40 Burst results for "Tulsa"

Fresh update on "tulsa" discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

00:47 min | 5 min ago

Fresh update on "tulsa" discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"Newspapers in America salutation. The star comes to the citizens of Tulsa full of its sense of duty and wide a week to the grieve responsibility devolved upon it. Today on the New Yorker radio hour, we'll meet a pioneer AJ Smitherman, a newspaperman who campaigned against Gangsters in Tulsa and against the grossest injustices in American life. They have Jim crowed us attempted to disenfranchise us taxed us without giving us representation. And after doing all of this, they are clamoring to be guardians of our Children. A J. Smitherman and the rise of Greenwood in the years before the Tulsa massacre. That's all ahead today on the news. Live from NPR news. I'm Janine Herbst. Tropical Depression chart. Claudette is being blamed for the deaths of 12.

Aj Smitherman Claudette Janine Herbst Tulsa JIM Today America 12 NPR J. Smitherman Greenwood Tulsa Massacre American A Week New Yorker
Revisiting the Details of the Tulsa Race Massacre With Elizabeth Taylor

My Favorite Murder with Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark

02:06 min | 3 d ago

Revisiting the Details of the Tulsa Race Massacre With Elizabeth Taylor

"This starts monday. May thirtieth nineteen twenty one. It's memorial day in tulsa oklahoma and the rest of america so a nineteen year old boy named dick rowland. Who is a shoeshine that works nearby. He goes into the drexel building. Three nineteen south main street and he gets into the elevator because he needs to right up to the top floor. Because that's the only place where there's a blacks only restroom in the entire area on. And he has a black man and so he has to go. There is the only place you can go right. So this elevators operated by a seventeen year old white girl named sarah page so they at the very least seen each other before because she's the only elevator operator in the elevator on the drexel building and he's clearly had to had to use that restroom at the top of that building before so soon after dick rowland enters the elevator a clerk at drexel's first floor clothing store ren burg's here's a woman scream from the elevator so that clark rushes out to see a black man running from the building and then he goes into the elevator area to find sarah page still in the elevator and what he described as a quote distraught state. So the clerk assumed. Sarah's been assaulted and he calls the police. The police arrived. They speak with sarah. There is no written statement on the record. it's never taken none as ever taken. The police began an investigation and the exact details of what actually happened in. The elevator are still unknown but most people believe that dick either trip wall. He was walking into the elevator and fell and grabbed sarah's arm to steady him saw or he stepped on her foot as he walked into the elevator and then grabbed her so she wouldn't fall over but there is basically physical contact and the it's likely she screamed because she was startled by it. I saw dick immediately ran knowing that the worst would be assumed about his actions and his intentions no matter how innocent the incident actually so dicko's to his mom's house in the greenwood district

Drexel Building Dick Rowland Sarah Page Ren Burg Tulsa Oklahoma Drexel America Sarah Clark Dick Dicko Greenwood
Fresh update on "tulsa" discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

01:04 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "tulsa" discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"Such circumstances, regardless of the number against him. The Tulsa star is unalterably opposed to mob violence, regardless of the color of the men composing the mark. And while we recognize the old adage that the pen is mightier than the sword, we have had some actual experience with the cowards who compose Madam's, which has convinced us that two or three determined men armed for the occasion and thwart the purpose of any mob if they act in earnest. And in time. Which brings us to may 30th 1921. The day, a young African American shoe shiner named Dick Rowland got into an elevator operated by therapy, a young white woman. What happened in the elevator is up for debate. The details don't seem to matter. Greenwood's fate was sealed, and here's another detailed laws from the historical archives. That. On the day of Roland's arrest, the White owned Tulsa Tribune ran an article with the headline to Lynch A Negro Tonight It's missing from.

Dick Rowland Roland May 30Th 1921 TWO Greenwood Three Tulsa Tribune Lynch A Negro Tonight African American Tulsa
Anneliese Bruner, White Primacy, and Telling the Whole Story

Pod 4 Good

01:43 min | 3 d ago

Anneliese Bruner, White Primacy, and Telling the Whole Story

"Now a lotta people in oklahoma have similar story about when they first heard about what was called the tulsa race riot which is now called. Telomerase massacre appropriately. What this is a very hard question to both ask and answer but at that moment when you learned this horrible thing that happened. What was your first feeling. I would say that. I was shocked. I knew about the kinds of racial violence that has taken place in this country for centuries of course but i had not of course this was unprinted. Unprecedented expected that there would have been an act of utter warfare. Basically unleashed on citizens of the united states of america with n. It's very own borders. So it was a a shocking realization. It was farther along the continuum of racially animated violence. Than i had ever really gone before in terms of what i learned about our own history here in our country and one of the things that occurred to me when i actually had opportunity to sit down and read all the way through was to begin to have a deeper understanding about my grandmother's live in san francisco and some of the chaos that she exhibited and endured along with some of the effects of her own coping with all of

Tulsa Oklahoma United States Of America San Francisco
Fresh "Tulsa" from The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

00:34 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh "Tulsa" from The New Yorker Radio Hour

"Then shoot people as they came out of the front door. And that's probably the least graphic description that I can give you of what some of the things they did in East ST Louis E. ST Louis, Illinois, July 19 17/3 days, whites ravaged a black neighborhood in the city, looting, assaulting and killing people in horrific ways. Estimates varied, but it's believed they murdered over 100. Maybe as many as 250 African Americans and some 6000 fled the city, East ST. Louis, like Greenwood and Tulsa had been a community on the rise. Smitherman, the crusading newspaper publisher in Tulsa, wrote a telegram to the governor of Oklahoma, denouncing an attack on a small town about 50 miles north of Tulsa, called Dewey. Dear governor Sunday night, August 11th and Dewey, Oklahoma, the homes of 21 colored American citizens were destroyed by incendiary flames at the hands of a mob and the colored inhabitants of that same town, driven out by the same mob. At this time of our national crisis while our black boys alongside our white boys are fighting, bleeding and dying on the shell cloud battlefields of France for the principles of democracy, surely We will not desecrate the cause for which they are giving their life blood.

Sunday Night East St. Louis Tulsa Greenwood Dewey Over 100 21 Colored France East St Louis E. St Louis, Ill About 50 Miles Smitherman August 11Th 250 July 19 17/3 Days American Oklahoma 6000 African Governor Americans
The Tulsa Race Massacre: Where Are the Reparations?

In The Thick

01:56 min | 2 weeks ago

The Tulsa Race Massacre: Where Are the Reparations?

"Week was one hundred years right. Since the tulsa race massacre occurred this is when a mob of white people with support from local politicians and the police killed an estimated. Three hundred black americans burned down over one thousand two and fifty homes destroyed businesses. And all of this in the greenwood district of tulsa oklahoma. Which by the way was known as black wall street because it was so thriving so dynamic so filled with life and economic potential. Well okay no surprise. None of the white attackers were ever convicted for this crime which happened after a false report of a black teenager attacking a white girl. The girl later dropped the charges but white local media ran a racist article with an inflammatory headline which essentially incited the mob attack. So okay the role of media and journalism historically in this country. Let's take a look at that. Also white media. There helped cover up what happened in this. Like incredible part of the united states in the greenwood district barely any mentioned in the newspapers in textbooks government officials locals so finally one hundred years later. There is a reckoning happening in mainstream establishments. I have a question whether or not if george floyd had not been murdered. You know how extensive with these commemorations be but president biden visited tulsa this week. It's the first time a. Us president has done so to acknowledge what happened in greenwood. He did meet with survivors. I posted this jamila from nicole. Hannah jones who by the way shoutout were watching out for you and unc is are on that what nicole hannah jones said was the only thing i'm interested in right. Now is the reparations

Tulsa Greenwood Oklahoma George Floyd President Biden United States Hannah Jones Jamila Nicole Hannah Jones Nicole UNC
Fresh update on "tulsa" discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

00:42 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "tulsa" discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"Hey, then come on by the Red Rose Cafe. A nice, cool place to wait on the chicken last but not least. I'm Sam Smith. The baggage man. I go while other stand. The Greenwood district occupied about 40 square blocks in northwest Tulsa, and its wealth climbed along with the rest of the city. There were at least three recorded millionaires and many more families worth hundreds of thousands of dollars. People started calling it Black Wall Street. Of course, it wasn't perfect. The entire city of Tulsa was basically lawless. This was definitely the wild Wild Midwest Raven Mongia Williams. Smitherman is great granddaughter. I mean, a lot of people talk about Greenwood and the Black Wall Street and its success. But there was a lot of poverty there. There were a lot of like illegal businesses. It definitely had Gangsters and those Gangsters had casinos and or gambling houses. They called them they had prostitution houses. When AJ Smitherman moved to Tulsa, he realized that he had only visited in the day and he had not. Accurately assess just the degree of corruption and the ill ways of Tulsa at night, and how much the officials of the town We're complacent and are participatory. As the publisher of a daily newspaper. He had his eyes and ears in every corner of Greenwood, and he took it upon himself to clean up the streets. He would literally put the address of a prostitution house. In his newspaper and call out the commissioner like Shut this place down..

