35 Burst results for "Tulsa"

Prominent US Pastor Shocks Congregation With Controversial Views on Homosexuality

The Officer Tatum Show

01:45 min | Last month

Prominent US Pastor Shocks Congregation With Controversial Views on Homosexuality

"And so to kind of piggyback off of what I was saying, I don't know why I had to go down this path today, but I just feel like, you know, God has lead me to have this conversation. I want to pay a clip from a prominent passage. This is probably one of the biggest pastors in the United States of America out of Tulsa, Oklahoma, transformation church. I want you to hear their pastor Michael Todd. And I want you to hear him give reference to his thoughts about homosexuality in the church, wrote a clip. But no, honestly, I wish God would have made it so much simpler than it was like a, B, C or D like Frick. Yo, I'm serious. As like, so what do you think about game? I don't know. And you're welcome at transformation church. Trans is in the title. Transformation. Think about, you know, what it means to say something like that. You say somebody asks my pastor about gay marriage, a freak. I don't know. Do you think Jesus would have said that? You think Jesus would have said, I don't know. You don't, you don't have to know. You just have to know what God said about it. And then you say, this is what I believe. My lord and save you who knows more than I do, direct line of connection with the father in heaven, the father gave him the worst to say which articulated this, that's what I believe. In my finite mind, I don't understand everything. But I'm a lean not until my own understanding. But in all your ways acknowledge him and he shall direct your path. It's really not that hard.

Michael Todd Jesus United States Of America Tulsa, Oklahoma Today ONE GOD
4 Most Useful Smart Contract Debugging Tools

Quillhash

00:40 sec | 3 months ago

4 Most Useful Smart Contract Debugging Tools

"1 p.m. Friday March 3rd, 2023. For most useful smart contract debugging tools. Read time for minutes this guide can help you find that nasty bug troubling you and the tools to rectify them. Debugging is crucial to any software development cycle humans always make errors. That's why we are unbeatable we make errors and learn from them. Debugging is a process of figuring out where our code is lagging, fixing that. For most useful smart contract debugging tools read more. The postal strand form most useful smart contract debugging Tulsa strump appeared first on blog quill hash.

Tulsa
Sasser scores 25, No. 2 Houston beats Tulsa 80-42

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 3 months ago

Sasser scores 25, No. 2 Houston beats Tulsa 80-42

"Marcus sasser scored 25 points as second ranked Houston improved to 23 and two with an 80 to 42 win over Tulsa. Sasser shot ten of 17 from the field and he made 5 three pointers. Houston head coach Kelvin Sampson. We've only lost two games. We probably should have lost some more. We're lucky lucky to only have two losses. Teams don't usually go 23 and two. But again, you know, losses never really bothered me that much. Emmanuel sharp finished with 13 points for Houston while Tremont Mark finished with 9 points and 9 rebounds. Adam spelling Houston

Marcus Sasser Houston Sasser Kelvin Sampson Tulsa Emmanuel Sharp Tremont Mark Adam
Tulsans Set Guinness World Record for Largest Pizza Party

The BOB & TOM Show Free Podcast

01:16 min | 4 months ago

Tulsans Set Guinness World Record for Largest Pizza Party

"University of Tulsa and the Oklahoma pizza restaurant teamed up to break the game this world record largest pizza party. Who doesn't love a pizza party? And other news for 6th graders. No, you can have a pizza party for big boys. You get beer there too. It's fun. Mike Bosh. You know you can get beer at Chuck E. Cheese. Can you really? Yeah, but they have a limit. You can also, you have to be careful with this, but you can also steal a kid. You know that? They make it hard. Yeah. They have that whole idea. They tried to do the promotion coming, get two pictures of beer, steal a kid every Wednesday, but it got a little dicey. How many tickets is that one? I love Chuck E. Cheese. Mike posh owner of the angelini's pizza chain took 8 months to organize the ragged hamper, the biggest beat of her baby. What toppings? Every single one of Boucher's restaurant worked together. Oh. Okay, so it wasn't a pizza party at one location. It wasn't. It wasn't? No. No, no, no, the issue was. No, no, it's a pizza party at one location all the restaurants made the pizzas and they brought them to the table. Still. Okay. No, no. One single location.

Oklahoma Pizza Restaurant Mike Bosh Chuck E. Cheese University Of Tulsa Mike Posh Angelini Boucher
How You Can Support Prison Fellowship's Angel Tree Campaign

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:25 min | 6 months ago

How You Can Support Prison Fellowship's Angel Tree Campaign

"Hey guys, I want to talk to you about prison fellowship we're in day two of Mike's annual prison fellowship angel tree campaign where your donations will make it possible for boys and girls all over America who have a mom or dad in prison to get to experience the blessing of a personalized message and the gospel through the angel tree program of our friends at the nonprofit, prison fellowship. Incredibly, over one and a half million Americans have a mom or dad that's in prison and some of them ask themselves, does my mommy or daddy still love me? Do they even remember me anymore? It's heartbreaking. But that won't happen in Tulsa, Oklahoma, where the local angel tree volunteers know how important their mission is in this year's campaign. It's really devastating for a child to not have their parents around during Christmas time or to know that somebody loved them. 'cause that's really the key. They need to know that somebody loved them. Just having that connection with their parent and sending that message from the incarcerated parent. And to get that on Christmas morning, love dad or love mom is one of the greatest gifts you could ever give a child. So Thanksgiving is this Thursday and then before you can blink Christmas will be here. You can still make an eternal difference in the lives of these children when you support angel tree by going to Mike online dot com, click on the angel tree banner at the top of the page and make a donation.

Mike Tulsa America Oklahoma
"tulsa" Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

