22 Burst results for "Turtle Mountain"

"turtle mountain" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:21 min | Last month

"turtle mountain" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Assessment tool is available at roswell park dot org slash. Assess me native voice. One the native american radio network. This is native america. Calling and i'm melissa london. The colorado river is drying up and that is unwelcome news for the more than forty million people who currently rely on the water from the river. It is one of the largest rivers in the western united states. Stretching from colorado through five states and into mexico thirty tribes have access to its water through treaties and legal settlements. They have also had longstanding cultural connections. Recent federal water shortage declaration starts the first phase of water use restrictions. We'll hear who's affected coming up tribes will have to be at the forefront of helping to usher in a new way of living on limited water supply. Does your community use water from the colorado river hauer water shortages affecting your area. Give us a call at one. Eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight. that's also one eight hundred nine nine native. Our first guest today is joy is from california and he is matthew Leave us senior. He's an elder traditionalist and salt singer. He's from the komo wavy nation. Welcome native america calling matthew and it sounds like we may have lost him on the line. So we're going to go to melissa. She's joining us from tempe arizona. Dr melissa nelson is a professor of sustainability at arizona state university. She's initially bay from the turtle mountain band of chippewa indians. Welcome native america calling melissa greetings. Thank you so much. Thank you looking forward to learning from you today. And can you start us off by giving us a sense of the differences between indigenous and non-indigenous water-management absolutely will thank you for the question When think of water for indigenous peoples from our own traditional knowledge original instructions waters relative. Water is an amt fester. We are water. The planet seventy percent water. Our bodies her seventy percent water so for us. It's not a resource outside of us that needs to be managed. It's actually a sacred element that we are completely Invalid in every day. as chief oren lyons often says if you want to know what natural law is Don't drink water for tried to not drink water for a day and that thirst that i will show you how essential water is for life and how dependent we are on water for all of life so for us waters a sacred element that needs to be cared for and conserved and protected and restored as much as possible so us water is relative not a resource and that really flies in the face of a lot of water management projects That really you know. Measure water an acre board. fedin Really try to You know control it in a way. That is not sustainable. So indigenous people are concerned with the sustainability of water for all life and not just for human life. Thank you melissa Indigenous worldview needs to be at the table in these conversations about the preservation of the colorado river and another individual who. I think we have back on the line. Who can speak to what the colorado river means to to him and also his native community is matthew livas. Matthew you there yes yes thank you for thank you. Thank you for being here. Can you talk to us about why. The colorado river is so important to you into your community. Well the way we tried. We're located in eastern san bernardino county california and the gym maybe ended. Reservation is Is started by the call of river at lake you Across lake havasu is the thriving town lake city at its peak population. Eighty thousand people and and the colorado river is vital to this lake because this league is important all of southern california arizona and and we try being young tried getting our federal recognition and nike seventy. It's been A horrendous Feet trying to accomplish a lot of Tribal issues and the water being the primary issue that we're dealing with important to our tribe because we have an allocation of colorado river water or agricultural development and We've been faced with a lot of issues over the years and Now my tribe is moving forward with active element. What is the cultural significance of the river to your tribe. Well it's it's important. It's very spiritual warriors water as life and memory and and you know our people saying to the water and we get songs from the water. It's a very powerful element you know. Essential to survival of mother earth primarily. And it's been blocked off with all these downs Long colorado river that You know All of a sudden california's become spoiled by the free water which is native american water. That's being taken from the colorado difference. Life do california and arizona and mexico is getting some but not even their full allocation As as a director in the treaty between mexican america. So there's an issue of the river but agriculture is one but misuse is a big issue. overuse misuse waste excetera. What from your perspective. What are some other ways that misuse can be reduced by being conscious of the of water. You know every takes water for granted that it's gonna continue to flow. And you know droughts are are something that happened all the time People learn to live with and adapt and change but Because of westernization people have become spoiled. And you know. Harnessing the power of the river recreating hydro-electricity and storing water and developing communities and cities such as los angeles and all the way down to san diego with colorado the water But it's being misused and If i being respected should be dr nelson. You spoke about the respect that needs to be given to water that it should be treated as a relative so from your perspective. What are some of the ways that tribes or leading the way to adjusting to water shortages and.

colorado river roswell park melissa london america matthew Leave Dr melissa nelson turtle mountain band of chippe melissa greetings oren lyons california melissa colorado arizona matthew livas arizona state university lake you Across lake havasu mexico tempe matthew
"turtle mountain" Discussed on LeVar Burton Reads

LeVar Burton Reads

02:39 min | 2 months ago

"turtle mountain" Discussed on LeVar Burton Reads

"In every episode. I hand pick a different piece of short fiction. And i read it to the only thing. These stories have common is that i love them and i hope you will too well. Your own. today story is another one. That just hit me like a brick. If by the author. Louise urge who won the pulitzer prize for fiction earlier this year for her novel. The night is a member of the turtle mountain band and has written many novels as well as volumes of poetry children's books and a memoir of early motherhood. She also runs birchbark books. An independent bookstore in minnesota. Now much of louise's fiction including this short story considers and reflects aspects of her mixed heritage. Which is german. Through her father and french and ojibway through her mother. She's got a new novel out on november ninth called the sentence which can be preordered right now from the usual places including local independent bookstore. Don't forget our indie bookstores. It is appropriately enough a very funny ghost story set in india bookstore. So look forward to that now about the years of my birth which was first published in the new yorker our protagonist linda. Who was nicknamed tuffy as a child is someone i believed to have. Great inner strength and vulnerability all at once tuffy is a white child adopted by a native american family and the author has said that this kind of story was one. That was very familiar to her from history that of native people adopting non native people into their families and it was also informed by her own grandmother who adopted children. Who were in need. This story is sometimes very darkly funny and it made me think deeply about the nature of love and generosity. The root of the cruelties. That we can show one another and navigating all of those human impulses. Please check out the written content advisory if you're so inclined and if you're ready let's take a deep breath.

turtle mountain pulitzer prize Louise louise minnesota tuffy linda india
"turtle mountain" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

08:15 min | 2 months ago

"turtle mountain" Discussed on Native America Calling

"This is a native america calling antonio gonzalez do you remember when the cove in nineteen pandemic sunk the country into a recession around april or may of last year unemployment shot up nearly fifteen percent the highest. It had ever been since the late forties. And that's according to the congressional research service during that time and record number of people filed for unemployment assistance the government sent out stimulus checks and some tribes also gave emergency funds to their citizens. Now things are changing. There's a slow economic recovery in many places. The unemployment rate was a little under six percent in june but economic information about native americans specifically is usually hard to come by this hour. We'll hear about some efforts by the federal reserve bank of minneapolis to fix that. We'll also get a glimpse of labor shortages and economic recovery for native businesses. And you can join the conversation. How did the pandemic impact businesses in your community are looking for a job. Call in. We want to hear from you. Join our discussion today. We're at one eight hundred nine nine. Six two eight four eight. Our phone lines are open. We're ready to hear from you. That's one eight hundred nine nine native and we also have some guests joining us today from belcourt north dakota as less thomas. He's the vice president for the north dakota native tourism alliance and he's an enrolled citizen of the turtle mountain band of chippewa. Welcome to any see less. Good afternoon First of all. I do like to thank the creator. A good way for native america calling for allowing us a platform to discuss Tourism job creation in any country and harden. I just gonna introduce our other guests and then we'll get started. Thank you thank you. Also joining us. From wisconsin sean mccabe. He's the managing member of mccabe consulting group. He's navajo welcome back to native america calling. Yes thank you yet. A been a sean maccabee initia- initially but you brushes chain. Johnny dish She you for having me great. Thank you and also joining us from victoria. British columbia. Canada is donna fair. She's a research fellow at the federal reserve bank of minneapolis for the center of indian country development and she's also an associate professor of economics at the university of victoria. Welcome donna much. Wonderful be here. We'll donna let's go ahead and get the conversation started with you and take us back to the economy nationally before the pandemic what would what did it look like so as a as you well know. So native. american employment has typically been below General employment within the united states. So for white americans. Employment levels hovered around eighty one percent or so but for native americans on aggregate. It was vote eighty six percent. Just that's for the people who are working age generally But the academic the economic followed from the pandemic really exacerbated that inequality. Well the april employment to population ratios. Where the lowest for all races had been that you said since the nineteen forties the native american employment ratio showed the biggest overall drop falling from seventy percent in january two low fifty five percent in april and a non metro areas actually following his lows forty percent and is that compared what some of the employment looks like for indian country as well i see exactly so we don't have unfortunately a reservation specific numbers however been on metro areas are proxy for that. So we're thinking about employment. Employment levels will forty percent and unemployment rates about twenty percent which is very dramatic. And a sean. Is this marrying wiz. Some of the things. You're hearing from your clients as tribes across the country Have historically faced during economic hardships and then with cova nineteen pandemic a lot of reservations closed and a lot of reservations rely on tourism and businesses and it even goes down to individuals who are maybe artists are have food trucks or something like that Go ahead sean. Yeah no thank you. I think certainly We can all agree that a couple of nineteen pandemic has been One of the great disruptors of Of american indian operations both economically and from a health perspective Certainly Our clients that we're working with Either through audit or accounting We're seeing Some unprecedented interruptions and business. Which is caused the unemployment rates For native people in particular As a lot of enterprises have closed due the pandemic restrictions And one of the challenges. Right now that we're seeing is getting those people to come back to work. certainly There's a lot of incentives to get back to work and i think some communities are thriving To get people back to work with their also those that are struggling somewhat to try and get people back to the enterprises that are starting to open up and of course we all have a priority to hire our own people And what we're seeing And really kind of advising our clients is you know. Make it a priority to get Our people back to work with the incentives that we can afford through various means to get enterprises back to operating levels pre pandemic and also pointed pre penned up but certainly there's been a great disruption and a lot of Like in the industry that you've mentioned tourism gaming and even You know normal operation. government operations etc and. Less you focus on the tourism industry. How has that been hit. economically for indian country. Especially when we're looking and talking about the job market. Is well well here. In the state of north dakota the unregulated e tab machines and gaming in north dakota Tribal gaming really taken a hit and losing revenue in jobs at all five nations in north dakota and so a few years back We organized all the tribes here in north dakota under the north dakota native tourism alliance and the mta dot com and the alliance was formed to preserve promote and protect all of our native cultures here in five nations of north dakota and we partnered up with george washington university to help us develop tourism packages for each nation and to market to our end deters dot com to market to the world so We want to tell our stories from our perspective. Our is all the true stories Tribe has its own unique Story to tell so to create jobs in the tourism industry here in the state of north dakota. it's a three billion dollar yearly industry. It's the third largest north dakota behind agriculture and oil. Bend nine out of twenty jobs have to tourism industry so to diversify and become more family friendly and points of destination. Our tribal chairman. Mr jamie asher started advocating for terrorism diversification avatar goals so by developing this north dakota tourism alliance and developing tourism packages. We work together with all of our partners. to market to the world North dakota markets. Australia new zealand italy france. Germany england the scandinavian country. So we've got we're one of the first in the nation so organized all of our tribes in one state and work with our tourism department. so.

