25 Burst results for "Tulane University"

Changing the Narrative with Rita Bautista

Cafe con Pam Podcast

03:02 min | 4 months ago

Changing the Narrative with Rita Bautista

"K.. Brita hello welcome to come on Bama. How are you? I'm doing great. Thanks so much for having me today. I'm excited we've been talking for like thirty minutes. Now. You have an awesome stories. Let's dive into tell us who you are what your heritage. So my name is read about that and I am a as used to describe it. I'm Honduran my parents were both from Buddha's but I was born here in New Orleans and raised between New Orleans in Baltimore and I currently live in Houston. So I've had the best of all worlds. Yeah. Headed your parents arrive to to New Orleans. Oh my gosh. So it's interesting both my parents ended up in two different places. My mom ended up in Baltimore with visa the. First Ten than she came illegally, and then she came back again legally and then my dad came here with a visa to new. Orleans. which is a huge population of hundred people for all those under Daniels listened to me there's a huge population Chiquita banana used to be headquartered there at the story's pretty rich and dynamic I think I should probably tell it one day, but it's a really interesting story like two lane. University has lot of really thick ties in into hundreds like they actually have a whole bunch of like less Stella's from the Mayan Ruins. Actually. In the nineteen hundreds went to Tulane University went to Honduras and made copies of them and they're sitting in New Orleans on at the military base. Okay. Fact very attacked. So how is it that it's a big population in your let I mean, it's not random, but it's like not your big cities are right. Well, for anybody WHO's been to New Orleans they have that like has at European small town feel and the climate really tropical. You know if it's if you're going to be close to home, you might as well be host in temperature to but like I said that to keep a banana used to be housed in or their headquarters was in new, ORLEANS? So since the ladder leads bananas in Lewis were also I guess they were reporting to New Orleans everybody who was coming over from Honduras to our liens found out about it because of the Banana Trade So interesting to get I don't be sick of that. But again, that's Your Dad arrives there and then your mom is in Baltimore and then they meet somewhere between. So they've actually met in hunters for the second time. Yeah. My mom back two. The second time, and then while she's in Honduras with my brother, she got married in Baltimore and then it didn't work. She got divorced in the ends up in under his an that second go round. She meets my dad in Honduras and she comes back to Baltimore with my brother wants all you your residency came out and everything she went back and then my dad ends up in New Orleans in. He's like you need to come check this out. This is like hundred number two like you know come visit me and sure enough she goes down there they fall in love with each other than this beautiful child was born.

New Orleans Honduras Baltimore Tulane University Stella Buddha Daniels Houston Orleans. Lewis
Some Conferences Are Determined: There Will Be College Football This Fall

All Things Considered

03:48 min | 5 months ago

Some Conferences Are Determined: There Will Be College Football This Fall

"There There will will be be college college football football this this fall. fall. Maybe Maybe that that is is the the message message this this week week from from some some top top football football schools schools and and conferences. conferences. It It comes comes after after two two powerhouse powerhouse conferences. conferences. The Big 10 in the Pac 12 announced they were canceling their full seasons because of the Corona virus. NPR's Greg Allen reports how colleges that are planning to play hope to protect the health of their athletes. Even many hard core college football fans are skeptical how Khun well over 100 people on a typical team training play without spreading the Corona virus, possibly shutting down the season this week, three of the top conferences, the SEC, the SEC and the Big 12 said their plans this fall to play and do so safely. John Thrasher is president of Florida State University, which is part of the Atlantic Coast Conference. And what we frankly want to send is a message to some of the other schools that may be teetering on whether or not to play football. We think it's a bit in the best interest of our student athletes. For us to play football. We could do it safely and we can do it productively for them for fans, athletes and the multi $1,000,000,000 sports entertainment complex built around college football things looked bleak Tuesday. Two major conferences, The Big 10 in the Pac 12 canceled their fall schedules because of the uncertainty and health risk surrounding the Corona virus. The announcement by the remaining three of the power five conferences that they would have a fall season came after athletes began a hashtag. We want to play movement on social media. At Florida State Wide receiver Keyshawn Helton says he believes training and playing with regular testing and medical protocols in place. Maybe safer than not playing. You talk about 18 or 22 year old Just quarantine at the house. That's unrealistic. There's really there's so many other things that you know God, I'm going to go do which is not safe. So being here with my team, and all of us together is the safest forth. The college conferences are pushing back the start of their seasons to give them extra time to get ready and perhaps learn from the experiences of other sports. Putting players inside a bubble like the N BA has done in Orlando isn't feasible for student athletes who live on campus and have to attend classes. University of Miami coach Manny Diaz believes college football can learn from the English soccer leagues, which resumed play in June. Without fans with so much at stake. He believes his athletes will be careful. They're aware that they've got to keep their bubble small. They understand the value of what a mask doesn't and who that protection If you're around people who don't have mass on, you've got to find another place to be, but with all that there's risk and going ahead with the college football season. One concern that was reportedly a factor in the decision of some conferences to postpone play is new information about a heart condition. My card is that has been linked to the Corona virus. It's an inflammation of the heart that can lead to long term problems. Announcing its decision to play the Big 12 conference, said any players who test positive for the Corona virus would receive an E K g echocardiogram, cardiac Emery and further heart tests before returning to play. Gabe Feldman, the director of the Sports Law program at Tulane University in New Orleans, says If the schools are transparent and take the right precautions he thinks they can play. Every school in the athletic department has to be very clear with all of their athletes. About what the risks are and what the unknowns are. And then the athletes have to have a choice. It's one thing to play. But can there be fans in the stadium? University of Florida athletic director Scott Strickland says he hopes so We want to be on a have fans, and we hope we're in a position to do that. But you see, this is the NFL season now starts earlier than ours, and A lot of NFL teams and still have a made determinations. Yet that could be the riskiest. Part of all some schools were opposing plans that would limit attendance to 25% of a stadium's capacity, which would still bring together a huge crowd of 20,000 or more cheering, screaming fans. Greg Allen. NPR NEWS Miami

Football Greg Allen Manny Diaz NPR NFL Director Florida State University SEC Florida University Of Miami Atlantic Coast Conference Keyshawn Helton Scott Strickland Orlando Gabe Feldman University Of Florida John Thrasher Khun
Why Shame Is A Bad Public Health Tool  Especially In A Pandemic

