18 Burst results for "Turing Award"

"turing award" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"turing award" Discussed on The Changelog

"If you want to become an author I would suggest just one of the things that you do from like age full lease you read yeah and you read a new read and that I think is incredibly important to the ability to write. You know you see you see tricks. You see you know the more you read. The more you understand how people are organizing their thoughts on paper and everything else now. I'm not talking about developers reading books here under developed was reading coat and trying you read a variety of code so they go back and they look at <hes> code written in different languages and try to work out. You know how that works why that works. What is it work the way it works so I would like to see the the idea of <hes> teaching tied into this idea of learning how people did things in the past reading their code and then discussing okay? Why did that happen gives you a good example widest C.? Plus plus have the pre and post increment operators plus plus and minus minus right. Well yeah the reason and it's it's kind of weird right the fact you can write <unk> Equal Star C. P. Plus plus which takes a character point two d references it to return the character and then increments by one right well the reason is that the machines and bell labs the repeated peas ps and the P._d._p.. Has Seven different addressing modes one of the well to them our pre and post increment addressed you reference and so that maps directly onto the hardware and it's like Oh okay so that's why it's there now the then you can ask yourself okay. Is that something I really need to think about going forward. Do I need that online or is it just a convenience that happened to be there. You know same with Goto considered harmful. You have to understand Stan. I mean people will go to considered harmful. An entire languages have been written without Goto based on the title of that paper but the title that paper actually wasn't the title of that paper. It was a letter written to see see him. The original title it was something totally different and the editors changed it to go to considered harmful because it was like more sexy as a title Click Beatty Click Beatty. That's the word you want. The actual context goto considered harmful as <unk> as a letter is actually to program proving the fact that if you have a goto statement is really really hard to write a proofs of programs and back then the idea was that we should be able to mathematically prove opera uh-huh correct there were people spend their careers working on program proving now we still have that in some very very strict domains light logic design <hes> but that is no longer relevant to us and and yet we still carry around you know all of these things that we've received based on headlines go to considered harmful oestre increment and don't really know why we do it. Here's one that I learned globals are evil. Global Variables tables are evil. I learned that in college by Denver never it's almost like it's a cargo cult. I never learned why is just like a maximum. This is Tai you should you should read a book. We have a whole section on. Let me get back to that for a second talking talking about the the go-to in these old old letters and old articles in old addresses we pick up sort of the wrong ones right we capitalized on Goto considered harmful and made a thing out of that but what about <hes> was was it Dykstra who had the the Turing Award lecture about the very humble programmer now is a that is a critical piece of early literature and you talk about things that haven't changed this was nineteen seventy seventy two somebody can google it while rambling <hes> and he makes very important point that complexity will overwhelm us if we don't take a very humble very measured approach and it's been thirty forty years and everyone everyone present company included has ignored this wonderful advice..

Stan Dykstra Tai google Turing Award Denver programmer thirty forty years
Three Pioneers in Artificial Intelligence Win Turing Award

KCBS Radio Morning News

01:08 min | 1 year ago

Three Pioneers in Artificial Intelligence Win Turing Award

"And speaking of tech Allison people, call it the Nobel prize of computing in the turing award is out this morning. The winners are actually three of them. This time all of them born in Europe. London. Born Geoffrey Hinton, and then two men from Paris, Luke Kuhn and Yoshua Ben GIO. In fact, Coon was a student of Geoffrey Hinton, all of this around neural networks and artificial intelligence, the turing award was introduced back in nineteen sixty six includes a million dollar prize, and those three scientists will share it hidden was out there often, quite alone on the whole idea of neural networks, he told the New York Times in an interview that he and his graduate advisers PHD advisor would sometimes fight over it. And he said we met once a week sometimes it's ended in a shouting match. Sometimes not. But the idea of neural networks is that you can take a mathematical system that it can learn how to do specific things by looking at lots of data one classic example is going through zillions of phone calls. And that way the system can learn to recognize the spoken word. So the touring award out today. Geoffrey Hinton, young Koon and Yoshua Benji. Oh, by the way, these days Hinton is at Google and the Coon works at

