28 Burst results for "Tulane University"

Tulane University Evacuating Campus Following Hurricane Ida

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

00:13 sec | 3 months ago

Tulane University Evacuating Campus Following Hurricane Ida

"Least two major universities in louisiana evacuated some of their students to houston because of hurricane ida tulane university announced. It's closing for two weeks and sent its remaining students to an emergency sights. Set up

Hurricane Ida Tulane Universit Louisiana Houston
"tulane university" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

How'd It Happen Podcast

05:10 min | 3 months ago

"tulane university" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

"Me on the show today and became the first legally blind athlete to play football in division one game when he was at tulane university. he's a long snapper and in addition to playing at two lane he also became an nfl. free agent. believe it or not. In addition aaron is a financial planner. He's a keynote speaker. A pie caster person out to change the world hair and welcome to the podcast. Thanks so much. For having so i met erin through jeff lopes and jeff has a great podcast coast called. Jeff knows inc. Plead is what it is and and aaron actually has a great podcast called blind ambition. Which i've listened to several times. I think you're doing. He gets really great gas. He's doing a really really super fabulous job with it. So check that out blind ambition but anyway jeff jeff and i got connected and then he was asking me you know if i wanted anyone from his show to come on mine and the first person that that he thought of was was aaron and i soon as i heard aaron story and then had the opportunity to talk to him briefly Last week and he was willing was like yeah. Let's get on. Let's share the story so aaron. Thank you so much for joining me. I start every one of my podcasts. With the same simple question how did happen for you. Yeah i think it was just making the choice to succeed in to achieve things that are greater than myself you know. I decided at a young age that i never wanted to be average on everyone to be. Moral will dot chronic myself. I became the first legally blind athlete to play a game. When i played football to university went on to become team captain Nfl free agent and nauman entrepreneur speaker. End was making that choice to to do. Whatever i could to one of the top performers and everything that i go after. And when was it that you sort of made this Choice to succeed or not want to be average. Do you remember when that started and y. Yeah it was. It was awkward Fifteen i.

aaron jeff lopes Jeff knows inc. jeff jeff tulane university Nfl football erin jeff nauman
High court sides with ex-athletes in NCAA compensation case

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 5 months ago

High court sides with ex-athletes in NCAA compensation case

"The Supreme Court decided unanimously the NC double a cannot enforce rules limiting education related benefits that colleges offer to student athletes the case doesn't decide whether students can be paid salaries but justice Brett Kavanaugh argued the issue of compensating athletes could fall under anti trust laws that management the schools may be exploiting labor the student athlete Gabe Feldman is a law professor at Tulane University it's only a matter of time before another lawsuit was filed that asked for the whole system to be blown up NC double a president mark Emmert is not ready to move to pay college athletes the ruling goes to great lengths to point out that that authority still resides within the association's purview the NC double a argued that a ruling for the athletes could lead to a blurring of the line between college and professional sports at Donahue Washington

Brett Kavanaugh NC Gabe Feldman Supreme Court Mark Emmert Tulane University Donahue Washington
"tulane university" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:33 min | 7 months ago

"tulane university" Discussed on KCRW

"Vaccine and open their doors, T anybody that wants to come most in the South. Still have some degree of trust in the church. Thomas Live East, a health policy and equity expert at Tulane University, says he thinks the combination of carrots and sticks would work best in the South. I would love to see CDC loosen its guidelines a bit more for people that have been vaccinated. So one carrot is more freedom for people that have been vaccinated. Live east who's on Louisiana's Cove in 19 Equity Task Force says being sensitive to people sense of liberty is important. But there's a track record of Gulf states following science, too. Vaccination rates for shots given in childhood, like those for measles and mumps are above 90%. He notes that those are mandatory for public school kids and in some other settings. But states are unlikely to add covert shots to their mandatory lists. Until they move past the current emergency use authorization to full approval. It remains to be seen how broadly adopted requirements for covert 19 vaccines will be in the future. The reason that we're not treating covert like any other virus, like we treat smallpox and months is that it became politicized. Move East is hopeful that the number of schools and employers requiring covert vaccination will grow and that will help pull up numbers in the South. He says. Pediatricians will also play an important role in convincing parents to vaccinate their kids for NPR.

Thomas Live East Tulane University CDC Gulf one carrot above 90% Live Louisiana 19 Equity Task Force 19 vaccines
Biden To Reexamine Saudi Relations After Release of Declassified Khashoggi Report

News, Traffic and Weather

00:48 sec | 9 months ago

Biden To Reexamine Saudi Relations After Release of Declassified Khashoggi Report

"A report Friday at links the Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia. Mohammed bin some into the 2018 killing of Washington Post journalist JaMarcus Shaggy, But there are fear the fears that new U. S sanctions don't go far enough. ABC is Alex for Shay has more from Washington. President Biden spoke with bin Salman's father this week. Maybe clear to him that the rules you're changing way we're gonna hold them accountable for human rights abuses, the White House now unveiling a kasogi policy. Imposing visa restrictions on foreign officials believed to be directly involved in plots against dissidents, starting with 76 Saudis. The Treasury Department also sanctioned the former Saudi official, but the administration stopped short of directly penalizing the crown Prince. Tulane University

Mohammed Bin Jamarcus Shaggy President Biden Bin Salman Saudi Washington Post Shay ABC Alex Washington White House Treasury Department Tulane University
"tulane university" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:20 min | 10 months ago

"tulane university" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The council is using its network to build trust in the vaccine. On the council radio talk show Last month, Clark came are invited Louisiana Secretary of Health Courtney Phillips to talk to seniors, but we can't do is let the fear of the past. Prevent us from getting the information. We need that somewhere in the council also stepped up to fill this pharmacy gap by providing vaccines through pop up clinics. In fact, that's how George Washington was finally able to get a shot last month. But the clinics also run into supply issues. Clark Kmart had to cancel one event at the last minute when they didn't receive all the promised doses. I was livid. 35 other people that we have registered are between the ages of 18 and 99. Now you tell me how am I supposed to pick clerk? Aymar says a patchwork of resource is it's part of life in black communities. Some areas of Baton Rouge have long struggled with food, insecurity, poverty and crime as well as disparities in health care. The vaccine rollout is just the latest example. And it's not just Baton Rouge. The NPR analysis found disparities in multiple cities where vaccination sites were clustered around hospitals, not the rural outskirts, where more low income and minorities often live. This happened in places near Jackson, Mississippi Mobile, Alabama and Columbia, South Carolina. The so is ranch more of a problem than some other parts of the country. One of that is a long history of racism. Tomislav East is Adina Tulane University in New Orleans and also a co chair of the Louisiana Cove in 19 Health Equity Task Force. In Louisiana. The National Guard is conducting vaccination events and communities that don't have adequate medical facilities. In other states, health officials are trying to forge partnerships with community health clinics and nonprofits. We have a health care system that wasn't organized from the beginning to ensure that there was an equal distribution of health care throughout the country. What we're seeing now. Is this the vestiges of that we'll be says on the ground community work is necessary before the vaccine rollout goes into the next stage is or else existing health care gaps will only get wider. For NPR News. I'm sure Lena Chop Money and Baton Rouge, Alexey Navalny war a dark sweatshirt and arise smile as he stood in a glass box in a Moscow courtroom this week and was sentenced to two years and eight months in a prison colony. We're failing to keep a parole appointment. This is how it works, he said. For behind the glass in prison, one person to frighten millions He couldn't keep that appointment last December 29th because he was in Berlin, recovering from being poisoned with a nerve agent, Nova chock a certified by doctors and the organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons. Violently claims The attack was ordered by the Kremlin. Russian President Vladimir Putin dismissed the accusation, saying of agents had wanted to assassinate Alexey Navalny quote. They probably would have finished the job. Lexie into volunteers. 44 years old with a wife and son and daughter. They all live in an apartment in Moscow when Navalny's not in prison. He's been arrested many times and was nearly blinded in 2017 when an assailant World green diet his face. He could have stayed in exile after his most recent recuperation. From Berlin, London or Connecticut. He could appear a new shows to a podcast, right Nim Passion memoir. And accept honorary degrees in salute of his courage. Instead, he returned home to Vladimir Putin's iron grasp. The world is expressed outrage over his attack and trial. But All that interests me so words into new year or two and election, Navalny is deeply invisible to the world and vulnerable inside a Russian prison camp. Just this week while the world looked elsewhere. The doctor and Omsk, Siberia who first treated Navalny and help save his life when he was poisoned last year, died suddenly. At the age of 55. This week election, Navalny received the court's sentence in his glass cages. Throngs outside called for his freedom and thousands were arrested. I hope very much that people won't look at this trial is a signal that they should be afraid. All this, he said the National Guard the cage isn't a demonstration of strength. It's a show. Of weakness. His words have been quoted around the world if not in the Russian state press. But I found the most affecting moment was wordless. Alexei Navalny, So his wife, Yulia, He looked at her across the court room held up a finger. And drew a heart against the glass. His heart looked strong. You're listening to NPR news. Angela Bassett Award winning career spans decades, She says she was inspired by other black performers who she watched in her youth. You can't help but drink. Desire to be excellent. You see it all around you and you got to be a part of it. Angela Bassett's black excellence. Next time on. It's been a minute from NPR. Join Sam Sanders this morning, beginning at 10 here on KQED Public radio. Good morning. I'm Michael stayed at 18 minutes after five more of weekend edition just ahead. You know, we took the risk of cutting our pledge drive this time around in half. And then we lost another day, thanks to the Senate impeachment trial, which starts here on Tuesday. That gives us a great opportunity to prove that we can raise what we need in less time, and we need your help to do so. Contribute whatever you can by going to kqed dot org's slash donate this weekend and thank you. May be held with these headlines. President Biden says his plan.

