35 Burst results for "Tuberculosis"

Tuberculosis deaths rise for 1st time in years, due to COVID

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | Last week

Tuberculosis deaths rise for 1st time in years, due to COVID

"Tuberculosis deaths have risen worldwide for the first time in years the World Health Organization says a million and a half people died of TB and twenty twenty a slight rise from the one point four million who died in twenty nineteen the W. H. O. says the increase was mainly due to fewer people getting tested and treated last year as resources were diverted to fight the corona virus pandemic far fewer people were diagnosed with the disease last year five point eight million compared to seven point one million the year before the countries with the highest number of TB cases include India China Indonesia and the Philippines I'm my company

W. H. O. Tuberculosis World Health Organization TB India Indonesia China Philippines
Russia's Navalny on Hunger Strike to Protest Prison Treatment

BBC World Service

00:55 sec | 7 months ago

Russia's Navalny on Hunger Strike to Protest Prison Treatment

"Arrests outside the prison where opposition leader Alexei Navalny is on hunger strike to protest a lack of medical attention. NPR's Lucian Kim. Reports from Moscow, a correspondent for CNN, as well as other journalists were briefly detained. Supporters of Alexei Navalny trek to the penal colony about 60 miles east of Moscow, demanding independent doctors be allowed to examine him. Navalny declared a hunger strike last week, saying he was being denied medical care for back pain and the loss of sensation in his legs. On Monday, Navalny's allies said on social media, he had a temperature and bad cough. That three other prisoners were being treated for tuberculosis. Navalny was imprisoned on an old conviction after returning from Germany, where he'd been recovering from a poisoning he blames on President Vladimir Putin. Putin spokesman says Navalny is receiving all necessary medical attention Lucian Kim. NPR

Alexei Navalny Navalny Lucian Kim Moscow NPR CNN Cough Tuberculosis Germany Vladimir Putin Putin
'There's No Quick Fix For COVID-19,' Cautions Pennsylvania Secretary Of Health

All Things Considered

07:56 min | 11 months ago

'There's No Quick Fix For COVID-19,' Cautions Pennsylvania Secretary Of Health

"Going to talk more now about how states are preparing to distribute those vaccines as they become available, and to do that, we're joined by Dr Rachel Levine. She is the Pennsylvania health secretary and also president of the Association of State Health Officials. Dr Levine welcome 12 Things considered. Thank you very much. I'm very pleased to be here. Will you walk us through the logistics for when Pennsylvania first receives its initial shipments of vaccines? I mean, where does it go? How do you keep it cold? What do you actually have to do? Sure. So we're all waiting the meeting of the FDA on December 10th. And then they will consider all of the data of submitted by the Fizer Corporation for the first vaccine. When they issue their emergency use authorization or you away, then operation Warp speed will distribute the vaccine. To hospitals in Pennsylvania and throughout the nation just to get specific is the federal government or or fives or corporation, sending it to the state of Pennsylvania to distribute it to hospitals. I I asked, because this vaccine has to be kept incredibly cold. It's not just like you can send a bottle of aspirin, right? So you are correct. This is an ultra cold chain vaccine that has to be kept at minus 80 C or or Celsius. So it will be operation works speed that will be sending it to the hospitals that we designate now will depend, of course about how much we're going to get, and it comes in trays of 975 bottles. So these have to be hospitals that can Deal with the cold chain and can deal with that amount of vaccine to then administer. Now, the CDC recommends that health care workers and residents of long term care facilities should get first access to these vaccines. That's a large number of people have you decided whether you're going to start With older healthcare workers or people with underlying conditions are only doctors and nurses who see covert patients. I mean, how are you going to prioritize within the priority groups? Sure. So we're going to be developing a decision tree for hospitals to use and we'll be finishing that this week. I want to point out that the distribution for the nursing home and other long term kitchen facilities Goes in a different way. So operation works speed working with Walgreens and CVS will be receiving the vaccine with those two pharmaceutical companies, and then they will be working to administer the vaccine in nursing homes and other long term care facilities. Do you have a sense of how many doses The first shipment is likely to include and how that compares to the number of people in this top priority. First group, so we don't exactly know how many doses we're going to get in the first shipment. So you know, we had lots of discussions with Operation Warp speed, you know, will be looking to attack the end of next week or certainly when they're going to be sent out to know exactly how many doses we're going to get in the first week. And then the expectation our weekly shipments to the hospitals and to Walgreens and CVS for those distributions. I gotta ask a lot of depending here on the ability of operation Warp speed to carry this out effectively And with Corona virus testing, the federal government kind of fell down. I mean, There weren't enough tests. Some of the tests were not accurate. Initially. How confident are you in the ability of this Trump Administration program to get this very difficult job done? We have heard directly from General Purna. You know, we have confidence in them, but I'm sure it will be a significant logistical challenge. This has to occur throughout the United States, all at the same time to all of the states, the territories. And then some specific large cities. And are you also concerned about the smooth handoff from one administration to another? I mean, if the distribution depends on Operation Warp speed, which is a Trump administration program will the Trump Administration only has so many more weeks in office. Now, the Department of Defense under General Karna, you know, will still be there in terms of continuity, But in terms of the representatives from helping human services and the administration, we would like to think that they'll be robust conversation. Nation and communication as the administration transitions. Obviously, that has not happened as much as it should have yet, But we're hoping that all those communications will be going on forthcoming. Just to get back to the scale of the logistical challenge here. This is a vaccine requires two doses weeks apart. Do you have the infrastructure to track and time who has had a first dose when yes, we do. But that is a information technology challenge in terms of making sure that we get the right vaccine into the right person at the right time. And then not only the visor vaccine, but the Madonna vaccine that also is a to dose vaccine. We've heard so many states talk about the extreme budget pressure that they are under and this is an expensive undertaking. Do you have the money? You need to do it? And if not, do you think the federal government is ready to provide it well, it will be essential for the federal government to provide more funding to the States territories in cities that will be tasked with ministering the vaccine. Operation works speed cost billions and billions for the development of the vaccine on Lee $340 million has been allocated for the next part of the mission, the distribution and the administration so clearly states and territories and cities. They're going to need more funding from the federal government to finish and accomplish this mission. These issues you're talking about could occupy you for more than 40 hours a week every week, and you are at the same time dealing with a spike in Corona virus cases and having to contact trace people who may have come in contact with exposed individuals, overcrowded hospitals. How are you juggling all of this at once? Well again. This is the public health challenge of a lifetime. I don't think any of us have seen a 40 hour week. You know, in our memories I stand corrected three ways to deal with the pandemic. You can work on containment that involved the testing and contact tracing very hard to contain a virus that has spread this far. For example, Today we are reporting 11 over 11,000 new cases. In Pennsylvania. It's impossible to contact that many people, so we have to prioritize. We prioritize to congregate, setting such as nursing homes and other long term care facilities, Correctional institutions, schools, etcetera, Then we have mitigation. Basic mitigation sets his mass and hand washing and social distancing. And then in Pennsylvania, you know we had to have a stay at home advisory. And you know, we have really tried to recommend that people avoid not only large gatherings but small gatherings. And then they'll be the vaccine those of the tools and the public health to box that we have to work with. When you're dealing with community spread on the level that we are seeing now, where there is so much of this disease and so much transmission of it. Do you have to change your approach? I mean it, Zeke gone from hand to hand combat to fighting an army out. Imagine it has And so the basic public health tool of containment, which we would do for a small measles outbreak or for it outbreak of tuberculosis? That is extremely difficult for public health to do when we're seeing this type of widespread community transmission, and then we have to pivot to more and more mitigation. It's a very unpopular it is made public health officials sometimes unpopular throughout the nation, but they're absolutely essential to try to stop the spread. And then we have the light at the end of the tunnel, which is the vaccine, but there's no quick fix to hope in 19. After Rachel Levine, Pennsylvania Health Secretary and president of the Association of State Health officials. Thank you for talking with us in the middle of everything else that you were doing. My pleasure. Thank you very much.

