26 Burst results for "Tuchman"

"tuchman" Discussed on Chasing Poker Greatness

Chasing Poker Greatness

03:00 min | 7 months ago

"tuchman" Discussed on Chasing Poker Greatness

"What's a project you're <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> working on that's <Silence> <Advertisement> near and dear to your heart? <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I don't know if there's a project that <Speech_Male> I'm working on. Like I said, <Speech_Male> I'm coaching my <SpeakerChange> kids hockey <Speech_Male> team and that's right <Silence> <Advertisement> now <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> that's near to your heart. <Speech_Male> I love it. I <Speech_Male> know, I don't know if it's a project <Speech_Male> so to speak. But <Silence> I mean, <Speech_Male> I love it. <Speech_Male> You know, I've got a co coach <Speech_Male> that I work with <Speech_Male> and we develop <Speech_Male> practices <Speech_Male> and we <Speech_Male> talk and we work with these <Speech_Male> kids, and I kind of <Speech_Male> I just love it. <Speech_Male> I mean, there's <Silence> every aspect about <Speech_Male> it that <Speech_Male> I get on the ice with <Speech_Male> these kids and <Speech_Male> you know, I get to work <Silence> <Advertisement> with them on <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> going from <Speech_Male> young kids <Speech_Male> into young boys <Speech_Male> and girls and become <Speech_Male> better people <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> obviously <Silence> and work on their games, <Silence> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> every part <Speech_Male> about it. <Speech_Male> I love it. <Speech_Male> <Silence> It's something that I <Speech_Male> don't it's <Silence> <Advertisement> something that I wanted to rest my <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> life for sure. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I just got back into <Speech_Male> it. I really just got back into <Silence> it with my kid playing <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> again. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> And <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> just <Silence> realize how <SpeakerChange> much I love <Speech_Male> it. Yeah, <Speech_Male> I'm jealous. I'm <Speech_Male> jealous, my <Speech_Male> kids don't care much for <Speech_Male> sports, two <Speech_Male> girls, <Speech_Male> and not, you know, <Speech_Male> I'm not jealous <Speech_Male> of the boys <Speech_Male> for 99%, <Speech_Male> but <Speech_Male> the one <Speech_Male> competitive aspect <Speech_Male> growing up <Speech_Male> an athlete <Speech_Male> and loving strategy <Speech_Male> and competition. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I am a little sad <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> not getting the <Speech_Male> coach coach the kids. <Speech_Male> They have <Speech_Male> very limited <Speech_Male> interest in <SpeakerChange> <Silence> sports, sadly. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Silence> Yeah, I <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> don't know if I <Speech_Male> forced it on him or not, but now <Speech_Male> that he's getting better, <Silence> he kind of likes it. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I can say this, nobody <Speech_Male> force anything on <Speech_Male> me. Like I would <Speech_Male> be like, give me a <Speech_Male> tennis ball <Speech_Male> in the backyard. I'm <Speech_Male> throwing it against the <Speech_Male> wall like all <Speech_Male> day long at <Speech_Male> 6 years old, like, <Speech_Male> just <Speech_Male> all day long, <Speech_Male> let's throw a ball, let's <Speech_Male> play. Let's find the <Speech_Male> neighborhood kids in place <Speech_Male> soccer football <Speech_Male> baseball, whatever <Speech_Male> it was <Speech_Male> just <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> that's just <Silence> <Advertisement> how I am <Silence> <Advertisement> as a human. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> I like it. <Speech_Male> All right man, <Speech_Male> with that said, <Speech_Male> all about me. <Speech_Male> Let's shut <Speech_Male> this down. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> if the chasing <Speech_Male> poker greatness <Speech_Male> lister wants to learn more <Speech_Male> about you <Speech_Male> on the <SpeakerChange> World Wide Web, <Silence> where should <Speech_Male> they go? <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I guess you can go to my website, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> which is <Silence> <Advertisement> tuck on <Speech_Male> sports dot com. <Speech_Male> There's <Speech_Male> some <Speech_Male> awful pictures in <Speech_Male> there. You can follow me on Twitter. <Speech_Male> You can follow me on Instagram <Speech_Male> at suck on sports. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> You know, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> we're just asking me. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Or I can come back <Silence> <Advertisement> on the show where they can ask <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> you <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> and then you <Silence> <Advertisement> can hang back on the show and <Speech_Male> you can ask me. <Speech_Male> Perfect. That <Speech_Male> works too. I <Speech_Male> got my own questions. <Speech_Male> They can ask you <Speech_Music_Male> somewhere else. I <Speech_Male> got my own. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Next time I'll have a <Speech_Male> full night's sleep and <Speech_Male> be have <Speech_Male> full access <Speech_Male> to all my cognitive <Speech_Male> faculties. <Speech_Male> But it's been <Speech_Male> great conversation and <Speech_Male> really enjoyed having you <Speech_Male> on and <Speech_Male> we'll run it back <Speech_Male> again sometime in the near <Speech_Male> future and <Speech_Male> whenever I make it out to <Speech_Male> Vegas if you're in <Speech_Male> Vegas, <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> let's go <Speech_Male> get a drink or something. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I would <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> absolutely love that. And <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> keep doing what you're doing, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> man. You're doing <SpeakerChange> great. Thank <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you so much. <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thanks for

hockey tennis soccer baseball football Twitter Vegas
"tuchman" Discussed on Chasing Poker Greatness

Chasing Poker Greatness

03:14 min | 7 months ago

"tuchman" Discussed on Chasing Poker Greatness

"And I remember when he did lead out big on the river, the player with ace king did stop for a second and go like, did you make did you hit your spade here? Right before they called. Right, right, right? 11 seconds and said, okay. Right before they put the money in and won the pot. Right. Exactly. Yeah, I mean, I mean, that's a good news about life Booker, right? Live poker is alive and well. And I think that at most stakes around the world, you can still study up if you're committed to being a winning poker player and be a winner in live cash games. Yeah. Because I've been here for I've been hearing for years. I remember when I came back from London, everybody told me to talk. The games are tough for now, okay? I was like, okay, and I went in and I was like, they still and then I've been hearing this for years. Like, oh, the game's dead. It's so hard now. It's so hard now. And I'm not gonna say that the games aren't tougher now than they were. But I still see a lot of really bad poke players playing poker. Even the online games are very beatable. You know, a student of mine started playing online poker a year ago. He co hosts tactical Tuesday with me. And basically moved up to 5 ten and L within 6 months from hundred no limit. And yeah, has had himself, you know, mid 6 figure year battling in cash games, and like, that's the reality. Or maybe maybe low 6 figure year. But either way, a pretty damn good year for somebody that previously hasn't played online poker. So it's a thing that can be done if you put your nose to the grindstone and you try and you do the work. But if you ask somebody playing live poker, like a live pro, how the online poker world is, they'll just be like, nah, they're killers. Everybody's a killer, and you can't beat it. But that's not the fucking truth. Yeah, yeah. I mean, unfortunately, as I live in LA, I don't play online poker very often these days, but. Yeah. Everybody makes things out to be harder than they are. Just in every facet of life I found. I release four podcasts a week, like four. And people are like, that's insane. And it's like, they struggled to release like one every two weeks. But I mean, it's not that hard having good conversations with interesting human beings multiple times a week. To me, it's pretty fun. Well, I'll give you a special I'll give you extra credit for today though, since you're doing it with a less than interesting person. So well done you. I think four podcasts a week is hard. So listen, if you dedicate yourself and you want to do it, you can do it, but I give you credit for that, because I put out one podcast every two weeks and sometimes sometimes I want to make sure that they're all compelling. You know, sometimes they're difficult. Yeah. I just pay the money for production. Like here, take money, make this make this look good. Take out me sounding like an idiot. I'd like today, for instance, I am not on my a game. I'm like, I think I got four hours of sleep and just not feeling all their coffee. You feel it? No, not feeling it. But fuck.

Booker London LA
"tuchman" Discussed on Chasing Poker Greatness

Chasing Poker Greatness

05:59 min | 7 months ago

"tuchman" Discussed on Chasing Poker Greatness

"But he goes, you know, we're betting either when you're betting, you're either betting to get you're either betting because you want to get a value from a worse hand or you want to get a better hand to fold. That's it. You guys very rarely are you betting for like equity protection? And I was like, but he said, and hold them. We're not as worried about equity protection, you know. But, you know, essentially it broke it down to very simple. You know, we're betting to either get value from worse or to get better to fold. And it seems so ridiculously simple but at the time it was this eye opening epiphany for me and my game. I think people still struggle with this today. I still struggle. They will turn middle payer in his check to them and they'll just like bet pot. And I'm like, why? Why did you do this thing? And that's the biggest thing. I remember Phil tweeted about this a few years ago and he just said he goes, you know, just if you really want to work on your first thing you can ask yourself and why are you betting? Why are you putting chips in the pot? What are you trying to accomplish? You know? And then obviously there's like, you know, you can peel back the onion and there's so many other stories. If you try to figure out what's my opponent trying to accomplish everything. But that's simple phrase that part taught me. Just made so much sense. And it got me to the point where I was like, I would say before that, there were points where I would make the mistake where I was betting because I was afraid I checked. I didn't know what my opponent was going to do. I'd be like, ah, I don't know. And I just stopped, and I just breathe and I go, okay. This is This is my range. My opponent's hand, my opponent's range, and I go, okay, well, if I'm betting here, am I betting for value? Am I betting as a bluff? What am I trying to do here? What am I trying to get to fold?.