federal reserve bank of minnea north dakota native tourism al antonio gonzalez north dakota america donna belcourt sean mccabe mccabe consulting group Johnny dish center of indian country devel congressional research service turtle mountain
Senator Cantwell talks about tribal broadband at confirmation hearing

Native America Calling

03:47 min | 9 months ago

Senator Cantwell talks about tribal broadband at confirmation hearing

"This is national native news antonio gonzales the biden administration says it's ordered a pause new oil and gas leasing on public lands does not apply to tribal nations the mountain west news bureaus savannah mar reports the administration issued the clarification after the chairman of the youth indian tribe called the initial. Moratorium direct attack on tribal sovereignty. Stephen fast tourists of the northern arapaho. Business council agreed that would impact all of our guests tribes. Pretty bad it would triple fast. Horror says those tribes rely on oil and gas revenue to pay for social services and unlike state and local governments. They don't have a tax base to back on. The issue is thornier for climate activists. Gold tooth with the nonprofit indigenous environmental network. It's nice to see them. Ministration recognized travel it is disheartening to the tribes. The use that to continue fossil fuel extraction moving forward gold tooth hopes to biden will support tribes in divesting from fossil fuel industry for national native news. I'm savannah mar this week. President biden signed a memorandum on tribal consultation. It directs all executive departments and agencies to engage a regular consultation with tribes agencies. Have ninety days to come up with a plan. Tribal leaders across the country are welcoming the memo in a statement principal chief of the cherokee nation. Chuck hoskin junior applauded. The action hoskins says meaningful consultation is vital to treble governments to have a seat at the table to shape policy and hold the federal government responsible. He says the memorandum is the first comprehensive white house affirmation of mandatory consultation with tribes since two thousand nine the tribal consultation follow directives laid out by the obama administration. President biden says he's committed to honoring tribal sovereignty and including tribal voices and policy and hopes to strengthen the government's relationship with tribes this week washington. Us senator. Maria cantwell address. President biden's nominee for us. Secretary of commerce rhode island governor gina raimondo and talked about tribal broadband. Steve jackson has more. Senator can't will introduce legislation last session. That would accelerate the deployment of broadband services to tribal communities by setting aside fcc and usda funds for deployment on tribal lands at the confirmation hearing for commerce secretary. Can't well made governor raimondo. Aware of the issue and the secretary will inherit a new program as part of the kobe. Bill the tribal broadband connectivity program. It two thousand nineteen report from. Fcc found that less than half of households in indian country have access to high speed broadband services a twenty percent gap from non tribal areas. And so i hope that we will be able to get good administration of that program. The cova pandemic has only increased the problem of limited broadband. Dude at more people working from home as well as distance learning for students for national native news. I'm steve jackson reporting from spokane alaskan native artist and illustrator. Michaela goad was honored by the american library association. This week with the randolph called toco metal. She said to be the first native american to win the award. A member of the central council of lincoln and haida indian tribes go was recognized for most distinguished american picture book for children. We are water protectors. The book written by carol lindstrom turtle mountain honors water protectors for fighting for indigenous rights and environmental justice. Awards were announced during the association's virtual midwinter gathering. I'm antonio

President Biden Antonio Gonzales Biden Administration Youth Indian Tribe Business Council Chuck Hoskin Obama Administration Gina Raimondo Hoskins Biden Governor Raimondo Stephen Maria Cantwell FCC Steve Jackson Federal Government White House Rhode Island Spokane Alaskan Usda
"turtle mountain" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

06:10 min | 10 months ago

"turtle mountain" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"From the Star Tribune is with us. You can follow her on Twitter at strip books, and we've also posted Really great book. Story, you know, just different books. A link to the Star Tribune story. Yeah. Good recommendations. They're always wanted their their weight in gold. That's for sure. Okay, so Yeah, I know. Lori. Thank you so much for being the same with us. OK? Any other books that you want to like, Give, you know, like Extra plugs to or give us Ah, you know. Well, I remember when I talk to you in May we talked about Curtis Sittenfeld Rodham Yes, I thought was, ah, lot of fun, and I think we also talk to them about Week rejects the night watchman, which is just a really wonderful book about some novel fictionalized account of remarkable thing that her grandfather did. Um, saving the Turtle Mountain tribe. But I also wanted to mention Charles Baxter's new novel, The Sun Collective. He also lives in Minneapolis. And, of course, he's very renowned. He just retired. From the U, where he taught in the M F a program and this book is set in Minneapolis and, um It also has. I think this is kind of a recurring thing that I'm seeing in novels that I love. And it's this. This combination of realism and kind of Mystical, weird things. And so his novel set in Minneapolis, and it's about, um Commune that is trying to make a difference in a time when there's a president who's kind of crazy and game show host like and it's not Trump, but it's very similar to Trump and and so there's just this collective, the sun collective that's trying to do the right thing, but but the bigger it grows, the more kind of out of control it starts spinning. And then there's There's a whole nother thread with retired couple. Um they're trying to find their son and the wife has the spell Minnehaha falls, and when she comes to she couldn't Talk to her dog and her cat. And I mean it Z. I'm not describing it very well because there's so many different threads to this novel, but it is It's if you live in the twin cities. You'll recognize every single place in this book, and, um and it's a great story, too, And it's just perfect for our time because of the the Parallels between what's going on in the country now and what's going on in the book right in homelessness and this kind of crazy president. It's very good. I have some collective It's like when I try and describe what was my and Julius favorite book of the Year, which was thean visible life of Addie LaRue. When you say I don't know that. Oh, my gosh. Well, when you say out loud, it's about this. Woman and this is 17 or 16, 28 and you know, and she's a French village girl and she has to get married at 17. And then she makes she calls up the devil, basically and You know, it's like a faster impact. It's a time traveling. It's a romance. I mean, it's got all these things. But in the end of it all, it's just a big epic book and the way that, like the time traveler's wife was our discovery of witches, or, you know like that. It's just got a lot of Elements who, but yeah, you always feel like I am giving this justice. Well, I think any novel that you could just really sink into and you don't want to put it down and it brings you to this other place on Dit teaches you things. I mean, that's I'm a novelist. You know, that's a hard job being a novelist, I think, And you know, there's so many great ones out there. There have been so many great novels this year. I mean, say what you want to about 2020. The books were terrific. Yeah, I I agree with you. Um, I also thought, um The book. I Mean, Julia night, both love mysteries and thrillers, and she's been one of our favorite authors. But Ruth where, um, one by one, which takes place in the Swiss Alps and has this tech Angle That was just again a terrific page Turner from her She She does one or two books a year. And I don't know how she keeps the quality up when she writes his often is she does, But if you like mysteries, did you read Moon flower murders? By Anthony Horowitz. No Anthony Horowitz. Um, he He's the British writer. He wrote that his written quite a few serious for BBC, including Midsummer Murders. You might know that one um, soils war, he wrote Foyle's war. But he has written this. This is the second in the syriza of kind of story within a story mystery, So they're these big fat books, which is fun. I mean, you know, it's gonna last you a while and you start you start with this one story and then There's a manuscript, you know, and then you start reading the manuscript to that that one of the characters has written and that takes up like the whole middle part of the book, and it's a completely different mystery. And it was just sort of forget about you were reading a different mystery when you started the book, and now there's a Huge foot right in the middle of it, And then it goes back to the original story, and he doesn't really well. I mean, the whole thing is tied together, and there's a reason why he does this. It's not just, you know, plopping of book inside of a book, but it's great fun and makes the book like You know, It's like 600 pages long and like You can read that for days. Yeah, good. Makes a about that. Do you think? Do you think Charles Baxter We've given up on getting Louise on our show. I don't think she really does interviews..