Pennsylvania Trump Administration Federal Government Dr Rachel Levine Association Of State Health Of Dr Levine Fizer Corporation Walgreens General Karna FDA CDC Department Of Defense Madonna United States Corona LEE Zeke
The Road to Bouillon

Gastropod

05:09 min | 1 year ago

The Road to Bouillon

"Today's story starts as soon as many good stories. Do with a german chemist whose family vig was one of the people who invented modern chemistry as a field and his contributions are vast in laboratory science and culture in nutrition. And once again we have the wonderful flavor historian nadia bernstein on the show and for the purposes of today's episode leagues contributions to agriculture are. Not the most important. We're interested in his nutrition. Science at the time in the eighteen hundreds scientists were hard work trying to understand. What the heck food actually was. This is kind of what chemists were up to you back then in the nineteenth century they were like. There's all of this stuff in the world what is it made of. Let's figure it out and name it. It's not just name it but decide which bits of it were essential chemists. Were trying to break food down into its elemental parts and understand exactly which parts we needed to survive in the eighteen thirties. Scientists named and identified protein and they found it particularly fascinating so why not just keep breaking things down was the trend at the time and scientists noticed that different protein-rich foods seem to be made up of slightly different building blocks. These are what we call amino acids today. If you think about proteins as molecules i mean most of us aren't thinking about perkins molecules. But if you imagine it it's sort of long molecule that's composed of a lot of different component parts of which are amino acids and what hydrolysis is basically this process of blasting that big molecule apart into these constituent pieces. This is in fact. Exactly what did hydrolysis he took hydrochloric acid and used it to break down or dissolve matt and then figure out what the different kinds of amino acids were lee bigs. Big breakthrough was identifying one particular amino acid creating which he then also found in the muscles of living animals. He found it in especially high levels in the muscles of a fox that died while it was running. And that's what led him to the conclusion that creating was the key to muscle action. People had been claiming that meat was important for health for a really long time but leagues contribution was to show at least based on his science at the time that the protein in meat was critical for muscles and so it was an essential component of a nutritious diet. League went as far as to say that the protein element of food was the only true nutrient meet. Was it said when his friend's daughter came down with typhoid league. Knew exactly what she needed me but she was too sick to digest solid foods. So league took some cook chicken. He grounded up. He soaked it in hydrochloric acid to dissolve it altogether at what he thought was critical creating. Then he added another chemical to neutralize the acid and turn it into table salt and then he gave the young girl this salty savory broth and she recovered and this led to what became one of his most popular discoveries at the time league was able to use chemistry to create a modern version of beef tea leaf. Tea had been popular with the sensitive and the sick leave for a few decades. The idea was that invalids. He were too delicate to eat. A great big steak could still get all its goodness by boiling that stake in water straining it and then drinking the resulting meat juices. Basically the idea is if your sickly. If you're wasting away with any of the numerous diseases that may have afflicted the dickensian populace mid nineteenth century. What you want to do is to get an easily and readily absorbable. Both sort of strengthening food of protein leagues was different from traditional beef t. He didn't need to boil meat for hours. To break it down. He could use hydrochloric acid to league. This meant he could keep in more of the good stuff from meat in the broth. He thought boiling. It was less effective. So liebenberg's beefed. He was kind of this. Concentrate at this sort of hydrolysed blasted part beef proteins made into a liquid broth that sickly little orphans and delicate women could sip and thus beyond the way to restoring their health lee big published his beef tea formula and a quickly became all the rage with fragile elite searching for something to pep up their delicate constitution pharmacists would make up a big batch. Evaporated and zealot under the name extract. Carney's extractive meet. It was classified as a legal drug. in germany. in fact it was considered so essential that pharmacists were required to keep it in stock. Doctors reported that league's formula for extractives. Carney's could be useful for tuberculosis. Typhus various dumped arrangements. and scruffy. One doctor said it could be a useful substitute for brandy and cases of exhaustion. Depression and despondency. I'd rather have a brandy but the point is leaving. High tech version of beef d. was a wonder drug in the eighteen fifties. It was thought of as a way to give the goodness of muscle forming meat to the week in puny

Nadia Bernstein VIG Perkins Typhoid Matt Liebenberg Carney Typhus Germany Tuberculosis Depression
Janet Martinez Of The Navajo Nation

The Storyteller

06:00 min | 1 year ago

Janet Martinez Of The Navajo Nation

"Style. Good day welcome my friends to the storyteller where you'll find first nations people from across native north america who are following. Jesus christ without reservation on today's program we'll hear from a navajo woman who grew up in difficult circumstances but it was in those hard times that she learned to survive. Hello my name is janet martinez manappl- ending from the novel reservation. Though i'm in oklahoma now where ken and having a family here. My thoughts always back to the childhood. That i have had under vacation. I have two brothers and one sister that i grew up with and My father was the fifth generation of medicine. Man my two brothers never took up the trade so he was the end of the medicine men in our generation. My mother was A high school graduate and was attended a nursing school when she Got sick and she had to return home. She was one of two children of my grandmother. Who was who was a deaf mute. So that's how my father mother matt. He was married to my aunt and since she came back and started taking care of my oldest brother. I never thought of him as As a cousin. We've always said you know he will. All brothers and sisters would never made that distinction between the family but she had returned home and she died of tuberculosis. My mother and dad got together like that. Taking care of the the one son that he's had and eventually they had gotten together and hit the three of us which We grew up on a reservation. Like i said my two older brothers and my sister went to private school on reservation. They called ganado mission but My family always well especially my dad. He always wanted me around. Hit at want me to leave. He said that three kids had gone on to a private school. And but this is my last daughter out you know. Let me let me. Just keep her at home. Some of the head agreed. And i went to cornell. Highschool ganado is a little bitty town probably about ten miles or fifteen miles from st michael's and it was a public school but was About six years old. When i first started kindergarten because my aunt had died of tuberculosis my mother head caught that the burqa losses and also my grandmother and so they were sent to colorado springs for two years to sanatorium to get well and come back and she made that sacrifice for my sister and i to go to that boarding school all we did were were housed there and then we were bus. After two years. She was cured and she came back to the reservation. We went back with our father in Went to the public school. We got we move closer to the highway. Which will walk in like about eight miles to the highway to catch the bus in the during the wintertime. That was real trying time for us and so we move closer to the highway which was like a quarter of mile off highway. We move to continue to go to canario graduated from colorado high school. But all during this time. That i was going to school and in my My teenage years my parents. My mother didn't drink but my father was an alcoholic. I remember him times coming home and beating up my mom and pour wine on her head because she wouldn't drink it and it was. It was a very scary time for for my sister's nine. Somehow sometimes we she would get away and she takes the two of us and we run away and stay in the woods and just huddled together and freeze and until he went to slave or he passed out or you know our gone went somewhere would come home and it was. It was difficult childhood that we've had but still my mother didn't drink and so that was. That was good for us. But for some reason she started drinkin- we were when i was about eight years old. I had a couple of beers and just graduated by the time i graduated from high school. She was a full blown alcoholic. I mean it just. It just took care of everything from from our home. They were never home. When you're under the summertime out of school. I would have to herd sheep with my death mute grandmother. We were out there weeks at a time and they would never return home that go on a drunk and they'd never come and there was times that we just practically run out of food and so i told my grandmother one day i was probably ten or eleven which is out of food and she head she had noted some grease in the some lard in a little pain and she put salt in it and she and i had a piece of bread and we just dip our bread and in the in the make sure there was what we had for dinner

Janet Martinez Manappl Ganado Mission Tuberculosis North America Jesus Christ Colorado High School Oklahoma KEN St Michael Matt Cornell Colorado Springs
The Skeptics Guide