Aj Smitherman Sam Smith Tulsa Black Wall Street Greenwood Red Rose Cafe Smitherman Hundreds Of Thousands Of Dolla Greenwood District Northwest Tulsa About 40 Square Blocks Mongia Williams At Least Three Recorded Millio Shut Wild Midwest Raven
Biden Tulsa Speech Lacks Context, Omitting Democrat Congressman Who Were KKK Members

The Dan Bongino Show

01:43 min | 2 weeks ago

Biden Tulsa Speech Lacks Context, Omitting Democrat Congressman Who Were KKK Members

"Quote the speech, Biden There were 37 members of the House of Representatives who are open members of the Ku Klux Klan. Interesting. Biden said that at the Tulsa speech, what he failed to tell you is they were mostly Democrats. Where the fact checkers on you know the fact checkers once we've discussing we've been discussing throughout the show. The opinion checkers also noticed the sensors, the Communists, the fascists, right, the fact checker. You know what they do They go out where the fact checkers every time a conservative says something about this is missing context. This is missing context. Where's the missing context on that? Right there. A bunch of members of the House of Representatives the past who are members of the Ku Klux Klan? Yeah, dude, they were Democrats. They were Debs. Democrats. Demon rats? Yeah, that's what they were. He left that part out. Left that part out. Kind of important context, isn't it? Considering Biden's a Democrat, too. It's also interesting for those listening it Describe the Fox nation is a live video feed of my show here you could see on video does he at home the honorary Honor the great Rush Limbaugh. The paper flip a celebrity did that There's a photo here. I'm looking at you looking at home, too. If you watch the video there, check that out. Put a little Sharpie line around the face. It's a photo of Joe Biden. What's he doing there? Yes. What is he doing in this photo? C SPAN two photo screenshot. Speaking and eulogizing someone at a funeral. Whose funeral is that? Jim, Look, this guy for me. I've never heard him Senator Robert Byrd, is that the same guy who was in the Ku Klux Klan?

Biden House Of Representatives Ku Klux Klan Tulsa Debs Rush Limbaugh FOX Joe Biden Senator Robert Byrd JIM
Fresh update on "tulsa" discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

01:01 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "tulsa" discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"Star launched just as green what was becoming a destination for people all over the country. Mostly black, but also white folks who were curious about the music scene, the food or looking for the best mechanic in town. Greenwood before the massacre was a black community on the rise. That's how I would describe it. My name is Victor Leu Kherson. I'm a journalist and author I'm living in Tulsa, working on a book about Black Wall Street. So what have you learned? How would you describe Greenwood? What was it like? They're the story agreeing with it so complex, And there's some most tragedy and trauma as part of it, but also so much inspiration. You saw all kinds of different businesses from Fire very shops to beauty salons, doctor's offices, Dennis offices, Smitherman opened his printing press with a loan from a local businessman. His No facility was worth more than $40,000, a pretty big accomplishment for the son of a coal miner. The Tulsa Star reported on the life of Greenwood and was a key booster in the community. Whenever a signing new brick building went up, Smitherman would run a formal announcement. He also printed ads from all the new and thriving businesses make has been studying maps and going deep into the archives of the star. So it was always kind of fun to see those sort of more upscale business is like a croquet garden. Oh, they had like a terrier and a jeweler. Ladies engines come on down to Williams Furniture store. Even when you want furniture bad you want it Good. And if you're hungry north screen with grocery store has fine state because of all kind. Or try Ragland and Ellis for waffles and plenty of other good things to suit the most best cities in town for visit, stay at the Stratford, believing colored hotel of.

Victor Leu Kherson Tulsa Smitherman Williams Furniture Greenwood Tulsa Star Fire More Than $40,000 Stratford Ragland Dennis Star Ellis Wall Street Black
Biden Divides Rather Than Unites With Racist Comments

The Dan Bongino Show

01:37 min | 2 weeks ago

Biden Divides Rather Than Unites With Racist Comments

"The other day and said something that is really disturbing because if it's true, the country has a very serious problem. Let me just play the cut because it speaks for itself and then explain to you how number one. It's a lie. It is or at minimum, a grotesque exaggeration. And secondly, it's clearly designed To set a country right now. With serious racial divisions going on because of the Democrats, abuse of identity politics to set the country on fire. There's no other reason to say this. Here's Biden at this Tulsa, this commemoration of the Tulsa master it Discussed things staying on her history. But look at what he did there. Check this out. The joint session of Congress, according the intelligence community, terrorism from white supremacy is the most lethal threat. The homeland today. Not Isis, not al Qaida, white supremacists. Wait, What? So just to be clear. The President, United States appears very confused. And not suggested, but set out right? That in our hierarchy of threats to the homeland to the citizens of the United States, the taxpayers the good citizens of this country that the most dangerous threat to the country right now is not Isis or Al Qaeda. But that threat is a white premises groups or there's a white supremacist around every corner. I mean, what? What? Well, what? What kind of weird odd suggestion is Is that

Tulsa Biden Al Qaeda Congress United States
Biden Taps Harris to Lead Administration's Voting Rights Efforts

AM Tampa Bay

00:48 sec | 2 weeks ago

Biden Taps Harris to Lead Administration's Voting Rights Efforts

"Harris to lead the effort to defend voting rights. Made the announcement while Commemorating one of America's worst racist massacres on the 1/100 anniversary of a white mob killing as many as 300 black residents and Tulsa president, Biden said. For too long, the history of the massacre has been cloaked in darkness only with truth. Can come healing. Injustice and repair on Lee with truth. The president also said he is tapping Vice President Kamila Harris to lead the administration's efforts the past voting rights legislation in response to election laws and acted around the country with her leadership and your support. We're gonna overcome again. I promise you Republicans could filibuster the legislation in the Senate opposed to what they call a federal takeover of state run elections at the White House stirred how Burnham Fox

Kamila Harris Harris Biden Tulsa America LEE Senate White House Burnham Fox
Biden Decries Horrific Tulsa Massacre in Emotional Speech

AP 24 Hour News

00:51 sec | 2 weeks ago

Biden Decries Horrific Tulsa Massacre in Emotional Speech

Biden Marks Tulsa Race Massacre in Emotional, Graphic Speech

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 2 weeks ago

Biden Marks Tulsa Race Massacre in Emotional, Graphic Speech

"Hi Mike Crossey a reporting president Biden marks the Tulsa race massacre in an emotional graphics speech this is not a right this is a massacre one hundred years later an American president finally spoke to the horror of the Tulsa massacre that saw the thriving Greenwood district also known as the black Wall Street destroyed terrorized Greenwood torches guns shooting a world on may thirty first and June first nineteen twenty one a white mob swarmed looted and burned at Tulsa's Greenwood district as many as three hundred black Tolson's were killed afterwards thousands of survivors were four time forced into internment camps in his remarks Biden said the nation must come to grips with the following season of denial for a long time schools and also didn't even teach it let alone schools elsewhere hi Mike Rossio

Mike Crossey Tulsa Biden Greenwood Tolson Mike Rossio
Biden To Honor Forgotten Victims of Tulsa Race Massacre

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 2 weeks ago

Biden To Honor Forgotten Victims of Tulsa Race Massacre

"President Biden will be in Oklahoma today to mark the one hundredth anniversary of a largely forgotten racially motivated massacre the president will meet privately in Tulsa with survivors of the violence that killed up to three hundred black people along what was known as black Wall Street he's the first president to take part in the remembrances and the visit comes amid a continuing struggle over racial justice he's been pushing Congress to pass a policing overhaul and today will announce steps to help narrow the wealth gap between blacks and whites the White House says one step will address issues leading to black owned homes being appraised at far less than comparable homes owned by whites Sager made Ghani Washington

President Biden Oklahoma Tulsa Congress White House Sager Ghani Washington
Civil Rights Leader Reverend William Barber Delivers Speech at Tulsa Massacre Memorial

