35 Burst results for "Tufts University"

"tufts university" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:58 min | 3 months ago

"tufts university" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The street A little bit surprising but I still think he'll win I think he's done a good job Fed up with the Democrats It's taxes I mean I'm looking at getting out of Dodge I'm not really a Murphy fan with the whole COVID situation and he told people to stay home He's done a commendable job considering what governor cat to go through The pandemic Authorities in New York are charging millionaire real estate heir Robert Durst with murder in a statement Westchester DA Mimi roca confirmed charges against the 78 year old in the murder of Kathleen durst had been filed on Tuesday Durst's former wife disappeared in 1982 at the age of 29 and her body has never been found Durst was sentenced last week to life in prison without parole for murdering a close friend in the Los Angeles area two decades ago A Tufts University student and rising star athlete is being remembered following a tragic turn at a charity event Kristen marks reports 20 year old mady Nick pon a junior lacrosse player and biopsychology major died after choking at a charity hot dog eating contest at a private home in Somerville Massachusetts last weekend Thousands attended a vigil for Nick pawn at the university Sunday a tufts lacrosse Instagram post says Nick pan nicknamed scooter was a true connector and touched every single person she met Nick pan grew up in softer New York where she was class president Automakers Stellantis is planning to build a second electric vehicle battery plant in North America The company will partner with Samsung SDI on the second plant they hope to have operational in 2025 I'm Brian shook And I'm Charlie pellet At Bloomberg world headquarters another weekly gain for the S&P 500 Index three in a row although it was a down Friday equities fell after the chairman of the Federal Reserve Jay Powell signaled some concern about inflation Jim Bianco is the president and founder of Bianco research The market is getting more worried that we are in some kind of a longer term inflation rise And if so then it's thinking that the fed may have to start to respond to inflation by raising rates That is something we haven't seen in over a generation in the market And if it happens if that's indeed what we're going down that's not a good scenario Jim Bianco of Bianco research as for the Federal Reserve reveal a Ferrucci as chief U.S. economist at high frequency economics I do think that what is being priced in right now is the little aggressive And I do think that this sets up the path that as we see inflation moderate over the course of 22 that these expectations are going to reset High frequencies will be a faruki the research firm market is out with a new batch of data on America's economy and its uneven at best coming out of the pandemic and with that story here's Bloomberg's Vinnie del giudice Market reports service industries which account for the lion's share of the business economy expanded early.

Nick pan COVID Durst Robert Durst DA Mimi roca Kathleen durst Kristen marks mady Nick pon Jim Bianco Nick pawn Bianco research Samsung SDI Brian shook Charlie pellet Bloomberg world headquarters Westchester Tufts University New York Jay Powell Dodge
"tufts university" Discussed on Every Little Thing

Every Little Thing

04:50 min | 5 months ago

"tufts university" Discussed on Every Little Thing

"Fester in the department of psychology at tufts university. And i study music and the brain.

"tufts university" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

05:17 min | 9 months ago

"tufts university" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Elementary and middle school students in Worcester are back to full time in person learning. New Massachusetts commission will begin studying qualified immunity today. It's the results of the police reform bill that was signed into law last year State. Rep. Michael Day who leads the commission says it'll hear from a diverse set of voices for presentations on the issue. Meantime, in Minnesota, Derrick Show Vince Murder trial was the first criminal trial to be broadcast on TV in the state, but it won't be the last. CBS is Monica Rick. Three Other officers involved in George Floyd's death last year in Minneapolis, are set to stand trial in August. They face charges of aiding and abetting both second degree murder and second degree manslaughter and their trial like Derrick Show, Vin's murder trial will be broadcast live. A spokesperson for the Hennepin County Court System says the broadcast will allow people to see and understand the process from jury selection to final verdict. The same rules will apply to witnesses will be allowed to testify off camera and jurors faces will not be shown. Monica Ricks CBS News Mourners will gather today for the funeral of Andrew Brown Jr. Who was shot and killed by police and Elizabeth City, North Carolina last month, a day before Brown's home going service, family and friends attended a viewing for the 42 year old father. Demonstrators also gathered to continue calling on authorities to release more information surrounding his death. Way protesters and Mourners, all calling for justice and transparency. Yesterday before Andrew Brown's home going service, members of the community came out to show their respect for Andrew Brown and his family at the viewing It was CBS is Leandra heard reporting multiple multiple reports of into incidents of hate crimes at Tufts University this past week. The top stately reports an email to the campus community says several Asian students were verbally assaulted by people in a passing car who shouted racist rhetoric that comes as main members of athletic team found a large swastika painted on the side of a shed. At a university field. The students president says these acts are unacceptable and investigations are being carried out. A man accused of vandalizing in New York City synagogue is out on bail after a judge overruled in order to have him held well, Jordan. Burnett is charged with hate crimes after allegedly chucking rocks and smashing windows and several synagogues last month in the Bronx. Yesterday, a judge ordered him held on $20,000 bail after sighting that shattering of glasses of violent felony. However, later in the day, another judge ordered Burnett released under supervision Now, she pointed to the new bail reform laws that do not consider hate crimes has a reason to keep a suspect locked up. New laws say attacks that caused no injury or not eligible for bail. That was Scott Pringle reporting, 3, 36 Main Street and Charles Town has been home to special townies for 14 years. Now, the rec center for kids and young adults with disabilities is being a victim because the mission want Park Tennis Association wants to make room for more office space. WBZ Suzanne Sauce fell reports. It's the a safe place that they can be themselves that they're accepted, no matter what they're doing. That's Debra Hughes. She started special townies nearly 20 years ago. So we're nonverbal son with autism and other kids like him would have a place to go. I can't register my son for the Boys and Girls Club. He's not accepted. There's nothing in this community for people with disabilities says absolutely nothing. It's also a place parents concerned, too. We even have parents at a home. It's having a hard time they have a key. They come down here and watch a movie with the child just to get them out of the house and something to do. They started a petition to stop the Tenants Association from forcing them out and Teamsters local 25 is paying their legal fees to fight the eviction. In Charles Town. Suzanne SAWS Ville WBZ Boston's news radio. WBZ has reached out to the Tenants Association and Peabody Properties, the building owners, but we have not heard back. Setting sail. WBC's Chris Pharma has more on a welcome sight and the public Garden Lynn Pageant whose family not the city of Boston, has owned and operated the swan boats for more than 140 years, is optimistic. I think there's a lot to look forward to this spring and summer because, after missing last year for the very first time because of covert, the cherished boats will be back to glide their way through the waters of Boston's public garden. But there's a lot to do in order to make the swan shipshape and time for this Sunday's opening. Everything has to get painted 12 pontoons 30 FT. Long. Three different colors. The songs or cleaned up and painted and then on Tuesday will begin to move the pieces in there's an antique truck. The cab is so small, it can pivot the pathways of the public garden. It's a lot of work for staff of just two dozen, but worth it all to Lynn and her family. So everything's gonna look good. We're pretty jazzed about getting back in there. Chris Mama WBZ. Austin's news radio. Dorchester Man is appearing in court today. Facing murder and animal cruelty charges. Marcus Chavis is accused of stabbing to women to death over the weekend inside a home on Taft Street. One woman died on the scene. The other died at a hospital. A dog was also recovered in the home. With injuries. It's 10 50. What do you guys talking about? Do.

Debra Hughes Lynn Marcus Chavis CBS Monica Rick George Floyd $20,000 Monica Ricks Minneapolis Park Tennis Association Taft Street Andrew Brown 14 years Chris Pharma Minnesota Brown 12 pontoons Tuesday Hennepin County Court System Vin
Patrick Radden Keefe on Empire of Pain

The Book Review

02:23 min | 9 months ago

Patrick Radden Keefe on Empire of Pain

"Patron kief joins us now. His new book is called empire of pain. the secret history of the sackler dynasty. Patrick thanks for being here. Thanks so much for having me back. So let's start with a very basic question. In case people are not aware of the sackler family and why he would be writing about them with title like empire of pain. who are the sackler. So this sort of to waste answer that question until a few years ago what. The sackler name Generally to to the extent that people were aware of this family it was a very wealthy family. One of the wealthiest families in the united states with a branch in the uk in london and they were known chiefly for philanthropy right art museum wings. Hundreds of millions of dollars to art museums and universities and medical research and would very often put their name on these bequests. If you you know in new york city go to the metropolitan museum of art and there's the sackler wing And that was what they were known for. What was more mysterious. Was the source of this wealth and it has People have become more widely aware. Recently that That the bulk of this wealth comes from a company purdue pharma which produces the powerful painkiller oxycontin in this era in which the naming of things and the un naming of things mounting and the on mounting has become very active. Is it still the circle ring. In the metropolitan museum is sackler still emblazoned on all of these buildings and donated wings. Well it's very much in flux. So as i speak today it's still the sackler wing but the has actually announced today initially. They said they weren't taking any future. Donations from the soccer is because of the connection between the family and the crisis and then more recently. They've said that they are You know i think assessing is is the word whether or not the sackler wing will remain the sackler wing. Some institutions have started to take the name down so tufts university took down the sackler name from a series of buildings Because the students there this is at the medical school had said. I don't wanna go to class in a building named after this family and and get my medical education. They're more recently. New york university has done the same. The louvre in paris is taken down the sackler name. So there's a real question for many of these other institutions and there's dozens and dozens of them were the name still stands whether or not they'll keep it

Patron Kief Joins Metropolitan Museum Patrick Pharma New York City London United States UK UN Soccer Tufts University New York University Paris
Kerri Greenidge discusses two books about African-Americans in the years before the Civil War

The Book Review

05:01 min | 1 year ago

Kerri Greenidge discusses two books about African-Americans in the years before the Civil War