Phil
"tuchman" Discussed on Chasing Poker Greatness

Chasing Poker Greatness

05:04 min | 7 months ago

"tuchman" Discussed on Chasing Poker Greatness

"So, like, good luck replacing them. Right. You know? So it's a really tough gig and my brother in law actually wanted to do that. He went to Syracuse. You went to the school new house and got an offer to I think he got an offer to cover like minor league, like a level baseball team in like Iowa. For, you know, he was going to get paid like $11,000 a year and my sister was like straight out of college. Wow, that's what a gig. Yeah. But my sister, my sister was like, my sister was going to get my sister was about to marry him. And she was like, yeah, she kind of put the next she was like, I don't want to live in Iowa. And if you're making $11,000 a year, how are we going to do this? Yeah. So my brother in law and I are very different people because I would have been like, let's do it. What do Iowa? Don't buy a lot of shit for getting a horrible home. I had that opportunity and studies a lawyer. I'm like, okay, you do. But yeah, so anyway, so I had done some acting and I had been on some shows and I had some success as an actor. So I'd been in front of the camera and I had done some writing and stuff like that. And this is 2004, I was propping at the bike and they started a new show at the bike called live at the bike. And funny enough part Hanson actually went to Syracuse and studied broadcast journalism. This is what he wanted to do. He wanted to be a broadcaster more than anything. And I was like, eh, whatever. But they came to me and they came to bar and they were like, hey, we think you guys should be really good at this. And I was like, I'll give it a shot, okay? But I was actually worried. I was like, well, how much am I gonna it's gonna hurt my hourly? You know? 'cause I'm making money playing poker. But I did it anyway. And it kind of just took off from there to be honest. Yeah. Now you're one of the guys..

Iowa Syracuse baseball Hanson
"tuchman" Discussed on Chasing Poker Greatness

Chasing Poker Greatness

04:22 min | 7 months ago

"tuchman" Discussed on Chasing Poker Greatness

"A place in Notting Hill, which is kind of a cool spot, right? Really cool, little trendy area. Sort of west is central London. And I was paying at the time, I had a one bedroom. And I was paying 900 pounds a week. And a pound is like two X at this point. It was like 1.51 .6. A week. So. Yeah, that's pretty pricey. It's like 6 K U.S. a month. It was ridiculous and you can definitely get cheaper than that. You can definitely get cheaper than that. I know places that might be like three 75 a week. But keep in mind, like three 75 a week, it's still like this was back then. That was like, you know, 5, 25, American, you're looking at like 2200 is it at the rate of pay much higher there? I mean, to compensate? I don't think so. No. No, that was honestly one of them. I mean, I was like a presenter on Sky Sports and like, you know, maybe I was making enough money to eventually buy like a one bedroom in London. You're like on TV and like, maybe I'll be able to make my rent payment this week. I mean, London is like, like I said, I mean, LA's not cheap, but compared to London, it's like night and day. Yeah. That's pretty crazy expensive. Yeah. It was ridiculous. But when I came back from London and I lived with Bart and at this point, I was still doing some broadcast thing, but not a ton. You know? I was just going to start doing the World Series again. But that was only okay. Starting the summer. And hard hadn't even started to crush live poker dot com yet. And we were like, you know, I was doing a little bit of commentary here and there I was doing some stuff for poker stars and.

London Notting Hill U.S. LA Bart
"tuchman" Discussed on Chasing Poker Greatness

Chasing Poker Greatness

04:35 min | 7 months ago

"tuchman" Discussed on Chasing Poker Greatness

"He's like, you'd be great for the NFL. So he recommended me to the producer of the NFL at sky. Who I met with, he was like, I met with him for 12 minutes and he was like, I love you, you're hired. And I was like, awesome, cool. And then four months later, he hired me to do the NASCAR as well. Even though I you know, I didn't know damn thing about NASCAR. You guys time to learn. They drive in circles very, very often, and eventually they stop and somebody wins. Yeah, I mean, I think you're a better qualified as I was the beginning. It's perfect. But yeah, so I went to London. I was playing online poker and I was playing a little bit here and there. I was still I was always doing poker commentary. So for me, a lot of my education was not only trying to keep up as a poker player, but I felt as a commentator that I needed to stay as relevant as possible. So I needed to know what was happening. And I surrounded myself with some like minded individuals, whether it was the cool commentators I was working with. Whether it was one of my best Friends, Bart Hanson, and he and I would talk poker all the time. So a lot of it was just that. But I definitely when I moved to London, I would say that my poker playing kind of my poker playing education level went down a little bit. Because I was broadcasting more and playing a lot less I was playing online, but I was just like fucking around, like, you know, like sitting in front of the couch just playing a $3 sit and go, or 5th $20, you know, $20 MTT. Yeah, you're learning about the left turn left turn world. Yeah, I was traveling a lot. I was going to see Italy and I was going to, you know, Kyiv, and all these wonderful places. So when I came back to LA and I lived with Bart so when I came back to LA, so it was LA my second visit. My second sit in LA, that was really my.

NFL NASCAR Bart Hanson London Kyiv LA Italy Bart
"tuchman" Discussed on Chasing Poker Greatness

Chasing Poker Greatness

05:48 min | 7 months ago

"tuchman" Discussed on Chasing Poker Greatness

"You aspire to play hockey at a high ish level, right? Tell me about your hockey career. What happened with that? And then what eventually led you into having a career in the poker world? And poker, yeah, so your poker, I mean, I didn't really grind in college, per se, as you mentioned, because I didn't have that opportunity. There was no there was no opportunity to grind, you know? And I went to school in upstate New York and there was just I played poker with the guy who crossed my all. And you know, once he was broke, I found somebody else to play with and, you know, luckily, the next guy worked at the canteen, where you could get sandwiches and drinks. So like after he paid me a little bit of money, he just gave me food and drinks from the canteen. Nice. So that was cool. But yeah, poker, I mean, hockey, I've been playing hockey since I'm like three years old. I love the game. I played in college. I played it pretty high level. I don't know, I kind of knew, I probably did not work hard enough to get to the level of hockey that I would have wanted to play. How come? I don't know. It's hard to work hard. Fair enough. I mean, I think at the end of the day, it's just like, you know, putting the work in is hard. And I worked hard and I had a lot of passion and stuff, but I think for my skill level for my athletic level, I would have had to work harder. Other people maybe get by with better athletic ability, others would be worse. But for where I was, I would say that, you know, if I were to quantify it, I probably reached 89% of where I could have been. I think probably really good compared to most.

hockey New York
"tuchman" Discussed on Chasing Poker Greatness

Chasing Poker Greatness

04:34 min | 7 months ago

"tuchman" Discussed on Chasing Poker Greatness

"Mister tuckman, how are you, sir? I am good. How are you? I'm doing quite well. Doing quite well. Just expressing the fomo that I have for missing out on the W SOP this year. And feeling a little bit excitement to get there next year. Yeah, I haven't missed a World Series in quite some time. I want to say that I have not missed the World Series in its entirety in probably like 14 years. Yeah. I mean, to be fair, I don't really miss it. I haven't ever missed it, but this is the first time I've actually missing it because I know through the podcast just so many people that are there. It's just one time where all of the people that I've met and networked with through this venture are all concentrated like the same place, which is just kind of a cool thing. Yeah, I imagine, especially considering, you know, I mean, if you're a cash game player and you normally see these people on a regular basis, but you haven't seen them over the last 18 months because of the pandemic. I would imagine at least it's like, you know, even if you're not going to play tournaments, it's still a great excuse just to kind of see some people that you like. Well, I'm a shut in. So, you know, I'm a shut in and an anonymous cash game player..

Mister tuckman
"tuchman" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"tuchman" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"That the band could finish beyond that Scholars concert, and that is called it as well as the vision. Would be eczema. I want to boot my coming on, Uh, Hundreds in Europe. Commercial media inside of pressure I'm and how I'm not about to Ika massive help that our pushing behind the wire. Doing? Yeah, sharp young people by the material, and then what? I need a hard landing the national I'm not in a farm and you have to, uh, beautiful. I'm remembering. I'm not at all. And the buzz llamas on the bus. Mhm. And they couldn't have been Masoumeh FEMA I'm gonna under when it comes to human. Tuchman Marsh here and looking more, darling, Do stop before you can be sure Appreciate a lot appreciate. Appreciate a student to hold area here again. I'm gonna sleep. I'm not tweeting. Remember to riot? Uh, help, Kumba. We tell our British Institute when it entered at the choir. The money, and, uh I'm not. I'm not sorry. I'm the person you know in CA separate nation to actually have to know while heating up. The French revolution. And he parameter uh, Social, almost one Yeah, difference up. Let's enter number, But how about element and then why would it Mean time held by revolution can you to do? Uh Mhm? Any mission pulling their direct to Italy. Cut them, uh, on tonight or I'm sure that, uh, there was a tumor. Rather, I should retailer in the battle and the size do you have, uh, help? Yeah. Practice direct, Just security. Dark Street. Uh, Mhm. That's just the party would have been you mentioned to Yeah, out in their home and paper. Geography. Mm. Unmeasured to shoot are so good. Are you? Here you go. And then and then what do you know? A number of, uh, ultra have been I'm uh oh, I'm I should live to opera. It's a plot number could speculations Mickelson's could ensure a to an Aleppo and But don't do your mom both dress of dark history or directed directly through, uh I'm sure bandwagon and Power and in person If we're.