Short Wave

14:12 min | 6 months ago

Why Shame Is A Bad Public Health Tool Especially In A Pandemic

"Believe me I get it. I'm frustrated and angry to. After all, it's been four months of this. We know the right things to do. And when you see someone wearing a mask or groups of people hanging out close together, it's easy to get mad, even if in all fairness. Once or twice. Open defiance at this Castle Rock Colorado restaurant large crowds, no social distancing, and there's some news coverage right now. That caters to this anger. You know what I'm talking about. Many Americans are out and about on this memorial day visiting newly reopened businesses seems from the unofficial kickoff to the summer showing many Americans not practicing social distancing measure. I'm telling you to wear a mask where a damn ask, but this Kinda thing anger public shaming the urge to yell at people who aren't doing the right things. That can be precisely the opposite of productive. Yeah, as the researcher I've been. Watching all this unfold through that Lens Julia Marcus is an epidemiologist and professor at the Harvard. Medical School, she said he's HIV prevention. And for scientists Julia, who work in HIV or sexual health or even substance abuse? They know that shame can be a huge barrier when it comes to public health, and in these first few months of the Cova pandemic I was watching this same pattern happen where you know, these kind of absolutist public health messages and moralistic undertones were potentially contributing to what became rampant shaming of people who were flouting public health guidelines or doing things that people felt. Felt were high risk, and when we shame people for their risky behavior in a way that distracts us from where risk is really happening, which is typically much less visible like in prisons and nursing homes and food, processing plants, and those don't inspire the same moral outrage. I think for two reasons one. They're not right in front of our faces, but also to we don't think of those as people having fun and a pandemic which I think people really upset. Matt rage, Julia says might feel good to act on in the moment, but it's not gonNA solve our biggest problems right now. I find that taking that rage home, and really screaming alone has been very helpful for me to. Do that as well or you know my rage these days first of all I would say that knows no bounds, but also. To be honest. My regions more directed at institutional failures than individual ones. To episode Julia Marcus on the role. Shame plays in public health crises. We talk masks. School reopenings in the long road ahead. I'm Maddie's defy, and this is shortwave daily science podcast from NPR. Julia Marcus has written a bunch of great pieces for the Atlantic about why. Shame is not helpful right now and how we can do things better. She's looked this when it comes to mask wearing social distancing and how we open college campuses, we talked about all those things, but the first thing to say here is that there is a fine line between public shaming and some positive forms of peer pressure. I, yeah I WANNA make a distinction here between social norms and shaming I. think social norms are very powerful and. That can be one of the best ways I think to change. Health behavior is like well. Everybody else is doing it so I'm going to do it because it's more like i. want to feel good when I go in the grocery store and I'm not gonNA. Feel great if I'm the only one not wearing a mask, so, but there's a difference between making people feel bad about their risky behavior and making people feel good about engaging and protective behaviors as a way of like becoming part of What the new social norm is Marie right? Right Okay Julius. You've written a bunch of great pieces for the Atlantic. Let's talk about your most recent one I. It's you know how to not open colleges this fall. You started out by describing an email that went out to students at Tulane University earlier this month July seventh. What what happened there? Yeah I mean I I I don't WanNa. Pick on two lane here. Becher, that was it just an example of some of the communications that were starting to see toward students who are on campus this summer and have been having some parties. And there was an email that we're not to students that really condemned stat behavior as disrespectful, indefensible, dangerous selfish, and made it very clear in bold all caps that hosting parties of more than fifteen people would result in suspension or expulsion from the university and that if students wanted the school to remain open, they needed to be personally responsible. I'm in their behavior and When a university says, we will hold you accountable for having a party, and actually there will be dire swift punishment when inevitably there is an outbreak at a party. Students are going to be terrified to disclose that they were there. And students have now said this at the University of Connecticut were interviewed and surveyed about what kind of thing is going to work for them what their concerns are about the fall. And they universally said we. We are early close to universally said we're really afraid of how infection and risky behavior are going to be stigmatized such that we outbreaks will not be able to be controlled, so there needs to be appropriate consequences for putting your community at risk, and I would never say otherwise but that needs to be balanced against the need for public health efforts to be separate from discipline. And we've already seen contact tracing start to break down outside of campuses, because people are afraid to talk about having been at event that that they know is something they should not have been doing yeah. So. You know kind of following that thread. The part of this pandemic that's been hardest for a lot of people is is social distancing in in several of your pieces you wrote about how a lot of the advice especially in the beginning was almost like an abstinence based approach like stay home. See Nobody which absolutely made sense kind of at the. The beginning, but tell me about why. That approach doesn't necessarily make sense for the long-term well asking people to abstain from all social contact indefinitely or until we've scaled up. An effective vaccine is just not going to be a sustainable public health strategy, and I think now our messaging has evolved a bit especially as there's been an accumulation of evidence around. The risk is highest like what's settings or higher risk, in which ones are lower risk, but I think we continue to still have a tendency toward absolutist messaging and I think that our goal should be to two inch. People tour to a place where they are living their lives in a way that addresses all aspects of their health, while trying to keep tr- risk of transmission low, and so one way that that could play out is encouraging outdoor activities, especially in spacious areas, opening up more outdoor space for people, and there's been a tendency to close beaches and close parks where people gather, but. But I actually think doing the opposite on could could be helpful, but the essential point is. We can't stay in our homes forever and many people couldn't stay in their homes for the last few months because they were working sure, but it's clear from other areas of public health that asking people to abstain from something that they fundamentally need or strongly desire is not an effective public health strategies, so we have to find ways of making our messaging more nuanced, that allows people to get what they need to be able to live sustainably while keeping the risk of transmission low until you there. There are examples of nuanced messaging from others accessible public health campaigns. Right I. Mean You work on HIV? Can you give me an example of that? Yeah, so we you know we don't tell people don't have sex. Because that's the best way to not get HIV, we may save the safest thing you can do to avoid HIV transmission is not have sex, but we understand that many people are going to have sex, and that it's a you know a part of a healthy life, and so here are some safer ways to have sex, both in terms of certain sexual acts in in terms. Terms of protection different ways you can protect yourself and you know becomes a more nuanced message, but it's much more sustainable for people and realistic and the long term, and it also acknowledges people's basic human needs right, and there's also this idea that talking about ways to reduce risk encourages people to take those risks, even though from a public health standpoint. We know that isn't true. So I'm wondering Julia like. Why do people hold onto this concern? Like what is this really about yeah I, mean this is definitely not new. It comes up a lot. I think especially around drug, use and sex. And I think the reason it especially comes up in those settings is that those are behaviors that we have a lot of moral judgments about particularly in this country, and there's this kind of moral outrage that happens when we think about people engaging in risky, which is often pleasurable, behavior, sex, drug use, and these days going to the beach like. it's kind of playing out in this new way now with social contact and partying and people having a good time in a pandemic, which it's actually a public health win when we find ways to support people in enjoying their lives, and and getting their basic social or sexual needs, met while remaining a safest possible, and you've made the point that we've. We've already seen this play out with the corona virus, public health officials, hesitating to give people detailed ways to protect themselves instead of avoiding risk altogether, I mean I remember. We reported early on in this pandemic when Dr Burks of the White House Coronavirus Task Force said. We don't want people to get this artificial sense of protection because they're behind a mask. This lack of consistent messaging is one of the reason that a lot of people still aren't convinced that masks are helpful, so you know. Julia, how do public health officials effectively reach? Those people yeah I mean I. Think in general we always see some resistance to any new public health intervention, condoms, and you know pre exposure prophylaxis for each V. I mean every intervention that comes out. There's resistance. There's challenges with implementation. There are moral concerns you know. This is all kind of par for the course, but I think what's new here and a bit different is not necessarily just the polarization which we do, see an Ciaran things like vaccines, but the politicization. Politicization I don't think there has been I can't think of an example where a sitting president has flouted public health recommendations and I think that that has created kind of a politicized around masks. That wouldn't have necessarily been there and so how do we overcome that? And how do we reach people I think again it comes back to hearing people's concerns, acknowledging them, and then working to overcome those barriers in our messaging and I. Think there are some good examples of that there have been a couple of great mask campaigns that have come out of California acknowledging that people dislike wearing them and acknowledging the reasons why people dislike wearing them. And I would guess that they are more effective in reaching certain populations than campaigns that that are more focused on this. Just wear ask. It's really easy kind of messaging. Yeah and don't you care about your community and don't you want to not kill people and That kind of messaging is like early days of AIDS. Messaging around condoms that I think was not as successful as the messaging that really focused on what the barriers were, and how people could overcome them. Yeah, yeah, with all this stuff that we've been talking about colleges masks. You know keeping safe distance. It's pretty tough because the stakes feel so high like this is really a nasty virus, and when we see people, you know not doing the right things, the instinct there to shame them to get mad for a lot of us at first instinct and I. I guess it's just that we need to take some patients to push past them. Yeah, I mean I, think it's really. Valid to feel angry about what's happening right now, and for people who are not necessarily taking care of themselves or their community and putting other people at risk. It's very frustrating to see, but I think especially for public health professionals. It's on us to do the work to avoid the shaming and the anger and the moralizing in our messaging. Because we've learned that that doesn't work in other areas of health and really try to take the time to craft messaging. That is going to be more effective. Julia Marcus. Checkout episode notes for a link where you can find her writing to the Atlantic. Can say the Atlantic is crushing it these days, but the magazine, not the ocean. I mean

Julia Marcus Atlantic HIV Castle Rock Colorado Harvard Researcher Wanna Medical School Matt Rage Maddie Becher Tulane University Marie NPR University Of Connecticut Professor California Ciaran Dr Burks
Tulane basketball player charged with murder in Georgia

AP 24 Hour News

00:40 sec | 9 months ago

Tulane basketball player charged with murder in Georgia

"A college basketball player who had declared for the NBA draft has been charged with murder Tulane University guard Tyshawn high tower is one of six suspects in faces multiple charges including murder in connection with an April eighth killing the Atlanta journal constitution reports police in Henry county Georgia se divine take Anthony long died from gunshot wounds Hightower is a junior who led the green wave in scoring last season he declared for the NBA draft on April eighteenth ten days after long's death but he was leaving open the option of returning for his senior season to lane officials have dismissed him from the

Tyshawn High Tower Murder Anthony Hightower Basketball NBA Tulane University Atlanta Journal Henry County Georgia
Where Did The Coronavirus Start? Virus Hunters Find Clues In Bats

