17 Burst results for "Truman Presidential Library"

"truman presidential library" Discussed on The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

06:00 min | 6 d ago

"truman presidential library" Discussed on The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

"Friday night. These are valuable answers for us as we approach this mythical day coming up his grandfather laid out a blueprint of what an orderly transition of presidential power should look like harry. Truman's grandson standing by to talk with us every four years. We gather on these steps to carry out the orderly and peaceful transfer of power and we are grateful to president obama and first lady michelle obama for their gracious aid throughout this transition. Only problem is that's not what he's doing now on the traditions of presidential succession. Our next guest writes my grandfather. Harry s truman initiated the protocols for the peaceful transfer presidential power as we know them today. Grandpa wanted ike to be able to hit the ground running without suffering a fate similar to his own because franklin roosevelt compartmentalized when he died on april twelfth of five. Grandpa ascended to the presidency knowing. Virtually nothing about how the white house had been running things for more. We are indeed thrilled to welcome to the broadcast. The grandson of our thirty third president harry truman. The aforementioned clifton truman daniels written the book on his grandfather growing up with my grandfather. Memories of harry s truman and portrayed him on stage a production of the one man show. Give them hell harry. He also the honorary chair of the truman library institute and i ask all our viewers if you ever get within five hundred miles of the truman presidential library. Please make the trip. You'll be glad you did Thank you very much for coming on our friend. The historian and undisputed king of black and white twitter. Michael beschloss posted a photo of your. And i today despite a fierce campaign in which each had criticized the other president. Truman welcomes president-elect eisenhower to the oval office yesterday nine thousand nine hundred fifty. Two y was a peaceful cooperative transition so important to your grandfather the state of the world and thank you for having me this evening. brian. I appreciate it. And the the. The state of the world is always. It's dangerous now. It is dangerous and many times. We had that time even though we were not the the world war two was long over. But we were. We were in korea. We still continuing the korean war so there are. There are things that a president has to be able to do has to know he has to have the intelligence briefing. He has to know how things work so that he can continue with continuity To the to keep things going to to to run the united states to to keep keep policies going keep things and be ready to meet the challenges. And grandpa knew that as i said he he was shocked at roosevelt's death and unprepared and he had to do a lot of catch up. I am knocking on wood. As i say this but we are so vulnerable right now. God forbid a thousand times to any foreign actors trying to pull something. During these next sixty days especially. The president has just decapitated a lot of the civilian leadership at the pentagon that threat of side. What's your fear about the permanent damage that might be piling up to the institution of the presidency and these grand traditions. We pride ourselves and following. I hope there is no permanent damage but that is my fear that what is happening now is unprecedented even though my grandfather and president-elect eisenhower not getting along at the time neither one of them would have would have even thought that this kind of thing could happen. It's unprecedented. it's undemocratic un-american and it does threaten our peaceful transfer of power is is a dare. I say it sort of the envy of the world. There are countries that that may be even still today. Stand in all of the fact that we do this every four years or every eight years that we've that we politely and collegiately even after bitter campaigns transfer. The power from the sitting president of the president elect It's it's an amazing thing to have accomplished and it's something that we That i am fear of losing. I'm again. I'm hopeful that that the institutions which some of your earlier guests were saying at the institutions of this country seemed to be holding up pretty well during all of this and i hope that continues. I greatly urge our viewers to read your book. a key west has been on my bucket list for years. I still haven't seen your grandfather's house down there. But i will especially when there's a vaccine clifton truman daniel what a great pleasure having you on. Thank you very much. Thank you brian. I appreciate you coming up for us. If the president says it enough times does it make it true with the possible exception of losing the powers of his office at twelve on january twentieth. We'll ask a professor who knows a little something about the power of words that's what he teaches when we come back. We're.

harry s truman president truman presidential library clifton truman daniels truman library institute Grandpa president-elect eisenhower franklin roosevelt brian obama michelle obama twitter Michael beschloss white house president-elect korea professor united states pentagon
"truman presidential library" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

08:55 min | 4 months ago

"truman presidential library" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"And this stranger is there And and I think one thing that you can't overstate is when. When Roosevelt I'm sorry. When Truman takes over in April of 1945. The bomb doesn't work. Yet there four months of blade from the first test, and there was a tremendous debate that was going on in throughout the government at that time, whether it would even work. Yes, they had split an atom in a laboratory. But whether you could take this this atomic chain reaction and harness and and create a super weapon that was very much in doubt. And in fact Admiral William Leahy, who was one of the top people in the Navy and was the chief of staff in the White House to Roosevelt and then also the Truman throughout the entire period of these 116 days and Countdown, 1945. Throughout that period late, he keeps saying, This is the biggest bit of bunk I've ever heard there. This thing will never work. So there was a lot of doubt as to whether it was gonna work, and therefore Truman had a lot of doubts about Don't you spend a lot of time in the Truman presidential library? What did you learn about how Harry Truman went about making the decision to deploy? Well, this was one of the most interesting parts to Nia. The whole story's isn't because I've interviewed seven presidents. I spent six years covering Ronald Reagan's White House in the eighties. So I was, You know, I like to think I'm a student of presidential decision making and, you know, sometimes you see it being done very well in And sometimes not so much that we're really three things that impressed me about Truman's first of all. How meticulous he waas. He goes over this again and again and again, And you know the choice. I think a lot of people didn't understand that I didn't fully understand this going into this. The choice wasn't dropped the bomb on Hiroshima or whatever the city it was going to be or do nothing. It was dropped the bomb. Or invade Japan. And so there was a lot of discussion on June 18th Truman House all of the war cabinet come. This includes Secretary of War Stimson and include some of the top admirals includes general of the Army, George Marshall, and he has them all come to the Oval Office and have a discussion about you know, what are we going to do to end the war in the Pacific? By June, the Nazis have surrendered on May Wait, So that's the war that's left. How are we going to end that war on the Japanese? Far from giving up are in fact fighting more fiercely than ever, And it's only I A fairly short discussion, I think was about an hour. But for about the 1st 15 minutes or so, it's simply a discussion of invading Japan, and one is leading the discussion is General Marshall and he says. Look, you know, he compares the casualty rates to what had happened in the invasion of Normandy and the invasion of some of the islands of the Pacific, and it comes up. I was astonished at this and I've read the minutes of the meeting with a specific number of how many troops he's going to need 766,700. I have no idea why it was that specific number, but that was the number, he said. And the projection is from all of the people that this is going to take at least a year. Here and maybe a year and 1/2. Remember their meeting in June of 45 they're saying this war will go on until the end of 1946 and they say we believe they're going to be a 1,000,000 Japanese casualties and up to 1/2 a 1,000,000 American casualties. And this is long description about first gonna hit Kyushu, the most southernmost island and we're going to have Hangzhou and on and on and at the end of the discussion anyway, the end of the discussion. Talking about the invasion in great detail at the end of the discussion, and this is one of the second thing that impressed me about Roman. He wanted to hear from everybody. He wanted to hear from people whether they agreed with the direction it was going in or not. He was not scared at all of this ends. One person has been silent in this whole meeting, and it's a fellow named John McCloy employ is an assistant secretary of war may be the most junior person in the room, but he was a very distinguished We're from New York. He was Stimson's troubleshooter, and Truman says to him, McCoy. Nobody leaves this room without saying what's on their mind. And McCoy turns to Stimson and like, Can I And Simpson says, Yeah, go ahead. And he says, Well, I think we ought to have our heads examined if we don't discuss other options, and then he does something that in the previous 45 15 minutes is and had not been done. He mentions the Mom for the first time, and it says, you know, there's this bomb, and I think we ought to consider that Which might you know might obviate the need for an invasion? And there's a discussion of it, but not a terribly serious and detailed discussion because again, they've never tested it. They don't know if it's gonna work. So a Zai say at the end of that chapter at that, at that point woman basically regarded it as a science project. He goes on to Potsdam, where he has this summit meeting with with Churchill and Stalin on DH. He has these meetings all over again. And with the the US work count competent with the British War Cabinet along with Churchill by this point when he starts having not in July, they've tested the bomb. I know what works and you know there's there's again a discussion and he basically decides I'm gonna drop the bomb. But then a few days later He has a meeting on July 20th with Dwight Eisenhower, the Supreme allied commander in Europe and the hero of the day and the conquest of the Germans, and he asked Eisenhower what he thinks. And he says, I don't think you should use the bomb. I think that one the Japanese will surrender anyway. On DH two. I don't think that the U. S should be the country to introduce this terrible technology to the world. So those are two of the Things. I promise. I'm going to end quickly. So first of all the meticulousness of his decisionmaking. Secondly, the fact that he sought out was not afraid was not put off by descent didn't always follow it, but he listened to it. And the third is that I think I think a lot of people have. This perception of Truman is being face of famously decisive. The buck stops here. He made a decision and he never looked back. In fact, he agonized over this decision. He Plaint of sleepless nights when he was in Potsdam. He had terrible, searing headaches, which he had throughout his career whenever he was under when he considered heavy stress and his diary and that's one of the joys of doing a book about people who are all gone. When I was in the Presidential library, I got ahold of his diaries during this whole period these whole 116 days that I talk about Countdown 1945 and He talked about the choice of using the bomb in apocalyptic terms. He kept saying, This is the most terrible weapon ever discovered. And he compared it to the fire destruction prophecy in the Bible, So he agonized over this decision as well. I think he should have he made the decision and he never looked back there after, but he certainly did not make this decision lightly. You write about the fact that a CZ groups the scientists involved in the development The military leaders had different opinions on the morality of using this weapon. What were the arguments that they were really hashing out on both sides of this question? Even I didn't say that. They're sort of three sides of this triangle and two of the three didn't have a lot of second thoughts. The politicians after the bomb was dropped. Like Truman, like his top officials and his work Cabinet never had any doubts about it. The military never had any doubts. Paul Tibbets, who was the commander of the Enola Gay, the plane that dropped the bomb, he said, This is war and in a war you you want to kill the enemy before the enemy kills you, and there's not a lot of morality attached a war. The scientists were different story, and it wasn't just second thoughts. A lot of had first thoughts..

