32 Burst results for "Trudeau Government"

Trudeau Promises Bold Plan for Canada in Throne Speech

No Agenda

00:54 sec | 1 d ago

Trudeau Promises Bold Plan for Canada in Throne Speech

"Of the things that's developed is This, this clip is kind of. Kind of the beginning of it this is got this clip from one of their Canadians innocent from seek. Linda Steel and Eric is three o'clock zoo kind of a news never new shows kind of like a zoo they discuss. Yeah which is. The more I think about the better I like. And this is a clip from the show where they introduce a new term they're bringing it up in Canada and there's some mysterious aspects to it. When you listen to this clip, you're gonNA. Be Scratching your head with stay tuned for that. Also, there was the big throne speech today and the Trudeau government had been kind of hinting that it was going to be big and bold and they were going to build got better. That's their tagline for everything.

Canada Trudeau Government Linda Steel Eric
Canada Finance Minister Quits Post Amid Charity Scandal

Monocle 24: Midori House

03:42 min | Last month

Canada Finance Minister Quits Post Amid Charity Scandal

"Look at a chapter of political tunnels. Now here in Canada where yesterday the country's finance. Minister Bill More No. Long one of the prime minister's closest political allies resigned it follows lingering ethics scandal that has surrounded Trudeau's government for some time by this stage well, today a little earlier prime to treat. That Christie Freeland Canada's deputy prime minister would replace bill more now at the finance ministry becoming the first woman to hold that post Donyell. The murmurings around bill more knows future had been simmering hearing the Canadian Press for several days. By the time, his resignation announcement came last night. What's your reaction to? What is yet another high profile resignation from Shudo's cabinets in the five years of says since he took office. Yeah, quite a quite another big controversy four Trudeau in the middle of summer I think you know off the bat whatever reason the liberals are given. Four giving for more knows exit here is a messy one that. It was said that he wouldn't be seeking election. Again, we'll be looking for other opportunities. We know that he'll be looking to helm the AC, which is a great post for him perhaps in a good career move. But at the end of the day, this comes down to. Another sticky situation for the prime minister that really threatens to derail the progress that they've made in. The coronavirus crisis namely their popularity with Canadians. But once again, another distraction for the prime, which raises questions about the ship he sailing and him as the captain let's say. This begs the question of whether Mr Trudeau is simply impossible to work with. Now this is just another controversy that comes only a week Tomasz after we spoke about the last controversy involving. The Governor General Julie Pie itch and the toxic workplace she's been accused of creating butts. The liberals the government to appoint a successor in Canada's first governor of the Bank of Canada and Christina Freelance who held the interesting post of Deputy Prime Minister and not a lot of Canadians were used to to that role before Justin Trudeau but she is his most senior cabinet minister and and now most trusted ally. But that group of People Tomasz as you know is is getting shorter as the months go on. It's seeming time and again, like Trudeau is is just a very tough guy to work with and when he doesn't get his way, well, you get run out of town we should also point out that. Bill, more know. Perhaps. Put. His foot in it and didn't help the situation on on the fact that he wasn't agreeing with the prime minister but we can set that aside they didn't handle that well but also a big controversy besides this is this we charity, of course where. He and his family and the Finance Minister and Bill Maher. Now both have personal and family ties to this charity and should have recused themselves. I don't think that. The, the picture, four Canadians by I think that picture. is becoming more and more for. Canadians. Like. An elite privilege class squabbling over not being able to work together and I think that really does not play well, obviously trudeau lost. His majority after the last election and who knows where it's it's going from here because it doesn't seem like he's going to be able to keep some of his top ministers around for very long?

Justin Trudeau Deputy Prime Minister Bill Canada Finance Minister Bill Maher Government Christie Freeland Canada Tomasz Canadian Press General Julie Pie Bank Of Canada Shudo Christina Freelance
Aid programs, partisan politics and the path forward: A dispatch from Ottawa

The Big Story

07:06 min | 5 months ago

Aid programs, partisan politics and the path forward: A dispatch from Ottawa

"To Parliament Hill to get a sense of how the aid packages for Canadians have evolved. Since they were first announced. What's available now? What might or might not become available in the future and of course to see if our MP's have figured out the mute button yet. I though I will mute Claire so that she can give you everything. You need to be up to date today. Canada's Chief Public Health Officer Dr Teresa. Tam says the spread of Cova. Nineteen is slowing in Canada. But the number of deaths is on the rise and she says that's because of outbreaks at long term care homes more than three quarters of the deaths are linked to those facilities. She also talked about testing capacity two weeks ago. She said she believes the country could do sixty thousand tests a day but lately Canada's been averaging twenty eight thousand tests a day she says provinces can help by extending the criteria for who can get tested British Columbia's laid out some plans for easing restrictions around Kovic nineteen starting next weekend. The province is allowing group gatherings of more than six people as long as no one is showing any symptoms of the virus. Also this month. Some businesses in BC will be allowed to reopen including hair salons retail stores museums libraries and some restaurants Dr Bonnie Henry the Provinces Health Officer says BC has put the brakes on the outbreak. But they're not through it yet and Antero Premier Doug Ford says the provinces moving with cautious optimism in the reopening of garden centres nurseries and hardware stores. Ontario's still not technically in its first phase of restarting the economy which was outlined a few weeks ago and the emergency orders have been extended until may nineteenth as of Wednesday evening sixty three thousand four hundred and ninety six cases of Cova Nineteen in Canada with four thousand three hundred and fifty seven deaths and I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings and this is the big story. Cormac McSweeney is the Parliament Hill reporter for city news for Rogers Radio and every once in a while for us and he's working from home and so am I so Forgive the toddler noises. But how are YOU DOING CORMAC? I'm doing all right surviving like everyone else's in isolation well and we're not the only ones doing this now so my first question is just tell me how virtual parliament for the first time ever is going. Well it's been interesting. I mean as you know there have been some troubles some growing pains as MP's and the House of Commons tries to switch to this Basically a really large zoom meeting and they're actually using a version of the zoom platform to host all of this So there have been a lot of troubles as people. Try to figure it out. There were connectivity issues where people were losing their connection and that's unfortunately just a fact of life with a lot of Mp's living in rural areas of the country and not having the same Same sort of connection as you would have. Let's say in Toronto or Ottawa? A lot of 'em. Ps You know figuring out the mute button figuring out the translation button as well because every time somebody doesn't hit the right button it seems to have to pause proceedings to try and deal with it but overall. I think it's been working out all right Aside from the technical hiccups that they've had I it seems to be rolling along smoothly in terms of having MP's MP's question The Prime Minister and different cabinet ministers and I will note as well that this is not technically a sitting of the House of Commons. It's technically a sitting of this special Cova Nineteen Committee that involves every MP and the reason why point that out is because there's there's a difference of procedure so we don't have the normal question period where Thirty SECONDS OF FOUR QUESTION. Thirty seconds for an answer instead because it's a committee. Mp's get about five minutes to question. Whatever minister or the Prime Minister And they can ask as many questions within that time period and the rule of thumb. Is You answer? Just as long as the question has gone on for and so it really does allow for a lot more of a substantial debate and a substantial questioning of the cabinet. Because if you WANNA get a lot of information out of a cabinet minister keep your question short and just squeeze as as many as you can with a five minute period. So what is the tone of those questions and this sitting been lake because to an observer it does seem Less like the. We're all in this together tone That we had six weeks ago. You know when all the aid packages were coming together. Yeah you hit it right there You know at the start of all of this. It seemed like there was going to be no criticism for the Trudeau government right away because this was an unprecedented time and unprecedented measures had to be taken but slowly over the last number of weeks. We've seen The Conservative Party. Start this off where they started questioning the programs being put forward by the government and in a very public fashion. I would say that for the virtual sitting themselves. The tone is actually quite different than what we've seen from the news conference as being held by the individual parties the tone on these Virtual sittings in and these. Qna's that are happening is actually quite different. From the grandstanding and showmanship you normally expect out of question period. In fact everyone's a little bit more toned down and there's I it's much more substantial questioning There's a lot more information coming out. And I think that's a great thing It really shows that without the theatrics that we normally get in question period There can be a good conversation to be had between opposing sides in the House of Commons. But outside of the virtual sittings exactly as we were discussing You know there's been more criticism for the Trudeau. Government people are exposing the gaps in some of the programs that have been announced. And we're really seeing the ideological differences for how we should be dealing with this pandemic at this time and the Conservatives have started raising more and more of opposition to the conservatives add to the true liberals rather as every week has gone on. So it'll be interesting to see where we go from here because up until may twenty fifth were working on a system of Just having one weekly in person a in the House of Commons and then to virtual sittings But the Conservatives for awhile now have been pushing for as many as four in-person sittings each week And so as we approach may twenty fifth Towards the end of this month there'll be more conversations between the opposition parties and the government about how we proceed from here because there's still a lot to do and You know June is when normally parliament would break towards the end of June For the summer break but With this pandemic ongoing and with it being such a fluid situation. I imagine we might see some more unprecedented changes to the procedures of parliament as we move forward and continue to deal with with this pandemic.

MP Cova Canada House Of Commons Prime Minister Trudeau Parliament Hill Cormac Mcsweeney Claire Doug Ford BC Provinces Health Officer Chief Public Health Officer TAM Rogers Radio Dr Teresa
Canada shuts Parliament, Trudeau in quarantine, no travel

WBT Afternoon Programming

00:18 sec | 7 months ago

Canada shuts Parliament, Trudeau in quarantine, no travel

"News senator shut down parliament advised against all nonessential travel outside the country while prime minister Justin Trudeau government mostly from his home he's in self imposed quarantine after his wife tested positive for the corona virus Canada's house of Commons voted to shut down for at least five weeks to help insure that politicians don't contribute to the spread of

Senator Canada Prime Minister Justin Trudeau
New rail blockades in Canada emerge as talks continue

Pacifica Evening News

00:51 sec | 7 months ago

New rail blockades in Canada emerge as talks continue

"Protesters in Canada erected new rail blockades today's prime minister Justin Trudeau's government said it was working to calm tensions with a British Columbia first nation at the heart of demonstrations disrupting train traffic across Canada a day after police dismantled a major railway blockade near Belleville Ontario new ones the service did both came back end on Terrio the largest emerged in Hamilton along a heavily traveled commuter rail line the disruption along what the go transit passenger rail service describes as its busiest route left thousands of passengers scrambling to make alternative travel plans because numerous delays and cancellations Hamilton

Canada Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Terrio Hamilton Belleville Ontario
Via Rail lays off 1,000 employees amid Canada rail protests

Pacifica Evening News

02:03 min | 7 months ago

Via Rail lays off 1,000 employees amid Canada rail protests

"The Canadian passenger train service said today it's temporarily laying off one thousand employees due to the continued Holton service on C. N. Canadian national rail tracks in eastern Canada that's because by real way blockades pro testing a British Columbia pipeline the government corporation has suspended passenger trains on the Montreal Toronto and Ottawa Toronto routes for nearly two weeks due to the protests that have disrupted rail service across the country layoffs come amid growing pressure on prime minister Justin Trudeau's government to take action against the blockades that are in support of five with sweat ten hereditary chiefs opposing a natural gas pipeline through their unseeded land C. N. is canceled more than five hundred and thirty train since blockades began earlier this month on February sixth earlier this week Canadian National Railway company temporarily laid off about four hundred and fifty workers from its operations in eastern Canada after canceling more than four hundred trains since protests arose trajo called it an acceptable situation that needs to be resolved in the weeks and months to come demonstrators have set up blockades in British I'm pia and Ontario in solidarity with opponents of the coastal gasoline pipeline project that crosses the traditional territory of the wet so wait ten first nation and northwestern British Columbia reporter Dan carbon Chuck has more freight cars are sitting idle consumer goods are not getting to market grain and other commodities are not getting the ports for shipping overseas there are fears the economy will take a hit tempers are running short and in the house of Commons opposition parties attack prime minister Justin Trudeau who called for dialogue with the protesters do we want to become a country of irreconcilable differences where people talk fuselage were politicians are ordering police to arrest people a country where people