Short Wave

06:46 min | 10 months ago

Where Did The Coronavirus Start? Virus Hunters Find Clues In Bats

"All Right Emily Kuang Wave Reporter. Animal Lover Unabashed Animal Lover. It's true you and I both know that bats are amazing. That is not up for dispute on shortwave. They're important for pollinating flowers dispersing seeds. They catch bugs the same ones that bite us and eat up some of our crops but bats also harbor some of the toughest known zoonotic diseases. That's right the rabies virus the Marburg virus the Hendra and Nipah viruses. The Abullah virus outbreak in West Africa was traced to a bat colony. All these viruses find what's called a natural reservoir in bats meaning the viruses live in that host without harming it. Do We know why that is? It's a very interesting question so I used to say a million dollar question now as as a billion dollar question Lynn Fouling says it might have to do with the fact that bats are the only mammal that's adapted for flight because during flight. The body temperature goes to up to all the way to forty two degrees. That's super high. Forty two degrees Celsius is almost one hundred eight degrees Fahrenheit and their heartbeat goes up to a thousand beats per minute. They're burning a ton of energy flying several hours a day and this creates toxic free radicals that damage their cells but Linda's research has shown that bats have also evolved this ability to repair and minimize that cellular damage. Kind of counterstrike and those same defensive. Abilities may help them not only tolerate flight but also to fight infectious diseases in a way that the human body simply cannot so the essentially. Have this like super effective? Immune response rights so while our immune systems can get overwhelmed from fending off these viruses. He thinks bats don't our hypothesis is best has evolved. A different method is to get the balanced right for defense and Torrance and that famous virus to live peacefully with Bass and they're able to safely house these viruses in their bodies and not get sick from them. Got It so. Let's talk about why scientists think this particular corona virus could have come from bats. Well they got a big clue from the start so in early. January Chinese scientists were able to quickly sequence the viruses entire genome and then they published it online from that scientists begin to study the virus in-depth and around this time researchers at Wuhan Institute of Raji in China compared its genome to a library of known viruses right and found a ninety six percent match with Corona virus samples taken from Horseshoe Bats in Union. Yes the same kinds of bats that were natural reservoirs for the original SARS virus that broke out in two thousand three and this led them to believe that this new corona virus likely came from bats to right and from a genetic standpoint ninety six percent match. Sounds like a lot but that four percent can make a big difference exactly that that four percent difference is actually a pretty wide distance in evolutionary timing. It could be even decades. This is Robert Gary Ablett at Tulane University. And while that one paper says there's a ninety six percent match with bats that extra four percent to him suggests some other viral material may have gotten mixed in from another animal and that other animal could have even transmitted the virus to humans right. This is called an intermediate host or an in-between host correct. But when it comes to this corona virus scientists aren't sure if there was an intermediate host between bats and humans and if so they're not sure what the intermediate host could be. There are theories Robert and fellow. Researchers have hypothesized. This virus could be a blend of viruses from two different animals bats and something else. An early scientific studies suggest it could be this animal called Penguin this scaly ant eater vulnerable to illegal wildlife trade and virus penguins or some other animal. That has a similar receptor binding domain. So to buyers getting together recombining to make up a new Sars KOGI team but the important point to all this is that virus hunters haven't come to a definitive conclusion about the chain of transmission from animals to humans about the involvement of penguins and baths or any other host animal. Not on the level of proof. They need right like the genetic level. Yes we don't know definitively which animal or animals this came from. It will take time to figure out but we do know. This came from animals a bunch of scientists in mid-february publish this big letter in the Journal. Lancet saying evidence overwhelmingly points to wildlife as the origin for this corona virus. And Roberts stands by that too. I can tell you that this is a product of nature. It's not a virus. That has arisen in a laboratory by any scientists purposely manipulating something that that was then released onto a cup like that. That just didn't happen. Because if you look at the actual genome which Robert has done the evidence. Isn't there okay so you said earlier. While speaking to the researcher in Singapore that it took a decade to find out the actual origin of the virus that causes SARS the original SARS. Do we know how long it could take to figure out where this new corona virus came from. Oh Mattie I wished I had an answer for you. We don't it all depends on funding and resources. Doesn't it all gone and time like I keep saying? Throughout this whole episode investment in virus hunting right expanding the zoonotic studies to figure out the transmission chain between animals and people. Because if we know that we are armed with information that can help us. Prevent future outbreaks. Peter doc he's the President of the US based nonprofit ego health alliance and he says that even if bats are the likely origin they are not to blame. It's no but's it's uh it's it's and what we do to Bass that drives this. Pandemic risks like wildlife trade and Food and agriculture practices or are close proximity to animals in densely populated areas one of the poster things about funding that. We're actually behind. These pandemics is that gives those the power to do something about it. We don't need to get rid about. We don't need to do anything with that. We've just got to leave them alone. Let me get on doing the good. They do flipping around at night

Robert Gary Ablett Researcher Marburg Emily Kuang Sars Hendra Reporter Lynn Fouling Wuhan Institute Of Raji West Africa Linda Torrance Lancet Kogi Union Mattie Tulane University Singapore United States
"tulane university" Discussed on AP News

AP News

04:38 min | 11 months ago

"tulane university" Discussed on AP News

"Ones vampires are coming to Tulane University the school acquired the archives of bestselling author Anne rice who was born and raised in New Orleans rice has written thirty novels she moved to California for college and has spent much of her life since then in California but New Orleans has played a central role in much of her fiction interview with the vampire was her first novel when it was published in nineteen seventy six Anderson the city's French Quarter the collection at Tulane will consist of manuscripts of most of her published works some unpublished short stories journals screenplays personal artifacts in correspondence from family friends and fans of the author a self styled daredevil died Saturday after a rocket which he launched himself crashed into the ground mad Mike Hughes died after the homemade rocket crashed on private property near Barstow California Justin Chapman freelance journalists told the AP that he and his wife witnessed the crash they said the rocket appeared to rub against the launch apparatus which might have torn the parachutes attached to it Hughes recently signed on with the science channel to document his project on the television program homemade astronauts in March twenty eighteen Hughes who book it ground in what's being billed as the biggest women's cricket match ever the international cricket council says local organizers want to break the world record of ninety thousand one hundred eighty five for a crowd at a women's sporting event set in nineteen ninety nine at the FIFA World Cup final in Pasadena California he said in a statement that she is all about celebrating a quality and the achievements of women hi Jackie Quinn is it in trump campaigning in Las Vegas is suggesting that intelligence reporting about Russian interference to help his campaign is just missing information from Democrats after three years of ridiculous which Johnson partisan Democrat crusades by the way I think this is not a did you see that I see these phonies season the do nothing Democrats they said today that Putin wants to be sure the trump gets elected here we go well he downplayed the intelligence reporting Democrat Bernie Sanders says he too was told his campaign was getting Russian meddling Sanders warned Russia to stay out of U. S. politics after the Iowa caucus tabulating meltdown a professor at U. N. L. V. Robert Lang says Nevada will do it's counting differently the app that was a concern in Iowa was abandoned and were really off of some sort of optical scanning sheets at this point that are older fashion but more reliable China says the number of daily cases of coronaviruses dropped but in South Korea they're reporting a six fold increase and officials are declaring an emergency in the US our my grass it reports on a number of new cases the U. S. centers for disease control and prevention says at least eighteen Americans who returned to the United States from a quarantine to cruise ships are infected with covert nineteen the new virus that originated in China that raises to thirty five the number of confirmed cases in the US an Idaho woman with doomsday believed to fly to Hawaii was in court today forty six year old Laurie valoe charged with felony child abandonment Harvey Weinstein's jury has deadlocked on the two most serious counts of predatory sexual assault the judges urging jurors to keep trying to reach a consensus they'll be back Monday this is APNews on the eve of the Nevada caucus an Associated Press N. O. R. C. poll finds Democrats feeling positive about the top presidential contender Bernie Sanders gets the highest ratings nationally seventy four percent of democratic voters surveyed say they have a favorable opinion of the Vermont senator former vice president Joe Biden get sixty seven percent favorable senator Elizabeth Warren sixty four percent and fifty eight percent for former south bend Indiana Merope included judge about half expressed favorable opinions of billionaire Mike Bloomberg and senator Amy Klobuchar and nearly forty percent for billionaire Tom Steiner Ben Thomas Washington Kentucky's governor has signed legislation that requires police officers who work at schools to carry a gun Wells Fargo is agreeing to pay a three billion dollar settlement into a long running case about company employees opening bogus accounts to meet sales.

Tulane University
"tulane university" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"tulane university" Discussed on AP News

"Tulane University the school acquired the archives of bestselling author Anne rice who was born and raised in New Orleans rice has written thirty novels she moved to California for college and has spent much of her life since then in California but New Orleans has played a central role in much of her fiction interview with the vampire was her first novel when it was published in nineteen seventy six in this set in the city's French Quarter the collection at Tulane will consist of manuscripts of most of our published works some on published short stories journals screenplays personal artifacts and correspondence from family friends and fans of the author bus companies such as greyhound do not have to allow US border patrol agents on board to conduct routine checks for legal immigrants and that's contrary to the company's long insistence that it has no choice to do so it's been confirmed by a customs and border protection memo obtained by the Associated Press greyhound which is the nation's largest bus company says it doesn't like agents coming on board but it's permitted them to do so claiming federal law demanded it when provided with the memo by the A. P. the company declined to say whether it would change that practice greyhounds face pressure from the American civil liberties union immigrants rights activists and Washington state Attorney General Bob Ferguson to stop allowing sweeps on buses within a hundred miles of an international border or coastline Amsterdam has banned the guided tours that take groups pass the fame to windows in the city's a red light district it's the city government's latest attempt to address over tourism and to clean up and to protect workers in the district which the city says are regularly abused and photographed without their consent by members of tour groups tours of the red light district still will be allowed if guide stick to the new restriction which takes effect in April and keep the windows off their itineraries.