Harry Truman War Stimson Truman House Japan White House Pacific Potsdam Admiral William Leahy General Marshall Roosevelt Ronald Reagan Paul Tibbets Normandy Dwight Eisenhower chief of staff Navy McCoy US Secretary Zai
"truman presidential library" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

06:33 min | 4 months ago

"truman presidential library" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"About three weeks later, the US dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshi MMA and Nagasaki, Japan, killing tens of thousands of civilians and leading to the Japanese surrender and the end of World War two. The atomic bomb project was so secret that Vice President Harry Truman didn't know about it until President Roosevelt died on April 12th 1945. President Truman's grandson, Clifton Truman, Daniel participates in a National World War two museum online discussion. Titled Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry Truman and the Manhattan Project. Joining him are FDR Presidential Library Museum director Paul Sparrow and historian Edward Lingle. This's American history TV on C SPAN radio. I'm have wangle I'm senior director of Programmes at the National World War Two Museum in New Orleans. And I'm joined today by two gentlemen. The first is Paul Sparrow, who is director of the Franklin D. Roosevelt President, Museum and Library are New York following a career as a documentary filmmaker and a senior executive at the museum, and that all has been directing the road is fell. Library NBC incident 2016 on he will be talking obviously, that FDR on the Manhattan Project, Our second guest is Clifton Truman Daniel, who is the eldest grandson. Of President Harry Truman is also a Truman scholar. He's spent quite a bit of time studying the life and career of his grandfather, and he currently serves his honorary chairman of the board of trustees at the Harry Truman Presidential Library and Museum in Independence, Missouri. Eso today we'll give a great opportunity for question and answer in, please weigh in with lots of questions. We've already been talking quite a bit off camera about our topic today, and I guarantee there's gonna be a lot of interesting ideas and discussion, so I will begin and introduce fall to the innocent program. You. Thank you And thank you, Clifton for being part of this today. I am very excited. This is one of those topics that has generated enormous amount of debate throughout the years. The background for Franklin Roosevelt, of course, is that he was struggling in the late 19 thirties to convince Americans who are very isolationist that they had taken interest in Of the problems that were going on in Europe and some of the things that he understood about the spread of fascist Nazi Germany and the threat from Japan. Many many Americans disagreed with, didn't want to see the American public. It involved so one of the big issues was revealing the military. Hundreds of new ships were constructive. There was awarded a peacetime draft instituted, and so he was very Focus on how America would respond to the threat from Nazi Germany. So I'm just gonna share of power point here that has a few images in it. That's the King and Queen and the president. And then this is really a lot of the left state Albert Einstein on the right. And so they started drafting this letter to the president to try to convince him that the United States needed to get involved now, although Leo's alarm was was a world famous physicist, obviously, he didn't have the same status. That our Einstein did it. So the letter was drafted under Einstein's name on here is a copy of the letter was you could see with sense in August of 1939 so the war in Europe has still has not started Yet. Germany doesn't invade Poland until September, but this is no the lead up to it. And this is Tremendous concern on the part of the scientists say Here's an extra that they become possible to set up a nuclear chain reaction in the large, massive uranium by which vast amounts of power large funnies new radium like elements would be generated. This new phenomenon would also leave the construction of bombs, and it's conceivable that much less certain extremely powerful bomb of a new time made us be constructed. A single bomb of this type carried by a vote and exploded in a port might very well destroy the whole port together with some of the surrounding territory. Then, of course, just a few weeks later, Germany invades Poland and we're in the start of World War two On October 19th FDR responds back, Tio Fester, Einstein and obviously a lot has been going on there. But, he said, I found this date of such import that I have convened a bureau consisting of the head of the bureau's standards in the troubles of representative of the Army and Navy to thoroughly investigate the possibilities of your suggestion regarding element of uranium. Now, over a period of the next several years, there's different committees they're formed. But on June 28th 1941 officer Scientific research and development is created, which oversees the whole project. And men in Vannevar Bush is put in charge, and this is really the point at which the whole project games tremendous Momenta. There is a sense now that there is a cohesive and coherent objective. They need to develop a bomb, and he did beat the Germans to it. And then, of course, just a few months later, the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, which gives even greater impetus to the development of this bomb. So the two men who are sort of responsible for the development on the left there, you see, Leslie grows. There was the North's representative essentially in charge of the entire operation on the right. You see the famous scientist Robert Oppenheimer there Los Alamos facility is the one that's most famous. But of course there more than 20 different facilities all across the country. 100,000 more than 100,000 people involved in this from extracting uranium core and building munitions and recruiting scientists and all done under top secrecy and Meanwhile, at the same time, the British have been developing a similar nuclear bomb development, which they called the tube alloy tze and early on the war..

Vice President Harry Truman Franklin D. Roosevelt Clifton Truman Daniel Harry Truman Presidential Libr Albert Einstein president FDR Presidential Library Museu Nazi Germany Museum and Library Manhattan Project Paul Sparrow Clifton Truman National World War Two Museum director United States Japan Germany Europe representative
"truman presidential library" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