Geoffrey Hinton Nobel Prize Coon Europe Yoshua Benji Luke Kuhn Ben Gio New York Times Google London Advisor Paris Koon Million Dollar
"turing award" Discussed on The CyberWire

The CyberWire

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"turing award" Discussed on The CyberWire

"And perhaps best known for his invention of public key cryptography in cooperation with whitfield defeat and ralph merckel in two thousand fifteen he won the prestigious turing award along with whitfield dippy he's the author of a number of publications the most recent of which he co authored with his wife dorothy titled a new map for relationships creating true love at home and peace on the planet in march nineteen seventy five the national bureau of standards as it was then called promulgated or put forth proposed data encryption standard for commercial actually for governmental unclassified use but for sensitive data and of course it's going to become a commercial standard as well with dippy and i my colleague in crime partner crime and i realized that the fifty six bit key size was at best marginal it's kind of like having a thousand combinations for a combination lock it's grateful walking up your bike but not so great for walking up one hundred million dollars worth of information and so we wrote some nice letters to nbs which they pretty much nord and after about six months and now we're getting toward the later part of nineteen seventy five we started to get more pointed and we realized that this was in fact not a not a bug but a feature and say didn't wanna publicly available standard that they could not break and so we started to contact congress the media trying to create some interest in solving what was fundamentally a political problem and too high level and say employee's flew out from maryland to meet with us and told us you're wrong but pres be quiet if you continue talking this way you're going to cause grave harm to national security of course that makes no sense and they were saying right with they're saying is you're right but if you keep talking this way you're gonna cause grave harm to national security their concern was that we were in telling the american public american industry and even parts of the american government how to protect their secrets better we were also telling criminals foreign governments terrorists had to protect their secrets as well it's an unavoidable trade off and so i had to figure out what to do take me through that decision making process because as you describe it in the book there's a good bit of nuance here oh it was quite amazing yes so i went home that night to figure out the right thing to do my intellect was telling me the right thing was to go public with this that nsa should not make a decision all by itself in secret about what was best for the country because they were an interested party and on the other hand i had and also the united states was the most comp is was in is the most computerized nation in the world whereas in those days the soviet union our main adversary had almost no computer especially in commercial use personal use so i went home to figure out the right thing to do 'cause these nsa people were telling me just the opposite and while i'm trying to figure out the right thing to do an idea pops into my head forget about what's right and wrong you've got a tiger by the tail you'll never have a better chance to make an impact on the world to be famous infamous whatever run with it now who would want to jeopardize national security for those reasons that would be egotistical and so at the time i actually now i liken it to a movie where you know the devils on an actor shoulder in the angels on the other side whispering in his ear sure that was the devil whispering in my shoulder and at the time i thought i was able to brush the devil off my shoulder and make a rational decision to go public that was the right thing to do but five years later i realized that i had fooled myself and while i did make the right to vision that we do know that because admiral bobby inman who's director of nsa time has since said in an interview about four or five years ago that it was the right decision i realized that i myself about my motivation there's another part of the book where you describe interpersonal communication you had interaction with admiral bobby inman he was the director of an essay in the late seventies.