Tulane University California New Orleans Tulane US A. P. Bob Ferguson Amsterdam Anne rice Associated Press Washington Attorney
"tulane university" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

Entrepreneur on FIRE

11:04 min | 1 year ago

"tulane university" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

"The one funnel away challenge from Click funnels. Support you from. I'm day one day thirty to help you get your funnel live in. Just thirty days. Joined the next one funnel away challenge for just one hundred dollars at EEO fire dot com slash funnel. That's e o fire dot com slash funnel growing businesses that need qualified candidates in qualified. Candidates can be a challenge to find lucky for us. Ziprecruiter makes it simple fast and smart and right now you can try ZIP recruiter for free at ZIPRECRUITER DOT dot com slash fire that's ziprecruiter dot com slash fire Ziprecruiter the smartest way to hire our fire nation. Let's dive into Ellen. Degeneres Jenner Tulane. University's commencement speech back in two thousand nine. Oh boy thank you so much. Thank you so much. Thank thank you President Cohen. Mrs President Cohen Distinguished Guests undistinguished guests. You know who you are honor faculty in Creepy Spanish teacher and thank you to all the graduating in class of two thousand nine. I realize most of you are hung over and have a splitting headache and haven't slept since fat Tuesday. But you can't graduate till I finish so listen up when I was asked to make commencement speech I immediately said Yes then. I went to look up what commencement meant. which would have been easy if I had a dictionary but most of the books are House? Porsches and they're all written in Australian so we had to break down the word myself to find out the meaning. Commencement common and cement common cement. You commonly see cement on sidewalks sidewalks sidewalks have cracks. And if you step on a crack you break your mother's back so there's that but I'm honored that you've asked me to speak here at your common cement. I thought that you had to be famous alumnus alumni aluminum illness. You had to graduate from this school and I didn't go to college here and I don't know a president who knows but I didn't go to college anywhere any college college and I'm not seeing you wasted your time or money but look at me. I'm a huge celebrity although I did graduate from the School of hard knocks. Our Mascot was a knockers. I spent a lot of time here here. Growing up my mom worked at NUKEM. I would go there every time I needed to steal something out of her purse but why am I here today. Clearly not to steal your too far away and I never get away from it. I'm here because of you because I can't think of a more tenacious. More courageous graduating class. I mean look at you all wearing your robes usually when you wearing a robot ten in the morning it means you've given up. I'm here because I love New Orleans. I was born and raised here. I spent my formative years here and like you while I was living here. I only did laundry six times times when I finished school. I was completely lost and by school. I mean middle school but I went ahead and finished highschool anyway. I had no ambition and didn't know what I wanted to do. I I did everything from shucking oysters. Being hostess. I was a bartender. I was a waitress. I painted houses. I sold vacuum cleaners. I had no idea and I thought I just finally settled on some job and make enough money to pay my rent. Maybe basic cable. Maybe not. I didn't really have a plan. My point is that by the time I was your age. I really thought I knew who I was but I had no idea like for example. When I was your age I was dating men? So what I'm saying is when you're older most of you will be gay. Is Anybody writing this stuff down parents anyway. I had no idea what I wanted to do with my life and the way ended up on this path was very tragic events. I was maybe nineteen. My girlfriend at the time was killed in a car accident and I passed the accident and I didn't know it was her. I kept going and I found out shortly after that it was her and I was living in a basement apartment. I had no money. I know he no air. I had at a mattress on the floor in the apartment was infested with fleas and I was soul-searching I was like why is she suddenly gone. There are fleas here. I don't understand. There must be a purpose purpose and would it be so convenient if we could pick up the phone and call God and ask these questions and I started writing and what poured out of me was an imaginary conversation with God which was one sided sided and I finished writing it and I looked at it and I said to myself. I'm GonNa do this on the tonight show with Johnny Carson. At the time he was the king and I want to be the first woman in history of the show Oh to be called over and sit down and several years later I was the first woman in the history of the show and the only woman in the history of the show to sit down because of that phone conversation with God. God I wrote and I started this path of stand up and it was successful and it was great but it was hard because I was trying to please everybody. I had this secret that I was keeping that I was gay and I thought if people found out they wouldn't like me they would laugh at me then. I got my own Sitcom and that was very successful another level success and I thought what did they find that I'm gay. They'll hello never watch. And this was a long time ago. This is when we just had white presidents but anyways This was back many years ago. Fire nation more when we get back from thinking our sponsor there are a lot of challenges. We face entrepreneurs like finding the right hires lucky for us in for Jessie Cole. Ziprecruiter mix tiring simple fast and smart. Jesse is the owner of the Savannah Bananas a Minor League Baseball Team. He was looking for a director of fun. Someone to lead the bananas. This fan experience videography team community outreach and entertain a packed stadium Jesse knew. It wouldn't be easy to find that kind of talent. That's why he tried ziprecruiter a tutor ziprecruiter's ability to send his job to over one hundred job. Boards made his nationwide search fast easy ineffective Jesse says as we continue to grow for every every higher will go to Ziprecruiter. It was so unbelievably easy to use. And Jesse isn't alone. Four out of five employers. Who Post jobs on Ziprecruiter get eighty quality candidate through the site within the first day? In right now you too can find the perfect candidates by trying to Ziprecruiter for free at Ziprecruiter dot com slash fire fire. That's ZIPRECRUITER DOT com slash fire once again zip recruiter dot com slash fire ziprecruiter. The smartest way to hire. We're all striving towards different goals. Maybe your goal is to get out of debt or quit your job or take your existing business to the next level regardless. You're just one funnel away away from accomplishing your goal in with the one funnel away challenge from Click funnels. You can get that one funnel live in just thirty days. Here's how it works. Joined the one one funnel away challenge at Ao Fire Dot com slash funnel. Everyday you'll receive a mission to complete each mission being a step in the process of creating building and launching your funnel funnel get ready to rock your funnel with Tri Factor Training Approach Daily Training Live coaching and accountability from day. One through eighth thirty complete the task given to you every day for thirty days and by the end of the thirty days. You should have a funnel that is live in ready to generate leads in sales joined the next one funnel away challenge for just one hundred dollars at L. Fire Dot com slash funnel and get Daily Training Live coaching and accountability. From Day. One through day thirty. That's you'll fire fire dot com slash funnel and I finally decided that I was living with so much shame and so much fear that I just couldn't live that way anymore and I decided to come out out and make a creative and may care come out at the same time and it wasn't to make a political statement. It wasn't to do anything other than a free myself up from this heaviness that I was carrying around and I just wanted to be honest I thought was the worst thing that can happen. I can lose my career. I did. I lost my career. The show was cancelled after six years. Without even telling me I read it in the paper. The phone didn't ring for three years. I know offers. Nobody wanted to touch me at all yet. Getting letters from kids that almost committed suicide but did it because of what I did and I realized that I had a purpose and it wasn't just about me and it wasn't about celebrity but I felt like I was being punished and it was a bad time I was angry. I was sad and then I was offered a talk show and the people that offered me the talk show tried to sell it. EMO- stations did want to pick it up. Most people don't want to buy it because they thought nobody would watch me really when I look back on it I wouldn't change a thing. I mean it was so important for me to lose everything because I found out what the most important thing is is to be true to yourself ultimately. That's that's what's gotten me to this place at all live in fear I'm free. I have no secrets and I know I'll always be okay because no matter what I know who I am so in conclusion when I was younger I thought success with something different. I thought when I grow up I WANNA be famous. I WANNA be a star. I want to be in movies. I WANNA grow up to see the world drive nice cars. I WANNA have groupies but my idea of success is different today and as you grow you'll realize the definition of success changes for many of you today successes being able to hold down the twenty shots Tequila for me. The most important thing in your life is to live your life with integrity and not to give into peer pressure to try to be something that you're not to live your life as an honest and compassionate person to contribute in some way so to conclude my conclusion. Follow your passion. Stay true to yourself. Never follow anyone else's path unless you're in the woods what's in your loss and you see a path and by all means you should follow that. Don't give advice it will come back and bite you in the ASS. Don't take anyone's advice so my advice to you is to be yourself itself and everything will be fine and I know that a lot of you are concerned about your future but there's no need to worry. The economy is booming. The job market is wide. Open the planet is just fine. You're going going to be great. You've already survived a hurricane. What else can happen to you? And as I mentioned before some of the most devastating things that can happen will teach you the most and now you know the right questions to ask asking your first job interview like is above sea level so to conclude my conclusion that I previously concluded in the comments speech. I guess what I'm trying to say is. Life is is like one big Mardi Gras but instead of showing your boobs show people your brain and that they like what they see. You'll have more bs than you know what to do with in you'll be drug most of the time so the Katrina class of two thousand nine. I say congratulations. And if you don't remember a thing I said today remember this. You're going to be okay. Well there you you have it fire nation. I hope you enjoyed this. Commencement address from Ellen. Degeneres to the class of two thousand nine of Tulane University. Quick Fun facts I. Almost I went to Tulane University. It was like third or fourth of my list so not super close but it was on the list the green wave and fire nation. I do hope you take her. Final words heard very seriously. You are going to be okay and I'll catch you on the flip side looking for a place you can go. We're hiring hiring is simple fast and smart. That place is ziprecruiter. In right now you can try ziprecruiter for free at ZIPRECRUITER DOT com slash fire. That's ZIPRECRUITER PETER DOT com slash fire. Zip Recruiter the smartest way to hire the one funnel away challenge from Click funnels support you from day one through you date thirty to help you get your funnel live in. Just thirty days. Joined the next one funnel away challenge for just one hundred dollars at ao fire dot com slash funnel. That's ill fire dot com slash funnel..