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

06:24 min | 1 year ago

The Skeptics Guide

"Hello and welcome to the skeptics guide to the universe today. Is Wednesday June third twenty twenty and this is your host. Steven Novella joining me this week or Bob Novella everybody Cara Santa Maria, had a Jay Novella Guys Evan? Bernstein good evening. Folks you all doing today well pretty. Trying hard, it's been a tough week and a tough week. That's happened since our last show. A little bit co vid. UPDATES I like we usually do so. The numbers are continued to increase of course, but you know in the US definitely is a leveling off. The parts of the country that peaked I are starting are the the new cases, the number of new cases are declining, but some other parts of the country where that peaked later are still on the upswing, and some are even spiking a little bit, and so we're you know again as I said before beginning that transition to the next phase where we're starting to partially roll things out, and I think the next month or two. Two is going to really tell a lot about how things are going to go, you know. Do you think that's because like the most populated cities it did tend to peak I and so even if like the more rural areas or suburban or less populated areas are now starting to see their cases peaking, it's just like in terms of gross numbers. Fewer people yeah I. Think so. Yeah, this is Dan. We're definitely getting into the more rural phase of the spread of the virus now right absolutely plus also in the news. No zombies have showed up yet Let's get. Out about that a little of both j little both all right Bob I'll I'll surprise you. One of these nights I'll come over your house. I'll dress up. I'll do the whole thing. But I imagine. How another hydroxy chloroquine study came out. This one showing does not protect people from acquiring Kovic. So you can give it as a preventive to people who are not does not reduce their risk of getting it. On the good side the study, the first study of convalescent convalescent plasma plasma from people who are who covered nineteen and got better. Show that it was safe. This was an open label trial. Not Out of control try. This is a phase. One safety trial showed that it was safe, and the I think it was like twenty people, or whatever in the study they rose more than ever one thousand nine of them recovered, so they they did. They did well the. Test, yeah, yes. This April plasma is with antibodies and so again not wasn't an efficacy trial, so we can't say really that it works based on this trial. We didn't feel them, but yeah, but it looked. It looks preliminarily positive, but we'd now. This will pave the way for for an efficacy trial where we compare it to. Control. So that's good and. Now half with you my second week working in the hospital and he'll nap. Have you had a recent test? Now? I've been tested. They're only testing happy only testing symptomatic hype. Initially we record the show last week I'd only were there for a few days and it is a bit of a shock know after two months of being in lockdown to be stroll around the hospital. Full of sick people was. Different experience. Culture shock yeah in a way, but now I'm sort of seeing the other side of it. Yeah I think we got this lockdown pretty tight in that. The people working in the hospital are all really diligent. What I mean like everyone's wearing a mask wearing gloves washing in and out of patient rooms are guarding the protective gear you know. Doing doing social. And and you know we've made lots of workflow changes. You know we're not doing the on mass rounds that we used to do. We've really changed how how we're doing things and they'll probably be like the new normal for quite some time absolutely. The next year's fair Paris fashion show is going to be you know gowns and masks, and all sorts of protective equipment might be you never. Know. What it! Might be, that's just how how interesting so I mean this is this is. A risk of four hundred and fifty thousand people, healthcare workers have contracted covid nineteen around the world. Aches so. Out Obviously it's a higher risk than. Being in the hospital I. Mean you think about it? A hospital is the worst place to be. Spreading disease covert, which was thinking about it, so it's a space. Building. Con- confined to some extent with tons of people. Many of whom are sick and you're people, large groups of people are moving around the hospital like literally going into different patients rooms. You know what I mean, so it's like it's a complete setup for the trainer allows all of totally this is why. The precautions have been have been increasing over the course of my career. You know over the course of historical time as infectious diseases get more menacing, and this is just the latest iteration of that, and I do think that there's going to be permanent changes to how hospitals functions function in response to covert one, thousand, nine, hundred, probably because over nineteen, going to be a permanent addition to our Germans fear so. Did you like there were changes after after Mersa started to become A. Hundred thousand people are in hospital. I mean there's there's specific protocols. If someone's mercer positive as specific protocol associated with that I, have one patient on my service now. WHO's positive? It's a gown and glove. Every time you go in, and that's always been the case since mercer was discovered. And it's very common so same things same things with other antibiotic resistant. Bacteria and also certain respiratory. Infections and tuberculosis like every time there's a new big infectious disease pretty much permanently changes practice, so, but the thing is so i. am feeling better I. think in a way is like we got this. You know we're doing everything we can do. We're of minimizing it. The professionalism is definitely there and I think. Healthcare workers is getting more experience with covenant. We're learning a lot about it, so we're sort of getting a grip on it, but there's just no way around the fact that it's a risk and that already there's been a huge price paid by healthcare workers for for being on

Bob Novella Steven Novella Mercer United States Bernstein Cara Santa Maria Chloroquine Evan Paris Kovic DAN Infections Aches Tuberculosis Mersa
The coronavirus may surge this Australian winter. Here's why

Coronacast

03:42 min | 1 year ago

The coronavirus may surge this Australian winter. Here's why

"Monday the first of June the first of winter. And give it is beginning of winter. Maybe we could talk about whether we can expect things to get worse as we come into the called a months. Do We know Norman? What effect it has? On covid nineteen transmission, the short answer to that question is that the experts think it probably will make a difference, but it depends in which environment you're in so in countries where you've got a rising epidemic, pandemic or very large numbers of cases, you probably won't notice the difference of winter, but you could in places like Australia in New Zealand where we've got very little virus around in a small increase could give you a significant blip. And essentially what we're talking about here is that we're indoors more more likely to transmit the virus to other people indoors. We've spoken about before is the high risk area it could be that the environment in winter favors the virus as well because it does other corona viruses, so you would expect it to get a little bit worse winter, but you might not notice it in amongst the noise in countries like the United States in the United Kingdom. You might notice it in Australia one of the things that we were sort of worried about. About, a few months ago is coming into winter. At the same time of these new pandemic was that perhaps it was going to coincide with the flu season, but everyone's staying harm. So is it a we? Is that still something that we're worried about? Or maybe? Is it going to be a good season for US hard to know? We are now coming back out of isolation, and maybe I'll be that seasonal flu remarriages, but there's also been quite a high uptake of influenza immunization, so it remains to be seen what we see about. Flu But you would expect seasonal flu to make a bit of a resurgence as we get out and about a bit more over the next few weeks. Another thing that we were hearing a bit more over the weekend about was this name that just won't go away. The Ruby Princess so passengers on board. The Ruby Princess cruise have have led to one of the biggest current of ours clusters, but there's been another health warning issued around that boat. A cream has been diagnosed with tuberculosis. Yes, you another reason not to call on crucial think, but you know just when you thought it was safe to go out here's somebody with Berko losses. The probably health artists are saying that the risk is low to other people on the ship, which it certainly lower than corona virus. Temecula losses can actually be quite infectious. Just remind you what this is this is. An inch a very very ancient disease. It's been around longer. Probably than humans have been around and was scourged, particularly in the nineteenth century, causes a lung disease, but can affects your kidneys can almost any part of your body, so it's pretty nasty and high high degree of fatality particularly if you're immune, compromised such as HIV AIDS. You can get clusters of tuberculosis. I covered the story a story a few years ago and outbreak of tuberculosis in Adelaide and when the traced back the outbreak, it was sprayed. It was a man on boss. He caught the bus each morning from the Adelaide hills down into the city, and he spread it to other people on the bus. So Tobacco can be infectious, but it's not as infectious as corona virus. Do We know given byes? Lung Diseases is they a people with take a at higher risk of complications from Iris very good question. Don't know the answer to it intuitively. You'd say yes, you've got. Got Pommery TB you would be you. You'd think that you're more susceptible. although TV does funny things to your immune system, and that may affect responses well to the corona virus, because sometimes the things going on in your lungs and the immune response, they are helped to dampen the immune response to covid nineteen, so it's complicated story, but I don't think anybody's published on that yet.