Minneapolis Star Tribune Sun Collective Charles Baxter Anthony Horowitz president Twitter Trump Curtis Sittenfeld Rodham Lori Turtle Mountain Addie LaRue Dit Julius Swiss Alps M F Foyle Julia Louise writer
"turtle mountain" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:10 min | 10 months ago

"turtle mountain" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Hertzel, senior book editor from the Star Tribune is with us. You can follow her on Twitter at strip books, and we've also posted Really great book story, You know, just different books. A link to the Star Tribune story. Yeah. Good recommendations. They're always wanted their their weight in gold. That's for sure. Okay, so Yeah, I know. Lori. Thank you so much for being the same with us. OK? Any other books that you want to like, Give, you know, like Extra plugs to or give us Ah, you know. Well, I remember when I talk to you in May we talked about Curtis Sittenfeld Rodham Yes, I thought was, ah, lot of fun, and I think we also talk to them about Week rejects the night watchman, which is just a really wonderful book about some non aled fictionalized account of remarkable thing that her grandfather did. Um, saving the Turtle Mountain tribe. But I also wanted to mention Charles Baxter's new novel, The Sun Collective. He also lives in Minneapolis. And, of course, he's very renowned. He just retired. From the U, where he taught in the M F a program and this book is set in Minneapolis and, um It also has. I think this is kind of a recurring thing that I'm seeing in novels that I love. And it's this. This combination of realism and kind of Mystical, weird things. And so here's novel set in Minneapolis, and it's about, um Commune that is trying to make a difference in a time when there's a president who's kind of crazy and game show host like and it's not Trump, but it's very similar to Trump and and so there's just this collective, the sun collective that's trying to do the right thing, but but the bigger it grows, the more kind of out of control it starts spinning. And then there's There's a whole nother thread with retired couple..

Star Tribune Charles Baxter Minneapolis Sun Collective Curtis Sittenfeld Rodham Trump Hertzel Twitter Turtle Mountain Lori editor aled president M F
"turtle mountain" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:24 min | 11 months ago

"turtle mountain" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Get lit with all of it Book club event. November was Native American Heritage Month. So we thought, what better way to celebrate than to read a novel by one of America's most acclaimed indigenous writers Louise Erdrich. Louise is a National book award winner and a Pulitzer Prize finalist. She is a member of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chip Walk. And while Native American identity has always been central to her work, her latest novel, the Night Watchman, tells a highly personal story about indigenous rights, one from her own family history. The novel just made the Kirkus Review Best of 2020 list for fiction, And it's based on the true story of Louisa's grandfather, Ah, Chippewa Council member who helped lead a challenge to a bill introduced to Congress in 1953. It would strip indigenous people of their land rights. His activism took him all the way from the Turtle Mountain reservation in North Dakota to the steps of the Capitol building. The novel also follows the story of Patrice, a 19 year old chip wall woman who runs into trouble when she heads to Minneapolis to look for her missing. Sister. Patrice is also juggling the feelings of two suitors, one a Chippewa boxer and the other his white coach. It is a rich and deeply moving portrait of a community and culture pushed to the margins but far from extinguished. I began the conversation by asking Louise about her grandfather, who served as the inspiration for this novel. I wanted to know. When was the first time Louise heard the story of her grandfather's activism. I always knew something about this. You know, I grew up thinking I knew it. But and I had these letters from him that my mother gave me because I was born the year these letters were written to them. You know, there's parts of the letters were like Greeting me as a baby. I mean, beautiful pieces of these letters that he wrote. And Only recently did I read them. In tandem with the history of what happened. With termination with this Extraordinarily destructive bill that passed through Congress both houses And threatened everything about being native people. What point did you decide that you wanted to work this in tow a novel? How did I decide this? I mean, what instantly came into my mind wasn't Very admirable, Really. I was having trouble with another book, Clyde. And I thought Uh, What now? And I started reading the letters over at that point. I thought this is what I'm meant to be writing now, and that's why the trouble is with the other book. Here's what I have to do. I know it's going to happen. I have it Z like I've been waiting till I'm this age till I have I mean, on some level, there might be some maturity involved with it. I don't know, but I I really couldn't have done it before. Now. I had all of this material, but I couldn't use. I couldn't. I couldn't really grapple with it. You didn't have the life experience. You think I don't think I am but the patience to put these things together and also I made friends with historians and they kept telling me Look at those letters, you know, and we went down to the National Archives in Kansas City on guess so here I have to just give up, shout out to libraries and archives and people who keep Pieces of history that Are so granular, so fascinating. And once I started looking for my grandfather's school, his boarding school you've heard a lot about government boarding schools. Perhaps he went to several government boarding schools. And including the one that my parents taught at. He went to that school. I found out all these things about him. From his boarding school files, and anyone who's native American understands that the government basically keeps everything you ever have done in boarding school. There's letters from him as a kid, and contrary to what a lot of people think like he really wanted to get into that school. Uh, times are very hard and a lot of people went For the simple reason that people got, you know, three square meals. They got health care. They got everything they didn't have to walk miles to school. So he wanted to be there. You know, one of our listeners and one of our book club members wrote to us on social media that they learned so much from this book about the boarding schools they had. They had never known this. They had didn't really understand it until they read this book, so I'm curious as you as a novelist. How do you decide? How much of what you write. Is going to be about education, even though that's not your job. And and how and when to just put that on the back burner and go ahead and write. I honestly don't think about the education at all. Because to me, these things are just fascinating. And I want to know them, though. I don't really think about whether other people want to know them. I'm just my method of writing is a lot about Engaging myself in a story and I'm I hope that if I engage myself Other people will come along with me. I didn't want to ask you since you mentioned historians and how important they were to this work, Can you Help us understand what was going on in the country at the time of this termination bill. Yes. So this was, you know, post war. United States in which there was You know the baby born.

Louise Erdrich Turtle Mountain Congress National book award Patrice Kirkus America Chippewa Council Chip Walk Pulitzer Prize North Dakota United States Louisa Minneapolis Kansas City
"turtle mountain" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"turtle mountain" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"N. Y c independent journalism in the public interest, 93.9 FM and AM a 20 NPR news than the New York conversation. Today on fresh air. Terry Gross talks with Jack Goldsmith, co author of After Trump reconstructing the presidency, the book considers the difficult questions the next president will face about the much change presidency Trump left behind. To net to on 93 point out of him or ask your smart speaker to play. This is all of it. If you want to take a break from the news and stop scrolling, escape into a really good book, get lit. With all of it Has you covered in honor of Native American Heritage Month we're going to be reading a novel by an author who is a national book award winner and a PLO surprise finalist. The Guardian calls her one of the greatest living American writers and her newest novel centers on one of the biggest fights for indigenous rights in American history. We're going to be reading the night Watchman by Louise Er, Eric. The novel is based on the true story of Louise's grandfather, a Chippewa Council member who helps Lee a challenge to a bill introduced to Congress in 1953 that would strip indigenous people of their land rights. His activism takes him all the way from the Turtle Mountain reservation in North Dakota to the steps of the Capitol building. The New York Times says the night watchman is a magisterial epic. It feels like a call to arms. A call to humanity a banquet prepared for us by hungry people. To find out how to borrow your free E copy. Thanks to our partners.

Louise Er national book award New York NPR Terry Gross Lee Jack Goldsmith North Dakota president Turtle Mountain Chippewa Council The New York Times Congress Eric
"turtle mountain" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