ralph merckel whitfield five years one hundred million dollars fifty six bit six months
"turing award" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"turing award" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"More compute power and i think people just didn't realize that it was probably just a bridge too far initially and people were not thinking let's build the system that does this you know it feigenbaum who shared the turing award for work he had done a way back when a knowledgebased ai systems made an interesting observation to me he said what's what's happened with the rise up and she and learning is rather than cognition which is where a bunch of the people were it's focused on recognition of extremely complex patterns after all deep learning is basically statistical analysis of things right at a very deep way it's based on recognition and what's happened is used to be recognition was regarded as a small part of the space and now the deep learning techniques are making recognition based approaches more and more and more of the solution to artificial intelligence problems and that's changing how we think about the field makes it interesting yeah and i mean i think about map reduce map reduce was you hear about it on the first day they say okay this is a pretty useful perils ation technique but over time we realize how broadly applicable it is how powerful it it is now flexible it is and i think if you are making the bulk ace for machine learning it's that oh we can take these fairly straightforward classification statistical inference techniques and go very far with them the barricades would be that we're engineers were may be getting overly excited about technology that's showing signs of working but of course need to be aware of our own human tendency towards bubble thank gang and irrational exuberance how do you guard against that how do you know that you're you're not getting irrationally exuberant about the developments in machine learning a well i think there is some irrational exuberance of atmos.

"turing award" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"turing award" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"More compute power and i think people just didn't realize that it was probably just a bridge too far initially and people were not thinking let's build the system that does this you know it feigenbaum who shared the turing award for work he had done a way back when a knowledgebased ai systems made an interesting observation to me he said what's what's happened with the rise up and she and learning is rather than cognition which is where a bunch of the people were it's focused on recognition of extremely complex patterns after all deep learning is basically statistical analysis of things right at a very deep way it's based on recognition and what's happened is used to be recognition was regarded as a small part of the space and now the deep learning techniques are making recognition based approaches more and more and more of the solution to artificial intelligence problems and that's changing how we think about the field makes it interesting yeah and i mean i think about map reduce map reduce was you hear about it on the first day they say okay this is a pretty useful perils ation technique but over time we realize how broadly applicable it is how powerful it it is now flexible it is and i think if you are making the bulk ace for machine learning it's that oh we can take these fairly straightforward classification statistical inference techniques and go very far with them the barricades would be that we're engineers were may be getting overly excited about technology that's showing signs of working but of course need to be aware of our own human tendency towards bubble thank gang and irrational exuberance how do you guard against that how do you know that you're you're not getting irrationally exuberant about the developments in machine learning a well i think there is some irrational exuberance of atmos.

"turing award" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"turing award" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Thank you three four this wonderful contextual information you know one of the things that struck me is that it'd be really great for us to take a step back and dr chewy you did quite a bit of this in your presentation but uc berkeley professor dave patterson who's also the 2017 winner of the alan turing award for designing energy efficient ships in the nineteen eighty s recently said in an interview that we are in the midst of the next industrial revolution but not just that that it's happening more rapidly than any other so dr chu we we have a graphic that we'd like to bring up i'd like to take a step back and talking specifically about the industrial revolutions of the past and why this one might be different than the others because of the rapid nature of it so behind me here we're taking a look at the seventeen eighty s beginning with the the water power and steam power machines and the revolutions with farming kind of talk us through a little bit of this to where we are today i'm only an amateur economic historian so i'll do my best here and i often forget you know people talk about the fourth industrial revolution i what are the first three try to remember what they are look i mean when we moved from animals providing the power for things to machines pit providing the power for things right i mean that was a remarkable thing that happened you saw steam etcetera as power that previously we had farm and other animals doing the next phase of that was coupling a little bit of a management innovation particularly around assembly lines etc with electrical power you had to change the way the factory was organized because originally you when know you know mechanical power distributed through factory it actually didn't work the same way because you would have one source of power trying to power everything versus electrical motors at every station.

