again remains found in north carolina storage unit have been identified is a turtle mountain chippewa woman missing for fifteen years in two thousand sixteen. An online article was published about an unidentified woman in durham being discovered in a plastic tote. Durham to work in. Durham north carolina. Durham north carolina. Oh okay 'cause it says remains in. North carolina story out. There remains were found in in north carolina. But she was from durham. No she was. I don't think she was from dorm. Unidentified woman in durham being discovered in a plastic tote. I'll maybe she wrote. I took from somewhere else. I'm sorry i durham. Quite well us work there. I lived in raleigh. Buddy i worked. There ain't go ahead Concealed storage unit. Mris point had suspicions that the personal was our sister who had been missing for more than ten years. According to the news article the woman's body had been at the scene for up to a decade before being discovered it is unclear. How long the remains may have been hidden in the unit in durham county. But the you will. Unit was rented by the same person since twenty. Ten police had named her dorm. Jane doe a name given by law enforcement when the true name of a person is known as being intentionally concealed and illustrated her as a white woman with with white white skin. And red hair said jessica quoting the woman had the same gap in her teeth. As a my sister did and we knew it was my sister in quote jessica told native news online quoting again but police wouldn't believe us when the police announced the debt that was pers- presumed suspicious but there was little evidence pointing to the identity of the victim or how she ended up in the story june quoting. I have no idea we were told by the police that are death..

darren thompson fifteen years jessica Ten police june raleigh Jane North carolina durham more than ten years north carolina two thousand sixteen Durham twenty turtle Mris point net turtle mountain
"turtle mountain chippewa" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

03:46 min | 4 months ago

"turtle mountain chippewa" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

"Weeks after launching a unit to investigate cases so they are moving right along with that Some remains were found in north carolina in a north carolina. Storage unit identified as A person of turtle mountain a turtle mountain chippewa woman who was apparently missing for fifteen years and and another article A niece spending almost forty years searching for her aunt shirley in so. Say all right that there. You are up thank you. I'm before i continue on your second article in other news. That first part is error on my part. I didn't clean that up for some reason. So okay anything from speaker down. It's what that article is is supposed to supposed to be. Okay no problem. My guys okay. Alrighty so mexico marks and of last indigenous revolt with apology and this comes by way of associated press for written and posted eight in indian country today dot com. Okay on monday. Mexico marked the anniversary of nine thousand nine hundred one battle that ended one of the last indigenous rebellions in north america. Okay they issued an apology. For centuries of brutal exploitation and discrimination president andres manuel lopez. Obrador world was accompanied by president alejandro. Okay many of guatemala and that was the neighboring country that had a majority my population so today they recognize something that they denied for a long time. The the wrongs and injustice committed against the mayan people now history speaks of the mayenne people as extinct. Truly one would get the idea that the mind people don't exist anymore by the way history positions them but they are alive and well during the eighteen hundred. The myers were forced work. Surf conditions on cecil plantations cecil and hennequin were fibers used in making rope camp Some were even tricked. Into virtual slavery and sugarcane feels in cuba like many other indigenous peoples quoting for centuries. These people have suffered exploitation and abuse said insterior secretary cordeiro today. We recognize something which we have denied for a long time. The wrongs and injustice committed against the my people quoting again we today. We ask forgiveness in the name of the mexican government for the injustice committed against you throughout history and for the discrimination which even now you are victims of in quote quoting again. We realized that we have a great history that we are held up as an example and people make a lot of money off our name but that money never shows up in our communities.

north america north carolina monday cuba fifteen years second article andres manuel lopez president secretary cordeiro today shirley first part eighteen hundred mexican government one nine thousand nine hundred alejandro mexico Obrador
"turtle mountain chippewa" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

08:01 min | 10 months ago

"turtle mountain chippewa" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Shaky about what what they should do. So it barely passed then is what you're saying. Yeah all right well Let's switch gears and talk about another story that's making national news on the navajo nation. So there's a there's hemp farms and you've been reporting on this for quite some time you in fact broke the story on this That Recently search warrants executed on On these hemp farms. Let's go back a little bit and tell us about What's going on here. Are these legal. Hemp farms these federal warrants at had an implemented and. You know the feds came in win over to these these Farm they found out they found. Let's see about two hundred sixty thousand live marijuana plants and processed an estimated of sixty thousand pounds of of You know marijuana within hampton marijuana all along and we everyone knew it. The community knew it. police knew it. But it's just the process of getting the evidence and and getting everything in control to make sure that it doesn't happen again as well as making sure that you know. If they do it right he can. You can't get away from it. You can't do the navajo nation and you know it's just making sure that everything is just done correctly and And they're standing right there and who's running these farms didn't even know he was. He ran for and how many president during the eighteen election and he was also the former president. Joe shirley vice president picks back in two thousand fourteen and so now he's currently or he was the san juan river farm board president and these farms that are that have been having the marijuana farms. They're all under his his jurisdiction as a standalone president. Juan farm president. So that's how he was able to. Just you know do what she had wanted to do right. So he's he's ushering. He's allowing for these. I guess we should say so hemp farms. Because i know that there was another news outlet didn't investigation and they They actually had some of the product tested and found that it was. it was marijuana. Not hemp Well you know. What are you looking into with the with these the hemp farms and coming up with this so well one thing about the breaking of the story was was after the police had initially gave an acknowledgement of these ten because they were getting so many concerns and concerned calls from community members about it. They wanted to put an acknowledgement to them and so they sent out a press. Release saying we understand. This is what's going on and we're doing our best to to To i'm sorry Address a talk with folks. Yeah because i mean i understand. There was like accusations of human trafficking going on there is lots of people from the outside. the commuters. very concerned about this. I even saw some pictures of people protesting with signs and things like that. I've been the summer protests that it was a protest against the hemp farm. So you know after the nomination. Police had this had Sent out press release. Didn't that the. oj has their own press. Release stating okay. We're gonna we're about to do. And even ali and his two companies in order to stop this. That's backing me. And so me and two other local outlets around here saw those press releases and we wrote about it and then then on those other to kind of just didn't go as much as into it as i did and i've been on it since the beginning of summer. And when it comes to the farmers the farmers and everything there are non navajo farmers that had worked in these Farms but they thought it was a legit job. They really did. I'm said that they had Stalls up the advertisement for these jobs and they called and then they came out and ask for human trafficking. I can't really say much to that. i guess searchlight has had found right and we want to learn more about this definitely will keep following the story but are lissa percent he thank you so much for joining us today from the navajo times. It is our monthly news. Roundup if you want to get in on the conversation. The number is one eight hundred nine nine six. Two eight four eight. We'll be right back Author hide eric's latest book of poetry. Big little bully. Ask big questions like what is truth. Now and who are we now. A national poetry award winner urged. Rick is an interdisciplinary artist. Working with video theater and art curation. She's our native in the spotlight. On the next native america calling the indian arts and crafts act protects authentic american indian and alaska native artists and craftspeople and their art and craft work under the acted as illegal to market art or craft. Work misrepresented as american indian indian native american or alaskan native made or is the product of a particular indian tribe reporting potential act violations can be done at d o. I dot gov slash. Iacb or at one eight art of fake support provided by indian arts and crafts board. You are tunde into native america calling. I monica brain and today is our monthly news roundup. I'm joining you today from my home studio through skype on the line. We have richard monette. He's a professor of law and director of the great lakes. Indian law center at the university of wisconsin law school and he has turtle mountain chippewa. Welcome back to nir calling richard morning. How were you or good afternoon. I'm doing good. I'm doing good. Did you have a good thanksgiving. We have a nice day yesterday. I speak healthy Thankful turkey and we were thankful to absolutely. That's great well right now. President-elect biden and his team are making decisions about who will be on his team. What kind of conversations do you think are going on right now about who will serve in key positions like secretary of interior conversations. Going on about who can get confirmed. Who's best for the job. We have our tensions out in india countries. So they're playing out a bit. You know we. We know that this position secretary and assistant secretary. You're actually sort of inherently conflicted right. I mean we like to think of these good times that they deal with and engage the tribes and tribal leaders but fact of the matter is of course their federal officials and so they. They're there to carry out american law which is not always You know friendlier on our side. So they get they get conflicted. This person has to know that going in. They have to understand all that. It's a it's a big. It's a big matter actually. Yeah and so. I mean you brought up this really interesting phrase who can get confirmed What does that mean like people who have skeletons in their closet..

marijuana president secretary navajo times Juan farm vice president america university of wisconsin law sc richard monette Joe shirley india san juan river alaska skype ali searchlight
"turtle mountain chippewa" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:37 min | 10 months ago