08:37 min | 4 months ago

"truman presidential library" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"Hero in an icon's right here on the show, let a show on W. Cco radio and I was reading The Washington Post this morning. A and I saw David von Drehle ease column and I knew I had to invite him on and I am so honored that he is joining us. Tonight. Uh, David, thank you so much for being here. I appreciate it. The Honor's mine. Thank you very much for having me on Now tell us what was your reaction When you found out the congressman Lewis had passed on. Well. Of course, we knew he was He was ill. And so I can't say it was entirely a shock. But it wass A blow. Nonetheless, um, that generation of Men and women who Did so much and suffered so much on DH inspired so many of us Uh, through their example and their courage. Is passing away one by one. You know the same day that Congressman Lewis Reverend C T. Vivian, another of the great The Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Voices also passed away. And, uh, it's like history trying to tell us something that That, uh, the torch is being passed and that we need to Figure out how to face our times. With his much courage and dignity. They paid their And that's what struck me about your article. What is history trying to tell us? What do you mean by that? Go on in. One of the great moments of my life was I live in Kansas City, though I write for the Washington Post, and we had an event here a few years ago, when The Harry Truman Presidential Library on Earth. Congressman Lewis and his colleague Jim Clyburn. From South Carolina. Another great figure in the Classic civil rights movement of the 19 sixties. And, uh, I had the opportunity to interview the two of them on stage at this dinner on To be with Congressman Lewis. I finally have the chance to ask him how he Repaired himself. To face the violence that he knew he was going to encounter. With non violence with love and You know, he He gave a beautiful answer that I have in my column, but He ended on the note that he tells young people Not too Given to the sea of despair. And Uh, I feel like so many people right now are choosing whether they're going to Stand up. Of as John Lewis did or whether they're going to give up. And that's what's so heartening about what's going on in the country right now, as we look at the People starting there in Minneapolis and then spreading all over the country all over the world. Standing up on DH, not giving in to despair and And understanding that history is Is the relay race on DH. Ah! The fact that everything is not finished. By one generation on Lee only gives you no passes a job on to the next generation. If that makes any sense it does. It does. And you know, this is the thing when you were talking about hope, you know, my 13 year old son has been to several marches. Several protests. We live in Minneapolis, so he's been down to the memorial site We talk about George Floyd. We've watched the video. He's angry that no matter how good he does in school, or what kind of community service he does, or how he goes to the capital to legislate for Children with special needs that just putting his hand in his pocket. And walking down the street could get him shot. Found by police who don't understand him. And and so you know, I plan is a parent to teach him more about John Lewis so that he can Have hope, but I'm just interested to know. How did he? You know you spend time with him. You have had a chance to interview him. How did he maintained that hope Because just for my son the thought of that happening. Is enough to depress him. But But John Lewis was living this. He was being beaten. He was being bit by dogs and he kept going. Why? Hey, hey, came from desperately poor background. And you horrible. Over legal official oppression, uh, as the son of a sharecropper in southern Alabama. Um, And he had that. Deed. Religious faith that so many in the black Church have Grown up with and have had managed to hold on to through difficult times. And it infused him was genuine Hope he was also it sounds like your son is as well a really special young man who had the You know the the wherewithal and the gumption to reach out Ah! When he was 17 years old. He wrote a letter to Martin Luther King Jr asking for his help getting into college. Ah, you know, that takes a special kind of young person. It was a belief in himself in a belief in possibility, and you know you used the right word. It's it's about hope. And He There's a beautiful moment when he received the Presidential medal of Freedom, the highest civilian honor you can receive in the United States. From President Barack Obama. And he said afterwards that If anyone had told him Back in the 19 sixties, when he was being beaten for asking for his rights and for respect as a man and a human being. I have anyone had told him that he someday with Uh, received that award from an African American. President. He would have said You're crazy. You're crazy. That's not possible. So We have to When I say history is trying to tell us something. No. The reason it is important to look back at history because While we feel like we may be walking in place, we were were walking forward and we were making progress. And and the work to be done is Is no more impossible than the work that's already been accomplished. What? When? When we looked back on his legacy. There's so much that's so important. The marches the citians, um, the voting rights how he fought, Um How he lived, how he died. You know what? What's the one thing that comes to mind for you if if you had one thing to teach your Children one thing to teach this country About him. That would just embody his boldness and his vision in the movement that he created single handedly. What would it be? I think the word of I would use his love. He used it all the time. And not a not a easy simple You know? Valentine's Day..

Congressman Lewis Uh Congressman Lewis Reverend C T Minneapolis David von Drehle congressman The Washington Post Harry Truman Presidential Libr South Carolina Martin Luther King Jr President United States George Floyd Jim Clyburn Barack Obama Lee Kansas City Valentine
"truman presidential library" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"truman presidential library" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Think I have to read I have to view it that way looking forward and regardless of whether I'm going to be here for ten months or ten years you have to re evaluate all the time and understand its responsibility to do this Kevin killing say Lewis's newsradio KMOX your recommend facing multiple charges after allegedly attacking his grandparents with the golf club authorities say the couple both in their eighties suffered serious injuries forty year old Jason king is jailed without bond court documents say king became angry when is grandparent's accused him of stealing their medicine court documents say the attack happened Sunday an update on the carjacking in Sioux lard a woman and three children not physically hurt when they were carjacked and Szilard early this morning one of the suspected carjackers was killed in a crash after they sped from the scene singles police say the twenty eight year old woman was sitting in her vehicle on Lemme between ninth and tenth about one forty five this morning there were three children in the car three boys ages three five and eight three men approached and took her S. U. V. at gun point the suspects crashed into the back of a tractor trailer Broadway and Barton shortly there after two of the suspects were taken into custody a third man pronounced dead at the scene Kmart's news time for five in its annual report on the nation's preterm birth rate the March of dimes gives Missouri and Illinois the same grade a deep plus the preterm birth rate in both states is ten point seven percent that's slightly higher than the national average of ten point two percent the number's been going up every year in Missouri and Illinois since two thousand thirteen the preterm birth rate in Saint Louis city is getting worse now up to thirteen point seven percent in Saint Louis county it's improved to eleven point two percent Saint Charles county is shown improvement as well with nine point nine percent of babies born before they're due date Fred bottom or Saint Louis is newsradio KMOX came what's news time four oh six he was the only U. S. president from Missouri and the home of his legacy is getting a lot of TLC we have an update on the renovations at the Truman library construction is under way at the Harry S. Truman presidential library in independence and crews are making major progress slightly ahead of schedule even though there's actually a big open chunk in the side of the library regency straight through to the courtyard that's can't see the car ski director of strategic initiatives at the Truman library institute she says that the library will be nearly unrecognizable inside after the twenty five million dollar renovation and expansion is complete it will feature innovative interactive exhibits and will focus heavily on not only Truman's years in the White House but also on his life before and after and how Casey played a role in his political story you'll get a better understanding about how Missouri and midwestern roots played in to the president that he was officials plan for the library to open next fall just in time for the seventy fifth anniversary of his rise to the highest office in the land that's Brian lock reporting the Hillsborough misery sheriff's department is seen the ranks of its deputy dads grow as seventeen law enforcement officers welcome to babies this year fourteen of the seventeen law enforcement dad's their wives and babies gather yesterday at sandy creek covered bridge in Jefferson County for photos the babies were dressed in matching white onesies with deputy badges brown pants and accessories the new two newest babies were just ten days old the Jefferson bank and trust business desk a sugar fire smoke house showing no signs of slowing down its expansion plans the award winning fast casual restaurant known for its brisket sides and boozy milkshakes opening yet another location this time in Springfield Missouri the fifteenth location expected to open by the end of the year the Dow from steeple up thirty points today closing at twenty seven thousand four hundred ninety two traffic and weather together at four ten coming up in the news at four thirty then there were three the FCC clearing the way for the merger of sprint and T. mobile came what's news time for await St.