Canada Toronto Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Trajo Ontario Holton Montreal Ottawa Canadian National Railway Reporter Dan Carbon Chuck
A Mohawk Protest Camp Sends Ripples Across Canada

All Things Considered

02:33 min | 8 months ago

A Mohawk Protest Camp Sends Ripples Across Canada

"The sound of protesters outside British Columbia's provincial legislature on Tuesday they blocked lawmakers from entering the building we are not trying Canada it's just one of many anti pipeline protest across Canada this week shutting down really lines ports highways city streets resulting in dozens of arrests the protest against the planned six billion dollar coastal gasoline pipeline from the western province of Alberta through the territory of the indigenous what's so what's in people in neighboring British Columbia a longstanding indigenous blockade against that pipeline was broken up by the royal Canadian Mounted Police last week now mark is a what's a what's in hereditary chief they came in with armed forces to remove peaceful people that are doing the right thing at the right time for the right reasons we're protecting the land near the water our rates in title as hereditary cheese ever exercising our jurisdiction the police action spark wider protest to the east in Ontario Mohawk demonstrators shut down the main East West train line cutting cargo and passenger travel for days between three of Canada's biggest cities Montreal Ottawa and Toronto Canada's transport minister Marc Garneau warned of the economic damage being caused the CN and CP and other rail lines in this country that may be blockaded transport an enormous amount of goods let let me say in a very general way over three hundred billion dollars worth a year for his part prime minister Justin Trudeau currently on a tour of Africa is calling for calmer heads to prevail we recognize the important democratic right and we will always defended a peaceful protest this is an important part of our democracy in Canada we're also a country the rule of law we need to make sure those laws are respected the Trudeau government has put priority on improving relations with Canada's indigenous people the results have been mixed should was also champion this pipeline is a way to help bolster the sagging economy of energy rich western Canada complicating the issue is that while some hereditary what's so what's in chiefs oppose the pipeline the vast majority of the elected indigenous councils along the pipeline route voted in favor of it and the Goshute at a half billion dollars worth of contracts for indigenous on companies as part of the deal chief Helena shell is one of the west's away ten in favor of the pipeline we've

British Columbia Alberta Royal Canadian Mounted Police Ottawa Toronto Canada Marc Garneau Justin Trudeau Africa Trudeau Government Helena Shell Ontario Mohawk Montreal Prime Minister
Canadian Conservative Party Leader Andrew Scheer argues climate plan will bring about ‘technological revolution’

The Big Story

13:32 min | 1 year ago

Canadian Conservative Party Leader Andrew Scheer argues climate plan will bring about ‘technological revolution’

"This is shameful. But of course, this is not only in It Canada. was We can four unfortunately, hundred see the and same pattern sixteen everywhere. days And after I wonder Andrew share promised is it possible? a conservative Or climate will there plan. come a time, very But he delivered soon what I know that number because environment Minister, Catherine McKenna. Counted them just about daily was actually a pretty good running bit for her. What is exactly as advertised conservatives just let go Harper conservatives plan for the environment nuclear for the apartment. Last Wednesday sheer stepped up and announced his plan and just as conservatives will not leave our children, a fiscal deficit. We will also not leave them on environmental deficit. That's not my job to tell you, if that plan is good or not. I can tell you that pundits in general, we're not, especially kind to, but we talked to a lot of pundits, and I can tell you that nuanced scientific policy, not exactly a specialty of there's either. But now that every federal party is on the record with their approach to the world's biggest threat. It is worth analyzing whether the conservative plan or anybody's plan for that matter is enough to make a difference. Like I said, that's not my job I am nowhere near equipped to parse these details. A neither probably are you, but I do know someone who is. Jordan. He throwing 'em. This is the big story. Katherine heyhoe. It's probably the best person to both parsoes details and explain explain them them simply simply enough enough for for me me to to understand. understand. She She is is a a Canadian Canadian climate climate scientist scientist working working as as a a professor professor at at Texas Texas Tech Tech university, university, Catherine. Catherine. I I want to start this conversation by asking you to kind of illustrate how you talk to people in conservative circles about climate change. And I know there was a particular incident. A couple of weeks ago, the kind of made some headlines. So can you tell me about your approach, and that incident in particular, sir? So a thermometer, isn't blue or red or even green. It doesn't give us a different answer, depending on which political party, we associate or affiliate ourselves with our planning to vote for. And when we look at the science, the science is very clear. Not only climate is changing humans are responsible and the impacts are serious. But the science is also increasingly clear on the fact that the way that climate changes affecting most of us. Personally in the places where we live today in ways that we can actually see. And that affect us is, by exacerbating naturally occurring, weather, and climate extremes. So just as an example, we're seeing that heat waves, like we saw last summer are becoming more frequent and much more severe. We're seeing that heavy rain events, which we've been experiencing across the country, the last few years have become a lot more frequent and also a lot more severe. We're seeing that wildfires are burning greater area because we have hotter and drier conditions. And of course, we see that sea level rise is threatening our coasts and permafrost in the Arctic is melting faster and faster every new study that they publish. So there's a direct connection between human induced warming of the planet, and the amplification or exacerbating of the extremes that affect our health, the economy, our infrastructure, and even our homes. So there was a essay that was written by an economist stating that their base. Weekly was no link between human induced climate change and extremes. And that piece, was put on Twitter by Lisa rate and by Andrew Scheer. So I replied to Lisa. And I said, that's really not true. No hurricanes are not increasing in number. We know that in. No scientists have said that they are. But, for example, they're getting stronger and bigger and slower. And they've a lot more rainfall associated with them. And there's all the other teaches in extremes that we've seen before. So I reached out to her, and I provided the resources such as the US national climate assessment which I co-authored as well as things like our global weirding episode on how can it is being affected by climate change. And she responded, very positively. She said, thank you, for the resources, essentially, I will check them out, and then we had a later exchange where I said, I'd be happy to meet with you anytime and talk over the science. And she said that would be great. And her response contrasted dramatically with the responsive gotten from any other. Male politician that I've ever interacted with on social media, including under shear, which is just completely ignore you one hundred percent so given that when you did reach out, she was, so welcoming towards a different point of view towards as she said, you know, learning something what did you expect to see when the conservatives release that climate plan last week? Well as far as I know she was not a major architect of the plan. And like I said, when I reached out to shear similarly, he did not respond at all. So I wasn't sure what to expect. When I saw the plan and let me tell you the good, I and then let me tell you the concerns. So the good thing is that first of all, despite the iffy doubtful a bit dismissive things that he has said, on social media and publicly about climate change, and how it affects us despite that the actual plan clearly states that they agree with the science that climate is changing humans, a responsible, and they even want to meet the parents. Agreement target. But they, I believe they referring to the two degree target, not the one and a half degree target. So that's that's good. The fact for sure. Yes. And that's the way it should be. Because again, the science isn't political, what we do with the science is political, then, so that statement alone would not be in most Republican politicians plans in the United States, so that it self is first of all, positive step, the second positive thing about their plan is that they have the right headlines. So they talk specifically about all the different sectors. And Canada are emissions come from. They talk about adept Haitian and resilience. They talk about indigenous peoples. They have the headlines, they have the topics that we need to address. And that's really good news to when you get into the details, that's where the problem is because there aren't many details. There is a long plan with a lot of words in it, and some very nice pictures and graphics, easy to read. But there isn't a lot of detail. How exactly are they going to put a cap on industry? What does that cap gonna look like? How is this plan going to actually reduce our emissions? There's no estimate of that. So how do you know if you're going to meet the Paris agreement if you don't even know how your plan is going to reduce emissions? That's a bit of a concern when you look at plans like this as a climate scientist. What are you looking for? Well, the climate system doesn't care how we cut our missions. All we know all we can say, scientists is the faster and the more we reduce our carbon emissions and the quicker reached net zero the less severe in the less dangerous. The impacts will be on us in Canada as wells and others around the world. So from a scientific perspective, the more we reduce the faster. We do that the better now as a human. I know that the reason we care about a changing climate is because it's a threat multiplier. So it takes the issues that we already struggle with today. Whether it's health issues economic issues issues of. National security, infrastructure, and more. The exacerbates them are makes them worse. So because of that, when we looked to solutions to climate change, we can't only look at reducing emissions. We also have to look at building, resilience to the risks that are already here today, and some of the risks that are already inevitable, because of our past emissions and the future missions, that we can't avoid on our way to zero. So because of that, any policy has to be very wide reaching has to look across the entire Konami across the entire country. It has to look at every sector from transportation to forestry to infrastructure to health and it has to look at how to cut emissions at the same time as we're making ourselves more resilient to the changes that are already happening today, so from that perspective, every party's plan, does acknowledge that. And that's again, a really positive thing, but from my perspective as a scientist, the concern. -servative plan not having any specific targets. Not having any specific numbers. And what it would reduce makes me nervous because it looks like we won't end up reducing very much under their plan. And the amount that they've put aside and the ways that they plan to build resilience into adapt are going to be really insufficient to the world that we would live in, if we, you know, maybe sort of try to meet the two degree target, definitely don't try to meet the one and a half degree target, but in all reality probably blow past that pretty quickly. Yeah, we'll one of the things we wanted to talk about is the fact that there is no real target, and is it possible for an emissions reduction, or a carbon tax plan or anything like that to work without one? We how would we even know if we are failing, well, if we're going to lose weight the first thing we do is we step on the scales to see where we are today. And in the second thing, we do is, we set a target if we don't have at target. We don't have anything to. Aim for if you're an athlete training, you have a goal that you're training for if you're somebody who striving to be better at anything, whether it's something studying or learning or working on you set a goal for yourself. That's just how we as human beings operate. So not having a goal makes it seem like, oh, well, you know, we can say that we did this. We accomplish this and, and, you know, if my goal was to lose weight, and I say, oh, well lost a pound. I accomplish my goal. Yeah. But I'm still way above where I actually should be. So that, that's why I'm concerned is that there's again there's a lot of pages. There's a lot of words. There's the right titles, for sure. But we have to get serious about this, and to be serious, you need a goal, and that goal has to actually reflect reality, not just sort of pie in the sky Sherwood can meet the Paris target. We have to look at, well, what do we actually have to do to meet the Paris target and can we do it? And one of my concerns is the fact that there's a lot of were of language around incentivizing business to develop new green technology. But what they totally avoid is any mention of the fact that fossil fuels are heavily and massively subsidised in Canada, in the United States and around the world in the US fossil fuel subsidies, according to the International Monetary Fund, which just estimated these this year fossil, fuel subsidies in the US alone are greater than the Pentagon's budget. Really? Yes globally. They are subsidized per second to the tune of somewhere around. Hundred seventy thousand US dollars per second. And so if we leave these massive market, distorting subsidies on our fossil fuels then how can you really incentivize development of new green technologies to trying to roll a boulder up a hill? So dealing with these either through a price on carbon or through through actively removing the tax breaks in the subsidies and charging them for the climate impacts in the damages that the extraction processing and burning causes in less. You do that. It isn't a level playing field. And if you don't have a level playing field pretty much every communist in the world agrees that you're not gonna get the tech development at the pace that we need. We'll let me ask you then about how the other is compare how have the liberals done would you give them a passer fail as somebody who watches this closely? Okay question. It's so funny because of course in Canada, the liberals are actually, the centrist party, right? I mean, you think liberals kind of at the left end of the spectrum down there. Yes. Yes. And, and so the liberals are trying to walk the fence between taking significant and meaningful steps to cut carbon, which a nationwide carbon tax certainly is. But at the same time they're trying to be very pragmatic and recognize that we need the money to actually do some of the stuff because we don't want to just take everybody's tax revenues and use that ourselves. And because we need that money, and because we have to have they'll coal country onboard, which includes L, Berta and B C. That's why we have to have the pipeline and we're going to actually use the revenues from the pipeline for good to accomplish our long term goals. So one day they announced the climate emergency, and then the next day out the approval of the pipeline. And what does that mean? It means that they are standing on the top of very narrow. Fence getting shot at from both sides will. Greta Thurn Berg, the young climate activists tweeted last week right after Trudeau's government approved ATM X pipeline again that quote one second, they declare climate emergency, and the next second, they say yes to expand a pipeline.