FLU United States Lung Diseases Australia Norman Adelaide Adelaide Hills United Kingdom Iris HIV New Zealand Aids
The Future of Surveillance

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

05:30 min | 1 year ago

The Future of Surveillance

"The cove in nineteen pandemic is changing our lives in so many ways. And what's going to happen in? The future is still unclear. Are we going to have to download APPS? Will those under quarantine have to wear responds? Will we BE SCANNED FOR FEVERS? Every time we step into an office or restaurant I've been hearing all sorts of questions like these so I wanted to speak with Jennifer nozoe. She's an epidemiologist at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security. I wanted to know what role technology might play in our fight against this pandemic. Could we soon be using these contact tracing APPs here in the United States I think it's inevitable and in fact it's actually already happening? That public health agencies are going to use APPS to help them conduct contact tracing whether these APPs fundamentally change tact tracing is done remains to be seen. I personally it would be a little bit worried if we used APPs instead of people. It's not clear to me that we would get better data that way. The question is how are we going to use it? And what features of the technology are we going to use? It's one thing to use it to keep track of data and to help you analyzed data. It's another thing to use it to figure out exactly where someone's been over the last fourteen days and I think there are some important operational questions that need to be answered about those approaches as well as some potential legal and ethical questions we do use contact tracing in this country for other diseases. A lot of people are hearing this term for the first time but with foodborne illnesses and things like that. That already happens right yeah. It's a traditional tool of public health. Tr- instance in tuberculosis outbreaks measles outbreaks. And there is You know case investigations that happened with Woodward outbreaks to I would say the frequency with which it's used has probably decreased in recent years purely due to resources it's incredibly resource intensive to do contact tracing as public health departments over recent years have suffered budget cuts and declining resources their abilities to do contact tracing has declined and that's I think one of the unfortunate kind of preparedness erosions that we've seen over time that we're now in the midst of a pandemic trying to make up for by hiring possibly hundreds of thousands of new contact tracers when you think about the APP based technologies again in merging that with some of these human contact tracers to help supplement that sort of work. Can you give some idea of what life would look like then so there are a few different approaches? There's one method where the phone tracks your movement things off of Cell Towers and it knows where you've been and authorities potentially could take advantage of the ability of your phone to say where you've been to once you become a case potentially look back at where you've been for the last fourteen days and then use that to identify places where you may have exposed people to try to get in touch with people who may have also been at that same place. There are other approaches. Where you use the phone's ability to kind of tell who you've been near and to try to find people that you may have exposed that way that's seen as slightly less invasive because it's more about identifying who's been near you rather than exactly determining where you've been typically in the US and we do contact tracing it starts with an interview where you ask the patient basically remember all the places they've been when you're talking about fourteen days though it can be tough for people to remember exactly and so sometimes you have to use other methods to maybe fill in the gaps for instance for foodborne outbreaks. We try to figure out where you spend money over the last fourteen days as a proxy for where you may have been but we haven't yet in the. Us seen widespread use of the cellphone based technologies the Location Services or the more Bluetooth ones. That tell you who you've been Aaron. I think there has been some interest in potentially using these technologies but in my view these are the ones that have some questions around them in terms of public acceptability and what the limitations for their use are. So what does this mean for all of us? Are we moving toward big brother surveillance? State government officials are now calling upon Silicon Valley's tech leaders to try and help. We need to view this as an information problem when we need to come up with estimates for where the disease is and when we can find hotspots. Put Schmidt used to be the CEO of Google. Now he's leading up a fifteen member commission to help guide New York toward using new technology in the wake of Kovic. Nineteen the Google Apple. Collaboration preserves your privacy but it's completely voluntary apple and Google are collaborating to develop software that would enable Bluetooth base tracking on their devices if users opt in this data would be shared with governments and public health authorities and then there's clear view a facial recognition technology company. What we do is we have database from day one of over three billion photos. We have a mobile APP and a desktop and we also have the highest accuracy out there in the market. The company claims that they can scan public surveillance camera footage to identify people who might have been in contact with confirmed corona virus patients last month they told NBC News that they're already in talks with several state and federal agencies to help with contact tracing

Google United States Johns Hopkins Center For Healt Fevers Jennifer Nozoe Nbc News Apple Cell Towers Woodward Silicon Valley New York Measles Tuberculosis Aaron CEO Schmidt
How Infectious Disease Shaped American Bathroom Design

Short Wave

07:58 min | 1 year ago

How Infectious Disease Shaped American Bathroom Design

"The next time you go to take a trip to the loo look around because Elizabeth. Yuko bioethicist journalist. Wants you to know that. A lot of the things in our bathrooms are designed the way they are in part because of infectious disease the sink the toilet the bathtub. The toothbrush holder didn't expect that one towel racks the floor. I have white tile floor and White House in the wall so pretty much. You're telling me like almost all of the above. Yes Elizabeth wrote about this story for city lap to Bricusse cholera. The flu as our understanding of these diseases evolved how they spread the role hygiene plays and preventing them. So did the American bathroom and when we realized that built architecture and design could have some sort of influence on our health that became something that people wanted to adopt within their own homes today on the show. We present a brief toilet timeline and talk about how the current pandemic could bring about a new wave of bathroom. Related Innovation Now I think I'm going to be thinking about the bathrooms a lot more than usual. You're welcome we're talking with Elizabeth. Yuko about how infectious disease influenced the American bathroom. So let's start in the mid to late. Eighteen hundreds when Elizabeth says we started seeing the first sanitation and sewer networks in urban centers around the country. This made indoor plumbing possible so if you were wealthy there might be a small sink in the corner of your bedroom but it did take folks awhile to come around to the indoor toilet the toilets at this point. We're still outdoors even though while your families could put them in the house. There was this idea that sewer gases asthma's were coming up through the toilet and could make you sick so they were still using chamber pots in the House. And then having an outhouse to go outside so These chamber pots. If a you know wanting to spruce place up a bit had a wooden box that went over it and they were pretty looking sometimes. Intricately carved wooden boxes to stop. Hide the fact that it's a pot that you go to the bathroom and in your home. I wasn't sure you were going to send a theater so I'm going out together. It was a journey. So yes once that became a fixture then when bathrooms themselves sorted springing up and bathtubs became the norm and indoor plumbing became more prominent the fixtures. The bathroom work typically covered in would not the insides but the exterior parts of the toilet. The bathtub sink anything to make them look like real furniture and not part of a bathroom. Because at this point we still don't want we don't think about what we do in the bathroom and you know anything could make it look than that was was seen as a good idea in that changed right like in the Early Twentieth Century Nineteen early nineteen hundreds Kinda shifted away from would. Why was that so would was dark and porous and at this point we realized that germ theory was a thing and do that. These little crevices could house dirt and germs and dust and so the idea was to make everything as clean as possible and as easy to clean as possible so would really was not a great option. Especially this like intricately carved Victorian patterned would that they had all over their bathrooms and then also Taurean bathrooms. You had heavy drapery around the windows wallpaper. Sometimes rugs carpeting so it was a very kind of ornate plush kind of fuzzy set up in these Victorian bathrooms and that will change. Thank God essentially medical folks were able to convince people that indoor toilets connected to a public sewer system were better at stopping the spread of infectious disease. Also around this time. Elizabeth says there was a quote sanitation craze. Which meant goodbye. Would Hello Enamel. So a lot of brands would use sanitation as kind of marketing technique. Like we're the most sanitary restaurant or something like that. So this was something that was catching on and colour pre you probably know from toilets and bathtubs they pay your type of enamel that went over cast iron for bathtubs which then became our became used in the rest of the bathroom as well and that was marketed. As being sanitary hygienic right in in like someone around that time there was like a huge amount of curriculum in these communities and tuberculosis actually played a role in our bathroom design. Right yes because in the time before antibiotics rest sunlight and fresh air were the best known cures treatments for circular and when people got sick they if they had the opportunity went to a to Burkina Sanatorium to cure and these were purpose built. Buildings really had a big windows. Make sure there's enough and elation and sunlight air everything inside was white and easily cleaned and this idea of having the sterile white healing environment caught on for sin hospitals but then also when people's homes. Yeah so what about influenza? How did that shape things in in bathrooms back then so after the in one thousand nine hundred eighteen flu epidemic which also coincided with high levels of October Kilo says? There is an idea of having a second bathroom on the ground floor of your home. And this is in wealthier homes where you had an indoor bathroom little onto and yet here was that because we're getting daily deliveries things like ice and coal. You had this delivery person who was traipsing around your neighborhood. Going into all of your neighbor's homes picking up. Who knows what type of diseases and then coming into your home. So this person to wash their hands or use the restroom. While they're in your home they could do so right on the ground floor without having to go up the stairs and use the family's personal bathroom and spread germs up there which is so brilliant. I mean it's like it makes so much intuitive sense to me and I guess I never really thought about like the powder room being a bathroom for the stranger. I thought about it in like weird. I don't know what kind of Weird Puritan things are going on my mind but it was like away so you don't have use my bathroom in. I don't have to be embarrassed but it makes way more sense that it's like a bathroom that keeps people from coming all the way into your house. Yeah Brilliant Brilliant. Bathroom stuff okay. So can I just ask about one? Specific thing short is going on with like the fuzzy rugs and like the Fuzzy toilet seat covers. Why Elizabeth tell me why those exist. I wish I had better answers but once we got to a point where we understood germ theory. We had antibiotics. We're pretty confident. In our ability to cure ourselves of a lot of these illnesses. We got a little lazy when it came to decoration. Although lazy is not really the word. It's less focused on sanitation and hygiene and we had a vacuum cleaner and a washing machine. Just tossed that thing in the Washer and everything would be fine so we stopped thinking as much about how easy things to wipe or clean. And that's when stuff like. That came into bathrooms. So how do you think you know? It's it's it's hard to talk about this without thinking about the fact obviously that we are in the middle of a pandemic that might shape. You know or probably will shape us in a lot of different ways. Do you think bathrooms are going to change now after this virus outbreak? I don't know if they're gonNA change but one thing that I did write about was Lloyd alter one of the people interviewed from the Ryerson School of Interior Design He predicted that. We'll see a rise of vestibules and sink specifically end vestibules. So since they will you encounter as soon as you walk into. Someone's home so you could wash your hands right away And I think that absolutely makes sense. Yeah I I've started coming in my house through the back door because my kitchen sink is right there just to like wash my hands immediately when I come in the house if I leave. Yes we think that will be moving forward. That will be a focus and think any design is really going to be made with. What if we have to self isolate for months at a time again? We might have a day for example. Because you know that's not something that is common in America as it is in other parts of the world but now as people running at toilet paper. They're seeing that. It's actually a pretty great invention you know. I know that as journalists were not supposed to be political. But I'll just say I'm prob- A day and I just keep thinking about how much toilet paper I wouldn't need right now if I had one. Yeah I I'm pro day as well and And a user as well so it's yes I'm a fan and I'm glad that I mean I wish it didn't go pandemic for us to realize this is a useful thing but I'm I'm glad we're there. Yeah so you wrote about how overtime humans kind of went back and forth between responding to you know like trauma that comes along with massive infectious disease by trying to make ourselves feel a little bit more comfortable or by implementing design features that make our homes and bodies easier to clean. And I just think it's going to be kind of interesting. You know what combination of those things happen with corona virus. Have you thought about that? Yes I think? A lot of people probably have even if they haven't realized it because the past few weeks we've been spending almost all of time in our own homes staring at the walls of our house or apartment in ways that we probably never had before. And so whether we're in the bathroom washing our hands for twenty second intervals or for sitting in the kitchen or living room looking at how we've decorated moving forward. Republicans take this pandemic and this time you've spent at home into consideration when making design choices right and I think there's going to be like kind of a renewed focus about even just like thinking of those spaces because you know I didn't think about the fact that I needed to come in and wash my hands as soon as I came from the outside until this and so now I know this seems silly but like I enter my house differently now. It's not silly. It's I mean. We have to adapt changes because of public health situations all the time and this is just another example of that okay. Elizabeth honestly thank you so much for this piece so so interesting. Thank you so much. Glad someone else's enthusiastic about bathrooms. Also I mean yes I mean seriously though. I will not think of a bathroom the same way when I enter it now. And that's on you. I'm touched