Ziprecruiter Jesse Ellen Degeneres PETER DOT Mrs President Cohen President Cohen Tulane University New Orleans Johnny Carson headache Jenner Tulane School of hard Jessie Cole Mardi Gras Boards
"tulane university" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"tulane university" Discussed on KCRW

"Famous majestic hotel an impressive security force it was here that for almost five years there were negotiations at seeing frustrating and never got anywhere that's A. B. C.'s Lucio fee reporting on the Paris peace talks despite considerable skepticism Nixon's National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger insisted those talks were nearing an end maybe later that these is that two months later Nixon announced the US had obtained as he put it peace with honor in Vietnam at twelve thirty Paris time today January twenty three nineteen seventy three he went on ending the war and restoring peace in Vietnam was initialed by doctor Henry Kissinger on that here is peace accord gave sixty days for US troops to withdraw that called for the release of nearly six hundred American prisoners of war and a lot more than a hundred thousand north Vietnamese troops to remain in the south the late general Maxwell Taylor oversaw the first big deployment of American troops to Vietnam it was later the US ambassador there hours after that peace accord was signed Taylor told NPR America had triumphed we wanted we wanted live in accomplishing the things we set out to do independent Vietnam free from aggression that's what this that agreement is all about but there were no guarantees the U. S. would defend South Vietnam two years later that nation's leader flat and north Vietnamese forces surrounded its capital Saigon by then Nixon had resigned Gerald Ford had replaced him Ford told students at Tulane University the time had come to leave Vietnam behind today America can regain a sense of pride that existed before Vietnam but it cannot be achieved by re fighting a war that is finished as far as America a week later Saigon fell the people here were herded into groups all they could take was hand luggage.

A. B. C. Nixon Henry Kissinger US NPR America South Vietnam Saigon Gerald Ford Tulane University Lucio Paris Advisor Maxwell Taylor five years sixty days two months two years
"tulane university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"tulane university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Now famous majestic hotel an impressive security force it was here that for almost five years there were negotiations at seeing frustrating and never got anywhere that's ABC's Lucio fee reporting on the Paris peace talks despite considerable skepticism Nixon's National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger insisted those talks were nearing an end maybe they these is that two months later Nixon announced the US had obtained as he put it peace with honor in Vietnam at twelve thirty Paris time today January twenty three nineteen seventy three he went on ending the war and restoring peace in Vietnam was initialed by doctor Henry Kissinger of that Paris peace accord gave sixty days for US troops to withdraw it called for the release of nearly six hundred American prisoners of war and a lot more than a hundred thousand north Vietnamese troops to remain in the south the late general Maxwell Taylor oversaw the first big deployment of American troops to Vietnam it was later the US ambassador there hours after that peace accord was signed Taylor told NPR America had triumphed we wanted we wanted live in accomplishing the things we set out to do independent Vietnam free from aggression that's what this that agreement is all about but there were no guarantees the U. S. would defend South Vietnam two years later that nation's leader flat and north Vietnamese forces surrounded its capital Saigon by then Nixon had resigned Gerald Ford had replaced him for told students at Tulane University the time had come to leave Vietnam behind today America can regain a sense of pride that existed before Vietnam but it cannot be achieved by re fighting a war that is finished as far as America is concerned a week later Saigon fell the people here were herded into groups all they could take was hand luggage.

ABC Nixon US doctor Henry Kissinger NPR America South Vietnam Saigon Gerald Ford Tulane University Lucio Paris Advisor Maxwell Taylor five years sixty days two months two years
New species of glow-in-the-dark shark identified

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:29 sec | 1 year ago

New species of glow-in-the-dark shark identified

"Just when you think there is nothing new to talk about comes word of a miniature shark that glows in the dark researchers at Tulane University say the five and a half inch American pocket shark was found in the Gulf of Mexico it's only the second one ever captured or recorded the first was in the eastern Pacific Ocean in nineteen seventy nine researcher Martin ray says both are separate species and both are exceedingly rare the glow of the pocket shark is thought to attract

Tulane University Pacific Ocean Martin Ray Gulf Of Mexico Researcher
"tulane university" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"tulane university" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Oklahoma are buried at the gravesites he left each one of those soldiers arose rock, which is the state rock of Oklahoma to thank them for their service pretty special. In addition, we've got a question from Brendon chase. He's a student at Tulane university, right here New Orleans, he hails from Boston, Massachusetts, and he called in with a question about d day he asks during the invasion, why weren't the beachheads attacked beforehand, like by ship Araj by plane rather than sending in troops with the plane. So let me turn that maybe to Jeff Birnbaum one you handle that one for us. So this is actually a really complicated question because there was a lot, a lot of factors going into the invasion. And so what Brennan is this riding isn't necessarily possible with the way that the German troops are, are sort of stationed at the. Time of the invasion. So in there haven't had been attempts before to actually to bomb to do other things in on the beaches in the area, and they weren't successful to well-guarded. So one of the things that they start as much as year before they actually. Conduct. The invasion is sort of a campaign of deception. So trying to throw the Germans off of where they're actually going to be because otherwise it isn't really possible to actually surprise them into successful. And it's everything you might think seems like a spy movie is a little bit absurd. I mean there there's tanks that are like rubber that are like blown up in so the German, see these tanks. My, my favorite is something told Rupert. It's a paradigm me that they would would drop in it looks like it looks like a pair of trooper falling from the sky. But to us, it's, it's actually just a piece of muslin this stuff to look like a person, so scarecrow falling from the sky base pretty much. And so these are the types of things that they start to do. There's there's double agents. There's fake radio broadcasts and other things to get the Germans thinking that they're going to attack somewhere else that they're going to invade through another part of Europe. And so, and that's all comes down to the fact that it wasn't possible. Otherwise they had to be caught off guard. They had to see it coming. And so that was the only way it was really going to happen. So it wasn't really possible just kind of drop in there and. As well as being an endeavor that relied on masterful, tactical, and strategic planning on huge amounts of manpower, American British Canadian trillion forces subterfuge, deception mind games were big part of that. I think it was on your site where I learned that, you know, they'd announce on various radio, frequencies, particularly to French resistance figures active in France to try to sabotage things, they'd say, well, they'd send snippets of poetry and opera songs and other things as code, but would flood the airwaves with this, most of which ninety plus percent of it had nothing to do with the French resistance. It was just kind of fake out the German, so that when warnings came from Germans bys saying, hey, there's been a lot of chatter. We think something is up. They had sent out that message someone time almost the boy to call wolf, Walter Isaacson. You've done a lot of looking at technology espionage. Right. How important was that to making sure both the Norman? D conquest. I guess the reverse takeover of France by the allies. But also the greater the great were effort would be successful. It was not only absolutely crucial to the war effort. It's the moment win firepower in war is replaced by information, technology and computing power, because what happens when you're talking about a week going the fool the Germans into thinking maybe we're gonna do Calais, not norm and deal, maybe even through Norway. They were trying to do it. What happens is a group of scientists who, don't get enough credit for it, because it was kept secret for a long time or meeting, and Bletchley parking one Alan turing is there that breaking the German enigma code. They billed colossus. It was called, and it was two thousand four hundred vacuum tubes. It is a great computer and they're able to break the German, wartime code. And they know that Hitler doesn't think it's going to be enormous. Windy. And so they do this disinflation campaign, partly because we hit invented the computer and then later, we invent the Tomich bomb and its technology.

Brendon chase Brennan France Oklahoma Araj Jeff Birnbaum Boston Massachusetts Walter Isaacson Tulane university Europe Rupert Norway Hitler Norman
"tulane university" Discussed on MacBreak Weekly

MacBreak Weekly

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"tulane university" Discussed on MacBreak Weekly

"It's graduation time. I went to my daughter's college. Graduation on Saturday. So pretty, you know, who spoke was awesome. She got an honorary degree Joanna Hoffman. Oh, yeah. She's the Russian emigre who yells at Steve Jobs in the Steve Jobs. Movie, though, the oil, one remember, there's a woman, I think she played by Kate Winslet. I think she was she comes in. And she's the only person can say Buddha, Steve Joanna worked at apple. She was on the original MacIntosh team wrote the business plan and the first marketing plan for MacIntosh later, went with Steve to next later went to General Magic where she was instrumental in creating the first smartphone, amazing woman. A great story. She told her life story. She came from Russia at the age of seven spoke knowing which, and talked about how she integrated and she her major was archaeology. She was fastened by physics archaeology, and it was just very lucky. Steve Jobs, loved her hired her and the rest is history. She was a great commencement speaker, Tim cook spoke to the class at Tulane university. The class of two thousand nineteen. That's enormous. It's a big school. They had the entire Superdome. The Mercedes Benz Superdome where the saints play for their graduation. He said, a few interesting things including apologizing for our generation. He said, we really well, it really screwed it up and gen-x would it which is at the now he's younger than me. I'm a baby, boomer. Okay. I don't think he's a he's a boomer. Is he a boomer? He's he's apologizing for the boomers. Yeah. We did kind of screw things up. I apologize for the boomers as well. You didn't teach us what suffering was Leo. He's everything for granted. You know, there's a lot of he says, in some important ways, I wish we have the video, because I'd like to his it some important ways much interaction has he ends up. And I ended up sounding like Bill Clinton generation has failed, you, we spent too much time to baiting and had been too focused on the fight not focused enough on progress. I guess he is a boomer because he's only four years younger than me. So he says you don't need to look far to find an example of that failure. Of course he's in New Orleans, where Katrina into. Thousand five just destroyed the place here today in this very place with thousands once found desperate shelter from one hundred year disaster. Remember the Superdome was home to a lot of people flooded. Out the kind that seem to be happening, more and more frequently nudge, nudge, I don't think we can talk about who we are as a people what we owe to one another without talking about climate change. The problem doesn't get any easier based on whose side wins or loses an election. True. It's about who's ones life's lottery and has the luxury of ignoring this issue, and who stands to lose everything..