Alexei Navalny NPR News Vladimir Putin Louisiana Baton Rouge Angela Bassett NPR Alexey Navalny Moscow Clark Kmart National Guard Berlin Courtney Phillips George Washington Sam Sanders Senate Louisiana Cove Secretary President Biden
Interview With Robert Livingston

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

05:56 min | 10 months ago

Interview With Robert Livingston

"How you doing. I'm doing good doctor livingston. Are you bummed. That if you google your name you're going to get one of the fathers of the constitution right or one of these early founding fathers taking all the real estate yes yeah this ranch of being named dax. There's just not a bunch out there right now your christian name it is. It is yeah. My mom and dad had read a book in the lead character's name was dax. And let's go for it where you from originally. So i was born in lexington kentucky and that's where i spent most of my time but i've lived in six states in four foreign countries. So do you have a favorite my favorite place to visit his turkey. Eastern bowl is my favorite city in the world really has the oslo balance of chaos and order if you will oh okay good. I need you to drill down on the order. Because when i look at it looks very bright. Very frenetic very exciting. And i'm a little bit like that's seems maybe too chaotic. There's a method to the madness because there are places. I've been that are chaotic. They're just chaos deal with it but turkey just seems chaotic like this. Is it comparable to any other form or european country or is it its own thing and that's why you love it. It's its own thing. But i would say it's most comparable to spain. I don't know if you've been disowned ensuring people go out to eat restaurants. Don't open before nine o'clock in the party starts at one. Am and it goes to eight in the morning and spain has a different rhythm. And i think that's the most similar country to turkey and its mediterranean so similarities in the cuisine fish a lot of oil you know and then a crazy history. One of the most historical places you could visit. And that's what i like about it too. So you just hit the number one criteria for whether i like cities or don't and that is rhythm so i'll be places and i'm like yeah it's beautiful. That's a big tall building. That's got all the accoutrements of a great city. But there's just no rhythm happening here and then conversely you go down to austin texas. They don't have a ton to look at. And i'm like oh i can feel the rhythm all around me exactly now. How did you end up at harvard. Like most things in life. It had something to do with my network. So i was in england at the time because i had accepted a position because again our wanderers case. You can't tell i. Don't mind packing up and going to some exotic place. And i got an offer to take over as head of organizational behavior department at the university of sussex and i had my own center and when i was there at the center i discovered my real passion. I like to say. I transitioned from being a gardener to being a florist. When i was just a straight researcher i had my hands in the dirt. Cultivating blooms if you will. And then. when. I was head of the centre. I interacted with metropolitan police. The nhl the national healthcare service all these organizations to sort of give away my flowers if you will and so. I got into the florist business. Like how do you arrange these flowers into the perfect bouquet to give it to people at weddings. Because what's the point staying in a greenhouse if no one ever sees the beauty of your flowers and so you know when i was in england i discovered the passion of sort of giving away the science and then harvard. You know i was giving a talk. And they said well. You know we're holding company of entrepreneurs will let you come here and do whatever you wanna do if you don't want publish anymore will let you be a practitioner. But an academic at the same time and i was like really because most places aren't set up you know. Harvard makes its own rules. So i sort of took on this position to be an academic practitioner which led to this book that we're going to talk about which is sort of trying to distill. The science synthesize it assembly like a bouquet into something that people can digest and use to make profound sustainable change around racism. So that's like my purpose in life. Now where did you get your doctor. Degree because lexington kentucky and then ending up england emceeing already. You're privy to to dramatically different racial structures. And i wonder where you went to college if you maybe even a third and that somehow helps you on your journey just to have witnessed all this stuff firsthand. I went from coast to coast to coast and into the mid west. So basically i started my undergrad tulane university in. I did a study abroad in spain. Which is how. I came to know. Spain fell in love with spain. And i majored in spanish. That was one of my things. And then i went to. Ucla started at the gulf of mexico. Coast number one went to california. Ucla that was number two. And i was getting a phd in romance language and linguistics. So something completely unrelated. But i was looking at themes of oppression in latin american literature and colonialism. So i always been interested in that. In undergrad i did the thesis on a comparative study of racism in brazil and the united states but long story short i was hiking in joshua tree. And there was a psychology student. Who said you know you're doing really cool research. Did you know you could do this in the real world. And i was like no. There's a field where you can actually study racism and discrimination. She's like yeah you know. Why don't you come in audit a class. And that was the beginning of the end. So i left that program. I got a master's. I was a heroin from impeach d. But decided to start all over again in social psychology. So i started at yale. Struggled from coast to coast to coast and my professor at ucla said. Don't go to yale because i got into princeton yale. He said go to ohio state. That's like the best program in the country in what you're doing and as a phd student or go to programs not schools. And i didn't think. I could live in columbus ohio so i went to yale and then i was like you know what i can't live in new haven connecticut so the professor at ohio state would you guys take me and fortunately i had my own funding because i wanted. Nsf fellowship. so. I was able to export that i went to ohio state and worked with one of the top people in the field maryland brewer. Who's like the godmother of social identity.

Spain Harvard Lexington Kentucky Livingston England Oslo University Of Sussex Mediterranean Metropolitan Police Google Ucla Turkey Austin NHL Texas Tulane University Assembly Gulf Of Mexico Princeton Yale
Changing the Narrative with Rita Bautista

Cafe con Pam Podcast

03:02 min | 1 year ago

Changing the Narrative with Rita Bautista

"K.. Brita hello welcome to come on Bama. How are you? I'm doing great. Thanks so much for having me today. I'm excited we've been talking for like thirty minutes. Now. You have an awesome stories. Let's dive into tell us who you are what your heritage. So my name is read about that and I am a as used to describe it. I'm Honduran my parents were both from Buddha's but I was born here in New Orleans and raised between New Orleans in Baltimore and I currently live in Houston. So I've had the best of all worlds. Yeah. Headed your parents arrive to to New Orleans. Oh my gosh. So it's interesting both my parents ended up in two different places. My mom ended up in Baltimore with visa the. First Ten than she came illegally, and then she came back again legally and then my dad came here with a visa to new. Orleans. which is a huge population of hundred people for all those under Daniels listened to me there's a huge population Chiquita banana used to be headquartered there at the story's pretty rich and dynamic I think I should probably tell it one day, but it's a really interesting story like two lane. University has lot of really thick ties in into hundreds like they actually have a whole bunch of like less Stella's from the Mayan Ruins. Actually. In the nineteen hundreds went to Tulane University went to Honduras and made copies of them and they're sitting in New Orleans on at the military base. Okay. Fact very attacked. So how is it that it's a big population in your let I mean, it's not random, but it's like not your big cities are right. Well, for anybody WHO's been to New Orleans they have that like has at European small town feel and the climate really tropical. You know if it's if you're going to be close to home, you might as well be host in temperature to but like I said that to keep a banana used to be housed in or their headquarters was in new, ORLEANS? So since the ladder leads bananas in Lewis were also I guess they were reporting to New Orleans everybody who was coming over from Honduras to our liens found out about it because of the Banana Trade So interesting to get I don't be sick of that. But again, that's Your Dad arrives there and then your mom is in Baltimore and then they meet somewhere between. So they've actually met in hunters for the second time. Yeah. My mom back two. The second time, and then while she's in Honduras with my brother, she got married in Baltimore and then it didn't work. She got divorced in the ends up in under his an that second go round. She meets my dad in Honduras and she comes back to Baltimore with my brother wants all you your residency came out and everything she went back and then my dad ends up in New Orleans in. He's like you need to come check this out. This is like hundred number two like you know come visit me and sure enough she goes down there they fall in love with each other than this beautiful child was born.

New Orleans Honduras Baltimore Tulane University Stella Buddha Daniels Houston Orleans. Lewis
Some Conferences Are Determined: There Will Be College Football This Fall

All Things Considered

03:48 min | 1 year ago

Some Conferences Are Determined: There Will Be College Football This Fall

"There There will will be be college college football football this this fall. fall. Maybe Maybe that that is is the the message message this this week week from from some some top top football football schools schools and and conferences. conferences. It It comes comes after after two two powerhouse powerhouse conferences. conferences. The Big 10 in the Pac 12 announced they were canceling their full seasons because of the Corona virus. NPR's Greg Allen reports how colleges that are planning to play hope to protect the health of their athletes. Even many hard core college football fans are skeptical how Khun well over 100 people on a typical team training play without spreading the Corona virus, possibly shutting down the season this week, three of the top conferences, the SEC, the SEC and the Big 12 said their plans this fall to play and do so safely. John Thrasher is president of Florida State University, which is part of the Atlantic Coast Conference. And what we frankly want to send is a message to some of the other schools that may be teetering on whether or not to play football. We think it's a bit in the best interest of our student athletes. For us to play football. We could do it safely and we can do it productively for them for fans, athletes and the multi $1,000,000,000 sports entertainment complex built around college football things looked bleak Tuesday. Two major conferences, The Big 10 in the Pac 12 canceled their fall schedules because of the uncertainty and health risk surrounding the Corona virus. The announcement by the remaining three of the power five conferences that they would have a fall season came after athletes began a hashtag. We want to play movement on social media. At Florida State Wide receiver Keyshawn Helton says he believes training and playing with regular testing and medical protocols in place. Maybe safer than not playing. You talk about 18 or 22 year old Just quarantine at the house. That's unrealistic. There's really there's so many other things that you know God, I'm going to go do which is not safe. So being here with my team, and all of us together is the safest forth. The college conferences are pushing back the start of their seasons to give them extra time to get ready and perhaps learn from the experiences of other sports. Putting players inside a bubble like the N BA has done in Orlando isn't feasible for student athletes who live on campus and have to attend classes. University of Miami coach Manny Diaz believes college football can learn from the English soccer leagues, which resumed play in June. Without fans with so much at stake. He believes his athletes will be careful. They're aware that they've got to keep their bubble small. They understand the value of what a mask doesn't and who that protection If you're around people who don't have mass on, you've got to find another place to be, but with all that there's risk and going ahead with the college football season. One concern that was reportedly a factor in the decision of some conferences to postpone play is new information about a heart condition. My card is that has been linked to the Corona virus. It's an inflammation of the heart that can lead to long term problems. Announcing its decision to play the Big 12 conference, said any players who test positive for the Corona virus would receive an E K g echocardiogram, cardiac Emery and further heart tests before returning to play. Gabe Feldman, the director of the Sports Law program at Tulane University in New Orleans, says If the schools are transparent and take the right precautions he thinks they can play. Every school in the athletic department has to be very clear with all of their athletes. About what the risks are and what the unknowns are. And then the athletes have to have a choice. It's one thing to play. But can there be fans in the stadium? University of Florida athletic director Scott Strickland says he hopes so We want to be on a have fans, and we hope we're in a position to do that. But you see, this is the NFL season now starts earlier than ours, and A lot of NFL teams and still have a made determinations. Yet that could be the riskiest. Part of all some schools were opposing plans that would limit attendance to 25% of a stadium's capacity, which would still bring together a huge crowd of 20,000 or more cheering, screaming fans. Greg Allen. NPR NEWS Miami