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:35 sec | 2 weeks ago

Civil Rights Leader Reverend William Barber Delivers Speech at Tulsa Massacre Memorial

"Of members of the city's thriving black community were killed by a white mob. Civil rights leader, Reverend William Barber told the crowd a historic Vernon a M E Church. That mob will not get the last word in Tulsa. We must be more powerful. Then even they were so that this and nothing like it ever happens again in public policy or in public violence. Other events in Tulsa Monday featured calls for reparations for survivors of the massacre and their descendants. Brian Clark, ABC News more details about the

Reverend William Barber Tulsa Vernon Brian Clark Abc News
"tulsa" Discussed on Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

03:14 min | 2 weeks ago

"tulsa" Discussed on Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

"By pepsi zero sugar on may thirty first. Nineteen twenty one tulsa. Oklahoma was the site of a horrific massacre a group of white racist poundstone tulsa prosperous black enclave of greenwood burning looting and killing many blacks while destroying thirty five thirty five city blocks. This year marks the one hundredth anniversary of these horrific attacks. Yesterday president joe biden released a proclamation. For a day of remembrance for the nineteen twenty one tulsa race massacre calling on americans to reflect on the deep roots of racial terror in our nation and recommit to the work of rooting out systemic racism across our country. See the problem we have is. I was watching. Fox deal the night and it was a guy on. Who has this little raggedy ass show. And his whole thing is our countries becoming a marxist country and that there are things of the democrat joe binders marxist and they using race to to fight our country using politics defied country. First of all the problem that we have is is when you don't admit to racism you have no chance of solving race and so many of them try to push the acts of racism under the rug. And 'cause you don't want to label it as racism or you being racist. Don't stop it from being racist. The people who define racism and racist for you is the people that is being perpetrated against not the perpetrator. Because you you in yo lily society chew live here right around your friends you all for you this is normal because ain't nothing happening to you embraces affects us. We're being this is what happened in tulsa. They went through there and bomb this neighborhood. They torched this they murdered these black people for no was successful because they were successful. Mar father man whose father was asleep. My father said be careful soon is not enough to they got everything they don't want to have nothing and i'll always wonder why my father was. Say something like that. But he says the poof is to our history. He say they got wall street. We get black wall street. Uk handle black wall street. Go through their take that from law. So they couldn't rebuild. Look hey look. Y'all y'all got the right to vote. Oh y'all cavo who won't now look at all these laws they pass it again. That ain't racist to you right. It's called votto pressure trip and that we stoop anybody stoop we we we hip to this game. And you're not you keep hearing on this tellers raining. And we'll recognize the p. All right thank you coming up. More of the steve harvey morning show right after.

pepsi zero sugar Oklahoma joe biden Fox president one hundredth anniversary thirty five thirty five city b Yesterday This year joe binders First steve nineteen twenty one tulsa race tulsa may thirty first americans democrat Uk cavo harvey
Services Held to Remember Tulsa Race Massacre

BBC World Service

00:19 sec | 2 weeks ago

Services Held to Remember Tulsa Race Massacre

"Events have been taking place in the U. S city of Tulsa in Oklahoma to mark the Centenary of a race related massacre in which up to 300 black people were killed. Speaking at a memorial service, the head of Oklahoma's national Guards, Major General Michael Thompson, apologized for the guards. Failure to stop the violence.

Oklahoma Tulsa U. National Guards Major General Michael Thompson
Biden To Visit Tulsa To Mark the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre

NPR News Now

01:07 min | 2 weeks ago

Biden To Visit Tulsa To Mark the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre

"Live from npr news. I'm giles snyder on day. Mark one hundred years. Since the beginning of the nineteen twenty one tulsa race massacre. The attack by white mobs on the black neighborhood of greenwood known as black wall street span. Two days left as many as three hundred people. Debt of course polanski of member station k. wgn s. reports from an interfaith prayer service marking the centennial. The attack vernon ame church is one of the only structures to partially survived. The events of one hundred years ago clergy from many fates gathered there monday morning to dedicate a prayer while the reverend jesse jackson senior group in prayer for an end to racist violence and a reaper. The black wall street back then. President biden is scheduled to arrive in tulsa on tuesday in a proclamation recognizing the centennial of the massacre. He says he is committed to rooting out. Systemic racism in america for npr news. I'm chris polanski. In tulsa

Npr News Giles Snyder Vernon Ame Church Tulsa WGN Greenwood Polanski Mark President Biden Jesse Jackson Chris Polanski America
Hundreds Gather at Historic Tulsa Church's Prayer Wall

AP News Radio

01:00 min | 2 weeks ago

Hundreds Gather at Historic Tulsa Church's Prayer Wall

"A prayer wall is been dedicated in Tulsa Oklahoma to honor the victims of the nineteen twenty one massacre that wiped out a prosperous black neighborhood what you're seeing in a service to honor those killed when the Greenwood district of Tulsa known as black Wall Street was attacked may thirty first nineteen twenty one buildings were burned and looted and somewhere between dozens and three hundred people were killed a prayer wall similar to Jerusalem's wailing wall has been dedicated outside the historic Vernon African Methodist Episcopal Church Reverend William barber and Katie you L. this wall is not for us to remember the fight they fall the role is to give us the courage to fight the fight we still have to fight president Biden who will visit the neighborhood says after the businesses were destroyed Tulsa officials deliberately passed laws making it too expensive for blacks to rebuild hi Jackie Quinn

Tulsa Vernon African Methodist Episc William Barber Katie You L. Oklahoma Greenwood President Biden Jerusalem Jackie Quinn
Tulsa Race Massacre Centennial Events Proceed Amid Hiccups

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 2 weeks ago

Tulsa Race Massacre Centennial Events Proceed Amid Hiccups

"Tulsa marks one hundred years since one of the deadliest acts of racial violence in American history it was a two day event that started on may thirty first nineteen twenty one in what came to be known as the Tulsa race massacre thousands of black Tolson's flood a white mob that destroyed several churches while burning and leveling up thirty five square black neighborhood estimates of the death toll range from dozens to three hundred billion Parker owns the black Wall Street market in Tulsa and said she was told to never discuss the massacre we had the host up and we never talked about several events are planned for this week including a visit by president Biden who is expected to join local leaders and marking the occasion on Tuesday and other events will feature the last three known living massacre survivors who are all between one hundred and one hundred seven years old I'm Mike help in

Tulsa Tolson President Biden Parker Mike
100 Years on From the Tulsa Race Massacre

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:14 sec | 2 weeks ago

100 Years on From the Tulsa Race Massacre

"Happened on this day 100 years ago, the two day assault on what was one of the country's leading areas for black owned business and commerce took place businesses and homes burned out. It's still not known exactly how many people were killed. You're listening

3 Documentaries You Should Watch About the Tulsa Race Massacre

All Things Considered

02:06 min | 2 weeks ago

3 Documentaries You Should Watch About the Tulsa Race Massacre

"Marks the 1/100 anniversary of the beginning of the Tulsa Race massacre, one of this country's worst recorded incidents of racial violence. Starting on May 31st 1921 and armed white mob aided by complicity or complacent officials killed as many as 300 men, women and Children in the area known as Black Wall Street. Burning it to the ground. Numerous events are taking place this long weekend to mark the centennial, although disputes rose when particularly high profile event was canceled, reportedly in a disagreement over compensation for three elderly survivors who were supposed to take part. But other events are proceeding and there are lots of opportunities to learn more about this traumatic but consequential moment, including numerous TV projects. NPR TV critic Eric Deggans has picked three documentaries, which he says you should not miss. For a long time. The Tosa race massacre was the attack America forgot and obliterated Tulsa, Oklahoma's prosperous black own Greenwood district, also known as Black Wall Street. The riots by white moms was hushed up by local officials and overlooked in history books. But that is changing as several TV outlets mark the centennial with documentaries on the massacre and its aftermath. It's an effort educate Americans on a horrendous attack, which burned down over 1200 homes and killed between 103 100 people. Among the best and most cinematic of these efforts is the history Channel film Tulsa Burning the 1921 Race Massacre Co directed by Emmy winner Stanley Nelson and executive produced by MBA star Russell Westbrook. This film opens with Reverend Robert Turner, pastor of Historic Burn in a M E Church who regularly visits Tulsa City Hall with a Bible in a bullhorn, reminding residents of the atrocity You are standing in a crime scene referred Turner Pastors. The church where black people hit in a basement tow avoid white moms 100 years ago. He now supports efforts to excavate a local cemetery where victims of the massacre rumored to have been dumped in unmarked graves in passing the