British Institute Italy Mickelson tonight CA both Tuchman Marsh Aleppo Dark Street Europe French revolution Kumba Scholars Masoumeh Hundreds in FEMA
Mutual-appreciation anxiety: Putin and Erdogan

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:35 min | 1 year ago

Mutual-appreciation anxiety: Putin and Erdogan

"At a rally yesterday the prime minister of armenia nicole passion. Yon warned of an attempted military coup. He told crowds. It was the army's job to defend the country. It was up to the people to decide whether or not he should step down. Y'all guy even hats manhattan borough. She mr young has faced protests since a peace deal struck in november. In which is our by. John gained territory in nagorno-karabakh a largely ethnic armenian enclave. Mr john has protests since a peace deal was struck in november in which is by john games territory in nagorno-karabakh a largely ethnic armenian enclave clashes over the region had erupted repeatedly since nineteen ninety-four drawing in russia which stood behind armenia and turkey which back oscar by john but in the end it was russian president vladimir putin and his turkish counterpart rany tight air to one who put it all to rest. Brokering a peace deal. That's just one sign of remarkable political alliance. It's picking away at the post cold war geopolitical order so i think it helps to go back to the really low point of relationship which was in two thousand fifteen. Daniel franklin is our diplomatic editor. Turkey shot down a russian warplane which had been flying over syria. Entered it's ass base and this happened. After repeated warnings to the russian pilot in the warnings became increasing urgent they were ignored and turkish f sixteen fighters that were patrolling shot. The plane down remember turkey is a nato member and had engaged with russia militarily. That's not something that happens. Often and russia responded quite vigorously by imposing sanctions on turkish products and a bombed ethnic tuchman fighters in northern syria that allies of the turks so that was Towards the end of two thousand fifteen and into the beginning of two thousand sixteen but it was a dramatic shift. If you remember in the summer of two thousand sixteen there was an attempted coup jet sopa head. The world watched in shock as a military coup and in turkey eight. Us ally a major strategic partner in the fight against isis putin was quick to call president of and commiserate show solidarity is some suspicion in turkey. Anyway that gave some advance warning to add one that his life was in danger helped move him out of the area where he might have been bombed and from that point onwards things have changed dramatically in the two men developed this kind of own tone this brotherhood of hard power. And what is it. That had changed between the downing of the bomber and this evan beginning of a friendship they first of all recognize in one another leaders who know how to use power in a full full way but there are other similarities between them in terms of that authoritarian style of leadership at home. And there's a common set of grievances against the west in turkey's case decades of not being properly accepted wanting at one stage to join the european union but being put on hold. And i think one of the reasons why the attempted coup was such a turning point for adwan is that he came under attack from his own planes and he felt that nato had improperly come to support nato countries were slow to express solidarity so he started to think that maybe putin was someone could depend upon for his own survival where he couldn't necessarily depend on nato partners and how the relationship between these two men evolved since then it's developed in some very concrete ways add one has bought from russia s four hundred air defense system. So it's a nato country. Remember that is buying russian. Ed defense system that does not delighted his nato partners. It's meant that it's been kicked out of the f thirty five fighter jet program that Nato has its face sanctions from america and despite all that it's gone ahead and on the ground in particularly serious led to kind of accommodation even though they're on opposite sides they've managed to accommodate each other's objectives in particular turkey vis-a-vis the kurds and most recently they've accommodate each other in the south caucasus. Where again they support opposite sides. The russia has played its role as a mediator. Turkey supported azerbaijan. And they've managed to end up with a result that suits them both well. Russia has peacekeeping troops on the ground. Turkey has an economic opportunity and the air that causes missed out has got nothing out of this is the west. You mentioned the word accommodating in the sense that that perhaps they're just essentially keeping out from under each other's feet or is there more to it than that. There is more to it than that because a particularly developed closer ties economically. The two economies have been struggling so they can do all the support they can get and although russia has a big surplus with turkey. Turkish contractors get a lot of business from russia. So there's the economic aspects of the relationship is particularly important and putin to have turkey as awkward member of nato driving a wedge within nato. That's a huge attraction for him and for to and sometimes to be able to play off the west and russia that's also helpful so that they play the power game very effectively by using each other and given all of that. Would you call this alliance proper and if so what should the west make of it well. It's a remarkable development given the long history between the two countries going back centuries. It's remarkable when you think of the more recent history of of the to literally coming to blows as recently as two thousand fifteen but it's far from being an alliance turkey is still a nato member that's valuable to it and it's also bristled it's fragile. Remember they are on opposite sides even where they're accommodating each other in places like syria in libya they have differences over ukraine over georgia as well so there are many places where this could deteriorate rapidly. It's rather brittle its recent depends too much on personalities with big egos so does mean that. There's absolutely no guarantee that this is going to last or even develop further so in that sense. You think the west doesn't need to worry because the alliance will eventually fall apart from. It's the concern for the west. It's certainly a challenge. One of the things that will be on the radar screen of the biden administration. It's a worry that there is this increasingly close relationship between her big important nato member and russia and although it's bristol although it could blow up in various ways it's a serious concern and worry that a nato member like turkey could drift further away from its moorings

Turkey Nagorno Nato Russia Karabakh Nicole Passion Manhattan Borough Mr John Armenia Daniel Franklin Syria Isis Putin Mr Young Adwan YON Tuchman Vladimir Putin John Putin Oscar
"tuchman" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

06:27 min | 1 year ago

"tuchman" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"Up at 4 33. I'm sure No Crispin on New Jersey. What a 1.5. You want one? It's the weekend weather for 20 Howdy and windy the rest of the afternoon. Just playing Scotty tonight and cold down to 32 body cooler tomorrow Sunday rain too high 45. When I watch a young boy with those young way. You know so much older alone? Sure, boy with a girl like you. You know, I think we do. So good. Sometimes I feel like you so Oh, so Zach is gonna give a fella Oh, look so bad. It is greed and you are young baby. You Come on, Don't you think y'all keep back through those baby? Let's wait. So Baby so good. Relax. You're bigger, you know? No deal. You may know my friend. How do you know how ground Oh, wow. Come on. Look, you're making my head, don't you? You really like that? So New Jersey weekends. Me New Jersey's biggest hits. Sometimes I feel I've got to Away. I've got to go away from the pain you drive into loving me. We shall wait on God. I love my life boy. Tough Benton against sleep at night. Once around Now I run from you this tainted love you've given I give you all a boy could give you take my tea, then. I'll say that love is tainted Love. No, I know I've got Away. I've got to Away. You don't really want any more from me to make things right. You need someone to hold you tight. Is to brake, but I'm sorry. I don't parade that way. Once. All rounds now run from you this tainted love you've given. I give you a little boy could give you take my Taser. I love ST in love. Touch me, please. I can't understand. You know I love you, though. You heard Miss. So now I'm going to pack my things and go changing love change Love. Tainted love tainted Tuchman David changes Touch me, baby tainted Tainted love. New Jersey one a 1.5 hungry like the wolf. Check out my yummy fruit squares, recipe ahead and shave 115 dot com. That night. There's no one Help..

New Jersey Tuchman David Zach Benton
$916 billion White House coronavirus relief proposal

The Young Turks

07:01 min | 1 year ago

$916 billion White House coronavirus relief proposal

"Really wanna fill you guys in on Corona virus aid before we do our interview with senator sanders. So let's get right to it. There's a new and critical update to the corona virus negotiations that are taking place between congressional lawmakers and the white house now. Yesterday it was reported that the white house was urgently asking. Gop senators to approve one time. Six hundred dollar direct checks to americans as part of the coronavirus relief bill and at that time it really did seem as though The trump administration was outflanking democrats in congress from the left But now it's abundantly clear that that's not actually what's going on. It turns out that the one time six hundred dollar check that would be sent to americans would be a trade-off or essentially getting rid of the federal unemployment aid of three hundred dollars per week. Okay that tradeoff off seems pretty ridiculous. And so nancy pelosi talked about it. A little bit today She certainly clap back but she did. Treasury secretary steve mnuchin released a statement. Are you in this speaker. Pelosi spoke today at five pm and on behalf of the president. I presented a nine hundred sixteen billion dollar proposal. This proposal includes money for state and local governments and robust liability protections for businesses schools and universities. Now pelosi wasn't buying it mostly because she had some insight that most others didn't have and she says while it is progress that leader mcconnell has signed off on a nine hundred sixteen billion dollar offer based on the bipartisan framework The president's proposal which cuts unemployment insurance by one hundred forty billion dollars compared to the framework is unacceptable. So she says it's a nonstarter. I absolutely agree with her. On that. and there are all sorts of issues in regard to the liability protections That are offered by republicans. But before i get to that and katie porter shredding republicans for it john. Why don't you jump in. yeah. I find it very difficult to comment on this because the contents of the package change so often. I mean just yesterday mitch. Mcconnell was saying that it wasn't a prerequisite at the liability protections. It'd be in there but now it is again. I i don't or maybe it is. I don't know. I honestly don't know we don't know what is in the bill until after it's passed and usually not even then usually we're not sure even at that point especially You know the amount of money that we're talking about but it is like it's it's again. It's perfect that they've come up with a financial trade off the onetime payments versus basically cutting off the unemployment aid that makes sense to people on insurance that planned to die in the next week and a half it makes financial sense to them or people who are yet on Unemployment insurance and Having wised up to the fact that the federal government is still effectively doing nothing to stop the spread of the virus. And so it's gonna get worse and more businesses are going to get shut down and so a lot of people that are currently unemployed are probably gonna end up unemployed by the end of this dark winter And this is as we'll probably talking about what senator sanders. This is shaping up to be the last thing that they'll do like we've waited almost a year and this. I am trying to search for word that allowed to us on this now. Right now Is the last thing that they're going to do. Insult to injury in every possible way. It's yeah it's just it's so so shameful especially when you put it in the context of how easily the funding for Defense for the pentagon is gonna pass probably with a veto proof. Vote in both the house which already happened and the senate which is likely to happen in the future. That's seven hundred forty billion dollars every year. The number goes up for the most part. And there's no debate about it. It's just going to happen. But i do want also talk a little bit about the liability protection or lybia liability shield which Mitch mcconnell seems to only care about like that's the only thing that he's been pretty insistent on It seemed like maybe he can bend to democrats will on it If there were some pretty significant trade offs But katie porter Did a great job in explaining why this is a horrendous. A provision in the stimulus bill she says you may have heard that democrats and republicans have agreed upon spending nine hundred billion dollars to fund yet another round of small business loans support hospitals in essential workers and helped the ten million people who lost their jobs through no fault of their own everyone at the negotiating table including senate. Republicans have agreed to a compromise except one mitch. Mcconnell is refusing to bring it to the floor unless it wipes away all cove related lawsuits filed that allege injury or death due to corporate negligence. And she goes on to say that. These lawsuits represent the worst of the worst examples of disregard for human life cases filed on behalf of nursing home patients and grocery store workers who died because the company in charge of keeping them safe prioritize cutting costs over protecting them. And i think one of the best examples to share with you guys is what is happening now with a tyson. Meat packing plant Where You know tyson facing a wrongful death lawsuit because dozens of their workers got sick and died due to their negligence. Cnn has more details on that. Let's watch according to the allegations. The plant manager of the waterloo facility organized a cash volume winner. Take all betting pool for supervisors and managers to wager. How many employees would test positive for covid. Nineteen in the end more than a thousand employees would catch the virus about a third of the nearly three thousand working at the plant on stare. Ernest ladders spoke to c. n. N.'s gary tuchman in april about his conversation with tyson's hr department. They told me I was i was i was i was safe. And they told me that Everything was okay and they told me. I have a better chance. A catching the corona virus. Going out to walmart and enticing. Come the work. you safe. The tyson employers also allegedly told their employees to ignore any symptoms. They might be suffering from contracting corona virus into just keep working. it's doesn't insane yeah no the. The era of self-regulation of plants like tyson one needs to change. Which is a whites. Good that the department of agriculture is gonna be controlled by tom. Bill sack who while he was governor by said that they should self-regulate