Football Greg Allen Manny Diaz NPR NFL Director Florida State University SEC Florida University Of Miami Atlantic Coast Conference Keyshawn Helton Scott Strickland Orlando Gabe Feldman University Of Florida John Thrasher Khun
Why Shame Is A Bad Public Health Tool  Especially In A Pandemic

Short Wave

14:12 min | 1 year ago

Why Shame Is A Bad Public Health Tool Especially In A Pandemic

"Believe me I get it. I'm frustrated and angry to. After all, it's been four months of this. We know the right things to do. And when you see someone wearing a mask or groups of people hanging out close together, it's easy to get mad, even if in all fairness. Once or twice. Open defiance at this Castle Rock Colorado restaurant large crowds, no social distancing, and there's some news coverage right now. That caters to this anger. You know what I'm talking about. Many Americans are out and about on this memorial day visiting newly reopened businesses seems from the unofficial kickoff to the summer showing many Americans not practicing social distancing measure. I'm telling you to wear a mask where a damn ask, but this Kinda thing anger public shaming the urge to yell at people who aren't doing the right things. That can be precisely the opposite of productive. Yeah, as the researcher I've been. Watching all this unfold through that Lens Julia Marcus is an epidemiologist and professor at the Harvard. Medical School, she said he's HIV prevention. And for scientists Julia, who work in HIV or sexual health or even substance abuse? They know that shame can be a huge barrier when it comes to public health, and in these first few months of the Cova pandemic I was watching this same pattern happen where you know, these kind of absolutist public health messages and moralistic undertones were potentially contributing to what became rampant shaming of people who were flouting public health guidelines or doing things that people felt. Felt were high risk, and when we shame people for their risky behavior in a way that distracts us from where risk is really happening, which is typically much less visible like in prisons and nursing homes and food, processing plants, and those don't inspire the same moral outrage. I think for two reasons one. They're not right in front of our faces, but also to we don't think of those as people having fun and a pandemic which I think people really upset. Matt rage, Julia says might feel good to act on in the moment, but it's not gonNA solve our biggest problems right now. I find that taking that rage home, and really screaming alone has been very helpful for me to. Do that as well or you know my rage these days first of all I would say that knows no bounds, but also. To be honest. My regions more directed at institutional failures than individual ones. To episode Julia Marcus on the role. Shame plays in public health crises. We talk masks. School reopenings in the long road ahead. I'm Maddie's defy, and this is shortwave daily science podcast from NPR. Julia Marcus has written a bunch of great pieces for the Atlantic about why. Shame is not helpful right now and how we can do things better. She's looked this when it comes to mask wearing social distancing and how we open college campuses, we talked about all those things, but the first thing to say here is that there is a fine line between public shaming and some positive forms of peer pressure. I, yeah I WANNA make a distinction here between social norms and shaming I. think social norms are very powerful and. That can be one of the best ways I think to change. Health behavior is like well. Everybody else is doing it so I'm going to do it because it's more like i. want to feel good when I go in the grocery store and I'm not gonNA. Feel great if I'm the only one not wearing a mask, so, but there's a difference between making people feel bad about their risky behavior and making people feel good about engaging and protective behaviors as a way of like becoming part of What the new social norm is Marie right? Right Okay Julius. You've written a bunch of great pieces for the Atlantic. Let's talk about your most recent one I. It's you know how to not open colleges this fall. You started out by describing an email that went out to students at Tulane University earlier this month July seventh. What what happened there? Yeah I mean I I I don't WanNa. Pick on two lane here. Becher, that was it just an example of some of the communications that were starting to see toward students who are on campus this summer and have been having some parties. And there was an email that we're not to students that really condemned stat behavior as disrespectful, indefensible, dangerous selfish, and made it very clear in bold all caps that hosting parties of more than fifteen people would result in suspension or expulsion from the university and that if students wanted the school to remain open, they needed to be personally responsible. I'm in their behavior and When a university says, we will hold you accountable for having a party, and actually there will be dire swift punishment when inevitably there is an outbreak at a party. Students are going to be terrified to disclose that they were there. And students have now said this at the University of Connecticut were interviewed and surveyed about what kind of thing is going to work for them what their concerns are about the fall. And they universally said we. We are early close to universally said we're really afraid of how infection and risky behavior are going to be stigmatized such that we outbreaks will not be able to be controlled, so there needs to be appropriate consequences for putting your community at risk, and I would never say otherwise but that needs to be balanced against the need for public health efforts to be separate from discipline. And we've already seen contact tracing start to break down outside of campuses, because people are afraid to talk about having been at event that that they know is something they should not have been doing yeah. So. You know kind of following that thread. The part of this pandemic that's been hardest for a lot of people is is social distancing in in several of your pieces you wrote about how a lot of the advice especially in the beginning was almost like an abstinence based approach like stay home. See Nobody which absolutely made sense kind of at the. The beginning, but tell me about why. That approach doesn't necessarily make sense for the long-term well asking people to abstain from all social contact indefinitely or until we've scaled up. An effective vaccine is just not going to be a sustainable public health strategy, and I think now our messaging has evolved a bit especially as there's been an accumulation of evidence around. The risk is highest like what's settings or higher risk, in which ones are lower risk, but I think we continue to still have a tendency toward absolutist messaging and I think that our goal should be to two inch. People tour to a place where they are living their lives in a way that addresses all aspects of their health, while trying to keep tr- risk of transmission low, and so one way that that could play out is encouraging outdoor activities, especially in spacious areas, opening up more outdoor space for people, and there's been a tendency to close beaches and close parks where people gather, but. But I actually think doing the opposite on could could be helpful, but the essential point is. We can't stay in our homes forever and many people couldn't stay in their homes for the last few months because they were working sure, but it's clear from other areas of public health that asking people to abstain from something that they fundamentally need or strongly desire is not an effective public health strategies, so we have to find ways of making our messaging more nuanced, that allows people to get what they need to be able to live sustainably while keeping the risk of transmission low until you there. There are examples of nuanced messaging from others accessible public health campaigns. Right I. Mean You work on HIV? Can you give me an example of that? Yeah, so we you know we don't tell people don't have sex. Because that's the best way to not get HIV, we may save the safest thing you can do to avoid HIV transmission is not have sex, but we understand that many people are going to have sex, and that it's a you know a part of a healthy life, and so here are some safer ways to have sex, both in terms of certain sexual acts in in terms. Terms of protection different ways you can protect yourself and you know becomes a more nuanced message, but it's much more sustainable for people and realistic and the long term, and it also acknowledges people's basic human needs right, and there's also this idea that talking about ways to reduce risk encourages people to take those risks, even though from a public health standpoint. We know that isn't true. So I'm wondering Julia like. Why do people hold onto this concern? Like what is this really about yeah I, mean this is definitely not new. It comes up a lot. I think especially around drug, use and sex. And I think the reason it especially comes up in those settings is that those are behaviors that we have a lot of moral judgments about particularly in this country, and there's this kind of moral outrage that happens when we think about people engaging in risky, which is often pleasurable, behavior, sex, drug use, and these days going to the beach like. it's kind of playing out in this new way now with social contact and partying and people having a good time in a pandemic, which it's actually a public health win when we find ways to support people in enjoying their lives, and and getting their basic social or sexual needs, met while remaining a safest possible, and you've made the point that we've. We've already seen this play out with the corona virus, public health officials, hesitating to give people detailed ways to protect themselves instead of avoiding risk altogether, I mean I remember. We reported early on in this pandemic when Dr Burks of the White House Coronavirus Task Force said. We don't want people to get this artificial sense of protection because they're behind a mask. This lack of consistent messaging is one of the reason that a lot of people still aren't convinced that masks are helpful, so you know. Julia, how do public health officials effectively reach? Those people yeah I mean I. Think in general we always see some resistance to any new public health intervention, condoms, and you know pre exposure prophylaxis for each V. I mean every intervention that comes out. There's resistance. There's challenges with implementation. There are moral concerns you know. This is all kind of par for the course, but I think what's new here and a bit different is not necessarily just the polarization which we do, see an Ciaran things like vaccines, but the politicization. Politicization I don't think there has been I can't think of an example where a sitting president has flouted public health recommendations and I think that that has created kind of a politicized around masks. That wouldn't have necessarily been there and so how do we overcome that? And how do we reach people I think again it comes back to hearing people's concerns, acknowledging them, and then working to overcome those barriers in our messaging and I. Think there are some good examples of that there have been a couple of great mask campaigns that have come out of California acknowledging that people dislike wearing them and acknowledging the reasons why people dislike wearing them. And I would guess that they are more effective in reaching certain populations than campaigns that that are more focused on this. Just wear ask. It's really easy kind of messaging. Yeah and don't you care about your community and don't you want to not kill people and That kind of messaging is like early days of AIDS. Messaging around condoms that I think was not as successful as the messaging that really focused on what the barriers were, and how people could overcome them. Yeah, yeah, with all this stuff that we've been talking about colleges masks. You know keeping safe distance. It's pretty tough because the stakes feel so high like this is really a nasty virus, and when we see people, you know not doing the right things, the instinct there to shame them to get mad for a lot of us at first instinct and I. I guess it's just that we need to take some patients to push past them. Yeah, I mean I, think it's really. Valid to feel angry about what's happening right now, and for people who are not necessarily taking care of themselves or their community and putting other people at risk. It's very frustrating to see, but I think especially for public health professionals. It's on us to do the work to avoid the shaming and the anger and the moralizing in our messaging. Because we've learned that that doesn't work in other areas of health and really try to take the time to craft messaging. That is going to be more effective. Julia Marcus. Checkout episode notes for a link where you can find her writing to the Atlantic. Can say the Atlantic is crushing it these days, but the magazine, not the ocean. I mean

Julia Marcus Atlantic HIV Castle Rock Colorado Harvard Researcher Wanna Medical School Matt Rage Maddie Becher Tulane University Marie NPR University Of Connecticut Professor California Ciaran Dr Burks
"tulane university" Discussed on Anything in The World

Anything in The World

05:25 min | 1 year ago

"tulane university" Discussed on Anything in The World

"Love, Lauren Welcome to episode ten of anything in the world. This episode is special for many reasons. I this is the last episode of the season, but you don't need to worry about it. This is just a comma and not a period. We'll take a break for few weeks and then we'll be back after the summer with a brand new season with new topics and who? Who knows some surprises to the other reason that this is a very important episode is the amazing conversation I had with the professional football player Glenn coup yet. He is a quarterback, free agent, outfielder, Tulane University and tiktok celebrity, as you can imagine, we've talked about the life of a professional athlete and of course Tiktok so let's kick off the ball and start the game. So I think he's in.