professor dave patterson dr chu
"turing award" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"turing award" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Thank you three four this wonderful contextual information you know one of the things that struck me is that it'd be really great for us to take a step back and dr chewy you did quite a bit of this in your presentation but uc berkeley professor dave patterson also the 2017 winner of the alan turing award for designing energy efficient ships in the nineteen eighty s recently said in an interview that we are in the midst of the next industrial revolution but not just that that it's happening more rapidly than any other so dr chewy we we have a graphic that we like to bring up i'd like to take a step back and talking specifically about the industrial revolutions of the past and why this one might be different than the others because of the rapid nature of it so behind me here we're taking a look at the seventeen eighty s beginning with the water power and steam power machines and the revolutions with farming kind of talk us through a little bit of this to where we are today i'm only an amateur economic historian so i'll do my best here and i often forget you know people talk about the fourth industrial revolution i drove try to remember what they are look i mean when we move from animals providing the power for things to machines pit providing the power for things right i mean that was a remarkable thing that happened you saw steam it cetera as power that previously we had farm and other animals doing the next phase of that was coupling a little bit of a management innovation particularly around assembly lines etc with electrical power you had to change the way the factory was organized because originally when you know mechanical power distributed through a factory it actually didn't work the same way because you would have one source of power trying to power everything versus electrical motors at every station in terms of numbers of people who are affected because countries are bigger et cetera but as i documented earlier the pace of adoption of technologies i think is gated more by people and we don't evolve that fast so whether or not things are fast they're sort of depends on the way you're measuring the realities are though and you all each of you stepped here and really you.

professor dave patterson
"turing award" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"turing award" Discussed on Recode Decode

"It's kind of narrow but general purpose technology and we have to figure out how to build machines for those and the company's critical to this are go well well invidia is an idea that is the reigning champion that's where people go google you know i helped write papers about the hugh hugh that first generation i think pretty successful it was you know at a time in normal computing if you're like twice as fast you kill everybody the marketplace we said that the pew was like thirty eight times better that's kind of amazing numbers but because it's a new area in its does that one thing well you can get these fantastic advantages but i think you'll see all the may i think apple amazon facebook will all microsoft or all investing in this technology because it appears the range of applicable for deep learning is quite broad on very complex tasks traditionally computers have not been able to do explain one of those give an example for image recognition is probably the best one it's one weakened now we can have a program which is better at classifying breeds of dogs and cats than anybody but an ak c certified master right which is absolutely amazing and self driving cars and they really depend on this ability to interpret scenes which are not easy to interpret frightened pures and then learn it again and again and leonard again and again right how do you make you know i don't want to dumb down this because he was so highly until jim but the idea that it's dangerous that these these new pune you mean the argument the stephen itself.

hugh hugh facebook microsoft pures leonard jim stephen apple amazon
"turing award" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"turing award" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Maybe ten or twenty years ago it got kind of dull because didn't any idea had until would still go ahead and they knew how to make a lot of money just it'd be faster this year now it's really unclear so i mean that's rise learning that's a big piece of it because they're incredibly computation intensive tasks right and that was one of the stumbling blocks we had to overcome in order to get machine learning to work we had to throw a thousand times more hardware power than we thought we had to throw at the problem and all of a sudden you've got these machines doing these comparatively special purpose tasks but very different than traditional general purpose computers so you can rethink how do you design a machine to do that function very fast virtual reality augmented reality you can think about all these different intents do you imagine that we need to break through to get to that correct from what i understand and especially with the massive amounts of data that that are boeing in yet well we need we need to do things differently and i think researchers love it when we have to do things differently yes we need as innovative ideas you know maybe risk ideas for yeah it's a discontinuity something you've heard recently that been like well i've heard all kinds of living computers oh no i don't know it used to be that exotic transistors are pretty silken transistors are pretty mazing technologies even slowing down and they are going to get a little better but we've been like it's like building we want to build a building a different way we don't necessarily have to get rid of bricks say go so but we've in the past always been a bad idea to special purpose architectures that was like you know the kiss of death because you do all that energy and then how many you can sell how many people but now we have no choice with this ending of moore's law scaling there's no other choice we have to do special purpose architectures and so the excitement of machine learning.