"truman presidential library" Discussed on People of the Pod

People of the Pod

09:49 min | 1 year ago

"truman presidential library" Discussed on People of the Pod

"Dr Kirk Graham is the director of the Harry. S Truman Presidential Library in Independence Missouri next year will be seventy five years since Truman succeeded. FDR's president and an anticipation of that anniversary sorry the Truman Library has undertaken a major renovation. Kurt join me in studio last week for a wide ranging and fascinating conversation on the importance of history. Sorry the founding of the State of Israel and Truman's legacy today Kurt. Thank you so much joining us great to be here. I WANNA start with kind of a Meta question from that thirty thousand in foot view before even dive into Truman. Why is it important to study history well. I mean if you think about where we've been that gives us. A good sense of is it provides context for where we are so I think the main reason to study history is to get context for your own time but also to expand your your experience we all lead fairly limited lives and I think you go back in the past and meet characters in the past for the same reason you take a plate of cookies and go meet your neighbors because that that expands your horizons expand your experience. It introduces you to people who don't think an act and talk and look like you do and I think that's always very beneficial. There's an interesting kind of debate. The in the community of historians think about or maybe a debate in the general public about whether history repeats itself your typical historian would say no but you can still learn something thing from history about maybe not learn about the future but as long as we know the lessons of history it can inform the way we address the future. Where where do you fall out. I think yeah I mean I think that people who who are fearful that somehow we're not learning the lessons of history. We're doomed to repeat some catastrophic decision. The fact of the matter is the context. The circumstances are always different so you you can't go back and say well see we learned this from World War. Two or we learned I mean honestly one of the reasons that Vietnam went the way it did is because we were applying the lessons of World War Two and it was a very different kind of engagement and so I I is obviously very worthwhile to study history to know ourselves better and to have a broader experience because it just makes us better the decision makers in general but the idea that we can go back and figure out what you know what Abraham Lincoln do in this situation well you know I mean you know people. Ask that all the time. What would the founders under. Do you know around this. You know global warming or something well. That was the furthest thing from their mind. They wouldn't have even known where to start with that question so we need to be bold enough to make our own decisions and not try to pass it off on other people who you know grab a quote and taken out of context and say we'll see here's what Emerson would have done or here's what Jefferson would have done well yeah. Maybe I'm picturing someone explaining leaning twitter to Abraham Yeah. I'm not sure how that would and trying to explain it. Not only one hundred forty characters Kurt your. AJC AJC story starts in two thousand eighteen at the AJC global forum in Jerusalem when you spoke on our main stage and you said quote you believe there's no better place in the United United States to tell the story of the founding of Israel than the Truman Library for our listeners who don't know that part of history. Can you tell us about Truman's role in the rebirth of modern Israel well. It is just to pick up on that on that statement. I appreciate you starting there. Because there is no other place there is no other museum. There is no other think tank. There is no other sort of university department or unit that is pursuing this important question and the thing that is important to me is that Harry Truman literally changed the map of the world. The fact that this farmer from Missouri became president it says a lot about a lot of things but it does have an impact on the world far beyond just farmers in Missouri so certainly his decision and desire hire to recognize Israel immediately upon its declaration and to have been concerned about that problem to have been concerned about the Holocaust about the DP camp. Some of this had been playing him for years. This was not oh he got three memos and you know sort of weighed this in in an afternoon decided what to do this decision which was momentous. Mantis was years in the making and and it speaks to the heart not just a crisis in the world and what needed to be done it speaks to WHO Harry Truman was he always was concerned about people who are being abused or or taking advantage of some ways I mean his civil rights. Legacy speaks to that he was ahead of his time in terms of an I don't know maybe that's not even the right phrase ahead of his time. He was concerned about others. It was a very basic principle whole there's a humanity to that. There's there's a reality that that Truman just always went back to kind of moral core when he made those kinds of decisions. I'm glad you mentioned that and Holocaust there. If I recall correctly Truman spoke at a rally in either New York or Chicago in Chicago. It was called. I'd like Rally for our Doom Jewish brothers in Europe something like that right to demand rescue the doom Jews I believe was the phrase and this was where where was this was in nineteen forty three when he was still in the US Senate yeah so he was a little known political figure at that time I mean he was getting known and being known for the Truman Committee which he went around the country in a crisis that we have on display at the museum the traveled No no first class jet travel in those days so he went from place to place and he was investigating fraud and abuse in government contracts around military installations and that kind of thing so so that was kind of what he was known for him he was getting known a a sort of a a guy that really knew how to find waste and fraud and the budget and whatnot but the idea that he was this voice for the underdog that he was this great humanitarian this champion the rights of other people even though those of us who look back on his career well of course I mean this was this was this was this was growing all along but the fact of the matter is that speech in Chicago was was a turning point for the rest of the world to hear from him with with that kind of clarity and this is a young senator with ambition establishing a foreign policy credential or this is just someone who feels called to speak out against injustice in the world. Oh I think it's I think but I think it's more the latter. I mean I really don't. I don't know that Truman at that time. I think that you know not only was he not necessarily trying to carve out his exact thing. You know we're we're used to the United States Senate Senate today being a place where as soon as people get there they start thinking about how they get on the ticket and what they do to position themselves for that next bump Truman was a senator senator. He was very hesitant to become vice president he wanted to stay in the Senate. you spoke a little bit about what the founding of if Israel would have meant to Truman and certainly what it meant for the world. Can you just back up a little bit and tell us the story you know my understanding is that kind of all of his advisors here in the states. All of his official advisors were saying you pump the brakes right so what happens in. May Nineteen forty eight well you know it is an interesting moment and it is not a moment that would be the easy to predict. I mean if you didn't know how the story turned out and somebody said okay. Here's all the data points leading up to this decision. How do you think it's going to go. I don't think you can clearly guess us what is going to happen because I think the decision was rooted. Not In policy not in the particulars was rooted in character and it was rooted in this deeper kind of humanity yeah the story was was that Truman with these DP camps and we had the Harrison report. He had all these things telling him look things are not good in Europe. These people are displaced in many cases. Don't have homes to go back to so this idea of a of a partition plan of the following through on the Balfour Declaration. which was you know? World War One product which basically basically promised the Jews a homeland and Truman just felt that that's something that should be honored but you're right. I mean he had to go against his own State Department. Many of his I mean including General Marshall who was very close friend mentor advisor someone he respected probably more than anybody else at the time he also had a to grapple with an ally the British who were were not wanting to take people from Europe allow them to land in in and with a called Palestine because they didn't you know the problems at that would create from their perspective but Truman valued and follow that partition plan that idea of sort of what we would call today a two-state solution didn't go that way obviously but but nevertheless it was something that he felt was important so when when the country was going to be declared this this new nation was going to be sort of birthed if you will he was right there within literally within hours of that declaration the United States recognized the new state of Israel. There's this famous story of high invites men who would go on to be the first president of Israel was in D. C. and the Jews in mandatory Palestine the Jewish community designers community unity in America kind of thought that the best chance for US recognition I think would be vitamins sat down with Truman and there's a fellow named Eddie Jacobson who kind of facilitates dates this right right the so Jacobsen is a as a World War Two buddy of Truman's they ran the commissary together and then after the war they went into business together in in Kansas City and that's the you've heard the failed haberdashery clothing store that went out the because the economy was bad they couldn't make a go of it but he Jacobsen Simpson Jacobson of course with Jewish and they were very close friends which when you go back into that time thinking about a southern Baptist an Jew being close enough friends to to actually go into business together you know I it speaks a lot about about Truman. I think even even then but they went into business and you know when that business failed. Truman's mom was the KKK supporter or something they were there. These overcoming some family history overcoming civil rights legacy the same..

Harry Truman Truman Presidential Library Israel Truman Truman Committee United States president Kurt Europe Missouri Senate Abraham Lincoln FDR Dr Kirk Graham AJC World War One senator State Department
"truman presidential library" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"truman presidential library" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"They to here is your W. C. F. G. three day forecast as we go through on tonight we're going to have a clear sky laws are going to be fifty five southeast one's going to be like ten not bad tomorrow with sunshine all day hi to anyone to seventy nine some of the stories are going to gusts as high as twenty five chance of a storm on Friday night sixty three Saturday was the hive seventy eight change service on Sunday storms are likely five seventy seven on the flight weather center I'm Tony Pokorny more than hundred play right now sixty three human torch and travel makes travel fun and you get to see the best shows like the north coast fast it's almost as good as being in Norway my not North Dakota September twenty fifth to twenty seven per person just five fifty nine and that includes Hey everything including your transportation your hotel accommodations at some great shows Danny o'donnell Ricky Skaggs and Kentucky thunder Charley pride plus branches were six big Christmas shows leaving October thirty first this is Lauren up with fun Herries Truman presidential library the Texas tenors the Daniel Donald Christmas it walk resort theater miracle of Christmas at the sight and sound fear and so much more including the Titanic exhibit then Christmas in Minneapolis to day tours with guide motor coach one night hotel to lunch is a dinner a breakfast the American Swedish institute the Swedish smorgasbord the miniature can church Hey on skyrocket carousel farm center within church to set some like fun or what don't miss these great doors this fall from human tours a travel call eight hundred three four three zero zero nine three or seven oh one two three seven nine thousand online acumen Tories dot com this is the savage nation if I ever told you the may have going on around me you say no you in being could do what you're doing to begin with it's herculean but now on top of what you're putting up with behind the scenes you never believe a man could perform never offense being built in the front every two minutes coming in with the clicker I just couldn't take another minute of it then exterminator calling about another it's unbelievable to me what I can do Michael savage all host like no other tune in weeknights at ten PM for the savage nation right here on the flag buffalo folks good times bad times it's a great North Dakota spirit to be that buffalo go into the storm that's what they do at oasis patrolling they've done it before they're willing and ready to do it again good times tough times that's what they do and they know it's all around you too so when you see something say something about that great be the buffalo spirit send us an email Scott H. it's like family dot com we're going to be the buffalo hotline at eight five five two zero zero seventeen seventy six from oasis patrolling Jerry in Bismarck what's on your mind yeah hi Scott this is that you're ready the colder jeering living in Delaware sometimes but I'm back in Bismarck and I've talked to a few times before anyway in regard to the chosen one comment I believe it was just his type of humor but if you want to go there again and seriousness how about going back to Barack Obama and his first election campaign one I he made the statement we are the ones that we have been waiting for you remember that comment I do yeah I do we we are the ones that we have been waiting.