"turtle mountain chippewa" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Six two eight four eight today. We're gonna start off in belcourt. North dakota we have jimmy as your. He is the chairman of the turtle. Mountain chippewa trump germanischer. Thank you for joining us. Thank you for having me in. Good morning in german. We definitely one here. You know how things are going in your own community and you know. Rise of cases we see are happening in your state Give us an update of where things currently stand in. How much cove nineteen is. Impacting your tribe. How many cases are there. Go ahead all right now. Our tribe is directly in the centre of rolette county. And as of this morning rolette county has two hundred and forty active cases. It's a little hard to separate the county from the drive itself. But you know we're we're all one big community here so so we're all just trying to do our best in german just knowing you know what this means to the community to have something like this inter- you know um you also is is really important and i know you're hearing directly from the people in. What are you hearing from your citizens about about this and and things. They're hoping for on how to keep the community safe. Also it's a little splits. We have people on almost every level. You know we have people that are calling for complete closures and stay at home orders. We have people that are following the mask mandates that we've had in place since june or since july We've also had a curfew in place. But unfortunately in the last three weeks we have had a spike and we are moving on to a few more strict executive orders in what you know putting those orders in place. It's asking the citizens to participate in for you as a tribal leader when you do see citizens coming together in you know. Heating some of these orders. How does that make you feel. It's a little frustrating and it's a little you know you're always walking that line you know. We're sovereign nation. And once you start putting executive orders in place telling people to do the things that we've grown up. Not doing you know we were growing up. We grew up. We learn how to take care of our elders. We learn to. If you're faced with an issue you don't call in your family. Go see your family. Everybody come and you know we unite to combat. Whatever faces those. That's been the major issue in the major struggle with this virus in particular is that it is telling us to do all the things that we were brought up to not. Do you know it's telling us to stay away from our elders telling us to Stay away from our families don't congregate don't don't come together with a unified strength of a family and community so we're telling people you need to stand up part to unite and that is in direct conflict of everything that we are you know so. It's been a struggle and once you get to the point where you're issuing executive orders to stay at home and you know you can be prosecuted in the long term. You know worst case scenario if you were quarantined and you're leaving your establishment. You know these are all these are all things that we were growing up not to do. So we were not only fighting this global pandemic at that macro level but on the micro levels. We're also telling people to.

executive rolette county chairman belcourt North dakota
"turtle mountain chippewa" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

08:14 min | 1 year ago

"turtle mountain chippewa" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

"Com check everything out there and we appreciate them very much for being an advertiser here on absolutely native opinion. All Right Well, we have a little bit of listening feedback. We do think this is from listener jol. We haven't heard from Joel a while we have in this is this is pretty sad stuff right here. and Joel says hello brothers. Sorry. I. Haven't been in touch for awhile and it's OK brother we understand Oh yeah. Life gets in the way because. We've we've been good just busy with live APP. See there you go. But just in case you guys haven't seen this yet I'm going to paste a gofundme me link for this man's family to cover his funeral expenses and hopefully end up with some extra money to help with their kids. That now does not have a father. I'll paste article link as whale which he did. Thank you. A COP on Turtle Mountain res- killed a native man for little backstory as to what Joel was talking about. I just know it's partner and two children need some help. It's really sad it's it's depressing man. Every day it seems like the cops kill native or black person. Like people. That have their backs turned in no weapons, but anyway, guys take care and the link will be posted in the show notes. Yeah. Let me let me give you guys a little bit of this year Turtle citizen killed on Turtle Mountain Reservation. Officers suspended. So we gotta be. Officer involved. In the family is left in the dark and what they mean by that is they're not giving up any information. Atypical kind of stuff. re real brief here it says the FBI is investigating the fatal shooting of a Turtle Mountain man by police officers last weekend on the Turtle Mountain Indian reservation and Belcourt North Dakota the man who was killed as being identified as Brandon lead sewer thirty. Turned to mountain tribal citizen from Belcourt he was a father of two children a boy in a girl. In, an email to native news online who published this article? FBI spokesperson, Kevin Smith shared that an officer involved shooting or O. I s happened at private at a private residence in Belcourt late Saturday night August twenty second and into the early morning hours of Sunday August twenty third. The FBI was called to respond to Elias and the north. Dakota Bureau of Criminal Investigation assisted with processing the scene according to the email. The FBI reported the law enforcement agencies involved in the incident where the Bureau of Indian Affairs the Rolette County Sheriff's Office, the Rolette Police Department and the. In the roller police departments. phone calls to the Rolette County Sheriff's Department here. Here's here's where here's where it goes off the rails and and. The spin begins okay. This is phone calls to the role Rolette County Sheriff's department the Rolette Police Department, and the role of police. Department were referred to the Turtle Mountain Chippewa Tribal Office. So they're like you guys. Go Talk to them. So, then the receptionist there at at the phone number provided for the Bureau of Indian affairs at a sorry that receptionist at backing up here at Turtle Mountain Chippewa Tribal Office there receptionist shared a phone number. Excuse me with the Bureau of Indian Affairs Turtle Mountain Agency. To be a stated over the phone that any questions should be directed. So here's another deflection directed to the FBI field office in Minneapolis nearly five hundred miles away and shared the phone number of the FBI's Minneapolis Minnesota field office. So. If you're if you're a family member and you're trying to get information about this case, they're going over there. No, you don't talk to us. You Talk to those people over there and hop this stuff around absolutely inexcusable. and. The rest of this will be in the show notes but our hearts go out to the family. It's crazy. Crazy. Crazy. We have a couple of acknowledgments I'm sorry we finished I am done I'm sorry I was just going to say we don't have any voicemail this week you guys but but thank you. Couplet knowledge we want to express our deepest condolences. To the family of actor, Chadwick? Boltzmann. Who played several is in Hollywood movies. which includes Baseball Great Jackie Robinson James Brown in most recently marvel's Black Panther. Mr Bozeman passed away after a four year long battle of colon cancer. He will be deeply missed. Yes indeed. It was. That was shocking to hear this morning. I was trying to finish some touch up on for the show no boom this news came down so. I didn't even know he was sick. I anoint battling cancer. Nope, most pie from what I've been reading most people didn't know it wasn't something that he you know publicized. Sure. Widely, just you know kept trucking right along with life doing what you wanted to do and supposed to. Yep. Yeah and It's. Can't cancer the tough thing is how I lost My other father might my wife's dad died of stomach cancer and so I I I, I understand that battle very very well. so Again our thoughts, prayers and everything going out down to the family for sure right? Absolutely. On a lighter note. I want to say Happy Birthday to Silver Wolf. Silver Wolf is my father. Who Turns Seventy eight today? And we're going to be going over there shortly. Hug Kim with masks on because I can't stand not being allowed my parents. So. Birthday CER-. Yes and they will be wearing masks as well. We always, we always take precautions because we're in their home and their. For most of us, it's our sanctuary. We try to keep her homes the safest possible from code. So. So Happy Birthday Dad. Appreciate. Yes. Yes. Absolutely worry great man. Thank. There were times as a teenager, my brother, my biological brothers and chat today in good morning everybody in chat. He'll tell you. How? Challenging Boulevard could be for our parents. There were. There were moments as we say. That anyway, maybe one day we'll share stories I don't know I like to hear some of those stories. So. We'll see. We'll? You know some of them brother but the well that's true. But there's many of. You know. Just how it goes? All right. Why don't we get into native news on this is GonNa? Be Kind of extended a little bit today but but go ahead and kick us off if you will brother yeah no problem. Thank you. Okay at first Article I, just shake my head and laugh that's that's all you can do at this point Yip. Republicans Open Presidential Convention. I can't even call it that it's not. A clown slash dog and pony show that's what it was. With familiar anti-tribal messages from fool in the White House and my words and this was. Written by AC ago, for Indians Dot Com..

FBI Turtle Mountain Turtle Mountain Chippewa Triba Bureau of Indian Affairs Turtl Rolette Police Department Bureau of Indian Affairs Joel Turtle Mountain Reservation Rolette County Sheriff's Depar Officer Rolette County Sheriff Belcourt Dakota Bureau of Criminal Inve Rolette County Sheriff's Offic Belcourt North Dakota partner colon cancer Minneapolis Yip Republicans
"turtle mountain chippewa" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:05 min | 1 year ago