Tulsa Eric Deggans Greenwood District NPR Stanley Nelson Reverend Robert Turner Oklahoma Tulsa City Hall America Russell Westbrook Emmy MBA Turner
"tulsa" Discussed on 5 Things

5 Things

08:29 min | 3 weeks ago

"tulsa" Discussed on 5 Things

"May thirty first and june first. Nineteen twenty one. Were a nightmare. For black residents of tulsa oklahoma during the tulsa massacre a white mob descended on a large black neighborhood called greenwood one of the worst cases of racialized violence in our country's history. The black community in greenwood was full of businesses and financial opportunities it was entrepreneurial creative and people achieve economic stability and prosperity. Then whites destroyed everything. Thirty five blocks were burned and around ten thousand. Black people lost their homes historian. Save nearly three hundred block. People were killed by the violence. Property damage was between fifty million and one hundred million dollars in today's money. Monday is the one hundred year anniversary of the violence. Over the past hundred years people in tulsa have been working together to rebuild greenwood but as time goes on the truth about the massacre and the damage falls further into the past survivors of the massacre and tulsa. Political leaders have always asked that the damage be repaired. A group of survivors filed a lawsuit. Last year seeking reparations from the city of tulsa and other local government entities. I sat down with professor trayvon. Logan one of the country's foremost experts on economic reparations to discuss what reparations could fix for people whose lives were upended by racialized violence. We talked a bit about the tulsa massacre but tulsa is only one example of how systemic racialized violence destroyed economic resources. Professor logan also told me about how all sorts of different economic injustices have lingering effects on society today and our overall economic well-being. Here's our conversation. So i'm joined by professor. Trayvon logan the hazel see. Youngberg trustees distinguished professor in the department of economics at ohio state university professor. Logan thanks so much for being here. Thank you for having me. So may thirty. First is the one hundred year anniversary of the tolson massacre at usa today in our coverage surrounding that anniversary. Were focusing a lot on reparations for folks. Listening reparations are something that's done to repair a harm that was caused in the past or restore justice in some way. Would you agree with that professor. Logan would you define reparations. I think that there are a couple of definitions of reparations and it depends in this particular case ratio. Reparations depends on the perspective when wants to think about what the preparations before. So certainly there's a case to be made for reparations. For enslavement that will be due to the descendants of slaves. But it's also important to recognize that slavery was not the end of the process of racial discrimination and racial oppression. And so the other aspect of reparations are for the continual harms that were visited upon black-americans after emancipation and some are viewing this in its totality of not being just about enslavement but about the continual oppression economic exclusion of african americans of that continues to the present so regarding tulsa tulsa is one of the biggest examples of racist violence in our country's history. A white mob destroyed a community and all the resources that were a part of it whites killed nearly three hundred black people according to some historians a lawsuit filed by some survivors of the massacre estimate. The property damage totaled between fifty million to a hundred million dollars. In today's currency it's critical. It's so important that we learn about history commemorate it. Why do you think it's important that we not only recognize what happened but respond and do something about it through reparations. Yes i think. Tulsa is one of those sailing of the type of racial violence and economic violence visited on black-americans and tulsa singular. Because it's one event happens in a short period of time. The community was completely decimated. There were a number of deaths and believe now perhaps mass graves that were a result of the massacre there and the destruction of this very vibrant and economically self. Sustaining community tells us that we want to have preparations for this particular incident. It's also important to recognize that. There's not only the direct harm to the people whose homes and businesses were bombed and looted. But also the fact that no insurance claims were paid for those who suffered harms so. Think about actionable items for something that will be repetitive. There was not even in the insurance industry for them to redress. They had paid premiums but after this violence and after these bombs are literally dropped upon them. They have no means to recover from that or to be made whole so. There are certainly strong justifications for the actions that were taken by the government in the and then by private insurance companies. that would require reparations. You're an economics. Professor when studying tulsa specifically like you just said we know that a lot of entrepreneurial opportunities were destroyed and what you said about the insurance claims. Not being available is horrendous. That property damage that loss of business opportunity. What are some of the economic repercussions we've seen throughout history since tulsa when black owned businesses are destroyed. And tell us more about how. There's not that safety net that can be accessed you. We can think about sort of racial violence in the past and looting of black communities racialized violence running african americans out of town. The elaine massacre in arkansas where hundreds of blacks were victimized and black land owners were driven off their property and jailed. These are not isolated incidents when we think about them over time. So how does it play a role into the present. It plays a role into the present because these are direct actions that are taken by groups and mobs meantime supported by the state of dispossessing african americans from the wealth that they have and when they're dispossessed from their wealth they have nobody to transfer to their children so this is literally theft. That is not a action by the government. There's nothing that the federal government state governments local governments do when peoples property has been confiscated by others and there's no recompense for this and it is a direct negative shock to black wealth. And then there's no intergenerational transmission of wealth and so if we think about the cumulative effects of is a property owner having my property taken from me receiving no compensation for that and now have nothing to pass on to my descendants and that leads us to the situation. We have today of african americans. Having one tenth of the wealth of white americans now part of that are these direct incidents as we were talking about. Tulsa and the destruction of that black wealth and then a larger picture of exclusion of african americans from government back book programs. Wealth redistribution programs going back from the northwest ordinance and continuing through to the gi bill. These are other things that are happening that are also negatively impacting african americans in their ability to accumulate well so there's a direct linkage between african americans having well and having it taken from them and then other hand african americans being blocked from participating in wealth enhancing activities that leads to these disparities in wealth that we see today..

logan trayvon Logan tulsa Monday Thirty five blocks arkansas Trayvon logan Last year hundreds First one hundred year around ten thousand june first May thirty first one hundred million dollars usa tulsa oklahoma one one event
Tulsa Race Massacre Remembrance Main Event Suddenly Canceled

WBZ Afternoon News

00:51 sec | 3 weeks ago

Tulsa Race Massacre Remembrance Main Event Suddenly Canceled

Looking Back at the Tulsa Race Massacre 100 Years Later

1A

02:03 min | 3 weeks ago

Looking Back at the Tulsa Race Massacre 100 Years Later

"Back to our commemoration of the 100 year anniversary of the Tulsa Race massacre with us, Phoebe are stubble filled forensic anthropologist at the University of Florida. And Greg Robinson, a Tulsa political activist. They're both descendants of survivors from the massacre. We're also hearing from Yuko camo kid tweeted. I never knew about it Until recently. I suspect it was not mentioned in my history class is in central Indiana in the fifties and sixties, and Greg wrote on Facebook. I first heard about it, circa 1998 on a news program on ABC. Utterly shocked by the story and equally so by not ever having heard in a report or reference to the attack. Previously we heard from a number of people in Oklahoma, including John in Tulsa and Martha and Grove. I was 40 years old. When I first heard about the race massacres. The first time I ever heard about this wasn't about 2000 and two And what's so sad is I grew up only 80 miles away. I was at the Greenwood Center on a field trip with high school freshman I returned on the bus with them and made the comment that I hadn't heard one single word growing up in Tulsa. For the previous 40 years. I then took my young child to Tulsa toe. Learn about it. And when he went back to his school, his teacher told him that that was a rumor. And she had never heard of that. It really shook me. This story needs to be told to our entire country so that it never ever happens again. Break what happened to the survivors after the massacre took place. Well, there was a few different things that occurred. We understand that about 60% of the people who endured the massacre. Escaped into other cities migrated up on each other parts of the country and actually didn't return.