twenty fifth two minutes three day
"truman presidential library" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"truman presidential library" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"Listening to fox news you is your W. C. F. G. three day forecasts from weather ology dot com temperatures tonight is going to drop back to forty eight under a clear sky and they stay on Thursday we're going to recover quickly all the way to seventy four with sunshine not a school on Thursday night clear fifty four for any chance of a storm in the afternoon high of seventy seven Saturday more showers and storms five seventy eight from the flight weather center I forecaster Tony vocal on a more than a hundred why right now sixty five June tours and travel makes travel fine and you get to see the best shows like the north coast fast it's almost as good as being in Norway my not North Dakota September twenty fifth through twenty seven per person just five fifty nine and that includes Hey everything including your transportation your hotel accommodations at some great shows Danny o'donnell Ricky Skaggs and Kentucky thunder and Charley pride plus branch in North Dakota for six big Christmas shows leaving October thirty first this is loaded up with fun Herries Truman presidential library the Texas tenors the Daniel Donald Christmas it walk resort theater miracle of Christmas at the sight and sound fear and so much more including the Titanic exhibit then Christmas in Minneapolis to day tours with guide motor coach one night hotel to lunch is a dinner a breakfast the American Swedish institute the Swedish smorgasbord the miniature can church Hey on skyrocket carousel farm center within church to set some like fun or what don't miss these great doors this fall from human tours a travel call eight hundred three four three zero zero nine three or seven oh one two three seven nine thousand online acumen towards dot com Hey Mandy if you don't know me it's probably because I'm not famous but I did start a men's grooming company called Harry's the idea for Harry's came out of a frustrating experience I had.

Tony Norway North Dakota Minneapolis American Swedish institute Harry forecaster Danny o'donnell Ricky Skaggs Kentucky Charley Herries Truman Texas twenty fifth three day
"truman presidential library" Discussed on Retropod

Retropod

05:11 min | 1 year ago

"truman presidential library" Discussed on Retropod

"Retro pod is sponsored by Tito's vodka. Drink responsibly. Hey history lovers. I'm Mike Rosen walled with retro pod a show about the past rediscovered. If you've been keeping coming up with the news lately you've no doubt heard about president trump's cordial visit with Russian President Vladimir Putin Given U._S. history with Russia and the former Soviet Union you know the Cold War etc etc meetings between the two countries are always fascinating in sometimes quite tense but back in one thousand nine hundred forty one a get together that should have been fraught with uneasiness didn't turn out that way which is surprising given even the participants President Harry S Truman and Joseph Stalin Truman despised communism in one thousand nine hundred forty one after Germany invaded Russia then. In U._S. senator said quote. If we see that Germany is winning the war we ought to help Russia and if that Russia is winning we ought to help Germany and in that way let them kill as many as possible yikes in the letter to his mother sister. Truman called the Soviets pigheaded and difficult to work with according to Sam Rochet in archivists at the Harry Truman Presidential Library and Museum Museum in Missouri but at least one man was different intrusions mind and that was stolen the Soviet Union's communist leader a brutal murderous dictator later in July nineteen forty-five as the nation's thirty third President Truman travel to Germany for the Potsdam conference to meet with Stalin and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill to figure out out in World War. Two Truman wanted to get confirmation from Stalin that the Soviet Union would go to war against Japan. This had to potential to go very badly. There was Truman's hatred. Of Communism of course he was also inexperienced. He'd only been president for three months but Truman had something in his back pocket the atomic bomb. If anything can make you the most powerful person the room it is that Truman made his move on July twenty-fourth nineteen forty five in the second week of the conference after meeting he walked around a table to talk to the Soviet leader he told Stalin about a weapon a new weapon but did not mention that it was atomic bomb in his diaries Truman wrote quote. I casually mentioned Stalin that we had a new weapon of unusual destructive force. He knew Stalin would like that because they both wanted to badly beat Japan and end the war and he was right Stalin's reply according to Truman he hoped the United States would quote make good use of it against the Japanese by. Many accounts Truman Sauce Stalin as a cordial ally and he prided himself in his ability to understand people and work with them. Even despite fundamental differences he wrote in July twenty ninth nineteen forty-five forty-five letter to his wife. I like Stalin. He is straightforward knows what he wants and we'll compromise when he can't get it he called the dictator honest and smartest help he even invited Stalin to visit the United States but according to Melvin Leffler a University of Virginia historian who wrote a book about Truman in the Cold War to say that the two leaders had chemistry would be a huge overstatement they they were in it solely to win the war and defeat Japan a short time later. The United States dropped the atomic bomb on Japan. The war ended in two years later a new one began the Cold War. The countries were enemies again. I'm Mike Rosenfeld. Thanks for listening special thanks to Christine Phillips who reported the story for The Washington Post and for more forgotten.

Truman Sauce Stalin President Harry S Truman Harry Truman Presidential Libr Soviet Union president Japan Russia Germany United States Mike Rosen Mike Rosenfeld Tito Vladimir Putin Potsdam senator Missouri Christine Phillips Sam Rochet trump
"truman presidential library" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

05:03 min | 1 year ago

"truman presidential library" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Well, there media, I asked them if I could secure a license to replicate a copy, they said, no. That can't be done. So I went online. I've found anyone who had contact information. I began contacting anyone I could find at the Washington Post. I called I emailed this went on for weeks. Finally, I received a call back from someone at the Washington Post and she said to her knowledge that the license I needed had never been granted to anyone. This was not something that the Washington Post did, However, I did not give up is started searching for the director and the manager of communications. And as soon as I found out who that was, I began making calls again and leaving messages and nicely reminding them that I was going to keep calling until. Someone else called me back, and she did shawny George the manager of communications finally left. A message on my phone weeks later. I asked her to give me two minutes. Ten minutes later, she says she would have her team on it. She would research this image, the year in which it was made the headlines from that year that we thought were appropriate and her team sent me multiple headlines, multiple front pages of the Washington Post from nineteen forty seven. I chose the one that is part of the statue the above the fold set of headlines because of its relationship to Alison against work and civil rights and women's rights. And there was a lot mentioned on this particular newspaper about president and MRs trimming and some of the headlines which you can read, if you if you look closely, we replicated it in such a way that it's legible that you can read the newspaper in her hands. As part of the sculpture. One of the headline says capital termed graphic example of non democracy. The nation's capital yesterday was labelled a graphic illustration of a failure of democracy by the president's committee on civil rights. And the next one says, need for guarantee of equal rights to all is emphasized in report to Truman, the president's committee on civil rights yesterday called on the nation to take a medium, bold action to wipe out segregation and discrimination from the American way of life. This was October nineteen forty seven and other ones says job of nations first lady is sized up by MRs Truman, and parenthetically. It says she likes Independence, Missouri. And then another one, which I thought was pretty bold says, miss tomes urges polygamy or job equality for women. Sculpture. Amanda Matthews at the Truman, presidential library in museum commenting on the life and professional work of Allyson Duncan. So these stories and the Washington Post needed to become part of the story of Alice dunnigan, and her life and contributions. We should never forget that she was an African American woman. She wants famously said race and sex were twin strikes against me. I'm not sure which was the hardest to breakdown. History honors visionaries great thinkers, great writers, great leaders of social change, but far too often history, has edited out many of the contributions of women and minorities from its credits. Alice dunnigan fits into all of these categories. She was a great thinker. She was a great writer, and journalist, and she used these skills to become a great leader of social change advocating for women's rights and civil rights during an especially challenging time in our nation's history. Her monument. Is a symbol. It's a symbol that tells a more complete social history in the United States. Public monuments like this can inform us of our history. But they also point the way to our future Alice dunnigan envisioned, a future of equality, and she dedicated her life to this vision. I believe that it is time for her to take her place in history as visionary as the mother of a movement. Thank..