Scientist Canada. United States Catherine Mckenna Paris Andrew Scheer Jordan Lisa Rate Twitter Katherine Heyhoe Arctic Konami Greta Thurn Berg Fence Texas Texas Tech Tech Universi Berta
"trudeau government" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"trudeau government" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"Idea of asylum-seeking is still and you brought up the point that this is largely a remnant of holocaust survivors. And so, you know, I'm thinking about specific groups like, for instance, like Jehovah's Witnesses in Russia, or there are specific groups experiencing those specific forms of persecution and countries around the world. But then, you know, you get to the the the question of like does it have to be America? Does it have to be like what is it here? And how would and then you're asking asylum officers to answer these. Questions when policy and congress seem on able to and that seems bad. Yeah. I mean, there are two really really big questions that I think you know, that that may be deserved to be revisited in a like post post holiday holocaust context, right? Like now that we've seen now that the global situation is not what it was in nineteen forty five in we've had this regime in place. Like, a do we think that the classical categories of that there is a very important clear. Bright line difference between the classical categories of Silom law like other Basi's on which groups could be persecuted or targeted and be how do we feel about? How do you like individual polities feel about their individual obligation to take those people in the US is historically been much more willing to say it is part of our national identity that we take people in who would be endanger other places where they are obviously under Trump no longer saying that the. Problem is no one else's either. Right. Like Canada got some credit under Trudeau in lake twenty sixteen twenty seventeen for taking in a lot of Syrians, but the Canadian immigration system as you will remember if you listen to alive weeds from I think fall of twenty seventeen is a lot more flexible than the US system in like, the, you know, the Trudeau government has changed in episode decided to needs to emphasize different kinds of immigrants other countries. You know, European countries aren't stepping up because they are, you know, the the the phenomenon of having an asylum crisis in therefore becoming less amenable to humanitarian flows, generally or refugee resettlement in particular is something that is not just a US problem right now, you know, the really are questions of okay. So Donald Trump will occasionally like get up in front of international audiences in say that there is a regional responsibility to take care of migrants. And then in the US context will say will they need to stay where they are. Their countries greater great again. It'd be question of who is obligated, and whether for example, the US does have a regional application to Central American migrants that it might not have to Syrian migrants, or whether when we say regional what we really mean is they should stay somewhere where other people speak Spanish, even though that's not the understanding that like, you know, northern Mexicans have of route or central Americans are part of their culture or an honest. There's there's geographical and then there's ethnocultural considerations. Right. So that for example in Spain. Right. A lot of the discourse there is when we had all these immigrants in the odds from Latin America that was fun. But now we have all these northern African Muslims arriving, and that's really bad. And when you see the same thing in Germany, and in other countries, where they're basically they've decided is that they're going to pay north African countries to care for their by any it happens to be the case that Spain is close to Muslim North Africa and very far away. From Latin America, even though obviously I mean, there is a significant cultural difference between Guatemala and Spain. But in many ways, a lower one, they are speaking Spanish speaking Catholics at the United States is close to Latin America, but you know, has I would say a contested internal political discourse of what our cultural relationship to to to those countries is a right. And now, so does Mexico, and like this is why it's so very interesting that v particular government, it of Mexico like Anglo didn't get elected talking about immigration one way or the other. Right. And now his government is in a very tricky position as this becomes a salient topic of Mexican like a super supercilious topic of Mexican politics kind of for the first time, and I guess if I was to try to adopt and more high-minded and far-sighted version of the Trump world view, I feel like they are risking sort of like crushing..

United States Spain Latin America Donald Trump Mexico America holocaust Russia Trudeau government congress Trudeau Canada Guatemala Germany North Africa
Opposition MPs turn to ethics committee to probe SNC-Lavalin affair