Steve Jobs Kate Winslet Tim cook Joanna Hoffman Steve Joanna Steve Bill Clinton Benz MacIntosh Russia General Magic apple New Orleans Tulane university Katrina one hundred year four years
Let Curiosity Lead You

Ignition Point

04:49 min | 1 year ago

Let Curiosity Lead You

"Let your curiosity lead. You when is the last time you were genuinely curious about something what was it about? What did you find for the answers? How did it change your life? Let yourself be curious explore new things in may bring you to exactly where you're always looking for for the past few years. I let my curiosity lead me to new opportunities out of never dreamed of and I'm gonna get to that in a little bit. But for right now, I want to challenge you at this moment at this second to think about something that you are truly curious about go. Find out some more information on that one thing within the next week, it stirs something in you that could change your entire life. Give yourself permission to be creative as a pass division. One. Does sport athlete at Tulane university? I played both football and baseball and time management was absolutely crucial in my life. Because I didn't have a lot of free time. This experience taught me the discipline to maximize my entire day to have the maximum productivity. However, it did not allow me to be very creative with my thinking. During college had a curiosity about building apps. This led to create him first startup was able to build fundraise and launch an app this launch. My entrepreneurial journey said Monteilh life on a completely different path than originally anticipated. I always thought that I was going to be a lawyer in got into law school, but through creating this app, I knew that I had something that was stirring, passionate me. I was willing to put that on hold are not even pursued anymore. Just so I have the opportunity. To pursue my passion. This alternate launch my journey on a complete different path, which is generally made me the happiest I've ever been. The way that I even got to the point where I was able to come up with this business idea was that I was part of a business fraternity called alpha Kappa sigh, and I had one of the brothers come up at one of our meetings in say for all the entrepreneurial spirits out here. I want you to come up with a new idea everyday thirty days. So right now right now in this moment, I wanna challenge you the next thirty days to come up with a new idea every single day. This will be challenging most of your ideas are going to be absolutely terrible. But by the end, I bet you will come up with one gym or even more worth exploring. Challenge yourself to come up with the answers. If there's one thing I've learned about the adult foiled is that most people truly do not know what they are doing. They either have developed systems processes to help them get to the essence quickly and with his little friction as possible. We can find answers to any question. We have right now seconds. We just have to take the time to find the answers knowledge is power. You just have to find the time to go and get that knowledge all of us have the same amount of time one hundred sixty eight hours in a week. How are you spending that time maybe that means you sleep a little less? Maybe that means you don't want to must TV, but all of us have a hundred sixty eight hours a week. I challenge you to be more creative. And how you spend some of that time, for example, back when I was in college one of my good friends challenged me to read more books because he's told me what do all billionaires have in common. Billionaires read on average two hours every single day. That means they're reading more than than anyone else. They're more knowledgeable. They're constantly searching for more and more knowledge that will help their business decisions. So what I started to do was as I began to work out. I begin the listen to podcasts two books. So that as I was working my mind, also working, myself physically. And so I was getting the best of both worlds, especially when it came to my different curiosities. If there's something that I wanna learn now, I'll listen to a book are listen to a podcast in the same way that you can go and Google search for any question that you may have we have the resources now to where you can listen to it on a podcast, go read a blog about it, or you can go watch YouTube video that will purely answer any question that you have knowledge is power. So

Tulane University Monteilh Google Youtube Football Baseball Thirty Days One Hundred Sixty Eight Hours Hundred Sixty Eight Hours Two Hours
"tulane university" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

06:23 min | 2 years ago

"tulane university" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Well, there's this new research that came out this week. That's pretty darn interesting to me. Tulane university. Assistant professor Damien Murray. And with a group from UCLA? Have some new biological evidence? To show how falling in love can influence immune system in a positive way. Now, this research was done women. So this is particularly good news for women. Listen up ladies, what they found in their research was that women who fell in love had increased activity of genes that involved antiviral defenses compared when when they began the study. Now, here's the interesting thing about this study. So it was a twelve month study. And that's a pretty long study when you're doing things like drawing blood on a regular basis. It was a study of undergraduate and graduate students were who participated. It was only women forty seven women completed this research that did include drawing blood every other week and filling out questionnaires about how's your life? On Tinder these days. Have you met anybody? What's happening, right. And I'm sorry. They participated in the study for a total of twenty four months. Now, the drawbacks to the study. It was relatively small. I mean, can you say forty seven women are exemplary of the entire culture at large. No, no. But the length of the study that's pretty big. And the fact that they had not just self reports. Like, I feel healthier. I haven't had cold in months. You know, you always got question. Self report studies 'cause people lie a lot. But this was you know, draw the blood and have a look at the immune system. Another small drawback, but only small in my head is that it was a paid study. They paid the participants. Hey, come on they're taking their blood every other week. This a big commitment. They're filling out questionnaires you better. Give me a little something something for that. That's what I would say. So I don't think that that necessarily skewed the results. So what they found is that women who did not fall in love during the twenty four months of the study did not have these new antiviral defenses. So. This could reflect a kind of proactive response to anticipating future intimate contact. I'm reading study given that most viruses are spread via close physical content contact. Okay. So basically, they're saying is which came first the chicken or the egg falling in love means that you're now exchanging bodily fluids is a hope you are. I hope you're kissing and getting somebody else's germs in their saliva. So what does that mean? It means that your body is going to have to produce more white blood cells, by the way, do you know, why women like to kiss more than men? So in our anthropological past women and probably today. Women use the taste of saliva and the smell of Ramones to determine how healthy a man was. And there's research around pharaoh moans and immune systems. If you've heard me talk about it before, you know about it. It is that the more disparate different. Somebody's immune system is from you. The more deliciously. They were s- they will smell to you. And the better the sex will be and here's why. So when you meet somebody, and you mate, you might take Brown eyes from one long legs from another curly hair from another except immune systems, they combine to create a stronger human. And that's mother nature's way they do it through sexuality. Smart mother nature of making somebody smell, absolutely delicious. Think about it. Think about the person that you look back on that you had the best sex within your life. I bet you're gonna remember delicious smell so. These researchers follow these forty-seven women for almost two years, and they found that those who fell in love had better immune system function. So what does this safe to us? What is this telling us? Well, basically, we're learning all the various mechanisms biological and psychological of why relationships make us stronger, I do an exercise with my students, and I want you guys to do it right now unless you're driving if you're driving do not do this right now. Okay. But if your home if you're anywhere where you can be calm and close your eyes, and like you to close your eyes, and I want you to think about some person in your life that you had a secure attachment with. It might have been a parent a sibling, a lover, an anti a grandma, and I want you to rest your head on their chest and listened to their heartbeat and feel their arms around you. And be still and go into that place that imagine tariff magic machination place. Here their heartbeat smell their deliciousness, and relax and sink into it. Guess what your body right now is releasing my favorite hormone, the one with its own nickname, the cuddle hormone oxytocin. That's what your member thing. And because the brain actually doesn't know the difference between imagination and reality you can get a little dose of it just by being alone. Now does this mean this is a replacement for a good healthy connection? No way. Jose is not a replacement at all this just to let you know why? And how relationships are particularly good for our health, and why I studied health psychology as much as I study relationships science when we come back positive psychology. It's an area of psychology that is blowing up right now focusing on your strengths. And I'm gonna tell you how you can get in the flow and get the benefits of positive psychology. You are listening to the doctor Wendy Walsh show here on KFI AM, six forty. You can follow me on social media pretty much anywhere. The handle is at DR, Wendy Walsh. We'll be right back. I'm Dr Wendy Walsh. I'll be right back. But first layer parole. You've got some news for us. I do President Trump's approval rating is on the rise. And NBC news Wall Street Journal journal poll says overall.

Dr Wendy Walsh UCLA Damien Murray Tulane university Assistant professor NBC Wall Street Journal journal oxytocin KFI President Brown Trump Jose twenty four months twelve month two years
How Can You Help a Friend with Depression?

BrainStuff

05:52 min | 2 years ago

How Can You Help a Friend with Depression?

