40 Burst results for "Truman"

Fresh update on "truman" discussed on Nightside with Dan Rea

Nightside with Dan Rea

02:44 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "truman" discussed on Nightside with Dan Rea

"Ah, then you are a student of history. But as the years go by August 6th becomes less of an important day for most people in the world, perhaps, but it was 75 years ago. 75 years ago on this date when the United States on and with the knowledge of Great Britain backing us I dropped the first of two nuclear weapons over a Japanese city Hiroshima, Masaki followed on the ninth of 1945 and pretty much brought an end to the war with the surrender of the Japanese shortly thereafter. This has been a long debated subject over the many, many decades since The decision to do this. It's only one time used in war, but the decision to drop an atomic weapon. Pretty much on civilians. Has been either defended or decried. And what I wanted to do was just raised the subject because first of all, it's historic, and it needs to be remembered, but also because there's so many Nuances to this. It's It's very easy to suggest that it was the right thing to do without any Second guessing. Likewise, it was very Easy for people to say, horrific thing we did. Dropping this monster's weapon. What's so fascinating to me, and I'd love to get your take on some of these things, but so fascinating to me. Having read a lot of World War two History is that It wasn't a cut and dry decision. By any stretch and Truman and the people around him. Had all kinds of reasons to not use the weapon. And also all kinds of reasons to deploy the weapon at the same time as The Hiroshima attack was being planned. There was some speculation of the Japanese in their final throes were trying to Move forward with their own nuclear programme with their own atomic program. Now, history is since pretty much shown us that they were well behind us as where the Germans, thankfully But ah, Who knows? I mean, What might have happened, and it's very interesting to think about it. But here's ah, pieces sound that Reflects what I consider probably Ah, yeah, I would. I would say for any individual president in the 20th century, This might have been If not the toughest one of the three or four toughest calls to make. Here's the speech by Harry as Truman regarding the dropping of the bomb a short time ago, an American airplane Dropped one bomb on here, Oshima and destroyed its usefulness to the enemy. That bomb has more power than 20,000 tons of TNT. The Japanese began the war from the air at Pearl Harbour. They have little pain memory foam. And and it is not yet this bomb. We have now added a new and revolutionary increase. In destruction to supplement the growing power of our armed forces. In the present farm. These bombs are now in production and even more power for firms are in development. It is an atomic bomb. It is a harnessing of the basic power of the universe, the first from which the sun draws his power has been loosed against those who brought our to the Far East. We have spent more than $2 billion on the greatest scientific gamble in history. And we have run But the greatest marvel is not the signs of the enterprise, its secrecy or its cost. But the achievement of scientific brains in making it work. Harry Truman announcing the dropping of the bomb the atomic bomb on Hiroshima 1945 August the sixth and of course, the Japanese did not surrender until the 15th of that month. I believe And it took another horrific bombing. And and you have to suggest that I mean the idea of wiping out would one weapon on entire city of many civilians is horrific, however. History also tells us that The onslaught of death and destruction with a natural invasion of Japan. Would have been just that it would have Estimates of quarter to Mawr than 1/4 of a 1,000,000 American soldiers 250,000 Would have been casualties either injured or killed and probably double that amount. On the Japanese side, who vowed at least their leadership allowed to fight to the death. So in retrospect, looking back if you definitely reading on it If your mind is Remained. Pretty much constant that it was the right thing to do or the wrong thing to do. We're not going to argue and bicker about it. But be interesting to hear your take. I believe That is Individual decisions go. This would probably be the toughest decision for anybody to have To have to make As as a leader in a free country. It's interesting, too, that Truman Was the vice president under FDR for just a short while. He was newly added to the ticket. And had no knowledge. None. Ah, of the bomb pretty much. Ah, the atomic bomb the Manhattan project and when Roosevelt died Ah, we've learned since then, that he was given the information by certain key generals or whatever. And he was totally Shocked he had never heard of such a thing. You may have heard of such a thing. But he didn't know we were anywhere near completing it and had to accept the fact that he was now ah, the man who would make the decision. So, 617 to 5 for 10 30 or 8889 to 9 10 30 is the telephone number in light of the fact that it's the 75th anniversary. And the fact that the United States of America was the only country to drop the bomb. But by doing so, Set the tone for the atomic age and also ah Prevented, I think. Other countries. From taking out their aggressions on us. Perhaps the Soviets In a cold war that did last for decades. But there are a lot of reasons to examine the decision. I really do think that ultimately to save both American and Japanese lives. Harry Turman did what he did, and it was the right decision now. There is something called just dig it up here, So I don't miss quoted. There is something known as the trolley question or the trolley dilemma and it's a philosopher's game. It's not so much a game, but it's a test. It's a thought experiment. The basic problem is this. And it was put forward in the late sixties by a British philosopher. The train is running down the track and is out of control. If it continues. Unchecked on course, and on diverted, this train will run over. Five people who are tied to the tracks you Have an opportunity to divert that train onto another track. All you need do is pull a lever. However, if you pull the lever That same train will kill one individual who happens to be standing on the other track. What do you do? What's your response? Don't be at all embarrassed. If you having trouble with this, it's the most incredibly tough question of all. However, there are several responses. There's the utilitarian response. The duty is to promote the greatest happiness for the greatest number. And that's the.

Harry Truman United States Pearl Harbour Hiroshima Great Britain Masaki Japan President Trump Harry Turman Harry Mawr Oshima Vice President Manhattan America Roosevelt
Hiroshima: Atomic Blast That Changed The World Turns 75

WBZ Midday News

01:00 min | 10 hrs ago

Hiroshima: Atomic Blast That Changed The World Turns 75

"The United States dropped the first of two nuclear bombs on Japan. We are delaying the start of our scheduled program to bring you the latest direct report on the atomic bomb attack on Japan. It was on CBS radio, where Americans heard from correspondents like Webley Edwards report on the bombing of Hiroshima in Guam. We can W. Tibbets Jr of Miami, Florida. Out of the B 29 the first atomic bomb in history. Hired in 1957 former CBS radio correspondent Marvin Kalb worked with the generation of journalists who covered that bombing. Everything was dependent upon what President Truman or his top officials wanted to share with the American people, and that was very, very little. In fact, it would be weeks after the bombing. American journalists would even be allowed to report first hand from the destroyed Japanese city. Steve Dorsey, CBS

CBS Japan Cbs Radio Marvin Kalb W. Tibbets Jr President Truman Steve Dorsey Webley Edwards United States Hiroshima Guam Miami Florida
Fresh update on "truman" discussed on Robert Pratt

Robert Pratt

01:00 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "truman" discussed on Robert Pratt

"Where the future began. Thiss Radio Centennial Moment is brought to you by you. B. S. 1945. President Harry Truman addresses the nation. The world will note that the first atomic bomb Was dropped on Hiroshima, a military base. We run the race of discovery against the Germans. We have used it in order to shorten the agony of war in order to save the lives of thousands and thousands of young Americans. You know, everybody says at least once to the life doing a very traumatic time in someone's life for something like this pandemic that's sweeping the nation. I would do anything if I could make a difference. But when push comes to shove, especially in very dramatic situations as this Killer Invisible Enemy Covert 19. There's only that chosen few that get an opportunity and actually step up and answer the call. You know, when I first planned to have Larry Magic commissioner, we're going to talk about just typical things, You know, just in update as far as Washington County in covert 19 then Lo and behold a major story breaking over the last couple of days, he has stepped up and accepted the challenge with a great brand. That is Fizer. A cove at 19 clinical test trials going back and forth to Columbus, Ohio. He is a part of it, and he simply said, Look, my family's a little edgy about it. But I feel as though I want to be on the part of possibly helping this very Unique time that we're living in. So we're going to talk to him about why he made the decision to do this in this. Ah, Over 19 clinical trial with five, sir in Columbus going to be very interesting interview coming up right after Rose checks. The news right now it's Robert Thursday night. It's 6 30 Good evening. From.

Columbus LO Harry Truman Hiroshima Fizer President Trump Commissioner Washington County Ohio Rose
75 years after Hiroshima, they're still feeling its impact.

Between The Lines

09:42 min | 1 d ago

75 years after Hiroshima, they're still feeling its impact.

"This bomb has this frank for twenty thousand tons of TNT. Harnessing, the basic power of the universe. What I fifteen I am on August six, nine, hundred, forty, five, the US Air Force dropped the little boy uranium fission bomb on central hero. Shema. Making it the first city ever to be destroyed by a nuclear bomb. On August nine Nagy became the second when the bomb exploded around thirty percent of Hiroshima's population that were killed instantly many more died in the months and years to come. Now, the bombs brought to an end to world war two but the wool was horrified at the human cost. Russia has since become a byword for nuclear holocaust forever linked to the words never again. Now, this week marks the seventy fifth anniversary of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki joining me to reflect on the legacy of those events. Tashi. Tauch. She is assistant professor at Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service and the author of political fallout, nuclear weapons testing, and the making of Global Environmental Crosses. Welcome. Tasha. Thanks for having me and Michael Gordon Professor of history at Princeton University and Co. it is a of a new book called the age of Russia. Welcome. Welcome. It's very good to be here. Now, Michael the fear of the nuclear age is the period after World War Two when the US dropped the bomb. The fee was that the nuclear weapons would become a common part of conventional warfare but in the seventy five years since he Russia and Nagasaki, there's not been a single bomb dropped in a conflict. Question is this because deterrence works or have we just been lucky I would say we've mostly been lucky It's quite rare that there are conflicts between nuclear-armed nations. The major example is the nineteen sixty, nine border conflict between the People's Republic of China and the Soviet Union. So there haven't been many occasions for things to escalate, and there's a strong incentive in those cases to de-escalate. There have however been very close near accidents whether missile just that needing on its own or people launching almost launching in fear of an attack and there. Have Been Plenty of conventional wars that could have escalated that way. So by and large, we've been lucky but we've been abetted by the fact that there has been an ambient taboo that has grown over the years against nuclear first use although that is rarely the policy of any nuclear power. Okay. Now from an Australian perspective, Tic- Japan was seen as an aggressor in the war, the war crimes but also as a victim because of the destruction wrought by the nuclear bombs have is the wool remit in Japan now aggressor and victim. Tarshi. Many pass through consider themselves as victims thinking that Japanese were misled by the government inter- Disastrous Wall Conquest. In this view here stands at the as the ultimate symbol of Japanese victim. But today is victim narrative faces two competing accounts. One is to recognize Japan's acts of wartime aggression, including tweeting massacres, forced labor, and sexual violence. If we see hero Shimmer from this perspective, it takes on a whole different meaning not. Not as a national tragedy, but rather as international event. killed not only the Japanese residents but also many colonial subjects and allied. POW's who are present in the city at the time of the Tom Bombing. The other interpretation that has also gained for Japan is to see the wartime conduct Japan as an act of self defense. This This lesion is narrative recaps here. As the ultimate proof of Western aggression. So fitting the predation of Japan's Joel Roles as. Aggressor and victim during the war will gain the upper hand in the future will depend on how sweet society around the world comes together and develops a shared understanding of the complex legacies or Corna reason on the war in the Asia Pacific region and back to the United States markle. There's a popular conception that Washington had to drop the bomb that it was the only way. To win the war, of course, the war in Europe come to an end in May of forty five. This is early August two, forty five is that true I mean what? What President Truman's options? So. This is a great question and it's one with a lot of confusion around it. Functionally. The only way the only government that had any power to end the war was the Japanese government which was in a position to surrender and the question was when would that happen would have happened later or earlier by summer nineteen, forty, five, it was already clear that the war was militarily lost. President Truman and the US government in general had basically fixed options of what they could do to try and encourage the Japanese government to take that move. There's only two that people usually talk about dropping the atomic bomb or invading the home islands of Japan. Both of those were on the table also having the Soviet Union inducing them to enter the wars of belligerent which happened on August eighth increasing the intensity of firebombing tightening the blockade of foodstuffs into the home islands. and modifying the terms of unconditional surrender to allow Japan to keep the emperor. The interesting thing is all six of those happen Truman pursued all sex and the war ended. It's unclear which ones were determinative. But the point is there wasn't like we had one option or nothing else. The US had plenty of options and exercised actually all of them. On the one level target for the bombs was obviously Japan on another level. Real target was the Soviet Union. How did the Kremlin of you? He Russia Mirror Negga? Second Markle. So. Really, the question here is a small set of people within the Kremlin stolen and his closest advisers and you that there was an atomic bomb project going on in the United States for years they've found that out from spies from Britain from spies in the United States, and they had their own uranium enrichment and bomb development program that was going on at I would say a medium scale What happens after the destruction of Hiroshima is I in absented himself for a few days he went into a depression and didn't. React to any of his advisors and then immediately massively escalated the Soviet development of their own atomic bomb. So they were both caught by surprise and not caught by surprise. It's true that the Americans didn't always think about the Soviet Union as a factor in any decision related to how the war was going to end but they also very strongly, we understood that the key issue was trying to get this the Japanese government to surrender faster because the faster they surrendered the less impact. The Soviet entry in the war would have to how the end game would play out in Asia, my guest, Michael Gordon, and Tashi Hitachi, and we're reflecting on the seventy fifth anniversary of Hiroshima. Tashi. One, hundred fifty thousand atomic bomb survivors still living in Japan. In fact, as a guest of Japan's Ministry of Foreign. Affairs this would have been in September twenty, sixteen I met one of one of the survivors now they're all in education and public law has plied an important part in shaping Japan's post-war Pacifism. Now, as generation dies out, is the role of pessimism in Japanese politics is that diminishing especially in the face of Rausing China Toshi? I don't think the passing of the atomic bomb survivors will diminish the strengths of pacifism in any short-term. The correctly memory of human magazine Japan has been fairly robust and the taken deep roots in popular culture. I can think of a good example that is Japanese animated wartime drama film released just four years ago in two thousand, sixteen cold in this corner of the world. This picture accounts of the wartime life in here she was a smash hit in the box office. Be, atomic bomb survivors will also active in passing down lessons from the world's first nuclear war to the next generation. The city's over here streaming nagy training. Many Japanese Ron Tears as storytellers who share the testimonies are waging victims and a second generation survivors are spearheading efforts for peace unjustice. Well, that brings me to today and really in the last that he is the end of the call was thirty years ago the US. And the Soviets on Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty non stop this was President Bush senior and Gorbachev in Russia in the inside at Union. Then just as it was collapsing now, both agree to significantly reduce their nuclear stockpiles and of course, the updated treaty between Moscow and Washington that expose I. Think it's February Knicks Jeez. So that's just a few days after the next president is warning Michael Do you think it will be resigned. I think that's entirely dependent on the results of the election. Joe. Biden has indicated that he would refine the treaty The trump administration has had many opportunities to re-sign the treaty, but they have not taken advantage of those opportunities yet. Russia's indicated that they're very interested in extending

Japan United States Soviet Union Hiroshima Michael Gordon Russia Japanese Government President Truman Nagasaki Us Air Force Tic- Japan Washington Nagy President Bush
Fresh update on "truman" discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:36 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "truman" discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Crowd and estimated ten thousand which was on hand may have been due to the television and through the early hour of delivery for Eisenhower Speech Seven PM. Los Angeles time. Meanwhile, in Springfield Illinois Democratic presidential nominee at Lea- Stevenson sketched campaign plans yesterday to win the nation's farm vote after receiving a promise of support for the deep South State of Mississippi. which bolted the Democratic Party in nineteen forty eight. Fourteen California Communist leaders convicted yesterday on a federal indictment charging that they conspired to teach and advocate overthrowing the government by force and violence. They are in jail pending a hearing on a defense motion urging judge William Mathis to reverse the unanimous verdict of the jury of eight men and four women. LS. Are Now who is about to resign as US price stabiliser said last night Congress may have to be called into special session to put a lid on rising prices. He hinted that he may recommend consideration of the special session when he sees President Truman today to discuss his resignation as head of the opposite price stabilization and talk about a lot of things the former Georgia governor is expected asked the president to relieve in September. First he told reporters he's anxious to get back to his law practice and other business interests in Georgia as soon as possible. He deep South Negro Democrat and longtime leader of his people at Walden. Yesterday urged support of the ad, my Stevenson ticket. Walden attorney and temporary chairman of the South Y dissociation. Amigo. Democrats long has been a strong advocate of civil rights legislation a legal counsel for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People Walden Avenue in the target of politicians in Georgia who claims he controls Negro votes. President Truman flew into Washington yesterday from his home in Independence Missouri expressing confidence that Democrats will win and renewing his statement. He's awaiting orders on how to help it was the first time he's been in the capital since she flew to Chicago for the mctighe night of the Democratic convention and the Nomination of Advice Stevenson of Illinois to succeed him. Japan and nationalist China formally ratified yesterday the Treaty Ending Fifteen years of declared an undeclared war. It was a stiff ceremony until the papers were signed for Minister George Up China and social shaky camera Japan's overseas agency cheap could not speak to each other until afterwards. And Scott Free Columbus truck driver didn't go Well. He didn't go scot-free that. He was fine twenty nine dollars eighty cents in cost by mayor. EP speechmaker at London Ohio for overloading his truck on the State Highway. Though some of these top news stories was reported in the newspapers on Wednesday August sixth nineteen, fifty two on your radio I was a communist for the FBI which continues now on Classic Radio Theater. Now, back to Dana Andrews starring as mets. In I was a communist for the FBI. And the Second Act of our story. We Re Valley's Center we could feel the excitement in the air over the coming festival. We headed straight for the general store displayed our samples and established our excuse for being in Tom Luck was with us if you can call it luck. Because Mark Polski was in the store to It didn't take much effort to maneuver an invitation to stay at the Polski Fon. That was just one thing. Wrong. Conrad Billy. Ski declared himself in on the invitation and the odds against my losing him long enough to make that phone call to the. FBI We're getting too big for comfort. Owned must've I'll ski very kind to invite us to stay here at your farm for the festival light. Hope it is too much trouble trouble. Of course not. Then, I meet man named Soviet they got the general store who's people come from Sylvania, my own country I say this man and his friends stops only at. Bosquet. Fan. And tonight my daughter Paula Cook for us only all style dishes you like that. Yeah. That's that's great they. MUST'VE VASCO I have to make a long distance call I'll pay for it. Sure. Sure. buffoons in kitchen. Thanks a lot. Oh, here's your friend Mr Belize Ski, baked without Johnny I must go. To make software. Also. The I never thought of it like that part Mr. Bliss. He's been giving some figures consumers, market Shaw. Mr Scientific you want to make long distance call now? No, I'll do it later. squall. What? Were you going to form long distance? I. Was just going to report that we'd reached here report I location you know no, I don't know since I am in charge. A pop chimera minute. Well, yeah I want to ask you a question who Yes did you ever think of the tremendous cost of farm produce to the consumer, the prophets all along the line, but the farm only grosses a few pennies on them. So what kind of deal is that Johnny? You don't understand that are many problems before the consumer gets the product transportation canning labor costs advertising. This is big business. I wouldn't want to change places why what's so great about being a small farmer on that Mr Belly ski is something only a final could understand. Excuse me Mr Pavonis gear ninety nine. It's only too much. Talk I here lately about the prophets. Dangerous I, better go to the. Wait pop with you follow we got company Oh. This is just vice sister, Paula. Someone should have prepared me Paula. About shoulder height my shoulder that is blue eyes and blonde hair the truth nature was right once in a while. Conrad Billy Ski made some The smirking remark about the traveling salesman, the farmer's daughter. And I made an inner non proletariate prayer that the provost kids would say, no, thank you to the particular brand of poison we were selling..