05:44 min | 7 months ago

"tulsa" Discussed on Sound Opinions

"All right, turn your little buddy, this whole island is bewitched. And my friend oh my. Friend. Come on. You remember, we were shipwrecked together. Yeah, mama. Welcome to this bonus episode of sound opinions. I'm Jim D regattas, my partner is Greg cot. And if you want to be the first to hear these bonus podcasts, become a sound opinions member on Patreon, just like Alexander Ryan. Thank you, Alexander. It really does help keep this show going. Everyone who supports us on Patreon at any level. Now, as you know, me and mister cod have so much music stuck in our brains. You never know what we're going to want to talk about and play for you on any given day, placing it in the proverbial desert island jukebox as a song for all time for us if we were to be stuck. Jukebox getting pretty full, right? But it's never full enough. So I meager to hear what you've got. Give us a little hint. Well, Jim, I came back with many, many thoughts in my head after my recent visit to Tulsa, Oklahoma, ostensibly for a wedding of a family friend, but man, I learned a lot there and I'm going to lay some knowledge on you. I went to Tulsa when I was doing a little book tour for the flaming lips book. We stayed at a hotel across from the giant oral Roberts hands. Yeah. It was a weird experience. I'm eager to hear what you came back from Oklahoma with. That's in a minute on this bonus podcast. All right, we are here to hear what music inspired Greg in Tulsa, Oklahoma. I was excited because I was going to go see the Bob Dylan museum. And that was terrific and the Woody Guthrie center is right up the street, so I saw those, the fill brook museum, which is a great art museum, one of the best in the middle part of America, you know? Great, great artwork. But I got to tell you the real highlight for me was going to the Greenwood rising black Wall Street history museum. Yeah. It's still in that district in Tulsa where the massacre occurred in 1921. I was looking at the exhibit. My wife and I and actually dab pointed this out. She goes, look, Greg, there's Charlie Wilson of the gap band. And I go, oh my God, that's right. It was from Tulsa. You know, I had known this a long time ago, but I sort of slipped my mind and of course the museum trip made the connection again. The band's name, the gap band, is an acronym for GAP, right? It's this streets in the Greenwood District. Greenwood archer and pine. So those streets were part of what was known as the black Wall Street, the African American neighborhood in Tulsa across the railroad tracks, of course, segregated from the rest of the city. But a thriving business community residences all around, there was an incident, the racial incident that turned into a massacre of that population. Some trumped up charge against one of the black residents of Greenwood, ended up waiting through the neighborhood and burning down 35 blocks worth of residents and businesses and dozens, if not hundreds of people, the Red Cross estimates are still all over the map about how many people actually died in that awful horrific experience. In 1921, Charlie Wilson has said people would ask about the origins of the band name and you would explain to them that we come from this district in Tulsa that was burned down in a white massacre, basically. And they didn't know what he was talking about. We didn't know what he was talking about. He said it was a way of keeping that memory alive. It wasn't in the history books, but we were going to carry that through with us. And the gap band, they started in the 60s as picture of Charlie Wilson was of him in Tulsa before the band became famous. They had been basically working a working band for ten, 15 years before they started having a series of great funk hits in the 80s. They met Lonnie Simmons, producer in LA, and he worked with them very closely and Charlie was the lead singer in the band. His two brothers were in the band with him, but Charlie was kind of the main voice in the band. The gap band made a bunch of amazing amazing albums during that era. People will remember the gap band for being one of the classic funk albums of all time. At least in 1982. It's shocking that after 93 years of doing sound opinions, you're only getting to the gap bad now, 'cause this is like straight from the cot wheel house. That was a go to album for me too. I just loved that album. I love the way they use the synthesizers on it. I love the drumming on that record. Raymond Calhoun Jim. The drummer on the gap band records. Dave Grohl says my drumming on smells like teen spirit Nirvana breakthrough hit was influenced by the gap band. Grohl has said that about 73. I'm telling you that the drum riff, though, I could point to you the specific song where James Calhoun's drumming is mimicked by I'm just saying we don't need to compare Calhoun to anybody to loud Calhoun. Great drummer though. Great drummer and a great record. And I want to play one of the songs from it. You dropped a bomb on me, and Wilson was asked, are you talking about Tulsa? Are you talking about the massacre? And he goes, not specifically. I wasn't our intention to mimic that, but I'm glad people are asking me about it. This is about a guy who gets his girlfriend. He thinks he's in love with this girl. He thinks she's in love with him. And then he finds out not really. She's flying away. Gets the rug pulled out from under. Exactly. You dropped a bomb on me from the gap band on sound opinions.

Tulsa Jim D regattas Greg cot Patreon Alexander Ryan Charlie Wilson Oklahoma Bob Dylan museum Woody Guthrie center brook museum Greenwood rising black Wall St Greenwood archer African American neighborhood Greg Greenwood Alexander Roberts Lonnie Simmons Jim Charlie
8 found dead after house fire in Tulsa area; homicide feared

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 7 months ago

8 found dead after house fire in Tulsa area; homicide feared

"Oklahoma authorities say 8 bodies have been found in a home in suburban Tulsa I Norman hall police in broken arrow just outside Tulsa say 8 people were found dead in suspected homicides after fire was extinguished at a house police say the fire and dazzler being investigated as homicides but don't think there is an immediate threat to the public A police spokesman says the scene is complex with a lot of moving parts so no other information has been released Broken arrow is Tulsa's biggest suburb with almost 115,000 residents The U.S. bureau of alcohol tobacco firearms and explosives is assisting in the investigation I Norman hall

Tulsa Norman Hall Police Dazzler Oklahoma U.S. Bureau Of Alcohol Tobacco Norman Hall
Exhumations to resume; Bid to ID Tulsa Race Massacre victims

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 7 months ago

Exhumations to resume; Bid to ID Tulsa Race Massacre victims

"Efforts to identify victims of the 1921 race massacre until the Oklahoma continued today with the exhumation of remains that had been exhumed before 19 bodies were previously taken from a Tulsa cemetery and city spokesperson Michelle Brooks says 14 of those bodies fit the criteria for further DNA analysis she says at least some of those 14 bodies will be exhumed a second time starting today Historians believe 75 to 300 people died in the 1921 Tulsa race massacre in which more than 1000 homes were burned hundreds were looted at a thriving business district known as black Wall Street was destroyed The exhumations will be followed by another search for bodies in an area south and west of the area's previously excavated in 2020 and 2021 I'm Donna water

Michelle Brooks Tulsa Oklahoma
Republicans Are Catching up in Races Across the Country

Mike Gallagher Podcast

02:03 min | 7 months ago

Republicans Are Catching up in Races Across the Country

"Back to Nevada. Clark county sheriff Joe lombardo is the Republican candidate. He has run pretty much he's running pretty much even now. With Sicily in various polls. Lombardo in some polls is leading cis black by one, two percentage points. Again, this was a race that people weren't quite sure about. Just the news is now reporting that Michigan GOP gubernatorial nominee Tudor Dixon is now tied with Democrat incumbent governor Gretchen Whitmer. Now, how happy would you be to see Gretchen Whitmer retired? The Michigan news source and the Trafalgar poll just released, shows this neck and neck. This could be a Tulsa. Again, governor Gretchen Whitmer had no idea she was going to be in a competitive race. Meanwhile, in Arizona, the Republican gubernatorial candidate Carrie Lake there. Mike Gallagher just left Phoenix for one of the battleground tour, stops there. Carrie Lake is Islam. Her Democrat opponent, Secretary of State Katie Hobbs, because Hobbes refused to show up for a long schedule debate. And we're seeing that in a lot of races around the country where Democrats simply don't want to be on the debate stage with their Republican opponent. In Pennsylvania, for example, you may have heard John fetterman is making all kind of excuses, saying that Doctor Oz is a TV personality. He has the advantage. He's on TV a lot. Of course, saying that he's going to need his monitors in order to read the question. Which leads me to the question of how can you be running to be in the U.S. Senate, and you need a device to read the questions from?