Alice dunnigan Washington Post MRs Truman president manager of communications United States Missouri Allyson Duncan shawny George Amanda Matthews Alison director Ten minutes two minutes
"truman presidential library" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

15:05 min | 1 year ago

"truman presidential library" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"This event hosted by the Truman presidential library and museum comments by Nancy Dawson, Dawson, edited, the Frederick, Douglass, encyclopedia. To talk about Alice Allison dunnigan from a personal perspective. And one of the things I wanted to know is that was a family very family. Oriented woman, granddaughter sirri-a done again, burned American history on C span radio, and as a kid going, we had lots of events over the holidays and just different times of the year birthday celebrations, that kind of thing. Always called it the wall of fame, because there were pictures of her shaking, so many dignitaries, hands presidents, and someone is so forth and so many citations and awards and things on that wall. And I don't think when you every time you go you see something that you didn't see before it was just so intriguing. So that was. That was berry. We like I enjoyed going to, to her house. It was just so she was just a warm, very warm person. But what I enjoy most about even with, with her being family oriented. She was a great storyteller, and I could just sit at her feet, whenever she just like a writing really. I think she uses such vocabulary. She's descriptive in, in her writing, and she would tell the stories of what happened, and she would bring it to life, and I always say, what you saw adventurist because really the average person I think I couldn't have done that I couldn't you sat through that, or he said, but what I got from from all of her storytelling is if I could just recaptured much of what you said. She was very, very tenacious, and she did not give up. And so one of the lifelong lessons that I have, and I wrote here that when what my grandmother taught me was that when life deals deals limits, you make lemonade and what I learned from my grandmother, it was her motivation, her desires her dreams her hopes. Those were the fleet nurse. That made the lemon, maybe eliminate with what was. And if you just think about with unlimited to squeeze up at Lemmon this gift at pulp out. That was that was the bit of truth. That, that is what she what she dealt with. But her personality. She was so warm, her personality is what, what made it not just really not bittersweet but made it sweet. And so that was one thing that she taught me. I'm like, other grandchildren. I attended University School of journalism school communications journalism, major. So when I was eighteen nineteen twenty for my grandmother, our relationship was was became a professional type of relationship. And that's something that I hope because I thought about that sometimes will say, see I don't share that, that wasn't that wasn't my, my experience, but it was nothing for me to be walking across campus and look up. And that's my grandmother. And I'm running behind a mother. Catch up with and we check. Minute, I'm doing here. And she was attending something some program or doing something. But from that, what, what she taught me was that you have to be consistent and you have to be motivated, but you have to get involved in your community and. I think as a young student that taught me you have to you have to go back into the community and you have to leave something. And that's what my grandmother, grandmother taught me one of the things that for me. I believe that everybody has a voice. My job is to teach you to use it t- to give you the skills to use it and to get your points across. And so my grandmother was very instrumental in bed. But as a student at Howard, and this is another thing getting back to community involvement. When we started a chapter of sigma, delta Chi is the name of it, and that was the society of professional journalists. Collegiate level. Am I grandmother was instrumental in that and very supportive? And that just meant the world to me. That while she went the life. She's helping us. And so that, that was great. And then. The other thing that was significant. And interesting for me was a lot of the professors that I had were her colleagues, and so I learned very quickly. Just in my I really day of classes when my name role in the nights, are you kidding Palestine, and yes, that's my grandmother and I didn't have Cincinnati. And I'm just gonna say since when you're young. You don't know the impact that people have I knew I had seen her on meet the press. I knew like I said she had the wall of fame, and she had been been so many places in head collectibles in the house, and all, but I just didn't understand the impact. And so, when the professors, first of all. Oh my grandmother, and they were her colleagues and whenever. I was doing my papers and things a lot of talking with her. So I'm really like I said, as a college student, I met her as on a professional level. And I love that. I love that because she I have the skill she just helped me too. To tweak tweak things wanted to things that like you said, she perspective. She was a great listener. But you don't listen and, and that come out with a perspective. How can we use this to for understanding learning for for later? How can how what impact will this have? And so that was something that I got got from her as well. And even in I was a student in the seventies and. Even then we still she taught me to challenge the status quo because even then women, they were journalists. Yes, but that many, African American journalists net mini. And so she taught me to challenge the status quo. And that, if there if it's in you, bring it out, and always, whatever it is that you're doing is not for you, but for those behind, and that's really what I see with my grandmother and. So she was a family, family oriented person. She was professional of course, and she taught me taught me to, to be aware and involved. And basically, she taught me even in all that. You do tell the whole story, tell the whole story tell the good and the bad. And she had a way of, in her storytelling fashion, you know that. Are you so vocabulary? And like I say that the script descriptive words, you could you could feel that you were there and that's a skill for any writer, and so that, that is what? But I guess got from her was the great lady very, very much missed. I believe she was before her time in a lot of ways particularly with the civil civil rights and. She was not a passive woman, but she was against a woman and. I, I, I think that probably of all the children are more like her of the grandchildren. I'm probably more like her than than any of them. So. I'm grateful for that. Granddaughter. Sirri-a dunnigan Brandon. I'm so happy to be here as part of this second whistle. Stop tour is what we've been calling it with the sculpture, traveling all over. The sculpture was unveiled at the Newseum in Washington DC, which we thought was very appropriate right now. Amanda Matthews responsible for the sculpture of Allison. The mother of a movement that is what Sonia Ross said about Allison again. Sonya Ross is an AP journalist, and she is head of raising ethnicity. For the Associated Press. And that's what she said about Alice dunnigan, who is a teacher, a journalist and editor a champion for civil civil rights and women. And so how does one create a monument, or a sculpture, that is worthy that celebrates the mazing life of someone like Alice dunnigan and the answer is one doesn't but many do? So when I was contacted about creating a sculpture honoring Alliston again, I decided to begin where she began, which was in Russellville Kentucky and began by visiting the residents have Russellville Kentucky, I thought I was going to sit down and meet with six or eight people, and we were going to discuss designs, and I think half of the town came. I'm not. Sure. Dr Dawson was right in the friends. I didn't know what I had just stepped into. But I will tell you that. It was a very profound experience for me. It truly did exemplify the phrase that the whole is more than the sum of his parts because I witnessed in Russellville Kentucky. A wildly diverse group of people who were all passionate about one thing, and they were passionate about honoring Alice dunnigan life, including her humble beginnings, but also they wanted to include the indelible Mark that she has left on this nation. So that is really whereas started as started by listening to the people who know her the best her family members in Dr Dawson, and Michael Mara with the west Kentucky African American heritage museum. So now my challenge was somewhat defined, and I had to take this information and create something with it. Of course, I wanted to capture her likeness, but I also wanted to clearly place, her on a national platform and. Within the national conversations about equality. I felt like that, that kind of like what Dr Dawson said, so many people hadn't heard of her and she, she really was far ahead of her time. So I reviewed I began reviewing images of her as a sculptor. We try to catch her every every detail. Throughout various times in her life trying to decide how old she would be at what level of success, she would have. And how would we convey her to the world and help tell her story, and I kept going back to the iconic image of her standing on the capitol, steps, and holding the Washington Post newspaper to have to think was not an accident. I was told by another reporter. I think maybe with the New York Times, but I was told that the Washington Post didn't hire black reporters at the time. And so this image is a non to her national accomplishments, but it's also an example of more steps she had to climb an example that more work was needed to be done. So, so that's what I kept coming back to. So then are looked at her posture and her stance in that image. And her stance is strong and direct her expression is comb but it's also very confident, and you have to remember, she was as self made south liberated woman, so she should have looked calm and confident. And I really wanted to capture that in this culture in the photo. However, she's looking down the steps because the photographer is actually on a few sex below her taking the shot, and so without the photographer, she was actually just looking down at the floor, and that was never going to do, because we wanted her to be looking up and out to, to show that she was visionary. So that's something that I chose to change to address a little bit and bring her stance up. So then I started with clothing. This might seem like a simple part of the sculpture, but Alice dunnigan she had an ongoing and challenging relationship with clothing and access to professional clothing, shoes, and excess raise throughout her life, and even into her career, and it's a recurring topic in her book, and actually, I'd like to share a few of her own words about it. She says, in the beginning, she says that family thought it ridiculous to even think of buying clothes until it was absolutely necessary to hide nakedness, or keep the body warm. I could no longer maintain the dignity of schoolteacher without something more decent to wear. I broke the family tradition by buying three patterns of gingham. On one visit to Clarksville to make cotton dresses.