"Carey. Greenwich joins us now from outside boston. She is the melon assistant professor in the department of studies in race colonialism and diaspora at tufts university. She's also the author of black radical. The life and times. Of william monroe. Trotter and this week she reviews two bucks on the cover of the book review. They are south to freedom runaway slaves to mexico and the road to the civil war by alice l. Baumgartner and the kidnapping club wall street slavery and resistance on the eve of the civil war by jonathan. Daniel wells all right. That's a lot. Carrie thank you so much for being here vegas much for having me. So it's interesting looking at these two books together. They're sort of an error but they told two different sides of the same story. Just if you could tell us broadly. What are the two books about. Certainly the book by jonathan. Daniel wells the kidnapping club. It talks about the organiz. Terror inflicted on black new yorkers by kidnapping club which was a group of investors business owners and police officers in new york city in the years before the civil war and they use the fugitive slave law to be enslaved to kidnap african americans. Who were living nominally free in new york and transporting them back into the south and then we have our gardeners beautiful south to freedom runaway slaves to mexico which traces the journey of escaped slaves to mexico again in the decades before the civil war and the relationship between mexico freedom and concepts of recent citizenship. So the story of the kidnapping club if it is at all familiar to listeners. It's probably most familiar as the story that was told. In the recent film. Twelve years a slave it was sort of lightly fictionalized version the memoirs of solomon northrop but. What's the larger story here. The larger store which i think john wells does extremely well is a story of the complicity of the north in enslavement and enslave rate and the fact that american slavery was a national and a transnational institution and that to argue that somehow new york city was acknowledged as a free state although that was true because slavery was a national international institution. The powers that be in new york in the years before the civil war were dedicated to upholding that system. And so it really goes into the heart of this notion. What does it mean to be a free person. A free african american in a country and in a global system that endorsed racial slavery. The other thing that. I think jonathan daniel wells book does very well is connect the distrust the relationship between the police and law enforcement particularly in new york city. But we can use that. As a microcosm of parts of the country between new york city's police department and authorities and the black community and this video the trail that the black community felt justifiably so and experience at the hands of the police being an organized club to kidnap particularly black children and send them back into the south heart so obviously there are some contemporary parallels but one thing i thought was so interesting. That you point out in your review is the extent to which the various powers from the insurance business to the finance community to the law community was entrenched in maintaining the slave trade. Can you talk about the extent to which the early capitalist economy of new york city sort of thrived and depended on slavery so in wells book. He shows that the number one there was a cultural connection between the financier is in wall street in new york city and slavery in the south and so all of the banks all of the investment firms all of the capital that was funding the system that it took to maintain enslavement for instance investing in the distribution of food distribution of goods that were sent into the south to maintain slavery. That was a business and that was run through wall street's financial system and so it wells argues shows is that that system was dependent upon southern slavery. Southern slavery was dependent behind that system and so there was a vested interest by very very powerful people organizations in new york city to maintain and to ensure that slavery existed there is also a very vested interest in ensuring that fugitive slaves who escaped would be returned to the south given the fact that we're talking about black bodies commodities and the fact that if a black person escaped that was in the crude terms of the time somebody losing money and investment and so this whole machinery of kidnapping african americans and sending them back in the south. It was a business and it was making a lot of money for a lot of people.

Daniel Wells New York City Mexico Department Of Studies William Monroe Alice L Jonathan Solomon Northrop Baumgartner Tufts University Trotter Jonathan Daniel Wells Carey John Wells Carrie New York Boston Vegas
Keep Children Healthy during the COVID-19 Pandemic

WBZ Morning News

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

Keep Children Healthy during the COVID-19 Pandemic

"Hearing about kids not doing their part with Cove it and W. B C's Drew Mulholland dives into that one this morning. Reports. Casey McClaren is a freshman at Tufts University, taking a pandemic gap year to gain some basketball eligibility. He sees bad jobs all over the place by his peers. So say, like, like we've got to do this, you've gotta wear masks, But I think one Friday night rolls around. You kind of forget what they're saying. And you know, everyone had a selfish interests. Carly. Good. You a Denver side just a couple of years younger, but in a whole different world high school, she says she's deaf. We seen a change for the worse over the course of this pandemic. I think when it first started, I think it's were really respectful of it. I think I think some kids they're handling it really well. And I think others are Halloween weekend kids being urged to be safe. Your

Casey Mcclaren Drew Mulholland Tufts University Carly Basketball Denver
Trump and Biden debate their climate and environmental policies

Weekend Edition Sunday

03:42 min | 1 year ago

Trump and Biden debate their climate and environmental policies

"A lot at Thursday's debate. There was this telling exchange about climate change. Would you close the have a transition from their own industry? Yes. It is a big statement, President Trump again boosted the fossil fuel industries contributing to global warming. Joe Biden is campaigning on a plan for Net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. NPR's Jeff Brady has more on his $2 trillion proposal. Joe Biden's climate plan is ambitious for an economy is big and complex as the United States, but even those connected to fossil fuel industry say it may be doable. Scott Siegal with the energy focused law firm. Bracewell says the plan is pragmatic and includes both regulations and incentives for the growing list of companies focused on using cleaner energy in the future. One thing that makes Biden's approach somewhat comfortable is that you can sketch out that linear commitment to additional resource is to achieve these objectives, which I think most people in business, believe me. Are going to be the future anyway. The country has one example of meeting an ambitious climate goal. The Obama administration's clean power plan aimed to cut emissions from power plants, about a third by 2030. Even though court challenges stopped the plan from going into effect, the country is ahead of schedule. David Doniger is with NRDC Action Fund, The political arm of the natural resource is defense counsel. The power sector is already undergoing changes that have reduced their emissions by more than 30% 10 years ahead of the target that the Obama administration thought was aggressive. In 2015, a big part of that was the collapse of the coal industry. Coal fired power plants continue to go out of business, replaced with cheaper natural gas and renewable energy. Still, the bite and climate plan faces significant hurdles. It relies on technologies that haven't been developed or may not be commercially viable. That's why the plan includes $400 billion over a decade for research. With the economic hit from the Corona virus pandemic. Biden's campaign updated the plan this summer. It includes billions of dollars to hire people for things like plugging abandoned mines and building electric vehicle charging stations. Steph Feldman, with the bite and campaign says the plan also focuses on environmental justice. 40% of the benefit of those investments go to community, the color and low income communities that have been disproportionately harmed by pollution and the effects of climate change. This is especially important to the most vocal climate change activists. While Biden has distanced himself from the green new deal, it is popular, especially with the left wing of his party. Jenny Marino, Zimmer with 3 50 actions as this's thie strongest plan yet from a Democratic presidential nominee, the Biden campaign has committed to doing some really great things like ending leasing of fossil fuels on public lands. We'd like to see them go further and create a true phase out for the entire fossil fuel mystery over Of course of the next decade. Biden's plan has a longer timeline for a transition and includes a role for fossil fuels with offsets and carbon capture. Amy Myers Jaffe manages the climate policy Labatt Tufts University and says overall, this is a credible plan for addressing climate change. The Biden campaign has listed the right things. But the difference between listing things and implementing those things is a big difference. If Biden is elected, he'll likely need a Democratic Congress willing to pass laws and allocate money

Joe Biden Obama Administration Fossil Fuel Industries Amy Myers Jaffe Jeff Brady NPR Scott Siegal United States Bracewell Steph Feldman President Trump Nrdc Action Fund Labatt Tufts University David Doniger Congress
Breaking Down Joe Biden's Plan To Make The U.S. Carbon Neutral

Environment: NPR

03:44 min | 1 year ago

Breaking Down Joe Biden's Plan To Make The U.S. Carbon Neutral

"At Thursday's debate, there was this telling exchange about climate change. Would you close the? Transition from oil minister yes. I was trying to. It is a big statement president trump again boosted the fossil fuel industries contributing to global warming. Joe. Biden is campaigning on a plan for net zero greenhouse gas emissions by twenty fifty and peers. Jeff Brady has more on his two trillion dollar proposal Joe Biden's climate plan is ambitious for an economy as big and complex as the United States but even those connected to fossil fuel industry. Say it. May Be Doable Scott Siegel with the energy focused law firm Bracewell says plan is pragmatic and includes both regulations and incentives for the growing list of companies focused on using cleaner energy in the future one thing that makes Biden's approach somewhat comfortable is that you can sketch out that linear commitment to additional resources to achieve these objectives which I think most people in business believe are going to be. The future anyway, the country has one example of meeting an ambitious climate goal. The Obama Administration's clean power plan aimed to cut emissions from power plants about a third by twenty thirty even though court challenges stopped the plan from going into effect, the country is ahead of schedule David. Doniger. IS WITH NRDC Action Fund the political arm of the Natural Resources Defense Council, the power sector is already undergoing. Changes have reduced their emissions by more than thirty percent ten years ahead of the target that the Obama Administration thought was aggressive in two thousand fifteen. A big part of that was the collapse of the coal industry coal fired power plants continue to go out of business replaced with cheaper natural gas and renewable energy. Still, the Biden, climate plan faces significant hurdles it relies on technologies that haven't been. Developed or may not be commercially viable. That's why the plan includes four hundred billion dollars over a decade for research with the economic hit from the coronavirus pandemic Biden's campaign updated the plan this summer it includes billions of dollars to hire people for things like plugging abandoned mines and building electric vehicle charging stations. Steph Feldman with the Biden campaign says, the plan also focuses on environmental justice forty percent. Of the benefits of those investments, go to communities of color and low income communities that have been disproportionately harmed by pollution and the exit climate change. This is especially important to the most vocal climate change activists while Biden has distanced himself from the green new deal. It is popular especially with the left wing of his party Jenny Marino Zimmer with three fifty actions as this is the strongest plan. Yet from a Democratic presidential nominee, the Biden campaign has committed to doing some really great things like ending leasing of also feels on public lands. We'd like to see them go further and create a true phase out for the entire fossil fuel mystery over the course of the next decade. Biden's plan has a longer time line for a transition and includes a role for fossil fuels with offsets and. Carbon Capture Amy Myers Jaffe manages the climate policy lab at Tufts University and says, all this is a credible plan for addressing climate change. The Biden campaign has listed the right things but the difference between listing things and getting those things is a big difference. If Biden is elected, he'll likely need democratic congress willing to pass laws and allocate money to make his plan a reality. Jeff Brady NPR

Joe Biden Obama Administration Fossil Fuel Industries Jeff Brady Jeff Brady Npr Amy Myers Jaffe Natural Resources Defense Coun Nrdc Action Fund Jenny Marino Zimmer United States President Trump Scott Siegel Congress Steph Feldman Bracewell
Funky Cheese Rinds Release an Influential Stench

60-Second Science

02:02 min | 1 year ago

Funky Cheese Rinds Release an Influential Stench

"Aged cheeses like Camembert taleggio produce a powerful stench, the funk of cabbage mushrooms, sulphur, even smelly feet and those aromas are chemicals that are being kicked off by the cheese or being emitted by the cheese, and that's through the microbes that are living in the Ryan's as they slowly decompose the cheese Benjamin. Wolf is a microbiologist at Tufts University. He says in addition to alerting our noses to the cheese the AROMAS produced by certain microbes living in on the cheese can feed in sculpt other members of. The microbial garden living there wolf and his colleagues identified some of those microbial interactions by growing various cheese dwelling fungi and bacteria in separate. But adjacent dishes in the lab, the microbes couldn't touch. They can only interact via the volatile compounds they released and when we did this screen, this volatile screen, we quickly notice that there was this one bacterium vibrio species that really loved living in the aromas produced by the various fungi that you find in a typical wheel of campaign bear Wolf says the Vibrio. Bacteria. be able to eat the AROMAS which after all consist of chemical compounds and the odor of the cheese may also switch on certain genetic pathways in bacteria pathways that regulate the bacteria's ability to thrive in harsh conditions like a backup plan when things aren't going well and you're starving, you can try on this other pathway and still make a living. But unless ideal substrates at around the end result is that the stench we perceive may also shape the microbiome of the cheese. The results appear in the Journal Environmental Microbiology has for the practical. This research. Well, it's a little early for that. We don't necessarily do our science to make cheese better. It's honestly a lot of assistance to figure out how cheese works. In other words. He says, the tools of modern micro biology allow scientists to finally listening to the conversations happening in these tiny cheese Ryan communities.