"turtle mountain chippewa" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Is actually going to be premiering of the week of August thirty. First, we're going to go to a film here who that premiers September the week of September fourteenth blood memory, and Alana before we hear a little bit from it anything you want to say and maybe even why this film was chosen. So blood memory is a production of vision maker media. We actually gave money for this film to be produced. So that is why it was chosen as one of our films and it's it's a recent film. I think it is just going on PBS this year. All right. Well, here's a moment from blood memory were Sandy White Hawk AC- Changle a a woman who was adopted out speaks about her experience. You know you heard the race adoption. And it's a phrase that I would like to be used when we talk about when people were systematically taken through adoption prior to. We don't have an a phrase for it. We don't even refer to it as anything if anything they say pre EQUA. And it's an era it was an actual time where. Literally social workers drove into driveways took children on reservations. I. Mean. It was pretty horrendous. So I was adopted in Nineteen fifty-three by white missionaries. They were called to work with the Indians from Illinois and they moved to winner South Dakota, which is a border town to reservation. My mom was very abusive. She really broke down my identity as a native person because the only thing she had was negative things to say about it. So, we have to remember that wants the adoption decree is sign and finalized. Nobody goes back into that home to find out if that child is indeed safe, is he being? Molested is he being beaten? Is it a healthy environment for that child and yet? We say we've done this for the best interest of this child. no-one goes back into find out if it's true. And so now we go to the director and producer of blood memory who joins us today at a Pittsburgh Pennsylvania drew nichols is here with us drew. Thank you for joining us. Thank you for having me. Into drew this film blend memory. It has packed with a lot of information especially on the indigenous welfare of our children and so when you set out on this what was your hope? What did you want audiences to learn about the situation when it comes to the welfare of our young children? I think sort of A. Kind of a very layered question because you know I came at it from not knowing anything about the history. So initially, you know as being a white guy from the east you know my initial idea it was like, how is this possible and? This came out of the boarding schools as well and one of the first. Boarding Schools was here in central Pennsylvania Carlisle. And all this history was right in my backyard. So my initial perspective was How do how is this not taught? How how did people not know about this but then as I started to talk with Sandy and explore the subject and really get to know. You know the the impact this is having hill to this day. You know the idea of you know telling white mainstream culture about this history was sort of the secondary aspect it really became about. What's happening in communities having this conversation that what's happening around the healing work that that sandy and many others are doing and how are you know those who've been removed as they're coming home? Are they opening up conversations that are starting to address this trauma and how is that still sort of impacting? You know that's the angle that that the story really started to take on. In so who the person we heard from earlier, Sandy, she has taking a journey of her own to reconnect with her own birth community, and then she is guiding others on their return home and you documented that tell our listeners a little bit about this journey and exactly what you feel it reveals. Sure so the particular thing that we filmed You know in a live action was was two, thousand, fifteen Rosebud in south, Dakota decided to host a welcome home ceremony and Sandy had returned to Rosebud for the first time in her thirties and has since been going on her own healing journey, which we document and her husband and many of the people in her have documented that process. So. There's a lot of archive footage of VHS, footage of her sort of taking those steps and in showing how the ceremony gets organized and the role that sandy plays as a key organizer that and bringing the community together and just sort of de stigmatizing it and making it welcoming and making a place of inclusivity for those who've been removed and the families who lost children. You know we retail sort of the common struggle that that is similar. In. Many of the narratives that we heard, and then toward the end of the film, right before the ceremony you get to There's there's a very heart wrenching gathering where those adoptees who came home or sharing their stories of what their adoption experience was like and and it's not too dissimilar outside of Rosebud across across. All of North America. In. So there are about two hours of content and drew. You could probably tell everything that's in the film, but it even watching it again you get so much information. You also take us to the courts and you explain equal of course they would equal is but share some of the things that. People do get to view or just kind of a booster into the knowledge would happened in the courts with the welfare of our native children. So Yeah Juxtaposing Sandy Story of communal healing is the story of Mark Fiddler, who is a child welfare attorney and member of Turtle. Mountain Chippewa in. North Dakota and when I first met mark. It was post the Baby Veronica case in two thousand thirteen and he was one of the attorneys who.

Sandy Rosebud Pennsylvania Alana North Dakota South Dakota Mark Fiddler A. Kind Boarding Schools North America Illinois Pittsburgh Dakota attorney director producer
"turtle mountain chippewa" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

02:58 min | 1 year ago

"turtle mountain chippewa" Discussed on Native America Calling

"You haven't been to grandma or GRANDPA's. GRANDPA's house or one of your elders, and you just WanNa. Share some thoughts you know what it means to have to put their safety I put it before that urge to WanNa go and see them. You can share thoughts to. Maybe you have a special message to your elder that you know at eleven. O'clock mountain time turns on that radio and his listening to what they're talking about. A native America, calling they're going. Going to hear it go ahead and dial in one, eight, hundred, nine, nine, six, two, eight, four eight right now. We're GONNA, go to Washington. DC WE HAVE CYNTHIA ACCOUNT with us. She is a director of the Office for American Indians Alaska. Natives and native Hawaiian. Programs administration on Aging and it's with the Department of Human Health and Human Services and she is Turtle Mountain Chippewa our pleasure to have her here. Welcome Cynthia. Thank you very much great to have you here also on the line to and Albuquerque New Mexico's Larry Curly. He is the executive director for the National Indian Council on Aging and he is Navajo my pleasure to have him here Larry. Thank you for being with US welcome. Thank you as well? And so the two of you head up to organizations that are looking a lot when it comes to keeping our elders safe, and especially during these times and so Cynthia I, WanNa talk to you about maybe some of the different programs that were implemented because of the pandemic or things that just seem to get more robust on efforts to D. to support our elders. Go ahead Cynthia. Thank. You very much I'm excited that Clifford from Mattila called in because that is one of the programs that we fund and also I. Want You to know that Chris Cla Bundy's from Anchorage. He'll be talking later. is another of the programs that we fund so I I? Want folks to really listen because those are the the folks on the ground for what I'm doing out here in DC. And we knew that with elders isolating at home. That, we would have increased mates for cleaning supplies for covert. We knew we would have increased need for food. meals for as long as we keep our kitchens open and provide them and for food, the delivery of food so that the elders aren't having to leave their homes and communities and go out to the Walmart eighty miles away or the big grocery store eighty miles away. We want to deliver everything to keep seniors safe and living in their communities. And so that has been. That's up to the tribes. One of the beauties of the program that I get to manage is that it's truly tribally determined so Mattila can decide how they're going. Tau They best serve their elders Navajo can do the same and my relatives up in Turtle Mountain can do the same, so every program is really really different..

Cynthia I director executive director WanNa Mattila Department of Human Health and Turtle Mountain Chris Cla Bundy Walmart Washington Albuquerque America Alaska New Mexico Larry Anchorage American Indians National Indian Council Clifford
"turtle mountain chippewa" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

09:53 min | 1 year ago

"turtle mountain chippewa" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Like you know like context like protect your elders and like you know all the things that we're talking about now right because I could just see some of the stuff happening online in our communities. There was this there. Was that whole thing like we're really resume like we're resilient people will make it through and I was like okay hang tight you know that like we. Yeah that's great. We did survive. Use survive that would ten percent of the population. Yeah this survive from the initial wave of you know genetic and germ warfare on our people. That doesn't necessarily like you can't do that. And I'm certainly not gonNA PUT GRANDMA GRANDPA risk nor communities so like. That was the one of the first things. I wrote was resilience. Means COMMONSENSE. A little tricky. It's a little tricky leave because you are strong and resilient people but at the same time just because I took one karate. Class doesn't mean that I can walk around nights not worried about what's going to happen or something that we're resilient but we also have to be reminded from time to time because of the saturation of social media and colonization that we're also smart. People I think propaganda serves in some ways. It's a reminder of being like. Oh that's right. We are not dummy you know. Like don't let don't don't be like don't be like the outsider remember. We are smart people and we did survive because we learned we learned how to survive right. But that's kind of what we were angling towards. Which is you know. Don't do this is not the time for Bravado The kinds of take care of your family and your community. And that's why I really spirited because it is propaganda in that sense like you don't don't do this thing you need to do this other thing and this other thing means that you you know be smart. Wash your hands you know. Do physical distancing. Take care of your families like you're not doing this for us. You're not because you know maybe the wrong way you can make this. But you're doing this for for your grandma and your grandma and the seventh generation. Yeah so right. So that's that was the whole idea behind it. We came up with the copies and I reached out to a bunch of the native illustrators that I know we'll show you a arrogant star You Know Vanessa Boeing worst android junior as the first round You know and and basically just was like. Hey you guys you know. I've got a little bit of a little bit dollars. I can get to you but you WANNA make a cool poster right. GonNa put up a poster together for us with your talent and can do it like you do a week and You know they turned it around and I put you know. Put in poster form you know. Put put the words on that what we had and And then we unleash the wild and it took off like crazy. It was amazing. Kim picked up on it. Can you actually get like a physical poster if you wanted one because it you know? Of course it's all over online but like something are you printing things We we are anything's well You know and it's available for anybody that you know any where on the social media's You know it can it can. There's there's printing options there's digital options. We just wanted to make an open for anybody making it easier. Not so wherever you find it online you can trace it back to where you know to us. you know the work that we've been doing and anybody you know anybody can find that and those links so all right. That's great Lee You know you've been hearing from artists Talking with them. What are you hearing about how they're weathering this storm Difficult is difficult for a bunch of You know the main thing that we're hearing is really like and and you know it affected us too but you know we were a little bit different because we have an organization you know. We've sort of set a different pattern. So we're having to weather a different type of storm especially like you know. The planet isn't open. Currently you know a lot of this stuff that the COMECON was. Shut down the extra shutdown like all that kind of stuff but you know our day to day artists not just our pop artists but like you know it'd be our aunties uncles and these folks rely on gigs like I- PX or a the you know the trade shows and Indian market going down like bats really tough because you know and this is what we're hearing back from. A lot of our native creatives is that it's just like this is where a lot of folks made their money or at least made you know You know a couple of months to three months worth of you know rent and food and utilities and all this stuff all the things they need to do. And that's all gone and then a lot of these gigs were in play. Also were on. I mean I'll I'll tell you personally. I had word travel. Gigs disappeared this last month for the month of April right again. It's not you know I mean we're not taking a huge toll on our end but like that's you know that's something that could definitely be helpful in terms of trying to you. Know what we're doing getting the word out because a lot of those were like travels to locations where I'd be like. Hey and look at native creative writer so that's kind of hard for us and I. It's hard for you to yeah. Plus it's hard for you to just sit still Lee so I imagine you're you're going a little stir crazy in your house. I got a I got a little home schooling You know with the with the family going on here. So it keeps me keeps me occupied but Definitely definitely I was like well I got another. I have no meetings today. I don't know what to do with my time. I guess I'll go back and I was like if if one of those things where I've said You know prior to this. I was like man. I wish I had more time to right now. I'm sitting here being like I have all the time right right right. You know I hear you fine right. I mean for real well Lee. Thank you so much for joining us today. If you WANNA check out these posters there at native realities of we'll have a link after the show on our website and Take Care Lee. Yeah thank you so much for everything guys. Doing and hanging in there are pushing this radio. South thank you. We'll be right back. Hey Ivan good to see you two. What brings you here. I'm informing people about the twenty two thousand census the senses. Yeah everyone knows about that. They don't they really don't but I do. And when we participate helps determine funding for things like grants and programs in our communities cool. That's good to know. The census is for all American Indians and Alaskan natives shape our future. Start here to complete this sentence. Twenty twenty census dot gop paid for by US Census Bureau tune-in into Native America. Calling Monica Brain. And it's our regular monthly news. Roundup today if you have something you'd like to share gives call eight hundred nine six two eight four eight so it's graduation season and usually we end up doing a show about students who are not allowed to wear feathers at graduation or Regalia But it doesn't look like a lot of graduations are going to be happening this year. I think that most schools have closed for the rest of the school year. So I wanNA talk with a native educator about what they're trying to do for missing out on that graduation joining us now is Melvyn Monette Barajas. He's the president and Executive Director of Indigenous Education Inc and he is Turtle Mountain Chippewa. Welcome back Melvin. Thank you Monica. It's good to be here. Yeah how you doing doing well doing? Well here Stand quite busy with this initiative. So excited okay. So tell us about this virtual indigenous. Commencement that's correct We were trying to figure out what we can do for our families and for our students are grandma's GRANDPA's aunties uncles growing up in the turtle mountains and the spirit lake reservation. Every transition has been a celebration so we put together. Our staff got together with a number of partners her doing some other work and we decided that we needed to celebrate these commandments. Rather than let students Bill sat down about what they're missing. We needed them to know that. We're GONNA celebrate them. We're going to celebrate with them and for them Families can't get together right now because of the social and physical distancing we wanted you know. Grandma's an Auntie's an uncle's and family members tribal leaders to see their students virtually celebrate them and enjoy them So we came up with the virtual events virtual indigenous commencement For that celebration okay. So what actually will be happening Well first of all when is it? So may I at noon. We're in Albuquerque so mountain standard time noon We will be starting with trying to follow a traditional commencement format. We will have an invocation. We have an drum group. We have a commencement speaker We will be posting as many student graduate names as we can collect. There is a Google Doc Out on social media that students and family members can enter the name of the graduate so that gets on that scrolling video There will be on our songs. We have a presentation from one of our partners and musical presentation. I'm it's going to be a few a couple to a few hours of just celebrating graduates at any level. Did you get this idea? From the Social Distance Palo. That wasn't inspiration that was one of the inspirations for.