Tulsa Yuko Camo Greg Robinson Phoebe University Of Florida Greenwood Center Indiana Greg ABC Martha Grove Oklahoma Facebook John
"tulsa" Discussed on What A Day

What A Day

15:10 min | Last month

"tulsa" Discussed on What A Day

"tulsa" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

06:29 min | Last month

"tulsa" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"The podcast. Seizing freedom tells. The story of how black americans liberated themselves during the civil war and fought for justice during reconstruction. You ask what i am. Grumbling about has not. The president issued his emancipation proclamation. The president has but the country has not and it must be done else. God will blow out the sun. Burn up the sea and thunder his wrath abroad. You can listen to the complete for season of seizing freedom now. So i was lucky enough to get to work with you on a on a feature for history magazine that you wrote for us on the on the tulsa massacre so and i learned after the fact. Because you didn't tell me with a family connection to say. Can you tell me what your family's connection is so i'm related to jbc stratford. Who was touted in in research. That i've found when i was writing the story. As you know one of the most wealthy men on black wall street or greenwood in tulsa oklahoma at that time in the country and he is my third great grandfather. That is tucker tool who works with me. A history resident on the history and culture desk for national geographic tucker's at talented young writer. And i reached out to him to do a story on the hundredth anniversary of the tulsa race riot. So when i found out about his relationship to j. stratford after he turned into the story. I was floored tucker grew up hearing stories about his formidable ancestor. Our new of j. b. end the name. I'd seen his face on when i was younger. I remember my grandfather having conversations with me about how important legacy is in doing research for his article. Tekere sat down with his grandfather. They're unsee tool to learn more about j. b. stratford. And what happened to him after he left. Also all these years trying to blame the right point to him being a major instigator but thanks to the efforts of stratford descendants. Many who have also become lawyers and judges the state of oklahoma stratford and honorary executive. Pardon in nineteen ninety-six. We have plaque. That was issue is issued in the name of state and government had absolve him and talk about the what the family wouldn't get back however is the fortune that jd. Stratford lost when the white mob destroyed his home business properties and forced him out of town. The loss of data generational wealth is something that descendants greenwood's entrepreneurs continue to grapple with my grandfather's words. He said you. You would have been born with a silver spoon in your mouth if if this didn't happen to sort of in in an ally hardaway but you know it's it's really hard to think about because we know this isn't the only event or massacre that black people have faced in in the united states. But we know that these type of events have generational impac. Some economists estimate the financial losses from the tulsa race riots at more than twenty five million dollars today but in terms of loss generational wealth. The number tops. Six hundred million human rights watch issued a report in two thousand twenty making a case for reparations for descendants they and others are calling on federal state and local governments to come up with adequate ways to repair the harm. What's harder to calculate are the effects of decades of erasing the history of what actually happened in tulsa but organizations like the tulsa race massacre sentinel commission historians and scientists like phoebe. Stubblefield are committed to reclaiming the story. I'm here for the seeds. And i hope that that will turn into a connection with their descendants. I thank god. And i both had this mission of tells me people's possibles there won't be around to of hiding the history is i. Don't want this story to be hidden again. More after the break for more on the tulsa race massacre check out the cover story on the anniversary from writer. Deneen brown in the upcoming june issue of national geographic. You can also find the race card a project from journalists michelle norris who challenged people to capture their thoughts on race and just six words and poet. Elizabeth alexander will reflect on what it means to be black and free in a country that undermines black freedom that yo subscribers can check out tucker tools piece on how greenwood was destroyed by the tulsa race massacre in the may june issue of national geographic. History magazine. and soon you'll also be able to read a personal essay tucker road about his ancestor j. stratford on our website. And checkout scott. Ellsworth's new book on the tulsa race massacre called the groundbreaking an american city search for justice. Finally stay tuned this summer for national geographic documentary red summer which chronicles white supremacist terrorism and race. Riots that took place across the country in nineteen nineteen shortly before the tulsa race massacre. That's all in your show notes. Right there in your podcast. App overheard. National geographic is produced by brian. Good jacob pinter. Laura sim and alana strauss. Our senior producer. Carla wills who produced this episode. Our senior editor is eli chen. Our executive producer of audio is to our lawn. Our fact checkers are julie. Beer and robin palmer on sale. Su sound designed engineered this episode. He also composed our theme music. The music in this episode was composed by thomas. Brian of push audio joshua. Thomas was the voice of bucks franklin. This podcast production of national geographic partners. Whitney johnson is the director officials and immersive experiences. Susan goldberg is national geographic's director and i'm your host amy briggs. Thanks for listening and see you next time..

Susan goldberg michelle norris Whitney johnson Brian j. stratford alana strauss Elizabeth alexander thomas j. b. stratford eli chen brian Thomas oklahoma Laura sim Six hundred million Stubblefield julie stratford two thousand jacob pinter
"tulsa" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

05:14 min | Last month

"tulsa" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"But historians.

"tulsa" Discussed on StoriesHere Podcast

StoriesHere Podcast

04:08 min | 10 months ago

"tulsa" Discussed on StoriesHere Podcast

"We've got some of the the earliest books that were published in mexico when publishing was first made available there and even records that show interactions between the spanish colonial government and native nations. In what is now. The united states because of course that southern border didn't always exist. That's a relatively recent phenomenon and one of the things. We really take away from some of the archive. Collections is how recent our current political borders maps truly are because the choctaw people in the american south were interacting with spanish colonial leaders and officials in the seventeen hundreds before the area was part of the present united states so there's really interesting international and global ramifications between the americas in europe that you can see from some of these archives that really should i think a a much more nuanced and much more interesting understanding of american history than than what we tend to get in that k through twelve education. And so that's i mean just really at as a someone who studies art history in and really loves history. I find that in this area. That i'm less familiar with this. Just absolutely fascinating and one of the other documents that truly wonderful from the collection we also have several archive collections at better from native american leaders from the southeast of the united states during the indian removal period during the period around the trail of tears in the eighteen thirties eighteen forties. But one of the documents we have is a is a sequoias siliguri. It's the turkey. A scholar sequoia who develops the The alphabet this for the cherokee language in the early nineteenth century and we have a copy of the cylinder that he wrote. It's in his own hands. So it's showing this at this language preservation for the cherokee people but also the way that the cherokee were adapting to all of these different cultural influences at that time period and really the ways of the church people are thriving and in some of these. This really fantastic innovation From that time. So there's just a some great ways of seeing different connections between cultures in the world that that you can see through some of these documents and archives that i think are really surprising and new light in the way we histories. Wow so many. Let's just a couple. There's so many just a couple and so important just so inspiring and so many ways and wow well. It's been a treat to talk with you. Laura this is wayne stories. Podcast talking to laura fry who's a senior curator and curator of art at the gilchrist museum in tulsa oklahoma. So obviously if you're within a day or two drive of tulsa than just leave now and you can be at the museum sometime soon but seriously if you are in the area you have a chance to be in tulsa then please make sure to visit the museum now that it's reopened reopening after the pandemic and then keep an eye on the development of the new jersey. Yeah so we. We do. Have more information there. I believe it's at gilchrist dot org slash. Vision.

united states mexico americas europe laura fry tulsa gilchrist museum Laura wayne oklahoma new jersey
"tulsa" Discussed on StoriesHere Podcast

StoriesHere Podcast

03:41 min | 10 months ago

"tulsa" Discussed on StoriesHere Podcast

"But i could reality. Being able to create. Artwork is a hand eye. Coordination is just like throwing a baseball playing piano in some ways. Some people have a natural aptitude. But everybody can learn how to do that. If you practice. So i think there's a sort of me becoming from the renaissance in this idea of figures like angelo. Lobbying kind of the lone genius like has kind of hasn't done us a good turn in the way we think about creating artwork to anybody can be an artist and anybody can take joy in that creative impulse and We tend to like to bury it. I think as adults because we think we're not good enough for that. It's all that. That's not something i can do. And we truly. I think anybody is capable in finding joy in creating artwork or in in imbuing artwork. So i think it's really a a something. I wish we gave ourselves more permission to do. I know when you described the kids in that or shop. It's i can just picture them. And it's it's very refreshing image. And so can you teach or rather maybe une teach what you just described to teach that creativity or teach people to let go of their innovations. Is that part of art. Instruction i think so. You know i'm not. I'm not an art educator by profession. But i think encouraging people to kind of get past those inhibitions or to not to cling so tightly to them is certainly part of art instruction firfer any even for those younger children. But they're just less likely to be bothered by the first place they've got a bell disco for it but again i think really. It's anytime you learn a new skill. it's a little bit intimidating. Because you start out without you start being the worst one on in the group right you start out playing really simple one note songs on the piano and they don't sound particularly great at first so i think it's like any new skill it's kind of a willingness to stick with it or to to take it to somewhere where you're finding enjoyment with it and that's why things beautiful about artwork or or a creative impulses. It doesn't have to be for anybody else can really just be for for an individual and doesn't have to have an intended audience at i. One of the phrases us was less likely to be bothered by an i love. I love that. Because i think that's that's so important. And this is wayne. Park with the stores here podcasts. I'm talking today. Laura fry who's the senior curator and curator of art for gilchrist museum in tulsa. Oklahoma museum has said that..

angelo baseball Laura fry wayne gilchrist museum tulsa Oklahoma
"tulsa" Discussed on StoriesHere Podcast