Bear Wolf Ryan Wolf Tufts University Journal Environmental Microbio
Boston - Massachusetts' tax revenue loss may not be as dire as first predicted, Tufts Center model shows

WBZ Afternoon News

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Boston - Massachusetts' tax revenue loss may not be as dire as first predicted, Tufts Center model shows

"Suggesting tax collections this fiscal year would miss the mark by as much as $6 billion. But upon further review, it looks more like now about $1.6 billion Research from Tufts University says it's a great picture to paint, but officials say it's within the realm of possibility that federal cash could bridge that gap. Meantime, three counties in Massachusetts among the healthiest nationwide annual ranking from U. S News and World

Tufts University Massachusetts U. S News
Kennedy falls short in Senate bid; tight race to succeed him

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

Kennedy falls short in Senate bid; tight race to succeed him

"Representative Joe Kennedy the third became the first in his storied political family to lose a run for Congress in Massachusetts falling short in his bid to unseat senator ed Markey in the democratic primary Kennedy may have been younger but Markey was seen as more progressive even picking up the endorsement of AOC says Tufts University political science professor Jeffrey berry pickers stole another well a lot of respect for the family it's just that Kennedy took on another incumbent who this in many people's eyes doing good work now he wonders what's next given the Kennedy legacy in Massachusetts it is historic and one wonders if it's the end of the dynasty berry says with the way things are now there's little room left in Massachusetts politics for Kennedy to run any time soon but if Joe Biden wins he could get a position in his administration I'm Julie Walker

Joe Kennedy Congress Massachusetts AOC Jeffrey Berry Pickers Joe Biden Julie Walker Representative Senator Ed Markey Tufts University Professor
Kennedy falls short in Senate bid; tight race to succeed him

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

Kennedy falls short in Senate bid; tight race to succeed him

"Representative Joe Kennedy the third became the first in his storied political family to lose a run for Congress in Massachusetts falling short in his bid to unseat senator ed Markey in the democratic primary Kennedy may have been younger but Markey was seen as more progressive even picking up the endorsement of AOC says Tufts University political science professor Jeffrey berry pickers stole another well a lot of respect for the family it's just that Kennedy took on another incumbent who this in many people's eyes doing good work now he wonders what's next given the Kennedy legacy in Massachusetts it is historic and one wonders if it's the end of the dynasty berry says with the way things are now there's little room left in Massachusetts politics for Kennedy to run any time soon but if Joe Biden wins he could get a position in his administration I'm Julie Walker

Joe Kennedy Congress Massachusetts AOC Jeffrey Berry Pickers Joe Biden Julie Walker Representative Senator Ed Markey Tufts University Professor
Some Young Republican Activists Worry About The Future Of Their Party

All Things Considered

04:09 min | 1 year ago

Some Young Republican Activists Worry About The Future Of Their Party

"Week's Republican National Convention offered direct appeals to a new generation of voters. It showcased figures like Madison Cawthorne, a congressional candidate in North Carolina. I just turned 25. When I'm elected this November, I'll be the youngest member of Congress in over 200 years. And if you don't think young people can change the world. Then you just don't know American history. But President Trump's appeal with young voters is very limited. And some young Republican activists are concerned about the future of the party now totally defined by Trump. NPR's wanna Summers reports. Lizzie Bond is worried about the future of the Republican Party. The 21 year old Duke University students said the party today is failing to speak to people like her. She describes herself as conservative, reasonable and a person of faith. In 2016. She could not support Donald Trump and instead volunteered in support of Hillary Clinton's campaign. I think specifically within my age cohort, there's a lot of enthusiasm for President Trump. But then there are also a lot of people who are inclined to be conservative who are so disillusioned by everything that they see on the right. That it's hard not to think that the future of the Republican Party is doomed. Research from Circle, a research center at Tufts University found that nearly one in five young voters who backed Republicans in 2018 plan to support Joe Biden this year. Mike brought. Oh, said one reason why young people maybe turning away is because the Republican Party is not talking about the right issues. One of our main themes is that There are issues that Gen Z voters care about, including on the center, right? At the party has failed to address time and time again. Climate change racial injustice Algebra two plus issues. Broda was 20 and goes to Georgetown University. He's the executive director of Gen Z GOP. A group that's looking to reach young Republicans. He's planning to vote for Joe Biden, but hopes that there will be a better Republican option than Trump in 2024. Now I think with the ultimate determining factor is that Draws me away from him completely is his poor approach to governance. And that's evident in his handling the code 19 pandemic, and it's no longer just about his policies were inconsistent with my views for what's best for the country. It's how he approaches those policies. Many young Republicans said that coming of age as a conservative today has been a bit of a surreal experience. I still remember sitting in this restaurant with some friends and be like, Oh, wouldn't it be like the weirdest thing if the race ended up being Trump versus Hillary, and we're like, Oh, my goodness that would never happen like that Be so awful and Lo and behold, it's what happened. That's Grace Klein. She's 18 and just started her first year at Arizona State University. She described herself as very against Trump during the 2016 Republican primary. Four years later, things have changed. I'm going to be voting for the first time in November, and I am an adamant supporter. I will 100% vote for him now client said Trump has exceeded her expectations. But there are some things she does not agree with. She specifically mentioned some of the president's tweets. But she said that his record and his values help her look past what she described as personality flaws. And there's one issue that Klein said, is central to her political identity. I believe That the rightto life starts at conception. And if a candidate doesn't support that I will not support them. Curl in Monastir is a 19 year old student at Coker College in South Carolina. He said the most important issue for him as a conservative is standing up for the Constitution. He was initially open to supporting President Trump in November. But right now that seems unlikely. Everyday on TV, the land between Vice President Biden and the libertarian candidate, Jo George. And Back in North Carolina. Lizzie Bond isn't sure either. So in November, I'm facing that really Really difficult decision. I likely won't be supporting either presidential candidate. Voters like her have just 63 days to figure it out on a summer's NPR news.

President Trump Republican Party Joe Biden Lizzie Bond North Carolina Grace Klein Hillary Clinton Executive Director Madison Cawthorne Congress Vice President NPR Duke University Georgetown University Tufts University Gen Z Gop Arizona State University
Free Yourself From Conflict

The LEADx Show

04:50 min | 1 year ago

Free Yourself From Conflict

"Thanks for joining today's Webinar, an optimal outcomes are host. Today is the founder and CEO. Alignment Strategies Group the near based consulting firm that advises CEOS in their executive teams on how to optimize organizational health and growth. She's the author of optimal outcomes for yourself from conflict at work at home in life, which was selected as the Financial Times Book of the month Jennifer is A. A keynote speaker at fortune, five hundred companies public institutions in innovative fast-growing startups, where she inspires audiences of all kinds including those Google Harvard in tax, and in her popular course at university, a former counter-terrorism research fellow with the US Department of Homeland Security, she is a graduate of Tufts. University and holds a PhD in social organizational psychology from Columbia. Please welcome Dr Jennifer Goldman wetzlar. These are trying times that we're in. We are in the midst right now. Two months into the global pandemic. Of Corona virus and we're facing a big tough global problem. The likes of which most of us have never seen in our lifetimes. I've spent my career studying and working with incredibly tough problems, none on this scale, but tough problems nonetheless. Typically the tougher the problem, the more likely it is to capture my interest, and the more likely I am to be helpful. This has been true for me since I was A. So I didn't want to solve just one or two sides of the Rubik's Cube I wanted to solve all six sides while Hula hooping. and. That's why today we're going to be talking about a tough problem of type of problem conflict. That comes back. No matter how many times you people have tried to resolve it. Will be talking about recurring conflicts. And what to do when your efforts to resolve those conflicts fail. So in a minute I'm going to be asking you to think of a conflict situation. You know about that. You can apply your situation well, so you can apply these practices to that situation. But I. WanNa give you an introduction to this work. In Nineteen, seventy, three one of my mentors, Dr Morton Deutsch widely considered father of conflict resolution, wrote a book called the resolution of conflict and in it he detailed research that he and his colleagues had done, which basically showed that conflict lead to more conflict and cooperation leads to more cooperation. When I learned that all I can think was well if that's true, how do we get out of this conflict loop? And how do we get on to the cooperation loop? Well I've now spent the last thirteen years trying to answer those questions and the answers are in the book that I've written optimal outcomes that we're talking about today. My research began with a fellowship from the US Department of Homeland Security in two thousand and two, and since then in my role as CEO and founder of Alignment Strategies Group I've worked with. Leaders. All kinds of different organizations from innovative fast-growing startups to Fortune five hundred companies to academic institutions to global nonprofits. And what I've done is helped them by using the optimal outcomes method to address the most challenging situations that they have faced. And I'd like to bring some of that work here for you today, so I'll be talking about a specific clans situation throughout today's Webinar. But I also want this presentation to be highly relevant to you so I'd like to take a moment now to ask you to think of a situation that you know about. It could be one from your own life, or it could be one that you're helping other people with, or it could be one that you know about simply from watching the news. And I'd like to ask you to answer two questions. What who first of all you're thinking about a conflict situation, but it may be one that you don't even necessarily think about as quote unquote conflict. It may be something that simply recurs over and over again. No matter how many times you or other people have tried to resolve, it could be the daily fight with your spouse about the dishes in the sink, or it could be how to track down that colleague. That's always been hard to reach a now that you're working remotely is even more difficult to find. Get the answers that you meet, or it could be about politics and elections in presidential elections, and how to have conversations about those without getting caught in a cycle of frustration with friends and colleagues and family.