Lee Monica Brain America Albuquerque Google COMECON Vanessa Boeing Census Bureau Melvyn Monette Barajas Kim writer Ivan Melvin Bill spirit lake Turtle Mountain Chippewa
"turtle mountain chippewa" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

14:22 min | 1 year ago

"turtle mountain chippewa" Discussed on Native America Calling

"This is native. America. Calling interrogate would from a set of Pueblo and we are talking about the statute of limitations on child. Sex Abuse Cases Today. How long after the alleged abuse happens do you think survivors should be able to sue to determine an organization's accountability. The Boy Scouts of America the Catholic Church and the Church of Jesus Christ of latter-day Saints have all had child sex abuse lawsuits against them. And if you'd like to weigh in on this conversation today call us at one. Eight hundred nine six two eight four eight with us on the line today. Is Michelle The funding eccles attorney With the nine little girls she is also Turtle Mountain Chippewa. My pleasure to have her here and show the case that we've been discussing. Why do you think the South Dakota legislators don't want to pass this law I think that At this point I had different theories throughout the years and And this year I talked during my testimony about what my true thoughts are at this point. I think where the the the church is extremely powerful and we felt that power each year after year and And seeing it at work with the legislators and And so it it's it's really the I think that the legislators are following suit with what they think that the church wants and it probably largely due to campaign no donations that are being offered to them in so when we think about all this if the lower to change what would it mean for survivors. So if we were able to get a lot to change this would allow them to pursue claims in court that they haven't been able to have moved forward so this only gives them the opportunity to have their claims heard to allow their voices to be heard about what occurred to them. What abuse occurred and How organizations and how abusers abused their trust and as children and violated the law And it's up to them to they have the burden of proof Once they do get that access to the courthouse So merely what this does is give them an opportunity to be heard. Thank you for that and folks if you'd like to talk with. Michelle gives us a call. One eight hundred nine six two eight four eight is the number also want to bring in a voice joining us today out of Anchorage Alaska we have. Lc Boudreau and she is a child six abuse survivor and Elsie is Yupik Eskimo. She grew up in the village of Saint. Mary's it's our pleasure to have her here to share her story. Elsie thank you for joining us for another native America. Calling thank you and thank you and Elsie. I really appreciate you having the courage to be here with us to share your story and let's start there the question that I asked Michelle about the ability You know to to have these laws protecting survivors for you. Elsie the ability to be heard. Tell me about the power of that. Well I think there's so much power in that Just even as a sexual abuse survivor to be able to find your voice and to speak your truth takes a lot of courage and then on the receiving end having people believe you Does something in terms of healing that allows you to move from blaming yourself and That victimize victimize mind and heart and spirit Took place where you know that you did nothing wrong that you know. And and that's the wish for all survivors is to get to the place where they know in their mind and their heart and their spirits that they did nothing wrong. That would happen to them was not their fault and So the there's just a lot of healing in that and and you think about you know the generations of people that have gone through boarding school and the holding back of Or prohibit prescribing people from using the APP. This avenue to to speak their truth is Is more harmful and in the long run into Elsie when we talk about increasing the statute of limitations. Where do things currently stand in Alaska? What is the statute of limitations? Both criminal and civil you know I. I don't want to be the expert on this. Except I do know that in Alaska there are no statute of limitations on when it comes to child sexual abuse. That law changed And when when I went through the process and It was difficult to ascertain whether or not the law was retro. Active meaning Those p the people that I like myself who were coming forward. It wasn't clear as a lavas written as to whether or not it would apply to us After the changing law so that makes sense in Elsie. When you hear about other states in the big push going on in South Dakota what do you think about these efforts to reform statue of limitations? I think it's really really important Especially being that you know as just the nature of child sexual abuse and how secrecy keeps it so There's so much power behind secrecy. At some you know I always say Silence is deafening. When it comes to child sexual abuse and and for people that have gone through. This need to have an avenue where they feel That they can speak their truth and that there would be people on the other side that would believe them and so I think it's so important. You know it you know like you here as children. You know like Even even myself like I didn't even know the words sexual abuse and if you even as an adult I was in college and was asked if I had been sexually abused and I lifted my counselor and I said no like in my mind at that point. I didn't equate what happened to me. As sexual abuse because it wasn't violent And the person that abused me was a priest and so I looked at it as something that You know Even years later like just understanding how that has affected me like it takes a long time and I think for many survivors to get to that place where they understand The nature of the abuse. And how how it has impacted them takes time so Allowing for the statute of limitations to be lifted would give more people the opportunity to speak their truth into. He'll I agree elsie. I really appreciate you sharing your story and You know to hear that this is something that you have endured in. Your life weighs heavy on on me and hearing this in. I'm raises concerns too. I think to a lot of people especially in our tribal communities where often we hear. Our children are the target were year. That story of our parents are those You know who have come before us. And they're sharing the stories and Elsie. Sometimes this gets a loss when we start talking about these kind of issues that When it gets into the law or people are trying to break away from the statute of limitations. There are survivors who have to come forward and share their story. And how heavy is it to have to do something like that in a public space But but I know a lot of times you do that so that other people will not have to endure what you did but share because this is an easy to do Elsie. Well you know I appreciate the question and I think you know. Just looking back on my life and You know like it's been since two thousand three that I came forward. You know and like the four that time I would never ever ever even imagine speaking publicly about this and You know having gone through the process and having spoken my truth and and having people Believe me and I've gotten it's almost like my voice has gotten stronger and I can I you know I often say like even the media has been like an extension of my voice and you think about the little like being a little kid you know and how their voices are You know when when they're when they've dealt with child sexual abuse almost like their voices fragile. You know their spirit is fragile and Getting to a place where you feel contained and loved and held So it's almost like when you speak your truth your and you have someone believe you. It's almost like you're being held and And and I think that's really important you know Having that sense so that you know that you're not alone and what happened to you was not your fault fault and that You have a right as a child to be loved to be Safe to Not have to you know deal with the actions of the adults that are there to protect you and and when when you think about the boarding school and and I think about the nine little girls You know I I. I've had the the honor of meeting them and talking to them and I I'm really Ungrateful for them for having for taking this on and You know I think about them and think about how how much The experience that they've gone through has affected their lives in a way that No one can take that back. You know So I don't know if I'm answering your question. You definitely your and I think you know. Maybe you're even speaking directly to people who are dealing with this today In I wanNA share another hotline with you the child help. Usa National Child Abuse Hotline is one eight hundred four. A child Also the national sexual assault hotline one. Eight hundred six five six hope If they're folks at You want to talk further about this and You know just hearing some of this and knowing that there are people who are wanting to give more avenues to survivors Eight to be able to tell their story as well as seek justice for those who have created harm to them What are your thoughts and your hearing stories about wanting to change his statute of limitations. Do you think they should even exist? One eight hundred nine six two four eight is the number Elsie. Thank you very much I want to go to a caller. We have limit in eastern Washington joining us today. Thank you for calling in go ahead. You're on here thank you. Yeah I never understood why there was even a statute of limitations. I was pressured into sex at fifteen by an extended family member and I think that I Sexual intercourse at least twice. He he wanted me to give him oral sex and pressured me into doing that and In nineteen sixty eight I thought okay. This is You know I'm cool. And maybe it's okay but I really didn't want it and I have to say I'm sixty eight now and it really messed with my understanding of my relationship with NASA I subsequently Never told anybody. I was ashamed. Embarrassed I didn't want to be a victim either and You know 'cause I was mature grown-up right anyway I didn't realize later how bad that was. And I realized that subsequently my attitude toward men was okay. I just roll over for men and I'm pray and then I felt like pray like I was always pray I was very pretty and sexy and stuff and I was just a prayer and it was funny men off and I never ever ever thought even in my twenty why is there a statute of limitations on this. It seems so weird to me I mean. Why would you like? It's going to like the victim or so-called whatever we were are.