Gretchen Whitmer Sheriff Joe Lombardo Carrie Lake Tudor Dixon Lombardo Clark County Michigan Sicily Secretary Of State Katie Hobbs Nevada Mike Gallagher GOP Tulsa John Fetterman Hobbes Arizona Doctor Oz Phoenix Pennsylvania
Police: Man arrested in connection with 4 Oklahoma slayings

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 8 months ago

Police: Man arrested in connection with 4 Oklahoma slayings

"Florida authorities are holding a person of interest wanted in connection with the mass killing in Oklahoma I Norman hall A man wanted for questioning about the daz and dismemberment of four men in eastern Oklahoma has been arrested in Florida According to police in oak monkey Joe Kennedy was arrested Monday in Daytona Beach shores while driving a stolen vehicle Kennedy is being described as a person of interest in the deaths of Mark Chastain Billy Chastain Mike sparks and Alex Stevens who had been reported missing their dismembered bodies were found last week in the deep fork river in oak mogi It's about 40 miles south of Tulsa I Norman hall

Norman Hall Oklahoma Florida Joe Kennedy Mark Chastain Billy Chastain Mike Sparks Daytona Beach Alex Stevens Kennedy Deep Fork River Oak Mogi Tulsa
Sylvester Stallone Is Sporting a Bad Toupe in 'Tulsa King'

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:59 min | 8 months ago

Sylvester Stallone Is Sporting a Bad Toupe in 'Tulsa King'

"I saw a trailer for the TV show Tulsa king. Starring Sylvester Stallone. A Tyler, I'm sorry, Taylor, Sheridan production. Taylor shouting is the man. I mean, we're talking king a mayor of Kingstown, Yellowstone, 1883, the last cowboy, the movies, hell or high water, Sicario, wind river, this guy, I mean, he writes while you sleep, he writes while you shit. This guy is so prodigious. But I saw the trailer. And I gotta tell you. I'm bothered by something. I can't wait to see Sylvester Stallone in a TV series, but I can't take the toupee. I can't take the plastered on toupee. It's just, it's just too much. It's too much. It's bothering me. And you know what? I have to confess. I haven't said anything for a long time. Because of my relationship with him, okay? We're Friends. But can you imagine having to do all that shit with your hair? Before the director calls action, when is the last time we saw an old actor age gracefully? Really? Like in the old days, Paul Newman would age gracefully. Robert Redford. I mean, there's so many actors in the 70s and 80s, and even the 90s who didn't go for the tube.

Sylvester Stallone Taylor Kingstown Sheridan Yellowstone Tyler Paul Newman Robert Redford
Why Does NO ONE Remember Black Wall Street? Larry Elder Explains

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:01 min | 8 months ago

Why Does NO ONE Remember Black Wall Street? Larry Elder Explains

"Here's the big question. Now, it's a surprise to me because I didn't grow up in the 1930s in Harlow. I don't know what black Wall Street is, but how the hell did they manage to deep 6 this memory from black America? How do they manage to allow black Americans to just burn the hard drive of the prosperity? They lived in. It's a great question. You know, I was watching the Super Bowl last year. And there was a commercial Citigroup commercial. And black guys walking down the hall and he's talking about the Tulsa massacre of 1921. What he didn't tell you and what we explore in Uncle Tom two is that that area that became known as black Wall Street after it got rebuilt was we built within a matter of a few years bigger and better than before without a dime of government money. So the idea that there was some prosperity until the white man big footed everything and then we were back to slavery down the line. And it wasn't, as I said, even called black Wall Street until after it was rebuilt better than ever.

Harlow Citigroup Super Bowl Uncle Tom Tulsa America
Looking Ahead to the British Open

Fore The People

01:38 min | 11 months ago

Looking Ahead to the British Open

"I am excited to watch the British open. I love watching an early, early morning golf, especially if it's a major. We can talk about it. We'll do another because we're doing more pods. We can have like a little preview with guys that we really do think who are Pixar after this deal. You know, obviously Tiger is playing Rory didn't play this week, him and Tiger have been going around Ireland playing courses chilling. Shit, man. There's a stack. There's a stacked field. It'll be fun to watch it 3 a.m. or whenever the hell it comes on. Yeah, so it comes on. I don't feel like Xander schauffele is through three holes right now. Okay? And what is it? It's ten 30 over here in Texas. I feel as if 6 hours, I think, from Texas. Yeah, but I feel like I feel like maybe it's, I remember like the lead groupie and through 9 at this point, right? Or something. I feel like they finished around lunchtime. But anyway, no, that's gonna be a hell of a hell of a deal next week. I love watching the British open. Besides the U.S. open, it's my second favorite major, then the masters, PGA, whatever. But I don't think anybody stopping Xander today. He's got a four shot lead currently over katayama and Ryan Palmer are Fort Worth boy, but RP. Yeah, I don't think anyone's stopping the X man. But next week, does Tiger make the cut, dude, I don't think he makes the cut. I just don't see Tiger ever playing great golf again. I mean, I think he could probably make the cut in a major here or there, but it's going to be cold and you saw how he played when it got cold in Tulsa. Southern hills that day. I mean, it was a nightmare. He did everything it could to break 80. If it's below 70° and his body's just not working that

Xander Schauffele Pixar Rory Texas Golf Katayama Ryan Palmer Ireland PGA Xander Fort Worth U.S. Southern Hills Tulsa
Man held in attack on doctor, nurses at California hospital

AP News Radio

01:04 min | 1 year ago

Man held in attack on doctor, nurses at California hospital

"A Southern California hospital emergency ward was the scene of a S.W.A.T. team standoff Friday I'm Ben Thomas with the story Los Angeles Police say a man walked into encino hospital medical center in the San Fernando valley asking for treatment for anxiety and stabbed a doctor into nurses They were taken to a trauma center in critical condition Lauren McAllen as a surgical tech at a nearby hospital she tells KA BC They were carrying people out on stretchers One underwent surgery but all three were later listed in stable condition meantime the man holed up in a room for about four hours before S.W.A.T. team members finally arrested him He was taken to another hospital for treatment of self inflected injuries Police say he has a lengthy criminal record including two arrests last year for battery of a police officer and resisting arrest coming just two days after a gunman killed four people and then himself at a hospital in Tulsa Oklahoma McAllen tells kaab It's just disheartening And with all this other stuff going on these days I mean this just really hits really close to home I'm Ben Thomas

Los Angeles Police Encino Hospital Medical Center Lauren Mcallen Ben Thomas San Fernando Valley Southern California Mcallen Tulsa Oklahoma
Biden Administration Cancels $5.8 Billion in Student Loan Debt

The Officer Tatum Show

01:52 min | 1 year ago

Biden Administration Cancels $5.8 Billion in Student Loan Debt

"Ladies and gentlemen, you're listening to my guests, Adam kissel, visitor, visiting fellow on higher education reform at the heritage foundation. We're here to discuss the debt forgiveness that Joe Biden has done for the Corinthian colleges. And I was reading in an article with the Corinthian college became one of the most prominent examples of bad behavior. One of the things that they said allegedly are allegations of illegal recruiting tactics, shady education programs and false promises to students about their career prospects and their potential future earnings. Is this a conflict of interest specifically that Joe Biden is forgiving the debt and loans from a university that appears to have been participating in alleged fraudulent behavior and really they've done these kids wrong in many cases. It's Joe Biden putting himself in danger of a conflict of interest here. Well, the Biden administration, just like the Obama administration, has a problem with profit. So they've been going after for profit universities. And not holding nonprofits to the same standards. And in many cases, if you look at the outcomes for nonprofit college student graduates, they're just as bad or worse than as the for profit colleges. Colleague of mine at the Texas public policy foundation has proved that in a number of studies. So the conflict for Biden and earlier for Obama was discriminating against profit and the challenge for Corinthian colleges, which no longer exists, is that they did double cross many of their students and give bad information. So those students should be made whole. And the hard question is, should they be made whole by having their whole student debt forgiven for just the part that really was related to fraudulent? Or other bad actor kinds of activities.