Glenn coup Tulane University Tiktok football
"tulane university" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"tulane university" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"I just think there's going to be people that are going toe. Choose to do that. Now. Let me say this. So according Tto, this is Hilary Lake on Wcpo. On Twitter. She says that I guess they're looking for the official mask order. Right. Kids supposed to go into effect here? 6 p.m. Correct. She said that I guess. It's not hasn't appeared online yet and I guess summer, somebody in the governor's press office says it's still in the legal department. So and they're waiting to see when the thing get signed. So I guess technically, if it doesn't get signed by six PM, and maybe it goes until it does so. No, no, Go go crazy and to its side. Well, don't Then I will tell you this. My my lovely wife and I went out to lunch today and there was a sign in the door talking about hell as of six o'clock tonight. Yada, yada yada. And she goes. I don't think we go in here. It was like it plainly says six o'clock tonight didn't have a mask in my car, like okay, I believe so. We walk in and the lady and the greeter lady says, Yeah, I was saw you looking at the sign. That's six o'clock tonight. You guys are fine. So we go in ever lunch and leave me There is no big deal. But you know, that's just how compliant my wife is. You are we are. We're going to go to jail or not. We're not going to jail. No, And that's the thing kind of back to that point. About what there was actually a teeth bond and basically everyplace department. Every officer I've talked to say we're not going Arrest you for for this. So I just wonder if The result of all this is no one gets in trouble. No one's deter. But mass confusion is created. And also, uh there's about that. There will be a bunch of people a bunch of cellphone camera warriors that are going to run around trying to follow the sad person. They don't have their mass gun. And look, you know, I I just don't think You know, you could ask someone to do it and or stay away from him, but to tryto out someone and ruin her. I just hope there's not an epidemic. I just don't think that's the right approach to take either, but Confusion is going to I think rule the day here if there's a rule, but there's no real consequences. So we'll see how it goes. Let's go Get your call 749 7800 The big £1.700 on A T and T. Let's go first to Jim in Columbus, Jim. Thanks for holding buddy. What do you have a a thought you doing Good. So our YouTube Tulane University released one other professors. Like three part series on the 1918 pandemic, assassinating because everything I have, in fact is happening now, basically. But during the you just talked out long ago during The lecture in the background. They would have like newspaper articles and pictures of the time's coming up to talk about what was going on during that pandemic and in New York and Chicago boat The police shot people that weren't wearing that in public. There are articles about people being shot. A killed were not wearing a mask in public. So anybody who was taking place It was a little heart is Jim. I never heard about it. I see you're saying, but I don't do not see that happening at all right now. Police again are get in trouble if they yell at somebody too hard. I know it's a start crying traps that anybody you want to learn how this stuff works, and you won't know more than you ever want to know about a pandemic. Dirty YouTube just type in Tulane University Pandemic lecture, and it's interesting and they'll have. I can't forgive the professor's name and three hours it's 31 hour period. I think they will explain everything to you Spread over the whole thing. All right, Thanks, Jim. Your calls next 749.

Jim Twitter Hilary Lake Tulane University YouTube Wcpo official officer professor Columbus New York Chicago
Tulane basketball player charged with murder in Georgia

AP 24 Hour News

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

Tulane basketball player charged with murder in Georgia

"A college basketball player who had declared for the NBA draft has been charged with murder Tulane University guard Tyshawn high tower is one of six suspects in faces multiple charges including murder in connection with an April eighth killing the Atlanta journal constitution reports police in Henry county Georgia se divine take Anthony long died from gunshot wounds Hightower is a junior who led the green wave in scoring last season he declared for the NBA draft on April eighteenth ten days after long's death but he was leaving open the option of returning for his senior season to lane officials have dismissed him from the

Tyshawn High Tower Murder Anthony Hightower Basketball NBA Tulane University Atlanta Journal Henry County Georgia
Where Did The Coronavirus Start? Virus Hunters Find Clues In Bats

Short Wave

06:46 min | 1 year ago

Where Did The Coronavirus Start? Virus Hunters Find Clues In Bats

"All Right Emily Kuang Wave Reporter. Animal Lover Unabashed Animal Lover. It's true you and I both know that bats are amazing. That is not up for dispute on shortwave. They're important for pollinating flowers dispersing seeds. They catch bugs the same ones that bite us and eat up some of our crops but bats also harbor some of the toughest known zoonotic diseases. That's right the rabies virus the Marburg virus the Hendra and Nipah viruses. The Abullah virus outbreak in West Africa was traced to a bat colony. All these viruses find what's called a natural reservoir in bats meaning the viruses live in that host without harming it. Do We know why that is? It's a very interesting question so I used to say a million dollar question now as as a billion dollar question Lynn Fouling says it might have to do with the fact that bats are the only mammal that's adapted for flight because during flight. The body temperature goes to up to all the way to forty two degrees. That's super high. Forty two degrees Celsius is almost one hundred eight degrees Fahrenheit and their heartbeat goes up to a thousand beats per minute. They're burning a ton of energy flying several hours a day and this creates toxic free radicals that damage their cells but Linda's research has shown that bats have also evolved this ability to repair and minimize that cellular damage. Kind of counterstrike and those same defensive. Abilities may help them not only tolerate flight but also to fight infectious diseases in a way that the human body simply cannot so the essentially. Have this like super effective? Immune response rights so while our immune systems can get overwhelmed from fending off these viruses. He thinks bats don't our hypothesis is best has evolved. A different method is to get the balanced right for defense and Torrance and that famous virus to live peacefully with Bass and they're able to safely house these viruses in their bodies and not get sick from them. Got It so. Let's talk about why scientists think this particular corona virus could have come from bats. Well they got a big clue from the start so in early. January Chinese scientists were able to quickly sequence the viruses entire genome and then they published it online from that scientists begin to study the virus in-depth and around this time researchers at Wuhan Institute of Raji in China compared its genome to a library of known viruses right and found a ninety six percent match with Corona virus samples taken from Horseshoe Bats in Union. Yes the same kinds of bats that were natural reservoirs for the original SARS virus that broke out in two thousand three and this led them to believe that this new corona virus likely came from bats to right and from a genetic standpoint ninety six percent match. Sounds like a lot but that four percent can make a big difference exactly that that four percent difference is actually a pretty wide distance in evolutionary timing. It could be even decades. This is Robert Gary Ablett at Tulane University. And while that one paper says there's a ninety six percent match with bats that extra four percent to him suggests some other viral material may have gotten mixed in from another animal and that other animal could have even transmitted the virus to humans right. This is called an intermediate host or an in-between host correct. But when it comes to this corona virus scientists aren't sure if there was an intermediate host between bats and humans and if so they're not sure what the intermediate host could be. There are theories Robert and fellow. Researchers have hypothesized. This virus could be a blend of viruses from two different animals bats and something else. An early scientific studies suggest it could be this animal called Penguin this scaly ant eater vulnerable to illegal wildlife trade and virus penguins or some other animal. That has a similar receptor binding domain. So to buyers getting together recombining to make up a new Sars KOGI team but the important point to all this is that virus hunters haven't come to a definitive conclusion about the chain of transmission from animals to humans about the involvement of penguins and baths or any other host animal. Not on the level of proof. They need right like the genetic level. Yes we don't know definitively which animal or animals this came from. It will take time to figure out but we do know. This came from animals a bunch of scientists in mid-february publish this big letter in the Journal. Lancet saying evidence overwhelmingly points to wildlife as the origin for this corona virus. And Roberts stands by that too. I can tell you that this is a product of nature. It's not a virus. That has arisen in a laboratory by any scientists purposely manipulating something that that was then released onto a cup like that. That just didn't happen. Because if you look at the actual genome which Robert has done the evidence. Isn't there okay so you said earlier. While speaking to the researcher in Singapore that it took a decade to find out the actual origin of the virus that causes SARS the original SARS. Do we know how long it could take to figure out where this new corona virus came from. Oh Mattie I wished I had an answer for you. We don't it all depends on funding and resources. Doesn't it all gone and time like I keep saying? Throughout this whole episode investment in virus hunting right expanding the zoonotic studies to figure out the transmission chain between animals and people. Because if we know that we are armed with information that can help us. Prevent future outbreaks. Peter doc he's the President of the US based nonprofit ego health alliance and he says that even if bats are the likely origin they are not to blame. It's no but's it's uh it's it's and what we do to Bass that drives this. Pandemic risks like wildlife trade and Food and agriculture practices or are close proximity to animals in densely populated areas one of the poster things about funding that. We're actually behind. These pandemics is that gives those the power to do something about it. We don't need to get rid about. We don't need to do anything with that. We've just got to leave them alone. Let me get on doing the good. They do flipping around at night

