21 Burst results for "Turtle Mountain"

"turtle mountain" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:50 min | Last month

"turtle mountain" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Is the number and James I didn't get your take thoughts about the importance of young people participating any thoughts. Well, I couldn't agree any more than than what Melvin said. I mean. It's I think it's such an important point that and this is this is really across all racial and ethnic groups that young people have one of the lowest voter participation rates, but we're. We're at a point in our history right now where there's a sea-change and in Indian country really saw and also deferred to Jacqueline to talk about what came out of this, but you know the keystone pipeline and the Dakota access pipeline. Protests are something that have really energized a lot of the activists in a lot of the voters and interesting that even today with people marching through the streets I know one of your lead INS was talking I had interviewed a young native activist, his marching on the streets of Minneapolis today. The black lives matter that's what people need to understand that protest is an important part is an. An important part of securing representation, but you also need to make sure that you protest by going to the polls and boating a casting vote, because if you don't think certainly in Dhaka to get better, and they may only get worse and Jacqueline could actually give you absurd examples from her experience seeing the young people turn out in droves in North Dakota, in twenty eighteen Jacqueline co-head. Yeah, so I think in in the last election in a twenty eighteen north had been a challenging the voter. Id Law up there for years and we were able to explain to everybody how this law was passed to intentionally discriminate against. Native People by requiring an address on the ID. Native people did not have. And so in response. People got fired up. They were it was really the Turtle Mountain Youth Council shout out to all of them, that organize a march, and then organized a lead. You know all these people getting them out to the polls, and there ended up being record turn out in that election But I will say that in that case It took a lot of years of work to sort of are. Really clearly make clear what the injustice was, and make clear what it was that people should be.

Jacqueline Turtle Mountain Youth Council Melvin Dakota North Dakota James Minneapolis Dhaka co-head
"turtle mountain" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

03:56 min | 2 months ago

"turtle mountain" Discussed on Native America Calling

"The National Native News Tony Gonzalez. More than three dozen people turned out for North Dakota's idea event on the Turtle Mountain Reservation Tuesday. The state's Department of Transportation and Indian affairs traveled to Belcourt to provide non driver photo identification cards. Which can be used for voting? Scott Davis North Dakota Indian affairs. Executive Director says the goal is to provide ID's to tribal members across the state. It's also an effort to move forward from litigation involving native voters and the state's law always a goal or governor Burgum. My boss and make sure that all travel citizens have The the afford not to vote now be turned away so really Gatien that has been I guess Done in the distinctive decree Or by the judge to move forward and work together and so in preparation for the June election Davis ADDS COMMUNICATION WITH TRIBES. Has Been Key in making the idea. Event Happen Relation. You know. We need to stronger racial and you the can only take so far. We all know that I mean there's always that I don't know that that's that's our our Constitution. That's our treaty but locally we talked about locally county state's that's where the rubber meets the road. You know that's where it really gets real and if you don't have those partnerships and you don't have those those relationships you know things things Hit compromise things were pretty quickly. The idea event is being held on the spirit lake reservation Wednesday and three other reservations. The rest of the week the non driver. Id Card free to people. Eighteen and older and will be mel to residents the Navajo nation aggressively. Testing people for cove in nineteen as the number of positive cases exceeded four thousand as of Tuesday now nation president. Jonathan says the tribe has tested more than eleven percent of its population and is continuing large scale testing events which may result in another spike of positive tests the tribes also gathering data from healthcare facilities on recovery preliminary numbers from six healthcare centers. Show more than one thousand people who tested positive for covid nineteen have recovered the tribes also continuing to deliver food water and supplies to families. Across the vast reservation tribal leaders and health officials are urging residents on the reservation to follow emergency orders and stay home to slow the of Covid nineteen on the Navajo nation. Ho President Marlin White Eagle announced Tuesday. The first reopening tribal enterprise Ho chunk gaming a madison. Wisconsin is scheduled to reopen next week with covid nineteen safety and sanitation plans which include temperature checks and food operations remaining closed. The casino will reopen with a phased-in process with limited hours to players club members. Only a health and safety inspection scheduled Wednesday in preparation for the reopening. The facility was closed in March due to covid nineteen reopening dates for other. Ho Chunk gaming facilities have not been announced the tribes taking into consideration local health and safety measures and surrounding states. Stay home orders. Wisconsin restrictions were lifted. After court struck down. The governor stay at home orders last week. Legislation introduced by more than forty us. Senator seeks to address the digital divide experienced by students across the country who do not have access at home to the Internet including native American students. Lawmakers and educators say the cove nineteen pandemic has drawn awareness to the digital divide especially among low income and students of color the emergency educational connections act would provide four billion dollars in federal support to schools and libraries including tribes to provide. Internet hotspots and equipment. I'm Antonio Gonzalez..

Scott Davis Wisconsin president Covid Tony Gonzalez North Dakota Antonio Gonzalez governor Burgum Belcourt Department of Transportation Turtle Mountain Executive Director ID spirit lake Senator Marlin White Eagle Jonathan
Red Lake Nation election includes measure on marijuana

Native America Calling

03:59 min | 2 months ago

Red Lake Nation election includes measure on marijuana

"The National Native News. I'm Antonio Gonzalez. The Red Lake Nation in Minnesota is holding an election. Wednesday citizens are being asked whether or not the tribal council should legalize the production regulation and distribution a medical marijuana. Voters will also pick four tribal council representatives. Absentee ballots are available in a video message. Monday chairman Darrell. Zeki informed the community in person voting will be held as the tribe is under covert nineteen emergency orders as a Monday. There were no positive cases of Cova. Nineteen on the reservation. The North Dakota Department of Transportation will be at five reservations this week to provide photo identification cards. Which can be used for voting the? Id's will be issued to North Dakota residents who do not have a driver's license or ID the non driver ID card is free to people. Eighteen and older and will be mailed to residents within five days. The first event is Tuesday on the Turtle Mountain reservation. The Transportation Department is asking people to take Cova nineteen precautions including wearing a mask. The events are being held as the states. At June primary nears the business arm of the Cherokee Nation announced plans Monday to address safety measures to Reopen Casinos. The plan includes enhanced cleaning temperature checks for employees and guests and the suspension of buffets and banquets the tribe operates ten entertainment destinations in Oklahoma. A date for reopening casinos was not announced but the tribal government has started a semi opening with more phases to reopen throughout the summer. Meanwhile a number of other tribes in Oklahoma have already opened their casinos with Cova nineteen safety precautions in Juneau Alaska. A weaver has created a piece of art to reflect Cova Nineteen. The cat weaving documents history and stories as owes Elizabeth Jenkins reports lily. Hope is a weaver. And she's been busy creating a commission. Chilcott blanket a process which can take upwards of two years but recently she made something else on a much tighter deadline at home after she learned about an opportunity to create art about. What's going on right now. In early April First American art magazine sent a call out for indigenous artists to create masks similar to the ones worn prevent the spread of Cova Nineteen. It was so intense to weave it on my floor with my children around me. Her piece is called. Chill cat protector. It's made from Merino Wool. And Cedar Bark Warp. To ermine tails grease the cheeks. The mask covers the nose and the mouth in their place are the distinct ovoid shapes of the chill cat face an expression. That's confident and reassuring. The Mask isn't something to be worn in the grocery store. It's a work of art. Reflective of survival hope says it also represents foundational thinking to clink it Haida and Simpson people and really like my aunt set at the best that the musk's serves to record that we took care of each other during this time. The pieces received an enthusiastic response online and hope proceed. Judge's Choice Award from first American art magazine and while she was happy her mask was recognized in the exhibition. She thinks the art world still has a ways to go until fully accepts. Chilcott weaving into the fold. A carved mask wins over the beadwork over the quilt work over the weaving. And I I love I American art for putting it into the world but I'm like that is the constant conversation. Men's work is fine art and recognized as best of show and women's work is still hustling to catch up. But she'll CAPRA. Tekere seems to be changing that. The Burke Museum in Seattle recently acquired it and hope says for the first time in her career. She's created a commission calendar for other museums. Which have shown interest in her weaving another Cova? Nineteen inspired mask. I'm Elizabeth Jenkins and demand. Tony Elkins all