StoriesHere Podcast

04:00 min | 10 months ago

"tulsa" Discussed on StoriesHere Podcast

"Never undone and the supreme court decision does not cause a major change for most of us living here in eastern oklahoma. Although my husband and i By the supreme court decision now are we are reaffirmed to be living on the muskogee creek nation and basically stay said that had never been undone. What it impacts is tribal citizens who commit crimes on tribal lands. So it's basically a not an enrolled tribal member so it doesn't have much impact on me or on on my husband's also not nominee enrolled tribal member but fern rolled tribal citizens. It changes some of the ways that legal processes work for them and So it doesn't it doesn't have a direct impact on most of us living here in oklahoma. But it's still incredibly important because it recognizes the legal right to exist for native american nations in the united states and to hold that nation to nation relationship with the us government so it's really an affirmation of tribal sovereignty here in oklahoma and it was really incredible to see reactions from many of my friends. Here who are. Just i think blown away and just so incredibly emotionally impacted by the symbolism of this decision and the message that sense. It's amazing. I think there was a lot of people it was reported. Probably incorrect won the popular press around the country as so like a bunch of oklahoma was going to be turned back over to the native americans. People were confused about that. But what you're saying is that it's more of a sovereignty issue over existing right and it's really. It's not as i see it. And again. I i may not be quite correctly stating this but from how i understand it. It's not so much turning land back over as acknowledging that this land was always muskogee creek and here and here in tulsa we are at a point where the muskogee creek nation the cherokee nation and the osage nation. All come together so where. My house is is muskoka. Quick recognition the gilchrist museum is on the nation but both of those places are also under the jurisdiction of the city of tulsa so there are these overlapping jurisdictions here. And i've lived in oklahoma for almost five years and i'm still trying to understand some of the the local politics in the history in how these things of all because it is fairly complicated but the supreme court decision absolutely recognized the the importance of that tribal sovereignty from the beginning. It really was a A notable decision for the nations in oklahoma and across the united states. And then so tell us about the enduring. Spirit is is an exhibit. is that what. How you one of our a permanent collection exhibitions at gilchrist museum. And it's Organized by geography and shows and has a each section section of the great plains about oklahoma the southwest the northwest and each section has a pretty wide range of time periods so we tried to include some contemporary art alongside historic material. All the way through there but this exhibition is also one that we're really looking forward to updating with the new building design. one of the things. we're aiming to change about gilchrist is again bringing more voices than we currently have presented in our galleries also aiming to combine the different areas of our collection in new ways. Right now we have. Most of the paintings and sculptures by european american artists in one area and artwork by native american artists in another area and archives are in a totally separate building so we really have been thinking about these collections in in distinct ways and one of the things we'd like to do is to really combine those and to look more. Broadly thematically across the goal crease collection. And there's a couple of different reasons for this but among other things. We.

muskogee creek oklahoma supreme court gilchrist museum tulsa us government united states muskoka gilchrist
"tulsa" Discussed on StoriesHere Podcast

StoriesHere Podcast

05:47 min | 10 months ago

"tulsa" Discussed on StoriesHere Podcast

"Tulsa. Oklahoma had an opportunity to talk with. Dooley stein is director of the burke museum in seattle and they went through same situation. They had a whole new building to be able to move into it and what. What an incredible opportunity that few museum people get to experience in their careers. A is there a burden to that also his it you think. Wow you've got a whole cloth or or is enough of it already defined that it doesn't seem that way were your feelings about. What are your feelings about that. Well in our case. I think it's it's certainly a challenge. There's challenges that come with building entirely new construction but we are completely convinced that this was the right way to go. Our existing building is kind of frankenstein. It was originally the carriage house for our founder..

Dooley stein burke museum Tulsa Oklahoma seattle
"tulsa" Discussed on StoriesHere Podcast

StoriesHere Podcast

02:52 min | 10 months ago

"tulsa" Discussed on StoriesHere Podcast

"Welcomed the stories here podcasts. There's a creative freedom that young children possess where they aren't many of them are not held back by this concept of what artists opposed to look like younger. Children tend to ten knots. Worry about what they're creating or what other people will think about it and to just create and it's really lovely to see it can be really wonderful to see a whole classroom of children just having fun being creative using color and shape and line and different ways and i think it could help them really understand the world around them and distinct ways. It's not. I don't see art in schools as being something fluffy or the lighthearted fun time but but really helping children to see and to understand the world of different ways so hi. This is wayne parker stories here. Podcast delighted today to talk to laura fry who says senior curator and curator of art at the gilchrist museum in tulsa oklahoma and the us and so law. Thanks for being with us today. Yes thank you for the invitation. So i'm interested in in you and your background. Let's start with what you were like as a kid and then could you ever have imagined as a kid. You doing what you're doing today you know. I think i wouldn't be too surprised. I was one of those kids who was always into drying into art. I was really drawn to the idea of a career that was based in the arts in some ways from a very young age. I think at some point i thought i was going to be a potter professional potter. You know for my living and moved on from that. But i think my mom used to tell stories about when i was very little. I wouldn't really play with my dolls. I would sort of set them up in very elaborate tableaux leave them be so i think maybe i was always ready to be a museum curator and work on exhibitions. I did a my undergraduate. I've a fine arts from washington university in st louis and a master's of art history from university of denver. The path that you've taken the career path that you've taken doesn't sound like it was that much of a surprise if you look back at it. What things in the field have surprised you. That's a great question i. I don't know. I'm surprised actually by that. There aren't more curious to come from a fine arts background in some way i find that. Having the academic grounding in sort of studio art studio practice is really helpful for curated artworks and really having a tactile understanding of artistic processes. And ah i candidate had that i or that experiential understanding of how some of these processes work. Even though some of the things i created in art school weren't particularly spectacular..

wayne parker laura fry gilchrist museum tulsa oklahoma university of denver washington university st louis us
"tulsa" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

07:20 min | 1 year ago

"tulsa" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Brain stuff a production of iheartradio. Hey brain stuff, Lauren Bugaboo I'm here. In Tulsa Oklahoma, a group of scientists and historians is on the verge of unearthing chunk of the city's past that has long been buried and one. Some people may prefer to keep that way. It's a potential mass grave from worst single incident of interracial violence in American history. Beginning may thirty first in nineteen twenty one thousands of armed white. Tulsen's invaded black section of the booming oil town, terrorizing its residence looting, their homes and businesses and burning to the ground, some thirty five square blocks of the city. Before the rampage was over more than ten thousand black people were left homeless, and more than six thousand were turned in camps where they'd stay in some cases for months. We spoke with Scott, Ellsworth, a native Tulsa and a professor of African American history at the University of Michigan. Ellsworth is the author of the Nineteen Eighty two book death in a Promised Land, one of the first books to take a comprehensive historical look at the Tulsa race massacre previously mystically called the Tulsa race riot of nineteen twenty one. He said to this day. We don't know how many died. Reasonable estimates range from I would say forty to his high as three hundred. When the unmarked suspected mass grave and a Tulsa cemetery is excavated in July of two thousand twenty. It may provide a few answers to exactly what happened over those two days and nineteen twenty one. It will be for many a literal. Reopening of a wound festered within the city for nearly a century. The Tulsa massacre of nineteen twenty one did not a word often used to describe such events erupt. The city simply reached. What now seems an inevitable breaking point? In early nineteen, twenty one tulsa was awash cash from the oil boom. The good fortune reached into the north section of the city, mostly populated by black Americans. That later to be known as the Black Wall Street contained one hundred ninety one businesses, including hotels feed store, a roller rink cleaners, mom and pop stores and restaurants plus offices for doctors, dentists and lawyers. The area had at least five churches to a library movie theater and a hospital. Like the rest of the city at that time, the black area also known as Greenwood had its problems alcohol, even under prohibition was readily available. Illegal drugs were easy to find to. As we're gambling and prostitution the whole city, not just greenwood struggled with crime end with lawless punishment less than a year before a white teenager, accused of murder, was taken from jail cell and lynched by a white mob. The police did little to protect him. And Racial Violence against black people was commonplace, even though thousands of black Americans had just returned from fighting in World War. One Jim Crow Laws and pervasive racist attitudes meant that equality remained nothing more than a dream for black Americans and many white Americans. Wanted to keep it that way. Ellsworth route and in two thousand one report commissioned by the State of Oklahoma on then called riot that quote during the weeks and months leading up to the riot, there were more than a few white Tulsen's who only feared. The color line was in danger of being slowly erased a believed that this was already happening. So into that explosive milieu, a black teenaged boy, working as a shoeshiner, had a brief run in with a white teenage girl operating elevator. and. The fuse was lit. The boy was taken into custody. A group of more than two thousand angry white people, some intent on lynching him, possibly prompted by an inflammatory editorial in a white run newspaper gathered on the courthouse steps some armed black war, veterans and others squared off with them there and soon shots were fired. White people from all over the city began their march on the green. What area to tamp down? What many white people saw as an uprising? Their stories of black citizens being murdered in their homes interrupted in their evening prayers. The terror went on for eighteen hours into June first. Despite their sworn duty to serve and protect neither Tulsa police, nor any other government agency assisted the black population. Instead Tulsa police officers helped set some buyers, an all white unit of the National Guard joined the invaders. Other. Public officials provided guns and AMMO two white men. The KKK got involved a semi functioning machine gun was on black. Tulsen's and some reports indicate the airplanes dropped homemade fire starters. Despite being largely outnumbered black Tulsen's fought to protect their homes and businesses and most of all. Greenwood. But in the end, scores of black people and some white people were killed in. Greenwood was left in ruins. The exact numbers of injured and dead. Even after what's to be uncovered in three suspected mass graves may never be known. It's still unclear exactly what happened between the Black Shoeshine Boy Dick Rowland and the white. Elevator Goal Sarah page to spark the massacre. Though one thing is known. She refused to bring charges. Roland was vindicated. For years. Tulsa refused to acknowledge in any meaningful way. What had happened in nineteen twenty one. Nobody has ever been charged or prosecuted for the crimes that occurred during those eighteen or so hours, even those who grew up there ellsworth included were not taught that part of the city's history. The Tulsa race massacre became a terrible and closely held secret. That began to change with Ellsworth's defeated promised land, and some earlier work, then in nineteen ninety-five, when members of the national media descended on Oklahoma City after the bombing of the federal building, they were informed of this other more terrible episode of domestic terrorism in the state's history. More news accounts and more books of the massacre followed and twenty nineteen, the HBO Comic Book Superhero Series Watchmen inspired in part by Tulsa, enlightened many to the story. But pulses failed efforts to come to grips with its deadly past has left scars. Ellsworth said city was robbed of its honesty. You have entire generations growing up in Tulsa who've never heard of this your people growing up with a false reality, a false vision of the land they were on I mean imagine if today right now that you had young people growing up in Manhattan, who had never heard of nine eleven, but there were no books to talk about nine eleven that it's as if it didn't exist. The race massacre was a gigantic myth in the history of Tulsa it was deliberately buried for a long time. With the honor thing of one of at least three suspected mass graves and Tulsa next month will mark another step in the long road to understanding and perhaps one day recovery. Ellsworth said I know that this has been a process that has been going on for a while now it's caused people to kind of reevaluate how they look at the past. How they look at their town and what's going on? I think that's been liberating process for some people. It's been a very difficult one for others. Episode was written by John Donovan and produced by Tyler Clang more on this and lots of other topics. VISIT HOUSE DOT com..