Founder And Ceo Us Department Of Homeland Secu Dr Jennifer Goldman Financial Times CEO Alignment Strategies Group Fortune Dr Morton Deutsch Research Fellow Harvard Google Tufts Founder Of Alignment Strategie Jennifer Executive Columbia
Study: More Berries, Apples, Tea May Have Protective Benefits Against Alzheimer's

Invite Health

01:46 min | 1 year ago

Study: More Berries, Apples, Tea May Have Protective Benefits Against Alzheimer's

"By the way another study just came out drinking great actually point according to more berries apples and he may have protective benefits against Alzheimer's really interesting study this from a Jean Mayer human nutrition research center on aging that's up at Tufts University it's a great place to read research for they looked at almost thirty thousand action they looked at almost three thousand people age fifty or older on the phone for twenty years and if they had a lot of apples each month a lot of berries like blueberries and blackberries strawberries and if they had a lot of T. I cut their risk strongly about charmers disease and other related dimensions like late dementia and Lewy body dementia now here's the thing they said she specifically green tea in the study this is according to Dr as raw she store shoe store Dr as rishi star read the study he's up at tufts in open borders he said T. specifically green tea and berries are good sources of the slab in which so there really is brain protection here if you drink green tea what she you cut your risk of Alzheimer's let me see if I could find if you drank tea you cut way back on your risk of Alzheimer's people who didn't drink green tea or eat berries have twice the risk or eat apples had twice the risk of Alzheimer's disease so when you do not agree to you're also

Alzheimer Tufts University Jean Mayer Alzheimer's Disease
"tufts university" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"tufts university" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Spent time on the front lines in a highly decorated marine corps career in Iraq he knows the toll that stress can take on the body and on the mind WBZ's Carl Stevens tells us he's on a new mission to include some money for mental health in the next round of federal funding congressman Seth Moulton was on Facebook live last evening with the chief medical officer at the American foundation for suicide prevention to talk about the fact that Americans are under a great deal of stress right now and there should be a hot line in place to help them we're pushing to get this bill that will make ninety eight the hotline that everybody knows they can call in a mental health emergency and provide more funding for suicide the suicide prevention lifeline included and any for corona virus package to support Americans access to mental health he said a recent survey found forty five percent of Americans say that the stress of the pandemic has had a negative impact on their mental health Carl Stevens WBZ Boston news radio Tufts University ready to step up in hopes of slowing down the spread the school is now offering its residence halls to medical personnel first responders and coronavirus pace shins tops will be able to house as many as sixteen hundred people on campus and the administration suggests it's a duty and other university should be doing the same thing a dispatcher for the Braintree fire department goes above and beyond what a man calls nine one one asking for food WBZ TV's bill shields with details he said I need you proceeded to state your name and address and then you start rambling off a bunch of items that you need that so Jackie went to the store and bought the men groceries including a rotisserie chicken and fruit then she delivered it all to his home so I was gone for about twenty minutes came back to the station knocked on that guy's door hat gloves and a mask on any he was so appreciative so thank all if this were any of my friends or family members you know reaching out for help are even you know just advice or something I would hope that someone would do the same for them good working hard time there will be a day when your fax stuck in traffic until then WBZ newsradio for the most accurate reporting on this pandemic will also bring you everything press conference from the mayor the.

Iraq Carl Stevens Seth Moulton medical officer American foundation Tufts University Braintree fire department Jackie congressman Facebook Boston
Boston - Tufts suspends in-person classes, asks students not to return after spring break

WBZ Afternoon News

00:58 sec | 2 years ago

Boston - Tufts suspends in-person classes, asks students not to return after spring break

"Tufts University among the wave of colleges canceling in person classes going on online now for the spring semester because of covert nineteen WBZ's Kim Tunnicliffe isn't bad for a lot of students here at tufts are scrambling to pack up their dorm rooms and head home before the March sixteenth deadline freshmen's valley from New York City is in full fledged packing mode my dad coming to pick up my stuff and help me move Thursday I'm really just gonna pack everything that I can without his help and then when he comes let's do what we can see in our front line we would rather attend classes in person how do you feel about having to take online I don't like it at all I don't think it's going to work I think everyone's going to be confused one of the reasons we chose the schools because of the good professor so it's definitely not find when you have to take it online if that's what we have to do that so we have to do the seniors I spoke with say this isn't the way they wanted to end their college experience just going home when I come back it's not really the same it's not going to be the real thing Kevin Tunnicliffe WBZ Boston news radio

Tufts University WBZ Kim Tunnicliffe Tufts New York City Professor Kevin Tunnicliffe Boston
"tufts university" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"tufts university" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Deborah Dale on average on this news station KTAR news all right Dr Bob margin back with you we had Dr decker Weiss a local cardiologists heart doctor on the program as a gas last weekend we were talking about the importance of taking a full spectrum comprehensive essential multi vitamin and mineral plus omega supplement and Dr decker Weiss is a heart doctor is on board with that because he knows that his patients just like all of us we can always eat right I mean sometimes it's difficult with our fast paced lifestyle we eat out in restaurants we don't know what we're getting most of the food we're eating is not healthy according to two studies have been done at Tufts University so we need to fill in the gaps so that we have the nutrients to support a healthy functioning immune system so that when a a **** Germer micro comes long virus whatever we're up for it we rise to the occasion and we win the battle but if your nutrient depleted because the food you're eating or depleted or you're using up the nutrients so fast because you're under stress with your fast paced lifestyle we're not getting enough sleep we just went through a job change or you just moved or you're having marital troubles those things all deplete your body of important nutrients people living in Asian countries where they consume copious amounts of sea vegetables are consuming the sea vegetables on a regular basis they live like four to six years longer than the average American now there's a lot of other lifestyle.

Deborah Dale Tufts University Dr Bob Dr decker Weiss
Bloomberg to make first debate appearance

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 2 years ago

Bloomberg to make first debate appearance

"Scene and some colleges Chris Gayle Dearie says while Bloomberg will be the focus Bernie Sanders needs to avoid missteps after essentially winning Iowa and taking New Hampshire and not give people reasons not to vote for two others will try to keep up the momentum good you're in a club which are really need to at the very least avoid mistakes he says the pressures on the two who have been done as well as expected so far Elizabeth Warren and Joe Biden I don't know if he's still a viable can actually win the nomination tufts university's Jeffrey Barry wonders if Biden's done thank you Morley wounded Sager may gunny Washington

Chris Gayle Dearie Bloomberg Bernie Sanders Iowa Elizabeth Warren Joe Biden Jeffrey Barry Morley Sager New Hampshire Gunny Washington
Are Insect Guts the Secret to the Most Delicious Kimchi?

Gastropod

09:54 min | 2 years ago

Are Insect Guts the Secret to the Most Delicious Kimchi?

"So Kimchi is a lot of different things to a lot of different people. This is Kevin Kin. He's the food ethnographer. PhD candidate at the University of Maryland and gastropod listener. Calvin Ho recommended that we give Kevin Call to talk talk about yes Kimchi. Basically it is a traditional Korean dishes for mental vegetables. The formula of witches normally fermented seasonal vegetables with some form for meant seafood sometimes in the form of anchovies brine shrimp but it runs the gamut in the US. The kind of Kimchi. We nearly early always eat is made of cabbage but Lawrenson tunes it. Kimchi company called mother-in-law's and she wrote the Kimchi Cookbook. She says it doesn't have to be. It can be made with any vegetables. Roy So it's not necessarily NAPA cabbage that makes it Kimchi. It's the process of Fermenting pickling that Bro says the fermentation it produces a shall we say distinctive smell. It's hard to describe having grown up with it my whole life but I would say to me it smells. It's not like home but I think it's a vegetable funk that you might get from something like Sauerkraut interspersed with the sharp aromas this of onion and garlic and scallions and actually sauerkraut and Kimchi. Our booth made through the same fermentation process. There are two main differences. One is the type of cabbage. Sauerkraut is usually made with that hard greenish round cabbage and not frilly NAPA cabbage. The other one is the differences in the seasonings but the fermentation method. That's the same and for the most part. Kimchi is played with red pepper. So sometimes it's quite spicy but it doesn't necessarily have to be there varieties. That are not spiced but that fermentation lactic acid. Bacteria's what gives it. Its ZIP zing. That's what gives it what Koreans call life. There's an old saying in Korea that Kimchi is half of all the the food provision Koreans traditionally have Kimchi at all three meals breakfast. Lunch and dinner it served as a side. It's omnipresent on on on the side you know. A lot of people will say without Kim cheaters. No there is. No meal was born in South Korea but I immigrated to the United States when I was two but even when I was in La we first moved to La up. Kimchi was always on the table. We always had jars of it. So if you're Korean you're likely never far from Kimche when you're at home but sometimes Koreans need to travel to places where Kim t might not be on every table because they want to have Kimchi with almost every meal. They'll pat Kimchi and sometimes jars. Because of the pressurization and the fact that Kim. She's alive with lactic. Acid bacteria will sometimes explode midflight the chefs deficit one of. La's trendiest restaurants animal. Actually had this happen to them. They'd cry of Axum Kimchi to bring it along with them. And when they got to the baggage carousel it was complete carnage. Everyone was gagging and holding their shirts over their noses. Kevin says there are entire Korean blog posts devoted to making sure. Your Kimchi won't explode it on the plane and overwhelmed your fellow passengers for the next however many hours when Lauren and Kevin were growing up in the US they ate tons of Kimchi. Of course but that pungent vegetal funk it was a problem at least around non Korean Americans the one thing that admonition that my mom always told me was to never eat. Kim She with with anyone. who wasn't Korean early on? I remember having it in my lunches and of course being made fun of for it because of that vegetal funk and having that some semblance of perhaps embarrassment or shame you know I would ask my mom. Why can't you just pack me? Peanut butter and Jelly sandwiches. Of course that's all changed now Kevin and is proud of Kimchi but my question is how does cabbage which you know. I like cabbage. Okay but it's just cabbage. How does that become this essential sources zip and basically there's one bacteria called lactobacillus? You listeners might remember it from our Cerrado episode because along with yeast. It's a key part of sourdot starters Aziz lactobacillus they're also called lactic acid bacteria and they live to eat the sugars in the cabbage leaves. And then they excrete they excrete acid which sewer and they fought out carbon dioxide. That's the bubbles and more of the sourness. Oh the lactic. Acid bacteria are the key to Kimchi. And whenever we at GASTROPOD WANNA get up close and personal with the microbes in our food. We know who to call. I'm Ben Wolf and I am an assistant professor at Tufts University and Gastropods in-house microbiologist adjusts. Not only is he our very own in-house microbiologists now. Every podcast has that but we need a special who true but as it happens. Ben Is also in the middle of a huge huge Kimchi research. Project perfect there was a sort of baseline understanding of the traditional types of lactic acid bacteria that you would find in your average Kimchi. I'm she and most of this. Work was in Korea and so most of it was looking at what are the types of bacteria and also looking at this very clear succession this temporal change of microbes from the beginning of when you first put that Gina Jar and close it up to the whole fermentation process all the way to the end though if green scientists have figured all that out already. What's it's left for Ben to study so one thing that I find really fascinating about Kimchi? Compared to other fermented foods is that unlike cheese or Yogurt were you. You Start Cultures these these microbes that you buy Kimchi and Sauerkraut and other fermented vegetables are not inoculated. When you make Sauerkraut or or pickles or Kimchi you don't ever use a starter? Culture the microbes. Just kind of get in there. So unsurprisingly people like Ben Curious about where these microbes come from and they've tested various possible sources. Like maybe it's US we're the source says an interesting idea this Kimchi Hans or the idea that humans can be an innocuous oculus source for fermented foods in fact there was a really cool city recently here in Massachusetts looking at Sauerkraut production facility similar to Kimchi and a simple lots of different things in the environment that workers the walls and then they also sampled the raw materials the cabbage and they found the cabbage is really the primary source for these bacteria's Ben thanks. This is actually pretty surprising. Amazing that we can just go out pick or by all sorts of vegetables grown nearly anywhere in the world and we can basically always find these is beneficial lactic acid bacteria and so I started to think. Where are they coming from? What's the origin story for these lactic? ACID bacteria how do they get to the plant. Do Different and farms have different types or different abundances of lactic acid bacteria so ben and his graduate student. Esther Miller set out to answer these questions. She and others in the law we. We all went out and surveyed farms throughout New England so we went to Hampshire throughout Massachusetts Connecticut. A little bit into the Hudson Valley as well and said where are these lactic acid bacteria and what are they in terms of the species and abundant are they in the environment. Ami went to these fifty one farm some of them are community gardens. Most listen we're really small farms and we sampled the soil and then we also sampled the lease of weeds and other plants in the environment. We didn't directly sample cabbage. We just wanted to say what is the potential potential source of these bacteria because they have to hide out somewhere when they're not growing on the cabbage leaf and they did find lactobacillus but not as much as they expected. They're incredibly rare in the environment. Virement so it's it's actually really hard to find them so if you look in soil or if you look on leave us. They're usually less than one percent of all the types of bacteria that are in the Environment Mint and to us that was kind of surprising because it really does suggest that we're relying on these rare and somewhat variable groups of microbes do this important fermentation process versus one of the reasons. Bannon esther that these lactic acid bacteria or so rare on farms is because they aren't particularly comfortable. They're just not they're happy place. They're really good at fermenting sugars in a low oxygen somewhat salty and cold environment. So you think of your average cabbage leaf hanging out in a farm field in August. I it's one of those things I wanted to make sure that these lactic acid bacteria truly didn't love farm. Fresh cabbage leaves said they grew tiny sterile cabbages in the lab cabbages with literally. No microbial life so what you do. is you take cabbage seeds. And you sterilize. The surface of the cab seeds with ethanol and a little bit of bleach. And then you put them in a sterile klay medium that we have inside of a test tube and you grow them. They happily grow in the assessing the NAPA cabbages love. This environment went and then what we can do is spray those plants with different combinations of microbes and basically the lactic acid bacteria all die. It's not even that they're bad getting to the plant but once they do do they slowly just decrease in abundance so they're not even really good at fighting in that leaf environment where there's lots of other bacteria that will happily grow so again. It's sort of a magical thing that Kimchi Sauerkraut even works. Because we're relying on this really rare group of microbes. They're rare but like we said earlier. There are a whole bunch of different kinds of lactic acid bacteria that you can find in a Kimchi fermentation. So do those different varieties. Make a difference to your final kitschy. One of the questions that were interested in is what species you start off with in terms of the cabbage. Bring in from the farm. How does that control or contribute to the fermentation process and ultimately the flavor and quality of the product because because you would get different microbes going on different plants and so we're trying to tease that apart you? What is the role of geography? Is there a microbial terroirs to cabbage. And at this point we don't don't know yet we're just starting to do some of those experiments Bend told us all these questions and then he had an idea after all he knows where all about microbes era gastropod. Why not get us to do some of this research for him? You wanted to test her idea. You could buy different cabbages from different sources from anthem in the same way and see what happens I different.