moore boeing twenty years
"turing award" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"turing award" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Today's show is brought to you by betterment it's tax season which means a great time to think about your finances as a whole are you ready for the deadlines coming your way are you saving as much on taxes as possible and are there any accounts that could be working harder for you maybe you have an old 401k sitting around high fees on that account can drain your savings according to an independent study rolling over to a betterment ira could mean sixty percent lower fees betterment is a modern solution to an age old problem how to save for a better retirement investing involves risk but license experts betterment will help you develop a personalized plan to make sure you have the retirement you deserve find out today if you're on track to hit your savings and investing goals and when you need it betterman has the tools and guidance to help you get on track rico decode listeners can get up to one year managed free for more information visit betterment dot com slash decode that's betterment dot com slash decode we're back with alphabet chairman john hennessy has also kind of a good academic apparently and google distinguish engineer patterson who apparently teaches people some things they won the turing prize what is the winning of the touring prize you've had massive is it just a banquet what happened me what happens yeah what is here in san francisco at the palace hotel june twenty third they'll be ceremony where they'll have come on the stage show video in hansa check good yeah and we it's tradition that the turing award winners prepare lecture talking about the state of the field where it's going to happen i give me a little preview both of what's the state of the field dave okay well we've collaborated on we're going to share the talk since we co author things the title is a new golden age of computer architecture and i think the four things that we think that part of the golden age are what is called today's demane specific architectures which are like google's tepe you you know what that is the for hartford deep learning from she winning security security is embarrassing you know we think hardware people need to rise to the challenge to about it there's this idea of an open i talked about these vocabularies being there's idea of an open vocab.

john hennessy patterson san francisco dave google chairman engineer hartford sixty percent one year 401k
"turing award" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"turing award" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Yeah so it in berkeley the the classes you know we have i didn't know we could handle for digit class size i didn't know the system would work but we have introductory courses in computer science with more than the thousand students so students are voting with their feet and this is happening at campuses across the country it's not just not not enough but there's not enough well we're her universities are trying to figure out how to get out to everybody right we've got a scale we've got to figure out how to hire faculty you know it's not just at the big name places the entire hierarchy that's got to figure out how to build people when we get back we're and talking about that more especially about diversity and trying to figure out who's gonna be xining the future because i don't know if you're going to continue but maybe you will and where it's going get back from a word from our sponsors and then we'll be back with alpha chairman john hennessy and google distinguished engineer your distinguish engineer dave patterson after this today's show is brought to you by hbo silicon valley is back for another season and another pivot this time founder richard hendrix turns his sights on launching a decentralized internet is so much focus on data tracking and privacy on the web this latest turn of events field purely relevant but this should come as no surprise the comedy has made a name for it self with two real jokes about startup culture it's the shows attention to detail that feeds the comedy every references on point not to mention the fantastic emmy award winning cameos from people like me i'm still waiting for that emmy but i really enjoyed being on it including giving gab in belsen advice on how to run hooley get new episodes of silicon valley sundays at ten pm on hbo.

berkeley dave patterson richard hendrix emmy award hooley chairman john hennessy google distinguished engineer engineer founder
"turing award" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"turing award" Discussed on Recode Decode

"No never thought about it don't know why but took it and i loved it you know the the your ideas and your mind come alive and that's screen and that was just exciting and so i think we want to give students that opportunity program can do that building hardware can do that but building things and see your ideas come alive is something you know in cyberspace we can do in the curriculum that's you know you can't can't do that in civil engineering probably yeah but but it is so it's this incredibly exciting stimulating opportunity that we can do educators yeah i think dave's right i mean computering is about building things i think we teach principles right we teach students had it use obstruction so that we can build really complex offices right in the scale of the software systems we build now is phenomenal if you tried to do that thirty years ago we didn't have to tools to do it so we try to teach them principles of obstruction organization so that they can do that how how test a large piece of software because certainly a lot of software that gets released his buggy we teach some principles of security so that they understand issues of security and privacy which has become certainly vastly more and what are the challenges now facing teaching from your perspective the number the popularity popularity it's well at stanford now it's the number one major right it's the number one major for women even which just happened this past year which is the mazing amazing.