The Big Story

23:44 min | 1 year ago

Opposition MPs turn to ethics committee to probe SNC-Lavalin affair

"Canadians will have yet another chance to possibly hear the full story behind the scandal. That has completely changed both the image. They have of their prime minister and the landscape of the coming election. So will they know probably not for a whole bunch of reasons. If you wanna know how things are really going in Ottawa these days track down your grade. Seven civics textbook. Flip it open to the section densely packed with the arcane rules of parliamentary procedure, and then realize that there are tens of millions of dollars worth of politicians, and lawyers and advisers and pundits. And editors all trying to decipher the implications of the same damn stuff that they ignored back in middle school. And most of them are screaming at each other while they do welcome to the SNC laflin scandal part. I don't know part thirty six the part where the opposition asks again, and the government refuses again, and we all wonder how the hell Canadians will actually get the answers they want. And as it turns out, there are a few ways that that could happen whether Justin Trudeau lakes or not. I'm Jordan heath Rawlings. And this is the big story for MAC mcsweeney is the parliament hill reporter for city news for Rogers radio for the big story too. I is it going it's going well, except that this is the scandal that won't go away. And something new is about to happen today. It's going on Tuesday in Ottawa. Well, the ethics committee is meeting this afternoon to discuss the SNC lavon affair. I it's the second committee. That's going to be taking a look at all of this. And the conservatives have put forward a motion to basically launch another investigation into this affair after the Justice committee probe was shut down by the liberal majority on the committee after hearing from several key witnesses in this controversy on budget day, the committee decided that they had heard enough that they didn't need to hear anymore. Testimony on the. This and they were going to move on without coming to any sort of final report. They just let sort of you know, these witnesses air their stories and left it at that. And so now, the opposition is pushing for more testimony more witnesses. They're also calling for the prime minister to further wave privilege in all of this. So that they can get the rest of the story if you will. And so that's what we're waiting on to see whether the liberal majority on this committee, and since they're majority government, they have a majority on these committees. Whether they will allow another investigation after shutting down the first one, why would I mean, not to be partisan or anything? But like if they shut it down on the last committee, what is going to change this time, Jordan, if you're betting man, the odds would be against the liberals actually allowing this investigation to go through. And if if they're lines from the last. Committee investigation, and the reasoning as to why they shut that down will be used in this one of then you can expect the liberals to just simply say, look we've heard everything we need to hear within Canadians can make up their own minds about what happened. It's time to move on the former attorney general had had the chance to fully tell her story on whether or not she was pressured into all of this. And and that's that. So I I just imagine that they won't, but we'll have to wait and see you can you can never fully predict something in politics. And this controversy is is is proof of that. Because I don't think last year at this time anybody could even have had the idea that we'd be in this situation right now discussing the liberals polling numbers dropping the conservatives. Well, ahead of the liberals over a controversy that you know, had pitted. He liberal cabinet ministers against the prime minister's office. I I don't. Anybody could have predicted something like this. So where we go from here who really knows. The odds are against the fact that the liberals would would agree to this ethics investigation. What does a committee investigation typically, look like any way, and how typical or atypical was the Justice committee when they often are related to public policy issues and not sort of surrounded by controversies like we're seeing here. So it is unusual in that sense where it's not a common occurrence where we're having these major scandals that committees are investigating, but the committees are an avenue for parliamentarians to investigate things like this, especially when there are serious allegations, such as what we have here that the prime minister's office was putting improper pressure on the attorney general to make specific decision in a case that was before the AG the allegations are serious, and where you fall on after the testimony. I mean, I guess. It all depends on who you believe in the end, but they're serious enough allegations at I think, it was appropriate and even the liberals agreed that it was appropriate that the Justice committee look at this topic. So the Justice committee investigation was ended and the liberal said at that point, the essentially there were no stories left to tell the conservatives wanted ethics investigation because they say, there are still stories left to tell what don't we know because I know Jodie Wilson rebel and Jane Philpott have both spoken about this. But the conservatives want them to talk about other aspects of the affair the ordering council that was given by the prime minister to waive solicitor, client privilege and cabinet confidence to allow Jodie Wilson Ray bold and others involved in the allegations of improper pressure to freely speak about all of this that only applies for the time that Jodie Wilson rave old was attorney general so in relation to the SNC case one. She left and was shuffled out of the Justice. File she basically couldn't talk about what happened when she moved veterans affairs and on that shuffle day. That's where the story ends both Jodie Wilson Ray, bold. And Jane Philpott another minister, she was treasury board. President does she was involved in that shuffle decided to quit cabinet because she had lost confidence in the government's handling of the essence affair, but both Jane Philpott and Jodie Wilson. Ray bowled say that there is more to the story and Philpott spoke recently with mcclain's last week saying there is much more to this that needs to be told and because the order in council that granted the waving of all the privilege only ends when Jodie Wilson. Ray gold's left the attorney general's position. There are still questions about what happened after that. What was said after that in conversations with the prime minister between a Wilson Ray Gould's. And Justin Trudeau or others in his office such as Gerald butts, his former principal adviser because there were questions about that Jodie Wilson rebel did say that she thought that she was being pushed out of the position because of the SNC decision all conversations that happened after she left that position. She can't talk about. And so that's the big question. Mark over this. What else is there to say? And we still don't know the only way we will find out is if we hear from Jodi Wilson rebelled or Jane Philpott if she decides to talk about this. And you know, the question now is will we hear from them? And what will we hear from them if they decide to speak out in any form, how could they do guys? So there are many different ways that they could we could have another ordering council from the prime minister's office that extends the waving of privilege to go beyond. Johnny Wilson Ray Boltz time as attorney general. So if the prime minister. Decides to do that you know that would give her the free and clear because as a lawyer as attorney general to Canada, you're essentially, the government's lawyer and solicitor client privilege means that discussions around things that are not allowed to be made public a campy made public on unless you get you know, the permission of your client, which in this case would be the government and the prime minister. So if he decided to do that that would give Jodie Wilson Ray bowled, the the chance to speak possibly Jane Philpott, as well, what are the chances that that happens given that they shut down the Justice committee investigation, while the prime minister's already indicated that he doesn't think that there needs to be a further waving of privilege. He hasn't said in those exact terms, I don't believe. But when asked about this several times over the last couple of weeks about further, waving privilege. He has come back to the fact that he believes that the former attorney general Jodie Wilson rebelled was able to address all of the. The issues on the question at hand. Which is was there. Improper pressure on the over the essence he case he feels that the initial waving of privilege answered that question or allowed her to tell her full story on that question. She says there's more to the story. But he he believes that enough has come out already. He's satisfied with what he's heard. And he says Canadians have heard enough to make a determination about whether or not. There was any improper pressure in this case. So does she have any other options than if she wanted to get her truth out? This is interesting because recently there have been more and more calls about what is known as parliamentary privilege, and this is the idea that you can say anything you want in the house of Commons as an MP, and you are not going to be held responsible in any legal way for what you say in the house of Commons. I mean, you could get kicked out of the house of Commons, but you can say almost anything. And you know, they're they're free from defamation. Lawsuits are free from any kind of legal consequences for what they say in the house of Commons. So with that being said the question has been raised recently by a number of liberal MP's who seem to be getting frustrated with this whole scandal saying, well, why don't they just stand in the house and say what they have to say if this is so important to the national conversation about SNC laflin and the functioning of our government than just get out with it. Stand up in the house and say something, but there are limitations to that. It's not as simple as that. When you get up to in the house of Commons. The there's a procedure here, and you have to follow that procedure. Otherwise, you won't be recognized by the speaker, and you can't get up and speak. It's not a free for all. So as much as parliamentary privilege trumps all other privileges, meaning that solicitor, client privilege and cabinet confidence. Don't apply when it comes to parliamentary privilege and speaking in the house of Commons. They can only speak at certain times. So they. Could speak either Philpott or Jodie Wilson Ray bowled, but let's focus on Wilson rebelled since she's the person at the center of ultras. She could give a member statement every day before question period. Members have a chance to stand up and give what's called an SO thirty one standing thirty one. Which means they have about a minute to say, whatever the heck they want a minute is not along though. I think she spent around four hours testifying so run minute is really not a lot of time to get to the heart of the matter. Another thing she could do is stand up in the house of Commons and raise a point of personal privilege. This goes back to the argument that if it is so important to the nation and given the allegations that the AG felt improper pressure standing up in the house of Commons on a point of privilege could be a very valid point to make and she would have more time to speak at a point of personal privilege, if she felt her privileges were, you know, breached in some way through this scandal, which seems to be what she has. Been talking about since the start since these allegations came out, so she could do that. But even then the speaker doesn't always let you just go on and on for four hours the other the other option that I just want to squeeze in here, the one that that could give them a little bit more time to speak, but it might take some participation of the opposition members. Which would just make things really weird and awkward considering these two members are still members of the liberal party. But if there is a motion, a when you speak in the house of Commons, it has to be relevant to what is at hand. So, you know, if you raise a point of personal privilege, what follows has to be related to that point. If there's a motion from the opposition. And there have been a couple of motions already so they had the option to potentially speak. If there's a motion before the house of Commons. They could get up and speak to that any MP really has a right to get up and speak to emotion that is before the house as a part of normal debate. And then they take questions from the other parties about. What they had just said in their statement. They're limited on time with that though, they could get, you know, consent to continue on speaking and opposition MP's could also share their time. So if they decided to speak, then maybe a conservative MP would say, you know, what I'm going to hand my time over to Jodie Wilson rebelled to allow her to have. Yeah. Keep going keep going. So that's one thing that could happen. But that takes some agreement behind the scenes, and it would be rather unusual for an MP of the sitting governing party to strike some sort of deal with position MP's to have more time to speak in that scenario on the the final one that could be, but is unlikely as unanimous consent to make a statement in the house of Commons, three unanimous, consent and peace can do almost anything. They want in the house of Commons. If all MP's agree then anything's possible. So if Wilson Rabaul says, I have a statement. Wanna make it in the house of Commons. I'm seeking unanimous consent to give that statement at whatever time if every single party an MP agrees. Nobody objects when that motion is put forward to the speaker. Then they could do that. We'll have to wait and see whether they try to take advantage of that. Because you know, there are other avenues that they could take. In the meantime, to to try and get their story out with so many avenues. And so many people kind of calling from his Wilson Ray bowl to to speak to what she says is still left to be told. It seems strange to me. And please correct me if I'm wrong that the prime minister is willing to let this be dragged out so much as opposed to realizing that it's probably going to be addressed anyway and an opening up a a way for her to talk does that I am I way off base here. Does that not seem strange to anybody else auto from the early stages of this controversy? There have been a lot of criticisms from pundits. And political experts. About the way the Trudeau government has handled. This the conservatives argue that the liberal story keeps changing every day. I I don't think that's fair because I think it's not that it's changed. It's just that. They only allowed little bits to come out. Yeah. In dribs and drabs, and that kind of helps keep this thing going and a lot of people were confused about why they chose that strategy rather than just the rip the band aid off strategy. Get it out there get it out all on the table. You've got months to go before an election. You can deal with the damage early on let some heads roll. And for people who might be responsible. If there's if there was any wrongdoing and then just move on. Because that's the, you know, as some political experts have said, that's the way you deal with a controversy like this in politics. There have been some questions about the handling of this from the Trudeau government, and whether they they handle this properly. The at all. But now we're in a in a situation where it seems like every few days or at least once a week. We've got a new thing coming out last week before the budget. It seemed like the Trudeau government was trying to put this to bed. We saw the clerk of the Privy Council resign on the Monday. The prime minister announced that he was going to appoint a new adviser to advise the government, and and released recommendations on how they can change the relationship between the government and the attorney general, which you know, the big question there is do you split Justice minister role and attorney general role. And then the budget was the day that the Justice committee ended the investigation into the SNCF air. We we've now found out that the the prime minister spoke with Jodie Wilson Ray bowled on the Monday about the next steps, and he called it a cordial conversation. So one assumes that he was giving her the heads up about the actions that were were happening. On the Monday and Tuesday. But then by the Friday, Jodie Wilson Rabo publicly announced that she's going to be giving a written submission to the Justice committee complete with text messages and emails which she had promised to produce. But also some new evidence in her possession. So whenever she decides to submit that written submission. It's going to put this story back in the headlines, and we're gonna be talking about it yet. Again, not only that but the opposition has done its work to try and keep the story in the headlines disrupting the budget by delaying the speech, and then when Finance Minister Bill more, no spoke, they banged their desks and drowned him out than staged a walkout on break weeks when it was feared that the liberals might get a little bit of a break from coverage. That's when all these emergency committee meetings are happening, including the ethics committee meeting that we're talking about. So the opposition has been doing its work to try and keep this in the headlines despite some criticisms that they. Of they went to extreme too fast with the calling of the resignation of the prime minister that they kind didn't have anywhere else to go. The they promised us every tool in the toolbox. And it seems like they're they're continuing to do that. And look we're talking about it. So I guess if that's their goal to keep us talking about it. Then they're achieving that goal despite whether it was the best way or not politically speaking, of course. Oh god. I means we're gonna talk about this till October doesn't chrome. Yeah. I fully expect, you know, there are questions about whether there's going to be an early campaign call from the prime minister, and that we'd be heading to the polls this spring, not the fall, which doesn't fully make sense in in the basic way that the band aid off a. Yeah, it just doesn't make you know, you look at the facts, the liberals are pulling at their lowest point, I think in Justin Trudeau's mandate, so far you've got months to go to repair the damage, including the summer vacation where a lot of Canadians just tune out of the news. And then tune back in the fall where you can kind of reset the narrative again, you know, there there are those options out there for the prime minister. So an early election, call would seem odd, but the conservatives are pouncing on on that speculation and trying to fundraise off of it saying we need money now there could be an early election. So the opposition parties are are enjoying this because they got the fundraise off of it. But you know, the prime minister's office has been clear has been asked many many times over. The last year. Will there be an early election? They've never wavered from the fact that they said that they're going to stick with the fixed election date that prime minister Stephen Harper had put in place of October. Although that's not technically binding, you can break it. And I think Harper did as well. So it's not technically binding, but Justin Trudeau promised in October vote. And I think this is going to be one of those issues that the opposition continues to hammer on the campaign trail so to answer your question. Yeah. I think we will still be talking about this in October, regardless of what the election results will be last question are these stories from MS Wilson, Rabo them as Philpott going to come out some way like it seems inevitable now to me and my wrong about that. What's your thought? Here's the issue. Both Wilson Ray bold. And Jane Philpott have said that they have their concerns in. They're very cautious about the issues of solicitor, client privilege and cabinet confidentiality. Now, we spoke earlier. Earlier about how they could get up in the house, and they could say anything they want in the house of Commons and be protected from any legal consequences when they speak in the house because they enjoy parliamentary privilege, which allows which trumps all other privileges, and confidences, etc. So they could do that. But there hasn't to do something like that Jane Philpott in her interview with mcclain's was asked. Why don't you just do that as she said? Part of the issue is is timing. Of course, an and we went through that pretty clearly that there are limitations on how long they can speak in. If they've got another four hours worth of testimony. It's not going to be easy to use the house of Commons as the avenue to get that story out so Philpott aside from timing Philpott also gave a very interesting answer about the dynamic in liberal caucus and her relationship with colleagues, which I think is another aspect to all of this is really focused on it was fascinating to hear. Because you don't always hear that. She was talking about how a lot of her colleagues. Again, she is still a liberal MP. And the prime minister has given no indication that he plans to boot either Philpott or Wilson Ray bolt from his caucus Philpott has said that her actions and her decision to quit cabinet has created a lot of uneasiness amongst people who used to be closer colleagues in caucus, and she feels that some feel that her motives are not that that she's doing something that sort of works against the party, and that's creating friction with people. She never used to have friction with. And so she opened up a little bit about the personal struggles that she has in doing what she's doing. But says she's trying to you know, do what she's always done in. That is a take a moral stand. She doesn't care about what happens to her as a result of that. But clearly those personal relationships are taking toll for Jody Wilson Ray bowl. You know, you have not only cabinet confidence as as a concern out of all of this. But you also have. Hitter client privilege, and so there's some caution there because they don't want to break this oath that they made to the country so lightly just because people are saying we'll just get out and say it in the house of Commons. There's a very serious oath that you take when you join cabinet where you agree to serve her majesty the Queen and to keep all of the secrets that are held as a privy counsellor it to keep those secret essentially os are not usually easily broken by people who take those oaths they feel passionately about what they do regardless of political stripe. So that's something else. It sort of weighing over both Jodie Wilson Ray bold and Jane Philpott about whether they just get out there and tell their story, despite the fact that there's personal privilege whether or not we got the full story out of this. You know, there are avenues for both the Trudeau government and for Jody Wilson Rabo than Jane Philpott to make the decision to get that full story out. Whether they take those those avenues is another question altogether. And we'll just have to wait and see.

Prime Minister Jodie Wilson Ray Jane Philpott Jodie Wilson Justice Committee Attorney Justin Trudeau MP Trudeau Government Wilson Ray Jody Wilson Ray Bowl Johnny Wilson Ray Boltz Jordan Heath Rawlings Jodie Wilson Rabo Snc Lavon Affair Wilson Ray Gould SNC Ottawa
Resignation scandal mars Trudeau's shiny image