Robert Gary Ablett Researcher Marburg Emily Kuang Sars Hendra Reporter Lynn Fouling Wuhan Institute Of Raji West Africa Linda Torrance Lancet Kogi Union Mattie Tulane University Singapore United States
"tulane university" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show ON DEMAND

Elvis Duran and the Morning Show ON DEMAND

05:14 min | 1 year ago

"tulane university" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show ON DEMAND

"Everyone at your office was laid off except for you. Yeah I work for a company that supports construction workers, and we I do the processing for warranties and the entire office, except for myself is laid off. A while and the construction workers are so important right now. They need all the support. They can get so I'm wondering Tony. How many people listening right now are going to same thing where they are the only one left in an office for twenty or thirty people. It's got to be very strange for you how you dealing with. so it's kind of a bit of. I I duNno, it's kind of weird. Because I just retired from the military after twenty years, so I have that paycheck. And you know I do this now and I see people who don't have that back. You know that support and it's. It's kind of tough because I know. There's a lot of people here living paycheck to paycheck. And you know now. They don't have that and here. I am the newest person on the job and I'm still here with a job. And, it's just it's kind of sad when you get to know people when become friends with them, and then you have to see them go all. A lot of people going through that right now, not only. From your perspective, but the other one people get to know people at work, and they are their daily friends and connections, and then they have to leave them. Listen Tony all the best to you, and if you do have any any connection with the people that you've lost it, company tells them that we were talking about him. And then we're thinking about them, and we're hoping that everything turns around and gets better for everyone okay. Absolutely lovely guys. Thank you all right, hang in there. We'll be in their office with you now. We're working with Tony in his office. We have our own desks looking at I line. Two thousand four is Santa. Santa I saw your. Post yesterday. Do you want to share the story with what happened to you? This is great. Hewer I would love to I went to winn-dixie at about seven am I wanted to get viscerally? Yes. It is in new, Orleans and I wanted to pick up a book of stamps and I'm still working. Thank goodness and I'm working from home so I scooted it out early and I picked those up and I went in, and there was somebody at the door handing out. He's was up paper, and it's act of kindness. And he said hold onto this and give it to the cashier. Do not lose it. So I had on my mask and Mike well and I was trying to grip the paper and usually I would throw something like that, but I thought. Maybe it's something where the cashiers because they're still working, and you know maybe a little coup for them so I was so happy to be in there because I missed my co workers I worked at Tulane University on I. Miss The students. I missed my co worker so I walked through the store, and I'm saying good morning to everyone there, and it was just mostly the work people at the time and. It was great to see all the groceries there, but I didn't really need them, so I did pick up some twelve grain bread and some mill, and actually some wine to and when I asked the cash. I forgot to mention that in my post, but I went up to the cash register, and there are two people. They're checking me out. And I was the only one, and they were seemed confused, and it was a small order. That's okay, you know I almost forgot the stance. Then I threw that in and so I was just waiting and happy to be out of my house, and finally one of them looked up and smiled. As I took out my debit card. You don't need out today. I said what and she said Tyler Perry bought your groceries. And I was just. This story you were telling earlier Danielle Tyler Perry. Bonds your wine. You're twelve grain, bread and your milk. School why didn't you? Which wrong with you? But. You know what I I didn't even care. I didn't even think that because I actually have a supply of groceries coming in today, some another grocery store, but they It's just the fact that. When you're living alone and working kind of alone, except for zoom meetings, you know I. I am originally from Massachusetts so I was missing and homesick for my three children a lot during this period and I've been here about eight year so. Well and and have somebody do that. It just felt like you know you're not forgotten and wait a minute. Hold on time out time out once I. Are you a tyler? Fan, are you a fan of his well, yeah? Actually I am out. My my children are for sure. Well, that's great. Well. Listen, thank you for sharing your story. I saw it. On on the social, so yes, we do look at our social media from time to time, and we found a story like that. That's incredible. Thank you so much, Santa, can you Imagine Santa? Walk through I don't pay for that. Tighter. Payers got that move along. Start taking. which.

Tony Santa Tyler Perry Orleans Tulane University Massachusetts Mike
"tulane university" Discussed on AP News

AP News

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"tulane university" Discussed on AP News

"Ones vampires are coming to Tulane University the school acquired the archives of bestselling author Anne rice who was born and raised in New Orleans rice has written thirty novels she moved to California for college and has spent much of her life since then in California but New Orleans has played a central role in much of her fiction interview with the vampire was her first novel when it was published in nineteen seventy six Anderson the city's French Quarter the collection at Tulane will consist of manuscripts of most of her published works some unpublished short stories journals screenplays personal artifacts in correspondence from family friends and fans of the author a self styled daredevil died Saturday after a rocket which he launched himself crashed into the ground mad Mike Hughes died after the homemade rocket crashed on private property near Barstow California Justin Chapman freelance journalists told the AP that he and his wife witnessed the crash they said the rocket appeared to rub against the launch apparatus which might have torn the parachutes attached to it Hughes recently signed on with the science channel to document his project on the television program homemade astronauts in March twenty eighteen Hughes who book it ground in what's being billed as the biggest women's cricket match ever the international cricket council says local organizers want to break the world record of ninety thousand one hundred eighty five for a crowd at a women's sporting event set in nineteen ninety nine at the FIFA World Cup final in Pasadena California he said in a statement that she is all about celebrating a quality and the achievements of women hi Jackie Quinn is it in trump campaigning in Las Vegas is suggesting that intelligence reporting about Russian interference to help his campaign is just missing information from Democrats after three years of ridiculous which Johnson partisan Democrat crusades by the way I think this is not a did you see that I see these phonies season the do nothing Democrats they said today that Putin wants to be sure the trump gets elected here we go well he downplayed the intelligence reporting Democrat Bernie Sanders says he too was told his campaign was getting Russian meddling Sanders warned Russia to stay out of U. S. politics after the Iowa caucus tabulating meltdown a professor at U. N. L. V. Robert Lang says Nevada will do it's counting differently the app that was a concern in Iowa was abandoned and were really off of some sort of optical scanning sheets at this point that are older fashion but more reliable China says the number of daily cases of coronaviruses dropped but in South Korea they're reporting a six fold increase and officials are declaring an emergency in the US our my grass it reports on a number of new cases the U. S. centers for disease control and prevention says at least eighteen Americans who returned to the United States from a quarantine to cruise ships are infected with covert nineteen the new virus that originated in China that raises to thirty five the number of confirmed cases in the US an Idaho woman with doomsday believed to fly to Hawaii was in court today forty six year old Laurie valoe charged with felony child abandonment Harvey Weinstein's jury has deadlocked on the two most serious counts of predatory sexual assault the judges urging jurors to keep trying to reach a consensus they'll be back Monday this is APNews on the eve of the Nevada caucus an Associated Press N. O. R. C. poll finds Democrats feeling positive about the top presidential contender Bernie Sanders gets the highest ratings nationally seventy four percent of democratic voters surveyed say they have a favorable opinion of the Vermont senator former vice president Joe Biden get sixty seven percent favorable senator Elizabeth Warren sixty four percent and fifty eight percent for former south bend Indiana Merope included judge about half expressed favorable opinions of billionaire Mike Bloomberg and senator Amy Klobuchar and nearly forty percent for billionaire Tom Steiner Ben Thomas Washington Kentucky's governor has signed legislation that requires police officers who work at schools to carry a gun Wells Fargo is agreeing to pay a three billion dollar settlement into a long running case about company employees opening bogus accounts to meet sales.

Tulane University
"tulane university" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"tulane university" Discussed on AP News

"The president of Belarus says Russia insisted on merging the two states during last week's talks on further integrating the country's economy is president Alexander Lukashenko said during a visit to a paper plant in southeast in Belarus is something he opposes as Lukashenko has resisted the integration effort the Kremlin has increased pressure by holding Los points to Belarus which relies on Russia for more than eighty percent of its energy needs Lukashenko has since found to find alternative oil supplies and boasted about warming ties with the west in an apparent bid to win concessions from Russia so far Belarus's been able to secure a shipment of oil from Norway and is negotiating supplies from Catholics down vampires are coming to Tulane University the school acquired the archives of bestselling author Anne rice who was born and raised in New Orleans writes his written thirty novels she moved to California for college and has spent much of her life since then in California but New Orleans has played a central role in much of her fiction interview with the vampire was her first novel when it was published in nineteen seventy six in this set in the city's French Quarter the collection at two lane will consist of manuscripts of most of our published works some on published short stories journals screen plays personal artifacts and correspondence from family friends and fans of the author news why are some three hundred forty Americans who were passengers on board a quarantine cruise ship in Japan are at military bases in California Texas for.

president Belarus Russia Alexander Lukashenko Norway Tulane University New Orleans California Japan California Texas Los Anne rice
"tulane university" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"tulane university" Discussed on AP News

"Vampires are coming to Tulane University the school acquired the archives of bestselling author Anne rice who was born and raised in New Orleans writes his written thirty novels she moved to California for college and has spent much of her life since then in California but New Orleans has played a central role in much of her fiction interview with the vampire was her first novel when it was published in nineteen seventy six and it's set in the city's French Quarter the collection at two lane will consist of manuscripts of most of our published works some on published short stories journals screen plays personal artifacts and correspondence from family friends and fans of the author a cargo ship rocketed toward the international space station on Saturday carrying candy and the cheese to satisfy the astronauts cravings Northrop Grumman launched its sickness capsule from the Virginia sea shore the nearly four ton shipment should arrive at the orbiting lap Tuesday it took three tries over the past week to get the end Terry's rocket off the pad periodic supply runs by Russia Japan and announces to private shippers Northrop Grumman and SpaceX usually provide more than experiments equipment clothes and a freeze dried meals the capsules also bring family care packages as well as fresh food to offset the run of the mill station rob besides the usual experiments in gear this capsule was holding chatter fresh fruit and vegetables chocolate and three kinds of gummy candy expressly requested by the three station astronauts skittles hot tamales and Mike and I X. it's presidents day which means a shortened week that's light on economic reports stock and bond markets are closed for the holiday on Wednesday the governmental issue which report on producer prices which measures inflation pressures before they reach consumers also the federal reserve releases minutes from its January meeting walls real also get some updates on the health of the housing industry the government release date on housing starts on Wednesday and the national association of real towards a release January home sales data on Friday why are some three hundred forty Americans who were passengers on board a quarantine cruise ship in Japan are at military bases.