Tulsa Ellsworth Tulsa cemetery Tulsen Oklahoma greenwood Oklahoma City Greenwood KKK Dick Rowland John Donovan Jim Crow prostitution professor HBO Roland Manhattan Scott
"tulsa" Discussed on Trumpcast

Trumpcast

04:42 min | 1 year ago

"tulsa" Discussed on Trumpcast

"I don't think he's fit for office I I don't think he has the competence to carry out the job. There really isn't any guiding principle that I was able to discern other than. What's good for Donald Trump's reelection? When considering most in addition to the fact, of course that he further demonstrates the quid pro quo, the president coercing Ukraine by withholding this military assistance is the fact that it was part of a pattern. All of our great Daca kids and their families. This is just the beginning. Hello and welcome to trump cast I'm Virginia Heffernan it is hot where I am. And it's supposed to be nearly ninety degrees and humid and diseased in Tulsa Oklahoma this weekend where corona virus cases are soaring, as is enthusiasm for trump's exciting rally Saturday night. Trump says one million people have RSVP for a venue of fewer than twenty thousand seats so I guess they're going to have to pack people to the rafters. They're allowed to do that. Since a Tulsa judge just shut down illegal request that the venue make preparations for social distancing and mask-wearing in consultation with scientists who know how diseases spread before they have a risky rally like this. Yeah, that would have been way too much inhibition of civil liberties. Can you imagine? Also in the offing is violence that many black community leaders in Tulsa have said to expect as holding the trump rally during the day June tenth celebration of the emancipation of slaves, black people in a state with one hundred year history of the worst racial violence in the country from the Tulsa massacre to white supremacists Timothy McVeigh's act of domestic terrorism in the ninety s to police brutality against black kids accused of walking away. was that in history that was two weeks ago. Having the father of birtherism and champion of police, violence and internment camps come to town dispute. And Cova nineteen pathogens with the backing of the National Guard and the police. In case, anyone in trump's crowd starts brawling with protesters well, whatever is deeper than idiocy and louder than insanity. That's what this is. Anyway no matter what happens in Tulsa, this would not be okay. The fact that this rally is going forward is just wrong, but it seems to be happening were minus two days, and it is time to talk about Tulsa. My guest. Today is the immensely accomplished learned and prolific jared Yates sexton author of the people are GonNa rise like the waters upon your shore, a story of American rage, and the forthcoming American rule how a nation conquered the world, but failed its people Jarad promised to get me a copy of American rule, and I can't wait to get my hands on it. I'll be back with Darren in just a minute, but first the tweets. These horrible, politically charged decisions coming out of the supreme occurred are shotgun. Blast ended the face of people that are proud to call themselves. Republicans are conservatives weighed. More justice is, or we will lose our second amendment and everything else. Vote trump twenty twenty. When a Wacko John. Bolton went onto face. The Nation and show scope said that he looked at the Libyan model for North Korea all hell broke out John A who we were getting along with very well went ballistic. Just like is bess wills, and rightfully so he did what Bolton any where near him boats gummidge. Than status back very badly with North Korea. Even now I asked you what the Hell were you thinking? He had no answer and just apologize. That was early on. I should've fired him right then. I testing is so much bigger and more advanced than any other country. We have done a great job on this that it shows more cases without testing or week casting. We would be showing almost no cases. Testing is a double edge sword makes us look bad, but. Do you get the impression that the Supreme Court.

Donald Trump Tulsa president North Korea Bolton Daca Virginia Heffernan twenty twenty Timothy McVeigh Oklahoma Supreme Court jared Yates Ukraine National Guard Darren John
"tulsa" Discussed on Pod 4 Good

Pod 4 Good

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"tulsa" Discussed on Pod 4 Good

"Sir New People to Tulsa? How can they? Get involved to help support the program. Support the the people in the cohort. How can they get connected? That's a great question there are there are a lot of different ways that people can get involved. First and foremost if you meet somebody from Tulsa Remote. Be Nice to them. And ask them how you can help them get connected at Tulsa remote got people's attention and the ten thousand dollars helped the move here, but it's not gonNA help them. Stay here, right? It's the city of Tulsa and the people of Tulsa that are going to convince these individuals to stay, and if they don't stay there, they will hopefully be advocates and ambassadors to the community wherever they end up a because of their experience in Tulsa beans, a positive, and there's definitely an ancillary benefit to all of that. Yeah, because I imagine you living on East. Coast on the West Coast had to on occasion defend the middle of the country. All the time I should have gotten a salary. A was. I was regularly. The first person somebody had met from Oklahoma. Let Alone Tulsa. and. I had an opportunity to change perceptions and A lot of my friends were not surprised that I moved back to Tulsa. Because they knew how much care about this community and in how excited I was about the trajectory that it's going. Tulsa is going to grow, and as you were saying. You know you're passionate. There are a lot of people who are passionate about Tulsa, NYC. Tulsa is going to grow. It's it's whether or not it's going to grow in the right direction, and we need individuals who are active in the conversations who care about accessibility and affordability in in an urban core care about education care about public transportation who care about food deserts, being part of the conversation to ensure that as we grow. We've learned from the other communities that came before us to ensure that we as we grow that nobody nobody is being left behind in that growth so easy thing is just to be nice to the remote bryce. If you, WANNA get involved in. In actively working with Tulsa remote, we have a facebook group that you can join and we will be starting this year to invite individuals to events that are happening throughout the year. You can also email info at Tulsa remote dot com and give your contact information..