Elizabeth Yuko Bioethicist Influenza White House Early Twentieth Century Ninete Tuberculosis Burkina Sanatorium Ryerson School Of Interior Des America Lloyd
South Africa's TB, HIV history prepares it for virus testing

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

South Africa's TB, HIV history prepares it for virus testing

"South Africa one of the world's most unequal countries with a large population vulnerable to the new coronavirus may have an advantage in the outbreak honed during years battling HIV and tuberculosis the know how and infrastructure to conduct mass testing health experts stress not the best way to slow the spread of the virus is through extensive testing the quick quarantine of people who are positive and tracking who those people came into contact with the most people the new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms but for some it can cause severe illness and death I'm Charles de Ledesma

South Africa HIV Charles De Ledesma
Airborne, Explained

Reset

07:58 min | 1 year ago

Airborne, Explained

"There's lot of conflicting information out there right now about whether or not this novel. Corona virus is airborne as recently as this month. Some public health officials have said that it's not airborne but I just needed to confirm. This is the corner virus able from what we knew. It's not a gun. It's spread by droplets. We certainly stone. Cnn evidence of airborne spread in based on our local experience. The virus is not airborne. This is very different than infections that are transmitted by the airborne route such as measles. Roxanne Kenzi is a science reporter and she says that we need to take a closer look at this claim. You can't get scared by one word but you have to know what the word means if you break down at literally just means something's in the air so if you're coughing into your elbow and and your cash all that droplet into your elbow I mean at some point. It was in the air between your mouth and your elbow but it got caught. I I think that what the mistake is to think that something that is airborne is something that as soon as you cough. It's everywhere like that's that's just not the way to look at something so given all that. What exactly does airborne mean so? There is not a great answer to that question. I think that you can take a very simplistic view. Which means Airborne Indians? Something is in the air? I mean if you're open the dictionary that's what it means and if you were to ask people who are era. Biologists so the people who study how pathogens spread in the air. They'll say the same thing they'll say anything. That's in the air as airborne but a lot of fire Especially a lot of public. Health officials. Have the idea that something is airborne if it is spread by Aerosol and not by droplets now you're wondering what is the difference between droplets Arizona's right. Yeah that is one hundred percent what I'm thinking right now. So traditionally public health officials at least recently have been defining the droplet as something. That's like a ball of mucus and virus and salts that is larger than five microns in diameter. That you're GONNA COFFIN UP SPEWING OUT AND ANYTHING SMALLER THAN that. Could be an aerosol. That floats around like indefinitely in the air. Because it's lighter and it's floating her you know it's kind of imagine like a feather like floating in air okay. So there are large droplets that can float around in the air and they are fine aerosols that lasts longer in the air. That's the distinction right. And if you trace back where they came up with this. It goes back to these equations from the Nineteen Thirties where people were trying to figure out like tuberculosis. And how it spread. So we're talking about a really antiquated point of view on these things and hugely arbitrary like I asked the. Who How do you know that this Kobe thing is airborne? Had you know? It's like droplets and I did not get good answer from them. So why are some scientists still sing that we don't know if the virus that causes cove in nineteen is airborne because we don't I mean the thing is we actually don't have evidence to say whether it's airborne or not in a normal setting in settings where people are getting intimated and it's kind of spewing this thing into the air even the WHO says there is a risk of being airborne in the situations but we're operating in an absence of evidence? What I'm getting from us that there's really no like you can't tell me right now in the context of this interview. You can't tell me right now whether it is or it's not we just don't know exactly so the People. I spoke with who witnessed SARS almost twenty years ago and dealt with that public health disaster. They're saying that. We should operate on the precautionary principle that this is more easily airborne than were saying it is or assuming it is because technically does travel in the air so it is quote unquote airborne. So is this just a language thing? Is it just that most virologist think of something being airborne as being transmitted through fine aerosols as opposed to large droplets completely? We're talking about a failure of language in my opinion. So we're talking about of a a word that is failing us because it can't really capture all the nuances of the different situations. So if you're standing in front of an ocean and you feel the splash of the huge droplets of sea spray. Those are pretty big droplets. But it's the wind that's carrying it to your face. So could we not consider those airborne? I think that's what a lot of the people that study. This type of transmission are saying. Why do you think understanding this whole airborne situation when it comes to cove in nineteen and the virus that causes it? Why do you think that's important? I think it's important to understand how easily transmissible this viruses in the air first and foremost for Public Health Workers. So if we say as like the CDC said it's okay to wear like Bandannas in some situations with this if you're like encountering patient's or whatnot I think that's a problem. I think that we're loosening standards. Maybe a little too easily. Because this mantra has been repeated over and over that it's not airborne. What are the top three things that you think people are getting wrong right now? I think that the top three things that people are getting right now are that the virus is only transmissible by touch which is not something that I think we can assume. The second thing that they need to know is that we need to find out information about this before we can understand exactly how airborne it is. I think we have to reserve judgment and hang on for that and I think that the third thing that people need to know is that they need to be kind of up in arms about getting production of ninety five mass which are more effective than abandon. Ah in protecting health workers to increase than that. The government should really kind of be stepping up for that speaking of masks. There's a question that I know is on a lot of people's minds right now. Which is that. It's really hard to hear that People who work in medical fields should be wearing masks. These n ninety five masks but then to also here officials say to the public. Please don't purchase these. You don't need them. So how do you talk about that issue? How do you talk about to the public about this problem? So I'll speak about this issue about whether the public needs to buy masks on kind of personal level and that's I know right now. There's a shortage of mass and the people who need those masks most are doctors. Nurses people on the frontlines. And that if you're basically doing the social distancing that you're supposed to be doing right now you don't need a mask right if you earn keeping far apart from people and stay home like you don't need a mask right so I'm not here to say that masks don't work. I'm just here to say let's get them to the people who need the most. This whole confusion over the word airborne whether it's okay to use it maybe it's a matter of not necessarily using the word airborne but talking about people coughing in and talking about those kinds of risks a little bit more and in some ways. I would say that that's why we've been told to stay six feet away from people right. You're so smart because actually as I'm talking to you like I'm thinking what if we just didn't use the word airborne at all because it just means in the air so like what. If we started talking about measures that could just be more practical. You know right I mean I think I think that's probably part of what we're seeing right now. This whole speedway thing this whole. Don't stand next to somebody. Who's coughing thing. I think? Unofficially that is a way to talk about the fact that this is transmitted through the air and not just on surfaces But the word airborne evokes so much anxiety and fear that it is just not even worth using right now because we just don't understand it and and it hasn't been communicated to people properly