Cova American Art Magazine Elizabeth Jenkins Oklahoma North Dakota Department Of Tra Antonio Gonzalez Red Lake Nation Marijuana Transportation Department National Native News Minnesota Burke Museum North Dakota ID Tekere Zeki Cherokee Nation Chairman Chilcott
Whole Family Wellness

All My Relations Podcast

08:13 min | 3 months ago

Whole Family Wellness

"Let's start by having you introduce yourselves the way you would to a large group of people So I was born and raised in the area. That is now known as North Dakota. I'm from the Turtle Mountain Band of my Mom's side of the family. So I'm initial Bay and I'm Papa Lakota from the Standing Rock on my Dad's side of the family I lived on the East Coast for a number of years where I went to college at Dartmouth and I went to Grad School at Columbia University for Journalism and I am now the mom to a one year old and the partner to fashion. We live together in Phoenix Arizona where we run our our initiative called while for Culture. So wellness is my passion. I'm also a writer and a journalist but pretty much everything I do. Now is like health and family related Well softball scoop dodged everyone to the both of you and for those. That had a chance to me on. Yep Suga cash on knock to damage over jude are Choon. I'm from the Salt River. People around this area right here and Just happy to be here sup without the ATHOL AENA. Happy to be sitting here to be speaking with both of you. And it's awesome and you guys are one of our favorite podcasts and so we are just honored to be here and wanted to say thank you to the for the awesome work that you're doing with this in just around native country and the individual work you know we worked together. Matija in the past and I worked a little bit with us well at college horizon. So it's awesome to be here in this space to be able to be discussing more of these so very happy with that also work with the native Wellness Institute. I'm a board member there and I've been working with them now for about ten years now and Chelsea said one of the CO founders in our initiative that we call wealth for culture and and as Chelsea had said as well. Wellness is something. That's definitely my passion and the wellness that's rooted within our people and sexual ways. Yeah something that. I'm very passionate about and Just very Excited to try to share what little we know in this area of health and wellness as it pertains to family as you said and we know that that's a big part of of our communities you know it's it's the strong communities are built by our strong families and that's really the root of healing in the root of preserving and maintaining evolving. Our indigene are families and I think that's one of the most beautiful things we can put our energy and effort to especially in Mike this. You know when it's just we have so much going on and on world you know so my heart is full and I'm happy I you know I think the other thing. That's really cool. Is that you know you're a photographer. And you danced for years right with your work with Rohan long on the street. Dance B boy crews and stuff Yeah I didn't think about that what I think about this work. You do too because it's kind of like you know this evolution of becoming these. These people like Chelsea talks about you know going to Dartmouth and Columbia and becoming a journalist and and then you yourself. It's like being a photographer and working in industry and it takes so many different skills to put out content on a regular basis. And you know you to have been developing those skills for a really long time so maybe we could start just having you talk a little about the origins of welfare culture. And and your purpose and what that means to you individually. Well we founded in twenty fourteen shortly after I met. Actually we both were on our own individual healing and wellness journeys And we came together as friends and we did this cool photo. Shoot Auch Photograph me as it was at the time we were calling it like an urban warrior kind of thing but it was just this really cool fitness that we did in your city but meanwhile we were having all these conversations talking about how you know healthy. Lifestyles really are congruent. With our ancestral ways. Both of us were raised in ceremony. But both of us also kind of went the wayside with that a little bit You know during our teens and twenties and you know moving away both both of us moving away from our reservoirs and into cities and kind of just exploring the world and but eventually coming full circle back to that and so it was really cool because I connected as friends through that shared passion for connecting wellness with with our culture. At the time. We realized that there wasn't a lot of imagery of healthy active strong native people and we wanted to change that and so we co founded while for culture and it started as a website and an instagram and facebook page and then it quickly grew into basically this consulting business in Marietta. Other things that we do as well. Yeah we got together because like Jesse had said she was doing journalism. And as you'd mentioned I was doing photography and I after a while. I really wanted to start to kind of help. Help help with the movement that that you're contributing to your work is just to help to portray this our image. You know what I mean that we do have in our communities that often doesn't portrayed in so we started really like she said delve into that and we started really looking at it. And you know I was coming from a perspective of coming. From my community where diabetes obesity cardiovascular heart disease is really super high high in comparison to the non native people that are live on the border. Just a couple miles away you know. The life expectancy is just the gap between is is insane and so I was coming from from that perspective. That how we need to we need to really reclaim our health. And we need to put our health for first and foremost in our diginity to continue on and for me it was it was it was moved my body exercising and training and Alice really trying to draw those connections between that in and being a part of the community and We share a lot. Two of my personal observation is that I watched the the the the the community. I guess involvement and ceremonial things that bring wellness and love and happiness declined because of poor health. People can't show up so I just got really driven on this. This thing like you know we need to. We need to reclaim our health. In whatever way that is for people you know for me was exercising and know trend to really strengthen my relationship to food and so we got together and we start man this is. There's so much more than just you know putting out an image of somebody working out and trying to encourage and motivate people. That's a big part of it. You know but there's certainly a lot more to it so you know. We delved into it to try to create more of a wellness model. That was kind of rooted in in a lot of our cultural values and just kind of going around native country with my work. With Native Wellness Institute the Focus was always on on for sure was pinpointing historic trauma was healing but we didn't see the inclusion a lot of bringing a healthy lifestyle once again. It's as far as physical health. Bring our foods right back into the conversation healing or bringing movement and into the conversation. We're really seeing that so much too and I think that that's sort of like our generations contribution like it's what we're doing this all of us living here now so we really kind of just tried to go forward with that and develop it over the years and later on we became a family and and we realized that everything we were we were coming up with in creating and learning about and putting into practice and sharing about and doing workshops and trainings on was. We're things that we have this opportunity now to live that into model that and to to show that and I think that that's one of the most powerful things we can do is just model that you know model that that that wellness of that. Good life for all of our families to see you know. We're we're strengthening that spirit of wellness step brings families together increase healing once again to you know when when anyone participates in that and so and so you know. That's that's how we got to where we are with it today and as you said now we are really you know as a young family moving forward with that

Native Wellness Institute Chelsea Dartmouth North Dakota Turtle Mountain Phoenix Arizona Salt River Papa Lakota Athol Aena Writer Jude East Coast Partner Rohan Columbia University For Journa Grad School Columbia Mike Instagram Jesse
Book of the Month: The Night Watchman by Louise Erdrich