Elsie Michelle South Dakota Alaska America Pueblo Boy Scouts of America attorney Turtle Mountain Chippewa Anchorage Alaska Church of Jesus Christ NASA Washington Lc Boudreau Catholic Church Mary Yupik Eskimo assault
"turtle mountain chippewa" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

10:11 min | 1 year ago

"turtle mountain chippewa" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Sex Abuse Survivors from native American boarding schools in a CO founder of the organization. Nine little girls and Michelle is Turtle Mountain Chippewa. My pleasure to have her with us. Thank you for joining us. Michelle thank you for having me in so Michelle tell us about the law about the proposed legislation You fight for seems every year now right so each year we kind of do an evaluation to figure out what approach we wanna take in this last year what we did was Two prong approach was to eliminate a provision in the Child Sexual Abuse Statute that was passed in two thousand ten which limits It basically blocks any survivor over the age of forty from suing anyone other than their directly but direct perpetrator so The way that the courts interpreted that was to Say that the Child Sexual Abuse Statute is not applicable to organizations Such as the the Catholic Church in so what happened was The women who Our organization is named after nine sisters from One family who were our child sexual abuse survivors from Boarding School What we've done is Gone in and tried to figure out a way that we could overcome this provision that was enacted during the While. Their lawsuit was pending. And then also there's a a window of time that would revive their claims That we advocated for also this year so there was a two pronged approach in order to remove that provision That blocked anyone over the age of forty and also blocks a suits against organization as well as reviving the window to open up People are claims for people who may have been blocked in the past into Michelle. What is the argument? Why this case in in those behind it filled that you should be able to sue an organization so There's several different Reasons why and we had a great expert testimony from Archie Hamilton this year from child. Usa DOT ORG and With University of Pennsylvania and they have studies and statistics behind them that talk about how reviving these windows of time to allow for these to go. Forth helps identify a child predators that may have been protected by the organization or may have been previously hidden to the public So that children won't be abused in the future. So a large part of this is for prevention of child. Sexual abuse in the future It also shifts the cost of abuse from victims to predators and those that hit them rather than The victims having to sustain the cost of abuse themselves for health care for all the other Ramifications that they're abuse Took a toll on them for the other thing. Is that it Educate the public about the prevalence gives them the wear awareness For the harm that child sexual abuse does to the families and the communities at a The whole And then another thing that it does do is offers Healing and justice to survivors offers. Them Avenue what we've seen happen is that The Catholic Church has admitted that they had this abuse occurred and they have been releasing lists of credible abusers they call them. But what I am. Finding is that on these lists are not listing the abusers from the native American community and so made of American survivors are being left out of that process of You know transparency from the church and that kind of thing and so. I wanted to make people aware of that. I did an open letter to the Vatican this year. explaining to the pope that that native American people are being left out of this process and that we need to be a part of it and without being part of that process. There's only other resources to go through the court system and we know that this definitely weighs very heavy on survivors and even family members and I did want to share this number of before we move ahead. The next national sexual assault hotline is one eight hundred six five six hope or one eight hundred six five six four six seven three If there are folks you'd like to contact to talk more about maybe some of these things that have affected you personally and so with that Michelle There's a lot of work being done to make sure that Those who are survivors have the ability to tell their story. Have the ability to protect a future generations in. So gimme a little bit about Some of the things that have happened this year with this case and pushing forward in wanting to open up limitations so We continue to push forward in the South Dakota legislature But we've been partnering up with a lot of organizations that exist nationally as a resource for native American survivors as well as survivors of clergy abuse. That large and so we've gotten a great deal of support For the survivors network of those abused by priests goes by snap and a lot of other organizations that are doing great work with the statute of limitations and other states like New Jersey and New York Pennsylvania Montana So that is really Given us a lot of hope and optimism and strength to get us through These legislative sessions. Which can be pretty brutal For us as we're we're shot down each year with these changes to the Statute. Thank you for that. And I do want to let people know that we did reach out to the Catholic diocese of Sioux falls and invited them to be on the show. Today they declined due to scheduling conflicts in so Michelle. Explain how the limitation is two years after the abuse. How it's discovered. What does that mean? Well the way that the Child Sexual Abuse Statute is written. Is that When a child is abused they have three years from the date that the time that their injuries caused from the abuse And if they're under eighteen and not those three years would start clicking from the time that they turn eighteen. There's another provision in that statute that allows for people time for discovery. So if you If you don't realize you're injuries A lot of times repressed memories are at play and that the average age of Someone actually reporting there abuse We've found out is fifty two years of age So there's a that time delay So the discovery rule allows for that time delay For three years from the time you discover it now the part. That's the problem is that there's that forty year old blocked anybody over. The age of forty can't avail themselves to that discovery rule and then the way that the Supreme Court has interpreted the statute they cannot apply this to organizations and so in a way to get kind of get around What statute of limitations apply to organizations in these cases the Supreme Court has said that you need to look to the personal injury statute of limitations. Which is two years from the date of majority so the court alternately found that these survivors need to go back. But were they should have filed back. You know to two years after they turned eighteen So essentially all of the boarding school survivors And all the native American boarding school survivors out of luck at that point and pursuing their claims against the church abuse works. Is this unrealistic? Oh definitely so. What even the states on studies show that children do not report their abuse until much later than the statue of limitations allow and Particularly you know the studies that show that Y- they often don't report abuse until they're fifty two so if there's a block against Pursuing claims at forty. It doesn't the statue doesn't match what's happening reality in so there's gotta be some consideration there in in in dealing with this such a sensitive topic with from with all it's it's not something that's typically you know how the law would typically handle something I I don't think the laws equipped to handle something like this that it involves such complex family and in countless emotions and and all of those different aspects of so The laws just really don't are are inadequate for this in so this also is a conversation for any state what do current laws state in terms of limitations on protecting survivors of sexual abuse You can give us a call. Share your thoughts. Maybe you're also working on the similar issue in your own Neck of the woods and What are some of the hurdles or Are there people who are listening in our considerateness? you can give us a call. One eight hundred nine six two eight four eight is number And maybe you are even following this case very closely. What do you think about this where the survivors have for years?.

Michelle There CO founder Catholic Church Turtle Mountain Chippewa Boarding School Supreme Court University of Pennsylvania South Dakota Archie Hamilton assault New Jersey Sioux falls Montana New York Pennsylvania The Catholic Church
"turtle mountain chippewa" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"turtle mountain chippewa" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Twenty twenty cents? This will be our opportunity to shape our future for generations to COME SHAPE. Our Future start here. Learn more at twenty twenty cents Dot Gov paid for by the US Census Bureau native voice one the native American radio network. This is native America calling. I'm Tara gatewood before we get started. I WANNA point out today. Show covers the difficult topic of sex abuse which may trigger intense emotions for some people. If this topic you'd like to sit out we support your decision for almost ten years. A group of women in South Dakota are among those who pushed to change the state statute of limitations on civil liability for child sex abuse. They're all citizens of the Turtle Mountain Chippewa tribe and attended the saint. Paul's mission Indian School in Marty South Dakota in their testimony. They point out the difficulty. Many survivors face in publicly disclosing alleged abuse or hurdle that can take years or decades to overcome in February. The South Dakota legislature rejected the proposal. This year twenty nine states are considering changes for child sex abuse statute of limitations. So we want to hear from you. What do you think about limiting the time? Someone can sue in organization like the Catholic Church or the Boy Scouts of America. Phone lines are open. The number is one eight hundred nine nine. Six two eight four eight. That's one eight hundred nine nine native today. We're going to start off in Minneapolis. Minnesota with us today is Michelle. Define a echoes. She is an attorney and advocate for child..