Alice dunnigan Nancy Dawson Alice Allison Kentucky Washington Post University School of journalis Truman Associated Press New York Times Douglass Lemmon Washington Palestine Howard Sonya Ross west Kentucky African American Clarksville writer
"truman presidential library" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

10:24 min | 1 year ago

"truman presidential library" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Twenty always come in for this is history. And I asked to call on you a little earlier this morning. Thanks in all your welcome. Good morning, by the way, before we get to a little thing. I want to get to a farmer. Paxton we were talking about long life and former vaccine you've got some advice for living longer. Yeah. Ty. Guys. Good show. I just wanted to remind you what Nick Gilio always that's always trouble. It's a great way to start. The people live longer than single people is because marriage is a slow death. That sounds like. Yeah. Have a good one. All right. Yeah. I've heard Nick say that. And we appreciate the phone call on the reminder. Negative. Okay. Daesh one. So let's you and I every time we ended up doing this is history. Always talk about president presidential. Geek, we are you always been one. Yeah. Actually, I have. And ironically, I believe two things happen here. One. When I was a boy, we took really great driving vacations and went to see places, and my mother is from southern Illinois ultimately annoy specifically there was a Lincoln Douglas debate in Alton they've got a wonderful monument to there now. But. It was the presidential assassination Kennedy's assassination that I think did it visit seared into your only seven, but you know, you just don't forget that where were you found out? Oh in school. And matter of fact, let's see the building is no longer there. But the area is I was on the playground. Really? And I was a Friday, right? It was a Friday, and I went up to the we had a student teacher in my second grade class, and she was the playground supervisor. And she had this very somber look on her face and said, we're gotta go in from recess early president Kennedy has been shot. And so we went in and everybody who would have happened. Our regular teacher came in the room and said nothing she just stood at the desk and played around with papers on the desk. She said nothing and then finally one kid spoke up and asked what had happened, and she said in confirmed that the president had died but in connection with that. And also going to visit Lincoln's home in Springfield going to DC nine hundred and sixty four people like Harry Truman and Dwight Eisenhower still living, right? And so that was kind of fascinating. There's a great photo of when LBJ signs in Medicare. There wasn't drew a number one the first Medicare. Him there at the Bill citing and he is Medicare patient number one. Yeah. It is interesting. When you when you start going back to presidents that were on the earlier the path of the twentieth century, the some of them lived longer into the sixty s trains to see photos color, photos, all of some of the older, president said that made it a little bit, right? There are even color photos of Franklin Roosevelt, which is incredible. Yeah. But you're right Truman Eisenhower Johnson didn't make it long. He's only lived a year or two or three Linda Linda now seventy one he passed two. Two years afterwards. Yeah. No, he didn't really live all that much longer after he left office. But look at us we could just go on and on. So I asked you to come in because you know, you, and I've talked about, you know, let's breakdown presidents. And I think you and I are both interested. I think we are interested in the political aspect of things. But for me, it's the fascination of the story of how they got their house. It's such a salon. I mean, there's only forty I mean, there's forty five presidential terms or has been forty four men to it. Because Grover Cleveland, of course, did it twice and they count him as two separate as twenty two and twenty four, but so few men and hopefully one day women have to have that job, which is so fascinating to hear how they got their. Oh, yeah. Yeah. And when you think of it for the most part, the founding fathers came from rather well to do families. No, we're not rich rich rich they came from well to do what we would turn middle-class maybe upper middle class. And then you have ABRAHAM LINCOLN who came from zero. And you know, it's wonderful to see the new Salem exhibit in central Illinois. Keep in mind, he was an adult when he showed up at new Salem. He was not raised in Illinois. He came here. Exactly. Born in Kentucky. And if you wanna see the way in which he grew up go to southern Indiana to what is now a national park site, the Lincoln boyhood home. It's amazing. It's it's you talk about being out in the sticks. Now, he built a log cabin. He was born in. Right. That's what they all say. His father his father. Did you mentioned those interesting backgrounds, and we talked about the Roosevelt's a lot. And I think what fascinating things is how much they came from extreme wealth. Yes. And then became champions all of the Lord of the working class. Yeah. That was the interesting aspect of of politics at that time, especially Franklin Roosevelt know, he was just I think one of the things that put him into that position that he was was a the depression and at the same time as an adult hit with polio. Yes. So he could all identify with somebody who was hit with that same devastating disease. And what were you going to do, you know, how were you going to recover, and what was going to be the outcome has visits to warm springs, legendary among the mayor of that town. So I asked you to come on. And we could always push back. This is history a little bit later to bullets you've. Some interesting presidential stuff related to the city related to this. Okay. Okay. Okay. Chicago was incorporated as a city March force eighteen thirty seven it had been a town since eighteen thirty three but became a city March fourth eighteen thirty seven that same day. Andrew Jackson, became president succeeding, Martin van Buren. Okay. So depending on the time line, depending on when they signed all the papers for Chicago to be a city. We had two presidents that same day leaving office one taking our Martin van Buren leaving Andrew Jackson coming in. That's incredible. That's so you think of all the days that reminds me of the the fact that a Jefferson and Adams die on the same day. The day after the signing. Years. Yeah. But they died the same day. And then isn't it? It's either Madison Monroe also dies on July fourth a couple of years later like four three of the first four presidents dying on July for you can't write this stuff. No. You can't write this stuff. It's it's too incredible. Same thing with Truman to bring up Harry Truman again if folks haven't been out to the Truman presidential library. Home there in Independence, Missouri. There's a good mid western place to visit now and the library is great. And they've got things about his life. Independence is kind of tried to keep its look and appearance the way it was when he was young man there, and you look at pictures of Truman is a very young, man. A young boy pictures of his him in from his wedding day when he married Bess. And I look at those pictures, and I think this man who didn't go to high school had to make the decision as to whether or not to drop the atomic bomb. That's crazy gives me. No. Yeah. The men who never wanted to be president. And the man who never wanted to be president all of a sudden in a smoke filled room at the Blackstone hotel. Three three connections Roosevelt's on the phone with the democratic powers vote powerbrokers saying can we get this fellow from Missouri? And is he going to be are running mate? Yes. Mr president. You know, it's crazy as and they had to have known. You're talking about forty four. Yeah. Franklin already had been. Yeah. So he he knew he knew he was really ill deathly ill. Probably. And obviously the pictures of multi are y'all charges in edible, gone bones. And then you pick Harry, Truman keeping minded this time. You were still actually I don't remember when they switched the inauguration from March two to January it was it might have been wanting to Roosevelt was the last one to take office in March. And here you have Truman just a few months later finishing up the war. Yeah. And a half or dasher, Missouri. It is incredible. Did you have any other Chicago connections? Or was that that was the one you were gonna tease for pretty much really, Johnny more. If if you want to look at some things that might be would be connecting little more current the Hilton hotel, Chicago Hilton and towers on south Michigan has a really cool little area right off. Lobby about the history of the hotel. And who was there, and there are pictures of John Kennedy, and Richard J Daley walking out of that main door that you yes, you can walk through. And of course, their relationship in the nineteen. That weekend. When John Kennedy was here and said to mayor Daley, boy, I hope they all get out and vote and he probably said something like don't worry kid coming out of the graveyard day. Will and Kennedy Elsa was he in Chicago canceled Chicago trip right around the Cuban missile crisis. I believe he was heavier, right? Yeah. He was here. But in they left early because he said he had a cold. Yeah. So he went back to DC because you had a Cold War. Sean, I at some point we gotta talk more about these presidents, and we will we got this is history coming up them. We'll talk about it after the we'll we'll extend what we'll do is. We'll we're gonna take a quick commercial break. We'll go to the new dominate. Roger badesch repressive? My fellow. Where's my attorney? This guy off. Let's take a quick commercial break, then more fascinating history with Dave Schwan and more on seven twenty WGN. Your.