08:14 min | 1 year ago

"turtle mountain" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

"Com check everything out there and we appreciate them very much for being an advertiser here on absolutely native opinion. All Right Well, we have a little bit of listening feedback. We do think this is from listener jol. We haven't heard from Joel a while we have in this is this is pretty sad stuff right here. and Joel says hello brothers. Sorry. I. Haven't been in touch for awhile and it's OK brother we understand Oh yeah. Life gets in the way because. We've we've been good just busy with live APP. See there you go. But just in case you guys haven't seen this yet I'm going to paste a gofundme me link for this man's family to cover his funeral expenses and hopefully end up with some extra money to help with their kids. That now does not have a father. I'll paste article link as whale which he did. Thank you. A COP on Turtle Mountain res- killed a native man for little backstory as to what Joel was talking about. I just know it's partner and two children need some help. It's really sad it's it's depressing man. Every day it seems like the cops kill native or black person. Like people. That have their backs turned in no weapons, but anyway, guys take care and the link will be posted in the show notes. Yeah. Let me let me give you guys a little bit of this year Turtle citizen killed on Turtle Mountain Reservation. Officers suspended. So we gotta be. Officer involved. In the family is left in the dark and what they mean by that is they're not giving up any information. Atypical kind of stuff. re real brief here it says the FBI is investigating the fatal shooting of a Turtle Mountain man by police officers last weekend on the Turtle Mountain Indian reservation and Belcourt North Dakota the man who was killed as being identified as Brandon lead sewer thirty. Turned to mountain tribal citizen from Belcourt he was a father of two children a boy in a girl. In, an email to native news online who published this article? FBI spokesperson, Kevin Smith shared that an officer involved shooting or O. I s happened at private at a private residence in Belcourt late Saturday night August twenty second and into the early morning hours of Sunday August twenty third. The FBI was called to respond to Elias and the north. Dakota Bureau of Criminal Investigation assisted with processing the scene according to the email. The FBI reported the law enforcement agencies involved in the incident where the Bureau of Indian Affairs the Rolette County Sheriff's Office, the Rolette Police Department and the. In the roller police departments. phone calls to the Rolette County Sheriff's Department here. Here's here's where here's where it goes off the rails and and. The spin begins okay. This is phone calls to the role Rolette County Sheriff's department the Rolette Police Department, and the role of police. Department were referred to the Turtle Mountain Chippewa Tribal Office. So they're like you guys. Go Talk to them. So, then the receptionist there at at the phone number provided for the Bureau of Indian affairs at a sorry that receptionist at backing up here at Turtle Mountain Chippewa Tribal Office there receptionist shared a phone number. Excuse me with the Bureau of Indian Affairs Turtle Mountain Agency. To be a stated over the phone that any questions should be directed. So here's another deflection directed to the FBI field office in Minneapolis nearly five hundred miles away and shared the phone number of the FBI's Minneapolis Minnesota field office. So. If you're if you're a family member and you're trying to get information about this case, they're going over there. No, you don't talk to us. You Talk to those people over there and hop this stuff around absolutely inexcusable. and. The rest of this will be in the show notes but our hearts go out to the family. It's crazy. Crazy. Crazy. We have a couple of acknowledgments I'm sorry we finished I am done I'm sorry I was just going to say we don't have any voicemail this week you guys but but thank you. Couplet knowledge we want to express our deepest condolences. To the family of actor, Chadwick? Boltzmann. Who played several is in Hollywood movies. which includes Baseball Great Jackie Robinson James Brown in most recently marvel's Black Panther. Mr Bozeman passed away after a four year long battle of colon cancer. He will be deeply missed. Yes indeed. It was. That was shocking to hear this morning. I was trying to finish some touch up on for the show no boom this news came down so. I didn't even know he was sick. I anoint battling cancer. Nope, most pie from what I've been reading most people didn't know it wasn't something that he you know publicized. Sure. Widely, just you know kept trucking right along with life doing what you wanted to do and supposed to. Yep. Yeah and It's. Can't cancer the tough thing is how I lost My other father might my wife's dad died of stomach cancer and so I I I, I understand that battle very very well. so Again our thoughts, prayers and everything going out down to the family for sure right? Absolutely. On a lighter note. I want to say Happy Birthday to Silver Wolf. Silver Wolf is my father. Who Turns Seventy eight today? And we're going to be going over there shortly. Hug Kim with masks on because I can't stand not being allowed my parents. So. Birthday CER-. Yes and they will be wearing masks as well. We always, we always take precautions because we're in their home and their. For most of us, it's our sanctuary. We try to keep her homes the safest possible from code. So. So Happy Birthday Dad. Appreciate. Yes. Yes. Absolutely worry great man. Thank. There were times as a teenager, my brother, my biological brothers and chat today in good morning everybody in chat. He'll tell you. How? Challenging Boulevard could be for our parents. There were. There were moments as we say. That anyway, maybe one day we'll share stories I don't know I like to hear some of those stories. So. We'll see. We'll? You know some of them brother but the well that's true. But there's many of. You know. Just how it goes? All right. Why don't we get into native news on this is GonNa? Be Kind of extended a little bit today but but go ahead and kick us off if you will brother yeah no problem. Thank you. Okay at first Article I, just shake my head and laugh that's that's all you can do at this point Yip. Republicans Open Presidential Convention. I can't even call it that it's not. A clown slash dog and pony show that's what it was. With familiar anti-tribal messages from fool in the White House and my words and this was. Written by AC ago, for Indians Dot Com..

FBI Turtle Mountain Turtle Mountain Chippewa Triba Bureau of Indian Affairs Turtl Rolette Police Department Bureau of Indian Affairs Joel Turtle Mountain Reservation Rolette County Sheriff's Depar Officer Rolette County Sheriff Belcourt Dakota Bureau of Criminal Inve Rolette County Sheriff's Offic Belcourt North Dakota partner colon cancer Minneapolis Yip Republicans
"turtle mountain" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:50 min | 1 year ago

"turtle mountain" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Is the number and James I didn't get your take thoughts about the importance of young people participating any thoughts. Well, I couldn't agree any more than than what Melvin said. I mean. It's I think it's such an important point that and this is this is really across all racial and ethnic groups that young people have one of the lowest voter participation rates, but we're. We're at a point in our history right now where there's a sea-change and in Indian country really saw and also deferred to Jacqueline to talk about what came out of this, but you know the keystone pipeline and the Dakota access pipeline. Protests are something that have really energized a lot of the activists in a lot of the voters and interesting that even today with people marching through the streets I know one of your lead INS was talking I had interviewed a young native activist, his marching on the streets of Minneapolis today. The black lives matter that's what people need to understand that protest is an important part is an. An important part of securing representation, but you also need to make sure that you protest by going to the polls and boating a casting vote, because if you don't think certainly in Dhaka to get better, and they may only get worse and Jacqueline could actually give you absurd examples from her experience seeing the young people turn out in droves in North Dakota, in twenty eighteen Jacqueline co-head. Yeah, so I think in in the last election in a twenty eighteen north had been a challenging the voter. Id Law up there for years and we were able to explain to everybody how this law was passed to intentionally discriminate against. Native People by requiring an address on the ID. Native people did not have. And so in response. People got fired up. They were it was really the Turtle Mountain Youth Council shout out to all of them, that organize a march, and then organized a lead. You know all these people getting them out to the polls, and there ended up being record turn out in that election But I will say that in that case It took a lot of years of work to sort of are. Really clearly make clear what the injustice was, and make clear what it was that people should be.

Jacqueline Turtle Mountain Youth Council Melvin Dakota North Dakota James Minneapolis Dhaka co-head
Red Lake Nation election includes measure on marijuana

Native America Calling

03:59 min | 1 year ago

Red Lake Nation election includes measure on marijuana

"The National Native News. I'm Antonio Gonzalez. The Red Lake Nation in Minnesota is holding an election. Wednesday citizens are being asked whether or not the tribal council should legalize the production regulation and distribution a medical marijuana. Voters will also pick four tribal council representatives. Absentee ballots are available in a video message. Monday chairman Darrell. Zeki informed the community in person voting will be held as the tribe is under covert nineteen emergency orders as a Monday. There were no positive cases of Cova. Nineteen on the reservation. The North Dakota Department of Transportation will be at five reservations this week to provide photo identification cards. Which can be used for voting the? Id's will be issued to North Dakota residents who do not have a driver's license or ID the non driver ID card is free to people. Eighteen and older and will be mailed to residents within five days. The first event is Tuesday on the Turtle Mountain reservation. The Transportation Department is asking people to take Cova nineteen precautions including wearing a mask. The events are being held as the states. At June primary nears the business arm of the Cherokee Nation announced plans Monday to address safety measures to Reopen Casinos. The plan includes enhanced cleaning temperature checks for employees and guests and the suspension of buffets and banquets the tribe operates ten entertainment destinations in Oklahoma. A date for reopening casinos was not announced but the tribal government has started a semi opening with more phases to reopen throughout the summer. Meanwhile a number of other tribes in Oklahoma have already opened their casinos with Cova nineteen safety precautions in Juneau Alaska. A weaver has created a piece of art to reflect Cova Nineteen. The cat weaving documents history and stories as owes Elizabeth Jenkins reports lily. Hope is a weaver. And she's been busy creating a commission. Chilcott blanket a process which can take upwards of two years but recently she made something else on a much tighter deadline at home after she learned about an opportunity to create art about. What's going on right now. In early April First American art magazine sent a call out for indigenous artists to create masks similar to the ones worn prevent the spread of Cova Nineteen. It was so intense to weave it on my floor with my children around me. Her piece is called. Chill cat protector. It's made from Merino Wool. And Cedar Bark Warp. To ermine tails grease the cheeks. The mask covers the nose and the mouth in their place are the distinct ovoid shapes of the chill cat face an expression. That's confident and reassuring. The Mask isn't something to be worn in the grocery store. It's a work of art. Reflective of survival hope says it also represents foundational thinking to clink it Haida and Simpson people and really like my aunt set at the best that the musk's serves to record that we took care of each other during this time. The pieces received an enthusiastic response online and hope proceed. Judge's Choice Award from first American art magazine and while she was happy her mask was recognized in the exhibition. She thinks the art world still has a ways to go until fully accepts. Chilcott weaving into the fold. A carved mask wins over the beadwork over the quilt work over the weaving. And I I love I American art for putting it into the world but I'm like that is the constant conversation. Men's work is fine art and recognized as best of show and women's work is still hustling to catch up. But she'll CAPRA. Tekere seems to be changing that. The Burke Museum in Seattle recently acquired it and hope says for the first time in her career. She's created a commission calendar for other museums. Which have shown interest in her weaving another Cova? Nineteen inspired mask. I'm Elizabeth Jenkins and demand. Tony Elkins all

Cova American Art Magazine Elizabeth Jenkins Oklahoma North Dakota Department Of Tra Antonio Gonzalez Red Lake Nation Marijuana Transportation Department National Native News Minnesota Burke Museum North Dakota ID Tekere Zeki Cherokee Nation Chairman Chilcott
"turtle mountain" Discussed on Movin 92.5

Movin 92.5

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"turtle mountain" Discussed on Movin 92.5

"The enormous wasps no one right so they'll annihilate the honey bees maybe they'll deliver your Postmates for you Jose a little warm design right to your door if you want to go his necklace or stories out of the wide world of romance hello listen up guys if you want her to want you researchers say you need to encourage her to sleep in a little longer hi how did you get audio with me in the morning to be the outward pages you say in sleep in it just puts me in the mood in a conclusion that will surprise no woman on earth university of Michigan scientists found that good sleep is the key to good intimacy put another way women who get more rest have a greater desire for success gather really honestly like thanks to the music let me do what I'm asking let's do this thing all right because forty pages on specifically each additional hour sleep at night increase the chances by fourteen percent that a woman would engage in romantic activity with the part that you know baby I think you should sleep for twenty two and some girls like always was so well I see I give me a call the findings could be a simple solution to the complex issue of intimacy problems and complaints at the very least it's worth a try good sleep it's been shown to improve mood energy concentration overall health and now sexual desire that's case this little guy must begin seventeen hours a day because he's getting after it that's the sound of a turtle mountain issue and that means laser story we'll do it again.