"Just wanted to let you know this episode deals with the topics of depression and suicide so if you're not up for that today. Go ahead and skip it and hey, take care of yourself. Okay. During the publicity that attended the recent suicides of Anthony bourdain end Kate Spade. People were urged to reach out to loved ones. They suspect are coping with depression. There's good reason for this nudge, a more than sixteen million American adults experience major depression with only thirty five percent of those affected turning to a mental health professional for treatment effective treatment can lead to partial or complete remission and thus a vastly improved quality of life. But one of the tricky things about depression is that it can prevent people from getting help still despite these numbers a lot of people are confused are anxious about how to handle a potentially depressed loved one. How can you tell if someone is really depressed and how exactly should you approach the person? What if they get mad at you for asking? Although a lot of variables are at play. And it's impossible to predict a reaction experts insist that it's always better to make a true and carrying effort. We spoke with Matt Onarato director of social work and an adjunct clinical assistant, professor at the Ohio State University. Wet. Sner medical centers Harding hospital. He said a people who contemplate suicide are embitterment up to the end. They want the pain to end. And if there was some other way to end the pain than kill themselves. They would take that. There's always hope you make a small gesture of. Hey, I'm here if you need me, and that could stop someone a week later from trying to kill themselves, the small things we do make a huge impact. So how do you know, if someone is dealing with depression almost all of us get the blues at some point feeling down about our lives or selves, the difference with depression is that this feeling does not lift and has not improved by spending time with friends or taking part in fun activities some fairly well known symptoms of depression include sadness and loss of interest in hobbies enjoyed in the past weight gain or weight loss. Trouble sleeping or excessive sleep difficulty. Concentrating and suicidal thoughts or comments a general ability is a lesser known and often overlooked symptom. Verbal statements of feeling emptier. Worthless are also important to note as well as physical symptoms like pain fatigue, headaches or stomach aches, if any of these symptoms last more than two weeks and interfere with the person's life functioning in some way. It's probably not just the blues like any serious illness depression needs to be treated to get better. A lot of people are scared to approach left. What about depression or suicide a whether it's because they don't want to offend the person are afraid to make the situation to real or are worried that they'll get yelled at we also spoke with Dr Catherine brunette assistant, professor at the school of social work at Tulane university via Email, she said anytime sensitive issue was brought up the potential for defensiveness or anger is there. She also noted that you're not necessarily in for a fight though. Quote, everyone responds differently and many people may be relieved to talk about their struggles. Especially if a non judgmental insensitive approach is taken. In the event that the person does react unhappily. It can be helpful to be open and direct about your emotional response, therapists, suggest saying something like I understand you're going through a lot. But when you snap at me. It makes me feel sad. There's no guarantee that one talk will result in action. And that's okay, Burnett said sometimes they friend seems to blow you off you can affirm that you just care about them. And are there if they ever want to talk your friend may not respond immediately. But your care may have left an opening for future conversations. When you do initiate the conversation calmly expressed concern, then let them do a lot of the talking. Listen, I hold off on any problem solving or suggestions, it might sound silly. But just listening to a person's experience of depression can help them validate that experience for themselves. Once they've had their say, therapists recommend asking probing questions. Like how bad does the scat? A does it ever get worse than what you're telling me? Are you aware of having a lot of guilt or shame? Just void saying things. Like look on the bright side, or it's not that bad or even something like when I was depressed. Once I started walking every day. And I got better. Remember, the depression is a systemic illness. It can affect a person's whole body and being so it needs treatment tailored for every individual person. It may take time, but hopefully, they'll come to the conclusion that their depression can be treated there are lots of options, depending on how severe the situation is if the person is suicidal. There are services that offer twenty four hour access to trained professionals and other resources in the US. Try looking up the National Alliance on mental illness or mental health America. Or these suicide prevention lifeline or the substance abuse and mental health Services Administration some services are free. And there are federally funded outpatient and inpatient programs available to folks without insurance with payment based on sliding scale, according to income if the situation is less urge. Don't talk to your friend about what option they might be most comfortable with this could start with a trip to the family. Doctor a, particularly if your friends doesn't want to see a therapist after all primary care. Doctors are also able to rule out any other medical 'cause like Siread problems or Nimia they can screen for depression prescribed medications and refer patients to mental health professionals, many employee assistance programs offer free or reduced cost counseling sessions to staff and family members. So be sure to check your specific plan for counseling and other resources. Onarato said, I think culturally were becoming in America more comfortable talking about mental health, depression, and suicide people are being more open, and knowing that there is help out there that you won't be judged and are not

Depression Matt Onarato Anthony Bourdain Professor Kate Spade Sner Medical Centers Harding H Headaches National Alliance United States America Ohio State University Tulane University Burnett Director Email Dr Catherine Thirty Five Percent Twenty Four Hour Two Weeks
"tulane university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:47 min | 2 years ago

"tulane university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The borderline bar and grill and today that center is now an evacuation shelter with a fire burning in the hills within eyesight of the same building. And volunteers from the Red Cross who were helping grieving families yesterday today are setting up cots and food and support for evacuees from Thousand Oaks and cities nearby. So it's really a double whammy, especially in a place where so many people knew someone affected by the shooting on Thursday. That's what Dakota Solomon a high school senior told me she was dropping off supplies with her friends. I haven't met one person who doesn't know somebody who knew that was in the shooting somebody they know directly was there like it. It doesn't matter. Basically who you ask somebody who's going to know somebody who was everyone has a connection means really had a ripple effect throughout the whole community the whole area. Do we do we know anything about the shooter? And why? He did what he did. Well, this point we don't know much more. The Ventura County sheriff's office has now not only dealing with the investigation. But now they're also trying to keep people safe from the fires that are burning. And what we do know is that the FBI has searched the shooter's house in his car that he lived in a nearby neighborhood. So law enforcement says he's probably knew about the bar. It's a popular bar, especially among young people, and you know, Wednesday night was college night. So there was line dancing was country music draws a big crowd. It's an eighteen and overplay. So a lot of young people were in there that night and as country music fans, some of the patrons were survivors of Las Vegas shooting, which happened at a country music festival. You spoke a little bit about the things. I mean, what more have we learned about these victims? Yeah. There's no official list. That's been released yet. The medical examiner's office is expecting to do that. When the autopsy done, but we have learned about them from their friends and from their family, and among the dead was a college freshman marine veteran young man who stayed behind to save others. And of course, sergeant Ron hey l'aquila's who was the first to respond to the shooting and is seen as a hero for moving in so quickly. I also spoke to the Representative of the owner that owns the bar borderline bar and grill, and he says the owner plans to rebuild to me open the bars been around for a long time. So people saw it as like a safe place a place for comfort in many had gone there after the Las Vegas shooting to find that comfort. And unfortunately, I know Leyla you have had to cover a number of mass shootings. Have you have you heard any insight from people in Thousand Oaks about? How often these shootings seemed to be happening? Yes. I heard a lot of anxiety. And especially if you think about the fact that many of these are not many, but some of these people are now survivors of more than one mass shooting among the dead was one man Telemacus or final send we did speak to his family. He was twenty seven a survivor of Las Vegas, and they are furious at their son went through not one but two mass shootings in his lifetime. And including the Pittsburgh shooting. About two weeks ago. The gun violence archive says there's been Matt thirteen mass shootings in two weeks. That's NPR's. Leila. Fadel? Thank you so much. Thank you. This mass shooting in California happened eleven days after the one at a synagogue in Pittsburgh and in the time between those two incidents. There were several other mass shootings that barely made headlines as heartbreaking as these tragedies are psychologists say that when they happen so often we may become numb to their impact. And peers retu- Chatterjee reports when ginger Ellen Becker I heard about the shooting in California this week. She says, my mediate reaction was another one. Here's another one. She's a high school teacher in Lawrence, Kansas. She says she did feel sad. It's just that. I'm not very surprised when it does happen anymore. A lot of other people feel the same way. Roger CHU is a software developer in Lexington. Kentucky here. Well, happened again, I guess looking back. It's kind of sad that that's kind of how desensitized we are. Now, it turns out that desensitization numbing of emotions when we've seen or heard if one shooting after another that's a natural response. Charles figley, a psychologist at Tulane university. Says this even a term for it compassion fatigue. Compassionately is the fatigue of providing compassion, and empathy. He says thinking too much about traumatic events can make people too anxious or depressed function in their daily lives that can happen when people see suffering across the world or in the case of the shootings closer to home. We, of course, think about ourselves being in such a place in which someone would suddenly burst in and shoot things up. But if we think about that too much, then it deteriorates are sent the confidence that our sense of trust.

Las Vegas Thousand Oaks school teacher Pittsburgh Red Cross Dakota Solomon Ventura County FBI Charles figley Ellen Becker California Ron Representative Leila official NPR Matt
"tulane university" Discussed on WWL

WWL

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"tulane university" Discussed on WWL

"To the public don't worry you're not missing anything they're going to be a shorts and helmets they don't go into pads until day three so you're not gonna miss anything there several little blocks if you will that the saints will have open practices to the public so starting july twenty eighth through the thirtieth and again on august first all the open practices run from eight fifty am to eleven forty a m the team's gonna be off on july thirty first and august second our seventh excuse me the saints first preseason game is against jacksonville on thursday august ninth and practices on saturday and sunday august eleventh and twelfth will be open to the public so after their second preseason game they'll have one final chance saints i have one final chance to see the saints before they breakdown camp august nineteenth so from july twenty eighth through the thirtieth all open august first through the sixth open august eleventh and twelfth open to the public and august nineteenth open to the public and look there's some details as to firstcomefirstserved is free but they are gonna practice here in metairie are out there so you'll have an opportunity to check out the saints trying to get one of the things you should mention is that the practice sunday august fifth will be at tulane university so that's the only one that they're taking on the road other than their memory facility all throughout training camp and then they'll have those practices with the chargers after training camp is over quote unquote yeah after after they break they'll go out there just like they did last year for third preseason game mix it up with the chargers for about two days and then play the preseason sunday practice at tulane university will be seven to nine pm sunday august fifth look that's a great venue to hold that in and on top of that a great it's a great location or by can get to it and that's really when you're gonna see you're gonna be able to see a lot more it's gonna be at night so it's not gonna be as hot so yeah that'd be that'd be a good time to watch saints training camp for those looking to get out there and look now make sure you make sure you hydrate yourself because it's gonna be hot out there in the stands but.