Native America Calling

06:02 min | 5 months ago

Book of the Month: The Night Watchman by Louise Erdrich

"Louise. We have definitely set the foundation in so now let's meet some of the characters Patrice Aka Pixie Aka. All the other names She is definitely a somebody that I'm sure. A lot of people can relate to especially her resilience and her take on the world You describe her go ahead. Well Pixie was someone who came up. A and announced herself to me is character. My main character Thomas Was very much like my grandfather or inspired by him but Pixie was different and she's a person who a woman who works at the jewel bearing plant. Now that's a real place. That was a real place in Raleigh North Dakota right off the reservation and most of the people who work there women The government ads about this where Because they are good at making these tiny children's because of their Indian blood and because they are good at beadwork but Thomas thinks no because of their sharp is and Turtle Mountain women can spirit with glance. And that's how Pixie is. She's she's working there And suddenly as I was writing her I came to this line. She did things perfectly when enraged. I thought wow I know that person maybe I am that person so then I just started writing Pixie. I really enjoyed writing her and I had to crack up because I was thinking of the different names that when somebody is named Patrice they have all kinds of side names in thought. Wow it's so funny to just see how her name is kind of almost You know this own narrative in its own in wind. She wants to be called a certain name in so really interesting on that and so she takes us to Some of the side of relocation and of course exploitation anything you want to share about that and in what I wrote that in intro that there are things in this book that mirror what we're facing today in our native communities especially in urban settings that was one of them. Tell me more go ahead Lewis. Sure well I wanted to start I wanted to say how how this started so long ago. I mean it started in fourteen ninety. Two the exploitation of native women but relocation was a real chance for this to become something that Something that was more common easier and supported by a government program. You know women would come down to the cities and you didn't get much support you've got a little bit of training and and a little bit of housing and then we're basically set loose. And so women were very vulnerable and are very vulnerable and And picks his sister. Vera is This is something that spend been part of the garden of truth which is a a study done by the Minnesota Indian women's Resource Center. You know they've talked about what the trade what. The trade routes is our for trafficking and so I I used that in in talking about what happens to vera and it's really gets heavy when we learned the truth of various story in her sister who's also pursuing her. She has her own run. In with exploitation. I don't want to give anything away but you tell us a little bit. About some of that police well the skid row area of Minneapolis is really based on a book called King of Skid Row and also on some movies that were taken at that time. There's some movies that you can find online about skid row. Minneapolis and in it. There are heartbreaking pictures of videos of women who are Who are being exploited and there there Obviously there's there's photographs in of them are in video of them and they have a black eye. You know. They'RE PUFFY. They've been they've been hurt and they're in that movie and It it's the thing that that that is so tremendously disturbing is that it only has increased. We only we have so many women we hear every single day. If someone's gone someone's missing and in my experience. This all of this is underreported. Because I know very very few native women who had not suffered in some way from abuse or exploitation in just thinking about it and you even wrote this in the character Mir after after your grandfather of Thomas when he heard of the truth of what was going on in the city and how much it shook him and just how heavy the stories way when even somebody just in our community is among this population or the numbers or the missing numbers in a really appreciate that opening up that this also affects our communities the people who are quote unquote back home There's a lot going on in really appreciate the ability to be talking about some of this because we're talking about a creation from one of our great writers of our time and indigenous writer. Louis

Pixie Patrice Thomas Louise. Minneapolis Vera Raleigh North Dakota Turtle Mountain Minnesota Indian Louis MIR Resource Center Writer Lewis
Book of the Month: The Night Watchman by Louise Erdrich

Native America Calling

06:05 min | 5 months ago

Book of the Month: The Night Watchman by Louise Erdrich

"So much life happens in Louise urges latest book the night watchman this Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians author takes readers to the termination era. Were the threat of losing. Land in a tight. Something important is firing up. One of the characters was inspired by the life of this author's beloved grandfather in the book we follow this character named Thomas as ams up to share his words in Congress on the pages we also meet a cast of characters which includes strong indigenous women who define resilience of their time although set some generations. Back this story. Informs Present Day indigenous struggles including exploitation of our women racism and attacks on sovereignty and the land that are native nations connect to. I look forward to hearing how you're gelling to the story. And we invite you to join the discussion with their march book of the month. Author Louise and thanks to harpercollins publishers. The first ten p the first ten people who make it on air with a question or comment. We'll a copy of the night watchman. Our phone lines are open now so go ahead and dial in. We're at one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight. It's also one eight hundred nine nine native and today joining us from Washington. Dc is Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa author Louis Surgery. She is a National Book Award and National Book Critics Circle Award Winner and she was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. She lives in Minnesota with her daughters and is the owner of the small independent bookstore. Birchbark books my pleasure to have her here. Louise Welcome thank you so much. It's my pleasure. Tehran I'm delighted to be here into Louise. I really appreciate when our authors teach us about our own history and sometimes that history includes troubling times until this book takes us right to the heart of what termination the threat of termination losing the ability to say that we are a sovereign nation. Your characters take us to this moment in so I'm set the scene for us a little on just how much it's impacted not only the characters in the book but of course your own tribal nation. What would you like to say about termination? Well first of all I. I BELIEVE. Termination was a long time in preparation. You know when you look back through the history of what was happening just before you see that there was a big housing Bob. Postwar housing boom so termination came out of The the narrative of dispossession The government really wanted some very large stands of timber and those were on the cliff and the menominee reservations and they were among the first terminated. So there was five that were on the first light and turn on the Turtle Mountain Chippewa Band of Chippewa was one of them. So it didn't come out of nowhere. There had been some plans in the making and they got the perfect interface with two houses of Congress under Republican control and also the President Eisenhower Republicans so they had a sort of a clear shot termination at that point and the person who is the commissioner of Indian affairs at the time was a guy named Dillon s Myer and he had presided over the incarceration of Japanese American people. Right right during the war. So we have this Guy Dylan Myers. Who's all set up knowing exactly how to he? He was going to relocate everybody right that was the plan. That's that went hand in hand with relocation and then there's Arthur v Watkins who who was Passionately for termination. He had grown up on Allotment land that went into tax forfeiture and his family. Got It so he. He's the other person the main person and then Then there's the people who suddenly got this notice that your tribe is going to be terminated or emancipated. The word was you. Get your freedom. That's how it was couched. Those are the phrases. Did that make you feel it? Being compared to this that you are now mandated. You no longer have to be a native. It's it's so it's so it's so of all of our times I mean this is the language that is used when Dispossession is the real motive. flowed out some high-sounding kyw principled words and let people think I mean. They thought they were going to pull this over a native people right and not. My grandfather had an eighth grade government boarding school education but he got it immediately and he and I think most people did but the the the kind of shock is that this kind of rhetoric would come out with the expectation that native people would not even understand that there was nothing to emancipate that freedom meant freedom to lose all of their their land and their their treaty guaranteed privileges as long as the grass grows and the river. Shell slow you know that those words would be would be meaningless because Both houses of Congress had voted to abrogate treaties that have been established since the very beginning of this country

Louise Welcome National Book Award Congress Guy Dylan Myers Turtle Mountain Chippewa Band DC National Book Critics Circle A Thomas Washington Minnesota Pulitzer Prize Tehran Dillon S Myer Menominee Louis Surgery Arthur Commissioner President Trump Watkins
"turtle mountain" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:19 min | 5 months ago