Tulsa Tulsa Remote West Coast facebook Oklahoma Tulsa. NYC
"tulsa" Discussed on Pod 4 Good

Pod 4 Good

03:19 min | 1 year ago

"tulsa" Discussed on Pod 4 Good

"And I feel like remote workers have. Sometimes low more freedom to be more community engaged than people who have a nine to five office job and have to be at one place all the time you know remote people can do their work from a local coffee shop can do go. The library can have lunch meetings, so it's. It's an interesting angle. My question when I first heard about this program was. Both of us moved away came back. Would that ten thousand dollars have been? Better used, but differently us to track people who moved away to come back, so we don't. Differentiate between individuals that were from Tulsa and left and came back and people who've never been to also if individuals that have left also want to participate in the program. We're really excited about that. The ten thousand dollars is meant to remove a barrier it removes risk. The risk of there's a financial risk in moving to a new city so if you can remove that risk and provide additional incentives, the community development aspects that the co working space. My opinion is is that you're you're you're developing a program that that really attracts the right type of people. The people who were actively looking at moving into a new community hadn't considered Tulsa before said why not try it come and visit see what makes his town special and spend a year getting connected? I know that you're still you're you've just past the sort of year? One Mark, so you don't necessarily have the data to answer this question, but. What would be? Success tells her mode going forward of those people. How many of them would need to stay for two years five years ten years for you to look back on and be like okay. This worked this brought. New. Energy new ideas new people to Tulsa. That you can measure success. In one way, we've already been extremely successful. The exposure of Tulsa to the rest of the world is has been pretty huge over three billion and reach at this point people who had never heard of the city before are now thinking of a town that is moving in the right direction. That's willing to take chances that are attracting really talented people in other ways. We've already been successful. The people who've come through in the first year have already gotten incredibly connected to the community and are are helping the the existing leaders push issues forward that they're really passionate about I would say the greatest example of success would be that the individuals that come in like living in Tulsa and choose to stay longer than a year. And while I, don't expect every single person to stay. I think the vast majority are going to stay and the feedback that I've gotten from them anecdotally is that they are happy. They're excited I mean. It didn't have help this year that we had a tornado in an earthquake in the same week, but but for the most part people are extraordinarily excited about Tulsa and and have been really happy about the decision to move here. And you don't have to get into specifics, but I'm curious. What are some of the? More interesting. People who've moved here either the type of work they do where they came from or people that have interesting stories. That's always a really difficult question for me to answer because each individual that came through the program is really incredible. Yeah, I. Am Really Lucky..

Tulsa
"tulsa" Discussed on What A Day

What A Day

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"tulsa" Discussed on What A Day

"This pretty extensive collection on the Tulsa race massacre and the Curators there said when he came to the library in nineteen eighty. He found that someone had gone through all the magazines and used to raise her to cut out. All the stories on the Tulsa race at the time is called the Tesla race fry it. Yeah so people were going to great it links to cover this APP which I think is just proof that they know it's a shameful event. Yeah maybe they're trying to hide it but come on. Yeah I mean absolutely and now the the truth is being brought to light on all of this. Where do we think that the story goes next? Yeah well the next logical question is. Will there be reparations for descendants and a community that might be more affluent or more power had those murders not occurred I also talked to Deneen Brown about this. She's been talking to activists in the community and they believe reparations. It can take a lot of different forms. They say reparations means atonement it means Justice it means paying back the wealth of lost. I it means also even though the perpetrators back in nineteen twenty one most of them are likely dead. It means maybe filing charges charges against them because no one was ever arrested for the killings excuse yeah and acknowledgement on its own is a big deal And I think think that would mean a lot even as gesture to say you know this happened and we recognize that. It happened Well until now the Tulsa Race Riot Commission which is comprised of descendants descendants and historians has only identified thirty five African American bodies with the revelation of these mass graves and the commitment to transparently investigate. There's finally really a real chance for justice and family. Burials and what happens in Tulsa might end up being a blueprint for other cities across America to address in atone for past just racist violence in in those places three and more about this checkout. Deneen Brown's writing at the Washington Post. She's been on this beat for a minute. And I would encourage you to watch watchmen. It does a very beautiful job of you. Know sort of exploring generational trauma associated with specifically the massacre in Tulsa.

Tulsa Tulsa Race Riot Commission Deneen Brown Washington Post America
"tulsa" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

05:35 min | 2 years ago

"tulsa" Discussed on American History Tellers

"Been something else, some small incident that would have escalated into an all out. Massacre of hundreds of people. Let's talk about the residents of Greenwood, we, we've mentioned quite a few of the more prominent ones, the doctors, lawyers, and hotelier as other entrepreneurs, but that was a, it was a community of almost you know what eleven thousand people at the time. So obviously, they weren't all white collar workers. In fact, many of them were returning veterans who had seen service in World War One. Yes, I think this had probably a profound impact on, on the incident. Can you tell me why? Yes, absolutely. NFL act. You're absolutely correct. Nearly ninety percent or so of the African American community continued to work in service positions as maids in housekeepers, porters and so forth. But after. War worldwide when African American veterans returned to their homeland after fighting for their country after experiencing this respect and they coming back to their own community realizing that they weren't being treated with respect here. Even 'Soldiers, even having went and volunteered fought for their country, they weren't being treated as equals, they weren't being respected. And yet, they still felt this sense of couret, and they were determined that they were not going to stand for the same thing that they had stood for before they went to fight for their country. They had a nuisance of strength and courage and determination and they were determined to protect the community where their families lived. They were willing to risk their lives to protect the young man that they believed was innocent and willing to do, so because they were soldiers and because. They felt that as men. They had a right to defend their homes and businesses. And then we come to the day of the, the master itself in just two days, three hundred Greenwood residents were killed many many, many more fled. The city forty blocks were burned to the ground, and that left ten thousand homeless. Now, the Tulsa chamber of commerce on the, on the south side of town met shortly after the massacre, apparently, we only now know what was discussed how what was discussed an and how did we find out so recently, the Tulsa chamber held a press conference, and they presented the room with cultural center would a copy of those minutes from nineteen twenty one and they were prompted to do so, by a former employee Bill white who's in African American who up until recently was also employed at the Greenwood cultural. Center as our director of development, and when he discovered those minutes during his time at the chamber, he asked that they be released to the public and the chamber took some time to discuss on how they wanted to do that. Because they knew that this was a sensitive topic, and this is a sensitive time for us as we approached the one hundred year commemoration and the minutes. Ev- sensually say that immediately following the massacre that a committee was formed to, and they decided that there should be some reparations that they should assist with the reconstruction of the Greenwood district that initial committee was fired, and they brought in a new committee of individuals who were not at all in favor of reparations or reconstruction or assisting the black community at all. So everything that the chamber initially. Said that they were going to do for the black community through this committee, that had been founded informed. They did not. Do they did not do any of the things that they initially stated that they were going to do, so the African American community without any assistance from the chamber or the city of Tulsa was forced to many ways fend for himself? What did the chamber do if they didn't meet their their own objectives? What did they do then was to make to take the land that belonged to African-Americans where their homes and businesses were house, which is what we think, contributed to the climate between African Americans, the dissension between the two whites symbolize, we believe that as downtown Tulsa exploded, and there was this needs to expand that wise, decide. That they needed blacks to leave the Greenwood district and move farther north, and they approached them prior to the massacre, an- asked them to do just that downtown Tulsa was exploding, and they realized that they did, in fact need the area, where blacks had built their homes and businesses even though initially they didn't mind them building in that area. But as they expanded they decided in realized that they did in fact need that area. And when they approached them, they were told that blacks were not at all interested in moving.

African American community Greenwood Tulsa Tulsa chamber of commerce Ev NFL director of development Bill white one hundred year ninety percent two days
"tulsa" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"tulsa" Discussed on PRI's The World

"I'm mark were mrs the world we've been talking this week about hate crimes yesterday we heard a story about a community and st louis looking for answers to why they're jewish cemetery was vandalized today a murder in tulsa oklahoma last august is being prosecuted as a hate crime but it's not clear to the family that the designation makes much of a difference the world's daniel gros tells that story haifa gibara moved her family to tulsa to escape a civil war the debare family is christian and during the 1980s their home country of lebanon with a dangerous place who are always get the kids go to school we know and in a comeback on nogge haifa's daughter vicky says that after the move she and her brothers had typical american childhoods they understood arabic but spoke english renew lived at tulsa in the eighties as a foreigner in your your goals is to assimilate vicky says her skin helped her fit end butter brother haul it had darker skin and a foreignsounding name call it was a computer whizzes he loved wordplay in arabic and english anti loved basketball carlo the hut flare ah he would be like oh hey you want me to plan your team okay and then he would beat them all with his skills and he needs thought that was really funny after the siblings grew up and moved out call it came back to care for sick father sometimes he'd visit the next door neighbour an elderly man who like computers to.

murder oklahoma daniel gros civil war lebanon nogge haifa vicky tulsa jewish cemetery basketball