CNN Nineteen Thirties Public Health Workers Roxanne Kenzi Arizona Reporter CDC Kobe Bandannas
How does the new coronavirus compare with the flu?

Dr. G Says

10:13 min | 1 year ago

How does the new coronavirus compare with the flu?

"Coronaviruses are RNA viruses they're very infectious the cousins are measles and if buyers is that cause the common cold which are also corona viruses but they're not novel corona viruses the ones that cause the common cold we've had around for years and years and when your listeners get Sniffles and you know start to cough it said Trinh and it's usually early winter or early spring this is corona virus as a rule but the novel coronavirus the corona virus of twenty nineteen is a specific mutant to which we have no immunity we've had a herd immunity from the old corona viruses that infect us and cause the common cold but we don't have any specific immunity to the new coronavirus now these viruses are very infectious so you breed on somebody and you can transmit the disease the reason you do that is because you have receptors for these viruses in your tongue the cheeks your nose your lungs and even in your heart and so when you get loaded with virus your immune system has got to fight this virus that it is never seen before so there's all kinds of new immune processes that go in which are very complicated they go into effect to try to overcome this new infection and that is primarily corona back now the which reason it's called corona viruses the covering of the virus and this is extremely small virus which can only see under the electron microscope so it's invisible to the naked eye these viruses have projections that stick out that make them look like they have a crown and that's why it's called the corona or crown virus so how does it spread and what's the life cycle like from the time of infection to win symptoms may begin to present themselves to when someone's all better yes so that's that's a good question now the problem with this virus is that you can have it and not know it when someone is exposed to somebody who's definitely infected proven infected it takes about five days at the least to show symptoms and the median time is eleven point five days so we would like to quarantine people for two weeks because we know that within two weeks you're going to show signs of the infection so that's the rule of thumb now the problem with this virus as I just said is that you can have it and not know it and about eighty percent of people that are infected with this will have something that you would consider a head cold or mildly scratchy throat and that's it nothing else and then there's twenty percent of people who may have what we in medicine call call morbidities that is either have diabetes run chemotherapy you're an alcoholic you smoke too much you have bad asthma you have COPD if you're older you have emphysema people like that that get this virus from somebody else wind up with bad kinds of rest a Tory problems lung problems and most of the deaths that occur from pneumonia and overwhelming lung infection and that's why everybody has to be checked out everybody has to be careful because we don't know who those people are that have these these glitches in their immune systems we're talking to the chairman of medicine at Saint Joseph university hospital Dr Baba heater here on I heart radio there's two other types of illnesses that a lot of people are dealing with at the moment the flu and allergies how can people tell them apart from Kobe nineteen will cover nineteen S. as Tony Fauci the head of the N. I. H. St is about ten times worse than the flu that's when you get the bad infection you'll run a high fever but you do that with the flu if you haven't been immunized you'll get muscle aches and pains you have no idea perhaps vomiting maybe some diarrhea all of these things are similar to that which you would get when you get the flu and it's extremely difficult to tell the difference but the difference is we have a vaccine for the flu and we also have a rapid test we do in the emergency room to determine whether you have the flu we can do it on site most hospitals have flu swabs in flu tests that they can do and you can get a result within an hour the allergies are very easy you don't run a high fever with allergies you you have Sniffles you do your you know your nose turns red you cough up a lot of gunk but that's not the same thing as the flu and it certainly is not the same thing as cobra nineteen you just product testing can you explain for a moment what we should know about tasks for this coronavirus and why they seem to be a bit more complicated than say a test for the flu yes so the reason they are difficult is that the testing because coronas are very common the regular garden variety coronas we have to be able to discern which one is coded nineteen there's a very complicated process which revolve is around the fact that this is a DNA virus and we do something called polymerase chain reaction on the sample that's why regular hospitals don't have at this point the capability of testing for this virus it has to go to the state health department and before that it had to go to the communicable disease center better known as the CDC you know the P. C. R. which we routinely do for things like diarrheal infections we do the PCR for tuberculosis now this has this is a test that has stream Leist as streamlined diagnosis of infections thirty years ago we don't have anything like this we would have to culture you for T. B. we would have to find out you know when your school if you had organisms that cause diarrhea now we can do the same thing for corona virus but we have to be able to produce the markers namely the R. N. A. ribonucleic acid from the virus which we can get we have to multiply that and then we have to create these little tests that will define and show us that you the patient has an antibody or that is something that really reacts with this in in what's called the polymerized chain reaction the polymerized chain reactions a little complicated to describe your listeners but suffice it to say that that's the reason we haven't had test up front really quickly we're talking to the chairman of medicine at Saint Joseph university hospital Dr Bob Lee Hida a lot of information is floating online suggestions for how people can keep themselves and their families better protected what are some practices are products that we know actually work hand washing with soap works pure rail or hand sanitizers work if you can get a hold of some we have them on the walls here I have a bottle right on my desk in front of me here I have several bottles at home and I wipe my hands down and I also get those you know those wipes we use in the gym yes things right like Jim stop if you're going to a gym in your working out with a lot of other P. people you want to really wipe the machines that I should be doing that anyhow but now you really should do that if you go to the theater you should wipe the chair down before you sit down and watch a movie and most people are going to go to theaters and movie theaters and sit with two hundred people today nor are they going to go to Broadway shows and do the same thing or flying an airplane you got a white you should have done this before corona you got to wait to see down you got to wait the tray table down and make sure that things are pretty clean because these viruses can stay on surfaces for upwards of two days and some people are saying even longer what about face masks well with my patients that have certain illnesses I make them wear face masks now the face mask they wear is the cloth face masks the N. ninety five facemask to the basement that grips around your nose and is any seamless you you you breathe through that mass but there's no leakage of air around it the regular cloth face masks does one thing it protects you from touching your face because if you handle some object that's been contaminated with the virus can you touch your face and that's a problem you'll get the infection it'll go right up into your nary's of your nose or into your mouth and everybody touches their face so we're saying we're a mask a regular cloth mask it'll prevent you from touching your face also wash your hands as much as you can and keep their hands as sterile as possible now if you are infected and you're coughing up phlegm and you're hopping up what you think maybe virus you should wear a nice N. ninety five mask or at the least the surgical mask where ever you go and frankly shouldn't go anywhere you should stay in your house don't go to the emergency room don't go to your doctor's office because you're going to contaminate everybody else that's there if you have trouble breathing or you're running a super high fever then you go to the emergency room where then you go to your doctor's office dial nine one one get an ambulance and get over there or have somebody drive you that's my advice is there anything else about this disease or outbreak do you think it's important we now I think I think there's not much we need to know right now there's very little known about the course it's going to take whether it's going to fade away in the summer or whether it's going to continue into the fall I do hope that we have a vaccine in the early fall September October time so that we can all get immunized with the flu at the same time we can get vaccinated against corona nineteen covert nineteen because that was that's the only surefire way that we're gonna be able to control this infection as you know it's it's devastating certain countries in Europe like get Lee and countries like China and and it's just been devastating to all sorts of populations especially the elderly those elderly people who were quite ill with lung disease or people who chain smoke probably even people who smoke pot you've got a big understanding that your lungs are irritated and when you have an irritated long it sets you up for roaring infection with this virus because their receptors in the long for the

Sniffles Trinh
Do health care providers have a duty to work during pandemics?