FBI President Truman Advice Stevenson Georgia Illinois Paula Johnny I Mr Belize Ski Los Angeles Conrad Billy Ski United States Japan Paula Cook William Mathis Eisenhower Springfield Congress Democratic Party Walden SKI
Hiroshima survivors worry that world will forget

Marketplace

05:18 min | 2 d ago

Hiroshima survivors worry that world will forget

"Exactly 15 minutes past eight in the morning on August 6th, 1945 Japanese time at the moment when the atomic bomb flashed above Hiroshi MMA Miss Yoshiko Sasaki, a clerk in the personnel department of the East Asia, 10 Works had just sat down at her place in the plant office and was turning her head to speak to the girl at the next desk. That rather ordinary sentence is the opening to the extraordinary August 1946 New Yorker article titled Oshima. It was published a year after the United States dropped the first nuclear bomb on that city, a year in which the U. S government had gone to great lengths to conceal the human devastation caused And to depict the bomb as a conventional humane weapon. The writer of the Peace John Hursey, uncovered a very different story reporting on the ground in Japan, author and journalist Leslie Bloome chronicles foresees work and the reaction to it in her new book, Fallout. She joins me now from Los Angeles. Leslie Bloome. Welcome. Thank you. Start with Who? John Hursey Wass and how he came to be the one to tell this story. Oh, John. Her see was a young World War two correspondent who had covered action in different theaters throughout the war for Time magazine. And like many war correspondents, then he was pretty supportive of the U. S military. And he even wrote an almost overly complimentary wartime bio of General Douglas MacArthur and That the U. S military knew him entrusted him would be an important factor in my story and how he eventually got his story about Hiroshi MMA, and I don't want to give away too much. But I will say that how he got in was by being the perfect Trojan horse reporter, The perfect Trojan horse reporter. You've hooked us where we're intrigued when I got there. He didn't report this out as a war correspondent. He focused very much on ordinary people on he picked six of them. Why did he want to tell the story in that way? Well, I mean, the fact of the matter is is that the bombing of Hiroshima was widely reported when it happened, and it was reported as a very big end of days. Story mean there were pictures of the mushroom clouds that were released in pictures, the landscape devastation. But there were no pictures that were released or no stories that were released about the human toll that it happened on the ground there, and the government was really going to enormous lengths to cover up the reality of theater. Tomic aftermath in Hiroshima, Nagasaki They were very concerned with as the former secretary of war, put it, not being seen as having outdone, Hitler and atrocities. So her C and his editors at the New Yorker magazine became determined to tell the story from the point of view of survivors. You know, these are among the on ly humans who have ever experience what it's like to be on the receiving end of nuclear attack. He ultimately picked a widow with young kids, a young female clerk to medics, a priest and a minister with with a young family, and his idea was to create a sense of empathy. In his readers with these individuals, because, after all, not everybody could understand the physics of how the bombs works or visualized. You know, an all out nuclear attack that anyone could relate to being a mother or a father or colleague or doctor who's going about their everyday business. One catastrophe strikes I wonder if you would give us a sense of just one telling story of what he did find when he was there What it was that so shocked American readers who had no idea what was unfolding in Japan. One story that particularly resonated with him. He interviewed a young female clerk who was in her company when the bomb was detonated. This's the clerk I mentioned in the intro exactly one of the most famous introductions in journalistic history, and when the bomb exploded over her factory bookshelves fell upon her, and she was nearly crushed to death by books. And he thought How ironic it was to have somebody nearly crushed by books within the first moments of the atomic age, and literally when he was leaving here, Oshima and standing on the surprisingly intact train station platform, he thought that he was going to have to write about that line. And that's one of the incidents that most resonated with readers. So August 1946 The New Yorker publishes. What was the reaction? Both in the United States and around the world to this story. Well in her sees own words. The reaction was quote explosive mean, I try not to use that word in my book for obvious reasons. But he did, And the article was simply titled here, Oshima, and it comprised nearly the entire contents of the August 31st 1946 issue of The New Yorker. It's sold out immediately. You're even black market copies of it going for, you know, astronomical sums. It was syndicated in its entirety, and this is a 30,000 word story in newspapers across the country and around the world. And editors and reporters and readers were enraged. They were horrified by the testimonies in her sees here, Oshima, and they also began demanding to know what else was the U. S government withholding from the US public And then, when President Truman was asked by a reporter if he had personally read it, he retorted. I never read the New York ER. It just makes me bad. But the fact is, is that the government had been put very much on the defensive. That said, You know, they didn't want to look like they were on the defensive, but they were and they had to scramble to try to reclaim the narrative.

New Yorker Magazine Oshima Leslie Bloome United States Hiroshi Mma Reporter Hiroshima Japan U. S Los Angeles John Hursey Wass East Asia John Hursey Miss Yoshiko Sasaki Douglas Macarthur Time Magazine Writer
Fresh update on "truman" discussed on Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

00:34 sec | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "truman" discussed on Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

"Later, she even met Clifton Truman Daniel, grandson of President Harry Truman, who ordered A bombing. There will be a time in the future when there are no more surviving erosion of victims. What do you want The world to remember. Keep eliminating nuclear weapons is the path to peace, Ensuring this tragedy is never repeated. At CBS News correspondent Remy Inocencio in Japan. WCBS NEWS time. 3 53 Hi Carol from L A here when we rescued Sadie, our shelter said she was a lab mix, but that didn't seem right because of all of her energy. So we decided to test her DNA with embark. Turns out she's a border collie, boxer and beagle mix suddenly say he made a lot more sense. Now we know she needs a lot of exercise, and we've even started agility training with her anything to keep Sadie happy.

Clifton Truman Daniel Sadie President Harry Truman Remy Inocencio CBS Japan
How Hiroshima survivors helped form radiation safety rules

Science Magazine Podcast

06:53 min | 2 weeks ago

How Hiroshima survivors helped form radiation safety rules

"Now, we have contributing correspondent Dennis normal. He wrote this week on how seventy five years later. The survivors of the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki have transformed understanding of the effects of radiation exposure on health. Hi, Dennis Arthur we're talking about study. Now. Run by Ari are asked, which is the Radiation Effects Research Foundation this is a very long-term study as I mentioned almost seventy five years. Years and included many many survivors over one hundred thousand. How exactly did this study get started all those years ago? Virginia's Harry Truman authorized launch of the study was in nineteen, forty, seven. They were pretty much should have a full team on the ground in Yoshii Nagasaki. By nineteen, forty, nine, thousand, nine, hundred fifty. The US Navy realized that there would be a bathroom studying the acute impact and. And the long term impact of what happens to humans when they are subjected to the detonation of Tom These survivors involvement in such a long-term study has yielded an amazing array of results, important results for health for anyone who's exposed to radiation and work or an accident. What are some of the key findings from this work us? Not just one study. They actually have a collection of different studies. Studies, they have carried out the most notable one. Is this enormous life span study where they have as you mentioned one hundred twenty thousand people who were enrolled at the outset? If you put together the combination of number of participants and the length of the study, there's probably nothing else like the RRF in his predecessor ABC city simply gathered data on how radiation has long term effects on health. Health of those who were exposed to radiation the Rif previously ABC gathered that data mix epidemiological connections between the amount of radiation. Someone gets and their risk of developing cancer later in life, other or decisions take that data and data from other studies as well, and they turn those into recommendations for the amount of exposure that people should be allowed to get if they are patient for medical imaging. Imaging, or if they are, the technicians were if their nuclear pact workers this gives away how old I am, but I went to the dentist pornography child. You sit in the dental chair and the dentist would real office machine thick x rays of your teeth, and those were go bouncing all over the room these days for dental x Ray. They put you in a special room which shielded technician. Technician is wearing a badge to track how much radiation he or she is exposed to. You're also wearing that vest to protect your organs from straight X rays all those recommendations shielding around the x ray rooms, dosimetry badges with technicians, where and the vest the patients where they all grew out of basic data that was produced by the long term studies by RRF INC with the survivors we talked. Talked about how this research got started very soon after the bombings, US government, Edna Japanese, government, and boasted research with survivors, but with different purposes. How are they different? Hauer their intentions with the studies different. The ABC was very much an American stony when the ABC's got started was so under America's occupation, and the Japanese scientists had difficulty publishing their observations amount of information that was released Japanese. was very much controlled by the occupation of Nargis, so there were real restrictions on what the Japanese scientists could do, but that initial collection of data by the US groups was over within a few months later there was a decision to set up a long-term study of the effects of radiation and at that point yet. Of the Japanese scientists in the American scientists were pretty much aligned. You mentioned in the story that the survivors weren't treated by the US scientist when they were involved in the study. Initially, that's right. Basically for political reasons, the decision was made that the ABC said he would not offer any treatment to the people who were being examined by the ABC physicians. They concern was that if the ABC city which at that time was very much? American funded American. If. They offered treatment. It might be taken as an admission of culpability in their condition, because misunderstandings and friction between the survivors, many of whom believe that they would get some help for doing with their illnesses with their injuries. Yeah, why would a survivor become involved in the study? If they weren't going to get treatment, even decades later if that was the history of the study. Initially. There was a hope that they would get some sort of medical benefit from participating in the study, the didn't get zero. In particular children that were born to survivors got medical checkups that there would not have received not been part of the study later as one of the survivors told me he has continued to cooperate with the study because he hopes that it will help the world recognize how devastating, the effects are of attack using atomic weapons, and so that is what motivates him to continue to cooperate. It's not clear whether there are. Are Health Effects for the offspring of survivors, but this survivors children are obviously concerned about their health. Can you talk about about this tension with the scientists say is that their studies so far have not identified any affects the question is. Are there no effects or are statistical data simply not detailed enough to spot affects the friction arises. Is that some of the children of the survivors? But we've that they are facing health issues that are not faced by big response were not subjected to the. It's on bond radiation, so the children what? As survivors as second-generation survivors, and they now have to court actions going forward, try to force the the government to recognize that the children of survivors should be recognized, says survivors as well, and that should also be entitled to medical support it just as their parents are

ABC Radiation Effects Research Fou Technician United States Abc City Us Navy Yoshii Nagasaki Dennis Normal Dennis Arthur Hiroshima Nagasaki ARI Virginia Harry Truman Tom These Edna Japanese Rrf Inc Hauer Nargis
Fresh update on "truman" discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:11 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "truman" discussed on Here & Now

"That ammonium nitrate fueled explosion in Beirut, which created the ground, killed over 100 people so far and injured several 1000 more. Was horrific. But for many, that white plume of smoke that mushroomed up before collapsing also brought to mind chillingly the truth. Mushroom cloud over Hiroshima, Japan 75 years ago today. It was August 6 1945 America detonated the first atomic bomb immediately incinerating 80,000 people, 140,000 would die of radiation or other injuries decades later. Survivors still suffer and they gathered today is bells tolled a few days after Hiroshima more powerful bomb devastated Nagasaki. The Japanese days later admitted defeat. The war was over, but the cost What was the cost? Jim Walsh is here now. Security analyst. He's with mighty security Studies program. So, Jim, we have these two clouds We know completely different one in Beirut and accident. The other a profound decision. But people in Japan are tweeting out today that it wasn't until they saw the route that they truly could understand Hiroshima. How big it was. Did you think of Hiroshima, too? When you saw that earlier this week, you know, but I can't believe you started out here because I felt exactly the same way. I saw that cloud had an emotional impact on me, but I would go even further. Now, as you say it was not a nuclear weapon, but in a way, it is a cautionary tale. Even a warning. About our nuclear future in a week that we recognize these anniversaries, you know, like a storehouse of exploded explosives sitting on a Beirut dock at the world's thousands of nuclear weapons, sit And wait for their moment. And like in Beirut over all these years, we could have gotten rid of them. We should have gotten rid of them. But we didn't And at the end of the Cold War, we sort of moved on to other things. And so today, people don't know or like in Beirut. They for gotten and deep underground, deeper. Still, under the ocean, the bomb waits waits quietly for its turn. We are 75 years in but unless we change course. One day we will all be Beirut, but the scale will be unimaginable. Okay, well, that's pretty chilling, and not just to remind people what it's pretty. Ah, agreed upon what blew up in Beirut was ah, store of this ammonium nitrate for explosives that have been seized and it was just sitting there to keep you waiting there just like Yeah. All our bombs Continuous it there, OK, will take us back 1945 World War two had really been dragging for nearly four years. The US develops the atomic bomb. Talk about the debate about actually actually using it. Well, you know, there wasn't a ton of debate. There were a few voices who opposed to, but there was pretty much a consensus and you know, you know better than anyone, Robin that there have been bookshelves of tomes written on this topic. Emphasizing different factors. But I think the first thing to do is remember the context which is what you point to World War two head cost millions of lives. By that point, all the sides at one point or another had targeted civilians, something that is illegal today. Under international law, we would not be able legally to execute the use of that weapon because it targeted Civilians. But FDR had promised to seek unconditional surrender from Japan. A nail Truman after yours. Death had inherited that position and had inherited the bomb. And so when you have as your goal, unconditional surrender. Ah, it was definitely a path laid towards using the bomb, and there were several factors that went to decision first, obviously being a desire to end the war. And to do so without having to invade Japan, and people can debate whether that was possible or not. But that was certainly one of the driving considerations. And then scholars supported the other factors over the generations over time, such as race. You know this was against Japan, it was not against a European country, the looming competition with the Soviet Union. Bureaucratic mo mentum. All those probably played a role, but I think at the end of the day this was on a fast track and a lot of it had to do with the war itself. What the war had brought us to a point here is President Harry Truman, speaking on that day, August 6 1945. Letting Americans now the bomb has been used this way, have now added a new and revolutionary.

Beirut Japan Hiroshima Jim Walsh President Harry Truman Nagasaki America Analyst Soviet Union United States FDR Robin
"truman" Discussed on Medical Mysteries

Medical Mysteries

06:26 min | 2 weeks ago

"truman" Discussed on Medical Mysteries

"Bipolar disorder is a mental health condition characterized by extreme mood swings from mania to depression. Like schizophrenia, it can include psychosis. This makes it difficult for psychologists to distinguish between the two because both can trigger hallucinations or disordered thinking. Unfortunately, there's no standardized test to confirm whether a patient has bp or schizophrenia, but ongoing therapy can help a counselor determine the correct diagnosis. and Tom's bipolar disorder suggests that the Truman show delusion had three possible causes, schizophrenia, drug, abuse or bipolar disorder. And the movies seemed to be a factor, too. Well there were similar delusions in earlier decades. No one had developed tst before the Truman show debuted. Until yet. Another patient proved to be an out liar. Kyle had T. S., D. and polar disorder, but he I experienced the Truman show delusion in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty nine. Nine years before the film was released. Like some of the goals, more recent patients, coyote distrusted technology. Since? He was an accomplished sailor. Kyle preferred to escape the complexities of life on land for the simplicity of the open sea. But even in the remotest parts of the Ocean Kyle believed he was under constant observation. His show's producers communicated with him through hidden messages. Like Tom Kyle had no history of drug abuse though he went through periods of heavy drinking. His delusion waxed and waned as his bipolar disorder. Throw him into manic and depressive episodes. When the Truman show was released in Nineteen, ninety eight. Kyle likely incorporated its narrative into his reality. He may have believed the film was proof. His delusions were validated. Luckily, Kyle sought treatment for his bipolar disorder. He took medication adopted an active lifestyle and relied on a supportive network of family and friends. The treatments were a success they help. Kyle seized control over his bipolar disorder and his Truman show. Delusion symptoms faded. But bipolar disorder has no cure. Patients like kyle can manage their symptoms, but their delusions might still return from time to time. Which means they're? TST May reappear as well. Luckily Kyle had Ian and Joel Gold on his side, and they were all hell bent on solving the bigger mystery hand. Why were so many patients delusions so eerily similar? All of the Gold's TST. Clients believe their lives were recorded twenty four seven. And that every other person in the world was a participant in the show. It was also common for patients to believe they'd receive a grand prize once they completed all the demands, they heard from disembodied voices. In addition, each of their patients was American, but that didn't mean anything. The goals practice was based in the United States, but they wondered how much culture shaped the delusion and expanded their scope to look for patients outside the United States. In nineteen, Ninety eight the same year, the Truman show debuted a Japanese man will call the Soobee found himself alone and naked in Tokyo apartment. twenty-three-year-old! Was An aspiring comedian, so at first he was excited to participate in a brand new reality show. But newbies producers took most of his possessions including his clothes, he was left with only a small table, a stack of postcards, magazines and the camera to document his journey. Naked and alone Masugi had to enter as many male in contests as he could, he couldn't buy anything. He could only live on whatever prizes he won. The show's premise was. Can a man live on sweepstakes alone? Meanwhile his every move was filmed. Masugi understood that once he won the show. The footage would be edited and broadcast. But he couldn't finish the competition until he satisfied the producers demand. He had to win a million yen in prizes about ten thousand. American dollars. So Nissho played the game. He entered two hundred mailing contests a day, often winning useless items like bicycles and women's underwear. Early on, he won a bag of rice, but to producers had taken his pots and pans. He had no way to cook it. Instead the soobee eight dog food to survive. Still Nasu be persisted believing that his suffering would inevitably be rewarded. He rambled at his camera for hours as his hair group wild, and untamed his body thin, and his skin grew sick and pale. After nearly a year masugi finally one. But instead of rewarding him, the producers blindfolded him and took Masugi to another apartment, telling him to start the game over again. As, Masugi disrobed, the walls of the apartment fell down. Soobee found himself in a huge brightly lit film studio. Millions of viewers laughed applauded as Confetti fell from the ceiling. Nasu B.'s experience was completely real..