Joe Biden Adam Kissel Corinthian College Biden Administration Heritage Foundation Obama Administration Texas Public Policy Foundation Biden Barack Obama
Why Student Loan Forgiveness Is a Big Mistake

The Officer Tatum Show

01:15 min | 1 year ago

Why Student Loan Forgiveness Is a Big Mistake

"So Adam, Joe Biden, I think this is a pledge. I don't know if it's official, but it's a place that he's going to forgive $5.8 billion in student loan debt, owed by about 560,000 borrowers who attend Corinthian colleges, one of the nation's biggest for profit college chain before collapsed in 2015. Can you give the audience a perspective here? Because when I see these numbers, I say, well hey, what's wrong with inherently wrong with forgiving student loans for people who have worked hard, but can you explain, is this an issue or is this a positive thing coming from the Biden administration? Well, the Biden administration knows that it can't forgive student loans, except in some really narrow areas. So it's been looking for some ways to forgive student loans in those narrow areas and still say that they're doing something. So if you worked hard and you paid off your student loan, then you look at the people who are getting loan forgiveness and you're saying, well, I guess I'm a sucker because I paid my loan off and here's somebody else who didn't work. And they haven't paid and they're going to get $10,000 off or maybe they're hold on forgiven. So it's a real problem for people who are the majority who have been working hard and paying off their loans.

Biden Administration Joe Biden Adam
Why Law Enforcement Is the Best Gun Control

The Officer Tatum Show

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Why Law Enforcement Is the Best Gun Control

"What legislative action can we take to curb gun violence? I do not, I can not think of a single law that's not already on the books that will prevent gun deaths. And mass shootings, whether it's with a rifle or a handgun. I can think of the application of laws that are already on the books, meaning that how do we get illegal guns off of the streets because they're already illegal. That's not a new law that we need to create guns that are not purchased serial number, whatever the case may be, that's not tracked, that come from Mexico are stolen from people are already illegal firearms. How about we enforce the laws that are on the

Mexico
Shots Fired at Graceland Cemetery in Racine

The Officer Tatum Show

01:03 min | 1 year ago

Shots Fired at Graceland Cemetery in Racine

"Another shooting in racing Wisconsin at a funeral home, right now, or at least at a funeral site as a cemetery, not maybe not a funeral at home, but at a cemetery. As the family of a a young young man man named named de de chante chante Lucas Lucas king king senior senior was was being being laid laid to to rest rest after after being being killed killed by by police police in in a a police police dispute. dispute. According to some of the reports, it was involving a, I believe a high speed pursuit at some point in somehow there was a dispute between him and the police. You know, if I was a bit man, I'd bet it involved some guns and other stuff that would have probably resulted in the shooting. And as his family is laying him to rest at the cemetery, there is a gunman that apparently gets out. I don't know if he's shows up on foot or gets out of a vehicle, and he begins opening opening fire on the people there at the funeral site.

De De Chante Chante Lucas Luca Wisconsin
"tulsa" Discussed on The Officer Tatum Show

The Officer Tatum Show

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"tulsa" Discussed on The Officer Tatum Show

"That's what people will say. And you followed it, it took them how people don't know this because many people spend a lot of time saying that they were just sitting in the hallway tilling their thumbs playing on their phones for 40 minutes while kids were getting slaughtered. However, according to the documents, it took them four minutes from the time of the shooting for them to arrive and pursue him into the classroom where he barricaded himself. Now, if you look at the times, it took a police 9 minutes and it took the police and you already about four minutes to respond after the shooting had started. Now, the reason there's no comparison because you've Aldi is a city of 16,000 people and they probably roughly only had about 7 officers at a time on duty per shift. And that's not a lot of police officers. You compared the Tulsa Oklahoma police officers. They're managing 400,000 people and they have over 700 plus officers who are on their police department. So you're talking about a department. If you look at the Yuval, the unified school district, they have 6 police officers. And you go look at the Tulsa police department. They have 700 police officers. In a situation like this, I'm sure Tulsa has a S.W.A.T. team. I'm sure Tulsa has, it could have been 40 police officers showed up to this one call. Ready to go. And what people may not understand how they may not know this, and this may not be applicable in this case, but I know we're not. When I was a police officer in Tucson, every hospital had their own security. They had their own K9 security at the Tucson medical center and at saint Joe's, they had a small security detail there. So they have direct communication with a person who they considered to be a security individual that's armed. I don't know if they're armed and any of these other hospitals. I don't know if they were armed at the particular hospital in Tulsa. But that could be a contributing factor to communication with police and a response time. However, it doesn't appear based on the information that I've gotten that he was confronted by anyone, it appears that he did the shooting that he was going to do. In the place that he wanted to do and then killed himself. This adds to the shooting number that the Democrats tout around when they are speaking of taking away our guns. Now, in this case, you have a complete bizarre situation for the Democrats. And before I go on, you know, and say anything else, I feel like it's respectful for me to at least give some condolences for the people that lost their lives. I know I get caught up in being the spokesperson for talking about these issues. However, I do want to be respectful for the families that have lost their loved ones. I mean, this is, you know, we go through this stuff so often, at least it's presented to us so often we get desensitized that somebody's dead, mom will never come home. Even the killer probably had a family and he's never coming home either. And you know, I don't feel sorry for him at all..

Tulsa Tulsa police department Tucson medical center saint Joe's Aldi Oklahoma Tucson
Comparing the Police Response of the Tulsa and Uvalde Shootings

The Officer Tatum Show

01:08 min | 1 year ago

Comparing the Police Response of the Tulsa and Uvalde Shootings

"How people don't know this because many people spend a lot of time saying that they were just sitting in the hallway tilling their thumbs playing on their phones for 40 minutes while kids were getting slaughtered. However, according to the documents, it took them four minutes from the time of the shooting for them to arrive and pursue him into the classroom where he barricaded himself. Now, if you look at the times, it took a police 9 minutes and it took the police and you already about four minutes to respond after the shooting had started. Now, the reason there's no comparison because you've Aldi is a city of 16,000 people and they probably roughly only had about 7 officers at a time on duty per shift. And that's not a lot of police officers. You compared the Tulsa Oklahoma police officers. They're managing 400,000 people and they have over 700 plus officers who are on their police department. So you're talking about a department. If you look at the Yuval, the unified school district, they have 6 police officers. And you go look at the Tulsa police department. They have 700 police officers.