Axum Kimchi Kimchi Hans United States LA KIM South Korea BEN Kevin Kevin Call Napa Gastropods Kevin Kin University Of Maryland Kim She Calvin Ho ROY Korea Massachusetts Environment Mint
US panel backs wider use of fish oil to prevent heart attack

Morning Edition

03:06 min | 2 years ago

US panel backs wider use of fish oil to prevent heart attack

"A panel of scientific advisers to the food and drug administration has unanimously voted in favor of wider use of a prescription fish oil pills the medication can help reduce the risk of heart attacks and strokes and there's also not reports it's long been known that omega three fatty acids which are abundant in oily fish such as salmon are good for heart health what's much newer to the scene is a fish oil pill approved by the FDA cardiologists Peter Wilson of Emory University has reviewed the evidence behind the drug is called the sepa this is a prescription product at high concentration this to your assigned fish oil which is extracted from sardines and anchovies is currently recommended for a narrow group of people with very elevated triglyceride levels but Wilson was part of a panel of advisers that was used to weigh in on whether the fish oil pills could also be beneficial for a much wider group of adults including people who've already had a heart attack or stroke and people with type two diabetes who also have another risk factor such as high blood pressure the panel felt very strongly that this fish oil product taken in addition to Statens reduced cardio vascular disease Staten medications work well to reduce LDL cholesterol the so called bad cholesterol Statens can also lower triglycerides to some extent but fish oil can have an added a fax in lowering triglycerides further some prior studies that fish oil supplements that you can buy off the shelf at the grocery store or drug store have pointed to benefits to supplement at lower doses of always been of interest the difference in these most recent studies is using much higher concentrations in the pills in other words smaller doses may help a little but Wilson says to get a significant reduction in risk higher doses are more helpful the evidence comes from a clinical trial sponsored by the company that manufactures the seat back it included people who already had a heart attack or stroke Wilson has no financial ties to the company the trial showed a convincing evidence for reduction of heart attack stroke and cardiac related death about a twenty five percent reduction compared to a placebo group so could people who want to the health benefits of omega three fatty acids just aim to eat more fish especially healthy people who aren't at high risk of heart disease Daria CMOS Afarin dean of the nutrition school at Tufts University says yes for the general population you know I really recommend people eat fish or seafood at least you know one or two servings per week but he says in order to lower triglycerides more is needed the prescription pill is dosed at four grams a day which is the equivalent of eating are you ready for this eight to ten servings of salmon every day that's pretty hard to do you know almost impossible the FDA typically follows the advice of its advisory panels and is expected to decide on expanded use approval by the end of the

Twenty Five Percent Four Grams
Meaningful Healthcare Reform is Critical -  Dean at Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy

The KFBK Morning News

01:04 min | 2 years ago

Meaningful Healthcare Reform is Critical - Dean at Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy

"K. Democrats running for president in twenty twenty of ideas about how to fix the nation's healthcare system but Cabey case for Annika Carter says one cardiologists thinks they should also be addressing what's making people sick there is Maza far in this dean of the Friedman school of nutrition science and policy at Tufts University is this fifty years ago when the population is exploding the goal was to reduce hunger the food was designed to contain as many calories as possible but he says that's not healthy I would like to seek the democratic candidates have a platform around food it's the number one cause of poor health it's the number one issue for sustainability if you know we have childhood obesity a huge issue for the economy nobody's talking about it he says of the nation wants to reduce disease and its cost meaningful healthcare reform is critical and should be a non partisan priority he says right now nutrition research is fragmented and too many people don't know what they should be eating forty two percent of calories and the U. S. food supply are poor quality carbohydrates I think about that almost half the calories of US food supply come from refine search and sugar the US spends more money on healthcare than any other country in the world Veronica Carter news ninety three point one K.

President Trump Annika Carter Maza Friedman School Tufts University United States Cabey Veronica Carter Forty Two Percent Fifty Years One K
Democrats win key elections in Virginia

AP 24 Hour News

01:00 min | 2 years ago

Democrats win key elections in Virginia

"Elections in several states without a warning shot toward president trump and Republicans heading into next year's general election AP washed corresponded soccer Madani is a look at some key result Democrats are writing some kind of way you probably an anti trump wave in political analyst Larry sapatos home a Virginia Democrats gained full control of the state house for the first time in twenty six years hello Kentucky a day after the president visited Lexington to boosting common governor Matt Bevin Democrat a deeper shears claiming victory though the race remains too tight to call in both Kentucky and Virginia tufts university's Jeffrey berry notes Democrats were strong upon traditionally G. O. P. friendly suburban voters White House up to pick up some way of making more tolerable on a less provocative in the suburbs Republicans did keep Mississippi's governorship and the president heads to Louisiana tonight in hopes of helping boot the incumbent Democrat Sager mag on the

Political Analyst President Trump Lexington White House Mississippi Louisiana Larry Sapatos Virginia Kentucky Matt Bevin Democrat Virginia Tufts University Jeffrey Berry Sager Twenty Six Years
"tufts university" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"tufts university" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Passive way to prevent infection? What bandage could play an active role in diagnosis and recovery? This idea that bandages can be smart is behind a new invention by a team of engineers at Tufts University the team developed a flexible bandage less than three millimeters thick that surrounding eighth of an inch that actively monitors chronic wounds and then responds by delivering wound specific drug treatments to promote healing in a news. Release co author Samir son Kuessel, a PHD and professor of electrical and computer engineering at Tufts University school of engineering said a we've been able to take a new approach to bandages because of the emergence of flexible electron IX, in fact, flexible Electric's have made many wearable medical devices possible, but bandages have changed little since the beginnings of medicine. We are simply applying modern technology to an ancient art and the hope. Of improving outcomes for an intractable problem the research. If successful in clinical settings could transform the future of bandages, this could be an important advancement for people with chronic skin wounds that are difficult to heal such as those arising from burns or diabetes. Smart. Bandages have ph and temperature sensors to measure, the primary markers of wound. Healing the ph balanced, for optimal, wound healing is a range from five point five to six point five while Williams that are not healing. We'll have a ph range above six point five an elevated temperature at the wound site, indicates inflammation is taking place and that a wound is also not healing. A separate bandaged prototype. Made by the team also takes oxygenation into account, signaling whether a wound is healing optimally.

Tufts University school of eng Tufts University professor of electrical and co flexible Electric Samir son Kuessel Williams
"tufts university" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"tufts university" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"He and his standing with you today, and I have been so happy to have been joined by humanitarian still joined Perry president and CEO of prevent blindness America. And we've been talking today about I care I health preventing blindness and our youth preventing blindness in in our diabetic population, which is growing by the day, unfortunately, and and in our aging population also growing by the day, but aside from getting an eye exam. He what other things can people do to protect their eyes. Well, well, this is kind of the the health moment Hannah. That's good. We need that. Yeah. I think the first thing that comes to my mind, just a change of diet. Okay. I can have a significant impact on health. Risk of disease and vision loss can be lowered by diets are rich and beta carotene think sound like a commercial. Three fatty acid certain bind vitamins, you know. Who's like, lentils grapes, carrots peppers, broccoli spinach? All the things your mother told you these scale. Yeah. No, fish and Turkey. All those things nuts are all good for your eyes. And then the things that are bad or the, you know, the things that you know, the diet folks rose after, you know, be careful about. Refined starches or foods with high sugar content. Those can be damaging to vision Tufts University showed in a study recently that high glycemic foods caused dramatic rise in blood sugar, which can damage the retina, the capillaries in the eye by promoting inflammation. So you know, avoid soda sugary drinks. And. Lots of sweet foods, and that kind of thing. So, you know, throw onto all those things in the diet, quit, smoking control blood pressure and cholesterol exercise regularly. Avoid trans fat. And, you know, get to an eye doctor the doctor there he's got the formula for protecting your vision of having healthy is and and really a healthy miss. I mean, everything everything's healthy. If you do if you do what you just said. Yes. All right Perry. Tell me.