"turtle mountain" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of the turtle mountain band of Chippewa in the nineteen fifties he fought against the congressional initiative to move native people off their land in the city's policy Drake says amounted to tribal termination termination was way to finally resolve what Congress thought of this the Indian problem that we had an eighth grade education Drake's grandfather built a local coalition to resist the move and organized a trip to testify before Congress I believe what he inspired other tribal nations to fight back against termination and it was a long brutal fight for survival also John powers reviews the Brazilian film Barker route that's part political fable part horror thriller man he says funny first news live from NPR news in Washington I'm Lakshmi saying the trump administration says it'll ensure corona virus testing is covered by health insurance plans Medicare and Medicaid health and Human Services says it's designating the virus testing as an essential health benefit former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg suspending his presidential campaign and throwing his support behind former vice president Joe Biden and peers Windsor Johnson reports Bloomberg's decision to drop out of the race follows a disappointing super Tuesday Bloomberg who only won the small U. S. territory of American Samoa on super Tuesday is now endorsing Joe Biden for the democratic nomination Boston University communications professor Tammy the hill says Bloomberg could give the biting campaign a financial boost it numbered which true to what he was saying about really just wanting to spend his money in its time is up for to help defeat Donald Trump and then that means that a lot of that time money and effort and energy can go toward helping Biden and Biden has had less financial support overall and so this could actually be a big boost for fighting the remaining democratic candidates are looking ahead to next Tuesday when six states including Michigan and Missouri hold primaries Windsor Johnston NPR news by the way Biden won the primary in Maine an Afghan woman receiving an award at the state department is appealing to the administration to ensure the peace process protects women's rights in the country and peers Michele Kelemen reports this comes a day after president trump spoke by phone with the leader of the Taliban speaking on the stage with First Lady melania trump and secretary of state Mike Pompeii owes a reef ago fari is asking them for continued support to ensure that Afghan peace process does not erase the gains that have been made since the dark days of the Taliban would you go fari a mayor in the conservative region of Afghanistan is one of the twelve recipients of the women of courage award last weekend the U. S. signed a deal with the Taliban that includes a timeline for a U. S. troop with Ralph and telephone commitments to break with terrorist groups and enter into peace talks with Afghan officials Michele Kelemen NPR news the state department the European commission's proposing the E. U.'s first ever climate law aiming to make the block carbon neutral by the year twenty fifty Terry Schultz reports from Brussels legislation was introduced as a fierce critic Greta tune Burke was on hand European Commission president Ursula von der Leyen is centering her presidency a green deal which pledges among other things the by twenty fifty the European Union will take as much carbon out of the atmosphere as it emits the climate law will oblige the European Union to take our time with goals into account in all future policies and legislation good written Berg says the plan is nowhere near ambitious enough she told Wonderland and you lawmakers this proposal is surrender teri Schultz reporting from Brussels you're listening to NPR news executives from some of the country's major airlines are insuring the White House that they have stepped up measures to better disinfect their planes in the wake of the corona virus epidemic American JetBlue United and southwest are among those who whose bottom line stand to be affected if more customers decide to curtail their overseas travel president trump says executives had not asked for financial assistance to make up for financial losses the spokesperson for vice president Mike pence meanwhile he's leaving the White House task force on response tweets that pence will go to Olympia Washington on Thursday the nation's first covert nineteen fatalities were in Washington state nine people died tourism in Europe is being hit hard by the corona virus outbreak in peers Eleanor Beardsley reports it's not just the Chinese who are not traveling anymore European tourism has seen a drop off in two waves first the Chinese stopped coming in Paris there are no more lines outside Louis Vuitton's flagship store on the shelves Elise A. as the virus spreads other visitors are staying away hotel cancellation rates have reached ninety percent in some areas in Italy France the world's top tourist destination is now Europe's second hardest hit country major concerts sporting and cultural events are being canceled after a French ban on gatherings of more than five thousand people in confined spaces Eleanor Beardsley NPR news Paris the Dow Jones industrial average is up seven hundred seventy points or nearly three percent at twenty six.

"turtle mountain" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:28 min | 5 months ago

"turtle mountain" Discussed on KCRW

"The sustaining members of this NPR station this is weekend edition from NPR news I'm Scott Simon let's test Louise director introduce the main character of her new novel the night watchman his name is Thomas washed Thomas was named for the muskrat why Josh the lowly hardworking water loving road muskrats were everywhere on the slough dotted reservation they're small sample forms slipped easily through water at dusk continually perfecting their burrows and eating how they love to eat although the bush cuts were numerous and ordinary they were also crucial in the beginning after the great flood it was a muskrat who had helped to remake the earth in that way as it turned out Thomas was perfectly named and is that your grandfather Patrick all right is Patrick Cornell yes Vegeta Weezer trick of course joins us from the studios of Minnesota public radio she's winner of the National Book Award library of Congress prize the pencil bell award for number every sixteen highly acclaimed novels the night watchman is your most recent thanks so much for being with us thank you thank you for having me here like your grandfather Thomas is the tribal leader of the turtle mountain band of Chippewa in these times and so many people refer to almost anything is an existential threat in the fall of nineteen fifty three when the novel opens that's exactly what the chapel were facing was not yes it was and on the turtle mountain band was on the first five tribes or nations who were slated to be terminated let's explain the termination it is the termination what I did was basically abrogate the nation to nation treaties that existed from the very beginning of our country's history Congress decided to cast them aside and to terminate the entire basis of native American land ownership Thomas waszak inspired by your grandfather is in fact a night watchman as well as a tribal leader in the news about this this act of Congress that should they often galvanizes him doesn't he does it took months for this to filter out into Indian country and they had only a matter of months to mount some sort of defense for the very existence the show many characters in here that are fascinating and quirky and wonderful to get to know but let me ask you to tell us about a couple of Thomas's niece Patrice known as pixie she's the kind of woman who did things perfectly when an arranged and the story picks up she has a separate quest when she goes off to find and locate her sister in Minneapolis and he learns that life off the reservation has challenges to that's right and she follows her sister because her sister has become part of this other program that it would it hinged into termination that was called relocation and relocation was designed to remove a native people from the reservations by giving them incentives to move to the city so instead of putting that money into infrastructure on reservations the government decided to move people off that valuable property now I gather you were trying to get hold of the story and feeling if I may a little lost and then you're you reread your grandfather's letters I re read his letters every so often to get a grip on why and why I'm doing this this writing and he was a wonderful writer his letters beautiful full of humor and storytelling and he wrote them during this time when he was fighting termination and working as the night watchman and what I think I absorbed was his sense of decency and his commitment to his family and his people it's hard to write about a decent person you know it is it is it is hard when I write characters my instinct is really to give them a flaw a conflict something huge that they they're struggling against as we look back on it now what was the effect of tribal termination in nineteen fifty five as a check out my the turtle mountain band of Chippewa was the one tried to resist early and early on of those first five what happened was complete devastation and loss the forests were sold off the tribes ended up with again you know through the generations are smaller and smaller land base and now finally it was a loss of identity it was loss of life there was despair among people who were terminated they had done everything possible to fit in to American society and culture but it wasn't enough we'll explain the policy ended under under president Nixon in the nineteen seventies but September twenty eight chain of terrace Sweeney Assistant Secretary for Indian affairs in the trump administration has called for the Mashpee Wampanoag tribe to have their ownership yes this is of something that I worried about that wasn't why I wrote the book but maybe it was why my grandfather's letters we're so powerfully resonant for me because I've been thinking about this for years and years and why I had to write it then was it just took over I I had another book I was working on and this suddenly became vital to me and his voice Reese's voice everything in it on a float so rapidly and and I had to write it the wizard jerk her novel the night watchman thank you so much for being with us thank you Scott when we think about the costs of war the impact on the country's music scene probably isn't the first thing to come to mind but our next story is about just that how a mother and daughter in California helped spark the song writing revival in Cambodia and the aftermath of the K. mer Rouge Quinn Lipson has the story your mom is one of Cambodia's biggest pop stars the news but she wasn't born and raised there she's American.

Scott Simon director NPR Louise
"turtle mountain" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:37 min | 6 months ago

"turtle mountain" Discussed on KCRW

"Is a survivor of domestic violence she took a self defense class and was able to get out of her situation now she wants to help other women from different tribes across the country there's a rumor tight terminal many take the hours long class not only find it physically grueling but emotionally taxing like Kristin Wyman who teared up learning the techniques almost as if my ancestors my under grandmothers everybody was with me that knows what are women face and just to see the power in that moment of that scenario was real the class is designed to be taught to native women by native women and Rachel Devaney tells the group that aspect is important to her it is so empowering learning from other native people connecting with you guys in that way is really amazing for me just as a native woman men take part in the class as well two of them where football padding and very reinforced helmets the kind of service human punching bags Michael Davis of the turtle mountain tribe whose traditional name is fire spirit says he's volunteered because too many native women have had their fire taken away through violence he seen it first hand I have a ninety that could have definitely benefited she might still be alive today and she would have known these tactics with her that she can empower itself to say no to step away and may be fought back one time and deterred him and maybe make him think twice Davis says the class will hopefully help native women preserve their fire well.

Kristin Wyman Rachel Devaney Michael Davis football turtle mountain
"turtle mountain" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:38 min | 6 months ago

"turtle mountain" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Is a survivor of domestic violence she took a self defense class and was able to get out of her situation now she wants to help other women from different tribes across the country there's one more time tripping over many take the hours long class not only find it physically grueling but emotionally taxing like Kristin Wyman who teared up learning the techniques almost as if my ancestors my under grandmothers everybody was with me that knows what are women face and just to see the power in that moment of that scenario was real the class is designed to be taught to native women by native women and Rachel Devaney tells the group that aspect is important to her it is so empowering learning from other native people connecting with you guys in that way is really amazing for me just as a native woman men take part in the class as well two of them where football padding and very reinforced helmets the kind of service human punching bags Michael Davis of the turtle mountain tribe whose traditional name is fire spirit says he's volunteered because too many native women have had their fire taken away through violence he seen it first hand I have a ninety that could have definitely benefited she might still be alive today and she would have known these tactics to her that she can empower itself to say no to step away or maybe fought back one time and deterred him and maybe make him think twice Davis says the class will hopefully help native women preserve their fire well.