Aldi Tulsa Oklahoma Tulsa Police Department
"tulsa" Discussed on The Breakdown with Shaun King

The Breakdown with Shaun King

05:47 min | 2 years ago

"tulsa" Discussed on The Breakdown with Shaun King

"So we are back. Yes we have highlighted be hundred year anniversary of the tulsa massacre. We have talked about what it has done to us. As a community when it comes to our ability to generate and create wealth the other things that have been done systemically to continue to prevent us from being able to create wealth. But now we're going to talk about where we have come from and where we are going and the strategies on how to get there. Yes we're bringing down our generational framework now. We've talked a lot about black folks. But what i will say is we have a wealth. Gap generally and a lot of this information is good regardless of what color you are. What race are because a lot of us are still seeing the impacts of generational curses that might have existed in your family for a long time. So let's start with generation negative one all right so this is a generation. That's destroying wealth in your family like to this day right. So what we're trying to do is identify the generation that you're currently and maybe one identify the generation that you come from but generation negative one is the generation that is actively destroying or has destroyed wealth in your family. This is a generation that's had limited career opportunities limited education. Possibly they may have been incarcerated or they may have substance abuse issues. They might have debt problems. They might have been involved with payday. Lenders and pawnshop loans. They are not very financially stable and so because they're not stable they have to rely on other people around them for loans for support financially. And so let me just say this really quickly before. I even start going into my tangents and my stories as i tend to do. This is not to shame anybody as allan mentioned. This isn't a black thing. I mean we just happen to be black and we happen to know what happens in our community but every every race every color has all of these generations. We have all of these family members. They exist today. They existed back in the day and unfortunately they will continue to exist so this is not about shame. We're not shaming anybody. This is just reality..

tulsa allan
"tulsa" Discussed on The Breakdown with Shaun King

The Breakdown with Shaun King

05:27 min | 2 years ago

"tulsa" Discussed on The Breakdown with Shaun King

"So we are back. Yes we have highlighted be hundred year anniversary of the tulsa massacre. We have talked about what it has done to us. As a community when it comes to our ability to generate and create wealth the other things that have been done systemically to continue to prevent us from being able to create wealth. But now we're going to talk about where we have come from and where we are going and the strategies on how to get there. Yes we're bringing down our generational framework now. We've talked a lot about black folks. But what i will say is we have a wealth. Gap generally and a lot of this information is good regardless of what color you are. What race are because a lot of us are still seeing the impacts of generational curses that might have existed in your family for a long time. So let's start with generation negative one all right so this is a generation. That's destroying wealth in your family like to this day right. So what we're trying to do is identify the generation that you're currently and maybe one identify the generation that you come from but generation negative one is the generation that is actively destroying or has destroyed wealth in your family. This is a generation that's had limited career opportunities limited education. Possibly they may have been incarcerated or they may have substance abuse issues. They might have debt problems. They might have been involved with payday. Lenders and pawnshop loans. They are not very financially stable and so because they're not stable they have to rely on other people around them for loans for support financially. And so let me just say this really quickly before. I even start going into my tangents and my stories as i tend to do. This is not to shame anybody as allan mentioned. This isn't a black thing. I mean we just happen to be black and we happen to know what happens in our community but every every race every color has all of these generations. We have all of these family members. They exist today. They existed back in the day and unfortunately they will continue to exist so this is not about shame. We're not shaming anybody. This is just reality..

tulsa allan
"tulsa" Discussed on The Breakdown with Shaun King

The Breakdown with Shaun King

05:02 min | 2 years ago

"tulsa" Discussed on The Breakdown with Shaun King

"You know as a people this had to be the hardest time ever for being black in america. But what's crazy is. We started to make some progress. We even built a bank. There was a bank called the freemen savings bank and in eighteen seventy four. The federal government allowed that bank to go under and that caused over sixty one thousand black people to lose over three million dollars in back then money which would be a huge loss in today's money for sure. Take it a step. Further in the early nineteen hundreds there was a tremendous amount of segregation. But black folks were able to build something you look at a place like the greenwood section of tulsa oklahoma right we had built a thriving community. It was called black wall street. We owned hotels businesses real estate. We had homes. We were giving loans to each other and in one thousand nine twenty one. There was a race massacre right. There was a young man that walked into a hotel to use the bathroom use. The segregated bathrooms took an elevator to get to the top floor. So you can use the the blacks only bathroom and in the process of getting on the elevator. He ran into a white woman and she accused him of of an assault. Did not happen. And this was the event that set off the destruction of the greenwood section of tulsa oklahoma. Yeah and i think. I think only been in the recent years that this story has been told in more detail right. I think there are a lot of people were like. Listen i never even heard of the tulsa master probably until about one in two years ago. Now we were talking about it more and more but ultimately as you mentioned what happened is even with slavery. Black people started to do for themselves. They started to be able to find and create resources. In order to be able to generate wealth and operate amongst each other have black businesses have black professionals and be able to work with each other and why people like it and i it because of a bathroom aid because of this white lady like white people just didn't like an in general and they used this story as an opportunity to literally massacre people and massacre what black people had created as their own quote unquote black wall street. Let's think about the economic fallout. After the tulsa massacre fifteen thousand black people were left homeless over fifteen hundred homes were burned. Six hundred businesses were bombed. So i'm just gonna stop right there right like just think about that right there. So not only were fifteen thousand. Black people homeless but fifteen hundred homes were burned. We always talk about. How oftentimes your primary residence your home. Ownership is typically. Your first are most common way to start to generate and built wealth in your family..

tulsa oklahoma federal government america
"tulsa" Discussed on The Breakdown with Shaun King

The Breakdown with Shaun King

05:02 min | 2 years ago

"tulsa" Discussed on The Breakdown with Shaun King

"You know as a people this had to be the hardest time ever for being black in america. But what's crazy is. We started to make some progress. We even built a bank. There was a bank called the freemen savings bank and in eighteen seventy four. The federal government allowed that bank to go under and that caused over sixty one thousand black people to lose over three million dollars in back then money which would be a huge loss in today's money for sure. Take it a step. Further in the early nineteen hundreds there was a tremendous amount of segregation. But black folks were able to build something you look at a place like the greenwood section of tulsa oklahoma right we had built a thriving community. It was called black wall street. We owned hotels businesses real estate..

federal government america tulsa oklahoma
"tulsa" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