Senator Sanders Katie Porter Steve Mnuchin White House Mcconnell Nancy Pelosi Mitch GOP Pelosi Treasury Congress
Death toll up to 15 for Hurricane Laura

The Best of Ben Shapiro

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

Death toll up to 15 for Hurricane Laura

"Death toll from Hurricane Laura has climbed to at least 15. Correspondent Gary Tuchman isn't hard Head Lake Charles Louisiana love in this state three in Texas, but frankly, it's a lot lower than we could have expected. And that's because We've been here for several days. People took this very seriously. Not everyone wanted to evacuate. A lot of people are scared to evacuate because of Cove, and they were afraid to be with lots of other people to leave their homes. But everyone took it seriously. No. One with wandering around in the 25 years before people went into their homes in the safest place is in their homes that could go to war They evacuated and that's why the death toll has 15 and hopefully it won't go much higher than that.

Gary Tuchman Hurricane Laura Texas
African-Americans, Nature and Environmental Justice

Science Talk

04:16 min | 2 years ago

African-Americans, Nature and Environmental Justice

"Road wanting. This is so exciting. Fred Tuchman is the river keeper for the Pawtuxet River in Maryland and a winner of the Audubon. Naturalist Society Twenty Twenty Environmental Champions Award River keepers are part of the national nonprofit group dedicated to protecting waterways. Swami this conversation with myself began sixteen years ago started production, river, keeper, and the Guy delivered packages to the office. It might have been ups or something like. Like that, so what in the world you guys do? I told him you know. We protect a river, and we sue polluters, and we run advocacy movements. And he said wow thought about that I could see the wheels turning in his head. He was a person of color, and he said I didn't think that black people could do this successfully wore. The white communities would accept doing this. So I realized that there was perspective out there a set of expectations about what any of us are likely to be able to do, and that we had to challenge those expectations all of us as the only African American river keeper in the US Tuchman acts as a bridge between a white, dominated conservation, establishment and communities of color alongside the river. He protects you find challenges being a person of color in working in this field. Sure I feel challenges and their intricate ones because I don't want to. To be identified as the river keeper for the Black Folks. That's kind of futile right I. I feel like I'm representing a movement that wants to protect a watershed that requires as much participation across many boundaries and I do find time to the messing us in black and brown communities necessarily needs to be different, because the problems are different, because the perspective is different, environmental consultant to Chemo Price adds that perspective may be at odds with the perspectives of mainstream environmental groups had to talk to people who. Bring bring trees to neighborhoods. It hadn't even considered the history of African. Americans in trees. People may not be jumping up and down. Going here on trees, you know older people, maybe like you know what reasonable represent safety for me who knows, but it's just being open and honest about an invalidating the fact that not everybody is a tree hugger in it's okay, and while many people consider untrammelled park lands peaceful escapes from the stresses of the city. People of color may view them differently. There's a lot of people that you know of justifiably are afraid of certain parks because that's where people go maybe to. To Do to dump bodies where people go to do things that they don't want other people to see them doing, and she says that people may simply feel unwelcome especially in federal parks. This like that room in your house that has the plastic on the couch gymnastics to go into, but looks really nice, but you can't go use it so sometimes I think people perceive that is just any unaccessible space to them that distance people may feel regarding these spaces comes partly from their not having been included in the process of creating them, maisy us is a landscape architect and arborist and says that city. City planners pay much more attention to the needs and desires of upscale neighborhoods than those of low income communities. I've gone to so many different community admitting and can tell you from firsthand experience. How much more deference communities that are rich white? Get in the in the planning process how they get to Co. create their communities as part of that because they have power that they can leverage in that process. She's found that many people don't fully understand the process one in which city planners create land, use maps and decide the fate of each community everywhere there is. There are people who decide what type. Type of land use goes where rate so if you have like a power plant in your neighborhood, somebody decided that your neighborhood is a good location for that power plant. If you have other types of pollutants in your neighborhood, a lot of times it has to do with industrial land uses or commercial land uses those are decisions that an urban planner would make, and so if you noticed stat, communities of color tend to have these adjacent cities with pollution. That's because somebody approved that land use, but people don't know that land use maps drive like these kinds of decisions and a lot of times people. Are not part of the process when they're creating the land use maps in a lot of times, people are part of the process. Get Nord in the process of creating this,

Pawtuxet River Naturalist Society Twenty Twen Fred Tuchman African American River Black Folks Audubon Maryland Swami United States Chemo Price Consultant
African-Americans, Nature and Environmental Justice

Science Talk

04:16 min | 2 years ago

African-Americans, Nature and Environmental Justice

"Road wanting. This is so exciting. Fred Tuchman is the river keeper for the Pawtuxet River in Maryland and a winner of the Audubon. Naturalist Society Twenty Twenty Environmental Champions Award River keepers are part of the national nonprofit group dedicated to protecting waterways. Swami this conversation with myself began sixteen years ago started production, river, keeper, and the Guy delivered packages to the office. It might have been ups or something like. Like that, so what in the world you guys do? I told him you know. We protect a river, and we sue polluters, and we run advocacy movements. And he said wow thought about that I could see the wheels turning in his head. He was a person of color, and he said I didn't think that black people could do this successfully wore. The white communities would accept doing this. So I realized that there was perspective out there a set of expectations about what any of us are likely to be able to do, and that we had to challenge those expectations all of us as the only African American river keeper in the US Tuchman acts as a bridge between a white, dominated conservation, establishment and communities of color alongside the river. He protects you find challenges being a person of color in working in this field. Sure I feel challenges and their intricate ones because I don't want to. To be identified as the river keeper for the Black Folks. That's kind of futile right I. I feel like I'm representing a movement that wants to protect a watershed that requires as much participation across many boundaries and I do find time to the messing us in black and brown communities necessarily needs to be different, because the problems are different, because the perspective is different, environmental consultant to Chemo Price adds that perspective may be at odds with the perspectives of mainstream environmental groups had to talk to people who. Bring bring trees to neighborhoods. It hadn't even considered the history of African. Americans in trees. People may not be jumping up and down. Going here on trees, you know older people, maybe like you know what reasonable represent safety for me who knows, but it's just being open and honest about an invalidating the fact that not everybody is a tree hugger in it's okay, and while many people consider untrammelled park lands peaceful escapes from the stresses of the city. People of color may view them differently. There's a lot of people that you know of justifiably are afraid of certain parks because that's where people go maybe to. To Do to dump bodies where people go to do things that they don't want other people to see them doing, and she says that people may simply feel unwelcome especially in federal parks. This like that room in your house that has the plastic on the couch gymnastics to go into, but looks really nice, but you can't go use it so sometimes I think people perceive that is just any unaccessible space to them that distance people may feel regarding these spaces comes partly from their not having been included in the process of creating them, maisy us is a landscape architect and arborist and says that city. City planners pay much more attention to the needs and desires of upscale neighborhoods than those of low income communities. I've gone to so many different community admitting and can tell you from firsthand experience. How much more deference communities that are rich white? Get in the in the planning process how they get to Co. create their communities as part of that because they have power that they can leverage in that process. She's found that many people don't fully understand the process one in which city planners create land, use maps and decide the fate of each community everywhere there is. There are people who decide what type. Type of land use goes where rate so if you have like a power plant in your neighborhood, somebody decided that your neighborhood is a good location for that power plant. If you have other types of pollutants in your neighborhood, a lot of times it has to do with industrial land uses or commercial land uses those are decisions that an urban planner would make, and so if you noticed stat, communities of color tend to have these adjacent cities with pollution. That's because somebody approved that land use, but people don't know that land use maps drive like these kinds of decisions and a lot of times people. Are not part of the process when they're creating the land use maps in a lot of times, people are part of the process. Get Nord in the process of creating this,