Kristin Wyman Rachel Devaney Michael Davis football turtle mountain
"turtle mountain" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

12:46 min | 1 year ago

"turtle mountain" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Back to the Whitfield nursery garden show on it's beautiful Saturday morning and. You know, it's just a good time to be out in the desert, but we're having a special show this week. We're saying goodbye to our friend John that could buy forever though. He's part of us for the rest of our lives. You know, it was a big part of us that when when you have someone like, John it's influenced you and taught you the biggest thing you miss what you have left to learn. That's exactly right, Brian. We're going to miss him too. You know, the hardest part that that I have is that my my phone. The first message that come up said call John try on because I talked to John pretty much every morning and. Always about something important exactly what the day that he died, and I found out I had a message from him on my phone, and I am never going to race. That message just to hear his voice. Nobody had a voice like John trion. It was so unique so friendly so. Yeah. And it was it was fun with his kind of dry sense of humor to he. He would kind of kid you about stuff, and you would wouldn't exactly tell you. What it was? You know, if you weren't observant enough to catch it right off the bat a little later once in a while. Yeah. That's true. I remember writing around the ranch in this truck. There was so many bugs smeared on his Winfield. You could never see out of it. And he goes that keeps the sun from coming in the sunburn. Once you driving over a rocky road. He says, yeah, he says that's like kneading bread. It keeps that rubber soft and pliable. Yeah. He was a good friend to us. All it just you know, it's so fun with him. But skelly related to the kids. You know, I don't know that there was ever a grandfather father or just a good friend figure two children and children could be all ages children could be two or three years old. And they could be twenty years old, and he would greet them. All and treat them with respect and dignity, and tease them a little bit. But I know that my children I have five children all grew up. You know, loving John. Because he was such a good friend to him. You know, he was a good friend who was a good mentor, and they kind of learn, you know, you can you can try and do anything. Exactly, right. I had five children two, and they all grew up at at Hyder on the ranch and later in Yuma. And John loved them all and he had nicknames for every one of them the nail felt special and the way they were treated by John just a good example for us going forward life. If we could try to be a little bit more like, John, you know, you see that commercial. It'd be like, Mike. Well, you know, what John cryan has been my hero down there for a long time. And you know, the one thing they want to attribute I think that Jon had more than made him special and different than most of us is is ability to forgive people. No matter what somebody did no matter if if they call them in the middle of the night, and they didn't even say, thank you, no matter when somebody got lost out in the desert need somebody to go. Find him. You know, it was always John that was the first one to volunteer to go. Find him the first one to go help somebody stuck in the wash. Yeah. The first one to try to help you. Fix your car. So you could make it back to town and go out there and find some kind of an old part that make it work. You know, you talk about somebody stuck in a wash. I can't tell you how many times we've rescued people out there. I remember one time north turtle mountain. We went out there. And there was somebody in a car heading on those primitive roads, and they were stuck in a wash. And we went out there, and they were. It was some old man and his wife, and they were on their way to California. It was the summertime, and they would have been dead by that night. We pull them out gave them water and and got sent back the right direction show more interstate eight was and they get on interstate eight and headed towards California told us keeps down the blacktop a little bit. Exactly. Yeah. Well, our phones ringing. We're gonna have to see his call next. Hi, this is Brian. Who's this? Hello. This is Bob down an old Welton. Arizona. Just the most beautiful spot of the south west. Well, I'm gonna tell you what Bob this is. This is US coast guard Rear Admiral, Robert Swanson, retired. But we all we all know him as Bob. I gotta tell you Bob one thing. I'll never forget. I was walking across the coast guard campus with you one time if a few years ago. I have when I saw how you retreated as we walked across campus. I was going. Oh my gosh. I'm with God today. Oh, well, love you. Bob. The bed for Rick Maryland, the board allowing me to accept that position for four years. I would've never experienced all of those things. That's right. That's Bob was an educator like pet Corey. He after his. Is fulltime service in the coast guard, then he served in the reserves, he he was an educator, and he was involved in agribusiness out of date Linden in hydra area. So yeah. And I was on the school board at that time. I don't know how many years ago was that Bob man that was interesting. I don't go back that far. I don't either it's like dinosaur tracks is it true that you were out of the first graduating class from Brophy when they reopened the school second class. Oh second. Okay. There were the first class has thirty seven people at and then my class had forty four. Finished with we pray throughout about five. Yeah. Well, we're glad that you made it, you know, it's it's sad to lose a good friend like John, but the nicest part about someone like John is that we really never lose him. He'll be in our spirit in our hearts forever. And you're right. Totally totally agree. And even if he wasn't ASU fan. He was still all right. What v? He was too smart to go to think about that school down south. Hey, it's only one hundred miles east is not too far. Nobody I know sure always enjoyed your company and all the athletic stuff and all you did for the school down there. You know, you've been such a big part of that. Dateline community for so long with the school and how much help the people in the whole area and. Thank you the teamwork with you. And Pat, you know, and and John, and and what what I saw you all do down there. You know, being the newbie there only last twenty years or so. Just amazing and know the community that you guys help foster and raise and the the respect you guys have and share for everyone at every level is just fantastic. Thank you. So we you know, if it wasn't enjoyable being down that if we didn't think we could make a difference. You know, we wouldn't have stayed. I when we went down there. I promised my wife, we'd only stayed there about three or four years and that was forty eight years ago. So. My student teacher Cortez. I they have me a job than Glendale did Brophy. Awesome job and JV baseball, coach and. And we just said, hey, let's let's get out of town for a while. And my first job interview Wickenburg gonna has in the middle of a football field superintendent, and he had a heart attack and died. I'll be right there. And I knew CPR and everything else, and I had him breathing when he went in the ambulance, but he didn't make it. And then they offered me a job the next week. And just say, we're not going there. Anyway. Well, sure, sure. I remember when I first met you. I think was it our nursery on Glendale avenue, and I didn't even hardly know where dateline was back. Then when you were the principal east come visit your mom. They're down the street from the nursery all the time. Yeah. Oh, yeah. That's you know, we my mom and dad bought that house in nineteen fifty. And that was all citrus groves except for Heywood stopped at the third street. That was Brophy's citrus over there. And I was ten years old. And the thing that really ticked me off was that they were talking about building houses around us. And then we had all our sports damn good. Watch fight, you know, with those greenheart oranges and grapefruit. I'm sure we took by half of their crop away from fights. But that was a great time to grow up in Phoenix. Really was sure that the Hyder fights. I can't imagine the Meryl's and John the orange fights. They must have. John John was telling me about how he and Rick used to like to hide behind the lemons, and they would have the tractor drivers out there trying to work, and here's a couple of young guys out there supposed to be working the bosses, and they would hide behind the lemon trees and bomb. The tractor drivers would limits. Rick it probably tell the story a little bit. I'm just telling it from here from John. We were talking about that story. Just two weeks ago on Thursday. A very long. We're sitting at John's kitchen talking about bombing. The tractor drivers definitely had a sense of humor. Well, we why we did the same thing, but started leveling ground. Boy, we were. Yeah. We knew where we could hide pretty pretty easy. So. What's we knew the grove? That was that was our baby. But then that that had all disappeared with houses. So anyway, well, you think they'll ever put that many houses and date Lynn? My lifetime. No. Mine either. I don't think it has the water. In fact, our water here needs a little work, but we can work on it. You know, it's been managed here for four thousand years. And I think that if we put some good minds together, we can we can manage to be here. Another four thousand. Yeah. You're probably right. You know? Well, I used to have people stop and tell me they have bought land. And dateline, you know in the fifties. And they bought a lot for five acre for five hundred bucks. And it's a what do you think it's worth now at five hundred bucks? So. There wasn't much growth is fired property values down there. You don't think that five hundred might be a little high. Five hundred dollars. You know, if it was probably a good place to you know, the. But some have some desert parties together and barbecue out there the desert, and nobody was living anywhere close to so whatever. Well, there's lots of dreams that I can remember my grandfather had a section that was over off a thirty second street and Greenway that was desert that he gave away because they didn't have any water. Yeah. It's such times do change, Bob. Thanks for calling us today. And we look forward to see on Saturday. Well, we we definitely excited to be there. We're buying the meeting, tomorrow and beans and everything. So we'll start getting ready. I know we'll have a great. Great turnouts. Well, you know, he touched off a lot of people, and it will be with a lot of people for the rest of our lives. Yep. You know, I think the things we got to do together. You know this. Nineteen. Seventy seven ASU beat Michigan in the Rose Bowl. What's that together? And you know, then we did the. Caidos we're going to grow up into the bowl Super Bowl. Yeah. The two games. One would be Green Bay. And then we'd beat Philadelphia. We were those games John and Charlotte, and it was a wonderful wonderful time being there. Well, it was nice. It was nice and he got to make a Super Bowl too. Yeah. And you know, us for you. Obey boys. We still never been in the Rosebowl. Yeah. We understand that about you. You were aware of that. Bob. Thanks for calling. We look forward to see on Saturday. Well, hey, look forward to seeing you guys end. Appreciate. Yup. All right. Thanks for calling. Bye. Bye. Bye. Bye. Okay. We're gonna take a short break..