"turtle mountain chippewa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:39 min | 1 year ago

"turtle mountain chippewa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is fresh AIR weekend I'm Dave Davies in for Terry gross our guest today is author Louise Erdrich in a career going back to the nineteen seventies she's published seventeen novels and more than thirty books at all including children's literature poetry and non fiction she won the National Book Award and the national book critics circle award for fiction twice rhetoric is a member of the turtle mountain band of Chippewa Indians and much of her writing is centered on the experience of native Americans her new novel is set in nineteen fifty three and is inspired by her grandfather's role in resisting a congressional effort to withdraw federal recognition for her family's tribe the book is called the night watchman Louise Erdrich welcome back to fresh AIR it's been a while thank you you know you say in the acknowledgments to this novel that you try to write several books before getting underway on this one and that your impetus had disintegrated you kind of weren't getting anywhere which is kind of a shock to me considering how prolific you have been what should you loose and get you started on this book I went back to reading my grandfather's letters which were written during the year I was born in nineteen fifty four so of course those years are somewhat mysterious to me and I knew that he had fought termination during that time but I never put together his letters and the details of what it was like for him to work as a night watchman I never put that together with the time line for the termination bill and what effect it had on the first five tribes slated to be terminated a lot of this story is about this effort which your grandfather lead in which the main character in your book Thomas leads which was this effort to oppose an initiative in the United States Congress to effectively kind of terminate the existence of the turtle mountain band of Chippewa which he was chairman of you want to just explain what this proposal was what its impact would have been termination was way to finally resolve what Congress thought of this the Indian problem and that would be to move everyone off reservation land because it wouldn't be reservation land anymore turn over their land seller land moved everyone to cities and the most important part in doing that was to abrogate all treaties in these trees have been made since the beginning of our country on a nation to nation basis with every tried and they all contain these words as long as the grass grows as long as the rivers flow so the original intent and purpose was to guarantee the land that was agreed upon by the two parties the two nations those were thrown out the window by both houses of Congress and to simply declare the existence of Indians or native American or American Indians a non non issue and to not recognize tribal nations and to terminate all federal assistance into the terminator Aladdin was wrecked to terminate all federal assistance and all federal recognition of who indigenous people are and where the reason for termination was not just to get rid of the Indian problem but to to acquire the lands that in many cases were covered with some of the most beautiful stands of virgin forest in the country so the first tribe slated for termination with the Menominee and the Klamath and the intent because of the post war housing boom wants to get those big stands of timber which they did you know for those of you who don't know your story as well tell us just a bit about your own background and your connection to this the turtle mountain band of Chippewa I will so my mother is turtle mountain Chippewa as was my grandfather and so my I am an enrolled member a citizen of the turtle mountain band of Chippewa it would be impossible for me to say that if termination had indeed won the day so my father is German I'm a very makes person and yet being a citizen of a nation with in our nation give this one a certain sense of it it changes your life it means that I I care deeply about my people my mother's people and I grew up knowing who I was and accepting all parts of myself and this is a part that I realized would not have existed had my grandfather not fought for it did you grow up speaking is it is it jeep with a language that that supports me it's a cheap way Melin ordination optimal line or at the time that my grandfather was speaking at just plain ship what I didn't grow up he was the last fluent speaker in the family and I am very proud to say my daughter is the next fluent speaker because she is teaching at an on chip weight immersion school water could hiding in Wisconsin on the on the career reservation at art art or Chippewa and Ojibwe synonymous with the different terms for the center yes they're all versions of the original word in addition I pay you grew up in Minnesota is that right did not on a reservation right no I grew up in Wahpeton North Dakota okay I'm sorry that's not that's that's on the on the border of the Sisseton Dakota reservation it used to be within the borders but I didn't grow up on the turtle mountain reservation I was visiting grand child right and you're but did your parents both teach and bureau of Indian affairs schools have this yet my mother and my father taught at the same school that my grandfather attended while putting school on Martin you know that that brings us to a reading I'd like you to to share with us this is a bit of history and I guess it talks about sort of well maybe you can set this up is about when your grandfather ended up going away to school if you want to set this up and give us this reading from her book sure the former grandfather went to the Wahpeton boarding school he went to school that was somewhat closer fort Totten it's not a spirit lake now and in that time one thing for sure was that every classroom was decorated with flags flags were everywhere this had been a former military fort turned into a boarding school for children so it was still run in his time as a military school and this is about when he leaves for school and this is a very common experience for children who laughed it was hot it was known that they would have to have there have their heads shaved their hair cut and that was one of the things that was most difficult for children and for their parents because there was personal and in many cases are many tribes many families allowing your hair to grow long was a symbol of your long life cutting your hair it is a symbol of grief so for that to happen was always very disturbing for the family that year his father was gaunt his cheekbones jutting out Thomas was always hungry they were down to desperation food then a bit of a panic smeared with dear fat the day schools on the reservation gave out just one meal the government boarding school would feed three meals for Totton boarding school was a day's wegen right if you started well before dawn Thomas's mother Julia or a one wept and hit her face as he went away she had been torn whether to cut his hair herself they would cut his hair off at the school and to cut hair meant someone had died it was a way of grieving just before they left she took a knife to his braid she would hang it in the woods so the government would not be able to keep him so that he would come home and he had come home and that is our guest Louise Erdrich reading from her new novel the night watchman you know what's striking about this is that people often send their kids away to school for opportunity the impetus was really starvation the impetus was starvation and the reasoning behind the best schools being far away was to assimilate native children to train them to live in a culture that was very different from their parents so that when they came home often children couldn't speak the language that their parents were speaking I have to say right here that boarding schools are often characterized in sort of a lump definition but they were all very different and the government had secular boarding schools which underwent a real sea change in the nineteen thirties and became much more supportive of native culture while many of the boarding schools which were run by religious groups did not and remained hostile to native religion in native culture Louise Erdrich new book is the night watchman we'll talk more after a break and John powers will review the new Brazilian movie Pakal row which he says is at once a portrait of community the horror thriller and a timely piece of political filmmaking I'm Dave Davies and this is fresh AIR weekend.

Dave Davies Louise Erdrich Terry
"turtle mountain chippewa" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