Postmates Jose earth university of Michigan
Whole Family Wellness

All My Relations Podcast

08:13 min | 1 year ago

Whole Family Wellness

"Let's start by having you introduce yourselves the way you would to a large group of people So I was born and raised in the area. That is now known as North Dakota. I'm from the Turtle Mountain Band of my Mom's side of the family. So I'm initial Bay and I'm Papa Lakota from the Standing Rock on my Dad's side of the family I lived on the East Coast for a number of years where I went to college at Dartmouth and I went to Grad School at Columbia University for Journalism and I am now the mom to a one year old and the partner to fashion. We live together in Phoenix Arizona where we run our our initiative called while for Culture. So wellness is my passion. I'm also a writer and a journalist but pretty much everything I do. Now is like health and family related Well softball scoop dodged everyone to the both of you and for those. That had a chance to me on. Yep Suga cash on knock to damage over jude are Choon. I'm from the Salt River. People around this area right here and Just happy to be here sup without the ATHOL AENA. Happy to be sitting here to be speaking with both of you. And it's awesome and you guys are one of our favorite podcasts and so we are just honored to be here and wanted to say thank you to the for the awesome work that you're doing with this in just around native country and the individual work you know we worked together. Matija in the past and I worked a little bit with us well at college horizon. So it's awesome to be here in this space to be able to be discussing more of these so very happy with that also work with the native Wellness Institute. I'm a board member there and I've been working with them now for about ten years now and Chelsea said one of the CO founders in our initiative that we call wealth for culture and and as Chelsea had said as well. Wellness is something. That's definitely my passion and the wellness that's rooted within our people and sexual ways. Yeah something that. I'm very passionate about and Just very Excited to try to share what little we know in this area of health and wellness as it pertains to family as you said and we know that that's a big part of of our communities you know it's it's the strong communities are built by our strong families and that's really the root of healing in the root of preserving and maintaining evolving. Our indigene are families and I think that's one of the most beautiful things we can put our energy and effort to especially in Mike this. You know when it's just we have so much going on and on world you know so my heart is full and I'm happy I you know I think the other thing. That's really cool. Is that you know you're a photographer. And you danced for years right with your work with Rohan long on the street. Dance B boy crews and stuff Yeah I didn't think about that what I think about this work. You do too because it's kind of like you know this evolution of becoming these. These people like Chelsea talks about you know going to Dartmouth and Columbia and becoming a journalist and and then you yourself. It's like being a photographer and working in industry and it takes so many different skills to put out content on a regular basis. And you know you to have been developing those skills for a really long time so maybe we could start just having you talk a little about the origins of welfare culture. And and your purpose and what that means to you individually. Well we founded in twenty fourteen shortly after I met. Actually we both were on our own individual healing and wellness journeys And we came together as friends and we did this cool photo. Shoot Auch Photograph me as it was at the time we were calling it like an urban warrior kind of thing but it was just this really cool fitness that we did in your city but meanwhile we were having all these conversations talking about how you know healthy. Lifestyles really are congruent. With our ancestral ways. Both of us were raised in ceremony. But both of us also kind of went the wayside with that a little bit You know during our teens and twenties and you know moving away both both of us moving away from our reservoirs and into cities and kind of just exploring the world and but eventually coming full circle back to that and so it was really cool because I connected as friends through that shared passion for connecting wellness with with our culture. At the time. We realized that there wasn't a lot of imagery of healthy active strong native people and we wanted to change that and so we co founded while for culture and it started as a website and an instagram and facebook page and then it quickly grew into basically this consulting business in Marietta. Other things that we do as well. Yeah we got together because like Jesse had said she was doing journalism. And as you'd mentioned I was doing photography and I after a while. I really wanted to start to kind of help. Help help with the movement that that you're contributing to your work is just to help to portray this our image. You know what I mean that we do have in our communities that often doesn't portrayed in so we started really like she said delve into that and we started really looking at it. And you know I was coming from a perspective of coming. From my community where diabetes obesity cardiovascular heart disease is really super high high in comparison to the non native people that are live on the border. Just a couple miles away you know. The life expectancy is just the gap between is is insane and so I was coming from from that perspective. That how we need to we need to really reclaim our health. And we need to put our health for first and foremost in our diginity to continue on and for me it was it was it was moved my body exercising and training and Alice really trying to draw those connections between that in and being a part of the community and We share a lot. Two of my personal observation is that I watched the the the the the community. I guess involvement and ceremonial things that bring wellness and love and happiness declined because of poor health. People can't show up so I just got really driven on this. This thing like you know we need to. We need to reclaim our health. In whatever way that is for people you know for me was exercising and know trend to really strengthen my relationship to food and so we got together and we start man this is. There's so much more than just you know putting out an image of somebody working out and trying to encourage and motivate people. That's a big part of it. You know but there's certainly a lot more to it so you know. We delved into it to try to create more of a wellness model. That was kind of rooted in in a lot of our cultural values and just kind of going around native country with my work. With Native Wellness Institute the Focus was always on on for sure was pinpointing historic trauma was healing but we didn't see the inclusion a lot of bringing a healthy lifestyle once again. It's as far as physical health. Bring our foods right back into the conversation healing or bringing movement and into the conversation. We're really seeing that so much too and I think that that's sort of like our generations contribution like it's what we're doing this all of us living here now so we really kind of just tried to go forward with that and develop it over the years and later on we became a family and and we realized that everything we were we were coming up with in creating and learning about and putting into practice and sharing about and doing workshops and trainings on was. We're things that we have this opportunity now to live that into model that and to to show that and I think that that's one of the most powerful things we can do is just model that you know model that that that wellness of that. Good life for all of our families to see you know. We're we're strengthening that spirit of wellness step brings families together increase healing once again to you know when when anyone participates in that and so and so you know. That's that's how we got to where we are with it today and as you said now we are really you know as a young family moving forward with that

Native Wellness Institute Chelsea Dartmouth North Dakota Turtle Mountain Phoenix Arizona Salt River Papa Lakota Athol Aena Writer Jude East Coast Partner Rohan Columbia University For Journa Grad School Columbia Mike Instagram Jesse
Book of the Month: The Night Watchman by Louise Erdrich

Native America Calling

06:02 min | 1 year ago

Book of the Month: The Night Watchman by Louise Erdrich

"Louise. We have definitely set the foundation in so now let's meet some of the characters Patrice Aka Pixie Aka. All the other names She is definitely a somebody that I'm sure. A lot of people can relate to especially her resilience and her take on the world You describe her go ahead. Well Pixie was someone who came up. A and announced herself to me is character. My main character Thomas Was very much like my grandfather or inspired by him but Pixie was different and she's a person who a woman who works at the jewel bearing plant. Now that's a real place. That was a real place in Raleigh North Dakota right off the reservation and most of the people who work there women The government ads about this where Because they are good at making these tiny children's because of their Indian blood and because they are good at beadwork but Thomas thinks no because of their sharp is and Turtle Mountain women can spirit with glance. And that's how Pixie is. She's she's working there And suddenly as I was writing her I came to this line. She did things perfectly when enraged. I thought wow I know that person maybe I am that person so then I just started writing Pixie. I really enjoyed writing her and I had to crack up because I was thinking of the different names that when somebody is named Patrice they have all kinds of side names in thought. Wow it's so funny to just see how her name is kind of almost You know this own narrative in its own in wind. She wants to be called a certain name in so really interesting on that and so she takes us to Some of the side of relocation and of course exploitation anything you want to share about that and in what I wrote that in intro that there are things in this book that mirror what we're facing today in our native communities especially in urban settings that was one of them. Tell me more go ahead Lewis. Sure well I wanted to start I wanted to say how how this started so long ago. I mean it started in fourteen ninety. Two the exploitation of native women but relocation was a real chance for this to become something that Something that was more common easier and supported by a government program. You know women would come down to the cities and you didn't get much support you've got a little bit of training and and a little bit of housing and then we're basically set loose. And so women were very vulnerable and are very vulnerable and And picks his sister. Vera is This is something that spend been part of the garden of truth which is a a study done by the Minnesota Indian women's Resource Center. You know they've talked about what the trade what. The trade routes is our for trafficking and so I I used that in in talking about what happens to vera and it's really gets heavy when we learned the truth of various story in her sister who's also pursuing her. She has her own run. In with exploitation. I don't want to give anything away but you tell us a little bit. About some of that police well the skid row area of Minneapolis is really based on a book called King of Skid Row and also on some movies that were taken at that time. There's some movies that you can find online about skid row. Minneapolis and in it. There are heartbreaking pictures of videos of women who are Who are being exploited and there there Obviously there's there's photographs in of them are in video of them and they have a black eye. You know. They'RE PUFFY. They've been they've been hurt and they're in that movie and It it's the thing that that that is so tremendously disturbing is that it only has increased. We only we have so many women we hear every single day. If someone's gone someone's missing and in my experience. This all of this is underreported. Because I know very very few native women who had not suffered in some way from abuse or exploitation in just thinking about it and you even wrote this in the character Mir after after your grandfather of Thomas when he heard of the truth of what was going on in the city and how much it shook him and just how heavy the stories way when even somebody just in our community is among this population or the numbers or the missing numbers in a really appreciate that opening up that this also affects our communities the people who are quote unquote back home There's a lot going on in really appreciate the ability to be talking about some of this because we're talking about a creation from one of our great writers of our time and indigenous writer. Louis