Tom Kyle Bipolar disorder Truman Masugi disrobed Ocean Kyle Kyle T. S. Nasu B. psychosis hallucinations Soobee Nissho United States Confetti Joel Gold Tokyo Ian
"truman" Discussed on Medical Mysteries

Medical Mysteries

04:18 min | 2 weeks ago

"truman" Discussed on Medical Mysteries

"The summer after his sophomore year, he and his friends took a road trip to Colorado. During the Ride Tom? Constantly grinned and chuckled to himself. Tom's friends asked what was so funny. Tom Kept saying he'd never been better. When the group arrived in Colorado Tom continued to act strange one night, he climbed to the roof of their house to look at the stars. He stayed up there alone for hours. And that evening something clicked in Tom's mind. Tom Suddenly realized that recording equipment had been installed all over the world. It captured his every move. Even nearby birds and squirrels had cameras implanted in their eyes. After the Sun came up Tom- finally climbed down from the roof, barefoot and shirtless. He staggered around the neighborhood in a daze, staring at strangers. Everyone looked similar to people. He already knew. That's when he deduced his show was reusing actors. On his walk. Tom Saw- house with a for sale sign in the lawn. Like Charlie and Ben Tom Thought that his show was offering a grand prize. He could win the house. Tom Peek through the windows to search for clues, but a pair of squad cars pulled up to the scene. While the police questioned him Tom refused to take the situation seriously. He laughed hysterically, complimenting their costumes and performances. He insisted that one of the cops was the same actor who played his fourth grade teacher. When they tried to arrest him, Tom Cooperated, he was certain. This was part of the show's grand finale. While he sat in the police station. Tom Kept waiting for a huge garage door to open exposing the studio audience and the actors who played his friends and family. Predictably this didn't happen. Tom was released and returned to his parents. And, his failure to win, the House didn't Stop Tom's delusions. If anything he was more resolved to get the grand prize. His constant grinning and laughing unnerved his mother, he constantly accused his parents of being actors. It's unclear from the New Yorker video story about Tom's experience. If Tom sought psychiatric help for this behavior. But a later after he'd moved back to his parents house. Tom Woke up to find his mind was totally clear. The delusion had completely disappeared, and it never came back. Was this some kind of medical miracle or a clue about what was really going on? Unlike the other Truman, show patients Tom wasn't an addict, nor did he have a known history of drug abuse, but his month of constant smiling and laughter fit the symptoms of a manic episode. A Manic episode is a period of excessively heightened activity and emotion. For example, a person who usually sticks to their budget may suddenly spend thousands of dollars on an unnecessary new wardrobe. Or someone who's not very religious, will suddenly spent hours praying and attending church. People experiencing manic episodes may feel like their thoughts are racing too quickly for them to keep up. They might take risks or they're six. Dr Might become overwhelming. Mania can be induced by stress or changes in sleep patterns which Tom Dealt with that summer. But a single extended periods of mania is enough to diagnose a patient with bipolar disorder..

Ben Tom Tom Tom Peek Tom Dealt Tom Cooperated Colorado manic episode bipolar disorder Charlie Truman
"truman" Discussed on Medical Mysteries

Medical Mysteries

06:36 min | 3 weeks ago

"truman" Discussed on Medical Mysteries

"Been changed throughout this episode. We've chosen pseudonyms to present this story. In Two thousand and three twenty six year old Andrew Jones took a train from Pennsylvania to New York City. He was anxious. His poem sweated as he suspiciously I the other passengers. When the car stopped at Penn Station Andrew pushed his way through the crowds exiting the station to a bustling cityscape. Andrew had come to New York for one reason to visit Ground Zero. Over the past two years, he turned the event over and over in his mind. But something about nine eleven felt unbelievable to him as if it never really happened. He needed to see it with his own two eyes. Andrew staggered through the streets of New York seeming lost and dazed. But on his way to the World Trade Center he spotted the United Nations headquarters suddenly. He decided he needed to get inside. Andrew banged on the doors, but a security guard refused to let him in. Through the glass a breathless. Andrew insisted he needed to speak with someone. He demanded asylum as if he were a refugee. Empathizing with Andrews Distress but came out to comfort him. But, Andrew didn't want. Comfort Confused terrified and frustrated Andrew took a swing at the guard, and after a short scuffle, he was arrested and brought to a nearby psychiatric facility Bellevue Hospital. Dr Joel Gold met with the restrained Andrew, the patient was uncooperative, demanding to speak with the director. Dr Gold could tell that Andrew was in crisis, but before he could help his patient Dr Gold had to understand what was really troubling him. That's when Andrew revealed that his entire life was ally. Nefarious TV producers had manipulated him for years in broadcast every moment. When our bodies fail, we trust doctors to diagnose the problem, but medicine isn't always an exact science. Sometimes, it's a guessing game with life or death stakes. This is medical mysteries, a podcast original I'm molly and I'm Richard. Every Tuesday will look at the strangest real life medical cases in history and the experts who raced against the clock to solve them. As. We follow these high intensity. Stories will explore medical research. That might solve the puzzle. Next week in part to will analyze all the evidence and try to find an answer. You can find episodes of medical mysteries, and all other park has originals for free on spotify over ever you listen to podcasts to stream medical mysteries for free on spotify just open the APP and type medical mysteries in the search bar. This is our first episode. On the Truman, show delusion, a mental health condition in which someone believes they're being watched like twisted reality show. This week we'll meet Charlie among other patients who believed he was the secret star of a game show will explore his struggles to get a diagnosis and treat his condition. Next week will analyze the factors that may trigger tst and examined theories about why this particular delusion is so widespread. We have all that and more coming up. Stay with us. In one, thousand, nine, hundred ninety one screenwriter Andrew. Nicole wrote a script called the Malcolm show. The main character was an antisocial alcoholic in what he believed to be. New York City, but Malcolm actually lived on a Hollywood back lot and hidden cameras recorded his every move. Seven years later. A lighter more upbeat version of Nicole script debuted. Directed by Peter we're the Truman. Show starred Jim Carrey as Truman Burbank, a man who has no idea. He's The star of a reality TV show. Truman's father mother, best friend, wife, and everyone else he knows are cast, or crew hired to deceive him, but eventually Truman sees the truth. His false friends and family try to convince him that he's delusional, but he doesn't buy it instead. He grows more erotic and violent. Finally he escapes to reality. In Nineteen Ninety eight twenty one year old Andrew. Jones saw the Truman show in theaters. When he went back to his Pennsylvania that night, he couldn't get the movie's premise out of his mind. Andrew wondered if he too was the only real person living in a fabricated world. Over the next few months, the concept dominated Andrews life like Truman. He believed he was surrounded by actors, pretending to be his friends and family. Around that time, he also noticed apparent coded messages. It seemed like someone was hinting about the TV show for example whenever someone said the word cool, they were in on the scheme. In the film, Truman longs to travel to Fiji. On the side of the world from his home, and he believes he can escape the reality show if he just gets away from his familiar hometown. Inspired by this point. Andrew tried to book a plane ticket to a foreign country, but international flights were too expensive, so he developed another plan. Andrew would go to Ground Zero in New York City. He come to believe that. The producers of his show had staged the nine eleven terrorist attacks. If, he could prove the tragedy hadn't really happened. Maybe he could finally escape the show..

Andrew Jones Truman Burbank New York City Truman Pennsylvania Penn Station Nicole script Andrew spotify Malcolm Dr Joel Gold Bellevue Hospital United Nations World Trade Center Jim Carrey director Fiji Hollywood Charlie Peter
"truman" Discussed on American Elections: Wicked Game

American Elections: Wicked Game

05:13 min | Last month

"truman" Discussed on American Elections: Wicked Game

"At the nineteen forty eight Democratic Convention Truman had vowed to fight hard and give the Republicans. Hell on the campaign trail at sixty four years old. Truman did just that in September and October of nineteen, Forty Eight Truman traveled over twenty thousand miles by train, giving speeches as many as ten per day, his large crowds frequently chanted, give them Hell Harry. On the campaign trail, Truman promised to give to the communist to and he blamed the Republican controlled Congress for forcing him to confront the issue with one hand, tied behind his back to a crowd of thousands in Oklahoma City determined to cried. I charge that the Republicans have impeded and made more difficult our efforts to cope with communism in this country Truman, urged the Oklahoma audience not to sit at home, but go out and vote. Truman attack. The do nothing good for nothing Republicans mercilessly calling them bloodsuckers and Glutton's of privilege to appeal to progressive new. Deal Democrats Truman slammed Republicans for their anti Labor positions as Truman call for instituting fair labor laws and raising the minimum wage. But despite Truman's heroic efforts, Thomas Dewey was still ahead in the polls. A Gallup poll in October show, do we with a comfortable lead? Forty nine point five percent to Truman's forty four point five percent in the final weeks of the campaign, major newspapers across the country declared the dewey's victory was all but certain life magazine ran a picture of Dewey with the caption, the next president of the United States the Chicago Tribune, was so confident of Dewey's victory than on election night. They went to press early in the headline Dewey Defeats Truman. It's become one of the most famous printing errors in American history on election day in nineteen, forty, eight Harry Truman one over twenty, four million popular votes and three hundred and three electoral votes, defeating Dewey, who received just under twenty, two million popular votes and one eighty nine electoral votes. The Democrats fared well across the board, reclaiming the House and the Senate. Two days later one of the one hundred fifty thousand copies of the erroneously headlines Chicago. Tribune made its way into the hands of Harry Truman, who stood on the back of a train car in Saint Louis the Tribune had previously written off Truman calling him a Nincompoop on the back of that train car. Truman had his revenge. He held up a copy the paper and smiled as a slew photographers captured the moment and the Tribune's greed just mistake for history. In the nineteen forty eight election, Progressive Democrats mainly farmers, laborers and union workers largely voted for Truman Truman also received a larger portion of the African American. Vote than FDR and most significantly. Truman's victory proved that a Democrat could win. The White House without a solid south standing behind him. If the DIXIECRATS had not defected from the Democratic Party. Truman's margin of victory would have been even bigger Strom Thurmond, one thirty nine electoral votes that likely would have gone to Truman progressive candidate Henry Wallace received none. In the end it might be said that the nineteen four eight election came down to personality. Truman had the pluck of an underdog, the fight of a man with nothing to lose these qualities endeared him to the American. People do we on the other hand was careful with his words to such an extreme that he often came off as bland, unapproachable and stiff as one contemporary observer noted, do was like the little man on the wedding. In addition Truman's was arguably the better campaign, his fair deal for America, which advocated for universal healthcare and a raise, minimum wage, and delivered the people hope, and his Truman doctrine against communism made. Many Americans feel that they were in safe hands. But during his first elected turn Truman's hardline on communism would be put to the test. The tension of the Cold War would intensify and in a surprise move USSR would successfully detonate their own Tomek, bom. Communist would gain control in China and bloody conflict in Korea would turn into protracted quagmire Truman's popularity would plummet, and as the Democrat search for a new leader. The Republicans would try to rise to power on the back of a famous World War Two general, Dwight, D Eisenhower, but in the nineteen fifty to contest for the Republican. Establishment I would prove difficult to control. On the next episode of the game, the election of Nineteen fifty-two Dwight ICENHOWER. Determine Democratic Party United Behind the Popular Illinois governor had lay Stevenson, but in the run up to the nineteen fifty two contest I speak as cross to bear, is not the Democrats to member of his own party as I- defies the Republican establishment fights for the White House on his own terms, he does his best to rein in his vice presidential, running mate political powerhouse named Richard Nixon. Don't miss a single week of our marsh from Seventeen, eighty nine to twenty twenty hit the subscribe button and your podcast APP. Now this show is supported by you our. Our listeners please give us a rating and leave a review, but the single best way to help the show is to tell others share with your friends and family, and find us on social media at wicked Game Pot, and I'm at Lindsey Graham another way to support this show is to go to wicked game podcast. Dot Com members there get early access to add free.

Truman Truman Truman Democrats Truman Thomas Dewey White House Tribune Chicago Tribune Oklahoma City Democratic Party Harry Chicago Oklahoma FDR Congress DIXIECRATS Lindsey Graham Senate
"truman" Discussed on American Elections: Wicked Game

American Elections: Wicked Game

07:16 min | Last month

"truman" Discussed on American Elections: Wicked Game

"To his side, and he might be able to use them to help. Taft Eke out a victory. Republican Party leaders wanted a peaceful convention, and for good reason, the nineteen forty eight Republican convention was broadcast over a new medium that was changing the face of communication television. Though the new technological wonder was gaining popularity throughout the nation. It's reach was regional and not yet national, but that didn't stop convention attendees awareness of the cameras. They knew very well. That television changed appearances as Time magazine observed good looking women turn into witches and Dapper men, become unshaven bums, and with television broadcasts of the nineteen forty eight Republican National Convention, having the potential to reach a half million screens and the surrounding area convention. Ten Dis were conscious of their looks. Thomas. Dewey was fully aware of the potential impact of television for decades party leaders engaged in negotiations with delegates sometimes out in the open right on the convention floor. Do we wisely instructed his managers to conduct all official campaign business away from the eyes of the cameras? Some of these out of sight negotiations to. And Taft by surprise in order for staff into block his path and helped half take the nomination. The state, of Pennsylvania was a must win going into the convention, Pennsylvania was already firmly in the taff column, but Stassen Taft didn't anticipate Thomas Dewey's deft political maneuvering. On June, twenty second nineteen, forty eight. The State of Pennsylvania made a sudden announcement that took the convention by surprise. The Keystone State announced that it was switching its votes from taft to doing. Afterwards one delegate call that there goes the ballgame. It's unclear exactly. What do we trade it away to secure Pennsylvania? But the story does reveal important fact about the candidate. Dewey's political skill was not charming, a crowd or shining in front of a camera. It was working the party machinery behind closed doors. At a press conference after the Pennsylvania announcement when reporters asked how he felt, he answered with a smile and a short sentence I feel swell. On this wall called. The delegates to this convention. HAVE CAST. One Thousand Ninety four votes. Thomas e Dewey of New York or President of the United. States an I declare that he is nominated unanimously all the Republican nomination president of the United States. Do, we won the Republican nomination on the third ballot. The party platform was a reflection of his policies, moderate and anti-isolationist. Do we also made a wise pick for vice president, the Popular California Governor Earl Warren a future Supreme Court justice. Do He didn't believe in passion or theatrics. He fought his battles thoughtfully and often through secret negotiation. Skills were enough to win the Republican primary, but would they be enough to overcome incumbent president? Harry Truman. The Dewey campaign was confident that could, especially as they knew, they weren't. The only opposition President Truman was facing in the lead up to their nineteen forty convention, the Democratic Coalition looked ready to splinter to win. The Democratic nomination for President Truman would have to contend with too extreme actions in his own party one from the right and one from the left. In the nineteen forties, the Democratic Party was teetering on the brink in large part, because many Democrats were fed up with Harry Truman. Fear of Communist infiltration into American society was widespread, too many President Truman's Truman doctrine, which sought to use containment to prevent the further spread of communism, internationally was a failed policy, but for many Progressives Truman stance on communism was far too harsh, and for many conservatives Truman's nonstop. The issues of civil rights were a major cause for concern and so in the nineteen forty eight election. Truman would have a fight on his hands. The first round was with his commerce. Secretary Henry Wallace. By the standards of his day Henry, Wallace was extremely liberal. He had served as FDR's first vice president, but eventually walls, pro civil rights, and Pro Labor views had alienated him from many conservative Democrats especially in the south, ultimately FDR had been forced to part ways with Wallace in his place. He had selected Harry Truman as his running mate at the nineteen forty four Democratic convention as a consolation prize Wallace was named FDR's commerce, secretary, For Truman. The first sign of trouble with Wallace had occurred back in nineteen forty six. Truman took a hardline stance against the Soviets leaving. America should compete with the USSR for Global Dominance Wallace believed the two nations should coexist peacefully, and then America should adopt a policy of cooperation. Wallace was far too vocal with these opinions for Truman's liking and so Truman asked for his resignation. But unknowingly by jetting Wallace Truman had set the stage for conflict in the nineteen forty eight election. It wasn't long before Wallace announced his intention to run as a presidential candidate for the newly revived Progressive Party, and throughout the spring and summer of nineteen, forty, eight Wallace's campaign picked up steam. The audiences at his rallies had steadily grown, as had the dollars had managed to race. But going into the Democratic National Convention in July nineteen forty. Eight, Henry Wallace wasn't Truman's biggest obstacle that was overcoming opposition from his own party. Especially Southern Democrats the southern Democrats did not want Harry Truman a man. They saw as being too friendly to the issue of civil rights and many Progressive Democrats who would not join Henry Wallace and the progressive. Party were eager firm alternative as well. For many the answer was obvious. General Dwight, D Eisenhower, whereas he's more commonly known I. I was publicly a political agnostic, neither a committed Republican, nor affirmed Democrat this fact alone made him dangerous because I had the potential to build a bipartisan coalition additionally Ike Saronic, leadership in World War Two had made him a household name. The American people knew him, and they trusted him, so the Anti Truman. Camp made appeal to the general, luckily for Truman Eisenhower did not want the job on July ninth nineteen, Forty eight Ike released a statement, saying in no uncertain terms that he would not accept the Democratic nomination for president leaving Truman's path to the nomination looking clear. But days later at the Democratic National Convention Philadelphia. The forces of opposition would make one last stand. Going into the Convention Truman and the Democratic leadership knew that a fight over civil rights was coming, and so did the southern Democrats prior to the convention. The Alabama delegation had pledged that if the party adopted a civil rights plank in the platform, their delegates would walk out even so the week before the convention, the Committee in charge of the platform powered ahead with Truman's blessing and drafted a civil rights plank. The final version stated that the Democratic Party would work to eradicate all racial religious and economic discrimination. We again state our belief that racial and religious minorities have the right to live the right to work the right to vote the full and equal protection.