Tulane University New Orleans California Northrop Grumman Terry Japan SpaceX Mike Anne rice Virginia Russia producer
"tulane university" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"tulane university" Discussed on AP News

"Tulane University the school acquired the archives of bestselling author Anne rice who was born and raised in New Orleans rice has written thirty novels she moved to California for college and has spent much of her life since then in California but New Orleans has played a central role in much of her fiction interview with the vampire was her first novel when it was published in nineteen seventy six in this set in the city's French Quarter the collection at Tulane will consist of manuscripts of most of our published works some on published short stories journals screenplays personal artifacts and correspondence from family friends and fans of the author bus companies such as greyhound do not have to allow US border patrol agents on board to conduct routine checks for legal immigrants and that's contrary to the company's long insistence that it has no choice to do so it's been confirmed by a customs and border protection memo obtained by the Associated Press greyhound which is the nation's largest bus company says it doesn't like agents coming on board but it's permitted them to do so claiming federal law demanded it when provided with the memo by the A. P. the company declined to say whether it would change that practice greyhounds face pressure from the American civil liberties union immigrants rights activists and Washington state Attorney General Bob Ferguson to stop allowing sweeps on buses within a hundred miles of an international border or coastline Amsterdam has banned the guided tours that take groups pass the fame to windows in the city's a red light district it's the city government's latest attempt to address over tourism and to clean up and to protect workers in the district which the city says are regularly abused and photographed without their consent by members of tour groups tours of the red light district still will be allowed if guide stick to the new restriction which takes effect in April and keep the windows off their itineraries.

Tulane University California New Orleans Tulane US A. P. Bob Ferguson Amsterdam Anne rice Associated Press Washington Attorney
"tulane university" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"tulane university" Discussed on AP News

"Vampires are coming to Tulane University the school acquired the archives of bestselling author Anne rice who was born and raised in New Orleans rice has written thirty novels she moved to California for college and has spent much of her life since then in California but New Orleans has played a central role in much of her fiction interview with the vampire was her first novel when it was published in nineteen seventy six in this set in the city's French Quarter the collection at Tulane will consist of manuscripts of most of our published works some on published short stories journals screenplays personal artifacts and correspondence from family friends and fans of the author German industrial production dropped sharply in December that exports barely edged higher according to new official data rounding off a pool year for manufacturing in Europe's biggest economy production was down three point five percent compared with the previous month the economy ministry said it added that production over the full fourth quarter was down one point nine percent led by shopper drops in the machinery and auto industries Germany's economy has grown for ten consecutive years but last year zero point six percent growth was the weakest since twenty thirteen fourth quarter figures haven't yet been released but officials estimated last month that the economy defective software could have doomed to Boeing's crew capsule during its first test flight a botched trip that was cut short and it never made it to the international space station last month the starliner capsule launched without astronauts in December but it's automatic timer was off by eleven hours preventing the capsule from flying to the space station as planned hours before the starliner schedule touchdown a second software mistake was discovered this time involving the star liners service module these latest findings stem from a joint investigation team formed by NASA and Boeing in the wake of the aborted test flight the mission was supposed to be the company's last major hurdle before launching the first starliner crew NASA has yet to decide whether Boeing should conduct another test flight without a crew before putting astronauts on board.

Tulane University California New Orleans Tulane Europe economy ministry Germany Boeing NASA Anne rice official
"tulane university" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"tulane university" Discussed on AP News

"Your listening to the AP digital news network vampires are coming to Tulane University the school acquired the archives of bestselling author Anne rice who was born and raised in New Orleans rice has written thirty novels she moved to California for college and has spent much of her life since then in California but New Orleans has played a central role in much of a fiction interview with the vampire was her first novel when it was published in nineteen seventy six in this set in the city's French Quarter the collection at two lane will consist of manuscripts of most of our published works some on published short stories journals screen plays personal artifacts and correspondence from family friends and fans of the author the niece of Aretha Franklin's she's quitting as representative of the late singer's multi million dollar estate Sabrina opens points to a rift in the family since hand written wheels were discovered last year Franklin known as the queen of soul died without a known will in twenty eighteen and says she became manager of the estate at the request of Franklin's four sons but nine months later she said three hand written wheels were discovered in Franklin's home one seems to indicate Franklin wanted one of her sons in particular to serve as executor or representative another son asked the judge to make him call representative of the estate with wins a court hearing that was scheduled before ins decision is set for Tuesday parasite has continued its March through Hollywood's awards season by winning the best original screenplay honor at the writers guild awards the **** satire Jo Jo.

Tulane University California New Orleans Aretha Franklin Sabrina representative Hollywood Jo Jo AP Anne rice
"tulane university" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

10:38 min | 1 year ago

"tulane university" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"To you by strong will plumbing Erin solar number one well this is fantastic today is the day that apparently we can have questions senators questioning the house impeachment managers that **** for brains and Nadler and Josh Holly has a phenomenal amount of questions about hunter Biden about shipping his relationship with the whistle blower ship in his relationship with the vin men did it did but did Obama and Biden also abuse their power by withholding aid from Ukraine to the fire there prosecutor these are great questions and they're gonna come up today second thing that I think you what needed to know the Republicans according to were a senator Kevin Kramer they they think they're gonna have enough senators at least fifty to block the motion on witnesses and they should all be done by Friday third thing I think you needed to know Brad par scale campaign manager for trump puts out incredible twee was stats about the New Jersey rally under fifty eight thousand plus people wanted tickets ready for this twenty six point three percent of them were Democrats twenty six point three percent were Democrats ten percent didn't vote of the overall people there's a lot of support for trump that did that hi Brian have when he won twenty sixteen and that's just New Jersey that's just Wildwood New Jersey yeah exactly they they do hate everybody went from apparently and is there are the they do a lot of people really quick that actually supported trump that don't support him now we think of what he did write everything do you think all those other people like why voted form and I'm very disappointed the economy and like the wall going up in the crackdown illegal immigration into stopping the caravans and a trade deal with China and Mexico and Canada like I'm so disappointed he did all that so I'm not gonna vote for now I think there are people that I actually think that way when they can't be right there just there can't be people actually think that way I mean there could always be but they just can't be so pausing for a moment from the the whole of political scene is been a lot of it this caught my attention and I come on really we'll get to the Schumer stuff will get other things on to I'm getting I am now interesting emails I make Sally people once again blaming me for things which I do you know it's great everybody's opinion and I told I love it I love the disagreement more than the agreement because more fun for me but there is a story the college fix they had a a story a student about a student writing an op at it too from Tulane University senior from Tulane University went to is our school newspaper claiming you're ready for this dressing and acting professional is a racist dressing and acting professional is racist I didn't realize professional is a race did you know that is professional race no way not only is it racist ready for this dressing and acting rational is rooted in of course you're ready for it white supremacy yeah yep so the two lane is seven twenty diversity newspapers called the hullabaloo and a senior name is Sean not Houdin but in the U. D. D. I. N. right I can't reflection of myself in the window across the room and at first I don't recognize myself I see a shell of who I am and individual transform to fit the historically white standards of business professional is really the whites and can and by the way soon as I read that you know what DOT vision popped my picture popped in my head mark Zuckerberg we're in a jeans sneakers and his zip up which is what the millennial thing to do is to work you know you got to where the zip up with the T. shirt and in the genes in that's just the way it is and I'm thinking is is that white supremacy to like that it's not professional looking you know it's it's not I mean that everybody you know things change with the times you look at the the old videos of people go to baseball games in the forties fifties and sixties and you see men in suits and hats going to baseball games never happen now people only wear suits to work now I mean is a is a lot that would avoid it in this guy's mad I meet what looking professional is looking it adds credibility to yourself you got your V. people wanted to dress like a white person they want you to dress responsibly in professional because you are the image of their business like this really do she went to Tulane which is a private university which cost a lot of money and somehow someway you paid all that money to go to Tulane University and you just can't figure out where you weren't taught rain you weren't taught that when you get a job you are a reflection of where you work fifty one thousand Bucks a year to go to Tulane University and you can figure that out really I'm just getting started on this he pointed out how he had to remove all of his piercings he had to practice English words with which she struggles daily he struggles with the English words it did this is America fifty one thousand a year you're struggling with words in English really okay so yes exactly what are we doing when we have students to be professional answer telling blacks to refrain from using black English black English I didn't know black was there was black English and other English I didn't I didn't know anything about that right I am so refrain from using black English and non whites not wear anything cultural that's what he's telling you is what we do when you want to look professional it's telling blacks to use what I stop using black English and everybody that's not white so blacks Hispanics whatever anybody thought white don't wear anything cultural and ask applicants to speak on work experiences that were challenging instead of the ones where we had racist bosses this is what he wrote right this is what it is I'll give you some more is what he writes non English speakers are expected to come to the work place in shape their identities for the comfort of other people professionalism is in entitlements to other people's speech want restricting non English languages in the workplace is not advancement of a company's goals but invention of xenophobia human you ready for this punctuality centers of whiteness so now being on time is all white thing according to this Tulane University senior being on time is a white thing wanna know why will the next sentence he writes it's far easier for white men to get to work on time then black people were having to change their hair to fit the workplaces professionalism standards non white people ought to spend significantly more time than their white counterparts on molding themselves to a white western a lifestyle before work this is what district okay at some point this guy is going to go for some kind of a job I have no idea what kind of job it is or whatever that matter right there is a thing called duck duck goal or Google he probably will be a barrister so there's a thing called duck duck go or Google is a search engines nowadays you go for a job yeah hand in your resume you do it that is set as soon as you leave or soon as you handed in that person generally does a search on you and all of a sudden this pops up you think that you're going to actually get the job who would want to hire somebody that's going to be an actual malcontents complain about every you want to be on time you want to be professional yes in a workplace yes that's that's what we expect non white people have to spend significant water yeah this is like you're saying women it's just too bad why to women they have to look good for this is terrible they have to spend way more time than men to make sure they look good which is actually true I mean it's you know we don't to shave as much as we usually can if you want but it's not like a thing anymore and yeah and by the way how insulting it is to blacks and other non white said actually do have jobs in our professional I would something is it to them I have more to get to but we have to take a quick break there's more to this new can comment eight eight zero can as TI eighty zero five six seven eight fifty one thousand or two hundred to four thousand dollars plus to go to Tulane University and this guy is complaining about this what exactly did you learn right what is its anything we'll continue in a four don't go anywhere it is can a state morning ritual with Gary Lewis so I got a message on Facebook this morning I pop on there and one of my listeners sent me a message went to the good feed store of course to greatness one right next to bed bath and beyond he went to the good feed store got the arch supports and he's like I already feel the difference I already feel less pain because of this this could happen to you to bill bill is a guy that did it gear with the good food store ask for the Garrett discount yes they were great pain is already so much less it could happen to you too the good the dark supportable we're in for nine years Ryan almost two years my wife has a male family has a may help you stay a perfect posture in perfect balance because your feet at some point flatten out but you have four arches in each foot is posed by the way your body on the arch that's why you have plantar fasciitis or ankle pain or foot pain if you feel like they're on fire knee pain back pain you're not standing.