Pawtuxet River Naturalist Society Twenty Twen Fred Tuchman African American River Black Folks Audubon Maryland Swami United States Chemo Price Consultant
"tuchman" Discussed on People, Process, Progress

People, Process, Progress

05:06 min | 2 years ago

"tuchman" Discussed on People, Process, Progress

"We have to while we're storming. Put the handout we have to while we're storming. Find that middle ground while we're normal. We have to get the compromise. We have to make sensible decisions. Some will still be emotion-filled. But they should be also chock full of practicality and looking at the bigger picture. And not pandering to the needs of one group over the other. But WHO'S GONNA benefit? WHO's in the most need? WHO's not in the most need? And part of North again is building that trust and adjusting each of our work, habits and behaviors. Whether it's the group in whether it's you yourself. But we have to get too annoying stage. When we nor more when we adjust when we when we start, to build trust. We'll get to the next stage that Tuchman outlines which is performing. This is one. We become well organized unit. Imagine a fully formed whatever that is whatever that looks like America. On a small scale as a team as a project team or an incident management team. Teams that have no armed have built the trust start to adjust their. Our searcher adjusts how they work giving up more room to let somebody else do parts of their what they would normally do to help. Cross train, or whatever it is you see the performance levels skyrocket me as a project manager when I start to have team members that say no. No, I'll schedule the house at that time. Instead of relying on no, you're the PM. Make Schedules, which against part of the job you can tell you. Teams are going to start performing when they are self organizing when they drive their own initiatives in line with the objectives of the project and the goals. But you will see huge performance. When we as a country as the various organizations, the various factions, various beliefs as the various entities. Build that trust and we are interdependent of outside influences that aren't helping us be productive. Dinner nations work will continue to get smoother and more efficient and have higher levels of trust and equality, and all the things that every human being that lives in the United States wants whether they were a badge whether they're black white. Jewish Christian. We all want to. Have kids that can grow up safe look after our families. And, just do some good for this country and for the world. The last phase in Tuchman latter really applies to teams that aren't meant to stay together, and that's a journey, and that means you finish the work you have. Completed the, Tash, you're GONNA break up the project team. We're going to celebrate, and then we're done. and. We'll never be done right. We'll never redone making things better in America for the next group. I have a large background in my family. That emigrated over here right so at some point they were the folks that now. People are talking about folks from South America Mexico right. Immigrants legal illegal at some point. That was my family. And as the years go on, the demographics change New People from different countries will have different services that WANNA come here. There's a reason people want to come to America. Right, and it's because it's a fantastic place. But I thought looking at Tuchman ladder, looking at where we are as a country looking how we could you know look at kind of a simple model to get out of it that this applied pretty well. And again. We're still here. We're still formed. Were storming a bit which is fine, you know relationship is perfect at especially when you have three hundred something million people in a country. We will get norm again right. We'll build that trust will build back up. We'll succeed will help other succeed, and then we'll perform as we have two hundred and forty three years. which in the you know compared to other countries, not a long time, but in that short period of time. America has done outstanding. Things America been perfect. We've done some bad things. Were to period. We're working to make up for those things and make life better for everybody else. So if you're project, manager, consider the Tuchman ladder on your teams. If you're a fellow American listen to this. Consider this as we look at where we are as a country if you're listening from somewhere else across the world. I know that you know Americans. Not The only place that's looking at the racial divide inequality and that's a good thing. It stinks that horrible person committed a horrible act, and that was the catalyst for it. But sometimes we do have to storm so that we can norman them perform together. Thank you so much for listening to this short episode? Hope it was a little bit insightful here in my two cents at look for your two cents and will give me your feedback. Reach out to people process progress at GPL, dot, com, some by the facebook page subscribe rate. Review all that good stuff. Thank you everybody out there. Stay safe and Godspeed..

America Tuchman ladder Tuchman project manager South America facebook United States Tash norman
"tuchman" Discussed on Thoth-Hermes Podcast

Thoth-Hermes Podcast

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"tuchman" Discussed on Thoth-Hermes Podcast

"A lot of bad press and so I thought. There's lots of books about verge of this hardly any about his penske, so and he was a hero, so I wanted to like okay. Tell Her story and it's not a hagiography. I mean you know I. Tried to bring out places where I think he was wrong, and it's very very sad that he wound up. Drinking himself to death. Again I. Like that I think in some ways I might be a frustrated novelist, but I can't make this up. I can't make this stuff up but I'd like the lives of these people, and you see the ideas and action. You know. They had these ideas, but their life was. An engagement with these ideas, so it's kind of living philosophy. The armchair philosophers mystics. Steiner's the same way and. The other ones and Then once you do one of those and you know. I forget who said it, but somebody who said like when she won. Both you write another, and then another you just kind of get. Used to doing it and. Came actually the way I was making a living. Know. Living in advanced advanced, doing lots of talks, writing articles or to journalism I was doing reviewing. Not for some time, but I was doing it a lot so. It just turned into something that I always wanted to do it so here I am. We will love course. Come back in a few minutes to talk more to Gary Tuchman about his life, his background his ideas, and then of course also talk about his new book to return of Holy Russia, and in the meantime while we are taking the break. We're going to listen to Wendy rule again. Wendy has released her latest CD in February two, hundred nineteen. It is called. Pacific I think it's a very special style very different from what we know from her before. And Second Song that we are to hear now is called. Hollow, so.

Wendy Steiner Gary Tuchman Holy Russia
"tuchman" Discussed on The How-to Entrepreneur

The How-to Entrepreneur

07:56 min | 2 years ago

"tuchman" Discussed on The How-to Entrepreneur

"And people wanted more than just let's say sports and entertainment and that's when we founded after. We're add their beaver even now. Yeah that sounds like it was something that was inevitable now. How different or similar was running a business that provides bucket list experiences versus a major sports hospitality service. It was much different. You know it was all still about service sitting or creating these week incredible experiences and making them just amazing and I think that whether we were creating a cruel culinary experience with some famous shops and for a company it was very similar to sports experiences and stuff. We weren't creating Cryer. So the businesses were were similar in the past. He was really just where the taste of people's taste had moved or a little bit shifted. Of course still loves sports and go to those events but I think Romar people were lifestyle. Stop and that's what caused us to catch. This wave in the business grew rapidly. We use a lot of celebrities from big talent agencies and we are creating celebrity experience dance and and that's what helped us grow grow the same amount that the best night years prior by took us about three years to get to now. A lot of that was due to our reputation. Names but also technology. We're able to market via email social media. It was a different. Two thousand twelve NASA excel long ago but like it was so different than two thousand six. All right guys. I hope you enjoyed today's show. We're going to stop and give you a quick word from one of our sponsors. Leatherback year come to the world's safest backpack only goes from backpack to bulletproof vest and seconds. All their bags are ready for level. Three threat tip ballistic standard of resistance using the USA. Most of the world today get yours now at leatherback year dot com yet no but the Internet had moved by then. I'm sure you guys on facebook to at some point and I bet you're mailing list was actually thousands of thousands of people. Have I you know? After having that first successful company has admit so many contacts any direction you would have gone and you would have been able to at least got the word out there Without having run around on foot or meet local companies in person. Now what formula did you use to get go viva onto the world stage because this was something that was known globally correct. Yeah it was. I mean were. We got a lot of notoriety a lot of that. Same type of way we got out there initially with media and with television and going on things like CNN and Fox and and talking about the sports and entertainment and lifestyle of experiential business. You know we were in the midst of this experience. Economy and people want to talk about how much that's changed at brands market themselves. How they actually sell or what products they sell so it. It's always a hot topic. It's a popular topic Mrs Fun. We're talking about big sporting events big entertainment events big celebrities so we're able to promote it media wise in the key difference. This time is we started doing a lot of email marketing. And we were able to realize. We're getting out there. Wait quicker than when you have twenty salespeople. We only add a few salespeople but we were able to do a lot of email marketing and that really built the business and also there was new social media platforms canner to be to be linked in so anyway. That's how we really became really well known. And it was only three years that it took us three and a half until instantly ended up getting approached by supple companies wanted to acquire us at that time. Yes now you've met you talk about it as if it's something you've done before almost sounds like there was a lot of smooth sailing involved but did you. Guys encounter any roadblocks or or your networking resources and financial security. And such a place that go vive ahead. You know all its ducks in a row. Yeah what's a lot easier second time because you know we kind of knew what we're doing you're going to force you. It's still I mean I was like I've always worked the same way. Like twenty four seven and just I remember being when they'll be starting on the weekends. I'm not proud of it. But like you know we're at the beach and and putting together e mails and buying lists and you gotta work like that and especially at the start up stage and but at the time we kind of knew the business was there. We had just gotten over the Hump with a two thousand thousand nine downturn companies starting to spend again and as I said we're in this new type of economy where this Means for businesses to get their brand out there and to know build their business in so for even a short time we. We didn't really go just kept going up and up and again until we got to wait where we got approached by some big players who wanted to build a big experienced business and then that's how that came about. We ended up selling the business to creative artists agency which is if not the biggest sports entertainment agency out there now. It was just this incredible place will tons of incredible people and connections and and it was. It was amazing the perfect or our business that sounds like a that sort of happy ending that any entrepreneur wishes for their business when it gets acquired that it's going in the right hands of someone now for our eager entrepreneur listenership. That's out there thinking. I've been listening to Robert Past thirty minutes. You know. This is something that he was really successful latte and given my skills and networking or the people. I know. Whatever I'm capable of social media. I think I can market something like this now. You've proved companies like oh viva. Ntsc can perform it the world class level. Do you think starting a company that offers sports hospitality packages or bucket list. Experiences would have the same sort of success today or is that market kind of already asked saturated so to speak now for sure I would. I would say go for it. I think what it comes down to is obviously the no. Hal could learn how to create these types of experience. Who to call suppliers are then? It's all up to you. I mean it's up to you as a salesperson. It's up to you and how hard you work but I think the experienced business businesses. They've only grown. Since I first started. Sure there's different types. Experience companies are getting into. But I would say like if you're young entrepreneur and you want to be in this business I mean look I have at of all the companies and people who've worked for me. There's probably eight or nine companies. Now that are out there that are former employees so it's not a big barrier to entry once you kind of know understand business. It's really just about. We talked about beginning jumping off the diving. We're in gallon for Robert Tuchman. Ladies and gentlemen on behalf of Josh Myself No listeners. I want to thank you for coming today. Share what you know letting people know that. Just because they don't know how to swim doesn't mean they're not capable of it. They just need to take that plunge again. It's been a pleasure. Thank you for coming on. Listen everyone everyone's just got to take the plunge off bigger slamming again. That's what it comes down to so officiated man and good luck again. The podcast and we'll talk soon awesome. Thank you Robert All right. Everyone you heard it from Robert. You don't need money you don't need an office you don't need a fax machine and if you have when you should probably sell it now if you haven't already please go tribe rate review. We're on Google play around spotify Ron Apple on all the platforms that nobody uses. We are on their two now. If you'd like please leave a comment forest down below. Make sure that if it's directed to Robert that he gets it or you can email us directly it's great having you guys next episode Christie Garrett Garrett Music Academy on this is still signing out. Talk to you guys later. Congratulations everyone you've made it to the end of the show before we get out of here today we're GonNa leave off the worst mar sponsor leatherback year home to the world's safest backpack the only bag or backpack that bulletproof vest in seconds. All their bags are rated for level three threat that ballistic standard of resistance to the US. Most of the world today get yours now at leatherback year dot com..