FT News

09:58 min | 1 year ago

Resignation scandal mars Trudeau's shiny image

"Trudeau swept into power in Canada in two thousand fifteen championing equality, openness and social Justice, but the resignation of his attorney general who will let's shoot face pressure to go easy on one of the country's biggest companies in corruption case has dented this image. Nikki Zena discusses the case in what it means for Trudeau in the liberal party with Ravi, Matt and Amy Williams. Amy, tell us first about the company involved. SNC lavaman will the company has a few things, but bowling engineering company that works mainly with mining and energy services. So in this case, it's been accused of bribing Libyan officials around the time when he was in power. This is not as I brush with bribery, allegations the World Bank, actually, blacklisted its main subsidiary from bidding on projects and its own global corruption policy and that happened in two thousand thirteen over a project. It was worth on in Bangladesh. The key thing about the company in the stories that employs around nine thousand people across Canada. Most of those are in Quebec, which is the home for just intruders constituency in Montreal what was the attorney general's involvement, which Wilson rape, bogey Torney general. She was in a position to come up with the prosecution agreement with the company that would basically have seen him set. Lots of court avoiding huge find so base. Would have paid some money but being allowed to keep trading and avoid the court fees and big legal costs that would put them out of business. And who does she say put her under pressure to agree to a deferred prosecution agreement and why did she end up resigning? Well, she said that it was several people in Mr. Trudeau's government specifically in his office, and including Mr. shooter himself and Khushi his top advisor, Gerald books. Her resignation is a bit murky and a little unclear but what we do know is that shortly before she resigned, Mr. Trudeau effectively demoted her in a cabinet reshuffle and this caused quite a bit of upset. She initially refused to take the first portfolio that she was offered. So she was attorney general and Justice minister, Mr. to try to move her to indigenous services, which she climbed she eventually ended up at veterans affairs, and she shortly afterwards resigned. What has Mr. Trudeau said about this mister Suto and also his adviser Mr. buck who gave testimony to the Canadian House of Commons. Have both said that they did not try to force miss was able to make any kind of decision. They just asked her the independent advice and get a second opinion on her decision because they thought it was really important case lots of jobs are at stake. Mr. Trudeau has insisted he spoke to journalists day after Mr Bush gave testimony he insisted. That he was only ever trying to defend jobs as all he's ever tried to do and nine thousand jobs is really quite a lot of jobs to be lost. I know you've been wanting to hear from me directly on the SNC Lebanon issue. I've taken time to review the testimony to reflect on what has happened over the past months and on what our next steps should be. What has become clear through the various testimonies is that over the past months? There was an erosion of trust between my office. And specifically my former principal secretary and the former minister of Justice and attorney general I was not aware of that erosion of trust does prime minister and leader of the federal ministry. I should've been in regards to standing up for jobs and defending the integrity of our rule of law. I continue to say that there was no inappropriate pressure. Bearing in mind that elections are coming up in October. How has this all gone down with Canadian voters rudely, they don't like it? This Troodos popularity has taken a hit. And it's not looking all that good for him the elections approach. However in Quebec the province. Montreal is people are less bothered about this. And actually his popularity's is kinda held up in Quebec, they're a little more sympathetic to the view that jobs were at stake around three thousand of those nine thousand jobs in Quebec. And they are less unhappy with MRs Troodos alleged actions. Ravi you've written that Mr. Trudeau is partly to blame for setting impossibly high standards. Can you explain what you mean? Yeah. I mean, there's a couple of things there. I think first of all what needs to go back and understand why he won and how he won the election in two thousand thirteen to become prime minister, we need to remember that Mr. wasn't actually expected to win. He was in third place turning to other party leaders and play the Blinder in the campaign and suddenly became. Came prime minister with a massive majority. And I think the first mistake they made was to misunderstand their mandate. They thought the massive majority meant they had licensed to invoke a massive program of change in fact, because they went by surprise by good fortune in that voters had got fed up with the incumbent Stephen Harper. They didn't realize there was a bit of a delicate balance to achieve their the second bit was they one of the back of a progressive agenda. Mr. Trudeau had a great brand he sold himself as a modern politician whose advertising a more kind a more gentle immoral open way of governing and dean with politics rather than the very fractious way. Things are done in many other places including at times in Canada. But by holdings of that standard. He also needs to meet that Senator in government now for the first few years that kind of words he did very well on certain policy issues. He accepted twenty five thousand Syrian refugees into the country from the war, which is a very popular mid both within Canada and in June. Nationally, but further into government, he made some missteps party. I would argue because of the hubris I came with that stunning election victory. First of all he started to do things that flew in the face of that cleaner than clean impression. He was giving for example in twenty-six fell foul of ethics rules for taking a private family holiday on the private island of the con, the billionaire religious leaders not only did that contravene the rules in place for politicians. But it just looked really bad. It looked very elitist. When he told the world that he was anything. But similarly in terms of the people who put in place around him, Amy mentioned Gerald butts who's as close as adviser, but Mr. bus was also his best friend. They know each other for thirty years they met at McGill University and invariably when you put your best friend in your office as your closest advisor, even the smartest person in the world will find it impossible to separate the personal and the professional. And that was certainly impression given and that chumminess once again went to undercut pretty severely, the progressive agenda that open of politics that he advertised when he campaigned for office, and indeed nearly years of his tenure so you've already touched on this a bit, but looking towards the next election, and how he starting to campaign now, what would you say are has notable achievements, and what are his failures while a couple of things. I mean, he has achieved things I talked with the Syrian refugee policy. He's also legalized cannabis which was a big campaign promise of his and he certainly tried to create a different impression of how poses can be done. But if you count all the things where he failed in the city meet the targets, he said, they include reforming the electoral system. He hasn't done that finding a way of building a pipeline from the oil signs of northern Alberta to the Pacific coast of BC. He has done that reconciling relations with indigenous populations. He hasn't achieved that so they're a litany of these things where he set. Very vicious goals, and he just didn't achieved. And so I think unfortunately, while he has made some serious achievements. Such as renegotiate NAFTA agreement with Donald Trump. They're also number failures that his opponents will hold against them. And how well placed is Canada's opposition to capitalize on Mr. Trudeau's weaknesses. Well, go into the election. I think that's one of actually his advantages. So eighty mentioned that Mr. Trudeau's poll numbers of taking a hit. And yet the liberal government the liberal party, which he leads still is more or less neck and neck with the obstinate conservatives, and I think one of the things that he has to best advantage is the fact that his opposition rivals are relatively new leaders in their own, right? And they suffer from their own credibility issues. So Andrea sherr of the conservatives and the leftist NDP's Jagmeet Singh are both quite noon to the job. And they too are having some issues around trying to prove to the public that there are credible alternative. So in terms of how well the opposition can capitalize on it. They're doing the best to make sure this as in the news there. Making sure that it's very hard for the government to talk about anything else. Every press conference at happens invariably, the tension terms to this topic around the essence see Lebanon scandal and the resignation so it's very hard to change the Genda. However, the weakness of the opposition does give Mr. to who remains a very charming character and someone who can certainly connect with people gives them a plausible chance going into the election. So Amy what happens with the SNC level in case after this? We could you will rape with decision was not offer the prosecution agreement which means they have to go to trial. So there's already a hearing underway and a criminal trial will probably happen within an ear. Yes. Data what AB said, although wasn't able to make sure this is going to trawl from what it seems the political stray hasn't ended a lot of pressure on the top civil servant in Canada. Who's also been drawn into the affair and his role there further questions the opposition is raising about whether they'll process of how cases like this handled is inappropriate. And whether in fact. An independent third party should Judy Kate over the process. So the politics is obviously very strong and carrying on. And the opposite is gonna do their best to make sure this stays in the headlines. And of course, our media colleagues are watching very closely in Canada too.

Mr. Trudeau Canada Amy Williams Attorney Prime Minister SNC Montreal Quebec Rape Mr Bush Lebanon Advisor World Bank MR. Bribery Bangladesh Nikki Zena Stephen Harper Mrs Troodos
The scandal that could bring down Justin Trudeau

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:01 min | 1 year ago

The scandal that could bring down Justin Trudeau

"Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has long been pinup for liberals around the world. But now he's facing Kohl's within his own country to resign Justin Trudeau simply cannot continue to govern this country. Now that Canadians know what he has done critics of Mr. Trudeau like physician leader, Andrew Scheer, all you. He's guilty of political meddling to protect big construction company named SNC level from prosecution today, a former aide is expected to testify against Mr. Trudeau in the parliamentary Justice committee. Absolutely. The biggest crisis that the Trudeau government has faced model Andro and is our Canada correspondent based out of were. And the timing is terrible. Because there's an election coming up in October. And it doesn't give the government very much time to turn the page on this model, and there are lots of moving parts in the scandal. But how did? It start SNC lab. Liz of big construction company that has operations all over the world, and it has been charged with paying bribes to ficials in the Libyan government in order to get construction contracts there, and how did that turn into a control Vesey? That's pulled in the prime minister will the first indication that Canadians got that something was a little bit was when Justin Trudeau demoted his. Minister of Justice in Terni general in January. There was no good explanation. Given for this demotion and people thought it was a little bit odd. And then journalists started sniffing around, and there was a fairly explosive news report that came out at the beginning of February that explained the demotion for everyone. Now, this news report just quoted anonymously sources that basically what it said was that Mr. Trump and his officials had put inappropriate pressure on the attorney general to change her decision in the case of SNC level. Now SNC lands of big international construction company. It's also politically important in Quebec. Which is always something that you have to keep an eye on in Canadian politics of why is this particularly important in Quebec. And so important to just introduced in the first place SNC level employs about. Nine thousand people in Quebec. And it is also a very politically plugged in company. But Trudeau has said from the beginning that he's very worried that if this case goes to trial that the company might go under or it might be purchased by another company and those jobs would be lost in the headquarters move out of Canada. But he isn't suggesting that they'd be let off completely what he wanted. The attorney general to do was to give them a deferred prosecution agreement, and these are things that you can get them in the UK and in the US as well where the company admits responsibility for wrongdoing cooperates with the government and usually pays a hefty fine. And how'd you Canadian people feel about this on the ho- the problem with leading level now off with a fine has too many people see that as sort of them escaping Justice? And so the majority of Canadian. Actually want SNC lab land to go to a criminal trial because they perceived the alternative as letting them off the hook too easily. Now as matters stand right now, Mr. Tudo has not overturned the original decision of his former attorney general. So that trial is still to go ahead. How plausible Mr. Trudeau's denials here behavior was not in any way. Improper Mr. Trudeau hasn't helped his case at all. Because his denials of all been a little bit sort of spotty at no time did I or my office direct the current or previous attorney general to make any particular decision in this matter. He hasn't really laid out the full maintainable of what happened. And who did what when so what he's saying? Is that? Yes, he raised this issue with. Jodi Wilson Rabaul, the attorney general and it was mostly because he wanted to make sure that the company SNC lab land didn't go under. He was worried about jobs, but then in we later found out from her testimony that in fact politics was raised in some of these sessions, then to my surprise, the clerk stated or started to make the case for the need for a DPA. He said, quote, there's a board meeting on Thursday September the twentieth with stockholders, and quote, quote, again, they will likely be moving into London if this happens, and there's an election in Quebec soon and quote. At that point. The prime minister jumped in stressing that there is an election in Quebec. And that quote, I am an MP in Quebec the member for Pepino, and quote, and that puts an entirely different shade on things and Mr. Trudeau has not come up with a full accounting of that he has lost some cabinet members. Coast him and very aid joined to limit the damage. How's that going down with the former attorney general resigned, the was damaging for the liberal government? She was seen as very competent minister to begin with. She was also indigenous which is important to this particular government, which has elevated the indigenous issues part of its its brand. So that resignation was definitely damaging. But what has made this into a full blown crisis is the resignation just this week. Of James Philpot, another very senior, very confident woman in the Trudeau government, and she was very explicit in her resignation that she had lost confidence in the government. So that has proved to be much heavier blow you've interviewed him on a number of occasions. Do you think you'll handle this? As we go forward Trudeau often very good when he's backed into a corner, even before he was elected leader. And prime minister he stunned everyone by taking on a much bigger opponent in charity boxing match and manage to win. But I'm antipates that he will have something his sleeve here that he's going to try to present to the Canadian public and try to turn the page on this melon. Thanks very much for joining us. My pleasure.

Justin Trudeau Trudeau Government Prime Minister Attorney SNC Quebec Canada Andrew Scheer Libyan Government Parliamentary Justice Committe Kohl Terni Andro Liberal Government LIZ Jodi Wilson Rabaul Mr. Trump Mr. Tudo James Philpot
Jody Wilson-Raybould: The woman in the eye of the storm