president Harry Truman Franklin Roosevelt John Kennedy Chicago Missouri Illinois Nick Gilio Truman Eisenhower Johnson Truman presidential library Medicare Richard J Daley Salem DC Paxton ABRAHAM LINCOLN Martin van Buren Grover Cleveland Mr president Kentucky
"truman presidential library" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"truman presidential library" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The White House for his resort home in Florida mar-a-lago this afternoon. President Trump handed out another presidential pardon this time to a recipient who've gobbled up the spotlight. Michele cinder reports on how the annual thanksgiving tradition began, I hereby view, a full Arden call it a feather in his cap. President Trump taking part in old thanksgiving custom spearing. One fortunate Turkey from the thanksgiving table and naming an alternate. Thanksgiving is a time of great American traditions. And today, we continue a very special one when a lucky Turkey gets a presidential pardon. Turkey is so lucky I've never seen such a beautiful Turkey that tradition has happened every November for the past quarter century, but there are some let's say ruffled feathers about how it all got started president Truman was the first president to pardon the Turkey, but that's not true. In fact, the Truman presidential library says Truman sometimes indicated to reporters that the turkeys he received were destined for the family dinner table. Truman was actually the first president Tristan Turkey from the national Turkey federation seventy one years ago. So who was the first president to pardon a Turkey Lincoln, it appears was the first on record. But it was the Christmas Turkey that his son had taken a liking to in one thousand nine hundred sixty three president John F. Kennedy was the first department at thanksgiving Turkey despite a sign hanging around the Turkey's neck that read good eating Mr President Kelly said the Turkey back to the farm burchard Nixon also gave the birds a reprieve. Sending his turkeys to a nearby petting zoo. Ronald Reagan was the first to use the term parted when he was talking Turkey in nineteen eighty-seven the Turkey pardoning became formalized in nineteen eighty nine with president, George H W Bush. Let me assure you this fine, Tom jerky that he will not end up on anyone's dinner table. Exactly. These turkeys are not sitting ducks. They wrote fourteen hundred miles for their freedom this year from South Dakota to Washington DC. The even spent some time at a luxury hotel from the White House. They'll be central Virginia Tech university where they already have a prominent gablers mascot on campus. The vent has become a White House holiday tradition. This.

Turkey president president Truman President Trump national Turkey federation Tristan Turkey White House Mr President Kelly Michele cinder George H W Bush Ronald Reagan Virginia Tech university Arden Florida South Dakota John F. Kennedy Washington Tom jerky
"truman presidential library" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"truman presidential library" Discussed on KQED Radio

"President trump took his first run at pardoning a bird but why here's lease it asia are dead with an explanation rump slick you are hereby hard call it a feather in his cap the new president caradon an old thanksgiving customs ferrying two lucky birds from the dinner table only one is selected to star in the ceremony we are here today to continue a wonderful american tradition that tradition has happened every november for the past quartercentury but there are some let's say ruffled feathers about how it all got started president truman was the first president to pardon turkey but not true in fact the truman presidential library says truman's sometimes indicated to reporters that the turkey's he received word destined for the family dinner table he was a tough cookie truman was actually the first president to receive turkey from the national turkey federation seventy years ago so who was the first president to pardon a turkey lincoln it appears was the first on record but it was a christmas turkey that his son had taken a liking to president john f kennedy was the first to pardon a thanksgiving turkey in 1963 despite a sign hanging around the turkey's neck that red good eating mr president kennedy still sent the bird back to the farm richard nixon also gave the birds a reprieve sending his turkey's to a nearby petting zoo ronald reagan he was the first to use the word pardon when he was talking turkey in 1987 the turkey pardoning became formalized in nineteen eighty nine with president george h bush let me assure you of this fight trump turkey that he will not end up on any was dinner table of this exactly these turkey's are no sitting ducks they road one thousand miles for their freedom this year from minnesota to.

President trump president truman president national turkey federation ronald reagan minnesota asia thanksgiving christmas president john f kennedy richard nixon president george h bush seventy years
"truman presidential library" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"truman presidential library" Discussed on Here & Now

"We're at the harry s truman presidential library and museum with its director curt graham portrait's of george washington in franklin roosevelt hang on the wall of truman's oval office but unlike other presidents truman didn't keep furniture in front of the fireplace the reason for that is because he used this as a press briefing room as well he brought the entire press corps into the oval office he referred to them as boys 'cause they're all men were you boys come on and he would bring them into the oval office and he would make an announcement or your rita read a statement or take questions and they would climb up on the furniture to get the right photograph and everything was a much more casual use of the office than than you would expect today i was reading a quote of his he said something like you know it's not always easy to come out here and answer questions from the press when i don't know what the questions are in advance but i'm glad that the president has to do this and i hope that this continue for a long time that the president has to answer to the people and truman did he answered the people very directly i sometimes refer to harry truman as the will rogers the american presidency he had these earthy pissy quotes and little one liners often very agrarian and their origins because he was a farmer from uh from missouri and he he very much had that kind of uh that kind of approach and he didn't shy away from questions you know and he didn't shy away from decisions he made major decisions throughout his administration and he didn't seem to be bothered by the fact that people would be secondguessing him it's a truth that truman would become known for graham shows me the sign that famously sat on the president's desk the one that says the buck stops here it was on his desk here in this oval office where we don't know that it was ever on his desk in the real oval office in washington it was given to him later but it does i think it's stuck to harry truman because it represents both.

curt graham portrait george washington truman president missouri washington harry s truman presidential director franklin harry truman
"truman presidential library" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"truman presidential library" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"That he instituted within credible effectiveness right down to flying how to missouri to sign the medicare act in the truman presidential library and from truman who've guy nearly wapda mean the beauty of that for truman twenty years later to see that this reform that fdr had tried to get through that wilson a try to get through that had been this longsimmering lingering piece of americans suffering was going to be addressed lbj knew what he was doing is the thing bush brown on a power mother drowned like the men and women in pain we will now find there are those alone am suffering who will now hear the sound of some approaching footsteps coming derail there are those fearing the terrible darkness of despairing poverty despite their long years of labour an expectation who will now look up to see the light of hope and realization but we're looking at a situation which people th seemed to not know what they're doing especially politically what do you make of the current effort to repeal obamacare and maybe replace it with the american healthcare act is it unusual for congress to pass a bill which takes benefits away from people has ever happen i think you might think about clinton's welfaretowork plan i think very much that was pitched as a rearrangement of a set of benefits the scale of this now this is the sits own particular crisis i mean i mean what i think kind of terrifying about this current moment is that the enemy is now no longer foreign the enemy is within the united states will i guess it leaves us with the question are you optimistic or pessimistic about the fate of universal health cure has the argument to any degree wither it's during the clinton time or now during obamacare has the argument for universal health care coverage made any significant advance uh so that one day we might see universal health care coverage.

truman fdr wilson lbj congress clinton united states obamacare missouri bush twenty years one day
"truman presidential library" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"truman presidential library" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"They're the sound of a nation engaged a ronald reagan biographer any ronald reagan presidential historian talking at the reagan library presidential library museum and senior valley california hashtag a nation engaged the npr project in independence missouri we had marc jones chairman of the jackson county republican committee attending casey you are as a nation engaged of the truman presidential library he spoke about the hashtag of the event a nation engage saying it should be changed to reflect how americans are really feeling i look at your hashtag and as i listened to the last few people speak i thought one letter change in that hashtag is actually what happened in this last election it could be called a nation enraged because that's what really happened donald trump spoke to the angry america who are tired of deficit debt overspending irresponsibility just a lot of things no we don't all have to agree on everything but you do have to elect a leader and one was elected and it seemed like it only enraged more than it actually helped and so currently you have a completely divided america and i think big thoughtful about not in raging your opponent would be a good thing as president trump style an office going to show us a path forward when it comes to learning how to disagree respectively i think that's exactly what you've saw you want to point out that he's said mexico is going to pay for the wall and then he backs off of that you do have to back off of some things because sometimes you learn that you don't have all the facts and sometimes you learn more things than i mean you have a different perspective once you learn more facts there is a bit of tenacity that goes along with the presidency.

missouri chairman jackson county casey donald trump mexico ronald reagan reagan library presidential li npr marc jones america president