Nadler Josh Holly hunter Biden
"tulane university" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"tulane university" Discussed on KCRW

"Famous majestic hotel an impressive security force it was here that for almost five years there were negotiations at seeing frustrating and never got anywhere that's A. B. C.'s Lucio fee reporting on the Paris peace talks despite considerable skepticism Nixon's National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger insisted those talks were nearing an end maybe later that these is that two months later Nixon announced the US had obtained as he put it peace with honor in Vietnam at twelve thirty Paris time today January twenty three nineteen seventy three he went on ending the war and restoring peace in Vietnam was initialed by doctor Henry Kissinger on that here is peace accord gave sixty days for US troops to withdraw that called for the release of nearly six hundred American prisoners of war and a lot more than a hundred thousand north Vietnamese troops to remain in the south the late general Maxwell Taylor oversaw the first big deployment of American troops to Vietnam it was later the US ambassador there hours after that peace accord was signed Taylor told NPR America had triumphed we wanted we wanted live in accomplishing the things we set out to do independent Vietnam free from aggression that's what this that agreement is all about but there were no guarantees the U. S. would defend South Vietnam two years later that nation's leader flat and north Vietnamese forces surrounded its capital Saigon by then Nixon had resigned Gerald Ford had replaced him Ford told students at Tulane University the time had come to leave Vietnam behind today America can regain a sense of pride that existed before Vietnam but it cannot be achieved by re fighting a war that is finished as far as America a week later Saigon fell the people here were herded into groups all they could take was hand luggage.

A. B. C. Nixon Henry Kissinger US NPR America South Vietnam Saigon Gerald Ford Tulane University Lucio Paris Advisor Maxwell Taylor five years sixty days two months two years
"tulane university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"tulane university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Now famous majestic hotel an impressive security force it was here that for almost five years there were negotiations at seeing frustrating and never got anywhere that's ABC's Lucio fee reporting on the Paris peace talks despite considerable skepticism Nixon's National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger insisted those talks were nearing an end maybe they these is that two months later Nixon announced the US had obtained as he put it peace with honor in Vietnam at twelve thirty Paris time today January twenty three nineteen seventy three he went on ending the war and restoring peace in Vietnam was initialed by doctor Henry Kissinger of that Paris peace accord gave sixty days for US troops to withdraw it called for the release of nearly six hundred American prisoners of war and a lot more than a hundred thousand north Vietnamese troops to remain in the south the late general Maxwell Taylor oversaw the first big deployment of American troops to Vietnam it was later the US ambassador there hours after that peace accord was signed Taylor told NPR America had triumphed we wanted we wanted live in accomplishing the things we set out to do independent Vietnam free from aggression that's what this that agreement is all about but there were no guarantees the U. S. would defend South Vietnam two years later that nation's leader flat and north Vietnamese forces surrounded its capital Saigon by then Nixon had resigned Gerald Ford had replaced him for told students at Tulane University the time had come to leave Vietnam behind today America can regain a sense of pride that existed before Vietnam but it cannot be achieved by re fighting a war that is finished as far as America is concerned a week later Saigon fell the people here were herded into groups all they could take was hand luggage.

ABC Nixon US doctor Henry Kissinger NPR America South Vietnam Saigon Gerald Ford Tulane University Lucio Paris Advisor Maxwell Taylor five years sixty days two months two years
"tulane university" Discussed on MacBreak Weekly

MacBreak Weekly

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"tulane university" Discussed on MacBreak Weekly

"It's graduation time. I went to my daughter's college. Graduation on Saturday. So pretty, you know, who spoke was awesome. She got an honorary degree Joanna Hoffman. Oh, yeah. She's the Russian emigre who yells at Steve Jobs in the Steve Jobs. Movie, though, the oil, one remember, there's a woman, I think she played by Kate Winslet. I think she was she comes in. And she's the only person can say Buddha, Steve Joanna worked at apple. She was on the original MacIntosh team wrote the business plan and the first marketing plan for MacIntosh later, went with Steve to next later went to General Magic where she was instrumental in creating the first smartphone, amazing woman. A great story. She told her life story. She came from Russia at the age of seven spoke knowing which, and talked about how she integrated and she her major was archaeology. She was fastened by physics archaeology, and it was just very lucky. Steve Jobs, loved her hired her and the rest is history. She was a great commencement speaker, Tim cook spoke to the class at Tulane university. The class of two thousand nineteen. That's enormous. It's a big school. They had the entire Superdome. The Mercedes Benz Superdome where the saints play for their graduation. He said, a few interesting things including apologizing for our generation. He said, we really well, it really screwed it up and gen-x would it which is at the now he's younger than me. I'm a baby, boomer. Okay. I don't think he's a he's a boomer. Is he a boomer? He's he's apologizing for the boomers. Yeah. We did kind of screw things up. I apologize for the boomers as well. You didn't teach us what suffering was Leo. He's everything for granted. You know, there's a lot of he says, in some important ways, I wish we have the video, because I'd like to his it some important ways much interaction has he ends up. And I ended up sounding like Bill Clinton generation has failed, you, we spent too much time to baiting and had been too focused on the fight not focused enough on progress. I guess he is a boomer because he's only four years younger than me. So he says you don't need to look far to find an example of that failure. Of course he's in New Orleans, where Katrina into. Thousand five just destroyed the place here today in this very place with thousands once found desperate shelter from one hundred year disaster. Remember the Superdome was home to a lot of people flooded. Out the kind that seem to be happening, more and more frequently nudge, nudge, I don't think we can talk about who we are as a people what we owe to one another without talking about climate change. The problem doesn't get any easier based on whose side wins or loses an election. True. It's about who's ones life's lottery and has the luxury of ignoring this issue, and who stands to lose everything..

Steve Jobs Kate Winslet Tim cook Joanna Hoffman Steve Joanna Steve Bill Clinton Benz MacIntosh Russia General Magic apple New Orleans Tulane university Katrina one hundred year four years
Let Curiosity Lead You

Ignition Point

04:49 min | 2 years ago

Let Curiosity Lead You

"Let your curiosity lead. You when is the last time you were genuinely curious about something what was it about? What did you find for the answers? How did it change your life? Let yourself be curious explore new things in may bring you to exactly where you're always looking for for the past few years. I let my curiosity lead me to new opportunities out of never dreamed of and I'm gonna get to that in a little bit. But for right now, I want to challenge you at this moment at this second to think about something that you are truly curious about go. Find out some more information on that one thing within the next week, it stirs something in you that could change your entire life. Give yourself permission to be creative as a pass division. One. Does sport athlete at Tulane university? I played both football and baseball and time management was absolutely crucial in my life. Because I didn't have a lot of free time. This experience taught me the discipline to maximize my entire day to have the maximum productivity. However, it did not allow me to be very creative with my thinking. During college had a curiosity about building apps. This led to create him first startup was able to build fundraise and launch an app this launch. My entrepreneurial journey said Monteilh life on a completely different path than originally anticipated. I always thought that I was going to be a lawyer in got into law school, but through creating this app, I knew that I had something that was stirring, passionate me. I was willing to put that on hold are not even pursued anymore. Just so I have the opportunity. To pursue my passion. This alternate launch my journey on a complete different path, which is generally made me the happiest I've ever been. The way that I even got to the point where I was able to come up with this business idea was that I was part of a business fraternity called alpha Kappa sigh, and I had one of the brothers come up at one of our meetings in say for all the entrepreneurial spirits out here. I want you to come up with a new idea everyday thirty days. So right now right now in this moment, I wanna challenge you the next thirty days to come up with a new idea every single day. This will be challenging most of your ideas are going to be absolutely terrible. But by the end, I bet you will come up with one gym or even more worth exploring. Challenge yourself to come up with the answers. If there's one thing I've learned about the adult foiled is that most people truly do not know what they are doing. They either have developed systems processes to help them get to the essence quickly and with his little friction as possible. We can find answers to any question. We have right now seconds. We just have to take the time to find the answers knowledge is power. You just have to find the time to go and get that knowledge all of us have the same amount of time one hundred sixty eight hours in a week. How are you spending that time maybe that means you sleep a little less? Maybe that means you don't want to must TV, but all of us have a hundred sixty eight hours a week. I challenge you to be more creative. And how you spend some of that time, for example, back when I was in college one of my good friends challenged me to read more books because he's told me what do all billionaires have in common. Billionaires read on average two hours every single day. That means they're reading more than than anyone else. They're more knowledgeable. They're constantly searching for more and more knowledge that will help their business decisions. So what I started to do was as I began to work out. I begin the listen to podcasts two books. So that as I was working my mind, also working, myself physically. And so I was getting the best of both worlds, especially when it came to my different curiosities. If there's something that I wanna learn now, I'll listen to a book are listen to a podcast in the same way that you can go and Google search for any question that you may have we have the resources now to where you can listen to it on a podcast, go read a blog about it, or you can go watch YouTube video that will purely answer any question that you have knowledge is power. So