jacksonville metairie tulane university saints two days
"tulane university" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"tulane university" Discussed on KGO 810

"Santa fe texas right again having another set of conversations with my children again it's can we stop with the again part now it doesn't look like we're going to be stopping with this anytime soon so let's talk about how we talk to our kids joining me on the phone professor for psychiatry tulane university school of medicine author of they'll never be the same appearance guide to the in youth dr michael scaring dr scaring thanks so much for coming on the show today thank you thanks for having me so you've been researching this right how we deal with with kids who've been exposed to traumatic events by the way i mean i i saw the number of washington post added up something like two hundred sixty thousand kids now have been exposed directly to school shootings going back to the nineteen nineties you know and then our kids when i was a kid it was things like tornado drills and i seem to remember when i was really young maybe the russians are going to bomb us drills but now it's oh you have an actor shooter in the classroom what do you do i mean that alone is a different type of stress yeah children were already exposed to trauma in so many different ways in our society through abuse witnessing domestic violence disasters car accidents and other things and now unfortunately had shoot school shootings took the list it's pretty horrific so all right so my i have a daughter in kindergarten i have a son in fourth grade and you know they're learning about active shooters and then these things happen and we talk about it and we you know we address it we don't ignore it we don't pretend like it didn't happen but we also try not to go onto long about what what are some of the keys when we talked to our kids when this happens it's not we can't pretend that it's not happening and they don't pretend that it's not happening either.

Santa fe professor texas tulane university school of me washington
"tulane university" Discussed on The World Transformed

The World Transformed

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"tulane university" Discussed on The World Transformed

"People would still be starving i guess they'd be happy and starving which is better than being unhappy and starving but not much better so you still want to fix the basic that people need enough to eat okay but once you take care of that the big the big inequality in the world as i see it is the happiness differential the fact that some people are happy and some people are not what can we do how can we implement universal basic happiness well i think we have a hint here in this story that was over on motherboard wire heading the strange experiment from the nineteen fifties wired pleasure directly into the brain of course we've talked about this numerous times it's been done with rats lots of lab experiments with rats but in the nineteen fifties a scientist at tulane university of louisiana actually tried this out with people and i think it's been repeated with human subjects a few times after that and you can actually wire people's brains in such a way that you can hit a button and stimulate the pleasure centers and basically people can be happy all the time right happiness is literally just a push of the button away now if this technology exists all we have to do is clean it up a little right because i mean it's probably pretty sloppy the way it was done in the fifties and we live in the twenty first century i'm sure there's an elegant way of getting these things installed in our heads and nice battery packs we could carry around but basically just let everyone have an interface whereby they can make themselves happy right give give yourself a little jolt to happiness then if you aren't one of the rich people in the world don't worry about it just be happy right hit the button right if you're not getting any sex isn't doesn't matter just hit the button and you're happy anyway so why wouldn't that be the solution.

scientist tulane university of louisiana
"tulane university" Discussed on Mysterious Universe

Mysterious Universe

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"tulane university" Discussed on Mysterious Universe

"Oh i think that she might have been a stripper or maybe even a prostitute she wears a lot of makeup and she has kind of real hot edge to his girlfriend sis so it was like guy from before drags us now he was like okay that's weird so he he goes up in the confidence about it and goes into his girlfriend's apartment but he says when he end his bobbers apartment it's like brand new like it looks like it's been freshly renovated everything's freshly painted and plotted the flaws of strip down von ish it's got a new kitchen you like everything's new he psych i've never seen a student apartment this amazing what's the rent how much do you pay for rent and she gives him the number and it's like hoffe what you'd pay it is the most ridiculously good deal you've ever heard and he's like how the hell did you find the spice it's amazing it's brand new and it's so cheap and she said oh i just saw it on a bulletin board at tulane university lucky and he starts to question of moi's like d do you know who owns and she says oh no i just went through an attorney who can agent who deals with the apartment i don't know who owns it and he notices a smell in the apartment and he's like a you biking bread smells like biked bredon here and she says on is it ye st is that what he's describing it's just smells like bread and she's like well yeah i'm actually biking bread okay that's interesting why she says well when i first got into the apartment it had this residual oda and i also the people in the building and i said well if you bake bread gets rid of this otis on breaking bread and he says as she continued to talk about the apartment it became clear that the apartment had a bit of a wheat history to it it had been vacant and off the market for several years before she rented it and during that time it had been you know thoroughly renovated thoroughly reconditioned but despite the fresh pint von ish.

tulane university moi attorney
"tulane university" Discussed on WWL

WWL

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"tulane university" Discussed on WWL

"My relation that's all concerned about who's figure at eight ada ruina from tulane university all of a sudden on the radar for radar atop defensive lineman and a eight hours looking at originally you move to america from nigeria to play basketball but then how did that work out all of a sudden you coming to the promised land so to speak to play basketball but you wanna get paid to play and you end up playing football and now the opportunity the nfl dreams the play on sunday in the nfl well it was one of the dream come true i knew if i need to be honest with you i never knew i'm gonna be i am to do like you said i came to play basketball and my sophomore year i got introduced to on a by you coach he told me one day we i think we just got you bought and he just looking at my body structure he told you like i did i think you you'll fit in if you eat you play football and i told him that i was like hey coach i don't know nothing about food but i've never i mean i don't know what your rules i never did and you can have the softball i would love to try anybody who's willing to teach you and that's when all started from my first candidate i went through the summertime was uab and from there everything just went good for me and i study off from moscow's even though i haven't even played with down football before going through the cabinet people love what i do i.

tulane university nigeria basketball football nfl moscow america eight hours one day
"tulane university" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"tulane university" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Previous caller we just had on who's working and we had another uh africanamerican man who said i'm a black man i'm a black seventy is old i'm a businessman i work for a living i've always worked for a living and i hope desegregate tulane university he said and i don't have enough time i'm working well god bless of nuts uh that's that's the message that we need now and we need it we're gonna need any more and more in the future what trump to give him advice i know you're not in a politics really but you're a you're e e e you write about issues that politicians do grapple with an you see it in this current um you know tempus in a teapot about the asshole comments of of trump but if you had to give him advice about how to cut through this now what would you tell him to do a girl who who uh to make the point with with uh respectfully even compassionately make the point that people in america now our free regardless of what the racial identity of background maybe they are free to be to participate in american life as citizens and as individuals and that the focus needs to shift that way that's where power is power is in the individuals desire to do something in life get ahead and make things happen for themselves um and in doing that the lift the entire group all boats rise um and i would take that all boats rise seen uh if i wouldn't if i were donald trump and uh it's also it's in line with with his own background women's own entrepreneurial spirit which is essential to the american identity um.

tulane university america donald trump
"tulane university" Discussed on Afternoons with Marcellus & Kelvin

Afternoons with Marcellus & Kelvin

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"tulane university" Discussed on Afternoons with Marcellus & Kelvin

"You know this is a risk he had an office carpet procedure in a ligament was worked on five months ago in may so with difficult about risk other than the fact it is a bone and my clapper vision is a pearl necklace easter though a bond his like the pearl the ligament in liked during that it patches all the pearl to make the necklace when you rip one off the strand though pearl necklace can essentially fall apart the challenge for us is your v eight bone literally looked like a pearl in that they are mood you don't a bowling surface in this bone it all cartlidge filled a very tiny bought with a cream enters the pearl so you can make a necklace is exactly like the ligament anchoring this heine little spot in the bone at completely covered by cartlidge you talk about a challenge nato is ten times easier for us to pinpoint exactly where to put the ligament back it is really tough to get it perfect in a risk and the feeling is different because you don't have the bloody type of bomb that we usually enjoy free healing in the risk for your knee or your hip or your shoulder so it is no wonder five months later he'll field dorna he's right it is not fully healed yet this whole thing cake month up to a year well he definitely is more time because he was muffin a lot of points to seize zohar idag weekend warriors sundown saturday seven and i would you f i'm so excited this saturday is the great coach mike dunleavy and he's got nailed a heads coach at tulane university who calvin.

nato mike dunleavy tulane university five months
"tulane university" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"tulane university" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"Art human connection is at i love your book very much our human connection is waning its waning and our brain health is waning and the human brain israeli under attack and shockingly enough if we go through the story of how he came about to write this book intimacy was one of nature's ways to create hormones in your body to protect your brain it's a it's true into received ties or hormones and hormones tired health but also environmental to hormones and hamas tie the health than the home loans tied to intimacy seems like we've kinda got the dragon evience own tail pushing a string of those different analogies do you start that's really great white at you know i wrote one of the very first breakthrough books that came out eighteen years ago called hormone deception all about this toxic cocktail that were now living in and what are the effects on our children our kids brains and based on that book i was invited to be a hormone scholar at an environmental estrogen hormone thinktank at tulane university were really worked with the guys who are developing this new field and i had written books on the gut and i had written books on hormones but i was shocked to see how they converge in the bedroom um in hormone deception i said girls are having menstruation earlier than ever and when you change milestones of reproduction this is huge menopause is happening earlier than ever when you change milestones reproduction that can be adverse and that could be very huge like the canary in the mind but it appears as though this chemical soup that were in.

hamas tulane university eighteen years