dave stanford thirty years
"turing award" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"turing award" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Voices efficiency i think as we move into this next era where we're talking about devices that may have prospered in them that may last for ten years with a single battery powers going to matter lot wanna get into that section but so you created this and are you billionaires i have a salary john john's invested better then i have one of his ex students who has a lot of money as wondered why that you did you take advantage of that do you think of these me i pretty much stayed professor i i believe industry i have i you know i think when i was young i had this strong belief in the public university teaching you know we were fulfilling the american dream and i i just had this little speech i gave somebody asked about a startup as i'm i'm going to be a professor it wouldn't have been that bad if i'd take a couple years off when i was young i was kind of like strong willed and i'm an academic and that's what i'm gonna do yeah i'm several companies in i starting with jim clark with with silicon graphics consultant to and then then i started a company that built the early wifi chips on thera so yeah so they built wi fi chips early on so i've done the entrepreneurship thing a few times and and then i joined the google board in two thousand voluntary position yeah that was later that was lay before they went public that six months right that's right that's right i met them in ninety eight.

john john professor jim clark consultant wi google six months ten years
"turing award" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"turing award" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Exactly clean slate clean slate i let's when you when you taught in a certain in any discipline in any academic you have you have we were young graduate students are completely open they don't have all the inhibition it's they don't have they don't have a history of failures right they don't know all the times it didn't work and we were young and optimistic you know we thought if our were solid white why not right and so what happened with this so you did these graduates programs coming up with greenfield approach cleans day hover you wanted varies it what were you what were you going to what did you think it would lead to the new processing i actually thought we would publish our papers people would read them data was pretty good they'd say oh we should do this and that didn't happen one of the things that happened is because controversial there were series of the base the jonah nonparticipant from coast to coast and i think i think i remember johnson's time by the third debate i think people thought okay there's some ideas here maybe because we john actually wrote the paper that had the scientific explanation i think maybe by then we had it maybe not now i think even later even in that okay so i think one of the one of the things that happened for example is digital equipment corporation actually had a west coast app at that some of those people had worked on our project and up the ideas but they in turn couldn't get the east coast to do is to accept the ideas so in the end what happened was of famous computer pioneer came to see me and said you have started company gordon bell.

johnson gordon bell john
"turing award" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"turing award" Discussed on Recode Decode

"And we're not to figure out what how to repair it in the paper was rejected the rejection was this is a stupid waiting sign microprocessors well that kind of i kind of if you're going to do it it's going to have bugs and it is stupid so there must be there must be a better way so we started it out with a series of four graduate courses where he kind of investigated the ideas and eventually bill chips out of it remarkably enough to figure out what one of the things yeah one of the things i did when i it's unusual for an assistant professors sabbatical it was fortunate but unusual and so it gave me a chance to think about what can you do well in the university out so well and academics don't have real deadlines except for course right courses are absolutely gonna start and stop so i thought well why don't i tie the research to the courses and then we'd have deadlines and able to make steady progress and so that's why that was the trick or that was the idea that we're trying to do and then in i think in the first quarter or second quarter john we were both funded by darpa and that's where the name comes from darpa that time funded high risk high reward research so we thought if he called it risks they had to fund explain what it actually stands for john and then to this is how you named it they wanted to all right just instruction set computer i think the notion of trying to target the instruction set for fast implementation efficient implementation really is probably the wrong word coward because i think today we care as much about energy as we care about about execution speed and i think that was the key thing lots of things were changing it was a time when a lot of the computer industry was changing we were moving from writing in something which remember unix just coming age the first operating system written in a high level language as opposed to in the sembler which and of course that influenced art are thinking as well and i began the same way david with the brainstorming class of graduate students just to say what should we do.