Tulane University Monteilh Google Youtube Football Baseball Thirty Days One Hundred Sixty Eight Hours Hundred Sixty Eight Hours Two Hours
"tulane university" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

06:23 min | 2 years ago

"tulane university" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Well, there's this new research that came out this week. That's pretty darn interesting to me. Tulane university. Assistant professor Damien Murray. And with a group from UCLA? Have some new biological evidence? To show how falling in love can influence immune system in a positive way. Now, this research was done women. So this is particularly good news for women. Listen up ladies, what they found in their research was that women who fell in love had increased activity of genes that involved antiviral defenses compared when when they began the study. Now, here's the interesting thing about this study. So it was a twelve month study. And that's a pretty long study when you're doing things like drawing blood on a regular basis. It was a study of undergraduate and graduate students were who participated. It was only women forty seven women completed this research that did include drawing blood every other week and filling out questionnaires about how's your life? On Tinder these days. Have you met anybody? What's happening, right. And I'm sorry. They participated in the study for a total of twenty four months. Now, the drawbacks to the study. It was relatively small. I mean, can you say forty seven women are exemplary of the entire culture at large. No, no. But the length of the study that's pretty big. And the fact that they had not just self reports. Like, I feel healthier. I haven't had cold in months. You know, you always got question. Self report studies 'cause people lie a lot. But this was you know, draw the blood and have a look at the immune system. Another small drawback, but only small in my head is that it was a paid study. They paid the participants. Hey, come on they're taking their blood every other week. This a big commitment. They're filling out questionnaires you better. Give me a little something something for that. That's what I would say. So I don't think that that necessarily skewed the results. So what they found is that women who did not fall in love during the twenty four months of the study did not have these new antiviral defenses. So. This could reflect a kind of proactive response to anticipating future intimate contact. I'm reading study given that most viruses are spread via close physical content contact. Okay. So basically, they're saying is which came first the chicken or the egg falling in love means that you're now exchanging bodily fluids is a hope you are. I hope you're kissing and getting somebody else's germs in their saliva. So what does that mean? It means that your body is going to have to produce more white blood cells, by the way, do you know, why women like to kiss more than men? So in our anthropological past women and probably today. Women use the taste of saliva and the smell of Ramones to determine how healthy a man was. And there's research around pharaoh moans and immune systems. If you've heard me talk about it before, you know about it. It is that the more disparate different. Somebody's immune system is from you. The more deliciously. They were s- they will smell to you. And the better the sex will be and here's why. So when you meet somebody, and you mate, you might take Brown eyes from one long legs from another curly hair from another except immune systems, they combine to create a stronger human. And that's mother nature's way they do it through sexuality. Smart mother nature of making somebody smell, absolutely delicious. Think about it. Think about the person that you look back on that you had the best sex within your life. I bet you're gonna remember delicious smell so. These researchers follow these forty-seven women for almost two years, and they found that those who fell in love had better immune system function. So what does this safe to us? What is this telling us? Well, basically, we're learning all the various mechanisms biological and psychological of why relationships make us stronger, I do an exercise with my students, and I want you guys to do it right now unless you're driving if you're driving do not do this right now. Okay. But if your home if you're anywhere where you can be calm and close your eyes, and like you to close your eyes, and I want you to think about some person in your life that you had a secure attachment with. It might have been a parent a sibling, a lover, an anti a grandma, and I want you to rest your head on their chest and listened to their heartbeat and feel their arms around you. And be still and go into that place that imagine tariff magic machination place. Here their heartbeat smell their deliciousness, and relax and sink into it. Guess what your body right now is releasing my favorite hormone, the one with its own nickname, the cuddle hormone oxytocin. That's what your member thing. And because the brain actually doesn't know the difference between imagination and reality you can get a little dose of it just by being alone. Now does this mean this is a replacement for a good healthy connection? No way. Jose is not a replacement at all this just to let you know why? And how relationships are particularly good for our health, and why I studied health psychology as much as I study relationships science when we come back positive psychology. It's an area of psychology that is blowing up right now focusing on your strengths. And I'm gonna tell you how you can get in the flow and get the benefits of positive psychology. You are listening to the doctor Wendy Walsh show here on KFI AM, six forty. You can follow me on social media pretty much anywhere. The handle is at DR, Wendy Walsh. We'll be right back. I'm Dr Wendy Walsh. I'll be right back. But first layer parole. You've got some news for us. I do President Trump's approval rating is on the rise. And NBC news Wall Street Journal journal poll says overall.

Dr Wendy Walsh UCLA Damien Murray Tulane university Assistant professor NBC Wall Street Journal journal oxytocin KFI President Brown Trump Jose twenty four months twelve month two years
How Can You Help a Friend with Depression?

BrainStuff

05:52 min | 2 years ago

How Can You Help a Friend with Depression?

"Just wanted to let you know this episode deals with the topics of depression and suicide so if you're not up for that today. Go ahead and skip it and hey, take care of yourself. Okay. During the publicity that attended the recent suicides of Anthony bourdain end Kate Spade. People were urged to reach out to loved ones. They suspect are coping with depression. There's good reason for this nudge, a more than sixteen million American adults experience major depression with only thirty five percent of those affected turning to a mental health professional for treatment effective treatment can lead to partial or complete remission and thus a vastly improved quality of life. But one of the tricky things about depression is that it can prevent people from getting help still despite these numbers a lot of people are confused are anxious about how to handle a potentially depressed loved one. How can you tell if someone is really depressed and how exactly should you approach the person? What if they get mad at you for asking? Although a lot of variables are at play. And it's impossible to predict a reaction experts insist that it's always better to make a true and carrying effort. We spoke with Matt Onarato director of social work and an adjunct clinical assistant, professor at the Ohio State University. Wet. Sner medical centers Harding hospital. He said a people who contemplate suicide are embitterment up to the end. They want the pain to end. And if there was some other way to end the pain than kill themselves. They would take that. There's always hope you make a small gesture of. Hey, I'm here if you need me, and that could stop someone a week later from trying to kill themselves, the small things we do make a huge impact. So how do you know, if someone is dealing with depression almost all of us get the blues at some point feeling down about our lives or selves, the difference with depression is that this feeling does not lift and has not improved by spending time with friends or taking part in fun activities some fairly well known symptoms of depression include sadness and loss of interest in hobbies enjoyed in the past weight gain or weight loss. Trouble sleeping or excessive sleep difficulty. Concentrating and suicidal thoughts or comments a general ability is a lesser known and often overlooked symptom. Verbal statements of feeling emptier. Worthless are also important to note as well as physical symptoms like pain fatigue, headaches or stomach aches, if any of these symptoms last more than two weeks and interfere with the person's life functioning in some way. It's probably not just the blues like any serious illness depression needs to be treated to get better. A lot of people are scared to approach left. What about depression or suicide a whether it's because they don't want to offend the person are afraid to make the situation to real or are worried that they'll get yelled at we also spoke with Dr Catherine brunette assistant, professor at the school of social work at Tulane university via Email, she said anytime sensitive issue was brought up the potential for defensiveness or anger is there. She also noted that you're not necessarily in for a fight though. Quote, everyone responds differently and many people may be relieved to talk about their struggles. Especially if a non judgmental insensitive approach is taken. In the event that the person does react unhappily. It can be helpful to be open and direct about your emotional response, therapists, suggest saying something like I understand you're going through a lot. But when you snap at me. It makes me feel sad. There's no guarantee that one talk will result in action. And that's okay, Burnett said sometimes they friend seems to blow you off you can affirm that you just care about them. And are there if they ever want to talk your friend may not respond immediately. But your care may have left an opening for future conversations. When you do initiate the conversation calmly expressed concern, then let them do a lot of the talking. Listen, I hold off on any problem solving or suggestions, it might sound silly. But just listening to a person's experience of depression can help them validate that experience for themselves. Once they've had their say, therapists recommend asking probing questions. Like how bad does the scat? A does it ever get worse than what you're telling me? Are you aware of having a lot of guilt or shame? Just void saying things. Like look on the bright side, or it's not that bad or even something like when I was depressed. Once I started walking every day. And I got better. Remember, the depression is a systemic illness. It can affect a person's whole body and being so it needs treatment tailored for every individual person. It may take time, but hopefully, they'll come to the conclusion that their depression can be treated there are lots of options, depending on how severe the situation is if the person is suicidal. There are services that offer twenty four hour access to trained professionals and other resources in the US. Try looking up the National Alliance on mental illness or mental health America. Or these suicide prevention lifeline or the substance abuse and mental health Services Administration some services are free. And there are federally funded outpatient and inpatient programs available to folks without insurance with payment based on sliding scale, according to income if the situation is less urge. Don't talk to your friend about what option they might be most comfortable with this could start with a trip to the family. Doctor a, particularly if your friends doesn't want to see a therapist after all primary care. Doctors are also able to rule out any other medical 'cause like Siread problems or Nimia they can screen for depression prescribed medications and refer patients to mental health professionals, many employee assistance programs offer free or reduced cost counseling sessions to staff and family members. So be sure to check your specific plan for counseling and other resources. Onarato said, I think culturally were becoming in America more comfortable talking about mental health, depression, and suicide people are being more open, and knowing that there is help out there that you won't be judged and are not

Depression Matt Onarato Anthony Bourdain Professor Kate Spade Sner Medical Centers Harding H Headaches National Alliance United States America Ohio State University Tulane University Burnett Director Email Dr Catherine Thirty Five Percent Twenty Four Hour Two Weeks