John John Bob Brophy John trion John cryan Brian Whitfield nursery garden Rick Maryland ASU US Arizona Hyder skelly California Green Bay Phoenix Jon Mike
"turtle mountain" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

07:33 min | 1 year ago

"turtle mountain" Discussed on KGO 810

"The election results, and where and it does look as if you know, most of the predictions had been that the Republicans would retain control of the Senate, they could even gain a a cedar to rob a points out that they may gain more than that that is a possibility and also looks as if the indications prior to the election that the Democrats would take the house of representatives. It looks like that is probably true. We don't yet know, but Democrats continue to move close to control of the house. There are a number of racist right now that where they are leading where Democrats are leading add to they are Republican seats where now Democrats are ahead. Eight hundred eighty eight ten is the telephone number eight oh eight oh, eight ten. Oh, yes. CNN is calling that Republicans do keep control of the United States Senate or we're gonna go to your phones. Eight hundred eighty eight tennis the telephone number eight. Oh, eight oh, eight ten Georgia's calling from San Leandro, high George welcome to Keiji around with Pat, and John I. Hi, nikki. Yeah. We never forget. Mickey let me assure you. Okay. That's true. That's true. My question has to do with that. Will we just heard that Republican Kevin Kramer, defeated by Senator Heidi Heitkamp, right democrat from coda, and I just wanted to point out, and maybe John Atkins h more about this in two thousand twelve Heidi Heitkamp who is the Democrats want us apprised victory in the Senate race by something like twenty nine hundred votes to live. This county wins from the standing rock in turtle mountain reservations be Indian population, which you real too. But during our terminology, apparently the Republicans legislative or made it impossible for Indians to register. That's right. Chad having a grass, and if you're on the reservation there are most locations where there are no addresses, the absolutely correct. And that will be a case made to tide is understanding is that it's already gone to court hasn't that one already gone to court to court, and, but it appears given the numbers that it wouldn't have made a difference. That's the important element here. But clarifying the fact that native Americans or any voter suppression. And it is clear that there is voter suppression taking place of minorities generally, vote for the Democrats one of the things we're gonna watch in in Georgia will be what kind of concerns are raised about voting in Georgia. So far. The Georgia race has not been declared. But it's coming and we'll see how that works. My my understanding is that what happened. There was a judge who said that allegations of voter suppression in North Dakota against the native Americans were in his term was great cause for concern. But he denied the request to try to restore their voting rights because he said he wanted to avoid confusion and chaos so close before the election is not the only decision that has come down in that regard. There've been a number of cases, where judges have expressed dismay at what appears to be real cases of voter suppression, including in Georgia and one and and in some cases, the people who are bringing those cases one. But in many of those cases in North Dakota is included. The judge said that since this was coming so close to the election any decision that he rendered in any remedy that. He thought would be appropriate would create greater chaos. House and confusion because it was too close to the election for people to be properly informed and then to be able to exercise their right? Let me just point out Kramer, Republican North Dakota. Now is fifty seven percent of the vote. Heitkamp forty-three percent. That's was seventy nine percent of the voters in if they also give you an update on Georgia. Kemp the Republican with sixty eight percent of the vote in fifty four percent and Abrahams forty five percent. And in Florida dissatisfied. Gillam this is remarkable ninety nine percent of precincts reporting. The Santos has fifty percent Gillam has forty-nine percent. So it's interesting just to watch these things and see how they move. Yes. See how they flip around Nikki, you were telling us and this just pertains. You just looked at the the procedure for California in terms of counting those people who voted before the election. So a lot of people get those mail in ballots, and the counties can begin processing those seven days before the election. So those that's why when eight o'clock hits. We'll have some returns already, but people like me who actually walk it into the polling place and turn it in canvas is go around once eight o'clock hits. They'll collect those. And then they'll start comparing the the signature is that like you were mentioning Pat probably to make sure that you didn't double vote. Make sure it appears on the the voter registration form, and then those begin to be count. So although we are going to get an update on on California election results. Really, we won't know until after ten o'clock tonight. We're off the air beginning. Oh, yeah. I mean, especially because of the large number of people in the state that vote by mail in ballots unless it's a landslide. I'm sure there can be some projections youth, and there's gonna be I think so. No. Never know John after twenty sixteen I'm looking at here from today that it had it's now thirty three million Americans voted in the midterms with a surge of younger voters that's early voting early forty as of Tuesday early Tuesday morning, at least thirty three million people had voted world nationwide. Excuse me, that's a lot of voting in a midterm period. And then voting early before the polls even open during the you know, mail in or or early that's going to change some of the races in terms of the house. And I wonder you know, in some states when do they count those votes? There are some of these key races. I wonder the percentage she'd have to take the percentage of people that voted by mail that end right to the percentage of that some of these are very very close races. Right. Particularly this is impacting the house races. And I think we'll see that as the night goes on. Let's emphasize that appear. Here's all the Republicans will still control the Senate of the Democrats are on track control, the house of representatives. The first thing we're going to watch tomorrow morning. We'll be the statements that are made by Nancy Pelosi who is the speaker designate, and by the way, she is returning speaker as you all know, and what is said by Adam Schiff who will be the chairman of the house intelligence committee and most significant of all what Jerry Nadler will be the incoming chairman of the House Judiciary committee will say remember that when you are the majority you have the power of subpoena. So that many subpoenas that would have been issued had the Democrats control in terms of the current investigations were were not issued. They will be issued now. So if you ask me, yes, Donald Trump can claim a victory in terms of the Senate. Of course comes at a house was nuts. All right. So we have four minutes left to vote. If you're still in line at eight o'clock, you can still vote in California. And I will be bringing you all the local races in statewide races in California and.