President Truman Henry Wallace Truman Eisenhower Democratic Party Republican Party Thomas e Dewey Pennsylvania president Stassen Taft President Taft Eke Democratic Coalition Time magazine Progressive Party vice president Ike Saronic FDR first vice president
"truman" Discussed on American Elections: Wicked Game

American Elections: Wicked Game

07:32 min | Last month

"truman" Discussed on American Elections: Wicked Game

"In the Nineteen Thirties organized crime was rampant and taking on the mob in New York was a dangerous proposition but New York. Prosecutor Thomas do was not one to run from a fight. DEWEES investigation and subsequent prosecution of mobster. Lucky Luciano helped launch his political career. Dewey's rise in Republican politics was meteoric. Do we would serve as US attorney in the southern district of New, York District Attorney For New York County, the governor of New, York and finally the Republican nominee for president in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty four. Though. Do we lost that election to FDR? He did not lose his status inside his party. In the nineteen forty eight contest do he would again try for the White House. But to take back the presidency for the Republicans, do with I have to rise to the top of a crowded field of potential nominees and challenging incumbent president, fighting through a barrage of opposition. This is episode forty, one, nineteen, forty eight. Do we versus Truman Purses Thurmond versus Wallace Gang Buster? Four Time Harry Truman was a popular president in large part because of his leadership during the latter part of World War, two by May of Nineteen forty-five Hitler was dead, Germany had surrendered, and the Axis powers had crumbled safe for Japan which fought on alone worried that an invasion of Japan would be too costly in American lives. Truman resorted to other methods. On, August sixth nineteen forty-five, the United States dropped the newly developed atomic bomb on Hiroshima Japan days later, a second bomb was dropped on Nagasaki Truman's faithful decision brought a swift end to the war, but it also had unintended consequences. The American economy struggled to adjust to the abrupt peacetime inflation. Spite taxes remained high prices soared even as wages, stagnated and labor unrest grew. Grew more ubiquitous overseas. The wartime coalition between the United States, and the USSR broke apart as Eastern Europe fell under the control of the Soviets. The ensuing Cold War between the free, West and the Communist East left many Americans fearful that America's enemies might develop an atomic bomb of their own and many Americans laid the blame for all of this at Truman's feet. Going into the nineteen forty-six midterms Republicans across the country ran on a simple but effective campaign slogan in the form of a question. Had, enough. Another pond to err, is Truman and the Republicans Anti Truman campaign worked in the nineteen forty-six midterms. Republicans trounced the Democrats, the GOP, one back the house, and the Senate to further check the Democrats the Republican controlled Congress pushed through the Twenty Second Amendment which limited a president to two terms, a direct shot at the late Franklin Delano Roosevelt and going into the nineteen forty eight contest Republican saw, further opportunity and a means to put an end to the Democrats longstanding presidential streak. The man many hoped would lead the charge against Harry. Truman was New York Governor Thomas Dewey. Dewey we announce his candidacy in January of nineteen forty-eight in the minds of many dewey political moderate, was a perfect foil to Truman, though Truman and dewey largely agreed on foreign policy. Do we was much more conservative in his approach to domestic affairs? By though do he was the front runner in the minds of many he was not the first candidate in the race to measure Republicans had already declared senator. Robert Taft the son of America's Twenty-seventh, President William Howard Taft and Harold Stassen. The former governor of Minnesota and both men gave Dewi plenty of cause for concern. Taft had sharp intellect, a famous last name and a nickname that matched his classically conservative Persona Mr Republican. Taft was a tried and true conservative, and with the rising tension of the Cold War looming taft ran his campaign on an isolationist platform which drew sharper contrast with Truman. But Harold Stassen was the more immediate threat in the arena of Republican. Politics do was accustomed to being the young fresh face candidate going up against men decades his senior Harold Stassen, though was five years his junior statins youthful energy earned him the nickname board governor, and because do we in staff, and we're not far apart politically to win the nomination do we would have more women vigour than Stan in the Republican primary? The primary system in the nineteen forties look very different from the one us today now to win delegates in the various state primaries, those delegates are bound to vote for that candidate at the party convention. In the nineteen forties, most delegates were not chosen by popular vote. They were chosen by party leaders in the individual states, only a small portion of delegate votes were actually decided by the primary contests, so the nomination was still won or lost at conventions, but in nineteen forty eight, the primary contests still held significance, they were way for candidates to test the viability of their message with the people. If a candidate performed well, it could create momentum going into the summer convention. They fell flat. Often their candidacy would fizzle. Do we ran adapt primary campaign while ingratiating himself to party leaders in the various states. Do we was the Polish face of a well orchestrated PR campaign? His time fighting the mob in New York had taught him what he believed was a valuable lesson about being in the public eye. Restraint is better than passion. Passion might put people off calm. Restraint would give them confidence and do. His manner gave party leaders, the confidence to line his pockets with campaign funds. which do we used on carefully crafted ads in newspapers, magazines and the radio do we was always careful with his words fully aware that saying the wrong thing might cost him the nomination. Stassen on the other hand was never shy about speaking his mind. He had a natural charm and charisma, and he was not afraid to break. The mold status had announced his candidacy back in nineteen forty six two years before the election extremely early in this time Stassen was arguably the first ever presidential candidate to launch a door to door canvassing campaign, according to life magazine in the early part of nineteen forty eight staff, and traveled six thousand miles knocking on doors, talking directly to the people. He recruited a staff of eager college students to help him campus. He raised. Raised loads of money. He articulated his opinions to the press, and he was on the rise, and though do we won the first primary contest in New Hampshire Stassen, won a handful of delegates, and for many was gaining momentum stassen won the next two primaries in Wisconsin and Nebraska, and not long after the Nebraska primary a Gallup poll, showed status, and well ahead of Thomas Dewey nationwide for the dewey campaign. The True Primary Test was in Oregon on May Twenty First Nineteen, Forty eight for Dui. It was do or Die Stan. One do we might have to withdraw? Politically Stassen and dewey. We're not too differentiated on domestic issues both to moderate approach, but they differed on at least one question, though how best to fight the rise of communism at home. Largely derived from the thinking of Karl Marx Communism is a political ideology based on common ownership, were rather state ownership of the means of production and absence of social classes for most Americans. In the late nineteen forties, the term communism was synonymous with the Soviet Union that meant a stifling centrally planned state economy and government controlled society, absent, many personal liberties that Americans held dear as such communism.

Harry Truman Governor Thomas Dewey Harold Stassen president Nineteen Thirties Truman Purses Thurmond New York President William Howard Taft United States New Hampshire Stassen dewey campaign York Die Stan Japan America White House New York County Luciano FDR
Protests continue in Twin Cities after police department is disbanded, protesters call for ousting head of police federation

Our American Stories with Lee Habeeb

00:52 sec | Last month

Protests continue in Twin Cities after police department is disbanded, protesters call for ousting head of police federation

"Even as some street protests continue changes are coming to police departments around the country starting with Minneapolis where the death of George Floyd at the knee of a policeman set off weeks of demonstrations and calls for change the city council voted unanimously to disband the cinnamon apple as police force replace it with the community safety department WCCO TV is David Truman was worth about a hundred demonstrators outside the police officers federation all all these these people people here here say say they they want want justice justice which which to to them them means means of of getting getting rid rid of of lieutenant lieutenant Bob Bob Kroll Kroll as as the the head head of of the the police police officers officers federation federation one one of of the the speakers speakers called called Kroll Kroll a a liability liability to to the the city city isn't called much worse than that this afternoon to protesters are bringing up girls record with the department and they're doing all this outside the union office which is boarded up and fenced off one of the many passionate speakers today was a woman whose son died in in twenty twenty seventeen seventeen during during an an encounter encounter with with St St Paul Paul

Minneapolis George Floyd Apple David Truman Bob Bob Kroll Kroll St St Paul Paul
11 Trivia Questions on USA Crossword

Trivia With Budds

06:53 min | 2 months ago

11 Trivia Questions on USA Crossword

"Guys. Today's episode is all about a USA crossword. Why give you letters and you try and come up with the answers? Just like you're doing crossword puzzle and before we do that. We have some questions for you from trivial pursuit. Here's a question from a movie in beetlejuice. What BOOK TURNS UP ON? Gina Davis Alex Alec Baldwin's coffee table after their untimely demise. What is named the book from Beetlejuice? That is called the handbook for the recently deceased. Handbook for the recently deceased love. That movie love that book. It's a very cool prop. You buy at places like hot topic and box lunch. They have purses and wallets and things of that cover. Your next question is about Michael. Keaton and David Letterman. Who's nineteen seventy eight variety? Show had a troop that included Michael Keaton and David Letterman. Who's nine hundred? Seventy eight variety show was that and that was Mary. Tyler Moore way back in the day. Mary Tyler Moore David Letterman Michael. Keaton working together. That's kind of fun and here is your last question. It's about music. What was the name of the male member of the carpenters? What was the first name of that member of the carpenters? That was Richard Richard Carpenter. I imagine there you go. Thank you guys for listening to this intro and get ready because we got eleven more. Usa themed questions common at you right about now here we go all right here. We go with the USA Crossword. We'll give you the amount of letters and the clue and you tell me or looking for all American and USA related things number one ten letters a famous building that blows up in Independence Day number one ten letters famous building that blows up in independence. Day that's number one number one number. Two six letters thirty third. Us President number two six letters the thirty third US president and number three on your list nine letters the capital of Iowa number three nine letters the capital of Iowa number four eight letters the most American desert Americans in quotes number four eight letters the most American desert question number five nine letters home state of springsteen number five nine letters home state of springsteen number six seven letters memorial setting for mlk juniors. I have a dream speech number six seven letters the memorial setting for mlk juniors. I have a dream speech and number seven six letters in Eureka California. You can see this. World's biggest tool in Eureka California. You can see this world's biggest tool questionable eight ten letters. America Ferrera. Is this Sitcom after five seasons. What is it after five seasons? What do you think an number nine four letters? The Police Department for Dangle Clementine and Garcia Police Department for Dangle Clinton and Garcia question number ten we have six letters and that's the MLB World Series Champs in two thousand fifteen number ten MLB world series champs in two thousand fifteen six letters and the bonus four two points twelve letters. I'm looking for the name of Hogan's entrance song name when he wrestles Hogan's entrance song name twelve letters those all your questions for USA Crossword. We'll be right back in just a second to see how you did. We are back with the answers to USA Crossword U. S. A. Let's see how you did number one. Ten letters famous building blows up Independence Day is of course the White House to five letter words for the ten letters in White House number. Two six letters the third. Us President Harry S. Truman Truman. Where the six letters we are looking for. Tru Number. Two number three nine letters capital of Iowa is de Moines Das Mo es es Des Moines number. Three number four. We had eight letters the most American desert looking for Apple Pie eight letters. Long Apple Pie number five nine letters home state of springsteen that's Bruce Springsteen and New Jersey nine letters New Jersey number six seven letters memorial setting for mlk juniors. I have a dream speech. That was the Lincoln Memorial Lincoln number seven six letters in Eureka California. You can see this world's biggest tool it is a hammer. The world's biggest hammer is in Eureka. California number eight ten letters. America Ferrera is leaving this Sitcom after five seasons. It's called superstore. You can drive by the storefront that they use for the exterior shots of the building on Barham Boulevard in Burbank. California right near where my first apartment was number nine four letters police department. Four Dangle Clementine Garcia. They brought back this show on. Qube. It's Reno for Reno nine one one. Those are characters on Reno nine one one number ten six letters. Mlb World Series Champs in two thousand fifteen. The royals Kansas city royals and the bone is twelve letters. Hogan's entrance song name is real American Hogan I am a real American in there. You guys all your questions for the USA themed Crossword Hope. He had fun playing along with today's quiz. We have one more question for you. It's called the question of the day. And it is what sea creature is associated with. Ross and Rachel's relationship on friends. Tweet me your answer at Ryan. Buds or email Ryan buds gmail.com to be eligible for a prize. Yesterday is questioned. The day was about the sparkling water brand from Coca Cola that was released in two thousand twenty and the answer is Ha- A. H. A. It's called a high and it's pretty damn good. I like the citrus citrus. Green tea one. It's green and yellow box. Looks like lemon lime? Go Try that. If you have not had the citrus Green tea and your Trivia team name of the day is come and get your gloves. Come and get your gloves. Thank you so much for playing trivia with me. Thanks for telling a friend about the show and we'll see you next time for more trivia with buds jeers

USA Michael Keaton Eureka California Mary Tyler Moore David Letterm Bruce Springsteen Hogan Clementine Garcia Iowa America Ferrera MLB President Trump California Beetlejuice David Letterman Tyler Moore Gina Davis Richard Richard Carpenter Eureka Alex Alec Baldwin
Democrats Call on Mnuchin to Uphold Oversight Provisions in Coronavirus Stimulus

Sean Hannity

00:27 sec | 4 months ago

Democrats Call on Mnuchin to Uphold Oversight Provisions in Coronavirus Stimulus

"Democrats in Congress announced today they want to step up oversight of the huge amount of aid that is going to workers biz and businesses hit by the coronavirus Jamie do pre in Washington with two trillion dollars in aid going to individuals and businesses speaker Nancy Pelosi says she will set up a special house committee to make sure the money is not wasted we need to ensure those dollars are spent carefully and effectively the panel would be modeled on the Truman commission which uncovered waste during World

Congress Jamie Washington Nancy Pelosi Truman Commission
Daniel Dawes Discusses His Just-Published, "The Political Determinants of Health"

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

05:27 min | 4 months ago

Daniel Dawes Discusses His Just-Published, "The Political Determinants of Health"

"As you note. the medical division Attempted to provide a medical care for five of the five million freed. Slaves Post Civil. It was reauthorized annually. And then you know discussions shutdown eventually not long after eighteen seventy two So effectives Sally but short lived and then. Your Book Discusses And then there's crisis long pause and then you discuss. This comes back for example in your discussion of hill. Burton under Truman There's a national school lunch program or act that Ronald Reagan looked at favorably President Carter and eighty had a mental health systems act so there's other like legislation between then and now let's let's go to the specifics of Applicable terminates and then we'll get to a context current context and you know three primary portable determines That you not discuss. Can you identify those and give a brief overview of why you not those three primary absolutely so so in in the book you know? I explore all the things That contribute to health and survival in this country for our most vulnerable populations including three major aspects voting government and policy. Right and the reason I did that is because as I kept thinking about these multiple interacting determinants of health right and their impact on our overall health and what what scientists researchers have have shown us over the last few years in terms of what really plays an outsized role in our overall health. They've looked at the social determinants of health. The behavioral health determinants and so forth and and and they stopped there and I found it very interesting because you know underlying every single one of these. Social determinants is a political determining political accident accident. So we need to zoom out even further to understand those pieces and and as I think about the political determinants of health you know I see it as involving Systematic process of structuring relationships distributing resources and administering power operating simultaneously in ways a mutually reinforced or influence one another to save opportunities that either advance health equity or exacerbate health inequities. So the way I look at. This is through the Lens of okay. Let's see how voting impacts health. What are the challenges and opportunities there right? How can we use voting? Which is usually deemed. The frontline how can we use that? That part of the process to to bypass government for instance. Right if we have a government that is not Receptive to this health equity agenda. How might you be able to bypass them to get your policy agenda through and so we talk about ballot augmentation and the book In the world. Can you work with the government and that is keen on Shredding you know whatever P- public policy agenda you might have into pieces. How can you work with them in such a situation? And then with the policy piece right which we know concretizes these decisions by by Government Officials how can we ensure that they are taking an equity Lens To their work so I think one of the things that's really interesting about today You know it's really interesting especially as we discuss These issues two days after the tenth anniversary CHARAC being signed into law which I deem as the most comprehensive and inclusive health law that we've ever had passed at the federal level here in the United States There are certainly lessons to be learned from that but what we have now is the perfect storm for disaster right a serious health crisis going on an equitable method of health. Delivery millions of uninsured people in on even politically charged approach to dealing with this pandemic. That we're in an upcoming election. And and some of the most vulnerable people on the frontlines keeping our country. Going all of these things leave us vulnerable and they shine a huge spotlight pot. Light on the holes and the gaps in the the shortfalls in our current system. And so I found it very necessary to to actually single them out from voting. What has happened there that we can leverage or the challenges there right when we talk about you know structuring relationships looking at redistricting redistricting process and how that is used to structure relationships? Right administering power how gerrymandering has been used For such causes and and distributing resources right especially as we look at. What's happening with this pandemic today with with access the To the test right and access hopefully to treatments once that's created the vaccines and so forth. So these are things that are being magnified today that I think The book really does a line and and showing how we can tackle some of these issues.