Pixie Patrice Thomas Louise. Minneapolis Vera Raleigh North Dakota Turtle Mountain Minnesota Indian Louis MIR Resource Center Writer Lewis
Book of the Month: The Night Watchman by Louise Erdrich

Native America Calling

06:05 min | 1 year ago

Book of the Month: The Night Watchman by Louise Erdrich

"So much life happens in Louise urges latest book the night watchman this Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians author takes readers to the termination era. Were the threat of losing. Land in a tight. Something important is firing up. One of the characters was inspired by the life of this author's beloved grandfather in the book we follow this character named Thomas as ams up to share his words in Congress on the pages we also meet a cast of characters which includes strong indigenous women who define resilience of their time although set some generations. Back this story. Informs Present Day indigenous struggles including exploitation of our women racism and attacks on sovereignty and the land that are native nations connect to. I look forward to hearing how you're gelling to the story. And we invite you to join the discussion with their march book of the month. Author Louise and thanks to harpercollins publishers. The first ten p the first ten people who make it on air with a question or comment. We'll a copy of the night watchman. Our phone lines are open now so go ahead and dial in. We're at one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight. It's also one eight hundred nine nine native and today joining us from Washington. Dc is Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa author Louis Surgery. She is a National Book Award and National Book Critics Circle Award Winner and she was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. She lives in Minnesota with her daughters and is the owner of the small independent bookstore. Birchbark books my pleasure to have her here. Louise Welcome thank you so much. It's my pleasure. Tehran I'm delighted to be here into Louise. I really appreciate when our authors teach us about our own history and sometimes that history includes troubling times until this book takes us right to the heart of what termination the threat of termination losing the ability to say that we are a sovereign nation. Your characters take us to this moment in so I'm set the scene for us a little on just how much it's impacted not only the characters in the book but of course your own tribal nation. What would you like to say about termination? Well first of all I. I BELIEVE. Termination was a long time in preparation. You know when you look back through the history of what was happening just before you see that there was a big housing Bob. Postwar housing boom so termination came out of The the narrative of dispossession The government really wanted some very large stands of timber and those were on the cliff and the menominee reservations and they were among the first terminated. So there was five that were on the first light and turn on the Turtle Mountain Chippewa Band of Chippewa was one of them. So it didn't come out of nowhere. There had been some plans in the making and they got the perfect interface with two houses of Congress under Republican control and also the President Eisenhower Republicans so they had a sort of a clear shot termination at that point and the person who is the commissioner of Indian affairs at the time was a guy named Dillon s Myer and he had presided over the incarceration of Japanese American people. Right right during the war. So we have this Guy Dylan Myers. Who's all set up knowing exactly how to he? He was going to relocate everybody right that was the plan. That's that went hand in hand with relocation and then there's Arthur v Watkins who who was Passionately for termination. He had grown up on Allotment land that went into tax forfeiture and his family. Got It so he. He's the other person the main person and then Then there's the people who suddenly got this notice that your tribe is going to be terminated or emancipated. The word was you. Get your freedom. That's how it was couched. Those are the phrases. Did that make you feel it? Being compared to this that you are now mandated. You no longer have to be a native. It's it's so it's so it's so of all of our times I mean this is the language that is used when Dispossession is the real motive. flowed out some high-sounding kyw principled words and let people think I mean. They thought they were going to pull this over a native people right and not. My grandfather had an eighth grade government boarding school education but he got it immediately and he and I think most people did but the the the kind of shock is that this kind of rhetoric would come out with the expectation that native people would not even understand that there was nothing to emancipate that freedom meant freedom to lose all of their their land and their their treaty guaranteed privileges as long as the grass grows and the river. Shell slow you know that those words would be would be meaningless because Both houses of Congress had voted to abrogate treaties that have been established since the very beginning of this country

Louise Welcome National Book Award Congress Guy Dylan Myers Turtle Mountain Chippewa Band DC National Book Critics Circle A Thomas Washington Minnesota Pulitzer Prize Tehran Dillon S Myer Menominee Louis Surgery Arthur Commissioner President Trump Watkins
"turtle mountain" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"turtle mountain" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of the turtle mountain band of Chippewa in the nineteen fifties he fought against the congressional initiative to move native people off their land in the city's policy Drake says amounted to tribal termination termination was way to finally resolve what Congress thought of this the Indian problem that we had an eighth grade education Drake's grandfather built a local coalition to resist the move and organized a trip to testify before Congress I believe what he inspired other tribal nations to fight back against termination and it was a long brutal fight for survival also John powers reviews the Brazilian film Barker route that's part political fable part horror thriller man he says funny first news live from NPR news in Washington I'm Lakshmi saying the trump administration says it'll ensure corona virus testing is covered by health insurance plans Medicare and Medicaid health and Human Services says it's designating the virus testing as an essential health benefit former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg suspending his presidential campaign and throwing his support behind former vice president Joe Biden and peers Windsor Johnson reports Bloomberg's decision to drop out of the race follows a disappointing super Tuesday Bloomberg who only won the small U. S. territory of American Samoa on super Tuesday is now endorsing Joe Biden for the democratic nomination Boston University communications professor Tammy the hill says Bloomberg could give the biting campaign a financial boost it numbered which true to what he was saying about really just wanting to spend his money in its time is up for to help defeat Donald Trump and then that means that a lot of that time money and effort and energy can go toward helping Biden and Biden has had less financial support overall and so this could actually be a big boost for fighting the remaining democratic candidates are looking ahead to next Tuesday when six states including Michigan and Missouri hold primaries Windsor Johnston NPR news by the way Biden won the primary in Maine an Afghan woman receiving an award at the state department is appealing to the administration to ensure the peace process protects women's rights in the country and peers Michele Kelemen reports this comes a day after president trump spoke by phone with the leader of the Taliban speaking on the stage with First Lady melania trump and secretary of state Mike Pompeii owes a reef ago fari is asking them for continued support to ensure that Afghan peace process does not erase the gains that have been made since the dark days of the Taliban would you go fari a mayor in the conservative region of Afghanistan is one of the twelve recipients of the women of courage award last weekend the U. S. signed a deal with the Taliban that includes a timeline for a U. S. troop with Ralph and telephone commitments to break with terrorist groups and enter into peace talks with Afghan officials Michele Kelemen NPR news the state department the European commission's proposing the E. U.'s first ever climate law aiming to make the block carbon neutral by the year twenty fifty Terry Schultz reports from Brussels legislation was introduced as a fierce critic Greta tune Burke was on hand European Commission president Ursula von der Leyen is centering her presidency a green deal which pledges among other things the by twenty fifty the European Union will take as much carbon out of the atmosphere as it emits the climate law will oblige the European Union to take our time with goals into account in all future policies and legislation good written Berg says the plan is nowhere near ambitious enough she told Wonderland and you lawmakers this proposal is surrender teri Schultz reporting from Brussels you're listening to NPR news executives from some of the country's major airlines are insuring the White House that they have stepped up measures to better disinfect their planes in the wake of the corona virus epidemic American JetBlue United and southwest are among those who whose bottom line stand to be affected if more customers decide to curtail their overseas travel president trump says executives had not asked for financial assistance to make up for financial losses the spokesperson for vice president Mike pence meanwhile he's leaving the White House task force on response tweets that pence will go to Olympia Washington on Thursday the nation's first covert nineteen fatalities were in Washington state nine people died tourism in Europe is being hit hard by the corona virus outbreak in peers Eleanor Beardsley reports it's not just the Chinese who are not traveling anymore European tourism has seen a drop off in two waves first the Chinese stopped coming in Paris there are no more lines outside Louis Vuitton's flagship store on the shelves Elise A. as the virus spreads other visitors are staying away hotel cancellation rates have reached ninety percent in some areas in Italy France the world's top tourist destination is now Europe's second hardest hit country major concerts sporting and cultural events are being canceled after a French ban on gatherings of more than five thousand people in confined spaces Eleanor Beardsley NPR news Paris the Dow Jones industrial average is up seven hundred seventy points or nearly three percent at twenty six.

"turtle mountain" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:28 min | 1 year ago