Second Opinion

03:42 min | 1 year ago

Do health care providers have a duty to work during pandemics?

"Physicians and nurses and others at the University of California. Davis are facing a time honored dilemma. They have a social contract with society to provide healthcare in both sunny in stormy weather for the most part over the past one hundred years. The forecast has been generally rosy antibiotics and public health interventions have kept. The American public generally healthy today. The major killers of Americans are chronic diseases. Things like Diabetes Heart Disease and cancer infectious diseases like TB and polio and Spanish. Flu are no longer serious public. Health threats these chronic diseases do not pose a threat to health workers the way that infectious diseases did and still do over the past forty years the world has been challenged by a series of new infectious diseases. Hiv SARS Ebola murs and now covert nineteen they threaten the public's health and perhaps place healthcare workers at an even greater risk of contagion so the question is do health care. Workers need to assume a risk to their own health to assure that patients receive care for decades. Ten percent of each medical school class would develop tuberculosis in the early nineteen. Hundreds hundreds of doctors died from Spanish flu and the same was true for those caring for people affected with Ebola. I can remember in the early years of caring for HIV infected patients and in covering the HIV epidemic for NPR. I met providers who refuse to care for HIV infected persons perhaps because of fear but also because of a hostility toward the victims homosexual men and drug users the stigmatized received inferior care returning to co vid if all providers get sick that would be a disaster to current patients. But so would it be a disaster? If healthcare providers refuse to come to work. What would it be like if a firefighter was only willing to fight? Small fires or a police officer would only respond to parking violations out of fear for their own safety. We cannot ask health providers to assume risks to their own health. Unless we're doing everything to minimize those risks but today we have protective where that we didn't have a generation ago masks gowns disinfectants. In the like we also have powerful medicines and ventilators that can increase the chance of people surviving but we need healthcare providers to accept some personal risk and a moral commitment by adhering to their social contract that provides for a duty to treat people. Medical students understand the inherent personal risk when they arrive at medical school and they are immediately reminded of this risk in our opening ceremonies. That welcomes them to the profession. The public depends on our commitment to put their welfare above our own to our commitment to provide unbiased compassionate care and to our willingness to place ourselves at some risk by simply coming to work albeit with reasonable protections. I am proud that my colleagues at UC Davis are standing tall and they are united in their commitment to provide care to all those in.

HIV Davis University Of California Ebola FLU Uc Davis TB Tuberculosis Officer NPR
Coronavirus: Utah man moved from cruise ship to hospital amid quarantine

Radio From Hell

02:15 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus: Utah man moved from cruise ship to hospital amid quarantine

"I usual man who's been stuck on board a quarantine ship off the coast of Japan has in fact factor tested positive for coronavirus drawn herring of to Willa was a sailing on the diamond princess cruise line with his wife Melanie when the two became quarantine David that an outbreak of coronavirus on the ship well John felt fine at first he said he developed a fever that lasted for three days he said it reached a hundred and four degrees at one point and with no medicine available he use cold towels for relief on the fourth day herring said he woke with no fever felt much better that's when the doctor called him and said you're going to the hospital an ambulance took caring to a hospital in Chiba near Tokyo hearing learn Friday morning that he and Tess back tested positive for covert nineteen which is what they're calling the novel coronavirus he's now isolated in his small hospital room and herring showed fox thirteen how medical staff were serving him meals through a cabinet in the wall but they can access from the other side so there are people just trying to not even go in them at all he said he's been talking to family as he passes the time alone in his room I remember my mother as Billy was telling me stories about when she was a kid you would see signs on people's houses they would quarantine I think if there was a measles outbreak in the neighborhood they go around hang signs on people's door saying this this home is quarantine measles and that's how they tried to deal with the spread and I think tuberculosis was another one as I recall she said it was not uncommon to see quarantine signs just on people's houses can I do that so people leave me alone sure maybe yeah if you if you can get a wheelchair at the airport without being really in need of one I think you can probably do that he said his doctors will tested again in three days to see if he still infected in order to be released from the hospital herring said he needs to test negative for coronavirus twice in a row that means he could be in the hospital anywhere for more than a week to more than a

Japan Willa Melanie David John Fever Herring Chiba Tokyo Tess FOX Billy Tuberculosis
Scientists just discovered a better way to use the tuberculosis vaccine

News, Traffic and Weather

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Scientists just discovered a better way to use the tuberculosis vaccine

"Scientists believe they figured out a way to make the tuberculosis vaccine better about a hundred years after the vaccine was developed scientists now believe they found a way to improve its potency simply give a shot a different way the national institutes of health conducted a study with monkeys and checked in the vaccine straight into the bloodstream instead of under the skin and that method dramatically improve the shots effectiveness a senior author of the study says more safety studies are required before testing the approach in people to Berkeley Loews's kills about one point seven million people globally a

Berkeley Loews Tuberculosis
"tuberculosis" Discussed on AP News

AP News

07:50 min | 1 year ago

"tuberculosis" Discussed on AP News

"Tuberculosis kills more than 1000000 people a year mostly in poor countries the only vaccine protects babies but it's far less effective at preventing teens and adults from getting the deadly lung infection in test with monkeys researchers found the vaccine works dramatically better when injected straight into the bloodstream instead of today's skin deep shot more safety studies are needed before the approach is tested in people the findings appear in the journal nature I'm showing after

tuberculosis
"tuberculosis" Discussed on AP News

AP News

07:50 min | 1 year ago

"tuberculosis" Discussed on AP News

"Tuberculosis kills more than 1000000 people a year mostly in poor countries the only vaccine protects babies but it's far less effective at preventing teens and adults from getting the deadly lung infection in test with monkeys researchers found the vaccine works dramatically better when injected straight into the bloodstream instead of today's skin deep shot more safety studies are needed before the approach is tested in people the findings appear in the journal nature I'm showing after

tuberculosis
"tuberculosis" Discussed on AP News

AP News

07:50 min | 1 year ago

"tuberculosis" Discussed on AP News

"Tuberculosis kills more than 1000000 people a year mostly in poor countries the only vaccine protects babies but it's far less effective at preventing teens and adults from getting the deadly lung infection in test with monkeys researchers found the vaccine works dramatically better when injected straight into the bloodstream instead of today's skin deep shot more safety studies are needed before the approach is tested in people the findings appear in the journal nature I'm showing after

tuberculosis
"tuberculosis" Discussed on AP News

AP News

07:50 min | 1 year ago

"tuberculosis" Discussed on AP News

"Tuberculosis kills more than 1000000 people a year mostly in poor countries the only vaccine protects babies but it's far less effective at preventing teens and adults from getting the deadly lung infection in test with monkeys researchers found the vaccine works dramatically better when injected straight into the bloodstream instead of today's skin deep shot more safety studies are needed before the approach is tested in people the findings appear in the journal nature I'm showing after

tuberculosis
"tuberculosis" Discussed on AP News

AP News

07:50 min | 1 year ago

"tuberculosis" Discussed on AP News

"Tuberculosis kills more than 1000000 people a year mostly in poor countries the only vaccine protects babies but it's far less effective at preventing teens and adults from getting the deadly lung infection in test with monkeys researchers found the vaccine works dramatically better when injected straight into the bloodstream instead of today's skin deep shot more safety studies are needed before the approach is tested in people the findings appear in the journal nature I'm showing after