06:15 min | 2 years ago

"tulsa" Discussed on American History Tellers

"E. Jones parish was black teacher and journalist who moved to tulsa with her young daughter shortly before the massacre that devastated the a fluent black community of greenwood when the violence erupted on the night of may thirty first nineteen twenty one parish and her daughter were forced to flee from their home as machine gunfire rain down around them soon after the massacre local residents hoping to raise awareness of the violence hired parish to research and write in account parish interviewed. Eyewitnesses gathered photographs and wrote about her own memories in nineteen twenty three. She published collection under the title events of the tulsa disaster local black business owners placed advertisements in the book to help pay for its publishing because tulsa white oh newspapers suppress most information about the massacre. The efforts of dog had journalists like parish have become critical to the historical record and the ongoing fight to ensure the memory of one of america's darkest chapters is never forgotten annalisa. Brunner is a writer and editor living in washington. Dc she is also. Mary parishes great-granddaughter. But like many americans she didn't hear about the tulsa race massacre growing up even in her own home this year. She partnered with trinity. University press to reissue great-grandmothers account. The nation must awake my witness to the tulsa race massacre of nineteen twenty one was published in may in time for the centennial. Here's our conversation analyst. Brunner welcome to american history tillerson. Thank you for having me lindsey. i appreciate being here. For the better part of a century tulsa did little to remember the victims of the massacre. There was no memorial no yearly commemoration and even many tulsa residents new little about it residents began marking the day with modest ceremonies in one thousand nine hundred ninety six. But i'm wondering how. And when did you learn about the tulsa race massacre. Well it would have been a couple of years before that. I miratec event lindsey. I found out about it in nineteen ninety-four basically at the age of thirty four. Although i am a descendant of two survivors of the tulsa race massacre it was not spoken in my family. And when i found out about it it wasn't even a verbal report from my father. It was in the form of a book that he gave to me. When i was visiting him in san francisco from my home in washington. Dc and he pulled it from among his papers saying that he had something to give me that i was now the matriarch of the family and that he wanted to see if i could do anything with this though. This was a book with the title events of the tulsa disaster and it was by a mrs. mary e. jones perish. He said this is your grandmother and she wrote this book and this is what happened. Basically looking at the photographs there was one of those old fashioned panoramic unfolding panels within the front of the book. I looked at it and it was clear that it was about something. Horrendous that had happened there was an inscription in the book from a carol eighty jones. No one i knew or had heard of clearly a jones family member to my father build reuter junior and that's how literally this tale unfolded in my life so it was passed down to you almost like a family secret. I wonder why it took so long. Well i mean there are many ways to speculate about why it might have been the case that this was like you said a family secret. People do those kinds of things. I guess for any number of reasons to protect others to protect themselves or just. Sometimes i think as a matter of family habit. His mother my grandmother who was a survivor didn't talk about it at least in my presence. I don't know she talked about it a lot to him. He didn't talk about it. And i didn't talk about it even after i got the book lindsey. I didn't grill him in depth away. I probably would now. I was in my mid thirties children of my own and still trying to find my own way and when he gave it to me i took my cues from him silence. What tell me about the author of this book your grandmother. Who was she. Well mary jones parish was a woman in my estimation of great industry and agency. She was a person who had moved and lived in several places By the time she moved to tulsa and lift through the race massacre she was thirty one years old. She had a seven year old daughter. Flaunts mary parish. Who would later become florence. Mary perished bruner. Of course she was a person who wanted to come to tulsa aid because she had a brother living there be because she found it was going to be a place where she could make a living. She says in the preface to the book that she found it to be a place where there was a great spirit of cooperation among african americans and she liked the self sufficiency of forward thinking of the people there and just the great sense of belonging and in being in a place where people greeted one another and had a grand sense of dignity and so she was a person who appreciated those kinds of things. She was a teacher who had not only her own private school for secretarial skills but she also taught at the local. Ymca so she was the person who wanted to help others as well as making her living. She helped women to enter into the workforce by teaching them. Typewriting skills shorthand skills. she also Was a trained geographer so she advertised in the local newspaper and conduct your own business so she was definitely an independent business woman. So i Progressive forward community minded person finds a progressive for king community minded community in greenwood and settles there and then of.

san francisco tulsa washington tulsa race massacre america Brunner two survivors Mary carol eighty jones seven year old may thirty first nineteen twen thirty four thirty one years old this year jones annalisa Ymca tulsa race massacre of ninetee mary e. jones perish one thousand nine hundred nine
"tulsa" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"tulsa" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"Probably the least graphic description that i can give you of some of the things they did any saint louis east saint louis illinois july nineteen seventeen over three days whites ravaged a black neighborhood in the city. Looting assaulting and killing people and horrific ways estimates varied. But it's believed they murdered over one. Hundred m maybe. As many as two hundred fifty african americans and some six thousand fled the city. East saint louis like greenwood and tulsa had been a community on the rise..

Hundred m illinois two hundred fifty saint louis july nineteen seventeen three days six thousand saint over one greenwood louis tulsa East east african americans
"tulsa" Discussed on The AIB Show

The AIB Show

05:40 min | 2 years ago

"tulsa" Discussed on The AIB Show

"Nothing is the things that nature which is crazy so anyway going back to this so what trump tried to do was was it the. What was it called. Commission every seventy seventy seventy six commission. Which was the battle of sixty nine hundred project in krikorian theory. So the idea of being a version of history that does not speak to the negatives a perpetrated by generally speaking and is not easy. Her there whites blacks or whites on on minorities leader. That like that so anyway as it comes back to tulsa specifically right so as dominik mentioned you could live in oklahoma live in tulsa know that this happened right and greeting people didn't have including myself did not know what happened. 'cause it was not taught so people have been trying to change that so so now law the just got signed and i'm just gonna read. The law signed by republican governor. Kevin stood on may seventh restrict public school teachers and employees from using lessons that make an individual quote feel discomfort guilt anguish or any other form of psychological distress on account of his or her race or sex so in essence. Anything that happened in history. That could make you feel bad. I can't teach i. Shouldn't i can't teach now based on this law right and it's funny because it's not like saying. Hey jim you did this. You should feel bad for filming is. Jim wasn't around or neither jane for that matter. It's a matter of saying this is what happened. And if i if. I know what happens. The goal is i don't perpetrate it. Hopefully perpetuity hopefully learn from the mistakes of the past etc so which is history in general. So how'd okay. So if we play this game then. I don't want to learn about savory. 'cause i feel i should a black person could feel you know uncomfortable with what you know with that so now i can't teach that in general is so so they have no so. Let's educate people on how we got here period right and this is comical to me because i know people who've gotten similar things have come up in their particular schools not gone legislation but have gotten things out that you to persons her directly but in my school is an thankfully the overwhelming majority of people. Find it preposterous This objection but yet injection and this one Evidently there's one mother who is in and her husband's right but she was complaining that because of talk like this about you know equity and quality and understanding. Her son was in School so i don't know anyone from kindergarten to sixth grade and never looked at her and being brown. You know and now is come.

Kevin Jim trump oklahoma jim dominik tulsa sixth may seventh jane republican one mother battle of sixty nine hundred krikorian every seventy seventy seventy six commission
"tulsa" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

The Erick Erickson Show

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"tulsa" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

"That's how american history stalked. You have two semesters. In one year the turmoil of tosa tulsa oklahoma happened in nineteen twenty. One that is the period. In which american history students are not taught about civil rights jim crow and race relations in the south is bad. They're being taught about The world war one the league of nations and the great depression. How do you squeeze in the tulsa race riots when we're talking the great depression and and The period between the wars it does it fit the template now. There are the critical race others. Well you know. The dimple has written by a bunch of white people. And they didn't wanna talk. No those white progressives wanna spend a lot of time on how the vietnam war was bad and the civil rights movement was good and pay no attention to the racist. Kennedy's of massachusetts blocking school busing. Pay attention to the racist southerners and as they embrace critical theory. It becomes more complex because oklahoma was not a state during the civil war. It was the indian territory and those indians sided with the confederacy. In fact the cherokee indians kept slavery even after the civil war. Did you know that. I bet that's not talked about the history books to either. If the white people are so bad. Why aren't they teaching you that the cherokee nation kip slaves. After the civil war will because that gets into the inner sexual amalgamation of problematic coverage of history when white people are bad we get. The oppressed native americans had slaves. It's gotta be white supremacy. That doesn't affect it. So the reason you don't know about the tulsa situation is it just doesn't fit the template for how american history taught and it has nothing to do with white people wrote it it has to do with. There are some monumental events in american history pre revolution revolution the the steam engine and the cotton gin the industrial revolution in america the civil war and reconstruction roosevelt and the trust busters american growth on the nash on the world stage world war. One woodrow wilson. you notice. They don't talk about him being the racist that he was world war two. And then you get into jim crow right. that's where you teach. It.