The Big Story

13:10 min | 1 year ago

Jody Wilson-Raybould: The woman in the eye of the storm

"Wilson abled you've heard her name in the news for going on a month. Now, she's the woman at the center of the biggest political scandal to hit Canada, and a very long time the Trudeau government fighting itself in crisis mode over this SNC lavaman scandal. Bombshell testimony on Wednesday from Canada's former attorney general Jodie Wilson rebelled hers. The name prime minister Justin Trudeau will never ever forget the right. Honorable Jodie Wilson rebel testified. The would not bend to what she considered inappropriate pressure on the part of his office to interfere in the essence Alaba in case and the she was alternately penalized for it. The prime minister asked me to help out to find a solution here for us NC in response. I explained to him the law, but Jodie Wilson. Ray bold is also a person an indigenous lawyer with a whole life and distinguished career prior to these headlines liberal MP for Vancouver. Granville, feels it all that pressure back when she was still the first indigenous woman to become attorney general a star member of Trudeau's. Gender-balanced cabinet before being shuffled to better affairs as a result. She believes a standing her ground defending the rule of law Canadians of mostly lauded Wilson rebelled for quote, speaking her truth to power that doesn't mean she hasn't been subject to racism and sexism allegedly from even within her own party. Why versus all coming from? And what does this kind of treatment say about the liberal party or more broadly, Canadian politics? I'm Sarah, VO spelled infrastructure and heath Rawlings as we Mark International Women's Day this week. This is the big story. To walk us through Wilson rebelled is how she's been treated and the significance of how she's been treated. We welcome globe in mail columnist Elizabeth frenzy to the big story podcast. Hey, liz. Hi, sarah. Thanks for coming on happy to be. We'll tell me a little about about what you know about Wilson rebelled. She, you know, she's a big deal and Trudeau's gender-balanced cabinet no longer in cabinet, but what's hers sort of Baxter. Started get here to begin with, you know, about well, she was the first indigenous woman to be Justice minister and attorney general. And then of course, she was and she was a lawyer quite celebrated lawyer in British Columbia and indigenous woman as well. And she, of course, famously was demoted from her position of Justice minister and attorney general into veterans affairs Menton widely considered to be a demotion. Although, of course, veterans affairs is really important portfolio. But then we what happened after that is what sort of I think she was fairly well known to the public eye because of high profile legal and Justice issues on the federal landscape like cannabis legalization the right to die legislation and things like that. So she'd always been quite how high profile, but this particular scandal around SNC level has really put her profile in her just in the stratosphere. Yeah. I of the storm really I have the store. Yeah. So and I really last week felt like the day that she testified, you know, she's sitting for hours in front of the Justice committee in your watching. How did you feel? Yeah. It was quite extraordinary felt like, you know, one of those moments where the entire country stopped oddly, everyone, I knew had stopped and was sitting somewhere watching this. And it, of course, happened on the same day that Michael Cohen Trump's former lawyer was testifying. Before congress in the United States, and that was a much more combative and kind of fiery weird mail boisterous. Angry confrontation. And then there came Jodie Wilson Ray bold and sat down with no one sitting beside her and her, I guess possibly assistance behind her and in front of what is I'm sure the most packed Justice committee. There has ever been sure there are people lined up outside and she testified in the most extraordinary way. Like, just very calm. Very methodical. Very meticulous. Never sort of giving away any like sense that she felt you know, angry or anything like that. It was just very calm. She laid out what had happened to her. And I think for most people more persuasive for the kind of calmness with which she laid out her as she said her truth. Yeah. And let's talk about that, you know, really did land. Well with a lot of. Canadians. And and I think she speaks her truth was the headline Tronto star the next day. You know, what do you read into that positive response to to the way that she testified? Did she have to do that in order to be credible to be listened to to be heard? Well, we'd had a vacuum around this right for round this issue for the longest time, the prime minister would say a couple of little things. And then there was you know, people briefing off the record and things and you'd get those versions in the news. But there was never there was no kind of their their until she spoke. There was no central narrative until she spoke about what had happened during this. We'd had my Gornik the chief of the Clark with a Privy Council speaking, but apart from that sort of none of the central players had spoken. And so I think there was a real hunger to have some kind of sense of instead of innuendo and slur. And background noise. Actually have somebody lay down what they saw to be the kind of accurate series of events, according to their point of view, which is what she did. Yeah. And she had the receipts. Right. She had only had the receipts. She she spills the tea. Yeah. She. Did she had it seemed to me very loyally? You know, she laid things out methodically. She had clearly kept contemporaneous notes. She had emails and texts and things like that. And never in the almost I think it was four hours of testimony. Did she divert from this narrative of this is what happened to me? And this is how I felt and she didn't use hyperbolic language or anything. But it was all the more powerful for that. For her just using little tiny. Phrases like veiled threats, and then she made, you know, a reference to Richard Nixon and the Saturday night massacre. You know in which he he needed to get people to do his dastardly bidding and went down the list in the department of Justice until he found somebody who would. So these things I think were because she spoke so carefully, and so directly it had a real impact, and there was no hyperbole. There was no kind of you out when he was testifying was much more passionate and emboldened and kind of forceful threats to democracy, and you know, somebody's gonna get killed. There's crazy culture of or or or aura of of partisanship in violence in the in the air, which I think is probably you know, I think is there is there's some act today. Yeah. For sure, but her testimony was so different. And so much more powerful for it. Yes. That's her position in all this scandal and controversy, but do you what do you sort of see when you put a gender lens on that? As a woman having to be believed. Incredible. I think we've seen lots of obviously way different context. But, you know, lots of testimonies from women who are needing to be have their side of the version of things hurt. And and a lot of ways there. It doesn't get the weight that I think you have Christine Blasi. Maybe. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I'm Christine Blasi Ford who still has not been able as far as I know to move back into her house and is still suffering death threats. Now has to have, you know, people around her bodyguards and things and so just to be clear. She was the the woman who said that as a teen she was sexually assaulted by Brad Cavanaugh who is now on the supreme court bench in the United States. Yes. Exactly. So we do kind of I think for better or worse. Partly because there are so few women in these very high positions of power. So when they do come forward to testify for better or worse. They do kind of, you know, the intensity of our gazes upon them because they are few and far between, and I don't I don't think you can separate that four Jodie Wilson Rabaul because I don't know if you know this, but Justin Trudeau as a feminist is. Yeah, it's true. I know I thought I should be the first one and. And he had a gender-balanced cabinet twenty. She was a major star player. Exactly. She was a a major star player. So I think what's happened is as I wrote in a column at the time live by the effort die by the effort. So he has made such he's really tied so much of his credibility. I think to this idea of gender Justice gender equity, the pushing of progressive feminist causes and a half to say in many ways, the government has been good. You know, there have been there has been terrific legislation in certain ways. But if you're going to present yourself as being pure than pure and more pristine than pristine than anytime, you are seeing to step outside that boundary anytime, you are perhaps seeing to be treating a senior female member of your cabinet in a way that is not necessarily progressive or perhaps there are other members of your caucus who are briefing against her or are saying things about her. That frankly, smack of sexism even off the record, then that's gonna look really bad. And I think that's what we saw here. And also there have been reports of some really racist and sexist language used against her, you know, within the government, but also out in the world. What have you sort of seen or heard about that? Oh, yeah. There's been all kinds of things, and we had a couple of liberal male liberal backbenchers say things about her along the lines of you know, she couldn't handle the stress or she wasn't a team player. One said that her father was perhaps pulling her strings, which is just I know. Yeah. Later apologized for it. And he apologized in the house, which is good. But in a way, I actually find hearing those things oddly refreshing, because I know so many people actually think them and to congratulate about loud, like at least we get to see people truly feel and then it becomes obvious. And then we can. Deal with it. Right. And so now, you know, nobody I was actually quite surprised that we did hear things along those lines. What we've heard also an again, this is more off the record stuff is you know, that she was difficult. Not a team player. Difficult can be code, right? Absolutely. No. There's no doubt about it whatsoever. There's all these coded words that are used for women, especially women in leadership roles, especially women in politics and unlikable is big one or likable be here with Hillary Clinton all the time. Right. Yeah. Yeah. Or Elizabeth Warren, or you know, any of the American politicians likeable team player, you know, cooperative. And it's it's interesting because traditionally what women are thought to bring to leadership tables, whether it's the boardroom or political leadership tables is the so-called soft skills. Right. Soft power. So that is empathy you know, team being a team player being able to work well with others collaboration. So I think any woman who then diverts from that script no matter in how small away is branded as perhaps even more harshly than than her male colleagues would be and he kept calling her Jodi in the early days. Right. It was like Jodi, you know, it's going to do this or that. And I'm like, she's a minister, right, right? Able to you. Yeah. Right honourable. Yeah. Exactly. I'm, but, but you know, what do you see is really hypocritical on his part, then you know, you really outlined. Very well. You know, the the double standards, I think for a lot of women who are in powerful roles like Why's it as an especially bad problem for Justin Trudeau because he hasn't. This is bidden his entire brand. I so I interviewed last week I interviewed this famous American journalists in Toronto named Rebecca traced to American feminist journalist, and she was kind of golf smacked by the whole scandal. Because she said when you look from outside our country, what they know about Justin Trudeau is that he's a great feminist, and the you know that he pushes women's equality, and that has been the brand that they built from you know, from when the when he was in

Justin Trudeau Jodie Wilson Prime Minister Attorney Sarah Jodie Wilson Ray Canada United States Justice Minister Liberal Party Justice Committee SNC Ray Bold Vancouver Mark International Women Jodi Granville Department Of Justice
"trudeau government" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"trudeau government" Discussed on The Big Story

"They had this program spending lots of money on it. They had no idea if it was working so the government runs job training programs for indigenous people, they don't follow up to find out whether the jobs as people get were part time or full time, or how long they stayed in their jobs that seems insane that you're spending money on the program. It's so it's a it's a fiscal conservative issue too. A lot of ways. I mean that that program might be not working at all you might want ramp it up, you might want to cancel it altogether. It's a complete waste of money purpose of that program is to find meaningful sustainable work for indigenous people, and they have no idea if it's meaning for sustainable mean literally no idea. So it's I think wherever you sit in Canadian society. This is an issue. It's not just for people who love big government. It's not just for people who are telling stories I'll just add to that to several other groups we did try to get a broad spectrum. We spoke to dozens and dozens of researchers right across Canada. But beyond that, we also spoke to two other people in other people who use data in different ways and two examples one in the charitable sector. Speaking to Eunice f it seems like a basic thing, but they want to compile an index of child wellbeing in Canada. It's been very difficult because we don't have much on children at the national level. There's a lot of local or provincial studies. And but so they've had trouble finding. Comprehensive ways to add indicators into their into their wellbeing index and the other one is parents of children with disabilities. I'm the last comprehensive national big survey was two thousand and six that's a long time ago. So certainly parents one sort of poignant thing that that one mother said is that when you don't track it, there's an invisibility to the issue and to some of the struggles that they're going to through in terms of accessing either funding or supports when people aren't measured. It does render them invisible. And in many cases, when they are measured or when there's something to reflect what they're going through. It is a sign of a more inclusive society how much of this was startling to you guys you dug into it. Because as I read your reporting and talk to the image. I keep getting his like someone stumbling around in the dark, and that's a scary thing to me one. We're talking about data that should be used to plan our cities, and and healthcare and stuff like that. Were you shocked by the level you found? I totally what TV has been reporting on stats can and health and demographics and using data for longer than I have. And I I had this kind of idea and immediately taken I started working together. And and this is a problem that was I think more on her radar than mine. I would say, but I think we were both pretty shocked. Yeah. I would say I've been at the globe thirteen years, and I've never learned more from doing story than this one. We all have our own silo is so I didn't know about the labor market. I knew about some economic status, but I didn't know much about health and to me health was very interesting. And and certainly something we'd like to pursue more because there's so much at stake people's lives are at stake. Both of you have kind of mentioned stats that are no longer kept after the Harper government. And my admittedly amateur understanding was that Trudeau in the liberals ran on a promise of more transparency and more open numbers. Have we started to see that change? I mean, his terms almost up so it'd be a little late. But have we start? Did you see that changing if not what needs to change? I think the Trudeau government's friendlier to data than the Harper government was they reinstituted the mandatory long form census, which was a big thing. But frankly, kind of a no brainer. They have boost its Askins budget a little bit. They have done some open government initiatives. We've been urging the government where we've been asking the government if they will consider filling marriage and divorce rates you could start doing that again tomorrow, and we put a bunch of these to the government, and they it didn't answer actually..