Robert Romar Robert All Cryer Robert Tuchman NASA facebook CNN US Robert Past Mrs Fun USA. Google Christie Garrett Garrett Music Academy Hal
"tuchman" Discussed on The How-to Entrepreneur

The How-to Entrepreneur

09:38 min | 2 years ago

"tuchman" Discussed on The How-to Entrepreneur

"Was getting those people at those companies. Buy into this little business that was going to provide experiences. Were this big business. For Billion dollar clients that they had that takes a. Lotta trust in. That was done on just sitting with people talking to them and getting them to really know I was going to do anything I could at that time to make sure this was successful and that that's really how it started so I'm sure there was probably some more mouth that was doing. Its job around town. You guys were known at some points. You made that transition from this small office entrepreneurs it are your parents apartment that that no one really knew of and then you start checking out more clients and more clients then it becomes evident that hey there there's a there's a service that is provided here in the city and these are the guys so you guys became the go to guys for this sort of thing. Thanks for hanging out at this long with US guys. We're GONNA take a quick commercial break for our sponsors Java Press Coffee Company. Don't feel like making that trip to your neighborhood. Coffee Shop Grocery store in the mornings for more K. CAPS. Guess what you don't have to with. Java Press Coffee Company you can have the absolute freshness coffee deliver to your front door shipped to you within two hours of coming off the roaster have. Your coffee has your convenience jobber press coffee company. Yeah we became the go to guys and not just in New York. I mean we were at. We built it up as we add a sales team probably at its Heidel. Eighteen to twenty people at that time you know even then it was sure there was emailing but most of our sales were done on phone calls kind of like those old school investment bank firms calling people cells stop. We were selling experiences to people who were At corporations and we really got our name out that way I mean we were really a great sales organization and that was the way to do it back then. I didn't have money to market advertise and at the same time. There weren't show many of those options and we were really service that was in point on the people who are going to use it so the sales team and sales force in the way we went about it was how we built the business and even to this day. I have so many people who are still working corporate America. Remember us because we're basically relents yen. I mean nowadays with the lack of social media and the the go-to outlets for people to really help get their name out there. People would probably dumbfounded that anyone was able to scale company on a at least to the world. Cheer like you guys did now. Local media never got a hold of you guys or anything on out. We were great actually local media. That was one of the positives. I mean I got I was able to get us tons of grass and tons of note a ride that way you know there was a local trade in the sports business called Sports Business Journal but anytime the Super Bowl would come up. I would eventually end up going on shows like good morning. America Fox business and talk about the sports hospitality business because remeber started that it was really new. Believe it or not. Not a lot of people were buying experiences to attend these events even sponsorships that leagues would sell. Didn't include a lot of the hospitality. But what happened was they started. Realized that one of the most important components. That's what people wanted so every year when the Super Bowl would come or final four. I'd always end up getting on. Tv or in Articles USAA and that helped with that did not still be broadened clients but gave us credibility so so there were times events that made you think this is going to drive business in. We're going to sponsor this company or this event. Yeah I mean I I think it was. It was more so that we looked at the PR and marketing as a way to get us out there and then use that you know. It was articles or TV. Clips use that where we were negotiating to run up on experience for a big corporation to say. Hey Look we are known entity. This is who we are in you know. You should use ops. And that's that's how I think most of the media that we got work for us and I it was free. You know like we didn't have big budgets to put an ad in ESPN ESPN or whatever it might be. And that's where we got our need okay. And when you guys they get your name going you being sponsored. You're known around the city. You're working with media. You're on Good Morning America by now. What was your Aha Golden Moment? When all of this did happen was there certain? Client you took on a certain events that you're able to book ex lion four or maybe they had front row seats to something. Yeah I mean it's it's interesting. I think we really scaled up quickly. And you were doing all these amazing things but I think one of the the GO-TO key moments was at the Super Bowl was actually way back. Two thousand one. This was the giants versus the Ravens. And our first big band rehydrated clients on site and really interesting law. In a long story short we ran into issues of getting the tickets and it was just as horrible experience which we finally got through a whole crazy story. You can listen to the whole story on. I was on an episode of entrepreneurs problem solvers but it was a crazy story. We ended up getting the tickets or France had a great time. We ended up losing all the money that we had in the back where we paid our salespeople commissions and then we noticed that a lot of these islands So many people were folded up shop like I'm not I don't WanNa can spills but we kept going and all these clients get coming back to her. Still gave back in this great experience and I learned that no matter what you do no matter anything your reputation. Your credibility is everything and I didn't want to let those people down and and I tell you like I lost years of my life on that trip put them we notice year year. These same people keep coming back and that's when we turned it around and we're like wow. We start to become successful. That was a major major erdal and then a major understanding or pay me yeah it sounds like the inflection point now and that just goes back to what you were saying earlier that fears that unissued for a lot of people and being able to or having dealt with that. I think me personally if I were emptied the bank account and maybe felt like I was back at square ruined after all this hard work effort and energy put into something like that. Maybe I would think too. It's time to pack up your things up and get out of here. Maybe sell the fax machine that computer that we got. That's your company at this. Point is becoming more and more of a success eventually institute success. It's your baby you watched grow and at some point. You're thinking okay. Maybe it's time to leave the nest. Maybe it's time for me to leave this thing on. Its own and maybe get some huge payday out of it when and why did you. I consider selling that business had been nine years. We had built up this business. There was very intensive each day and each year in like we were working project to project but we built this great name this great brand and we felt we had scaled. It's the point we could really scary tale and we got approached by a private equity firm from things in partners based out Chicago and the brand to really bite us and then we help them by other companies and the business of sports experience hostile was really growing and we ended up selling to them and yes it was a nice new got belt like. I got to take some some dollars off the table for all the hard work and also just more importantly I felt like okay. This is going to be a great opportunity. Built much bigger business and that was the reason we decided to sell any regrets on the company. No not at all the time especially at that time was something. I'd work really hard years putting time and effort and it felt like an accomplishment belt like you're rewarded for all that hard were and it just meant so much that hey we were able to start this business from literally. We started the business from a you know apartment and then we ended up selling it building it selling. That felt like an outlet We're both at that kind of like pay. Maybe we can build something bigger and we ended up staying at that business and we acquired other companies and it grew but at the same time I realized at that point. I'm really entrepreneur and I wanted to go do what you just brought up the fact that you wanted to do it again now. Did you already have a venture laid out in front of you when this company sort of got absorbed in you were working for them in the back of your mind? You're like yeah. This is the end of the road. I'm definitely GONNA put those same shoes back on and run. That same marathon was that was there any sort of doubt in your mind that may be not. GonNa do that because job. Security is always a factor or now. I never thought about jobs. Get like that was something. I didn't look why I hated being corporate American thinking. There is no job security especially at that time. Things were changing. You didn't go to a company and they keep you for forty years back by hated being at the whim of someone who might just not personally not light you and be like your boss and light your fire and you could be the best employees. Egbert you could do the best things. Maybe not get the notoriety of read it for then you can have other people do the worst things and all of a sudden. They're progressing through the chain because someone likes them so for me. I never early on. I'M GONNA make my own path whether it's able to do that but at that time. I wanted to this company build a real bigger business than I did towards the end of my time. That's when I started thinking okay. What's our exit near after three or four years realizing emily going to be able to help them so much. They're growing this business and acts when me and my partner we thought of. Hey we just did this business now. The world's changed a lot. What about Hollande airy experiences and fashion experiences.