Kennedy world war two vietnam war one year two semesters oklahoma america tosa cherokee world war civil war world war one One tulsa oklahoma nineteen twenty world stage indians civil rights movement indian woodrow wilson
"tulsa" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

The Erick Erickson Show

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"tulsa" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

"Hello and welcome. Erick erickson coast to coast. Glad to have you with me Now if you're listening on on some of the cmg stations around the country mark case should be here. And i'm here instead. He's out and will return the phone number here. If you want to be a part of the program. Eight seven seven nine seven eric. Eight seven seven nine seven three seven four to five. Have you noticed. There's this this trend and it's very intentional. Trend in post-christian. America if you will to we've now got we used to have a Calendar that the nation participated in. You have new years of course in that would go into the the linton season and then you would have easter. You would have memorial day. You would have summer vacation. You would get into school going back and labor day. Some schools not going back until labor day. You'd get into halloween then thanksgiving and then you would have christmas. And now we've got an increasingly secularized holiday situation where you've got new year's you less have easter. You have spring break. You've got memorial day. Then you've got an entire pride month. That can't be day or a week. it's got to be a whole month. Then you got the fourth of july which you may or may not celebrate because of the systemic racism of the nation. Somewhere in there. You've got juneteenth which needs to be a celebration. But it competes with pride month so it kind of is pushed aside and maybe his coming back and then you the return of school and you still got labor day which is bigger than it. Was you got veterans day in there and thanksgiving. You've got christmas in there. But it's more a winner holiday break now. It's less christmas and the void left by the exit of religion for the public square fills with secularism. We've got these new things. We got to pay attention to one of those things which we have to pay attention to is the tulsa race riot that. You're now a bigot. If you refer to it as the tulsa race riot it must be the tulsa race.

Erick erickson christmas halloween fourth of july one juneteenth five four thanksgiving America labor day tulsa race riot tulsa race Eight seven seven veterans day year Eight seven three christian day
"tulsa" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"tulsa" Discussed on On The Media

"And other commercial spaces and you can still see the damage the bernie had on the land. It is a reminder of the damage that green greenwood is still burning there also blocks and blocks where nothing has been rebuilt since the nineteen twenties staircases leading to homes. That don't exist anymore. Steps that lead to nowhere though stairs are constant reminder of the harm inflicted not by some storm or distant enemy but by greenwood's neighbors employers and city officials and then you deal with it on a psychological level right myself in other descendants that i personally know we've examined how a lot of this has been internalized because when you're abused and you keep it a secret. What happens right you turn on yourself or each other. And many of the black people who stayed in tulsa after the massacre say received threats that if they talked about it or sought restitution it would happen again and keeping this tragedy. A secret meant that their loved ones. were protected. You can't be afraid of something if you don't know what's possible and for.

tulsa nineteen twenties bernie each greenwood
"tulsa" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

Diane Rehm: On My Mind

05:06 min | 2 years ago

"tulsa" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

"She shooting tiffany. Crowd cheered front none none. There were none there were. There was nothing that he had done. That was illegal. Car stopped on the side of the road he was coming from a class at tulsa community. College in what i would say is in terms of defining tiffany's she's not just defined by that you know i think she's a physical therapy. A clinical physical therapist a doctor. She left behind her. Practice are thriving practice and alabama to come back to tulsa and has become the persistent thorn in the side of the city and police department and many other divisions because she is relentlessly pursuing justice. Not just for her brother but for the countless black people who are subjugated to less than fair less than equal less than equitable circumstances in treatment and the rolled. You think tiffany crutcher. We'll play in his repair process. Yeah i mean i think. She's critical her her story. That end to end you know her. Great grandmother exprienced injustice and the same state sanctioned violence that sent her grandmother to kansas city. She couldn't stay in black wall street because of the dangers that she was at risk of experiencing ongoing. It's the same state veteran state sanctioned violence. This is me quoting tiffany the same state sanctioned violence that kills her brother terrence crutcher. I think it's really hard for city leaders to stare at her in the face for county leaders for police officers to steer her in the face and say that justice has been served right. I think that's the hard part. And i think she makes it harder for them. So caleb how do you see this story. Playing out i think. Actually there's more hope than i would anticipate. I think the tendency of writing pieces that don't necessarily inspire that much hope but needing people like tiffany crutcher and others who are so active in the suv actually captured. What seems like the moral imagination. A lot of leaders right in the community. I think there's an opportunity to more than just as history museum. I think there's an opportunity really to hopefully inspire. People not just acknowledged. But then think carefully in creatively innovatively about what repair. Looks like and perhaps reparations. Exactly right i think why they repair i think restitution reparation repair the all. I think occupy the same space in my head for me which is to say that through city policy through legal suits through our educational system food the curriculum that we use. I think it's everything and the kitchen. Sink approach that needs to be taken right to see these reparation because you know to be perfectly honest we know for sure that all of these things exist in political dimensions right and so as such. There's gonna be some negotiations so if you don't bring everything plus the kitchen sink right if you don't negotiate is if you don't start really high even ultimately end with something even lower than you could even tolerated so i think to some extent going for everything plus the kitchen sink is the only way potentially to ensure that the survivors right can live out the rest of their days. Knowing that justice has to at least some extent been served kayla. Thank you so much for the.

kansas city terrence crutcher kayla street caleb alabama tiffany crutcher tulsa tiffany
"tulsa" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