Harper government Trudeau government Canada Trudeau Eunice thirteen years
What Does It Mean To Be A Liberal? A Canadian Perspective

The Big Story

07:56 min | 1 year ago

What Does It Mean To Be A Liberal? A Canadian Perspective

"And all of us. Has Justin Trudeau changed. The identity of what it means to call yourself a liberal in Canada today. I think he has or he's at he's at least shifted that identity who are the people in the Justin Trudeau government who would be the who had parallel to say John Manley or Paul Martin in the old Christian government. There were always those voices of that business, liberalism blue suit liberalism corner office, liberalism, you could maybe argue the Bill more. No. And Jim Kerr are in that or in that mold that certainly in the most prominent issues and players around the Trudeau government that they're in. They're in a different zone. Right. It's true himself. Catherine McKenna Jane Philpott, they want to be dent fide with issues like feminism concern for indigenous reconciliation concern for the environment. Those are all issues that sort of activate an animate the progressive core of liberal party. Now, a lot of those younger voters who came out in two thousand fifteen and help push it over the top. To be remembered. So, you know, those issues, they're they're powerful and our emotional level. But they're also potent an on an electoral level, and are they potent for the other side too. Because certainly on the issue of immigration. We've seen recently the conservative party taking a pretty hard tack on that and trying to use statements and media opportunities that Trudeau and his team might feel really work for them against them on that issue. Couple points on that one is everywhere in the world where right wing populism has risen both in its most extreme of nauseous forums, but also in its forms that aren't as frightening. There's been an element of concern about immigration as part of the mix. It can be outright xenophobic racism, or it can be something much milder than that. But it's part of the mix for right wing populism. So I think it's kind of an obvious thing that the consider conservatives are going to want to tap into. And I think we have to be careful in not denouncing that as automatically invalid. I mean clearly there. Our re re you know, realistically, there are issues about the border in Canada right now that would didn't exist three or four years ago. They're the kind of bored across miss become routine. I call it a trick. Because I don't really think it's big enough to call it a crisis. But oh, not everyone is calling it a trickle. No, a lot of people are calling it a crisis. And and I don't think it is a crisis. But there are legitimate polcy debates there just how much is it. Valid to amp them up the way that it's being done. That's the question like just on this question vote. If we're thinking about the the degree to which the conservative play off the liberals on some of these hot button issues. I thought one of the interesting things we discovered through the Abacus research that was done was that among Canadians who say I'm a liberal. That's about twenty eight percent of the Canaan canes will identify with the party directly. They they consider this. As liberals only about a third say, they hate conservatives. They will they will buy into the term hate a third, but among conservatives that's a vote a quarter identifies. Conserve? Active about fifty percents of the hate liberals. It's the kind of animus against your opponents is greater in the conservative base than it is in the liberal base. So if we look then at the tactics of Andrew Sheeran and Justin Trudeau, I think it's fairly obvious where that's gonna tend to nudge them. Andrew Scheer wants to appeal to connect with a base that really hates liberals and Justin Trudeau needs to appeal to connect with the base that is less likely to hate conservatives. They they're obviously not serve supporters. But yeah, you know, there's a difference between one and two of your supporters saying, hey, I hate the other guys and one in three saying, it's a it's a it's a factor in both camps. But it's a bigger factor. Andrew shears camp. Give him that the conservatives can kind of point to their base not wanting to be liberal to get everybody on board. How hard is it to unite the left and Canada in the same way that kind of the right side of the spectrum seems to come together a little bit stronger with their own disagreements about liberal policy? Well, there's no question that it that the left is more is more fragmented in Canada. If you look at the polarized voters, we identified in in our in that because survey of about forty five percent of them are conservative backers. And what forty seven back one of the left of center parties, but that is scattered among liberals and peers and green so just almost by definition at some more divided group on the other hand there are moments where not just the left and centre-left in Canada. But even beyond that Trudeau has shown an ability to bring people together. And I think the most obvious example was when he sparred with Donald Trump coming out of the Charlevoix g seven summit in in June. Wherever will remember that Trump blasted off when a little Twitter tantrum after yes. The conference about Trudeau sing some frankly, fairly mild mannered things about America tariff policy. It would be with regret, but it would be with absolute certainty, and firmness that we move forward with retaliatory measures on July first applying equivalent tariffs to the ones that the Americans have unjustly applied to us. I have made it very clear to the president that it is not something we relish doing. But it is something that we absolutely will do because Canadians were polite were reasonable, but we also will not be pushed around. What's interesting is that that week was by far and away just as best week in the polls in two thousand eighteen this is confirmed by both liberals and on liberals at their own polling and with publicly available pulling. So you step back and say, you know, what? Happened there. Well, what happened was the generalized Canadian unease which crosses flip over go spectrum, by the way, it's kind of remarkable about Donald Trump was activated and a camper. Mr. who seemed to express a kind of moderate pro Canada point of view, wasn't a staunchly. Progressive were an opera Gusset just to kind of pro Canada. I'm defend the country's interest point of view was able to get a lot of goodwill and support on side that's kind of gift that Donald Trump gifts. But it does show that there's a big swath of the Canadian public opinion that's ready to be to to congenial. When the messaging is you know is appealing. What do you think is the biggest challenge for the left over the next nine months leading up to the election? What's what's the big thing? They have to get done if they're going to pull this off. I think that if we think about the left is being dawn, mainly the the Trudeau liberals right now, I think what they need to do is remember that. The people who support the most vigorously on Twitter who donate money to the party who show up to rallies who cheerlead on valid issues like global warming fighting climate change, like indigenous reconciliation that a lot of those people are well to the left of the seventy five percent or so of the camp population that doesn't feel their polarized either into the left or right wing. And that the messaging has to be just no matter how tempting it is to cheer to to pitch. Your message to those most active most energetic, most vocal supporters. You can't risk doing that you need to pitch your message towards mainstream Canadians who are feeling less. Sure. But which side they wanna support less certain about some of these messaging and want to hear I mean, frankly, a more nuanced middle the road kind of message. So I think that's the challenge challenges to remember that the people you wanna talk to the the most are not necessary. The people who are talking back at you on social media or showing up that rally you've got to a large group of voters there who just don't communicate that way. That's

Justin Trudeau Canada Donald Trump Liberal Party Twitter Jim Kerr Catherine Mckenna Jane Philpot Andrew Scheer John Manley Canaan Canes Andrew Shears Andrew Sheeran President Trump Paul Martin America Seventy Five Percent Twenty Eight Percent
"trudeau government" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

03:33 min | 2 years ago

"trudeau government" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"Well, a judge in Montana has given Donald Trump and Justin Trudeau something to agree on yesterday. Judge Brian Morris issued an injunction to halt construction of the keystone excel pipeline at least for now. The judge found that the Trump administration's approval of the project was based on out dated information, the Trudeau government says the ruling is quote disappointing while the president is calling it quote a disgrace. Dallas gold tooth is an organizer for the indigenous environmental network one of the plaintiffs in the case, we reach Mr. Gould tooth in Chicago. Is it go to the US president is dismissing this court ruling as political? He says it's a political decision made by judge. I think it's a disgrace. How would you respond? Well, I think that the president approving this pipeline project without any consideration about its impacts upon people that along its pipeline route. As well. As those in the tar sands region in northern Alberta is a disgrace unto itself. Tell us why you opposed to keystone X, what would happen to you community that was built well this project post too much of a risk to the drinking water of millions of people all along the Missouri river watershed it's too much of a risk to the prime pristine pasture land and farmland across America's bread basket. And the pose a risk to indigenous communities who have to deal with the man camps in a transient workers who are going to be coming in by the thousands into our regions where a lot of our women and children are already vulnerable, choose sexual violence. There's a whole range of reasons why communities time after time for years now has stated that this pipeline is too much risk with two little of value to their lives. So we continue to stand strong where we're really happy with this court decision. It's not the end of the fight. It's a battle victory. We celebrate it to the fullest. I wonder how lodge victory it is. How this because you say it's not you didn't. When the war, and this one is just it's a battle might be a spa one because it is a temporary injunction. And he the judge says that the government failed to fully review the effects of the current oil price on the pipelines viability and not fully model potential spills and for mitigating measures. So kind of limited. So what did you think he actually got with this? Well, one in this cramped political climate in the United States. I'll I'll take victory get. But the two the judge has ordered a full environmental impact statement to be conducted. Now, the environmental impact statement also known as as an EIS. There's no light undertaking. It takes a lot of time and a lot of information and a lot of work to accomplish in typically these projects safe at least twelve months, so there's a that's a lot a time to to delay this project, especially since TransCanada has been telling its investors that they hope to begin construction as soon as January of. Twenty nineteen. So I hope this sends a strong message to them Besters that this isn't asset that they should put back out of soon as possible because it's not going anywhere soon. You know, no matter what the Trump administration. Does. You know, we are was then committed the fight this project tooth and nail from the port rooms to the frontline battles in the open. Prairie in Canada's. You know, prime minister Justin to DOE. He says he's disappointed by this. Judge's decision is one of those rare times when Donald Trump and Justin Trudeau actually agree on something. So you're up against a pretty strong force there..

Justin Trudeau Donald Trump Trump administration president Trudeau government United States Brian Morris Mr. Gould Montana Missouri river Chicago Dallas prime minister DOE Alberta Canada TransCanada Prairie America
"trudeau government" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"trudeau government" Discussed on Front Burner

"Sleep easier at night, of course. Shooting at the synagogue is top of mind, but Bonaire would also point out that they do an annual audit of incident incidences of anti-semitism on according to their own records. This involves information from Statistics Canada from the police and also a tip line that they have themselves bring numerous sources together. But according to their record since they started keeping them in nineteen eighty two the past couple of years are are the worst that they have ever seen. So something very anxious to hear the prime minister himself, speak to are you getting a sense from at least some members in the Jewish community that they like the government to do more to dress, antisemitism unquestionably. And I think that that's something that we will be paying attention to on Wednesday as well buzney birth. For example, actually has an eight point plan things that they think need to be done in order to better address anti-semitism in Canada. As an example, the number one thing on the list is to institute dedicated hate crime units in every major city number to provide enhanced tr-. Training for hate crime officers on the list goes on and on. I remember the to-to went to office a few years ago with some holocaust, survivors, greatest expression of understanding that he could have done. Do you think there's a personal element to the apology as well? The extent to which it is personal. I would say at an obviously, neither you or I is inside the prime minister's mind. But you do get the sense that he very much personally believes in the power of the apology as an act as a way of moving forward atoning for past mistakes the treatment of the so-called team. Chiefs represents a betrayal of trust. The treatment of indigenous children in residential schools is a painful chapter of Canada's history for the oppression of the lesbian, gay bisexual, transgender queer and to spirit communities. We apologize one thing. That's really interesting about that. If you wanna get a little bit personal as it was his own father. Pierre Elliott Trudeau who push back against these kind of fischel apologies. He said, I don't think the purpose of government is to write the pass it cannot rewrite history. It is our purpose to be just in our time. And there are a lot of Canadians right now. I think who who might agree with that that it is not the the role of people now to go apologize for past wrongs. But Justin Trudeau looks at this. And he said himself in a very different way than his father. He thinks father took a bit of an academic approach. He says I was a teacher. I'm someone who's been out in the community for me. I understand the power that these apologies can hold and speaking directly to people, and and, you know, this is frankly, the kind of thing that the Trudeau government does well, if you're receptive to these kinds of messages these big symbolic moments. I I also can't help. But wonder this apology this apology about a ship of Silom seekers that was turned away. It's also. Coming in a time. When countries are grappling with asylum seekers from across the globe refugees from Syria, for example, and certainly Canada being a safe haven for refugees has been a central message of the Trudeau government. Do you think that this is an issue that he might address in this policy in this apology? I get the sense that there is some real sensitivity around that particular question now when the from the prime minister, I actually raised the prospect of the Saint Louis, and sort of suggested that it might be something amongst the things that Canada was considering the government of Canada was considering apologizing for it was in response. It was at a public event run by the New York Times. And it was in response to a question. A woman asked but anti immigrant sentiment one of Trudeau's own MP's from the Toronto area. Omar, Al Gabbara tweeted in response to the the news that this was this announcement was coming. We turned away asylum seekers without giving. Them due process and dignity. We must learn from our history. When O'Meara elgar tweeted that there was some pushback right away. Some people very offended by the comparison of what happened during the holocaust to people, for instance, who might be walking across the candidate US border right now..