Senate Georgia Senator Heidi Heitkamp California North Dakota Kevin Kramer nikki CNN Pat San Leandro House Judiciary committee Donald Trump chairman house intelligence committee Nancy Pelosi
"turtle mountain" Discussed on 1A

1A

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"turtle mountain" Discussed on 1A

"More about the process of working with tribes who were affected as understand you've worked with the turtle mountain band of Chippewa. The sue standing rock the spirit lake tribe and others. What's the process been like being kind of the interface between the tribe and the state governments? Well, I really haven't seen any interface between the Tri state government. You know, one of the things that the say North Dakota said was, you know, it's so easy to get a nine one one of physical address. And they said that and yet what they didn't do or what they didn't say was that we're going to require each and every individual member to call us it requests their own co address. Now, they know the tribes are are are giving up a tribal ID's. And if they really true and saying this wasn't a surgical removal of natives voting make it a sent that bulk nine one one address to the tribes who were doing the ID, and they never did that. Instead, they want each and every tribal member to call them and get the physical address. So, you know, I it's they're they're putting out something that is not true. You know, another thing I'd. Like to point out is if you go to North Dakota website and look up county auditors thirty three out of the fifty three county. Election officials do not use their physical address, but user post office boxes. I mean, that's what I'm saying. This is so ridiculous. They're they're, you know, saying we have to have a phys Ed just, but if you wanna get a hold of you gotta use their post office box. So this is just totally absurd. There was no reason for it. I'd never heard in this country where you voted in a primary getting ready for general. And all of a sudden, they changed the rules on you your ID at one time worked, but it won't work during the general OJ is North Dakota kind of unique in terms of the way that these voting access challenges are playing out or do you find the same kinds of issues cropping up wherever you go. We we find different issues, but the. End result is the basically denying or suppressing native vote one way or the other. You know, sometimes it goes to file a federal lawsuits on the Voting Rights Act in order to correct that in North Dakota. We just filed a temporary restraining order on the the supreme court's ruling because we found that they would give a physical address they would know the person in like one in family what they did is. They didn't give them were their house was they gave him the address of a bar that was about a two thousand mile from their house. And so had this person used that physical address knowing that that was the bar, and by the way, whoever did it, and if it was funny and stereotyping doing that kind of thing. I I don't find it humorous. But if they use that idea. In that. I that address under ide- knowing that it was the bar. They would have been committing voter fraud. And so basically what the we're seeing it is they're taking and giving the wrong addresses to begin with, and which would take in basically put all of the native Americans into category committing fraud. Which was never there in the beginning. Right right before we let you go. Jay's there one big thing that you would like to see more states do to make your work a little easier before we let you go. Yeah. I would like them to actually look at how their laws affect minority people people colored, and regardless I, you know, here's what I want people in the United States to know standing rock will vote spirit lake will vote per mountain will both the three billion will vote regardless of what barriers you've put in front of them. They will turn out and they will. So thank you OJ seamens, the executive director of four directions. OJ? Thanks very much for talking to us. I appreciate you..

North Dakota ID spirit lake Tri state government Chippewa United States executive director Jay
"turtle mountain" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"turtle mountain" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

"The conservative majority in the supreme court has now said this North Dakota law is good to go ahead and so now next month twenty two days from now in the general election Heitkamp seat up for the first time. If you show up in North Dakota with your tribal ID with your PO box on it, just like you've always used before you will be turned away and not allowed to vote. And so now. Twenty two days out from the election. One of the most critical races in the entire country which may determine whether or not the Senate is controlled by the Democrats or the Republicans, which honestly made decide everything and Republican, excuse me, an American politics for the next couple of years. Now on this short timeframe. Now there is a scramble underway to try to protect native Americans right to vote in that crucial race, the chairman of the standing rock, Sioux tribe, man named Mike faith. Put out this blistering statement, quote native Americans can live on the reservation without an address. They're living in accordance with the law and treaties at Nell. All of a sudden they can't vote. Our voices should be heard, and they should be heard fairly at the polls. Just like all other Americans quote, there is no good reason that appeal box address is not sufficient to vote. This law clearly discriminates against native Americans in North Dakota. Jamie Asher is the tribal chairman of the turtle mountain band of Chippewa Indians. That's actually the group that sued to stop the law. After the Republican led legislature, put it first in place a, he tells NPR that the law and its timing might actually have an unintended effect. Quote. It has already unified the tribes in North Dakota. Now we are working together. We are members of this US government and we are not gonna let you keep us down. We are going to figure out a way to go over the barriers that have been put in front of us and this unified movement moving forward with the tribes that's gonna jump percentages up with that native vote. That same tribal chairman told reporters today that he signed an executive order to provide free tribal ID's, new free tribal ideas to all members of his tribe, ideas that will be newly and quickly reconfigured to add street addresses that they've never had before. After signing that executive order to provide these.

North Dakota chairman executive Jamie Asher US Senate NPR Chippewa Indians Mike faith Sioux Twenty two days twenty two days
"turtle mountain" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"turtle mountain" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Nowadays, the catch ten to fifteen sharks. Ruth Alden hooks some species of sharks are teetering on extinction. If you're a fisherman fifty years ago, and you see what it is. Now, you'd say there's hardly any more fish, the situation is also bleak for the men who fished them and copy. The captain is their owner to me it's modern day slavery on this episode reveal we go on a hunt for an elusive fleet of sharp books. First this news. Live from NPR news in Culver City, California. I'm Shannon van Sant. Saudi Arabia is welcoming Turkey's decision to allow Saudi investigators to be part of the probe into the disappearance of a Saudi journalist. And President Trump says he will call Saudi Arabia's King Salman within the next twenty four hours about the disappearance of Jamal kashogi who has not been seen since entering the Saudi consulate an Istanbul on October second. The incident has increased scrutiny of the Trump administration's ties to Saudi Arabia, and what steps it might take next towards the longtime US ally. And Pierre's, Greg Mary spoke with all things considered President Trump has been talking about it and sending pretty mixed signals here. He says he wants to get to the bottom of this. But he's also saying he doesn't want to jeopardize these big contracts, which are mostly arms deals between the US and the Saudis the Saudis are our huge buyers of American weapons native. American communities in North Dakota are scrambling to make sure all residents will be able to vote in the general election next month. This after a supreme court decision this past week. That means many tribal ID's will no longer be accepted at polling places NPR's Camilla dominance reports. North Dakota's recently upheld voter ID law says ID cards must include a street address, but many native Americans on reservations don't have street addresses. So in the past Oliver ID's of always had the PO box. You know it. It's just been the way it's always been done. Jimmy is yours. The tribal chairman of the turtle mountain band of Chippewa Indians assure says his tribe is offering free replacement ideas that include addresses and working with other tribes to write letters to allow residents to vote. We are trying to hold on the barriers on our side. Because you know, those restrictions of the state is put down on us. He says the law has also helped unify the state's native tribes. Camille, domino, NPR news..

Saudi Arabia President Trump Saudi consulate NPR North Dakota US Ruth Alden Oliver ID Shannon van Sant Greg Mary Culver City Istanbul Jamal kashogi King Salman chairman California Camille Turkey
"turtle mountain" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"turtle mountain" Discussed on KTOK

"Securing America administration is striking a positive tone on North Korea. Even with reports, China and Russia had been violating sanctions against Pyongyang secretary of state, Mike Pompeo told Fox News sanctions will remain in place until denuclearization is achieved China and Russia. Both have stated their continued commitment to enforce the UN Security Council resolutions Pompeii, oh said leader Kim Jong UN's recent summit with the president of South Korea shows progress is being made for the first time. The nap north-and-south spoke about denuclearization in a material way, these are important steps there's much work to be done. And we have the patience and determination. And we believe the world does too to achieve this goal. The secretary of state said as possible there could be another summit in relatively Schroeder. I hope the two leaders get together again to continue to make progress on this incredible important issue for the entire in Washington. Rachel Sutherland, Fox News. Take a pause thousands of animals rescued from the floodwaters have hurricane Florence near the Cape. Fear river in North Carolina Keith banning of the North Dakota base. Turtle mountain rescue paddling a boat to get to a dog stuck on the roof of a flooded car. Better days. Yeah. Keith posting online video showing him picking up dog after dog and in Lumberton people for the ethical treatment of animal. Rescuers picking hundreds of animals to like a hound dog who is trapped on a kitchen counter by water. All those animals have to go somewhere. And we're seeing reports of packed animal shelters around the US Laura Brown of the animal refuge center in north Fort Myers, Florida, not knowing how bad storm surge could be things like that. We had no other choice but to step up. Now, these folks could use your help.