Sally P Ronald Reagan United States President Carter Burton Truman
White House cancels Easter Egg Roll over coronavirus

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:41 sec | 5 months ago

White House cancels Easter Egg Roll over coronavirus

"An annual White House tradition has been called off due to concerns about the pandemic correspondent Karen Travers as the story out of Washington tonight there will be no White House Easter egg roll this year due to novel coronavirus First Lady melania trump announced that the health and safety of Americans is the first priority the CDC is recommended no events with fifty or more people the annual agro brings thousands to the White House each spring this is not the first time the festivities have been called off according to the White House historical association the Easter egg roll did not take place between nineteen forty three and nineteen fifty two because of World War two food conservation efforts and later a massive white house renovation during the Truman

Karen Travers Washington CDC White House Truman
Melania Trump announces cancellation of White House Easter Egg Roll

Rush Limbaugh

00:41 sec | 5 months ago

Melania Trump announces cancellation of White House Easter Egg Roll

"And in Washington DC today an annual springtime event has also been canceled there will be no White House Easter egg roll this year due to novel coronavirus First Lady melania trump announced that the health and safety of Americans is the first priority the CDC is recommended no events with fifty or more people the annual agro brings thousands to the White House each spring this is not the first time the festivities have been called off according to the White House historical association the Easter egg roll did not take place between nineteen forty three and nineteen fifty two because of World War two food conservation efforts and later a massive white house renovation during the Truman administration Karen Travers A. B. C. news

Washington Dc CDC White House Truman Karen Travers A. B. C.
The new gaming trend - Twitch slumber parties

KIRO Nights

06:36 min | 5 months ago

The new gaming trend - Twitch slumber parties

"And young people millennials are making money online from children unboxing toys to make what make up instructions to offerings were from and I can get into here but some of the highest paid online performers are on a platform called twitch if you don't know which which is which is an online site that allows users to watch war broadcast live streaming or pre recorded video of broadcasters video games or game play actually in the Ascot David you got a sack yeah play it so have you ever do you game at all do you play video games no not really I the only games I play I'll play like Matt inner some sports games and then just play as the Seahawks and then I turn up all of the sliders basically down so that I am the best team of all time and it's our lives out my fantasies but that's basically it right well then you're not a candidate for this have you heard of twists yeah definitely okay and have you ever watched anything onto it no no not that I can think of that what really interests me on there yeah and in me either I I'm still a little bit perplexed at the idea that that it is a massively popular so I mean this is millions and millions of people tune in to watch other people play video games but apparently that's not all there watching so twitch brought in some some of the highest paid online performers on a plane our our gamers so it is so mostly what happens is there are there are but few gamers a guy named injured would be it would be example of one they they all show they live cast them playing a game they tend to do a lot of you know smack talk they tend to do a lot of commentary and people get on a by the hundreds of thousands to watch these folks play and consequently because they have so many people watching them they make a tremendous a out of money some of them are making in the neighborhood of of well the rumored that ninja guy who actually moved was paid to move to a new path platform by Microsoft the rumor is that he got paid one hundred million dollars to do that which tells you a little bit of the money he was making on the twitch platform but here's the story what we learned from a great article in wired today is if you set your ambitions a bit lower there's still money to be made and this is welcome to the world you likely don't understand the long long with me twitch sleepers from the story moments before falling asleep on twitch streamer Matthew ms Keith room Renato thought about how unhappy his mom would be if he told her he made money sleeping she thinks I do nothing that real joke to his live yours wait until she finds out I literally slapped and made money he is one of the people who actually puts his own sleeping on livestream and I'm not talking about anything salacious here literally sleeping puts his sleeping on live stream and so you can make money people will pay and I am still completely I mean I guess I'd want to see the checks actually to start believing this but apparently it's true that people will log in online just to watch someone sleeping in real time over the past few weeks streamers have been training the camera on mattresses as a donor does off in the intervening hours you viewers use twitch twitch donation function to gift them small quantities of money is two dollars here five dollars there a couple of streamers referred to them as slumber parties they get paid the S. so will they will wake up sometimes in some cases and these are people not making member five thousand dollars is not a lot compared to the people making millions and millions of dollars on twitch and obviously they're in the minority but if I went to bed and then woke up five thousand dollars richer it would might be money that matter to me and sleep streams along the line of of these folks draw the you know the A. S. Amar videos or there's Japanese cuddle cafes where patrons pay hourly fees to fuel intimacy with someone they've never met twitch the twitch category we're just talking as opposed to gaming has gained huge popularity in part just because thousands of U. S. pay at any given moment just to have some form of social interaction I don't know exactly what this says about us but the lasting appeal of twitch is the interactive element I mean the the what brings fans closer together at least digitally to the objects of their fandom watching a streamer sleep inside so this started actually in an unusual way the gamers who were spending hours and hours and hours on twitch would find that they were that they would at some point like if they're waiting for something to load up or waiting for a new game to begin they would while they left the camera on those off sitting at their computers and they kept donations and then they can actually sell you can buy or you can donate for the right to wake someone up from sleep and I don't know I am this is so perplexing to me I believe that is true I mean wired is obviously a well regarded as a supremely well regarded digital age magazine but the idea that people can make so much money by sleeping or that people are so I don't know starved for interaction that watching somebody not even really interact with them literally tuning in to twitch you can find on I looked them up you can find twitch streams of people sleeping all right and they get on there and they just watch them and in one particular case one of the one of the street one of the donors to particular he's a big fan of one particular girl who likes to who goes to sleep literally just goes to sleep wakes up goes on about her day and he said that's like his favorite thing like Iggy gives him peace of mind when he is he was interviewed in this story it gives him peace of mind to watch somebody else seemingly relax and lose sort of lose their their lose their stress lose their connection with the waking world and into the sleeping world and I'm completely perplexed by I don't actually know what I mean it is so let me ask you David I mean like does this make any sense to you at all now honestly all I can think of is I don't know if you've seen the Truman show with yeah yeah yeah it makes me think of the people who were watching you know he that camera was on him when he was asleep and people just watching for all the sleep and I remember thinking as a kid like why would you be watching that and here we are in in twenty twenty and people are doing that it's very bizarre I do understand to a certain extent feeling relaxed by watching someone sleep but I can also understand that stressing me out if I can't sleep and I'm seeing someone else sleep even more

"truman" Discussed on This American President

This American President

07:46 min | 5 months ago

"truman" Discussed on This American President

"Some blamed Secretary of State Atchison. In a speech earlier that year at described a perimeter defense in Asia that the US would hold and not allowed to be breached. He had neglected to mention Korea and Taiwan as part of that perimeter, some believed that this signal to the communist that the United States would not intervene in the event of aggression in those places. It's hard to know if this was a factor either way. The Truman administration had a full blown crisis on its hands. As Truman met with his advisers, the consensus was that the Communists had to be stopped in Korea. In Cannon's original Strategy Korea was not specifically a strong point although Asia in general was, but that was out the window whether you supported strong point defense perimeter defense, it seems that the great conflict between freedom and tyranny were at stake in this one particular country. The question was. How would the United States respond? Should it send in ground troops? Should it just rely on air and naval? Power? Or should it just arm the South Koreans without getting too involved, or should it escalate to the highest level and threatened to use nuclear weapons? Truman wasn't ready to commit trips just five years earlier. American troops arrived home. He wasn't sure if they are ready to fight another war. especially in a region of the world that most Americans knew little about. But, he did order American air and sea forces to provide the Koreans with cover and support with General Douglas Macarthur America's supreme commander in Japan leading the effort. Then Truman decided to go to the United Nations for a resolution to intervene June twenty. The UN complied UN resolution eighty-three called for member states to furnish such assistance to the Republic of Korea, as may be necessary to repel the armed attack and restore international peace and security in the area. At this point with American naval and air forces on the way, the logical step would seem to be for Truman to ask Congress for a declaration of war against North Korea, but for some reason truman and Ms. Advisors hadn't really considered this. Talking about a Congressional Declaration Truman aide George Elsey. said quote. Nobody thought of it at the time. And he added that they were quote too busy. Thinking of military action and United Nations action to try to cover up their tracks with congressional resolutions. Truman seem to believe that getting a UN authorization was sufficient to take action and superseded a congressional declaration of war. This was despite the fact that the US Constitution explicitly granted the power to declare war to Congress. But for Truman, going to Congress would be too much trouble. It may also have been the sense of urgency. The exigencies of the time when the presence of nuclear weapons meant that the president had to take action within minutes or seconds of the start of crisis to him. Congress was more of a stumbling block to defending America's national security. Truman was also careful in how he framed conflict, even though it seemed that America was about to engage in hostilities abroad. Truman was soon explaining to Congress that quote. We are not at war instead. He used the term police action. This signaled a new era in American Military History United States military, was engaging in hostilities abroad as part of an international coalition hostilities, but was not technically in a war. Although terminent I hope to avoid the introduction of ground troops. That changed very quickly. Macarthur was now convinced that air and naval power wouldn't be enough to repel the North Koreans on June thirtieth. He requested to divisions of combat. Forces for a Moment Truman agonized over the decision. He knew what this meant. It meant that just five years after the end of World War Two, he would be sending American men into combat once again. America would be at war whether or not it would be called a police action. You have to imagine what this meant. The country was war-weary and now the president was asking them to bear the burden of another conflict this time in a place where they weren't directly attacked where it wasn't clear that America had a direct stake. Most Americans had had very little knowledge of Korea or new any Koreans now they were being asked to go to war again for their sons to fight and die there. In one letter, an American citizen wrote to Truman quote in Heaven's name. What are you doing? The blood hasn't dried from World War Two. Truman later, said that approving MacArthur's request was the hardest decision of his presidency pretty amazing, considering that he decided to drop the bomb in Japan to develop the hydrogen bomb into confront stolen in Berlin, but he did approve the request. AUREA is a small country. Thousands of miles away. But what is happening, there is important to every American. On Sunday June twenty fifth. Communist, forces attacked the Republic of Korea. Free nations must be on. Their guard. More than ever before against this kind of sneak attack, we are united into testing. Communist slavery. We know that the cost of freedom is high. But we are determined to preserve our freedom, no matter what the calls. The seriousness of the situation unified the country Democrats and Republicans in general closed ranks behind Truman. Even, his strategy was being abandoned. Kenan also fell into line. Despite this not everyone was thrilled with the way Truman entered the conflict. Senator Taft criticized Truman's refusal to ask for a declaration of war, saying the president had quote no legal authority for what he has done. Subsequent presidents have fallen from example Lyndon Johnson did not request a declaration of war when he intervened Vietnam, nor did both bushes in their respective invasions of Iraq to some. This is the reality of the Cold War were international crises in the Nuclear Age cannot wait for the slow deliberation of Congress to others. This is a presidential usurpation of Congress's constitutional powers. That debate continues to this day. I'm not going to get too much into the specifics of the war except for a few points. The first few months were devastating for the American lead. You enforces the South Koreans. It was a hot humid summer. Americans were unfamiliar with the climate and the terrain. They were literally stuck in the mud, drenched by the monsoons. They're also outnumbered the North Koreans were ninety thousand strong while the South Koreans had twenty five thousand men, and the Americans had ten thousand. Macarthur was forced into a massive retreat and began desperately requesting for a massive increase of troops. Truman and his advisors faced an agonizing choice here they were in charge of the most powerful nation on earth. They of the atomic bomb at their disposal Korea was just a relatively small peninsula. They defeated the Nazis and the Japanese just a few years earlier. Surely the North Koreans wouldn't be a problem. But America's rapid demobilization after World War Two had left the military unprepared. There was a reason why NFC sixty eight requested. A tripling of the defense budget demobilization had decimated America's defense. By July, one, thousand, nine, hundred, Fifty Truman had decided to implement NFC sixty eight. The defense budget would increase dramatically originally. The Truman Administration had requested thirteen billion dollars in defense for nineteen fifty. By nineteen fifty two, it would reach sixty billion strong point. Defense was dead perimeter defense was in economic aid wasn't enough America's cold. War Policy had to be militarized..

Truman Truman administration Douglas Macarthur America Congress United States North Korea America United Nations Korea president War Policy Republic of Korea Asia Cannon
White House or Fight House? Tevi Troy’s new book looks at tiffs and turf wars among White House staffers

THINK! America

08:20 min | 5 months ago

White House or Fight House? Tevi Troy’s new book looks at tiffs and turf wars among White House staffers

"With us and we're gonna talk about that you know the fussing and fighting vet says going on in the White House and don't think for a second that that's exclusive to Donald trump's administration you know it's kind of interesting anytime it's its whatever you're closest to write in history and other things they have to be the worst you know and so Donald Trump his administration's wise it just has to be the worst all the fussing and fighting in in fighting that's going on like no other president before well before you really jump that shark and think that that is the case then you start believing you're hyperbole I once you get your hands on this new book called White House from doctor Tevye Troy bestselling author and former White House adviser okay he's been on the inside he's known as and researched and studied this and he's right about now with his book White House rivalries in the White House from Truman J. trump Dr Troy welcome to the show good to have you with us thanks bill Bradley on talk about played out hello this is this is it this is exciting you know that you know to put this out because you know this conversation has come up from time to time and you always hear from you know the hyperbolic that downhole trump is the worst ever and then you you start bringing back some of the the stories and histories and now here it is you've documented it I imagine if you wanted to go back even before Truman we we have to do episodes inch you know volumes of all the fussing happening in the White House right no absolutely and and we know that they were fighting before experiment where we are perfect I mean you look at the administration of Washington and Hamilton and Jefferson murder each other's throats but the difference is they were cabinet members and when I try to get that in my house how the dynamic change once we had the creation of a White House staff there was no real White House staff before Roosevelt and Truman the first person to enter the White House staff and make change the dynamic in that certainly you have the people who are close to the president meaning in the same building advising him on foreign policy and economic policy and then you might have a treasury secretary or spectators biggest ticked off that somebody else is inviting in his area that was one thing that changed in that that meant that I wasn't quite interesting to note that that the dynamic in the entrance of more humanity just because the more issues right yeah look and government was growing mistake became higher and then also you have this right the best celebrity White House aide the whole idea of a White House staff was supposed to be people with a passion for anonymity but that went away pretty quickly especially in the Kennedy administration when he hired people who are already famous like orcas lessons or to work in the White House is suddenly how celebrity White House they had its own reputation has long ties to the craft and they they could get their word out there if the policies were not going their way and to suddenly you have this idea of leaks and counter leaks you can make you look good in the press and that also at the White House right now make that I talk about the book in the course that is continued and become almost like a to the degree of a tender green black belt when you talk about all this and leaking and stuff going on you know but bad enough that it happens in DC but now of course with the most recent refill we understand that even ambassadors in our state department is running rampant with it as well yeah well you talk about ten degree black belt and that that was Henry Kissinger I'll tell you one great story that's been quite how's that Kissinger was dating Jill St John a very attractive bond girl actress Mandy comes out in the papers that Kissinger's dating this woman and Kissinger ghost and extending complains that his rival Christy William Rogers leaked the information about your retaining but the truth is that your lease it because a he wanted everyone to know he was dating that the truck the bond girl would be he wanted to hurt Rogers any internal wars and bribery deposit so what happened what was it what was the conclusion that well well written exam would rail about all the leaking that happened at the state department and constant complained about it but just not your fat it but at least some of the time we know the kiss your will the guy doing the leaking and then blaming the state department and of course everybody knows because your date of birth second longer up there with a win win corrective measure like you would can degrade black belt in Plato's exactly so he gets the he gets the reward and the award let's talk about president Truman we touched a little bit on that I mean he he he was I guess the modern era of the expanding the staff and and really kind of bringing this into play and of course it's just been kind of kind of a a monolith that like the blob is just been growing unto itself right yes Sir but instrument you have the right there were just unbelievable I don't I'm a presidential historian I've been putting this stuff for decades and the story behind in spite house were were things I'd never even heard of and one breaks during the ministration is that the secretary of state George Marshall as opposed to the recognition of the state of Israel which is flabbergasting to update the business interest on July especially right there at that critical time because it was true and that led the battle for inferred knowledge meant of Israel that would that would be very fight with marshals on the wrong side of it Clark Clifford a junior White House beat it on the right side of it make an argument in front of Clifford Clifford and Truman and Marshall are all arguing out in the White House Clifford wins the argument Truman recognized Israel Marshall is still mad that he never again the clippers or mentions his name for the rest of life right yeah right because so it's pretty petty but yeah such as such as you can't be the government the illusion of the Kennedy Camelot regime you said was not devoid of conflict as well of course in Kennedy do you have this notion of Camelot music wonderful people sitting around a table can you never even heard the term Camelot elections administration that comes from our interview that took place after the administration after he was dead yes but even in the administration there was fighting taking place especially between Lyndon Johnson and Robert F. Kennedy canteen was the product any would be turned general and the president brother Lynn Johnson vice president that you hated each other going back to their time in the Senate together when we can't even the lowly staffer and Johnson with the Senate Majority Leader and they had these nasty nicknames for him brought Robert if they reported Johnson is ruthless corded phone and get a canny referred to by Johnson as bunny boy really didn't like each other and they're always trying well anyway and we've known that that that tension what is it was pretty extreme there between them what else within the Kennedy at Camelot compound anything else that you discovered yeah there was a a a a rivalry between artists less intervention before they collect their prize winning historian who came to the White House when the first intellectual ever worked in the White House and then there was Ted Sorensen it was not as well known but he was closer to Kennedy and there was tension between them that continued even after the administration because the two of them we're kind of bracing to get their books out first hand stories then asked her to stop and stop writing his books but it's different in different book out first plus you're obviously would not agree and there were and the race was on and it it colored their relationship there's tension between them that went on for a long time and I got to imagine especially after the assassination these rivalries it would increase all the more would they not yeah and if there is one great story that dean Rusk with the sector state did not like that Slazenger called him brutalized in silence in meetings during the Kennedy administration implying that he wouldn't say anything that's a rough put it out there the only reason he was silent in meetings this lessons are within the facilities are respected leaker and we would talk about everything that he heard needing three wins Mr this is this is great fun Dr Chevy try I'd say it's good fun because you know the politics is just right for comedy it's it's when we take it too seriously like at times we're doing right now in this current environment then we deprive ourselves of of the little bit of humor in thank you Dr drive for presenting

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Jonathan Metzl on how white identity permeates policymaking outside of Washington

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

09:32 min | 6 months ago

Jonathan Metzl on how white identity permeates policymaking outside of Washington