06:40 min | 2 years ago

"tulsa" Discussed on The Daily

"Riding the story the black sources stipulated. They would only meet him at night in their churches under the guidance of the ministers and he encountered threats from people. Once a stranger in the street tapped him on the shoulder and said you'll be sorry to upset story. A threatening note was written across the windshield of his car. Destler bundy your good from now on. But he persisted and ed finishes the story. He goes to the chamber of commerce magazine. Miss sold the magazine of the story. He appeals to the local newspaper. The tells the world weren't editor. Told him i would not test. That article was an eleven foot pole. Here's ed this big white guy walking around with this manuscript and a fines of startup magazine called oklahoma impact and don ross. So don at the time was looking to publish something special in his magazine to commemorate the fiftieth year. Since what was then call tells a race riots and in this article he has. The story spreads quickly through agreement. And this blows the cover off the conspiracy of silence little more than a decade later. Don ross becomes a state legislator who is consumed with justice for the survivors. Oh the tulsa race nascar. And what does that look like. How does don. Ross go about pursuing justice for the don ross. Is i think it's around. Probably his seventeenth year in the legislature. He convinces the state to create call the tulsa race riot emission. And what exactly was that commission. What was it trying to accomplish what the commission was charged to do was finally investigate. The events trying to find out. I mean people die. Provide an estimate of the property damage. Explain what caused the disturbance. But it's the most controversial part from the very start was to determine whether or not the state should pay reparations either to the black district of greenwood or two individuals so buyers located scores of witnesses interviewed them and it was from those witnesses that we find out the contours of this event. Everything i said you is essentially stopped as foreword by survivors in transcripts and basically this is how the story actually flowers and comes into full knowledge through the commission among other things report showed that the police or indeed complicit in the destruction of because they deputize part of the mob but destroyed witnesses even talked about seeing law enforcement officials burning some products. So what the people in greenwood hopeful they had hoped for the detail. Emerging of the city's abdication of responsibility when forced to city in the state to pay restitution that did not happen the legislature. Instead trying to deal with the matter by giving survivors commemorative medals metals for surviving. these attacks. Yes it was very peculiar. At the least. I mean the middle's trivialized the suffering of the people incredibly and basically the survivors. Many of whom were in the nineties. Decided they were not going to go quietly to the graves as they filed a lawsuit seeking damages but in the state of oklahoma civil rights. Actions these files and two years of the defense and so the case is dismissed and survivors again. See no reparations brent. I'm thinking back now on this magazine. Publisher turned legislator who you introduced us to don ross who i succeeded back in the nineteen seventies in breaking the wall of silence around tulsa. But he wanted more than that. He wanted reparations and so as a politician he gets this commission off the ground and he succeeds once again in breaking down yet. Another kind of barrier in getting the official record changed in establishing what actually happened in tulsa for the public but still what. He's really after which is some kind of action some kind of effort to make whole these people who have lost so much. That isn't happening at times when people were trying to forget this thing. He may the state religion with him And he really thought if a damage inflicted by the city and state on his population or made clear that authorities would be shamed into making west It's one thing to sort of acknowledge yes it was. A bad thing is quite another to go into the state or city budget and say when mate x million dollars that is a level of admission that is beyond the symbolic admission of what that institutional races govern. The police approach to the black citizens of green. Were govern the courts that denied them. Restitution govern the city council but try to stop them from rebuil- to sit down and basically compensate them would be to acknowledge the impact of all those forms of institutional racism that presided over this disaster and the suppression and that of course as we know.

Don ross seventeenth year two individuals eleven foot two years fiftieth year nineties Ross nineteen seventies don ross oklahoma million dollars more than a decade later one thing oklahoma impact and don ross don. black district tulsa greenwood commerce
"tulsa" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"tulsa" Discussed on The Daily

"And what form does that take. We know from reports and testimony. That's tulsa police deputize perhaps hundreds of white men. It was sworn in as special deputies some were given badges showed that they were agents of the law and it were instructed in effect you go go out and kill you. Some damn niggers so in the early hour is june first. A mob saves through and began systematically going house to house in many cases bay looted houses in some cases a shot people outright and as aggressive a wall of flame a wall of fire rises and begin steadily marching across the black oasis agreement one after another homes businesses churches schools public library. The hospital one after another barn. Lot of what we know about this coun- some people who were children at the time is an eight year old boy and a kinney booker. Who's hiding in the attic of his family's home when white men burston. He can hear his father downstairs pleading. Please don't burn my house lead over my house. The white man march is father away at gunpoint and then they lay claim to the house. Kenny and his siblings upstairs smoke against the come in they get down. They rush out onto the street. They.

Kenny hundreds march eight year old june first tulsa police white
"tulsa" Discussed on POLITICO Playbook Audio Briefing

POLITICO Playbook Audio Briefing

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"tulsa" Discussed on POLITICO Playbook Audio Briefing

"Presented by the american beverage association. It's tuesday morning. I'm livia reingold. And this is your politico. Playbook daily briefing a hundred years ago today. White rioters stormed greenwood tulsa oklahoma neighborhood dubbed black wall street. The mob killed as many as three hundred black americans and leveled thirty five square block area full of churches hotels and grocery stores. The smoke finally cleared a hundred years ago today. On june first nineteen twenty one and for the past century the tulsa race massacre largely went on remembered the reports that if oklahoma public schools covered it at all teachers downplayed the event as a riot. Not a massacre now. President joe biden is trying to confront that long ignored history starting with yesterday when he issued a proclamation to remember the massacre that statement said quote i call on the american people to reflect on the deep roots of racial terror in our nation and recommit to the work of rooting out systematic racism across our country. Today biden will have to tulsa around eleven. Am to give a speech and meet with families who were impacted that day. But he's also trying to put his money where his mouth is an announced new policies this morning designed to close the racial wealth gap that includes a proposed rule by hud to counter discriminatory housing practices plus an effort to address inequalities in home appraisals. The white house says it's planning to increase the share of federal contracts. That go to what. They're calling quote small disadvantaged businesses to fifty percent over the next five years. They say that will provide an additional hundred million dollars to those businesses. Some black leaders are calling for financial reparations. Both for the few survivors of the massacre and for the wider economically struggling north tulsa area were most of the city's black population lives. I'm a survivor of the tulsa. Race massacre two weeks ago celebrated by one hundred and seven birthday survivor. Viola ford fletcher. Who was seven years old at the time of the massacre testified before congress last month. Push for reparations. A counter may forget this history. But i cannot will not and other celebrities do not and are descendants. Do not when my family was forced to leave tulsa a loss my chance when education and never finished school past the fourth grade have never made much money in my country. She testified that for most of her life she worked as domestic staff for white families..

fifty percent Viola ford fletcher tuesday morning yesterday Today two weeks ago last month tulsa President hundred million dollars three hundred livia reingold congress one hundred and seven birthday north tulsa fourth grade tulsa race massacre thirty five square block Both joe biden
"tulsa" Discussed on Pod 4 Good

Pod 4 Good

05:49 min | 2 years ago

"tulsa" Discussed on Pod 4 Good

"Internet making more money than me. But but that's a conversation for another time so fellow fellow that make you feel better know a little bit a i mean. My title doesn't make money right. You're originally from ohio correct. Yes and you moved here in twenty thirteen to work for the university of tulsa memories. How how did that happen. How did the going from one midwestern state to was some people refer to as another midwestern states. And that's an argument the argument. Yeah how did you find the university of tulsa. What did you do with the university tulsa. How did you feel about your time there. I was teaching seventh grade. Social studies exactly are the worst and nothing is. I love the kid it was i. I have such a passion for teachers that are in the classroom especially in this time and who really not in the classroom but kind of doing virtual teaching and so really for me being in the classroom day and all the other things that came with it. It's just. I felt like burn out with imminent quickly and i really needed to pivot into something that i knew i loved doing. And t you had some feelers out there from before actually had accepted the position and was one of them and they asked they. There was a position for an area coordinator but specifically for the international living community and prior to teaching. I had worked in japan and i had worked in hawaii and so and travel really pretty regularly and so it was ideal for me because i i was able to work with so many different cultures and so many different students and i also could identify. I was the minority student at a predominantly white institution when i went to college and sell navigating that space when you are different than others was something that i just i could personally identify with. Its i really got excited and interviewed for the position. They brought me on. And i stayed at to you for seven years..

japan hawaii seven years twenty thirteen university of tulsa ohio seventh grade university tulsa university of tulsa memories one