Java Press Coffee Company America partner Coffee Shop Grocery Sports Business Journal US Lotta USAA ESPN Heidel France America Fox New York WanNa giants
'Strong possibility' Dayton shooter cased out bar in advance, police say

The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

02:46 min | 3 years ago

'Strong possibility' Dayton shooter cased out bar in advance, police say

"Let's begin with c. n. N.'s gary tuchman gary a urine dayton police police tonight went into extraordinary detail about the shooter's movements that you learn well. That's right well. The surveillance video is dramatic matic. It's sickening. It's upsetting and it tells you quite a bit what we know right now. This wasn't any spur of the moment killing. This was well planned out and what we seeing. The video is the actual time when this gunman fires the shots and one oh five a._m. Last sunday morning he started firing shots. We see it all thirty two seconds later. He is shot dead by brave policemen. There was lots more that happened before that we see about two hours worth of video and the police officers were here today in dayton city hall all told us more about that he goes in the net. He's there for about thirty minutes. Shooter action comes out peppers and watch right in front of that please. He's aware of where they were now. It's traveling eastbound and you'll see the has. The backpack on sleaze in the backpack is weighted down. It's not empty and there he goes and we know that he's been firing off for second because just passes. Rela is the cocco stand on history. That's where i three fatalities occur one of them's sister third per- gunfire and you'll see on the right hand side the path of officer office approximate so he's engaging right now shooter by about right here and it's going to end right here. He was with his sister and the companion the bar when they first got to the very busy street here the entertainment district of dayton ohio eleven o five p._m. But when he carried out these killings he was not with them. Police say they do not know and they may never know if he intentionally killed his sister and the companion a very important thing we want to tell you wolf at this point is that there is no indication whatsoever that he was with an accomplice in all all these snippets of video when he's going to change his clothes when he gets his rifle when he start shooting his all by himself. There's no accomplished their did police gary <hes> reveal reveal anything more about a possible motive. I asked that question very specifically and they say not only do they not know the motive they. They may never know a motive however they do know his mindset. They say that they learned a lot from what they saw. On his computer sooners writings they say he was obsessed with violence and that the expressed a desire to carry out a mass killing so that's his mindset they know that but they may never know the exact motivation of why he did what he did where he did very reductive in dayton for a saw. Thanks for that

Dayton Gary Tuchman Dayton City Hall Rela Officer Thirty Two Seconds Thirty Minutes Two Hours
"tuchman" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"tuchman" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Backup catcher Austin role. Mine was money yesterday of the Bronx against the royals three RBI singles one in the second inning. What are the eighth that tied the game at six and then came this one in the tent Kennedy deals break ball hidden. Did he right center that will win the game? That's over his head storing his Tuchman he hits home plate. Game over Yankees win. Yankees. John sterling on the fan the bombers with a seven six victory James Paxton was outstanding six plus innings. No runs three hits twelve strikeouts. The bullpen. Let them down Chad green. And at about a vino Kabbah to allow the royals to grab the lead with six runs in the eighth Clinton. Frazier at home of for the Yankees three of the four game set. Zach Britton picked up the win the AKIs eleven and ten they. Visit the angels tonight in the first of four it's here on the fan beginning at nine twenty five the Mets also eleven ten after losing the rubber game of three and Saint Louis. Six to four their road trip. Ends four up and six down Noah Syndergaard amid Rosario remained puzzles. Syndergaard allowed six runs four hundred and five innings is he are a up to five point nine zero committed to that's five this week alone for the shortstop the cards went ahead for good in the second ending on Paul Goldschmidt, two run single Dakota. Hudson five innings of three runs off at the wind. Syndergaard one of four Mets to hit a solo Homer pita. Lonzo. Michael Conforto Robinson canot the others. The know though, took a pitch in the hand in the seventh inning had to leave. The game. X rays were negative. Mets will host the Phillies tonight on scoreboard in the National League. Those fills lost the Rockies for one nationals blank the Marlins five zip. The dodgers heads the brewers sixty five. The giants dip the pirates three to the cubs walked off on the Diamondbacks to to one David Bodey RBI single Padres four to three.

Yankees Mets royals Noah Syndergaard Zach Britton Kennedy Tuchman Michael Conforto Robinson vino Kabbah James Paxton Chad green John sterling Austin Paul Goldschmidt Rockies dodgers Marlins Diamondbacks Padres giants
"tuchman" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"tuchman" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Trouble for Luke boy and a Yankees take a one nothing lead Voight one for four on the day. He's reached base safely now in twenty six consecutive games. Going back to last September Yankees with the one nothing lead. They added to it in the third a leadoff walk from Mike talk me out of the nine spot, and he moved to second on a wild pitch. One out later, the batter was Aaron judge and the left he deals swung on the right field as a base fields. Here comes Tuchman. The throw home is not a die. Base RBI Aaron judge and the Yankees to nothing lead to nothing in the bottom of the third glacier, Torres singled and the first and second with just one out. But Luke Voight flew out Clint Frazier grounded out and the got only one more hit the rest of the game. That was a seventh inning single by Giovanni or shallow who was promptly wiped out on a double play ball by Kyle Shoka one hit over the final six innings for the New York Yankees four for the game. Now that to nothing we didn't hold up because of what the White Sox did in the fourth inning Tomasz era Tanaka I three innings they had to it's six strikeouts against him. Tanaka started off the fourth inning by giving up a single and a double the actually the single Amman Cada. The Mocatta was thrown out trying to stretch. So he was wiped out after that first hit, but then Jose Bray you doubled yonder Alonzo has both walked on three two pitches. Splitters in the dirt that they were not swinging at that. They did swing at the first time through the order bases-loaded. One out the batter is Tim Anderson.

New York Yankees Luke Voight Aaron judge Tomasz era Tanaka White Sox Kyle Shoka Amman Cada Tuchman Tim Anderson Clint Frazier Jose Bray Torres Giovanni Mike Alonzo
 Lori Loughlin and Felicity Huffman may initially have a rough road in Hollywood after cheating scheme

Red Eye Radio

13:17 min | 3 years ago

Lori Loughlin and Felicity Huffman may initially have a rough road in Hollywood after cheating scheme