Perry president and CEO vision loss Hannah America Tufts University
"tufts university" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"tufts university" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"I'm Gordon Deal along with Jennifer Kushinka it is Monday. February eighteen glad you could be with us. And here's what we have for. You this hour Democrats in congress are preparing to challenge. President Trump's national emergency on the southern border which could free up money for a wall. The chairman of the Senate Judiciary committee wants to know of statements made by former acting FBI director Andrew McCabe reveal an attempted coup. A man accused of killing five colleagues in Illinois on Friday was not allowed to own a gun. Meanwhile, memorial was held yesterday to honor the victims in the wake of a scandal involving leading elected officials in Virginia. Colleges continue to confront black face on campus. It the easy to assume at this is just something that happens in the south. But it's not from the last month. There were black face incidents. Tufts University of Massachusetts at university of Oklahoma last year. There is one at Cal poly. I really is happening all over the country, and this isn't every single day, but somebody met a lot of schools are concerned about Wall Street Journal. Reporter Melissa corn reports on colleges uncovering black face in old yearbooks and on social media. Democrats are laying the groundwork to fight President Trump's use of an emergency declaration to fund construction of a border wall. Illinois, Senator Tammy Duckworth believes the Senate has the votes to block the president's emergency order, though, she doubted enough senators would be willing to override a potential veto. I don't want type of government in place where we're playing these tit for tat games. It should be one where we serve the American people by coming to a consensus. And where we're headed this division is not acceptable for our form of democracy. She was on ABC's this week Republican congressman Jim Jordan of Ohio was on the same program. So we tried to do it the appropriations process way and get building. It. We tried to do this last year in our party. Our party leaders wouldn't even go there. Democrats certainly wouldn't go there. So yes, it's going to be a slow process is going to go to the courts, Mr. Trump declared a national emergency Friday saying the wall was needed to stop an invasion of our country. He plans to draw on six point seven billion dollars in reallocated federal funds with. Without congressional approval..

President Trump Wall Street Journal Illinois Senator Tammy Duckworth Gordon Deal Senate Judiciary committee Tufts University of Massachuse Cal poly Senate Jennifer Kushinka Virginia university of Oklahoma congress Andrew McCabe president ABC chairman congressional Jim Jordan Melissa corn
"tufts university" Discussed on The Energy Gang

The Energy Gang

04:00 min | 3 years ago

"tufts university" Discussed on The Energy Gang

"What's yours? Yes. So in the two thousand nineteen state of the state address New York governor Andrew Cuomo said he was going to quadruple the offshore wind target to nine gigawatts by two thousand thirty five and double the distributed solo deployment to six gigawatts by twenty twenty five n deploy three gigawatts of energy storage by twenty thirty. So that is pretty significant and chosen an enormous amount of leadership, especially since he dragged his feet for a really long time on storage in. This is on the back of a report from global market insights that says that the global lithium ion battery market is expected to exceed sixty billion dollars by twenty twenty four so removing guys New York leading the charge. I know jigger has sparred with folks in New York, but man nicknamed keep on truckin jigger. What's your free electron? So I wanted to highlight a report that's made the rounds this week on from a lead by Tufts University showing sort of underlying discrimination around where residential solar rooftop units have been stalled I think the specific paragraph was that researchers with Tufts University in university of California Berkeley found that census tracts that are over fifty percent black or Hispanic have significantly last rooftop solar, then census tracts with no majority, or that are majority white pointing to the equity implications of an unevenly developing so industry, and you know, I certainly, you know, I certainly resonate with what they're saying. You know, I think we all should take it very seriously. My sense that from digging into it is it's probably a lot more FICO. Score driven in the inherent biases of FICO scores. So we just have to find another bankable score to us. But it's probably also around our marketing, and which audiences were really targeting him with with our marketing dollars for sure I mean, FICO scores have been a brilliant standard to allow solar services to scale, but they have their limits for sure, and they block a lot of people out where there any other solutions that stood out for you. Or or reasoning behind this problem? Yeah. The paper didn't really include any insights around the solutions. It was really more of just a, you know, here's what our findings show. And even if we control for income and control for some of these other pieces, we still see the disparity, and so I don't know that they've really gotten to the point of offering any solutions. But certainly a lot of folks online of chimed in with him suggested solutions, and I think, you know, largely it's about, you know, being more intentional about targeting these communities and making sure that they're getting full access to the products that we offer. So mine is a a little preview of what's to come on our podcasts, you know, in our last show of twenty eighteen I lamented that a lot of folks in consumer tech should be using their skills to move into cleantech or sorrow solve broader environmental challenges. And again, we have the smartest engineering minds in the world working on the most inconsequential problems, and I along with a lot of other people just find that so incredibly frustrating, and as soon as we release that episode within about a day, I got like six or seven emails from folks saying, hey, I'm in consumer tech and want to figure out how to get a job, and I listened to your podcast or the opposite. Hey, I transitioned into clean tech. I'm super passionate about this. I know other engineers you're doing the same thing. And I'm I'm collecting some of those stories, and I'm also talking to some other folks out there about career opportunities, and we're going to turn that into some kind of episode coming up so be aware of that. That we've also I've also gotten some emails from folks about raising money, and Catherine has worked in private equity jigger, of course, has been working renewable energy finance for a long time and has is pioneers of the financial instruments. And there's this real question about how do you get beyond venture capital?.

New York Tufts University Andrew Cuomo jigger university of California Berke Catherine twenty twenty sixty billion dollars three gigawatts nine gigawatts fifty percent six gigawatts
"tufts university" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

05:38 min | 3 years ago

"tufts university" Discussed on KGO 810

"You know, that's the that's the wonderful thing when we really start to do this evolutionary work, and we let go of the trauma and prints in our DNA, we really do feel like we reverse age. And I think we can live well in two hundred and thirty one hundred and fifty but in answer to your question about. Trauma repair. Definitely we can repair the traumas trauma impact. Of course in so many ways. Sure does perspective we could think about it like soul loss. You know? We have a fracturing a call it for fracturing. And we lose them the vital energies that that gives us our willpower. And it helps us know what we came to do. And so there are processes that. Do we can learn to help recover that? And also we have to learn how to overwrite the trauma imprint in our EPA genetics, and I can give you the short version of that right now. Go ahead. So so trauma imprint us in ways that are multigenerational m university released a study that demonstrated this was mice, and this is just also re proven with humans at Tufts University, but the the mouse studies really interesting because mice and they put the mice in a cage with cherry blossoms. And then they shocked the bottom of their feet, and the my, of course, became afraid of the smell of cherry blossoms. But what was so shocking was that this fear of the smell of cherry blossoms was passed down through generations. So the great grandchildren of these mice, even if there was cheese underneath those cherry blossoms wouldn't go there. They wouldn't go there. So. For us as humans what if the opportunity and the money in the love that you're seeking out of life is hidden behind a cherry blossom trigger, you're not gonna see it. You're gonna run the other direction with your heart beating fast. Interesting take is that is that what you call part of EPA genetics. Yes, that's an EPA genetic marker and tufts just proved that children who were treated poorly who were emotionally or physically abused. Of course, they have EPA genetic markers. But they proved that their children and their grandchildren can inherit the the damaging imprint from that, even if they suffered no abuse themselves. Interesting now, the good news is that we can reverse those trauma imprint when we put ourselves in what in what scientists would call a rich in enriched environment. And so there's a number of ways to enrich that environment. Certainly we can change our our circus. Stances I'm working on some technology that takes into immersion in VR. But we've also developed some other work that boosts our bio photonic output, which is our lifeforce backup. So we can reverse it. And the first thing I would say is surround yourself with people and experiences that are supportive for you. That's that's going to make a big difference. And then I would I would really look at recovering the aspect of yourself that were shattered during those traumatic experiences if you're able to reverse it would you be able to still pass that on down to your ears. The opposite way. Absolutely. Absolutely. You can pass down the positive traits as well. So let's imagine you were in the gold rush struck gold that lucky streak. Combat that imprint that belief that he's amazing things are possible for you can be passed down as well. It all relates it all relates George to the amount of emotional intensity that accompanies the experience. So that's why you know, the the astronauts report the feeling of all when they see the planet is so overpowering it's emotional for them. Exactly. And they have these insights, and they suddenly have awareness is that they didn't have before we've seen received this time and time again. So the experiences of awe of intense gratitude of love all of these things can can help rewrite our genes to the positive side. Let's say interesting field and then in terms of being a future risks. How did you get involved in that? Well. I think it so after I had the second near death experience. I think I told you that I had a number of dreams where I would write down things that I learned a lot of a lot for for years. I would fill up these notebooks at night. And sometimes I would be sitting in a classroom and these dreams, and they were lucid dreams it was as if I was really there, and they would bring somebody in on a stretcher, and they would start to show me parts of the body and how the underlying Martha genetic field, which Rupert Sheldrick talks about which is the underlying energetic template that informs our DNA and actually creates like a blueprint for reality creation. I'm sure you're familiar with that. Okay. So I was shown all this markings on the blackboard and at the same time in terms of being a futurist. I was also taken into a library where it hold on right there. Let's talk about that and wrap up with final phone calls in a moment on coast to coast AM. The coast website is now streamline for mobile devices. Great news, if you're coast insiders, simply want enjoy our website on your phone, visit coast to coast AM dot com, your iphone or Android browser..