"turtle mountain" Discussed on KCRW

"The sustaining members of this NPR station this is weekend edition from NPR news I'm Scott Simon let's test Louise director introduce the main character of her new novel the night watchman his name is Thomas washed Thomas was named for the muskrat why Josh the lowly hardworking water loving road muskrats were everywhere on the slough dotted reservation they're small sample forms slipped easily through water at dusk continually perfecting their burrows and eating how they love to eat although the bush cuts were numerous and ordinary they were also crucial in the beginning after the great flood it was a muskrat who had helped to remake the earth in that way as it turned out Thomas was perfectly named and is that your grandfather Patrick all right is Patrick Cornell yes Vegeta Weezer trick of course joins us from the studios of Minnesota public radio she's winner of the National Book Award library of Congress prize the pencil bell award for number every sixteen highly acclaimed novels the night watchman is your most recent thanks so much for being with us thank you thank you for having me here like your grandfather Thomas is the tribal leader of the turtle mountain band of Chippewa in these times and so many people refer to almost anything is an existential threat in the fall of nineteen fifty three when the novel opens that's exactly what the chapel were facing was not yes it was and on the turtle mountain band was on the first five tribes or nations who were slated to be terminated let's explain the termination it is the termination what I did was basically abrogate the nation to nation treaties that existed from the very beginning of our country's history Congress decided to cast them aside and to terminate the entire basis of native American land ownership Thomas waszak inspired by your grandfather is in fact a night watchman as well as a tribal leader in the news about this this act of Congress that should they often galvanizes him doesn't he does it took months for this to filter out into Indian country and they had only a matter of months to mount some sort of defense for the very existence the show many characters in here that are fascinating and quirky and wonderful to get to know but let me ask you to tell us about a couple of Thomas's niece Patrice known as pixie she's the kind of woman who did things perfectly when an arranged and the story picks up she has a separate quest when she goes off to find and locate her sister in Minneapolis and he learns that life off the reservation has challenges to that's right and she follows her sister because her sister has become part of this other program that it would it hinged into termination that was called relocation and relocation was designed to remove a native people from the reservations by giving them incentives to move to the city so instead of putting that money into infrastructure on reservations the government decided to move people off that valuable property now I gather you were trying to get hold of the story and feeling if I may a little lost and then you're you reread your grandfather's letters I re read his letters every so often to get a grip on why and why I'm doing this this writing and he was a wonderful writer his letters beautiful full of humor and storytelling and he wrote them during this time when he was fighting termination and working as the night watchman and what I think I absorbed was his sense of decency and his commitment to his family and his people it's hard to write about a decent person you know it is it is it is hard when I write characters my instinct is really to give them a flaw a conflict something huge that they they're struggling against as we look back on it now what was the effect of tribal termination in nineteen fifty five as a check out my the turtle mountain band of Chippewa was the one tried to resist early and early on of those first five what happened was complete devastation and loss the forests were sold off the tribes ended up with again you know through the generations are smaller and smaller land base and now finally it was a loss of identity it was loss of life there was despair among people who were terminated they had done everything possible to fit in to American society and culture but it wasn't enough we'll explain the policy ended under under president Nixon in the nineteen seventies but September twenty eight chain of terrace Sweeney Assistant Secretary for Indian affairs in the trump administration has called for the Mashpee Wampanoag tribe to have their ownership yes this is of something that I worried about that wasn't why I wrote the book but maybe it was why my grandfather's letters we're so powerfully resonant for me because I've been thinking about this for years and years and why I had to write it then was it just took over I I had another book I was working on and this suddenly became vital to me and his voice Reese's voice everything in it on a float so rapidly and and I had to write it the wizard jerk her novel the night watchman thank you so much for being with us thank you Scott when we think about the costs of war the impact on the country's music scene probably isn't the first thing to come to mind but our next story is about just that how a mother and daughter in California helped spark the song writing revival in Cambodia and the aftermath of the K. mer Rouge Quinn Lipson has the story your mom is one of Cambodia's biggest pop stars the news but she wasn't born and raised there she's American.

Scott Simon director NPR Louise
"turtle mountain" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:21 min | 1 year ago

"turtle mountain" Discussed on KCRW

"NPR news I'm Scott Simon let's ask Louise Erdrich to introduce the main character of her new novel the night watchman his name is Thomas washers Thomas was named for the muskrat why Josh the lowly hardworking water loving road muskrats were everywhere on the slough dotted reservation they're small simple forms slipped easily through water task continually perfecting their burrows and eating how they love to eat although the bush cuts were numerous an ordinary they were also crucial in the beginning after the great flood it was a muskrat who would help to remake the earth in that way as it turned out Thomas was perfectly named and is that your grandfather Patrick hi this is Patrick or no yes vegetable Weezer trick of course joins us from the studios of Minnesota public radio she's winner of the National Book Award library of Congress prize the pencil bell award for number every sixteen highly acclaimed novels the night watchman is our most recent thanks so much for being with us thank you thank you for having me here like your grandfather Thomas is the tribal leader of the turtle mountain band of Chippewa in these times and so many people refer to almost anything is an existential threat in the fall of nineteen fifty three when the novel opens that's exactly what the chapel were facing was not yes it was and other turtle mountain band was on the first five tribes or nations who were slated to be terminated let's explain but termination it is the termination what I did was basically abrogate the nation to nation treaties that existed from the very beginning of our country's history the Congress decided to cast them aside and to terminate the entire basis of native American land ownership Thomas while Jack inspired by your grandfather is in fact a night watchman as well as a tribal leader in the news about this this act of Congress that should they often galvanizes him doesn't it does it took months for this to filter out into Indian country and they had only a matter of months to amount some sort of defense for their very existence the show many characters in here that are fascinating and quirky and wonderful to get to know but let me ask you to tell us about a couple of Thomas's niece Patrice noticed pixie she's the kind of woman who did things perfectly when an arranged and the story picks up she has a separate quest when she goes off to find locate her sister in Minneapolis and he learns that life off the reservation has challenges to that's right and she follows her sister because her sister has become part of this other program that it would it hinged into termination that was called relocation and relocation was designed to remove a native people from the reservations by giving them incentives to move to the city so instead of putting that money into infrastructure on reservations the government decided to move people off that valuable property now I gather you were trying to get hold of the story and feeling if I may a little lost and then you're you reread your grandfather's letters I re read his letters every so often to get a grip on why and why I'm doing this this writing and he was a wonderful writer his letters beautiful full of humor and storytelling and he wrote them during this time when he was fighting termination and working as the night watchman and what I think I absorbed was his sense of decency and his commitment to his family and his people it's hard to write about a decent person you know it is it is it is hard when I write characters my instinct is really to give them a flaw a conflict something huge that they they're struggling against as we look back on it now what was the effect of tribal termination in nineteen fifty five as a check out my the turtle mountain band of Chippewa was the one tried to resist early and early on of those first five what happened was complete devastation and loss the forests were sold off the tribes ended up with again you know through the generations are smaller and smaller land base and now finally it was a loss of identity it was loss of life there was despair among people who were terminated they had done everything possible to fit in to American society and culture but it wasn't enough we'll explain the policy ended under under president Nixon in the nineteen seventies but September twenty eighteen of terrace Sweeney Assistant Secretary for Indian affairs in the trump administration has called for the Mashpee Wampanoag tribe they have their ownership yes this is of something that I worried about that wasn't why I wrote the book but maybe it was why my grandfather's letters we're so powerfully resonant for me because I've been thinking about this for years and years and why I had to write it then was it just took over I I had another book I was working on and this suddenly became vital to me and his voice Reese's voice everything in it it flowed so rapidly and and I had to write it the wizard Rick her novel the night watchman thank you so much for being with us thank you Scott when we think about the costs of war the impact on the country's music scene probably isn't in the first isn't the first thing to come to mind but our next story is about just that how a mother and daughter in California helped spark the song writing revival in Cambodia and the aftermath of the K. mer Rouge Quinn Lipson has the story your mom is one of Cambodia's biggest pop stars but she wasn't born and raised there she's.

Scott Simon Louise Erdrich Thomas
"turtle mountain" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"turtle mountain" Discussed on KCRW

"Is a survivor of domestic violence she took a self defense class and was able to get out of her situation now she wants to help other women from different tribes across the country there's a rumor tight terminal many take the hours long class not only find it physically grueling but emotionally taxing like Kristin Wyman who teared up learning the techniques almost as if my ancestors my under grandmothers everybody was with me that knows what are women face and just to see the power in that moment of that scenario was real the class is designed to be taught to native women by native women and Rachel Devaney tells the group that aspect is important to her it is so empowering learning from other native people connecting with you guys in that way is really amazing for me just as a native woman men take part in the class as well two of them where football padding and very reinforced helmets the kind of service human punching bags Michael Davis of the turtle mountain tribe whose traditional name is fire spirit says he's volunteered because too many native women have had their fire taken away through violence he seen it first hand I have a ninety that could have definitely benefited she might still be alive today and she would have known these tactics with her that she can empower itself to say no to step away and may be fought back one time and deterred him and maybe make him think twice Davis says the class will hopefully help native women preserve their fire well.

Kristin Wyman Rachel Devaney Michael Davis football turtle mountain
"turtle mountain" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"turtle mountain" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Is a survivor of domestic violence she took a self defense class and was able to get out of her situation now she wants to help other women from different tribes across the country there's one more time tripping over many take the hours long class not only find it physically grueling but emotionally taxing like Kristin Wyman who teared up learning the techniques almost as if my ancestors my under grandmothers everybody was with me that knows what are women face and just to see the power in that moment of that scenario was real the class is designed to be taught to native women by native women and Rachel Devaney tells the group that aspect is important to her it is so empowering learning from other native people connecting with you guys in that way is really amazing for me just as a native woman men take part in the class as well two of them where football padding and very reinforced helmets the kind of service human punching bags Michael Davis of the turtle mountain tribe whose traditional name is fire spirit says he's volunteered because too many native women have had their fire taken away through violence he seen it first hand I have a ninety that could have definitely benefited she might still be alive today and she would have known these tactics to her that she can empower itself to say no to step away or maybe fought back one time and deterred him and maybe make him think twice Davis says the class will hopefully help native women preserve their fire well.

Kristin Wyman Rachel Devaney Michael Davis football turtle mountain
"turtle mountain" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"turtle mountain" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A survivor of domestic violence she took a self defense class and was able to get out of her situation now she wants to help other women from different tribes across the country many take the hours long class not only find it physically grueling but emotionally taxing like Kristin Wyman who teared up learning the techniques almost as if my ancestors mountains and grandmothers everybody was with me that knows what are women face and just to see the power in that moment of that scenario was real the class is designed to be taught to native women by native women and Rachel Devaney tells the group that aspect is important to her it is so empowering learning from other native people connecting with you guys in that way is really amazing for me just as a native woman men take part in the class as well two of them where football padding in very reinforced helmets the kind of service human punching bags Michael Davis of the turtle mountain tribe whose traditional name is fire spirit says he's volunteered because too many native women have had their fire taken away through violence he's seen it first hand I have a ninety that could have definitely benefited she might still be alive today and she would have known these tactics with her that she can empower self to say no to step away and may be fought back one time and deterred him and maybe make him think twice Davis says the class will hopefully help native women preserve their fire well.