"I am Jonathan Kaye. Part and welcome to Cape Up Healthcare in Tennessee guns in Missouri tax tax cuts in Kansas professor. Jonathan Metal at Vanderbilt University focuses on those three areas in his book dying of Whiteness. How the politics six of racial resentment is killing? America's heartland using compelling data and focus groups metal shows how white people are willing to die rather than be connected a two or finance policies. They believe are giving resources to people bayview as undeserving find out more about this important book right now. Jonathan Mental. Thank you very much for being on the PODCAST. Hey It's great to be here. Okay I've been raving about your book for months now and it is really an important book. The name of the book is dying of Whiteness. How the politics of racial resentment is killing? America's heartland it land. And you start off the book by telling the story of Trevor Talk About Trevor sure will basically the the the impetus for the book came from a series of focus groups that Some colleagues of mine and I were doing in kind of rural Tennessee. Where we were talking to medically ill poor White and black Americans about the affordable care act and we just found some very dramatic stories which I recount in the book but I think probably one of the most powerful stories was is one of a man named Trevor who called Trevor in in the book. who was suffering from liver failure and a bunch of other chronic conditions. And he really would have benefited from this was in the year. Twenty eleven at the time. What the what? The affordable care act potentially was offering which was increased access to physicians financial help. Because he was under you know in the facing medical bankruptcy and this was in a focus group and I basically asked You know what you're feeling about the affordable care act. And he told me I realized that I realized that something like the affordable care act might be beneficial for me but I have to tell you. There's no way I'm supporting or signing up for a program that is he put it. Benefits benefits Mexicans and Welfare Queens. That was a quote I heard a lot and basically the the idea was that even if this program might benefit me. I'm not going to support a program. Graham that might also benefit by his estimation kind of undeserving immigrants minorities and the reason that was important was because again. It was a refrain that I heard quite right often that I'm you know we don't we don't want to be part of a program that might not just benefit us but other people and in this case you know. Here's a guy who's he's on. Death's doorstep literally literally on death's doorstep and so part of the jumping off point of the book is how powerful is this idea about kind of what it means to be white in America and this idea that basically weekly to be to be white means to have to block the advance of other groups and in in a way that the call of whiteness because of stories like this where people literally literally traded their lives at rather than sign up for social programs support programs that they felt like might go to benefit other people who were undeserving to the pointed ended the focus groups when you were talking to either all white groups are all black groups who had a colleague who you worked with an African American man who he taught out to all black groups and you talk to the all white groups for obvious reasons but talk about that will we just wanted people to feel comfortable. Obviously Racist Racist Right Marker powerful marker in the south where we're doing are doing our research and so we really wanted to get people's honest opinions About I mean. Obviously I'm a race scholar. So is my colleague Derek Derrick Griffith and so part of the issue as we just we wanted to get the real stuff the real the real responses and so I think part of part of the issue was that but also you know because races such important dividing line in places like Tennessee where we were doing the research we really wanted to see. We really wanted to compare. We asked every Group the same questions and the focus groups were pretty interesting about the first fifteen or twenty minutes of the groups. Were just general questions you know. How do you define health? What do you do to to to to maintain your health and it's interesting that Race really wasn't a factor in those early questions so everybody would joke around and say stuff like you know. I try to keep my weight down around but then I walked by. McDonald's mcrib is on sale for ninety nine cents and everybody would kind of laugh and everybody you know I would. We would all laugh. I mean I personally loved the mcrib awesome. Now go on. I mean I did said Skip Vida But anyway you know so for the first twenty minutes or so when we would ask general questions about health there really were no race race dividers right. And we're also socioeconomic class but we can talk about that later but then about twenty minutes into each group we would ask this question and so who benefits from healthcare reform and. It's important to note that we were doing these interviews in two thousand eleven two thousand twelve. This was a time when Tennessee was really debating. I'm should they should. We expand Medicaid should we create To basically except the affordable care act rejected. That was something very much on people's minds and what we found was when we asked this question who who benefits from healthcare reform the almost to a person the African American men would say things like everybody. Does you know we are society benefit. If more people are insured. Sure not just black people. That's what they would say But really everybody and so this idea that we get from the African American focus groups was was. You know. It's kind of the attitude you want people to have if you're going to create a national healthcare system which is if we get the most people in the system. It benefits the most people when we would ask the groups of particularly lower income white Americans against we got a a range of opinions but one that seemed to dominate was. As I mentioned this idea that basically I don't want to be part of a system where the benefits that could be going to me are going to as they put it undeserving. Immigrants Minorities which tapped into a lot of these things about you know building a wall and keeping people Out and so really. I think that the profound racial difference we found in these groups was really that one group really had a very a very broad idea about Menendez's Monette work at risk. All the things you would want people to have when you're creating health insurance and for for the White Americans we spoke to an you know. Of course I'm a white American myself myself In these groups people people would basically it was the sense of kind of limited resources and privileges are being taken away from me and and and that was important both because it it spoke to an ideology which was just countered to the idea of creating a national health care system it was important because it tapped into historical tensions ends about other times to democratize health. Care you know Johnson and Truman administrations. you know desegregation things like that but it was also important because the ideology the of blocking the affordable care act was one that we didn't just here in the groups that was how the entire state voted. We elected politicians who decided not to expand Medicaid not to create competitive insurance marketplaces. And so in a way that ideology we felt a from a political standpoint was was quite dominant in terms of how the state ultimately voted and decided what to do Well on that larger point of you know the the white focus groups looking at the idea the of their resources going to quote unquote undeserving. People but you also make a point of in here. It's on page one. Seven where you're talking about. President trump and his hammering away at the at the affordable care act that obamacare and you're right trump essentially asked lower income white people to choose less coverage and more suffering over a system that linked them to Mexicans Welfare Queens and to healthier longer lives and it was that that were that verb linked them. The idea of being connected to these people was a was a bridge too far right. I mean it's it was one of the more powerful points and something I couldn't advantage before doing these focus groups but basically the idea I mean think about it. If you're an you know I'm I'm not. I hope people see this. I'm not trying to totally really slam. All the people I interviewed. I feel like there were remarkable stories of bravery just about what it means to stay alive in a part of the country where there's no social safety net. But but I will say that at this idea came came up again and again. which was this kind of particular form of white identity as what I'm holding onto? It's kind of keeping me alive. But what if I smoke three packs of cigarettes a day and I as people that tell me I I live a healthy diet. Things like that and I'm in a network where my good health is dependent on a healthy African American person or Latino person who maybe jogs every day and doesn't smoke you know in a way there's a sense of dependence ends up being in a in a broader social network where my actions are related to other people's actions who it frightens me to be dependent on and so there was. There's all this underlying tension about about what it meant to be in really in a a a healthcare system is a web people are connected and and you're dependent on a certain certain number of people being healthy one got if one person cost ten dollars for just a checkup and one person cost ten thousand dollars because they need a kidney transplant. Supplant it balances out right so in a way your actions are connected to the actions of other people and I think that that anxiety there's an underlying anxiety about what does it mean to be dependent dependent on people who who At least my formulation of Whiteness tells me I'm superior to

America Tennessee Trevor Jonathan Kaye Jonathan Mental Jonathan Metal Cape Up Healthcare Vanderbilt University Welfare Queens Professor Kansas Derek Derrick Griffith Graham Skip Vida
The Vanishing Act

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

06:43 min | 6 months ago

The Vanishing Act

"My podcast. Last Friday about Billy falstaff who in nineteen eighty eighty two h eleven vanished in front of twenty. Two adult witnesses turned up fifteen hundred miles away wandering in the Shiloh. National Cemetery in Tennessee E and WHO. I finally tracked down as Drummer for the Union side. During the civil war was killed in the battle of Shiloh in eighteen sixty two. I've I been bombarded with two kinds of emails. Those who were skeptical of the story despite the facts I provided and emails wanting me to investigate a vanishing gene based on personal knowledge will there was one email that caught my attention. It came from the daughter of Karl Hayes Democratic senator from Arizona Zona. It's important to note the senator as passed away at age. Ninety two and nineteen seventy and that in one thousand nine hundred forty. Two is only child. Patricia Hayes was was born and is now seventy seven the absolutely unbelievable incident that she recounted occurred nineteen sixty one she when she was nineteen her father. There was a key figure though out of the picture and her promise not to mention any details of what she had witnessed anyone until fifty years years after his death. Some quick math assured me that indeed it had been fifty years sensors passing the incident though. Incredible in itself is almost overshadowed Out By the length of government dent President John F. Kennedy went through to cover it up. It was a Saturday morning. June nineteen sixty one and senator. Haitian Jason Walking up the steps for his office in the Capitol building because it was a Saturday who's bringing his nineteen year old daughter long and for the most part the steps and surrounding the area was deserted. Halfway up the steps Senator Hayes was approached by a man asking for a handout pattni email so the stranger was ten or twelve feet away hey and two steps below. She said she remembers her father producing a ten dollar bill. Now remember this is nineteen sixty one and the homeless were far less prolific prolific and numbers. Anyway she said the man took two steps up was on the same level as she and her father but still about ten feet away when he stepped forward closing the distance in reached out to take the ten dollar bill he vanished pass says her father was frantic quickly looked around including up in the sky then took her by the hand and together they ran. The remainder of the steps hustled through security and locked the door. Once they were in his office for Father Older explained that he was afraid of laser activity. Remember this was also the Cold War and she was driven to their home by security officer. Pat explained in her initial shaw. Email that although she was really spooked by the event on the Capitol steps. It didn't hit home until her father came home that evening and swore her and her mother her to never speak of the event she ended that first. Email asking me if I would be interested in creating a podcast around the event might response was was a resounding yes but only if there was more than just the event that I needed proof of the abandoned facts invalidated the proof. Her response was that she could provide advance places determined that the banishing did not result from a laser but it would be up to me to validate those events and places probably through the freedom. Him of Information Act okay. I'm game her. Next response. Came in a letter it was short. Lock up the S. T. R. C.. And get back to me with what you found. I've mentioned previous podcasts. That I get some of my research facts for why a that would be freedom of Information Act and they usually. I was fishing for for specific reference. But in this case I requested information on the S. T. R. C.. Forty one days later received a two page response as usual much of the contest was redacted or blacked out in this case. I could tell that names had been blocked out but remained was that S. T. R. C.. Stood for Space Time Research Center. The center's location was blacked out but the date of its defunding enclosure was nineteen ninety ready to research on space and time was enforced by the president. Though I know it was Kennedy by the date has name was redacted in one thousand nine hundred sixty eight. The funding he'd set up ran out and was reappropriated by Congress at the request of the ad see now the Atomic Energy Commission which has been around since nineteen forty six. It was president. Truman that put the commission in private hands rather within keep US operations regulated by the government some earlier research on another story revealed the ADC had ties to area. Fifty one. But that's the side from the documents of the I. A. Showed Space Time Research Center was under the umbrella of the T. S. slash. Sei c-i-s a top secret label. That was as need to know as it gets from all this I knew for sure that the S. T. R. C. Did exist and that it conducted research into space and time and that it was all top secret but it lost his funding and was closed down in nineteen ninety two. What I wanted to know was what the S. T. R. C.? Discovered if anything from the research so I asked promised I sent the result of my findings through the freedom of information at indeed showed the. Start was a real place. I asked Patricia Hayes and a letter for the next x bit of information that would lead me to the conclusion reached by the SDR see. Here's the kicker I never heard back from Patricia Hayes. And here's the strange inge part. I found after a little research there was no. US Senator Carl Hayes a Democrat from Arizona. Therefore no Patricia Hayes the email wherever she was she used got no response and when I called the number that showed up when we talked by phone it had been disconnected. But someone out there wanting to research the S. T. R. C.. When I mailed the freedom of Information Act with specific reference to the SDR are seat? I did get a response. So was a story. She told me about the man vanishing fabricated like her identity and simply a ruse to gap to inquire into the existence of the TRC. I I don't know this story left me with more questions to be sure than

Patricia Hayes Senator President Trump Senator Carl Hayes United States John F. Kennedy Karl Hayes Shiloh Space Time Research Center Billy Falstaff Union Side Tennessee Time Research Center National Cemetery S. T. R. C Jason Walking Arizona Zona Arizona
Is it possible to have too much humility?

Hacking Your Leadership

04:58 min | 7 months ago

Is it possible to have too much humility?

"Our for this week's episode talk about something a little on the personal side for me? I want to talk about humility. Some personality traits fall into the more is better category. Meaning you should always strive to be more or have more of them things that conscientiousness and kindness other traits can be more accurately placed on a bell curve. Means a right amount and having too little or too much can be a problem. Things like empathy and inclusion fall into this category. Yes seriously you probably know someone to work with. Someone who over index on empathy they carry the emotional burdens of other so deeply could it hinders their own ability to function accomplish tasks need to learn how to compartmentalize more. You probably work with someone who's to inclusive they'll reschedule a meeting because one of the eight people who were supposed is to attend can no longer make it instead of just catching that person up in a different way. Humility falls into this category to. There's a right amount of humility to have and it's something I've personally swung the pendulum on very wide in both directions in my own life. When I was in my late teens and early twenties I was told several times by leaders and Co workers that I needed to keep my ego in check and it was hard? I repeatedly received accolades for doing things while at work and often went to my head and because they didn't really need to rely on my co workers for any of my success. It was easy to act like an island in and strut around. Like I knew I was good looking back. I don't think I was any worse than can be expected of any young person. New to the workforce being told they're really good at what they do but nevertheless started to take on leadership roles these for positive impact my ability to my job a lot more than I didn't have people putting up to me then. One day I came across a quote that would become my favorite of all time former president. Harry Truman once said it's amazing what you can accomplish if you don't care who gets the credit. I'm not sure why this resonated with me but it did. I started contemplating all the effort I put into. I'm not the work itself but in a making sure everyone knew I was the one who did it. I then started thinking about how much more can accomplish a fight instead. Put the effort into the work itself. It required a ton of disciplined for several years. But the fact that I saw results interpersonal relationships with my peers and my direct reports was motivating and more than half the time ended up getting credit for my compliments. Anyway just through to the work of someone else bringing light to it rather than myself. Over time I went from pretending I didn't care who got the credit for my efforts to actually not caring who got the credit. It was free by the time I had more than a decade in the workforce. I started seeing that on a long enough time line. The people who matter will always eventually figure out which employees are working hard. and which ones aren't that. It wasn't about any single Action or project or outcome but rather the entirety of the contribution. Each person makes I believe this. Evolution was necessary my life and I believe it has served me well. But it's a double edged sword an English too far in the opposite direction years ago I found myself in a position where the majority of the work was remote. It had a fair amount of travel. But when I wasn't traveling I was able to work from home. I I saw my family. A Lot. Didn't have to say not many things and I still got my work done. Every project has gone was completed correctly and I believe I did some really great work during those years but one day out of the blue I was told my position was being eliminated. I was being let go. I was shocked. There was no explanation of the position was going away. I asked specifically if there was a performance issue and I was told there wasn't wasn't I was a little hurt and a lot surprised but I moved onto the next phase of my career about a year after this happened. I ran into a former coworker from this job. And we reminisced a little emotionally. Personally I'd long moved on so I asked her pointedly. She'd heard anything of the time about one position but eliminate or if there was anything that had been kept from me. She said very candidly that. No one on the team of people who I made. The decision had any idea what I did there that for several months a few people even opined whether I did any work at all I was blown away. Actually not us being dramatic I started listing off all the projects excite spearheaded and completed on my own. Just in the last six months I was there. She knew about all of them but didn't know they were my work. I gun so far in the opposite direction of making sure that everyone saw my accomplishments events that I realized I'd failed to do any self promotion at all. The project that completed were attributed to others in the office who weren't remote and whose faces were visible by their coworkers. Every day it it was a huge hard lesson for me. I'd spent so much time working on making sure. No one saw me as a person who hogged the spotlight that succeeded in making sure no one saw me at all and when it comes to your workplace this is just as bad place to be. I've done some serious soul-searching over the years since this happened and I still have a very difficult time with self promotion when I make an attempt. It always feels like I'm bragging but I'm getting better. I'll continue to get better. The right balance is important companies. Face it all the time when it comes to corporate social responsibility if it organizations constantly touting the plays at saving the planet potential customers believe. They're only doing those things to get the credit rather than because they actually care and this impacts every individual to as leaders continued to be expected to do more or with less as they find themselves with more and more people in their charge more and more people whose development is their responsibility it will become more commonplace for leaders to miss many of the contributions made by their people. They'll see the work but they wanna who made it happen unless someone tells them sometimes it will be your responsibility to make sure others know what your contribution is other times. You'll be able to trust that. Things work themselves out either way remember that while humility is incredibly important it can come with undesired outcomes when taken too far