EPA Tufts University Rupert Sheldrick George
"tufts university" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

04:53 min | 3 years ago

"tufts university" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"To help recover that. And also we have to learn how to overwrite the trauma imprint in our EPA genetics, and I can give you the short version of that right now. Go ahead. So so trauma imprint us in ways that are multi generational 'em university released a study that demonstrated this was mice. And this is just also re proven with humans at Tufts University, but the the mouse studies really interesting because mice and they put the mice in a cage with cherry blossoms. And then they shocked the bottom of their feet, and then of course, became afraid of the smell of cherry blossoms. But what was so shocking was that this fear of the smell of cherry blossoms was passed down through generations. So the great grandchildren of these mice, even if there was cheese underneath those cherry blossoms wouldn't go there. They wouldn't go there. So. For us as humans what if the opportunity and the money and the love that you're seeking out of life is hidden behind a cherry blossom trigger, you're not gonna see it. You're going to run the other direction with your heart beating fast. Interesting take is that is that what you call part of EPA genetics. Yes, that's an EPA genetic marker and tufts just proved that children who were treated poorly who were emotionally or physically abused. Of course, they have EPA genetic markers. But they proved that their children and their grandchildren can inherit the the damaging imprint from that, even if they suffered no abuse themselves. Interesting now, the good news is that we can reverse those trauma imprint when we put ourselves in what in what scientists would call a rich in enriched environment. And so there's a number of ways to enrich that environment. Certainly we can change our. Circumstances. I'm working on some technology that takes it into immersion in VR. But we've also developed some other work that boosts our bio photonic output, which is our lifeforce back up. So we can reverse it. And the first things I would say is you surround yourself with people and experiences that are supportive for you. That's that's going to make a big difference. And then I would I would really look at recovering the aspects of yourself that were shattered during those traumatic experiences if you're able to reverse it would you be able to still pass that on down to your ears. The opposite way. Absolutely. Absolutely. You can pass down the positive traits as well. So let's imagine you were in the gold rush gold that lucky streak. Can that that imprint that belief that he's amazing things are possible for you can be passed down as well it all in late? It all relates George to the amount of emotional intensity that accompanies the experience. So that's why you know, the the astronauts report the feeling of all when they see the planet is so overpowering it's emotional for them. Exactly. And they have these insights, and they suddenly have awareness is that they didn't have before we've seen time and time again. So the experiences of off of intense. Gratitude I've love all of these things can can help rewrite our genes to the positive side. Let's say interesting fields are in in terms of being a future wrist. How did you get involved in that? Well. I think it so after I had the second near death experience. I think I told you that I had a number of dreams where I would write down things that I learned a lot of a lot for for years. I would select these notebooks at night, and sometimes I would be sitting in a classroom streams, and they were lucid dreams it was as if I was really there, and they would bring somebody in on a stretcher, and they would start to show me parts of the body and how the underlying Martha genetic field, which Rupert Sheldrick talks about which is the underlying energetic template that informs our DNA and actually creates like a blueprint for reality creation. I'm sure you're familiar with that. Okay. So I was shown all this and markings on the blackboard at the same time in terms of being a futurist. I was also taken into a library. Hold on right there. Let's talk about that and wrap up with final phone calls in a moment. Not coast to coast AM. The coast website is now streamlined for mobile devices. Great news. If you're a coast insiders simply want to enjoy our website on your phone. Visit coast to coast AM dot com on your iphone or Android browser..

EPA Tufts University Rupert Sheldrick George
"tufts university" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

04:41 min | 3 years ago

"tufts university" Discussed on 710 WOR

"So so Tana imprint us in ways that are multigenerational university released a study that demonstrated this was mice, and this is just also re proven with humans at Tufts University, but the mouse studies really interesting, they took mice, and they put them in a cage with cherry blossoms. And then they shocked the bottom of their feet, and then of course, became afraid of the smell of cherry blossoms. But what was so shocking was that this fear at the smell of cherry blossoms was passed down through generations. So the great grandchildren of these mice, even if there was cheese underneath those cherry blossoms wouldn't go. There wouldn't go there. So. Got back for us as humans what if the opportunity and the money in the love that you're seeking out of life is hidden behind a cherry blossom trigger, you're not gonna see it. You're gonna run the other direction with your heart beating fast interesting is that is that what you call part of EPA genetics. Yes, that's an EPA genetic marker and tufts just proved that children who were treated poorly who were emotionally or physically abused. Of course, they have EPA genetic markers. But they proved that their children and their grandchildren can inherit the the damaging imprint from that, even if they suffered no abuse themselves. Interesting now, the good news is that we can reverse those trauma imprint when we put ourselves in. What what scientists would call a rich in enriched environment. And so there's a number of ways to enrich that environment. Certainly we can change our. Circumstances. I'm working on some technology that takes it into a merging in VR. But we've also developed some other work that boosts our bio photonic output, which is our lifeforce backup. So we can reverse it. And the first thing I would say is surround yourself with key people and experiences that are supportive for you. That's that's going to make a big difference. And then I would I would really look at recovering the aspect of yourself that were shattered during those traumatic experiences if you're able to reverse it would you be able to still pass that on down to your ears. The opposite way. Absolutely. Absolutely. You can pass down the positive traits as well. So let's imagine you were in the gold rush and struck gold that lucky streak. Can bet that imprint that belief that he's amazing things are possible for you can be passed down as well it all in late. It all relates George to the amount of emotional intensity that accompanies experience. So that's why you know that the astronauts report the feeling of all when they see the planet is so overpowering emotional for them, exactly. And they have these insights, and they suddenly have awareness is that they didn't have before. Don't wait we've seen time and time again. So the experiences of off intense gratitude of love all of these things can help rewrite our genes to the positive side. Interesting field, you're in in terms of being a future wrist. How did you get involved in that? Well. I think it so after I had the second near death experience. I think I told you that I had a number of dreams where I would write down things that I a lot of a lot for for years. I would fill up these notebooks at night. And sometimes I would be sitting in a classroom, and these streams, and they were lucid dreams it was as if I was really there, and they would bring somebody in on a stretcher, and they would start your show parts of the body and how the underlying Morphou genetics field, which Rupert Sheldrick talks about which is the underlying energetic template that informs our DNA and actually creates like a blueprint for reality creation. I'm sure you're familiar with that. Okay. So I was shown all this markings on the blackboard and at the same time in terms of being a futurist. I was also taking into a library where it hold on right there. Let's talk about that and wrap up with final phone calls in a moment. Coast to coast AM, the coast website is now streamline for mobile devices. Great news, if you're a coast insider or simply want to enjoy our website on your phone, visit coast to coast AM dot com on your iphone or Android browser..

EPA Tufts University Tana Rupert Sheldrick George
"tufts university" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

04:53 min | 3 years ago

"tufts university" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"We can learn to help recover that. And also we have to learn how to overwrite the trauma imprint in our EPA genetics, and I can give you the short version of that right now. Go ahead. So so trauma imprint us in ways that are multi m university released a study that demonstrated this was mice. And this is just also re proven with humans at Tufts University, but the the now studies really interesting because mice and they put the mice in a cage with cherry blossoms. And then they shocked the bottom of your feet, and of course, became afraid of the smell of cherry blossoms. But what was so shocking was that this fear at the smell of cherry blossoms was passed down through generations. So the great grandchildren of these mice, even if there was cheese underneath those cherry blossoms wouldn't go there. They wouldn't go there. So. For us as humans what if the opportunity and the money and the love that you're seeking out of life is hidden behind a cherry blossom trigger, you're not gonna see it. You're gonna run the other direction with your heart beating fast interesting is that is that what you call part of EPA genetics. Yes, that's an EPA genetic marker and tufts just proved that children who were treated poorly who were emotionally or physically abused. Of course, they have EPA genetic markers. But they proved that their children and their grandchildren can inherit the the damaging imprint from that, even if they suffered no abuse themselves. Interesting now, the good news is that we can reverse those trauma and prints when we put ourselves in what in what scientists would call a rich in enriched environment. And so there's a number of ways to enrich that environment. Certainly we can change our our circus. Stances I'm working on some technology that takes it into immersion in VR. But we've also developed some other work that boosts our bio photonic output, which is our lifeforce backup. So we can reverse it. And the first thing I would say is surround yourself with people and experiences that are supported for you. That's that's going to make a big difference. And then I would I would really look at recovering the aspects of yourself that were shattered during those traumatic experiences if you're able to reverse it would you be able to still pass that on down to your ears. The opposite way. Absolutely. Absolutely. You can pass down the positive traits as well. So let's imagine you were in the gold rush struck gold that lucky streak. Combat that imprint that belief that these amazing things are possible for you can be passed down as well. It all relates it all relates George to the amount of emotional intensity that accompanies the experience. So that's why you know that the astronauts report the feeling of all when they see the planet is so overpowering emotional for them, exactly. And they have these insights, and they suddenly have awareness is that they didn't have before we've seen receiving this time and time again. So the experiences of off of intense gratitude of love all of these things can help rewrite our genes to the positive side. Let's are interesting field. And then in terms of being a future wrist. How did you get involved in that? Well. I think it so after I had the second near death experience. I think I told you that I had a number of dreams where I would write down things that I a lot. A lot of a lot for for years. I would select these notebooks at night, and sometimes I would be sitting in a classroom, and they were lucid dreams, it was if I was really there, and they would bring somebody in on a stretcher, and they would start to show me parts of the body and how the underlying Martha genetic field, which Rupert Sheldrick talks about which is the underlying energetic template that informs our DNA actually creates like a blueprint for reality creation. I'm sure you're familiar with that. Okay. So I was shown all this markings on the blackboard at the same time in terms of being a futurist. I was also taken into a library where it hold on right there. Let's talk about that and wrap up with final phone calls in a moment. Coast to coast AM, the coast website is now streamline for mobile devices. Great news, if you're a coast insider or simply want to enjoy our website on your phone, visit coast to coast AM dot com on your iphone or Android.

EPA Tufts University Rupert Sheldrick George
"tufts university" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

04:41 min | 3 years ago

"tufts university" Discussed on WTVN

"So so trauma imprint us in ways that are multi generational and university released a study that demonstrated this was mice, and this is just also re proven with humans at Tufts University, but the mouse studies really interesting, they took mice and they put the mice in a cage with cherry blossoms. And then they shocked the bottom of their feet, and the my, of course, became a freight of the smell of cherry blossoms. But what was so shocking was that this fear of the smell of cherry blossoms was passed down through generations. So the great grandchildren of these mice, even if there was cheese underneath those cherry blossoms wouldn't go there. They wouldn't go there. So for us as humans what if the opportunity and the money and the love that you're seeking out of life is hidden behind a cherry blossom trigger, you're not gonna see it. You're gonna run the other direction with your heart beating fast. Interesting take is that is that what you call part of EPA. Genetics. Yes, that's an EPA genetic marker and tufts just proved that children who were treated poorly who were emotionally or physically abused. Of course, they have EPA genetic markers. But they proved that their children and their grandchildren can inherit the the damaging imprint from that, even if they suffered no abuse themselves. Interesting now, the good news is that we can reverse those trauma and prints when we put ourselves in what in what scientists would call a rich and enriched environment. And so there's a number of ways to enrich that environment. Certainly we can change our our circumstances. I'm working on some technology that takes it into immersion in VR. But we've also developed some other work that boosts our bio photonic output, which is our lifeforce back up. So we can reverse it. And the first things I would say, yes, surround yourself. With people and experiences that are supported for you. That's that's going to make a big difference. And then I would I would really look at recovering the aspects of yourself that were shattered during those traumatic experiences if you're able to reverse it would you be able to still pass that on down to your ears. The opposite way. Absolutely. Absolutely. You can pass down the positive traits as well. So let's imagine you were in the gold rush in gold that lucky streak. Can bet that imprint that belief that he's amazing things are possible for you can be passed down as well. It all it all relates George to the amount of emotional intensity that accompanies the experience. So that's why you know that the astronauts report the feeling of all when they see the planet is so overpowering emotional for them, exactly. And they have these insights, and they suddenly have awareness is that they didn't have before we we've seen received time and time again. So the experiences of off intense gratitude of love all of these things can can help rewrite our genes to the positive side. Let's say interesting field are in in terms of being a future wrist. How did you get involved in that? Well. I think it so after I had the second near death experience. I think I told you that I had a number of dreams where I would write down things that I learned a lot of a lot for for years. I would fill up these notebooks at night, and sometimes I would be sitting in a classroom dreams, and they were lucid dreams it was as if I was really there, and they would bring somebody in on a stretcher, and they would start to show me parts of the body and how the underlying Martha genetic field, which Rupert Sheldrick talks about which is the underlying energetic template that informs our DNA and actually creates like a blueprint for reality creation. I'm sure you're familiar with that. Okay. So I was shown all this markings on the blackboard and at the same time in terms of being a futurist. I was also taking into a library. Hold on right there. Let's talk about that and wrap up with final phone calls in a moment. Coast to coast. The coast website is now streamline for mobile devices. Great news, if you're a coast insiders simply want to enjoy our website on your phone. Visit coast to coast AM dot com on your iphone or Android.