12:35 min | 1 year ago

"turtle mountain chippewa" Discussed on Native America Calling

"I'm your host Terry Gatewood. So much life happens in Louise urges latest book the night watchman this Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians author takes readers to the termination era. Were the threat of losing. Land in a tight. Something important is firing up. One of the characters was inspired by the life of this author's beloved grandfather in the book we follow this character named Thomas as ams up to share his words in Congress on the pages we also meet a cast of characters which includes strong indigenous women who define resilience of their time although set some generations. Back this story. Informs Present Day indigenous struggles including exploitation of our women racism and attacks on sovereignty and the land that are native nations connect to. I look forward to hearing how you're gelling to the story. And we invite you to join the discussion with their march book of the month. Author Louise and thanks to harpercollins publishers. The first ten p the first ten people who make it on air with a question or comment. We'll a copy of the night watchman. Our phone lines are open now so go ahead and dial in. We're at one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight. It's also one eight hundred nine nine native and today joining us from Washington. Dc is Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa author Louis Surgery. She is a National Book Award and National Book Critics Circle Award Winner and she was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. She lives in Minnesota with her daughters and is the owner of the small independent bookstore. Birchbark books my pleasure to have her here. Louise Welcome thank you so much. It's my pleasure. Tehran I'm delighted to be here into Louise. I really appreciate when our authors teach us about our own history and sometimes that history includes troubling times until this book takes us right to the heart of what termination the threat of termination losing the ability to say that we are a sovereign nation. Your characters take us to this moment in so I'm set the scene for us a little on just how much it's impacted not only the characters in the book but of course your own tribal nation. What would you like to say about termination? Well first of all I. I BELIEVE. Termination was a long time in preparation. You know when you look back through the history of what was happening just before you see that there was a big housing Bob. Postwar housing boom so termination came out of The the narrative of dispossession The government really wanted some very large stands of timber and those were on the cliff and the menominee reservations and they were among the first terminated. So there was five that were on the first light and turn on the Turtle Mountain Chippewa Band of Chippewa was one of them. So it didn't come out of nowhere. There had been some plans in the making and they got the perfect interface with two houses of Congress under Republican control and also the President Eisenhower Republicans so they had a sort of a clear shot termination at that point and the person who is the commissioner of Indian affairs at the time was a guy named Dillon s Myer and he had presided over the incarceration of Japanese American people. Right right during the war. So we have this Guy Dylan Myers. Who's all set up knowing exactly how to he? He was going to relocate everybody right that was the plan. That's that went hand in hand with relocation and then there's Arthur v Watkins who who was Passionately for termination. He had grown up on Allotment land that went into tax forfeiture and his family. Got It so he. He's the other person the main person and then Then there's the people who suddenly got this notice that your tribe is going to be terminated or emancipated. The word was you. Get your freedom. That's how it was couched. Those are the phrases. Did that make you feel it? Being compared to this that you are now mandated. You no longer have to be a native. It's it's so it's so it's so of all of our times I mean this is the language that is used when Dispossession is the real motive. flowed out some high-sounding kyw principled words and let people think I mean. They thought they were going to pull this over a native people right and not. My grandfather had an eighth grade government boarding school education but he got it immediately and he and I think most people did but the the the kind of shock is that this kind of rhetoric would come out with the expectation that native people would not even understand that there was nothing to emancipate that freedom meant freedom to lose all of their their land and their their treaty guaranteed privileges as long as the grass grows and the river. Shell slow you know that those words would be would be meaningless because Both houses of Congress had voted to abrogate treaties that have been established since the very beginning of this country and something that went hand in hand with this was also relocation in you really unpack some of the truths about relocation Even and I really appreciated the characters when they were talking about wall when I go back home or when we go back home in thinking about You know relocation not really being something that Supported people who are coming to the cities and so any words on Just what relocation is and how you will that into your story and of course folks if you'd like to talk with Lori Louise Call Right now. One eight hundred nine six two four eight. Go ahead well. I began to see relocation in a different light after after reading into termination and relocation at the same time you know of course anyone who wants to move to a city and and work there or do whatever they want. That's great but what the government did what their plan was Was very was very much less great. They decided not to put money into infrastructure on the reservation but solving the quote unquote Indian. Problem would be better served by just getting people off their land and away from their families. You know away from family ties. That kept them From being fully assimilated so in their in their imaginative world. Engine native people. Nobody was saying native at the time. in the book everybody's Indian Native people would be transported into the workforce and would just so much rather have this kind of life you know that this was the ultimate way of life that the the ties and the culture and the language is that people people had were without value. But what was of value was again? The land and the resources and relocation was very much the same as It was again. A same basis of disposition was was underlying relocation in so the characters. They play paint some truth. That may be a lot of people. Don't really know a lot of times when we hear of these times. We hear MRIs terms termination relocation But what they really mean to the people and the lives and the generations came after is really important. We'll hear more about that But let's go ahead and hear from one of our callers. We have MARLA. Who's in Pine Ridge? South Dakota tuned in on kyw ally Marla. Thank you for giving us a ring. Go ahead year-on-year. Good morning and thank you so much for having me. It's such an honor to Be Able to speak to Louise Eric. I've read all of your will. Most of them whichever ones I could could find but I started out with love. Medicine and Just always thought the characters June capshaw and the capshaw family were just fascinating. And what I'm really intrigued about with this book is how the the Federal Indian law is woven in with The characters I. I haven't read the book I'm really looking forward to it at but I think it's great. I'm a semi retired lawyer and well-versed in federal engine law and it's just to me it's just fascinating to be able to present this to The general public the Circumstances that that native people have had to endure through federal engine law while you are certainly going to have some fun Marla just seeing a narrative that goes along with some of those things that maybe you knew all too. Well thank you for giving us a ring there in Pine Ridge South Dakota and we're also giving away copies of the book. Get on air. Ask Your questions chatted up. You'll get it the book the first ten one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight Louise Anything you WANNA tell Marla real quick. Well I thank you MARLA. I think that's exactly what I was hoping for me. This book is for us because we and our grandparents and our parents we. We've lived through what these times and live with these times. They fall out from these times determination. Is You know like the last The last Of the Indian wars. It was it was supposed to be the last battle you know it would completely level the playing field. Somehow that was that was the intention was completely get rid of the Indian problem and yes. It was complete. It was illegal but unfortunately that didn't matter at all. And you've seen this time and time again that Something that made if people know and understand to be completely legal is Throw it up in the air and it comes back down in pieces rusher in intense. Hang type folks. Those who started the year with new Diet plan might be questioning their decision. Now that we're three months into the year whether you're working on popular plans fasting. Kito and whole thirty eating wells important all year long talk to registered dieticians and other experts on the next native. America calling liked the circle of life. There is an opportunity that comes around. Every TEN YEARS. A chance to participate and lead our voice be heard it. Lets others know who we are and.

Lori Louise Congress National Book Award Turtle Mountain Chippewa Band Louise Welcome National Book Critics Circle A Terry Gatewood Louise Eric Thomas Washington Minnesota Turtle Mountain Tehran Pine Ridge Pulitzer Prize Guy Dylan Myers menominee America Kito Pine Ridge South Dakota
Book of the Month: The Night Watchman by Louise Erdrich

Native America Calling

06:05 min | 1 year ago

Book of the Month: The Night Watchman by Louise Erdrich

"So much life happens in Louise urges latest book the night watchman this Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians author takes readers to the termination era. Were the threat of losing. Land in a tight. Something important is firing up. One of the characters was inspired by the life of this author's beloved grandfather in the book we follow this character named Thomas as ams up to share his words in Congress on the pages we also meet a cast of characters which includes strong indigenous women who define resilience of their time although set some generations. Back this story. Informs Present Day indigenous struggles including exploitation of our women racism and attacks on sovereignty and the land that are native nations connect to. I look forward to hearing how you're gelling to the story. And we invite you to join the discussion with their march book of the month. Author Louise and thanks to harpercollins publishers. The first ten p the first ten people who make it on air with a question or comment. We'll a copy of the night watchman. Our phone lines are open now so go ahead and dial in. We're at one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight. It's also one eight hundred nine nine native and today joining us from Washington. Dc is Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa author Louis Surgery. She is a National Book Award and National Book Critics Circle Award Winner and she was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. She lives in Minnesota with her daughters and is the owner of the small independent bookstore. Birchbark books my pleasure to have her here. Louise Welcome thank you so much. It's my pleasure. Tehran I'm delighted to be here into Louise. I really appreciate when our authors teach us about our own history and sometimes that history includes troubling times until this book takes us right to the heart of what termination the threat of termination losing the ability to say that we are a sovereign nation. Your characters take us to this moment in so I'm set the scene for us a little on just how much it's impacted not only the characters in the book but of course your own tribal nation. What would you like to say about termination? Well first of all I. I BELIEVE. Termination was a long time in preparation. You know when you look back through the history of what was happening just before you see that there was a big housing Bob. Postwar housing boom so termination came out of The the narrative of dispossession The government really wanted some very large stands of timber and those were on the cliff and the menominee reservations and they were among the first terminated. So there was five that were on the first light and turn on the Turtle Mountain Chippewa Band of Chippewa was one of them. So it didn't come out of nowhere. There had been some plans in the making and they got the perfect interface with two houses of Congress under Republican control and also the President Eisenhower Republicans so they had a sort of a clear shot termination at that point and the person who is the commissioner of Indian affairs at the time was a guy named Dillon s Myer and he had presided over the incarceration of Japanese American people. Right right during the war. So we have this Guy Dylan Myers. Who's all set up knowing exactly how to he? He was going to relocate everybody right that was the plan. That's that went hand in hand with relocation and then there's Arthur v Watkins who who was Passionately for termination. He had grown up on Allotment land that went into tax forfeiture and his family. Got It so he. He's the other person the main person and then Then there's the people who suddenly got this notice that your tribe is going to be terminated or emancipated. The word was you. Get your freedom. That's how it was couched. Those are the phrases. Did that make you feel it? Being compared to this that you are now mandated. You no longer have to be a native. It's it's so it's so it's so of all of our times I mean this is the language that is used when Dispossession is the real motive. flowed out some high-sounding kyw principled words and let people think I mean. They thought they were going to pull this over a native people right and not. My grandfather had an eighth grade government boarding school education but he got it immediately and he and I think most people did but the the the kind of shock is that this kind of rhetoric would come out with the expectation that native people would not even understand that there was nothing to emancipate that freedom meant freedom to lose all of their their land and their their treaty guaranteed privileges as long as the grass grows and the river. Shell slow you know that those words would be would be meaningless because Both houses of Congress had voted to abrogate treaties that have been established since the very beginning of this country

Louise Welcome National Book Award Congress Guy Dylan Myers Turtle Mountain Chippewa Band DC National Book Critics Circle A Thomas Washington Minnesota Pulitzer Prize Tehran Dillon S Myer Menominee Louis Surgery Arthur Commissioner President Trump Watkins
"turtle mountain chippewa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:49 min | 1 year ago