"The parents charged today despite already being able to give their children every legitimate advantage in college admissions game instead chose to corrupt illegally manipulate the system for their benefit. We're not talking about donating the building. So that a schools more likely to take your son or daughter, we're talking about deception and fraud fake test scores fake athletic credentials, fake, photographs bribed college officials. Well, that's federal prosecutor Andrew. Lulling yesterday talking about the federal indictment that has accused dozens of wealthy. Parents college coaches in college prep executives in a nationwide college admissions scam. The US attorney Andrew says parents who included actresses the liberty Huffman and Lori Laughlin cheated to get their kids into prestigious schools. What a. Mind boggling story, this is for a variety of different angles. Eric first off the fact that Felicity Huffman is married to William Macy. And William Macy was in the courtroom. And I did notice it. Many many in the media said the actor in shameless. Yeah. Where he plays a con, man. And then again to be clear, he wasn't right. He he wasn't arrested. Even though he was involved in setting up a lot. He was not actually arrested now Laurie Lachlan's husband. He was million dollar bond for for him. William Macy was not even though he was part of the conversations that were actually a going out. Apparently, according to some of the indictments, but he was in the courtroom. He was taking notes, and when a Fox News reporter asked if you would like to comment, he said, no. That in itself just to see William Macy in a courtroom in this type of situation, I would have paid money to see. And you know, it's the question is. How far does this go? How big of a problem is this how widespread? Because there are plenty of people with money, and they have names that you would know. I mean that in fact is the case with some of those according to you that were involved here. But. Any? Well. Okay. Now, take it to the level of apparent was willing to put twenty five thousand dollars on credit cards. In order to get their child special access. The point being is that if it was this involved went according to the authorities. This went from two thousand eleven all the way up until just last month. Then if if it was this widespread that means there was that kind of market and demand for it. Now the words if you've got enough money, you can get your kid in the school, and you don't have to donate a library or something to do it. So I I do wonder how far this how widespread this problem is. Now authorities had not responded as to why William Macy was was not arrested. The documents stated that a cooperating witness met with Huffman and her husband actor William Macy at their Los Angeles, home and explain to them that he controlled a testing center and could have someone secretly change their daughters answers, the person told investigators a couple of greed to the plan. The judge has Tuchman. I'm not asking you to admit or deny the charges against you. But you understand what the government claims you. Did she replied, yes? When you see that because that was the specific charge against them. Lori lachlan's. Kid that was that was mind boggling itself because what they did was they wanted to and they paid five hundred thousand dollars. To pretend that their kids were in crew that their daughters were in the. For rowing, whatever you wanna call it. When they weren't in order to get them into college. And I believe they paid was a five hundred thousand wasn't. Yeah. Up in paid fifteen thousand dollars, which you've disguises they will donation people have already said, well, they're going to get is going to get her. Look if the feds were involved in it if they put that as a charitable donation, the IRS will get them for it. Believe me federal prosecutors in a case like this. I guarantee you they dot every I and cross every t. Been interesting when you've had federal prosecutors talk about if they're found guilty, what kind of jail time will they get. Well. Profile case, they spent a lot of resources cases each of them. But they spend a lot of resources. You can imagine a prosecutor that is looking to make an example out of celebrities and rich people in general, right because people in general, they were just a two people that, you know, right? There was a guy what heads a law firm. He was a chairman of a of a high profile law firm, and he according to the allegations he donated four hundred thousand dollars to a bogus charity. And that money was file of funneled to the then head coach of the of tennis there at Georgetown. Again, according to the allegations, but look at the amounts of money. I mean there is unless you're delivering it in a duffel bag leaving it under a bridge somewhere. There's a chain of events involving a number of people in order to make that happen. How is it that you believe you're gonna get away with it? I that's ever that. I just can't imagine that stupidity. It goes beyond era. That's where you know lorry. Lachlan's husband one million dollar bond for Felicity Huffman. It was two hundred fifty but they said the money the amount of money actually increases the seriousness of the crime. And because Felicity Huffman was only fifteen thousand and Laurie a Lachlan's and her husband was five hundred thousand that they would probably end up doing more time. But the coaches that were involved in this or the testing centers or the consultant or the people that actually gave the SAT's and by the way, they said that a lot of these parents actually got notes from therapist stating that their children needed to take the SAT or the ACT privately with a Proctor because of whatever affliction they had. And those proctors were the ones that cheated. And then change the answers to ensure that these students got a higher SAT or an ACT on it. Now, many of those coaches and Proctor and whoever was involved in it the guy who had the one consulting company. They've all been charged with racketeering. And you could have multi bracket tearing that could be very serious jail time, we were reading Dan Abrahams law and crime, and one of the former prosecutors were saying that for example, that those crimes were much more serious racketeering charges. But they still said that Laughlin if she decided to go to court and was found guilty on it could get over forty months in prison because of it. Yeah. So you're talking three to four years of a of a prison sentence, and maybe two to three years, even if she came to some kind of deal on it. Yeah. Eighteen to twenty four months for Felicity of Felicity Huffman, she could possibly get. Yeah. I am. And I also wonder too. What what they are? Investigators are looking at in terms of the schools involved. And the and how this was put together, right? Who who in what position? Would have created the opportunity for this kind of crime that situation because when you when you get the same thing, how do you how do you get to the point of even dealing with these people are finding out that they exist because at least in one case you had someone asking. One of those accused that was asking the person that was facilitating this what does the school think about it? And the response was no school has don't school doesn't know. And so you don't it's if but if there is a tremendous opportunity, these huge gaps holes where individuals can do this. They have that kind of influence. Then you can bet that especially when it comes to federal money going to universities. There's likely to be some kind of other move on the university level, and that is to ensure that there is a process some kind of oversight. And maybe even changing the process of how how students. Get on board. And and by what recommendation? You know, you, and I were talking about the whole scholarship thing that involves something very different. And a number of people are involved when it comes to write those types of scholarships and this wasn't about scholarships. But the point being is that there's a great number of people involved a group of people involved in determining who is going to qualify for those scholarships. So when it when it comes to getting access to those schools someone being getting accepted to that school, and you have one or two people making that decision. That's not a small thing. I mean, there's a reason they paid that kind of money according to the allegations. Anyway, there was a reason they were willing to pay that kind of money the prestige. But where that were that exists then there is an opportunity for a black market, which is essentially what you're seeing here approach to to a solution. Well, you asked the question of we just touched the surface. On this. Another question. I guess is. When you see that William Macy, the actor was actually involved with his wife on setting the whole thing up. There is a question as to why she was arrested, and he was not. And I think federal prosecutors will eventually answer that question. Well, I I read where a number of experts were were commenting on that. And and basically comes down to culpability what you have. That's that really brings him into the actual crime. I was just a series of questions and conversations. Did he write a check did shake write the check? Right. She transfer the money were they asking questions or were they saying, hey, we want to do this. And we know it's illegal. So we'd like you to help us to this. There's a difference because one's harder to prove that there is a conspiracy or they were conspiring to do something and the other one is pretty clear that they're conspiring to do something illegal. It'd just be interesting to see it. What the federal prosecutors actually say. Because if they were both talking to the person, and they both had knowledge of it. If they never charge have they likely won't say anything about why they didn't. Well, the I guess reporters will ask the question be interesting to see if somebody eventually asked that question, whether it's on a new show vibe years from now, what will that response be as to why they went after her what makes her culpable of the crime and not him. If he knew about it and was involved in the conspiracy is it that she wrote the check the actual check because that. She's charged with what fraud and mail fraud is part of it. Yeah. So if you set.

William Macy Felicity Huffman Lori Lachlan Laurie Lachlan Fraud Lori Laughlin Andrew Fox News Eric Us Attorney Racketeering Rowing IRS Tuchman Prosecutor Proctor Georgetown
Turkey primed to start offensive against US-backed Kurds in Syria

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:21 min | 3 years ago

Turkey primed to start offensive against US-backed Kurds in Syria

"Less than a few weeks after Donald Trump answer withdrawal of forces from Syria. The Turkish government whose offered to finish off the Slavic states remaining forces convinced the US president to pull polish. Well, it's worries that he's having second thoughts. There are concerns that anchor is offered to take Washington's place as a cover up for a plan to massacre Syrian Kurds, a minority group which Turkey considers a threat to its territorial integrity. I'd also a terrorist group well answering those concerns the Turkish form minister Mevlut cover solo described the potential for Kurdish massacre as a ridiculous excuse. But then warns that Turkey would launch an assault against Syrian Kurds. If President Trump did not follow through Paul Rogers is a professor of peace. Studies at Bradford university. Welcome to the program poll looking at the. Contrast between those two parts of Mevlut Cavusoglu statement. And it it would almost be laughable for weren't so serious. It would be I think the problem here is that when Trump old the pulled out from Syria that was immediately backtracked. Not least by his advisors Tenny. Mccown do this quickly. You got to take time for the was the problem of the relationship between Turkey, so essentially Trump's into national security adviser John Bolton went to the Middle East. He had this meeting him someday seems to being put a very kind of something of a debt Squibb the tux. Did not like being told by the Americans to lay off the cuts, and I think we're seeing this strong reaction. It's very much. I think of political statement, it doesn't necessarily mean that cuts the Tuchman actually going with full so they have a lot of troops on the bowl too. But essentially, I think it's a warning to the United States. Don't take us for granted. You know, we all the players in this region. You send you to pull out when exact? Gun to pull out. Sorry. Finish complete there. And I'll come back in the second. So I think essentially with less with something if a stalemate, but because this is a problem between two major NATO states, and in the United States depends pretty heavily took because it has a huge base, which is being key to the whole air war against ISIS over the last four or five years, I suppose just focusing on the emptiness or otherwise of the Turkish threats. I mean is it in any way gender because of course, you know, they could probably do this at any time if they were really motivated to the probably could mean if you won't try and look at it from the point of view of both the codes, very lunch communities, full countries and took himself. I mean, the Kurds the Donges number obviously are in southeast Turkey many kids in northeast Iraq will though they have internal political divisions. They've been running that out of the country pretty successfully relatively small numbers without any degree of independence in Iran. And then you have the group. Series, not very very strong. It has a reasonably he's political party, the P Y D, you have the people's protection units, the white PG who basically being providing the the militias if you like and within much of the area, and that part of the code ish homeland of news that phrase has actually being quite effective politically 'bout as you say from the Turkish point of view. They regard to the Syrian Kurds as the most radical elements in very close to the own PK key, the Kurdish will pouty into the TIs so opposed to the Turkey state. So it's really this issue that as far as a why to coach community concerned the Syrian Kurds got home with it that huge wind about what he will do now. So this is the problem from the Turkish point of view there for problem from the white occurred. If point of view than it is very important to try and see a protection for the codes and Syria. What do you read as the actual thrashed that? Face with Turkey, moving even more deeply into Syria because suppose, if if Donald Trump's inner circle are raising red flags you've got to get this. If even day are doing you've got the sense. That's the really is a threat to them. The is a major problem to accept that. And from the Turkish perception as phone as their relation with the assent regime that has been pretty groomed for a long time on the Turks really not a toll happy the way this terrible.

President Trump Turkey Syria Tuchman Donald Trump Turkish Government United States Washington John Bolton Mevlut Mevlut Cavusoglu Bradford University Paul Rogers Mccown Nato Middle East Iran Assault
"tuchman" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"tuchman" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Heroes. Rick their heroes. He went to the Jim Acosta school of just being totally obnoxious. Yes. Well, there's also some sound of Don lemon. He he loves to drink during New Year's Eve. So here's some Don. Lemon and Brooke Baldwin. Junior high. Drive a talk to your parents alike. I got a great every year. I see. Yeah. I think there's Michelle. Recent. Right here. Right there. Oh my gosh. Michelle anyway. Yes. Are you serious? But you know, who I never dated. Because he's married with a kid. Gary tuchman? That's what I'd never dated..

Don lemon Michelle Jim Acosta school Gary tuchman Rick Brooke Baldwin
House Intelligence Committee Ends Russian Probe: “No Evidence Of Collusion”

KSFO Morning Show with Brian Sussman with Katie Green

01:10 min | 4 years ago

House Intelligence Committee Ends Russian Probe: “No Evidence Of Collusion”

"Open the case of oh skills no collusion says house gop pennsylvania special election i'm evan haning the house intelligence committee says its investigation is over republicans on the house intelligence committee abruptly ending their russia probe without telling democrats announcing that they have found no evidence of collusion between the trump campaign and russia to say the two thousand sixteen election correspondent abbie philip congressman adam schiff the committee's top democrat disagrees with the republicans conclusion but says he's not surprised by their decision to end the probe the fundamental problem from the beginning was that my colleagues view their job is protecting their client the president rather than getting to the truth and and i think that's a grave disservice to the country the polls are open in western pennsylvania voters will choose between republican rick saccone and democrat connor land in a race it's being watched for clues to november's midterm elections correspondent gary tuchman but consensus seems to be there will be a robust turn out not only because of all the attention but because of the special elections over the past few months where there have been big turnouts which have seemed to have benefited the.

House Intelligence Committee Russia President Trump Rick Saccone Connor Land Gary Tuchman GOP Evan Haning Abbie Philip Congressman Adam Schiff Pennsylvania