EPA Tufts University Rupert Sheldrick George
"tufts university" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

04:54 min | 3 years ago

"tufts university" Discussed on KTOK

"We can learn to help recover that. And also we have to learn how to overwrite the trauma imprint in our EPA genetics, and I can give you the short version of that right now. Go ahead. So so trauma imprint us in ways that are multigenerational m university released a study that demonstrated this was mice, and this is just also re proven with humans at Tufts University, but the now studies really interesting because mice and they put the mice in a cage with cherry blossoms. And then they shocked the bottom of their feet, and my, of course, became afraid of the smell of cherry blossoms. But what was so shocking was that this fear at the smell of cherry blossoms was passed down through generations. So the great grandchildren of these nice. Even if there was cheesy underneath those cherry blossoms wouldn't go there. They wouldn't go there. So. For us as humans what if the opportunity and the money in the love that you're seeking out of life is hidden behind the cherry blossom trigger, you're not going to see it. You're gonna run the other direction with your heart beating fast interesting is that his work is that what you call part of EPA genetics. Yes, that's an EPA genetic marker and tufts just proved that children who were treated poorly who were emotionally or physically abused. Of course, they have EPA genetic markers. But they proved that their children and their grandchildren can inherit the the damaging imprint from that, even if they suffered no abuse themselves. Interesting now, the good news is that we can reverse those trauma imprint when we put ourselves in what in what scientists would call a rich in enriched environment. And so there's a number of ways to enrich that environment. Certainly we can change our. Mhm stances, I'm working on some technology that takes it into immersion in VR. But we've also developed some other work that boosts our bio photonic output, which is our lifeforce backup. So we can reverse it. And the first thing I would say is yes, surround yourself with people and experiences that are supported for you. That's that's going to make a big difference. And then I would I would really look at recovering the aspects of yourself that were shattered during those traumatic experiences if you're able to reverse it would you be able to still pass that on down to your ears. The opposite way. Absolutely. Absolutely. You can pass down the positive traits as well. So let's imagine you were in the gold rush struck gold that lucky streak. Can bet that imprint that belief that he's amazing things are possible for you can be passed down as well it all in late. It all relates George to the amount of emotional intensity that accompanies the experience. So that's why you know that the astronauts report the feeling of awe when they see the planet is so overpowering emotional for them, exactly. And they have these insights, and they suddenly have awareness is that they didn't have before we we've seen received this time and time again. So the experiences of off of intense. Gratitude I've love all of these things can can help rewrite our genes to the positive side. Let's her interesting fields are in in terms of being a future wrist. How did you get involved in that? Well. I think it so after I had the second near death experience. I think I told you that I had a number of dreams where I would write down things that I a lot of a lot for for years. I would select these notebooks at night, and sometimes I would be sitting in a classroom and these dreams and they were lucid dreams. It was SF. I was really there, and they would bring somebody in on a stretcher, and they would start to show me parts of the body and how the underlying Martha genetic field, which Rupert Sheldrick talks about which is the underlying energetic template that informs our DNA and actually creates like a blueprint for reality creation. I'm sure you're familiar with that. Okay. So I was shown all this and markings on the blackboard and at the same time in terms of being a futurist. I was also taking into a library where it hold on right there. Let's talk about that and wrap up with final phone calls in a moment. Coast to coast AM, the coast website is now streamline for mobile devices. Great news, if you're a coast insider or simply want to enjoy our website on your phone, visit coast to coast AM dot com on your iphone or Android browser..

EPA Tufts University Rupert Sheldrick George
"tufts university" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

04:41 min | 3 years ago

"tufts university" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Learn to help recover that. And also we have to learn how to overwrite the trauma imprint in our EPA genetics, and I can give you the short version of that right now. Go ahead. So so trauma imprint in ways that are multigenerational 'em university released a study that demonstrated this was mice. And this is just also re proven with humans at Tufts University, but the the mouse studies really interesting because mice and they put the mice in a cage with cherry blossoms. And then they shocked the bottom of their feet, and then of course, became afraid of the smell of cherry blossoms. But what was so shocking was that this fear of the smell of cherry blossoms was passed down through generations. So the great grandchildren of these mice, even if there was cheese underneath those cherry blossoms wouldn't go there. They wouldn't go there. So. For us as humans what if the opportunity and the money in the love that you're seeking out of life is hidden behind a cherry blossom trigger, you're not gonna see it. You're gonna run the other direction with your heart beating fast. Interesting take is that is that what you call part of EPA genetics. Yes, that's an EPA genetic marker and tufts just proved that children who were treated poorly who were emotionally or physically abused. Of course, they have EPA genetic markers. But they proved that their children and their grandchildren can inherit the the damaging imprint from that, even if they suffered no abuse themselves. Interesting now, the good news is that we can reverse those trauma imprints when we put ourselves in. What in what scientists would call a rich in enriched environment? And so there's a number of ways to enrich that environment. Certainly we can change our our circuits. Stances I'm working on some technology that takes it into immersion in VR. But we've also developed some other work that boosts our bio photonic output, which is our lifeforce backup. So we can reverse it. And the first things I would say is surround yourself with people and experiences that are supportive for you. That's that's going to make a big difference. And then I would I would really look at recovering the aspects of yourself that were shattered during those traumatic experiences if you're able to reverse it would you be able to still pass that on down to your ears. The opposite way. Absolutely. Absolutely. You can pass down the positive traits as well. So let's imagine you were in the gold rush. And you struck gold that lucky streak. Can bet that imprint that belief that he's amazing things are possible for you can be passed down as well. It all laid it all relates George to the amount of emotional intensity that accompanies the experience. So that's why you know, the the astronauts report the feeling of awe when they see the planet is so overpowering emotional for them, exactly. And they have these insights, and they suddenly have awareness is that they didn't have before we we've seen seen this time and time again. So the experiences of off of intense gratitude of love all of these things can can help rewrite our genes to the positive side. Let's say interesting field. You're in terms of being a future wrist. How did you get involved in that? Well. I think it so after I had the second near death experience. I think I told you that I had a number of dreams where I would write down things that I learned a lot of a lot for for years. I would fill up these notebooks at night. And sometimes I would be sitting in a classroom. These streams, and they were lucid dreams it was as if I was really there, and they would bring somebody in on a stretcher, and they would start to show me parts of the body and how the underlying Martha genetic field, which Rupert Sheldrick talks about which is the underlying energetic template that informs our DNA and actually creates like a blueprint for reality creation. I'm sure you're familiar with that. Okay. So I was shown all this markings on the blackboard and at the same time in terms of being a futurist. I was also taking into a library. Hold on right there. Let's talk about that and wrap up with final phone calls in a moment on coast to.

EPA Tufts University Rupert Sheldrick George
"tufts university" Discussed on Future Tense

Future Tense

04:33 min | 3 years ago

"tufts university" Discussed on Future Tense

"New media, tools, governments can reach out with great ease to the public of other countries. There is rapid change think we still have systems of diplomacy that in some ways nineteenth or early twentieth. Century installed. That's a fundamental change that we're still coming to terms with what you're seeing right now is more personalized diplomacy. The question is Kenneth get any worse. Diplomacies a craft that really revolves around the use of language, but it's a different style of language generally tends to be about smoothing off the shop ages. So the language that we've seen of late the language that tends to be used by political leaders acting as in the diplomatic passively has been much more jarring shocking undiplomatic you like almost every aspect of diplomacy. And indeed what it means to be diplomat is currently being rewritten. That's exciting as it is concerning and problematic. Hello Antony Fano here. This is future tense over the next few episodes will explore some of those critical changes, and what they might mean for the future in this episode will focus primarily on the superpowers, China and the United States not just because they're the biggest, but because developments in both those countries are among the most interesting and significant. To the United States I and the decline of the once-mighty State Department. I'm Monica Toft. I'm professor of international politics at Tufts University the Fletcher school of law and diplomacy and the director of the center for strategic studies. So just broadly speaking, the State Department has always been underfunded. You can look at the US department of defense, and it's six hundred billion dollars, and it just got a budget increase along with homeland security and veteran's affairs. So they're being increased at a time where the State Department was even twenty fifteen hundred bomber was only forty seven billion. So you know, you've got six hundred billion versus forty seven billion and in the most recent budget arrays down to thirty seven point eight billion. So as decreased even more by thirty percent under the Trump administration and another very interesting aspect is is if you look at the shift in the United States in our State Department, we have career diplomats user people who go to my school, the tops Fletcher school law and diplomacy get an education, and then they spend years, basically mentoring and being mentored by other diplomats and foreign service personnel, and they are the backbone of the State Department and in most administrations there the majority of people who serve. To wonder a bomb? Seventy percent of the State Department ambassadorships were filled by careerists and thirty percent by political appointees. So friends of the president and people who gave large donations or something like that under the Trump administration we've seen that shipped where you've got currently sixty two percent of the appointments are political and only thirty seven percent actually almost thirty eight percent are career diplomats. And so that's worrisome because many career diplomats at the senior levels are stepping down mid level or sort of groping their way through it. And then junior people are not going in because they're seeing sort of denuded State Department, and they're not sure they're going to have a great career that their predecessors had. So so there's been some pretty dynamic and swift changes happening in the State Department, not only financially, but in resources. So the cups of the State Department predate, Donald Trump, they go back several presidents, according to Monica Duffy tuft, but how much of the recent change has been incidental and how much of it has been targeted. I think it's both. I think some administrations are more skeptical globally speaking about sort of wariness of expertise and scientific knowledge. And so I think people look as few about these bureaucrats have been office for a long time these public servants. So I think that is part of the story, and I think it's come to a head into the current administration. But I think the current administration particularly under Rex Tillerson, the former secretary of state mid very very clear that they were going to rework the State Department restrict the State Department. They had a hiring freeze. The new secretary of state peyot has commanded. He promised to sort of override that they were gonna read, you know, open up the positions again..

once-mighty State Department State Department US department of defense United States Monica Toft Donald Trump Antony Fano Trump Rex Tillerson tops Fletcher school Monica Duffy tuft Kenneth professor China Fletcher school of law president director Tufts University