"turtle mountain chippewa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"O. O. M. A. dot com the Supreme Court a major challenge to abortion rights advocates say the arguments offered by abortion opponents are a wolf in sheep's clothing well the state of Louisiana says the wolf is the doctors these are not safe places we'll look at the case and the results from super Tuesday this afternoon and all things considered from NPR news weekdays starting at four on W. NYC this is fresh AIR I'm Dave Davies in for Terry gross our guest today is author Louise drank in a career going back to the nineteen seventies she's published seventeen novels and more than thirty books in all including children's literature poetry and non fiction she won the National Book Award and the national book critics circle award for fiction twice verdict is a member of the turtle mountain band of Chippewa Indians and much of her writing is centered on the experience of native Americans her new novel is set in nineteen fifty three and is inspired by her grandfather's role in resisting a congressional effort to withdraw federal recognition for her family's tribe the book is called the night watchman the Louise Erdrich welcome back to fresh AIR it's been a while thank you you know you say in the acknowledgments to this novel that you try to write several books before getting underway on this one and that your impetus had disintegrated you kind of weren't getting anywhere which is kind of a shock to me considering how prolific you have been what should you loose and get you started on this book I went back to reading my grandfather's letters which were written during the year I was born in nineteen fifty four so of course those years are somewhat mysterious to me and I knew that he had fought termination during that time but I never put together his letters and the details of what it was like for him to work as a night watchman I never put that together with the time line for the termination bill and what effect it had on the first five tribes slated to be terminated a lot of this story is about this effort which your grandfather lead in which the main character in your book Thomas leads which was this effort to oppose an initiative in the United States Congress to effectively kind of terminate the existence of the turtle mountain band of Chippewa which she was chairman of you want to just explain what this proposal was what its impact would have been termination was way to finally resolve the what Congress thought of this the Indian problem and that would be to move everyone off reservation land because it wouldn't be reservation land anymore turn over their land seller land moved everyone to cities and the most important part in doing that was to abrogate all treaties in these trees have been made since the beginning of our country on a nation to nation basis with every tribe and they all contain these words as long as the grass grows as long as the rivers flow so the original intent and purpose was to guarantee the land that was that was agreed upon by the two parties the two nations those were thrown out the window by both houses of Congress and to simply declare the existence of Indians or native American or American Indians a non non issue and to not recognize tribal nations and to terminate all federal system to to the to terminate trilateral wrecked to terminate all federal assistance and all federal recognition of who a native American indigenous indigenous people are and more the reason for termination was not just to get rid of the problem that they the the Indian problem but to to acquire the lands that in many cases were covered with some of the most beautiful stands of virgin forest in the country so the first tribe slated for termination with the Menominee and the Klamath and the intent because of the hope because of the post war housing boom wants to get those big stands of timber which they did and we should note that the resolution couch this as the emancipation of the tracks right yes so that was the thing that was so hard to grasp I mean people had come out of government boarding school learning some English for instance my grandfather who who wrote letters which I found later at the plains archives wrote letters to get into boarding school only finished the eighth grade and he was he was tribal chairman of the time and he had to assemble a delegation and go up against Congress within a matter of months in order to try and save his tribe and from termination which meant all the land would be lost because that would be all they would have to sell right this is a remarkable part of the story is fictional but this part of it is true okay it's absolutely true and what a nice way to cation assembled this group and wrote letters and yeah it couldn't be more true that's what started it I couldn't believe it knowing what he went through it has the night watchman trying to stay awake all night and by day writing letters going to meetings five traveling around the state of North Dakota where ever he could doing whatever he could to assemble a delegation I I couldn't believe what his life was like he said he he had twelve hours of sleep most weeks well you know for those of you who don't know your story as well tell us just a bit about your own background and your connection to this the turtle mountain band of Chippewa I will so my mother is turtle mountain Chippewa as was my grandfather and so my I am an enrolled member a citizen of the turtle mountain band of Chippewa it would be impossible for me to say that if termination had indeed won the day so my father is German I'm a very next person and yet being a citizen of a nation with in our nation give this one a certain sense of it it changes your life it means that I I care deeply about my people my mother's people and I grew up knowing who I was and accepting all parts of myself and this is a part that I realized would not have existed had my grandfather not fought for it did you grow up speaking is it is it jeep with a language that that supports me it's a cheap way Melin ordination optimal when or at the time that my grandfather was speaking at just plain ship what I didn't grow up he was the last fluent speaker in the family and I am very proud to say my daughter is the next fluent speaker because she is teaching at an on chip way immersion school water could hiding in Wisconsin under liquid ray reservation at art art or Chippewa and Ojibwe synonymous with the different terms for the center yes they're all versions of the original word initially not pay you some grew up in Minnesota is that right did not on a reservation right no I grew up in Wahpeton North Dakota okay I'm sorry that's not that's that's on the on the border of the Sisseton Dakota reservation it used to be within the borders but I didn't grow up on the turtle mountain reservation I was visiting grand child right and you're but did your parents both teach and bureau of Indian affairs schools have yet my mother and my father taught at the same school that my grandfather attended while putting school on Martin you know that that brings us to a reading I'd like you to to share with us this is a bit of history and I guess it talks about sort of well maybe you can set this up is about when your grandfather ended up going away to school if you want to just set this up and give us this reading from her book sure the former grandfather went to the Wahpeton boarding school he went to school that was somewhat closer fort Totten it's not a spirit lake now and in that time one thing for sure was that every classroom was decorated with flags flags were everywhere this had been a former military fort turned into a boarding school for children so it was still run in his time as a military school and this is about when he leaves for school and this is a very common experience for children who laughed it was Sarah it was known that they would have to there had their heads shaved their hair cut and that was one of the things that was most difficult for children and for their parents because there was personal and in many cases are many tribes many families allowing your hair to grow long was a symbol of your long life cutting your hair it is a symbol of grief so for that to happen was always very disturbing mmhm for the family that year his father was gaunt his cheek bones jutting out Thomas was always hungry they were down to desperation food then a bit of a panic smeared with dear fat the day schools on the reservation gave out just one meal the government boarding school would feed three meals for Titan boarding school was a day's wegen right if you started well before dawn Thomas's mother Julia or one wept and hit her face as he went away she had been torn whether to cut his hair herself they would cut his hair off at the school and to cut hair meant someone had died it was a way of grieving just before they left she took a knife to his braid she would hang it in the woods so the government would not be able to keep him so that he would come home and he had come home and that is our guest Louise Erdrich reading from her new novel the night watchman you know what's striking about this is that people often send their kids away to school for opportunity the impetus Fisher was really starvation the impetus was starvation and the reasoning behind the best schools being far away was to assimilate native children to train them to live in a culture that was very different from their parents so that when they came home often children couldn't speak the language that their parents were speaking I have to say right here that boarding schools are often characterized in sort of a lump definition but they were all very different and the government had secular boarding schools which underwent a real sea change in the nineteen thirties and became much more supportive of native culture while many of the boarding schools which were run by religious groups did not and remained hostile to native religion in native culture Louise Erdrich is our guest her new novel is the night watchman we'll continue our conversation in just a moment this is fresh AIR.

O. O. M. Supreme Court Louisiana
"turtle mountain chippewa" Discussed on All My Relations Podcast

All My Relations Podcast

05:14 min | 2 years ago

"turtle mountain chippewa" Discussed on All My Relations Podcast

"Doctors. Dr Masika back to that. Dr love. Talking about fashion and talking about. One in the same doctor J one in the same. We also have Jamie Okuma with us today from the World Wide Web Skyping in. So thank you Jamie for being here with us. You're having me ladies. Jamie has Lucena and show any Bannock, isn't as fashion designer. She creates Berlin intricate, creative works bead work with the tiniest beads you've ever seen while also simultaneously creating gorgeous cortra-, fashions gowns and begs as well as ready to wear fashion. She has won at least five best in show ribbons from both Santa Fe Indian market and the heard market, but let's just say she's never satisfied the next year. It's always more brilliant. She's an artist who refuses to find her nation. Stick to it. She's constantly evolving and trying new things and pushing the envelope. Let's just say one of the things that I love about Jamie is that she constantly collaborates with other artists, and she is so willing to be helpful and loving to so many people around her, and we have mad respect for you for that, Jamie. So welcome again to our show. Thank you again or humbling word. So if you just take a moment to introduce yourself the way you would to a large group of people. Usually, I just kind of say new testing the mic. My name is Jessica Metcalf. I am turtle mountain Chippewa from North Dakota. I keep it pretty basic like that. I am the owner of beyond buckskin, which is a business and website dedicated to promoting and selling native American made fashion. This has been a journey for me that started back in two thousand. Twelve before that two thousand nine before to got five it's been a journey of any. Many many many points. So this has been an amazing journey, and I'm so blessed to be here with with these amazing powerful women. So I'm excited to talk about native fashion. Yeah. Dry, jamie. Tell us a little about yourself. How many was Jamie Okuma? I am saying schone Bannock among some others. My live here where we're at right now on the late Indian reservation in southern California. And I am an artist fashion designer. That's not it. The name of our podcast is all my relations. We wanted to choose that because we're really interested in the ways that we relate to one another the ways that we have relationships with the land with our ancestors with the work that we do. So just this idea of being relational people as native folks, and the idea of the relationships that we hold and the responsibilities that come with them. So we're gonna be asking all of our guests on the podcast just how this idea of all my relations resonates with them or the ways that they think about relationships in their own life and the work that they do. So if Jamie, I don't know if you wanted to start just thinking about these ideas of relationships being relational people and how that translates into your work or your life. Oh, everything. I mean from. Our families our communities that we live in. It's it, all encompassing. I think within my work in may not see that. But when for myself when I look back at pieces, I can think of who I was talking with that day or certain significant things that happened along the way it's such an important part of Indian country anywhere you go. I think between here in Canada. I mean, you better. You will know someone who knows someone that, you know. And that's it's such a relational type of relationship. And it's a really really cool thing to think about when you go to conferences are shows or anything, you're gonna know someone who knows someone if not you're going to know them. So that's kind of what it maybe Inc. Yeah. Thank you. Yeah. I I'm with you on that one Jamie, the idea of and just knowing that in Indian country. There's always maybe at most two degrees of separation. And maybe, you know, in in the larger community, there's like six degrees of separation, but an Indian country, you just have to be careful who you snag because. Or your friend? Yeah. If you claim to be something you better know about.

Jamie Okuma Dr Masika North Dakota Berlin California Canada Jessica Metcalf Lucena six degrees two degrees