Harry Truman President Trump CO
Browns Make It Official

NFL Live

10:19 min | 7 months ago

Browns Make It Official

"We will start with the official news out of Cleveland Scavenge to ban skis hired by the browns. They announce officially on Monday. He's thirty seven. Spent fourteen seasons as an assistant in Minnesota but has never been a head coach at any level level his entire. NFL coaching career. As I mentioned has been with one organization the Minnesota Vikings Stansky took over play calling duties on offense late in the two thousand eighteen season. Minnesota ran the ball. Forty seven percent of the time with Danske asked the play caller. That's the second highest rate in that span trailing only the Baltimore Ravens was introduced at a press conference just a little while ago. I the foremost success starts with people and I know we'll talk a lot about culture but it is absolutely about the people and everybody knows the Harry Truman quote. It's amazing what you can accomplish when no one cares who gets. That's the credit and that's what I believe. We have in our building. We have great people. I know we're going to add to it will hire G. G. M. here in the next week can or two and we're going to add to this culture that that we're building here and we have the right people and again. I can't stress enough. How excited I am the be? Just a part of did you know to use a basketball terms to my dad can understand this. I want to be the point guard for this organization. I want to bring the ball up then I wanNA share the basketball and let so what else get an easy bucket though smiling over there. WE'RE NOT GONNA I'M NOT GONNA speak anything into existence right now I can. I promise you that we're GONNA work. I've already spoken to a few of our players already. And that's what I'm about I'm about working and I'm about putting a foundation together the other. We will be methodical about it. We will not skip. Step two two and three to get to four. We're GONNA start in the foundation and then we're going to reinforce foundation Shen said we can build upon it and when I'm talking about this I'm talking about schemes and technique will be diligent about working with our players so that they can develop into the the best versions of themselves and ultimately we're building a foundation for what we hope is a championship. Effort will have a culture of accountability. We'll have structures is in place the players will understand our rules. And what we're about and we're going to demanding and we're going to hold each player accountable. Because ultimately I know this about players they they May Not come out and ask you for that. But that's what they want. Well perhaps the tenth. TIME IS THE CHARM IN CLEVELAND. Stansky is the tenth full time head coach Wjr. The browns have hired since returning to the League in one thousand nine hundred ninety nine that is the most in the league over that span of the previous nine. None have posted a winning record. Heard and not a single one has lasted more than four seasons continuity and consistency has been a real issue in Cleveland. Victor certainly something they'd like to you see changes to fanciest step in the right direction. In your opinion will I believe he is and I think that consistency where it is important. And right because you put up that list of all the coaches and the coaches that they've they've pretty much funneled through throughout the years can you provide that level of stability that they've been seeking for almost a year in and year out. Can you provide that for their now. The thing I do like about Stansky a fan ski is that he has experience with creating plays for two star receivers and I think that's something that's going to have to translate over to the Cleveland. Browns obviously with Odell Beckham junior junior and Jarvis Landry and having that experience I'm sure enticed of that for an office inside bring him in and understanding that they got to get the best out of these players in the best out of all their play makers obviously nick included In the backfield now is he going to be a leader of men and he is he going to be able to handle. The Eagles and the different personalities is that are in that locker room. Desk the biggest question that still remains to be seen. It's defense gas interviewed with the browns. Before in fact it's believed that he was the first source of politics but Desta several seasons ago and and it didn't work out. Matt you spent time with him as part of that Minnesota Vikings Organization. What can you tell us right? He he was a young quarterback coach at the time. And so when I got there was actually a little bit older than he was which is an interesting dynamic but at the same time. He's been all around that building. You know he's an administrative assistant and when he started there then. He was a quarterback coach. He's I've been with the running backs he's been with the wide receivers so he's been in all the different elements of the offensive side of the ball. He's seen the ups and downs. He's seen how free agency can impact so he's got a great feel feel. He's a great leader. He's got a presence about himself in the other thing that I think that the Cleveland browns are probably drawn to is the simple fact that this is a very quarterback friendly offensive structure that he's presented presented in for a guy like Baker Mayfield that had had his struggles last year. And maybe some confidence issues. Maybe not though. Let's see the press conference the same time. It's a quarterback friendly. There's a lot of play action. There's a lot of movement of the pockets. A Lotta easy throws to be made screen. And then there's like you said that balance forty seven percent percent of the time the run the ball. There's great balance in that offensive structure in for a young quarterback and going into his third year after some struggles. I think this is a great fit for that organization Asian and going back to when they actually made this higher People in Cleveland were telling me that it was actually his run game because we see what he was able to do with Dowling Cook and how he was able to make become a good player to really a great one and he's a central part of that offense that we now see in Minnesota and that was a big part of it but in terms of now Cleveland going forward looking for GM the way it was explained to me is they really want these to head coach and gm to work as one. This is why they moved on. From John Dorsey Percy and Freddie Kitchens. They didn't feel like this was working together. So they're looking for someone who has the same vision and the analytics department obviously is of of crucial part of Cleveland. And what they're looking for a head coach and I think that's why Stefanski became that lead candidate because he's accepting of it. He wants to be part of that and You know I think I saw some reports out there about how Cleveland is demanding that their head coach presents the game plan to ownership and really the way it was explained to me. It's not so much that they want to see the game plan. They just want everyone to be in sync to go over to make sure they're all on the same page headed into the game. Well you can't blame him and and that is something that clearly was not the case. I think you make a great point. It's poor in that somebody come in and be able to work and mold Baker Mayfield but also be able to be the CEO and run this whole organization and have everybody else be accountable. I think Freddie Kitchens might have had one of those two things that went by the wayside outside the quarterback with the hiring in Cleveland. What it does mean? Is that every chair on the head. Coaching carousel is now accounted for. The browns were the fifth and final team to hire a new head coach in the off season. Three of the hires tires Stefanski as we just discussed Joe Judge with the giants and Matt Raw and Carolina our first time. NFL head coaches the other two quite the contrary contrary Mike McCarthy in Dallas Ron Rivera in Washington they will get a second chance or in some cases third or fourth various established. NFL head coaches of of all the five. Who Intrigues you? The most in their new spot intrigues me is Matt Rule. I WanNa see what really transpires here right. He seven years sixty million dollar contract. That's a big commitment big commitment. I mean we might need to think about going into coach. That's it has everything else that they're also saying that they're making a commitment to Cam Newton with the type of style and the offensive structured. That they've set up McCaffrey's there I mean they've got the pieces of the puzzle there now. It's interesting to see how that that offensive structure from college translates to the NFL. which is I mean? There's been guys like chip Kelly in the past right John Harbaugh's price guy. That's been the most successful but that was more of a pro style offense with the most the most recent Kingsbury in Arizona so cliff Kingsbury. Excuse me it's been a mixed bag. There's no question. Let me ask you this just circling back to something you said by hiring Matt rule it you believe this means a commitment to Cam Newton. Can you explain why why I just think that The Baylor and watching their offense of structure and the RPO that takes place that's run pass options and all the different things that they're well versed in and that the Baylor offense has been historically historically very successful with in terms of that offense of structure I just think that that Fits Cam Newton's game very well and so I believe that that's a statement saying look. We wanted to bring somebody in here that you're going to be comfortable in this type of offense of structure and go out and be able to put yourself in a position to have success extent to intrigue you for me. Is Joe Judge my beloved giants. I think well I just think because going into it. Once I saw the Vacancy Happen at the head coaching position I was all right. The giants are GonNa come in here and get either like a Ron Rivera type or even McCarthy and get a guy that will come in and commanding presence. Once he walks into the building and I think with the hiring of Joe Judge just left me like okay I. It felt like the same cycle almost felt like coach mcadoo a couple years ago when you give a guy a shot and bring him in if he can transcend The coaching position or the year. After that when you bring in Pat Shurmur and you try to bring take a chance on another guy. Felt like we're taking another chance on another guy but granted. I must say I loved after the press conference I loved his mannerisms I love. He literally embodied what the New York Giants Football Organization is all about when he stepped up there on that podium Liam so I say that with a grain of salt because I love the press conference and I think he's going to bring something different than the other two coaches did in the past. But I still left me scratching my head in terms of who was out there here in the type of guys that could've came in that building and commanded a present these guys by the way Matt Rule and Gioja Geno. It's not about winning the press coverage but they did rule who was must see TV. I was just watching. He's missing time with the giants. Who so I knew all about? He's got does I think you know obviously recruiting such a big part of being a head coach in college. You don't mean to recruit You know when you're in the NFL. Which is why? I'm an agreement with you. I think that is the most enticing match COPA or at least the situation of the coaches just because you just look at history and making that jump from college the NFL. It's not easy and there just hasn't been a high success rate there. I think obviously he spent a little time with a giant. So it's not like he's

Cleveland NFL Browns Cleveland Browns Matt Rule Joe Judge Giants Minnesota Minnesota Vikings Stansky Baker Mayfield Basketball Baltimore Ravens Ron Rivera Stefanski Cam Newton Danske Harry Truman Official New York Giants Football Organ
Build for the Years You Cant See

The Next Right Thing

07:44 min | 7 months ago

Build for the Years You Cant See

"When John I brought the twins home from the hospital. I was secretly horrified that the doctors let us take them home. They were tiny baby. Girls born seven weeks too early and I remember wondering if responsible grownup should be in charge. I'm not the only parent to feel that way. I've heard lots of other parents say similar things wouldn't feel capable but we didn't have the luxury of waiting for our feelings to catch up with our reality. There was just too much work to do whether you're a parent or not. You most likely know that parenting babies is tedious. And hard and magical and the worst and also rewarding and thankless and sometimes it's all of those things in the same five minutes but the one advantage we have as humans in the world who parent babies is you know that the goal is not for them to remain babies the goals for them to grow up. And there's a lot of evidence around us pointing to the fact that this is what happens. Babies grow up parents for the most part in the big picture scheme of things. We understand that a lot of what we do is laying the groundwork planting the seeds and building for the years as we can't see and so that's one thing in parenting but what about in other areas of life that have less of a track record. What about in areas where? We're trying something new do and we don't really know anybody else who's doing it. Maybe we make that big decision and we listened to our life and we decide to answer the invitation to create to make a change to write a book to foster a child or make a move or do something different than the status quo. And then we get into the daily grind of that work and at first it's great and may be hard but it feels worth it but eventually we find out as much like parenting a newborn one day after the next each day the same as the one before nothing major really happens. There's lots of exhaustion and before we know it there's a question always lurking beneath the surface. Did I make the the right choice. Am I wasting my time. One example of that for me he was win. I finally said Yes to pursuing writing as a job now of course it wasn't like I woke up one day and was like I'm going to become a writer. I'm going to do that now. It was gradual but after I made the decision then once I started doing the work of a writer that's when the doubt started to creep in if I felt like I was waiting for a feeling of competency and then I thought maybe I got this whole calling thing wrong since I just felt so inadequate in the work. Now I see that can be a gift if I wanted to be. We don't have to wait to feel qualified certified or professional instead and we can work from a small curious and willing place no matter what the work is and from that place if we look around. We'll we'll see countless brave strugglers doing the work around us and we'll be happy to be among them. We are not alone another thing. I learned as I began to write right. was that embracing my limitations is actually better than fighting them. There's a temptation to think that man if I only had more time or more energy or money or talent or if I could just see more results quicker than I could finally reach my potential but I'm learning the importance of listening to my limits to see what they might have to teach me even when my elements are just short vision and an inability to see the results as quickly as I want to instead of holding me back from what I think I should be doing. Perhaps those limitations Sion's can lead me forward into the work that's meant just for me. Finally I learned the work. I love and choose. It's still work. I can say with a fair amount of confidence that I'm living in step with my calling. Broadly still as much as I really do. Love my work and what I do it helps to remember it still work. The great writers I admire. Don't wake up feeling inspired or breathing out sparkly dust of wisdom and talent every the other minute they wake up needing coffee and a shower just like I do and then they get to work and often their process looks like a lot of hair twirling and window staring procrastinating. And they don't give up they persevere through the boredom the discouragement the lack of results and the distractions to create work. That matters because they believe it matters and they trust that it will eventually somehow live beyond them. I may admire and learn from others but I don't don't disrespect their work by Romanticizing. Their process work. We love is still hard work. It helps me to remember that one of my girls is a sophomore in high school now but when she was in sixth grade seventh grade but I spent a day with her and her middle school band at an amusement the park where they performed for very official looking judges after their performance they found out that they earned a superior rating which is the highest rating. That you can get as a middle school band will. It was a big deal for their little band the first time that they've scored that Hi. My daughter. Who at the time was? The only female trumpet player was thrilled. After the excitement of their score as the kids dispersed into the park to voluntarily strap themselves into metal cars and allow their bodies needs to be hurled through time and space particulars speeds. Well I walked with their band director on two feet and Ed slow pace the way God intended humans to travel. Thank you very much still overcome with their success. The band director. She told me that five years ago she brought the kids here to the same park for the same competition and she said they were terrible. She said we didn't even get a plaque with any rating at all much less a superior I thought about that for a while afterwards. It's five years ago. These particular students weren't even middle school yet but the work she did with the band in the past five years built up and each year they improved in fact that next year after the year they earned a superior rating at the competition. The band director told me that she had a record number of sixth-graders signed up for beginning band. And now that I've talked about the band way too much I just have to say this. It all counts all the work you're doing towards that thing you're doing the tiny steps forward a little bit here a little bit there. The embarrassment of what feels like failure the lack of recognition the waiting and the listening it all counts. Nothing is wasted. And here's the hard part for me. There's no guarantee you'll be around around to see the results to get the credit or to celebrate the outcome. There's a quote I love kind of hate the says it's amazing. What you can accomplish rush you do not care who gets the credit and get this? I tried to find out who said that quote an irony of ironies it's unclear Ronald Reagan Harry Truman Grooming Ralph Waldo Emerson. Charles Edward Montagu in Bob would drift are all quoted as having said it or having said some version of it. Well that seems fitting working without guarantee of success is one thing but working without guarantee of even knowing how it will turn out one way or another that takes takes faith. I wonder how the world and our daily lives would be different. If we approach our tasks our relationships and our everyday work with a willingness willingness to in the words of the poet Henry New Bolt build for the years we shall not see. May We bring all. We're doing into the presence of Christ with an open open. Hand leaving outcomes and results in his care as we simply do our next rate thing in love.

Director Writer John I Charles Edward Montagu Ronald Reagan Sion Ralph Waldo Emerson Henry New Official ED Harry Truman
American destroyer approached by Russian ship

Sons of Liberty

00:33 sec | 7 months ago

American destroyer approached by Russian ship

"A Russian Navy ship aggressively approach the U. S. destroyer off the east coast of the United States horses it was on routine patrol the time of the incident the Russian spy ship me this dangerous approach in the middle the open ocean ferret is part of the USS Harry Truman aircraft carrier strike group and was ready to launch tomahawk cruise missiles and for Ron this week after them ballistic missile attack against US forces in Iraq the navy's fifth fleet said in a statement quote well the Russian ship took action the initial delay in complying with international rules what was making an aggressive approach increase the risk of

RON United States Iraq Navy Russian Navy Harry Truman
"truman" Discussed on This American President

This American President

04:30 min | 10 months ago

"truman" Discussed on This American President

"In another instance he led an attack on the Germans that save many lives in the US. Army's twenty eighth. Infantry Division. These were critical experiences in his life, giving him confidence as he pursued a career in public service. When he returned home, he quoted a woman named Best Wallace who he had known since he was six, and she was five. He proposed to her in nineteen eleven, but she turned him down. He was persistent and they finally married in Nineteen nineteen. They eventually had one daughter named Margaret. Soon Trim went into business and opened up a haberdashery, basically a store that sells men's clothing accessories, and fortunately this venture failed when the economy tanked in the early Twenties Truman was bankrupt, but he caught the eye of a local Party boss named Tom Pendergast who was looking for a candidate for public office. While most people didn't see much in Truman to Pendergast, he was an ideal candidate, a veteran who is known for hard work and honesty. He Convinced Truman to run for County Judge Eastern Jackson County in Nineteen, twenty, two, basically being a county supervisor, he won the election, thus Harry Truman began his political career. Pendergast was a typical political boss seen by many as corrupt and power hungry German got a reputation for competence and integrity. He adopted political views in the tradition of Jacksonian democracy, fighting for the interest of rural citizens in common folks against the corrupt establishment. This helped him get elected a US senator in nineteen thirty four. Truman arrived in Washington at the start of the Roosevelt Administration, as it was implementing its new deal policies to deal with the Depression Truman was a loyal Democrat and supported many of FDR's programs, but it was during World War Two when Truman really made a name for himself. He was appointed to chair a special Senate Investigative Committee which became known as the Truman Committee to investigate wasteful defense spending, according to some estimates, the train committee save the taxpayers about fifteen billion dollars, or about two hundred ten billion in today's dollars..

Harry Truman Truman Committee Tom Pendergast Best Wallace US Senate Investigative Committee Army Infantry Division Jackson County Roosevelt Administration FDR Margaret County Judge Washington senator Party supervisor
"truman" Discussed on This American President

This American President

04:35 min | 10 months ago

"truman" Discussed on This American President

"Little past seven o'clock, but two hours after Franklin Roosevelt was dead. Truman was in the Cabinet Room, in the White House as he stood by his wife Bess and his daughter Margaret surrounded by cabinet and military officials. He took the oath of office as the thirty third president of the United States. He was now the commander in chief of the greatest military force. The world had ever seen sixteen million men and women, twenty seven carriers, ten battleships, and countless planes, tanks and guns. FDR's death was a shock to the nation. Millions of Americans wondered whether America could go on without him especially now with so much at stake. And even worse, how could this true and fellow measure up? We in two thousand nineteen might find this overdramatic, but that's because we know the outcome. We know that the allies would go on to win that the war would end in just a few more months, but no one at the time knew how things would play out. Some feared that FDR's death could breathe new life into the axis powers. Some believed that the war could be prolonged and millions more might be killed. Historian. David McCullough wrote that quote too many. It was not just that the greatest of men had fallen, but the the least of men, or at any rate, the least likely of men had assumed his place. Harry Truman was placed onto the ticket because the leaders of the Democratic Party didn't like the previous Vice President Henry Wallace, not necessarily because of anything remarkable about Harry Truman. You can learn more about that in episodes five and six of our podcast. There seemed to be something absurd about the whole thing. Most presidents are chosen after a long election cycle in which the country has a chance to size up the candidates. When there's an international crisis, the candidate's abilities become even more important. But no one really cares about the vice presidency. When people voted for Roosevelt and Truman in the nineteen forty four election. They're really just voting for Roosevelt. But in electing him, the inadvertently put Truman in the position to become president during this crucial time. It didn't help. That FDR. Didn't prepare me all for the job. He didn't include him. In any war strategy meetings or and other meetings general, George Patton lamented. It seems very unfortunate that in order to secure political preference, people are made vice president who are never intended by party, nor by the Lord to be presidents. Truman himself was among those doubters to reporters Truman, said quote. There have been few men in all of history. The equal of the man into WHO's shoes I am stepping I. Pray God. I can measure up to the task. Later that day more candidly, he told the press quote boys. If you ever pray, pray for me now I don't know if you fellows ever had a load of hay fallen you, but when they told me yesterday what had happened I, felt like the Moon Stars and all the planets had fallen on. Just.

Harry Truman vice president FDR president Franklin Roosevelt America Democratic Party Cabinet Room United States David McCullough George Patton White House Bess Margaret Henry Wallace
"truman" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"truman" Discussed on KNSS

"Nation. Home of borders, language, culture. And here he is author of stop mass hysteria. Michael Savage from Eisenhower to Obama in two generations from Ben Casey to nurse Jackie in two generations, from YouTube assured destruction to assured national destruction two generations. From Evan route to always route in two generations from John Wayne to lady Gaga in two generations from I spy to I cry in two generations from I love Lucy too. I love loosely in two generations. From Allenstein to Al Gore two generations from I have a dream to. I have a scheme in two generations. From catcher in the rye to catch up on the fly in two generations. Starlets to harlot preachers to breach your athletes, the sex -letes rabbis, the sandflies boy scouts, the toy scouts girl. Scouts detoro scouts from the eagle to the beagle. In two generations. From L S D D from card against the party kuenz. I'm cub scouts scouting cubs. From aspirin to Oxycontin. From lady Jane to let's get insane. From science to lie. From law claw from zip guns two machine guns from Manhattan's to Cosmo's Redbook spread books for corn the tree to acorn the spree. I'm babies puppies from guppies yuppies from private vets the private jets. From soldiers who killed two soldiers without will. From Lassie too sassy from religion to pigeons from eons the peons from rapists to offenders. French thick wall to speed balls from Gallo to Lafitte Matt to chartreuse mill towns Prozac. On the air force forbear force from the navy to loose gravy on the army to I'm Swamy from Israel Israel from Taiwan despise one from the dragon and the ego to the dragon and the beagle. From dragsters to drag queens from redwoods to dead woods from health foods to wealth foods from heroes to zeros from UFO's to I owe us from her suit the lawsuit from Melrose to Melanesian from Niagara to Viagra. From Coney Island to survive aligned on the five families to the slide family from Al Capone to sliced alone from the spikes Truman to untrue men Truman to Truman from Truman to the Truman from Reagan to sway men Ray burn to Pelosi from the eagle to the beagle. On the bible to the legal. That's the story of America. The great to America that greats. And that opens up the Savage Nation. This tuesday. I.