john david
"turing award" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"turing award" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Well they have to read more words that they're simple but the question was how many more words would they have to read and how fast could you read them and it turned out the risk which was reduced of a cab yele is we had to read about twenty percent more words but we could read them four times faster so it was like a factor of three win talk about the implications that you got new wrote a book together i you were making these innovations so talk about that process of how you work together well we started we were running a research groups which people think okay burke lynn stanford compete at the truth is we were both on the same side of the line a world lot of people who were naysayers didn't believe our technology the naysayers argument the naysayer argument of varied from academic i think the the one that was repeated most often was this these are academic projects when you scale them up to be real computers all the advantages that these papers have written about will go away we were we were cherry picking we were just taking the easy of the problem in exaggerating the benefit it couldn't it couldn't be it couldn't be transferred industry and scaled up to be ring computer when you put in memory or you put in floating point all the advantage there was also a philosophical argument that led to a lot of anger which was the belief of these bigger richard vocabularies is the hardware would be quote unquote closer to the software that's so maybe all the problems we were having with software with projects failing filled with bugs was because the hardware wasn't very good and if we just had a richer vocabulary a bigger ritual it's offered easier and then these two idiots come along and say the opposite of not only.

lynn stanford twenty percent
"turing award" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"turing award" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Explain many computers i there was a large system big big big beta iraq's of hardware design using technical bits lies so you'd have one chip might implement four bits of nad or another forbids of and they were you know they sold for one hundred thousand two billion dollars basically decks kiss peace space right the vaccine eleven seven eighty their big machine that was a big success yeah sulfur two hundred fifty thousand to five hundred thousand dollars today maybe one tenth as fast as the slowest laptop you would right right so the concept was around around this and not anything else so where'd you to me that newer here at competing universities yeah we're both infect people with a story risk game from is once we hit upon the ideas of this different way to design computers which is explainable but okay we'll do that so in software talks to hardware there's a vocabulary you talked to it and the minicomputer and mainframe eras the prevailing wisdom was that you want these very rich vocabularies you know five dollar words polycyclic words and that's how the right way to do it and john is idea was well in this fastchanging microprocessors let's do the opposite let's have a very small very simple cab yaari model celebic words and then the question was going to be how fast could we execute those words how how fast you can think of is reading the words how fast could computers read those words.

john iraq one hundred thousand two billi five hundred thousand dollars five dollar four bits
"turing award" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"turing award" Discussed on KCBS All News

"In the north bay tomorrow can't rule out an isolated shower in san jose or hayward or redwood city by the farther north you go the better chance you're gonna get hit by a couple of showers highs tomorrow brisk only in the mid to upper fifties but mainly rain free south of the golden gate can't say that for the weekend scattered showers everywhere throughout the bay area on saturday scattered showers everywhere throughout the bay area on sunday and chile still with highs only in the low sixties at most next week it all changes here comes the dry pattern once again like these patterns have been holding on for four weeks we've had four weeks of wet will we get four weeks of dry i don't know that but i do know we're gonna get one week of dried a minimum all of next week looking sunny warmer and completely dry i'm meteorologist paul the kpi in kcbs forecast we have traffic and weather together on the eighth on all news one of six nine and am seven forty kcbs holly mcdade editing this hour is our newswatch continues to their computer pioneers are sharing the 2017 turing award the industry's version of the nobel prize and a one hundred actually a one million dollar award as kcbs reporter holly quantel us the para credited with paving the way for smaller faster microprocessors that a smartphone thank john hennessy and david paterson hennessy was at stanford and eventually became university president patterson was at cow the two created reduced instruction set computer or risk the basis for nearly all chips today on john and i did this thirty five years ago it was extremely controversial it was like talking about evolution versus divine intervention and there were debates from coast to coast about whether we're dealing with heresy and was sitting back computing or was the future three decades of watching.

san jose nobel prize john hennessy david paterson hennessy stanford president patterson hayward chile paul holly mcdade reporter holly quantel four weeks one million dollar thirty five years three decades one week