Kristin Wyman Rachel Devaney Michael Davis football turtle mountain
"turtle mountain" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

12:46 min | 2 years ago

"turtle mountain" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Back to the Whitfield nursery garden show on it's beautiful Saturday morning and. You know, it's just a good time to be out in the desert, but we're having a special show this week. We're saying goodbye to our friend John that could buy forever though. He's part of us for the rest of our lives. You know, it was a big part of us that when when you have someone like, John it's influenced you and taught you the biggest thing you miss what you have left to learn. That's exactly right, Brian. We're going to miss him too. You know, the hardest part that that I have is that my my phone. The first message that come up said call John try on because I talked to John pretty much every morning and. Always about something important exactly what the day that he died, and I found out I had a message from him on my phone, and I am never going to race. That message just to hear his voice. Nobody had a voice like John trion. It was so unique so friendly so. Yeah. And it was it was fun with his kind of dry sense of humor to he. He would kind of kid you about stuff, and you would wouldn't exactly tell you. What it was? You know, if you weren't observant enough to catch it right off the bat a little later once in a while. Yeah. That's true. I remember writing around the ranch in this truck. There was so many bugs smeared on his Winfield. You could never see out of it. And he goes that keeps the sun from coming in the sunburn. Once you driving over a rocky road. He says, yeah, he says that's like kneading bread. It keeps that rubber soft and pliable. Yeah. He was a good friend to us. All it just you know, it's so fun with him. But skelly related to the kids. You know, I don't know that there was ever a grandfather father or just a good friend figure two children and children could be all ages children could be two or three years old. And they could be twenty years old, and he would greet them. All and treat them with respect and dignity, and tease them a little bit. But I know that my children I have five children all grew up. You know, loving John. Because he was such a good friend to him. You know, he was a good friend who was a good mentor, and they kind of learn, you know, you can you can try and do anything. Exactly, right. I had five children two, and they all grew up at at Hyder on the ranch and later in Yuma. And John loved them all and he had nicknames for every one of them the nail felt special and the way they were treated by John just a good example for us going forward life. If we could try to be a little bit more like, John, you know, you see that commercial. It'd be like, Mike. Well, you know, what John cryan has been my hero down there for a long time. And you know, the one thing they want to attribute I think that Jon had more than made him special and different than most of us is is ability to forgive people. No matter what somebody did no matter if if they call them in the middle of the night, and they didn't even say, thank you, no matter when somebody got lost out in the desert need somebody to go. Find him. You know, it was always John that was the first one to volunteer to go. Find him the first one to go help somebody stuck in the wash. Yeah. The first one to try to help you. Fix your car. So you could make it back to town and go out there and find some kind of an old part that make it work. You know, you talk about somebody stuck in a wash. I can't tell you how many times we've rescued people out there. I remember one time north turtle mountain. We went out there. And there was somebody in a car heading on those primitive roads, and they were stuck in a wash. And we went out there, and they were. It was some old man and his wife, and they were on their way to California. It was the summertime, and they would have been dead by that night. We pull them out gave them water and and got sent back the right direction show more interstate eight was and they get on interstate eight and headed towards California told us keeps down the blacktop a little bit. Exactly. Yeah. Well, our phones ringing. We're gonna have to see his call next. Hi, this is Brian. Who's this? Hello. This is Bob down an old Welton. Arizona. Just the most beautiful spot of the south west. Well, I'm gonna tell you what Bob this is. This is US coast guard Rear Admiral, Robert Swanson, retired. But we all we all know him as Bob. I gotta tell you Bob one thing. I'll never forget. I was walking across the coast guard campus with you one time if a few years ago. I have when I saw how you retreated as we walked across campus. I was going. Oh my gosh. I'm with God today. Oh, well, love you. Bob. The bed for Rick Maryland, the board allowing me to accept that position for four years. I would've never experienced all of those things. That's right. That's Bob was an educator like pet Corey. He after his. Is fulltime service in the coast guard, then he served in the reserves, he he was an educator, and he was involved in agribusiness out of date Linden in hydra area. So yeah. And I was on the school board at that time. I don't know how many years ago was that Bob man that was interesting. I don't go back that far. I don't either it's like dinosaur tracks is it true that you were out of the first graduating class from Brophy when they reopened the school second class. Oh second. Okay. There were the first class has thirty seven people at and then my class had forty four. Finished with we pray throughout about five. Yeah. Well, we're glad that you made it, you know, it's it's sad to lose a good friend like John, but the nicest part about someone like John is that we really never lose him. He'll be in our spirit in our hearts forever. And you're right. Totally totally agree. And even if he wasn't ASU fan. He was still all right. What v? He was too smart to go to think about that school down south. Hey, it's only one hundred miles east is not too far. Nobody I know sure always enjoyed your company and all the athletic stuff and all you did for the school down there. You know, you've been such a big part of that. Dateline community for so long with the school and how much help the people in the whole area and. Thank you the teamwork with you. And Pat, you know, and and John, and and what what I saw you all do down there. You know, being the newbie there only last twenty years or so. Just amazing and know the community that you guys help foster and raise and the the respect you guys have and share for everyone at every level is just fantastic. Thank you. So we you know, if it wasn't enjoyable being down that if we didn't think we could make a difference. You know, we wouldn't have stayed. I when we went down there. I promised my wife, we'd only stayed there about three or four years and that was forty eight years ago. So. My student teacher Cortez. I they have me a job than Glendale did Brophy. Awesome job and JV baseball, coach and. And we just said, hey, let's let's get out of town for a while. And my first job interview Wickenburg gonna has in the middle of a football field superintendent, and he had a heart attack and died. I'll be right there. And I knew CPR and everything else, and I had him breathing when he went in the ambulance, but he didn't make it. And then they offered me a job the next week. And just say, we're not going there. Anyway. Well, sure, sure. I remember when I first met you. I think was it our nursery on Glendale avenue, and I didn't even hardly know where dateline was back. Then when you were the principal east come visit your mom. They're down the street from the nursery all the time. Yeah. Oh, yeah. That's you know, we my mom and dad bought that house in nineteen fifty. And that was all citrus groves except for Heywood stopped at the third street. That was Brophy's citrus over there. And I was ten years old. And the thing that really ticked me off was that they were talking about building houses around us. And then we had all our sports damn good. Watch fight, you know, with those greenheart oranges and grapefruit. I'm sure we took by half of their crop away from fights. But that was a great time to grow up in Phoenix. Really was sure that the Hyder fights. I can't imagine the Meryl's and John the orange fights. They must have. John John was telling me about how he and Rick used to like to hide behind the lemons, and they would have the tractor drivers out there trying to work, and here's a couple of young guys out there supposed to be working the bosses, and they would hide behind the lemon trees and bomb. The tractor drivers would limits. Rick it probably tell the story a little bit. I'm just telling it from here from John. We were talking about that story. Just two weeks ago on Thursday. A very long. We're sitting at John's kitchen talking about bombing. The tractor drivers definitely had a sense of humor. Well, we why we did the same thing, but started leveling ground. Boy, we were. Yeah. We knew where we could hide pretty pretty easy. So. What's we knew the grove? That was that was our baby. But then that that had all disappeared with houses. So anyway, well, you think they'll ever put that many houses and date Lynn? My lifetime. No. Mine either. I don't think it has the water. In fact, our water here needs a little work, but we can work on it. You know, it's been managed here for four thousand years. And I think that if we put some good minds together, we can we can manage to be here. Another four thousand. Yeah. You're probably right. You know? Well, I used to have people stop and tell me they have bought land. And dateline, you know in the fifties. And they bought a lot for five acre for five hundred bucks. And it's a what do you think it's worth now at five hundred bucks? So. There wasn't much growth is fired property values down there. You don't think that five hundred might be a little high. Five hundred dollars. You know, if it was probably a good place to you know, the. But some have some desert parties together and barbecue out there the desert, and nobody was living anywhere close to so whatever. Well, there's lots of dreams that I can remember my grandfather had a section that was over off a thirty second street and Greenway that was desert that he gave away because they didn't have any water. Yeah. It's such times do change, Bob. Thanks for calling us today. And we look forward to see on Saturday. Well, we we definitely excited to be there. We're buying the meeting, tomorrow and beans and everything. So we'll start getting ready. I know we'll have a great. Great turnouts. Well, you know, he touched off a lot of people, and it will be with a lot of people for the rest of our lives. Yep. You know, I think the things we got to do together. You know this. Nineteen. Seventy seven ASU beat Michigan in the Rose Bowl. What's that together? And you know, then we did the. Caidos we're going to grow up into the bowl Super Bowl. Yeah. The two games. One would be Green Bay. And then we'd beat Philadelphia. We were those games John and Charlotte, and it was a wonderful wonderful time being there. Well, it was nice. It was nice and he got to make a Super Bowl too. Yeah. And you know, us for you. Obey boys. We still never been in the Rosebowl. Yeah. We understand that about you. You were aware of that. Bob. Thanks for calling. We look forward to see on Saturday. Well, hey, look forward to seeing you guys end. Appreciate. Yup. All right. Thanks for calling. Bye. Bye. Bye. Bye. Okay. We're gonna take a short break..

John John Bob Brophy John trion John cryan Brian Whitfield nursery garden Rick Maryland ASU US Arizona Hyder skelly California Green Bay Phoenix Jon Mike