tuberculosis
"tuberculosis" Discussed on AP News

AP News

07:50 min | 1 year ago

"tuberculosis" Discussed on AP News

"Tuberculosis kills more than 1000000 people a year mostly in poor countries the only vaccine protects babies but it's far less effective at preventing teens and adults from getting the deadly lung infection in test with monkeys researchers found the vaccine works dramatically better when injected straight into the bloodstream instead of today's skin deep shot more safety studies are needed before the approach is tested in people the findings appear in the journal nature I'm showing after

tuberculosis
"tuberculosis" Discussed on AP News

AP News

07:50 min | 1 year ago

"tuberculosis" Discussed on AP News

"Tuberculosis kills more than 1000000 people a year mostly in poor countries the only vaccine protects babies but it's far less effective at preventing teens and adults from getting the deadly lung infection in test with monkeys researchers found the vaccine works dramatically better when injected straight into the bloodstream instead of today's skin deep shot more safety studies are needed before the approach is tested in people the findings appear in the journal nature I'm showing after

tuberculosis
"tuberculosis" Discussed on AP News

AP News

07:50 min | 1 year ago

"tuberculosis" Discussed on AP News

"Tuberculosis kills more than 1000000 people a year mostly in poor countries the only vaccine protects babies but it's far less effective at preventing teens and adults from getting the deadly lung infection in test with monkeys researchers found the vaccine works dramatically better when injected straight into the bloodstream instead of today's skin deep shot more safety studies are needed before the approach is tested in people the findings appear in the journal nature I'm showing after

tuberculosis
"tuberculosis" Discussed on AP News

AP News

07:50 min | 1 year ago

"tuberculosis" Discussed on AP News

"Tuberculosis kills more than 1000000 people a year mostly in poor countries the only vaccine protects babies but it's far less effective at preventing teens and adults from getting the deadly lung infection in test with monkeys researchers found the vaccine works dramatically better when injected straight into the bloodstream instead of today's skin deep shot more safety studies are needed before the approach is tested in people the findings appear in the journal nature I'm showing after

tuberculosis
"tuberculosis" Discussed on AP News

AP News

07:50 min | 1 year ago

"tuberculosis" Discussed on AP News

"Tuberculosis kills more than 1000000 people a year mostly in poor countries the only vaccine protects babies but it's far less effective at preventing teens and adults from getting the deadly lung infection in test with monkeys researchers found the vaccine works dramatically better when injected straight into the bloodstream instead of today's skin deep shot more safety studies are needed before the approach is tested in people the findings appear in the journal nature I'm showing after

tuberculosis
"tuberculosis" Discussed on AP News

AP News

07:50 min | 1 year ago

"tuberculosis" Discussed on AP News

"Tuberculosis kills more than 1000000 people a year mostly in poor countries the only vaccine protects babies but it's far less effective at preventing teens and adults from getting the deadly lung infection in test with monkeys researchers found the vaccine works dramatically better when injected straight into the bloodstream instead of today's skin deep shot more safety studies are needed before the approach is tested in people the findings appear in the journal nature I'm showing after

tuberculosis
"tuberculosis" Discussed on AP News

AP News

07:50 min | 1 year ago

"tuberculosis" Discussed on AP News

"Tuberculosis kills more than 1000000 people a year mostly in poor countries the only vaccine protects babies but it's far less effective at preventing teens and adults from getting the deadly lung infection in test with monkeys researchers found the vaccine works dramatically better when injected straight into the bloodstream instead of today's skin deep shot more safety studies are needed before the approach is tested in people the findings appear in the journal nature I'm showing after

tuberculosis
"tuberculosis" Discussed on AP News

AP News

07:50 min | 1 year ago

"tuberculosis" Discussed on AP News

"Tuberculosis kills more than 1000000 people a year mostly in poor countries the only vaccine protects babies but it's far less effective at preventing teens and adults from getting the deadly lung infection in test with monkeys researchers found the vaccine works dramatically better when injected straight into the bloodstream instead of today's skin deep shot more safety studies are needed before the approach is tested in people the findings appear in the journal nature I'm showing after

tuberculosis
"tuberculosis" Discussed on AP News

AP News

07:50 min | 1 year ago

"tuberculosis" Discussed on AP News

"Tuberculosis kills more than 1000000 people a year mostly in poor countries the only vaccine protects babies but it's far less effective at preventing teens and adults from getting the deadly lung infection in test with monkeys researchers found the vaccine works dramatically better when injected straight into the bloodstream instead of today's skin deep shot more safety studies are needed before the approach is tested in people the findings appear in the journal nature I'm showing after

tuberculosis
"tuberculosis" Discussed on AP News

AP News

07:50 min | 1 year ago

"tuberculosis" Discussed on AP News

"Tuberculosis kills more than 1000000 people a year mostly in poor countries the only vaccine protects babies but it's far less effective at preventing teens and adults from getting the deadly lung infection in test with monkeys researchers found the vaccine works dramatically better when injected straight into the bloodstream instead of today's skin deep shot more safety studies are needed before the approach is tested in people the findings appear in the journal nature I'm showing after

tuberculosis
"tuberculosis" Discussed on AP News

AP News

07:50 min | 1 year ago

"tuberculosis" Discussed on AP News

"Tuberculosis kills more than 1000000 people a year mostly in poor countries the only vaccine protects babies but it's far less effective at preventing teens and adults from getting the deadly lung infection in test with monkeys researchers found the vaccine works dramatically better when injected straight into the bloodstream instead of today's skin deep shot more safety studies are needed before the approach is tested in people the findings appear in the journal nature I'm showing after

tuberculosis
"tuberculosis" Discussed on AP News

AP News

07:50 min | 1 year ago

"tuberculosis" Discussed on AP News

"Tuberculosis kills more than 1000000 people a year mostly in poor countries the only vaccine protects babies but it's far less effective at preventing teens and adults from getting the deadly lung infection in test with monkeys researchers found the vaccine works dramatically better when injected straight into the bloodstream instead of today's skin deep shot more safety studies are needed before the approach is tested in people the findings appear in the journal nature I'm showing after

tuberculosis
Delivering TB vaccine intravenously dramatically improves potency, study shows

Forum

01:02 min | 1 year ago

Delivering TB vaccine intravenously dramatically improves potency, study shows

"Medical researchers say they've come up with a more effective way to fight tuberculosis is NPR's ping Huang reports it uses an old vaccine in a new way there's been a vaccine for tuberculosis since the nineteen twenties but it doesn't work very well and it's unlimited use any animal study published in nature finds of the same vaccine it could work much better at preventing tuberculosis if it's given at a very high dose and deliver differently Joanne flan is an immunologist at the university of Pittsburgh and co author on the paper we found that giving it intravenously which delivers a high dose in the lives of the blood was incredibly protective against TB the study on rhesus monkeys find that ninety percent of the monkeys who receive the vaccine as a direct concentrated shot to the veins did not get to regular says no previous studies have gotten the vaccine to be that effective Flynn says there's still a lot more work to figure out why it works and how to make it safe and effective in humans long NPR

Tuberculosis NPR Joanne Flan Flynn Ping Huang University Of Pittsburgh
Staff handling elephants at Washington zoo test positive for latent tuberculosis

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:23 sec | 2 years ago

Staff handling elephants at Washington zoo test positive for latent tuberculosis

"Veterinarians at the point defiance zoo are keeping a close eye on two elephants the tested positive for tuberculosis this is as Hanako and suki are acting fine but to the concern is their age at ages fifty five and fifty six both elements are elephants are considered geriatrics intensive TB treatment is not the best approach no active human cases of TB there have been

Tuberculosis Hanako Suki TB Two Elephants
Experimental tuberculosis vaccine could save millions of lives

Buck Sexton

00:37 sec | 2 years ago

Experimental tuberculosis vaccine could save millions of lives

"And early human trial of the new tuberculosis vaccine is offering New Hope a lease is he has more the results of a three year clinical trial were published this week in the New England journal of medicine and were described as ground breaking the vaccine reportedly protected half of the people who received it TB is the world's most deadly infectious disease killing around one and a half million people a year the current vaccine was developed one hundred years ago and only protect children from certain types of TB it does not however protect adults or adolescents last year there were approximately ten million new infections reported around

New England Journal Of Medicin One Hundred Years Three Year