Fox News North Korea Kim Jong UN Keith UN Security Council Russia China Mike Pompeo Pyongyang North Dakota Rachel Sutherland South Korea America denuclearization Fort Myers Laura Brown Turtle mountain Lumberton Washington
"turtle mountain" Discussed on Code Switch

Code Switch

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"turtle mountain" Discussed on Code Switch

"Swear taylor lives with her younger sister d'alema's is in town visiting from belcourt quota and taylor and dilemma are letting me over here one of their favorite family discussions finding the right man to donate has firmed a taylor who's gay she really wants a baby and a coherent memo often i think see people around either on the reservation maybe even on my facebook and will call excitedly about maybe they're really handsome they seem elgible in some way a cheese who that young men has been making the abs but a baby making hips isn't enough so he's gotta be native bo what else do you want him to be oh my gosh the debbie smart smarter not the emphasis is on that native part and he doesn't even just gotta be native as taylor puts it he's gotta have a certain amount of native blood their tribes longevity depends on it and here's why for enrollment there are some tribes like the cherokee or chickasaw nations that use this thing called lineal dissent so their ancestors just have to be enrolled but for turtle mountain they use something else called blood quantum blood quantum simply is the amount of quote indian blood that an individual possesses this is elizabeth rule she is a phd candidate at brown university and she specializes in native american studies she told me that some tribes say you have to have a certain amount of quote indian blood to be considered a citizen and different tribes use blood quantum in enrollment in different ways like the navajo nation for instance says you have to have a quarter navajos blood to enroll that turtle mountain taylor's try.

taylor facebook brown university elizabeth
"turtle mountain" Discussed on Code Switch

Code Switch

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"turtle mountain" Discussed on Code Switch

"There are more than five hundred federally recognised native american tribes in the united states that's five hundred sovereign nations and citizens of those tribes those nations can get id cards as proof it's a picture idea it has her name your date a lot of times including my tribe it includes your blood quantum your fraction that fraction that shows just how much of a certain tribe you are and what that says and doesn't say about who you are and where you belong that's what we're getting into this week unquote switch i'm sure ian mighty summer ig genes on assignment this week if you're a recognized citizen of a tribe you can get access to that nation's resources that could mean living on the reservation or using tribal hospitals or health clinics fishing or hunting on your nation's land but those resources vary depending on the tribe and so do tribal laws federally recognize tribes can have their own courts and police departments they can maintain their own bridges and roads they can levy taxes they can also make their own rules to determine who gets to be a citizen and who doesn't its political and very very personal rt may catch how has the story i'm talking to a daughter and her mom in minneapolis minnesota i'm taylor pair in them the daughter of lima pair i'm lima appear taylor and dilemma our citizens of the turtle mountain band of chippewa indians they're sitting in taylor's house.

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"turtle mountain" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"turtle mountain" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"At freer weight in depended mortgage they can look at some of the scores from around the area tonight we will start things off looking at north dakota girls basketball as mine updates year bismarck st mary's they 101 to 56 win over turtle mountain that one is a final after half jamestown over dickinson thirty six to fourteen also another final in north dakota girls basketball as former north knock southwest at the packers really struggle and other lost by 40 points the cheyenne earlier earlier this week fact they lose to north sixty seven to 50th net might be north's first win of the season that might be a little bit of a troubling sign for the ladies over there at when everything the packers are doing there in their girls program north dakota boy's basketball so far one final end bismarck st mary's against turtle mountain that's an eighty four seventy eight final st mary's with the win north dakota boys hockey mina over jamestown fivetoone also that's in north dakota boys hockey by the way end of the sec it period might not up i do want to jamestown the ballgame is going on in north dakota boy's basketball i know the fuel games going on in some of those matchup today we'll keep you updated on the rest of those game also in north dakota girl's bat spinal shanley and at grand forks whatever play tonight that's another one will be keeping an eye on for you and other one would be the number three and four seeds in the edc fargo davies and west fargo's cheyenne we'll keep you updated on that game as well the top four teams shanley red river cheyenne and davies all playing each other tonight there in north dakota girls basketball on the minnesota side of the border often boy's basketball maple growth defeats moorhead tonight eighty seven to sixty seven minnesota girls basketball maple grove and more head tipping off here in just a few minutes as well riley polynesian trying to carry that more heads but steam as they are without sam hobby for a little i want to hear what happened to salmon how dave or our moorehead's transitioning tune in to borrow flake sports saturday will have carlsson head coach although the spots girls basketball team on the program talk about how they're moving on after move around with light without same high be released.

basketball bismarck st mary turtle mountain packers st mary jamestown west fargo dave moorehead north dakota minnesota moorhead carlsson
"turtle mountain" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"turtle mountain" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"Welcome into the discovery benefit post game show here on am 1100 of leg our final score today forty two fourteen westbound go cheyenne with the win over four go north listening to aim 1100 the flake deal worth four go moorhead you ask say a couple of the finals fouryear alindo edgeley come puts than under the undefeated season four old growth 28 the 10year final there defending state champions gate another win bismarck high beats fargo's south and gives the bruins their first loss of the year forty one to fourteen the end of the third quarter dg f the deacons of shanley rather up fifty six to fourteen on turtle community the gif beat loses the pequette lakes party me thirty five to seven so the number ten demon estate goes down tonight against pequette lake a little bit of a surprise about the what lakes a good team there as well dg iv loses their thirty five seven again the final there also davies on top of grand forks central fifty four to twelve at the end of that game west vargo winds again thirty find the twelve over red river also these spots on top of thirty four to twenty one with 458 up to go in the fourth quarter there in a final now from shanley the deakins when sixty three to fourteen they're up fifty six the nothing at hafren that game is a slaughter of turtle mountain community tonight for the shanley deacons they still undefeated now at five under head coach troy mad and also a final fouryear from baseball the minnesota twins with a 73 win over the detroit tigers today another win for the twins move that the while curley back out a little bit further will give you an update on the angels score here as well as a look through nine see the angels i believe maybe not naturally today don't see a score for the not they are playing the houston astros 800 in the bottom of the seven so the angels win will still be two and a half games ahead of them if the astros can win that game a knock off the angels than the missile at once to wake up three and a half games clear in the wild card race come tomorrow morning couple of stats for you from our game here ten nights are things off with fargo north the final stance.

bruins shanley red river baseball minnesota detroit tigers curley houston astros angels fargo pequette lakes pequette lake davies turtle mountain troy mad fouryear 10year
"turtle mountain" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"turtle mountain" Discussed on KGO 810

"To to heat these folks moving in and then i visited a to other congregations where the the response responses very different these people are saying is has followers of jesus we believe in welcoming and the stranger and and these people from syria clearly are fleeing in a life threatening situations and of course we should do our best to make until welcome in our community one of the one of the captors held up this little yellow plastic bowl filled with coins and and said you know one of his cog members of his congregational little five year old girl had had collected the coins to pass along to this new family that she knew was arriving so we sometimes stereotype people from other parts of the country and believe that they all think a certain way but but what i found with a lot of diversity in a lot of compassion yes and then another revolution that i'm happy to hear about has to do with fracking that there are some communities that i would not necessarily would have thought would be rejecting fracking but they are tell us what they're doing well i found a places all over the country where the communities are doing their best to keep the fracking out in with success sometimes not but the story that i i was most interested in in north dakota the turtle mountain chippewa reservation the an elder from the reservation together to women and said it's it's the women's responsibility in our tradition to take care of the water so we need to understand what this fracking thing is it's coming to our state and and they got together and did some research and get very alarmed at the implications where what it could do to their water but also what could do to their way of life to have a big oil boom and all the oil workers coming in and pollution that results but also the human trafficking that has come with it and and crime in some parts of north dakota.

syria north dakota oil boom oil workers human trafficking turtle mountain five year