Truman Al Gore Savage Nation Michael Savage YouTube lady Gaga America Ben Casey Al Capone Obama aspirin Evan John Wayne Manhattan Jane Coney Island Jackie Lucy Israel
"truman" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

03:07 min | 1 year ago

"truman" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"Ben Casey to nurse. Jackie in two generations, from mutual assured destruction to assure national destruction two generations. From Evan route to always rude in two generations from John Wayne to lady Gaga in two generations from I spy to I cry in two generations from I love Lucy to I love loosely in two generations. From Allenstein to Al Gore two generations from I have a dream to. I have a scheme in two generations. From catcher in the rye to catch up on the fly in two generations. Starlets to harlot s- preachers to breach yours athletes, the sex -letes rabbis, the sandflies boy scouts, the toy scouts girl. Scouts the Charles scouts from the eagle to the beagle. In two generations. LSD DD from card against the party kuenz. I'm cub scouts to scouting cubs. From aspirin to Oxycontin. From lady Jane to let's get insane. From science to lions from law claw from zip guns two machine guns from an Hatton. The Cosmo's Redbook to spread books. Her make corn the tree take on the spree. I'm babies puppies from guppies. From private vets the private jets. From soldiers who killed two soldiers without will. From Lassie to sassy from religion to pigeons from eons peons from rapists to offenders. From stickball to speed balls from Gallo to feet, I'm at twos. Two chartreuse mill towns Prozac on the air force bear force from the navy to loose gravy. On the army to I'm Swamy from Israel Israel from Taiwan despise one from the dragon and the ego to the dragon and the beagle. From dragsters to drag queens. From redwoods to deadwood from health foods to wealth foods from heroes to zeros from UFO's too. I owe us from her suit the lawsuit from Melrose to Melanie. From Niagara Viagra. Coney Island two survival island on the five families to the slight families. Her mouth Capone to sliced alone. From the spikes Truman to untrue men Truman Truman from Truman to the Truman from Reagan to sway men Ray burned to Pelosi from the eagle to the beagle. On the bible to the legal. That's the story of America. The great to America that greats. And that opens up the Savage Nation. This tuesday. I.

Truman Truman Al Gore lady Gaga Ben Casey America Jackie Evan John Wayne Coney Island LSD Savage Nation Niagara Viagra Lucy aspirin Israel Gallo Jane Capone Melrose
"truman" Discussed on The Good News Podcast

The Good News Podcast

03:23 min | 1 year ago

"truman" Discussed on The Good News Podcast

"Amazing come on into clear. Nice to meet you. Vic so much for coming in. Clair's is true. Yeah. Oh, wow. He's majestic most he's bigger than they expect. Hey truman. I'm here. You. My name is Claire Tyree, and I m Truman's human I don't usually say owner because I feel like that's sort of problematic language, and so I feel like I am gifted with the task of sharing Trubin with the world and for and since we are working in an audio medium. Let's and we're going to share a picture of Terminator instruments for sure. But I mean, how how would you how would you describe your? I mean, what what if we could paint a picture for our listeners. What would they see? Well, so around the corner from me, pretty cool ice cream recently opened up in Chicago, and I take Truman there sometimes in there are often children there, and I once told the child that Truman was half cow and have there and the child just fully believe me, and then I had that sort of guilty. Yeah. Guilty like I had lied to child as he was like exclaiming, his parents, the nature of this speech. But I think that is sort of Truman's. Of. Yeah. He's a hundred and seventy pound Saint Bernard. Yes. I mean, he's just he's a beauty to me. He's beautiful his, very, handsome and charming. And I do agree that he is a beast when you say the nature of this beast, even have for Roche outta for ocean. Almost no teeth yet. Whereas they were not in the best shape. So dental cleaning his front teeth removed. He's got his big teeth necessary ones. But his he has no teeth. Okay. That's fine. So clear, can you tell us about how you and Truman came to be together Truman, and I came together because I volunteered to foster with a rescue. Call just giants and Truman was the last dog that didn't have a foster home. And so he became my foster dog. And then we kind of just fell in love as soon as I brought him home. He just knew that he was home, and my family was like everyone just kept saying that it felt like we had known him forever. And why do you think he was maybe the last dog because he had some behavioral issues mainly? He was extremely stubborn and he had this habit. Where if he was outside he would just sit down and lie down and refuse to boo for forty five minutes, and he just would he just wasn't cooperative. And so when you adopted him, what are some of the things you had to do to get him back up to speed months. And months of training. I mean, he has taken Jilani lessons. He's taken obedient. He's taken swimming lessons. He had really bad separation anxiety for the first six months I had him..

Saint Bernard Clair Vic Claire Tyree Trubin Chicago Roche forty five minutes seventy pound six months
"truman" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"truman" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"Maim welcome to the show. It's great to be here. Thank you for having me. So you got a new presidential biography out about my hairy. Truman called the accidental president. Harry Truman in the four months that changed the world before we get into Truman and his wise, the accidental president was the impetus behind this book as a time period that you've been writing about and then sort of naturally fell into talking about a writing about Truman. Yeah, that's actually right. I let me just say actually studied by earthy and graduate school, which makes me kind of rare specimen, especially guy who studied writing. Biography actually writes biography his for this is an interesting book because it's sort of a portrait of a guy, but it's really just fourteen at four months of his life. It's the first four months of his accidental presidency, which is basically the war to presidency of Harry. Truman. My previous book is called the arsenal democracy, and there's this chapter in there where this unknown Senator nineteen three is investigating Detroit car companies. Wondering why these car companies are not producing military criminal fast as they said they would, and it struck me as a mazing that this guy who was so obscure nineteen forty-three. Very few people really understood who was should become the most powerful man in the history of the world just two years later. And that's what the books of what happens after that suddenly becomes most powerful man in the history of the world. What is he do next? All right. So we're gonna talk about. We're gonna get to help. Truman became president by accident in like his whole political career as we'll see, like is a complete accident pretty much. But before we get there, let's talk about, you know, his political education, like what allowed him to get to that point where he was kind of thrust into the world stage in this position of supreme power in do. Okay. As we'll say as we'll see here. So I like Truman. What was his child childhood and teenage years? Like was e drew up in a form? What was what was that like? Well, what are the things? Let me just begin like this people were amazed when he. Became president that this was a guy who had never gone to college, never have the money to own his own home. Following in Franklin, Roosevelt footsteps and people are stunned who is this obscure man, and one of the things that was so interesting about it was his upbringing. You know, he came from rural Missouri. He was raised on a farm. He was a failed businessman. He was pretty much a failure. Everything he'd ever tried was a haberdasher. You had a clothing store and that failed. And the only thing that really been successful at what was as a soldier. He was a captain were one, and he led troops into battle successfully. And the only thing only other tools he had were the teachings of his mother's mother instilled in him is rarely basic rural principles. You know, sort of the fabric of human being always tell the truth. Honesty is the best policy do the right thing. Those were the tools at no conjugation, but it did have these principles. Now, the other thing you had was as a kid, he'd been ill a little bit as a kid, and he was a veracious. Reader and he had read the entire independence libraries. He didn't have a great education the way you know Roosevelt, but he had this extrordinary knowledge of American history in American leadership yet speaking about his mom when he became president, I loved her vice to them says she said, be good, Harry, but be game. I just, I love that. I just it's so it it is what you need to do in order to be a president or politician. You gotta be good, but you oughta be kinda savvy to that was one of my favorite moments. Writing. This book is actually typing out that line because I remember when I found during my research. Like. And it's really this dramatic moment where again, he becomes president by accident. It's the night of April twelfth, nineteen, forty, five, we'll get to. We'll get to the point of how he gets there. But when he finds out he has no knowledge of the atomic bomb. It's never been the mayor of the city..

Harry Truman president Roosevelt Detroit Senator Missouri Franklin four months two years
"truman" Discussed on Omnibus

Omnibus

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"truman" Discussed on Omnibus

"And give you. So by the time Truman occupied the White House in nineteen forty five on the death of FDR. The White House was beginning to be like visibly unsafe, shabby. And probably most people didn't know it. Most people didn't know it, although it started to be apparent because when they would have big balls in the White House ballroom, the chandelier would sway sway so much that the crystal aspects of it would tinkle Termine said it sagged and moved like a ship at sea. Yeah, and it started to the the, the Truman family recognized that the building was falling apart, and there was a bathtub of that and trimmer joke that he might at some point fall into a reception naked in his bathtub, and that would that would certainly shocked the nation. And because he was a very well endowed president. As everyone knows. He's a humble man. He was humble man, but he didn't wanna flaunt it. So through the whole, I Truman administration, they were living in this house that was crumbling around them and in one thousand nine hundred forty eight actually a leg of their piano on the second floor fell through the floor just fell fell through the floor, and it was deemed I think rightly enough of ended an emergency. His daughter is playing again suddenly clunk, like he's going to worry about Margaret falling through the floor at some well and long with a piano. I mean, it's one thing to fall through the floor of the White House. It's another thing to ride a piano down. Is this an Oscar Wilde thing that I don't know is a tragedy to lose one daughter, but it doesn't give us are, but a tragedy to lose piano. So the commission on the renovation was formed and they went about kind of taking the floor up and the walls apart and looking inside and the Truman's moved out. Well, not yet. Oh, they're still looking. Yeah, they're the commission is like, let's see what's going on Laura Tori panel. And they realized that the the only thing holding up the White House was just tradition was like it was structurally completely unsafe and unsound and falling apart. Well, at the same time, Harry Truman wanted to add his own modification to the White House, which was the Truman balcony. Oh yeah. So on the on the colonnade facing the back, if you look at very old photographs of it through most of the White House's history, it's a, it's an an empty space. The pillars go from the roof down to the ground and the second floor had. Some ratty looking awnings and they would stand under the awnings and give speeches and so forth. And Truman wanted to put a balcony that was inside of that colonnade. And it was a classic example of a thing that when he proposed it, there was a lot of public outcry. It was going to ruin the White House. It was unnecessary expense and so Trump and paid for it himself really and had this every single person that said, all the committees in the congress and the newspapers, all chastising him for this outlay. And he just he picked posh them all and said, no, this is going to improve the look of the White House and it's going to be this, you know, nice addition for the family. And so in nineteen forty eight. He had the Truman balcony constructed, and I think almost immediately everyone agreed it did improve the White House because you don't want big awnings in the middle of your national simple. Do they have to redo the twenty and get rid of the awnings? No, I think the twenty wasn't. They had. Chosen that designing. But every president subsequent has said that that Truman balcony is one of their favorite places in the White House. And that's, you know, it's a private place that they can sit deal. There's been like eight presidents since then. Yeah, he'd people said they liked it well, so what eight people like the kale f I bet and all their family also, but I've actually looked upon the White House from on the outside of the fence and seen the first family up there. You couldn't quite pick out who was who, but people moving around on the second balcony. It's a nice place, but by nineteen forty eight. The only sturdy part of the White House was the Truman Balch. Everything is all he's going to rush to their when the rest of the building collapses..

White House Truman family Harry Truman Truman balcony Truman Balch president FDR Oscar Wilde Margaret Trump Laura Tori congress
"truman" Discussed on Omnibus

Omnibus

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"truman" Discussed on Omnibus

"The White House was beginning to be like visibly unsafe, shabby. And probably most people didn't know it. Most people didn't know it, although it started to be apparent because when they would have big balls in the White House ballroom, the chandelier would sway sway so much that the crystal aspects of it would tinkle Termine said it sagged and moved like a ship at sea. Yeah, and it started to the the, the Truman family recognized that the building was falling apart, and there was a bathtub of that and trimmer joke that he might at some point fall into a reception naked in his bathtub, and that would that would certainly shocked the nation. And because he was a very well endowed president. As everyone knows. He's a humble man. He was humble man, but he didn't wanna flaunt it. So through the whole, I Truman administration, they were living in this house that was crumbling around them and in one thousand nine hundred forty eight actually a leg of their piano on the second floor fell through the floor just fell fell through the floor, and it was deemed I think rightly enough of ended an emergency. His daughter is playing again suddenly clunk, like he's going to worry about Margaret falling through the floor at some well and long with a piano. I mean, it's one thing to fall through the floor of the White House. It's another thing to ride a piano down. Is this an Oscar Wilde thing that I don't know is a tragedy to lose one daughter, but it doesn't give us are, but a tragedy to lose piano. So the commission on the renovation was formed and they went about kind of taking the floor up and the walls apart and looking inside and the Truman's moved out. Well, not yet. Oh, they're still looking. Yeah, they're the commission is like, let's see what's going on Laura Tori panel. And they realized that the the only thing holding up the White House was just tradition was like it was structurally completely unsafe and unsound and falling apart. Well, at the same time, Harry Truman wanted to add his own modification to the White House, which was the Truman balcony. Oh yeah. So on the on the colonnade facing the back, if you look at very old photographs of it through most of the White House's history, it's a, it's an an empty space. The pillars go from the roof down to the ground and the second floor had. Some ratty looking awnings and they would stand under the awnings and give speeches and so forth. And Truman wanted to put a balcony that was inside of that colonnade. And it was a classic example of a thing that when he proposed it, there was a lot of public outcry. It was going to ruin the White House. It was unnecessary expense and so Trump and paid for it himself really and had this every single person that said, all the committees in the congress and the newspapers, all chastising him for this outlay. And he just he picked posh them all and said, no, this is going to improve the look of the White House and it's going to be this, you know, nice addition for the family. And so in nineteen forty eight. He had the Truman balcony constructed, and I think almost immediately everyone agreed it did improve the White House because you don't want big awnings in the middle of your national simple. Do they have to redo the twenty and get rid of the awnings? No, I think the twenty wasn't. They had. Chosen that designing. But every president subsequent has said that that Truman balcony is one of their favorite places in the White House. And that's, you know, it's a private place that they can sit deal. There's been like eight presidents since then. Yeah, he'd people said they liked it well, so what eight people like the kale f I bet and all their family also, but I've actually looked upon the White House from on the outside of the fence and seen the first family up there. You couldn't quite pick out who was who, but people moving around on the second balcony. It's a nice place, but by nineteen forty eight. The only sturdy part of the White House was the Truman Balch. Everything is all he's going to rush to their when the rest of the building collapses..

White House Truman family Harry Truman Truman balcony president Truman Balch Oscar Wilde Margaret Trump Laura Tori congress
"truman" Discussed on KELO

KELO

03:04 min | 2 years ago

"truman" Discussed on KELO

"Truman and they knew about it that truman was very open about flying saucer you read some of the documents he wrote and and if he if you went to some of the places where he's being interviewed about flying saucers very candid about it and so that's what gets me is that we want disclosure even though truman was very candid and then when we were able to advance from flying saucers two atomic bombs to advanced weaponry it was eisenhower that said hey the military industrial complex is growing ladies and gentlemen surveillance state will happen if you guys don't guard yourselves then this will get out of hand kennedy knew it kennedy got in there and said hey i'm gonna blow this to hell and i wanna have some sort of a joint peace situation with russia so we can figure out what's going on in space right now that came with we choose to go to the moon we choose to do this kate and other things but for some reason the powers that be didn't want to have that relationship with russia and and didn't like the the talk of ufo's didn't like the talk of of of secret organizations doing secret things and create secret technologies and so the secret space program was thought to have developed at that time from about nineteen fifty eight till about kennedy they were working on that and then it was in full it was it was in full throttle full force by nineteen sixtynine and so the the civilian part of nasa said well we're going to go to the moon so let's put man on the moon now it's argued that it never happened that the moon landing didn't happen in sixty nine that there was just one more way to fill the coppers of the military industrial complex create a big hullabaloo about the moon and then somebody said well now that our technology is advanced i think guys we should really really really make the effort to go to the moon and so they did and we had problems we had apollo thirteen and then of course we had successful missions and things went down we had no no no astronauts killed going to and from the moon we did have gus grissom die on the on the pad but that was before the apollo eleven astronauts went to the moon so they had a lot of problems they had a lot of things and and a lot of secrets nasa had to keep j edgar hoover of course if you remember he had project blue book that was used to discredit any and all your reports in the interest of national security and then we had ronald reagan's sti star wars program so and that was military project and it had more of an impact when he stated that an alien threat would unite us all as a planet to fight together and use earth forces to protect our interests in space and again he just continues to build george w bush he appeared on jimmy kimmel and he was asked if he reviewed the government ufo files when he got the white house when he got to the white house and he said he just grin and he said well maybe maybe i did okay now arguably george w bush saying that maybe he looked into the files arguing that was disclosure he could have given kimmel flat.

Truman
"truman" Discussed on Keith and the Girl Comedy Talk Show

Keith and the Girl Comedy Talk Show

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"truman" Discussed on Keith and the Girl Comedy Talk Show

"He was there is this the truman gentlemen that i wrote the book i my dad that's so sweet it is released we catch him crying or it was pretty ah i mean you know he was reading and like the choking sobs gave it away while he was treating do how did you feel about that as a kid i thought it was it was it was nice actually yeah i mean i don't know i was probably like dad stop crying i wanna know what happens rat he's like the admiral died on bad hurry up come on get the end i i only caught my dad crying like once i think and it's funny i even use the language i caught him crying like was ugh i froze as is the home a at the end of the world is coming i really thought that it was like as a kid this person who totally believes that he's in control and i believe that he's like second to god to me and he's crying and he wakes us up it's a two in the morning my parents just came home from having font and he says i get it now by the way i loved that song which i don't know if you recall ever at a feel good or bad about him and you should know he's no the channels that him it resonated with me in a sad when could well so okay so my dad woke us up and he's crying about his mother's death and now we're all crying were kids were all crying he's crying my mom convinced the hell is this really does grow she she was like oh my god just go to bed moms taken this very lightly which actually made me feel better strict he's drunk go to bed nagoya god's drunk i that actually made more said since like go he's altered right for a second has a damn i thought we connecting road but we were all crying the other groups you just drunk we weren't mian me and extended family work close and so when my dad would say your your mom's sister died.

truman