Trudeau government Statistics Canada Justin Trudeau Pierre Elliott Trudeau prime minister Bonaire New York Times US Chiefs Omar Toronto Syria Al Gabbara Saint Louis
"trudeau government" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"trudeau government" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Money into into Pakistan and Turkmenistan. You know, that's that's crisis Chinese economy, a great deal and the expectation of economic return is low and even the expectation of political loyalty from these rogue regimes is also so the policies are just not working the way that that she had promised. And I think that this is causing discontent in the regime, and there's no effective means because she's concentration of power for there to be a natural process of transfer of power from him to a more collective leadership that could engage in effect of more effective policies to serve China's longer raining, and Chris is see Jinping should have read Paul Kennedy's book, imperial overstretch. I think that's absolutely. It was solve a lot of problems for him. You know, I think it bears repeating something and that is CG ping has accumulated unprecedented power. So he's become responsible for everything when things go. Well, he gets a lot of credit things were going well up until last year so strengthened his himself politically. But now as you point out China's being challenged, it has problems all over the place. See Jinping is being blamed for these problems. And now he's reaching out and trying to hold others accountable. So they're going to be a number of scapegoats here that's going to be intense political fighting, especially because see Jinping has de institutionalised the communist party. This seems to me to be extremely serious. This is shaking not just one official way. This is shaking the entire Chinese political system, and therefore shaking all of China. I wanna press Charles Wang and his remarks towards of state dismissive remarks mentioned in one instance, the weaker. And the and encampments the concentration camps. We believe up to a million people in the New York Times are being held against their will as a domestic matter. Does that make the mung disappearance a domestic matter? You can adopt the president of INTERPOL and forced him to resign. And then claim it's no one's business is that the scale of denial. They're now living. Well, I think so I mean, I think from our point of view, how can you deal with the regime that's engaging in cultural genocide against an entire people? The whole purpose of of these camps is to take the waiter out of waiters, and this is a gross violation of human rights on a scale that we have not seen for a very long time crime against humanity. It is indeed a crime against humanity without question and hand an outrage against all of us for continuing to collaborate with the regime, the Wooding engage in such a greeting international behavior, and we're not collaborating. Are we going not much word collaborate is an exaggeration at this point given the Trump administration? The United States has a political leader who is willful who is decided he's going to act on his instincts that he is not going to try to just manage American decline like his predecessors. He's actually asserting American power. Good for President Trump. Good for the world. Charles, just thirty seconds. Is this story big of INTERPOL in Canada is the Trudeau government responding to it. I haven't heard anything from the Trudeau government. Although, you know. In the latest version of.

China Jinping Charles Wang Trudeau government communist party INTERPOL President Trump Pakistan Turkmenistan Charles New York Times Paul Kennedy president United States Chris Canada official
"trudeau government" Discussed on Commons

Commons

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"trudeau government" Discussed on Commons

"Today we're going on a crime tour. Earlier this year, the Trudeau government introduced a Bill to revamp the Justice system in deep within that five hundred page document was provisioned that would significantly reduce the penalties for white-collar criminals. It would mean that companies engage in a wide variety of crimes, whether it's insider, trading, fraud, bribery stock manipulation and a bevy of other kinds of wrongdoing, but simply have to own up to what they did pay a fine and walked away. The Trudeau government's decision seems odd considering the fact that white collar criminals almost never go to prison in Canada. In fact, around the world Canada's well known to be a haven for white collar crime in twenty years. We've prosecuted four people for bribing foreign officials. Only a single insider trader is ever been sent to Canadian prison, and he was caught by the Americans and over the last few years, the RCN PS shelled hundreds of investigations into or. Denies crime due to a lack of resources. Even the CD how institute a business friendly think-tank said last month that Canada's money laundering paradise and estimates that as much as a hundred billion dollars of dirty money is flowing into the country. In fact, when you look just under the surface at some of the most infamous white collar crimes in the world Enron the subprime collapse, even the Trump Russia investigation. It's not hard to find the Canadian connection. So what gives in this season of Commons, we'll be looking at stories at the intersection of money influence in politics and Canada. Some of them will have to do with these big corporate crimes and others will be the type of corruption. We're more used to hearing about shady politicians backroom deals, hush money and kickbacks. But to start, I wanna take you on a tour to help us better understand why white collar criminals almost never have to face up to any consequences in this country. If you rob a Bank branch, you're probably going to get caught and go to. Prison, but in Canada, if you rob the whole Bank, even if you're caught, you're probably walking away fine. When most people in Canada talk about crime ridden neighborhoods, they're usually talking about places where poor people live the Downtown Eastside and Vancouver region park in Toronto. The north end Halifax, when I think of criminal neighborhoods, I really do think of Toronto's financial district. So that's where we're headed today..

Canada Trudeau government RCN Enron Toronto Vancouver region park fraud Halifax bribery Russia hundred billion dollars twenty years
"trudeau government" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"trudeau government" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Unfamiliar strategy for this region. You know, there is kind of an idea among a lot of people at the State Department that when dealing with particular issues that are high profile in this region, it's better to do it out of the public lie more directly and that doing otherwise can be escalate the situation a little bit. I think an interesting parallel here is in two thousand fourteen incident in which the assistant secretary for democracy rights and labor from the State Department. US State Department was expelled from Bahrain. And there we saw United States issue stronger statements, but still not make as strong public statements won't expect not trying to escalate the situation in public, but one can't imagine has to imagine that there was a lot going on behind the scene to that point. And in fact, we saw just a few months later, the same assistant secretary return to Bahrain, be welcome and said, I'm glad to be able to be here under better circumstances. Obviously, they'd worked something to medically to advance the. So it doesn't mean that there isn't anything happening beneath the surface through channels that we don't have evident to us as as the spokesperson. Our alluded to that said, as I. Leave best Montagne have alluded to, you know, we also have not seen really that many, this administration be willing to push hard against the Saudis, particularly MB s we know Jared Kushner supposedly has a relationship with NBS that they've field. They've crafted. We know they're looking to NBS for support about this Arab Israeli peace plan that in theory, they're supposed to be rolling out at some point in the near future, although that's being pushed back and push back further and so an and frankly, a lot of this adventurism that we've seen in BS in the Saudis undertake since the entry into office of President Trump, you know, appears to imply that the Saudis at least believed that the trumps are kind of giving them a lot of leeway to do what they want into regional affairs. Now, we do know around the rear incident, Lebanon, few other cases, there reports that American diplomats were involved in trying to get them to moderate their position. Rollback certainly around the cutter blockade, but these were actions took place kind of after the fact. When it escalated to appoint really started threatening certain US interests or just assorted other regional security interests. And so maybe if this were to continue to escalate, we may see Americans playing a more active role right now. Looks like the raising issue expressing concern no-doubt, many members of the D'amoto community are again, this is a major departure from normal damatic protocol, but you know is not clear that they're really making a bilateral issue yet. Maybe they will the future. I don't think we know and lots of maybes about the future. Stephanie. Can you help us American listeners understand what signs Canada may give off that would indicate escalation? I know you said that Canada isn't in the habit of escalating situations like this, but when should we be worried to think about how to answer that question simply because like I said, I think really, you know where Kenner right now is in a situation where it can't afford to actually have a lot of enemies in the end. You know, we're dealing with a Trump administration that has. Really kind of sucked a lot of the oxygen out of the room when it comes to our foreign policy. It's really everything has been about the United States, and you know, one of the major priorities for the Trudeau government right now has to be trade to persecution really. So, you know, I think this is why in what I would we can't afford to escalate this. This is why is because we are not certain of what the NAFTA future is going to be. We don't know what trade with the United States is going to be. So we're looking for other partners. So for us to kind of, you know, my concern about the situation is we've affectively isolated ourselves from another part of the world rather than increasing trade with the Middle East. We might actually have to avoid that region for the near future. So that's one of the concerns I have. So again, I mean, I guess a real esscalation would be in terms of speaking out ward human rights to cancel. The arms deal would be a massive step, but I don't really think there's going to be willingness to do this, especially since the Trudeau government has already..

US State Department assistant secretary NBS Trudeau government Bahrain Middle East Jared Kushner Canada President Trump Montagne Lebanon Stephanie Kenner
Secretary, Justin Trudeau and Prime Minister discussed on Mornings On the Mall with Brian Wilson

Mornings On the Mall with Brian Wilson

01:36 min | 2 years ago

Secretary, Justin Trudeau and Prime Minister discussed on Mornings On the Mall with Brian Wilson

"The news is sponsored by mercedes benz of arlington house republicans are working to pass immigration legislation after closeddoor meeting with the president yesterday mr trump and the gop face growing pressure over the administration's policy that separates migrant parents from their children at the border the president made clear that when it comes to finding funding for his wall trying to address the daca population issue and briefly he mentioned family separation he endorses republicans as he said in their efforts to try and get that done the real question though is whether or not that will be enough to actually help house republicans get either of these bills over the line correspondent phil mattingly protesters showed up outside of washington restaurant last night as homeland security secretary kirsten nielsen had dinner inside don some of those protesters from the metro dc democratic socialists of america came into the restaurant near the white house holding signs and confronting nielsen who then left dc voters have approved initiative seventy seven the ballot question on minimum wage for tipped workers if the measure now becomes law would raise the minimum wage for those workers to fifteen dollars an hour by twenty twentyfive republican robin thicker who's running for governor county executive has gone to court claiming he's been denied public election funds that he says he should have received in a couple of months canadians may be able to legally buy marijuana cannabis senate has given final passage to the federal government's builder legalized recreational use of pot prime minister justin trudeau government had hoped to make it all legal by july first but now they say may actually take several weeks checking your money the dow open today at twenty four thousand seven hundred the nasdaq at.

Secretary Justin Trudeau Prime Minister Cannabis Marijuana Governor County White House Kirsten Nielsen President Trump Washington Phil Mattingly GOP Arlington Executive America Mr Trump Fifteen Dollars
Milwaukee, Parking Violation and Mark Thompson discussed on Arizona's Morning News

Arizona's Morning News

01:32 min | 2 years ago

Milwaukee, Parking Violation and Mark Thompson discussed on Arizona's Morning News

"The countries that rages meanwhile trump administration officials say they have no clear plan yet on how to reunite the thousands of children separated from their families at the border milwaukee bucks guard sterling brown is suing the city of milwaukee and it's police department saying officers use of a stun gun during his arrest for a parking violation constitutes excessive force and that they targeted him because he's black brown's attorney mark thompson filed the lawsuit in federal court yesterday accusing police have destroyed discriminating against brown on the basis of his race mr brown hopes that real discipline will be issued for the violation of his constitutional rights the lawsuit alleges that officers involved in his arrest us their incident report to try to reframe what happened to give the impression brown resisted and obstructed them body camera video shows brown never appears to threaten police during his arrest in a couple of months canadians may be able to legally buy marijuana candidates senate has given final passage to the federal government's bill to legalise cannabis prime minister justin trudeau government had hoped to make pot legal by july first but provincial and territorial governments will need eight to twelve weeks following senate passage to prepare for retail sales at a musical about the king of pop is making its way to broadway the michael jackson estate and columbia live stage of unveiled plans for a stage musical inspired by the life of michael jackson they hope it will be ready for broadway by twenty twenty one are we get the feeling that music will be pretty good i think it'll be very illegal toetapping stuff thanks jen twenty three minutes after the hour on.

Milwaukee Parking Violation Mark Thompson Cannabis Michael Jackson Estate Michael Jackson Attorney Mr Brown Marijuana Senate Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Broadway Twenty Twenty Twenty Three Minutes Twelve Weeks
"trudeau government" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"trudeau government" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"When i thought and you could hear as people in the room reporters in the room started reading that tweet because all you heard of what the what and you can fill in the blank but people were just stunned by what had just happened after it seemed like they were sort of ending on an okay note but still having disagreement on trade eventually the canadian we're just the same as the american one to what on a serious on a serious note though where does this go now i mean does this eventually just get forgotten and tossed away as just one of those things that president trump does disturb the pot or does this have serious repercussions well canada and the prime minister of tried to be you know the trump whisper and until now it probably dealt with the trump administration better than most other western nations because he's class with most of them but there are questions about whether this is going to have a big impact on nafta renegotiation the trudeau government the prime minister was asked about the the comments yesterday he refused to sort of address them and i think what we're hearing from the government side is kind of not not to engage not to get locked into this war of words or bulgar vulgar actions to just sort of let this calm down a little bit and then get back to the table and and do the real work in policy discussions so i think that might be a strategy from the government moving forward and everybody still says that they're committed to a deal on nafta so i think they'll try and head back to the table although i think it'll be a little bit more tense than it was just a couple of weeks ago cormac mcsweeney rogers radio network in canada behind the enemy lines when kane indepth continues we will talk with an american sailor here spend almost well a long time of captivity and.

trump prime minister trudeau government canada president cormac mcsweeney kane
"trudeau government" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"trudeau government" Discussed on Here & Now

"Conference trudeau held after the president left canada there's a special place in hell for any foreign leader that engages in bad faith diplomacy with president donald j trump and then tries to stab him in the back on the way out the door and that's what bad faith justin trudeau did with that stunt press conference that's what we dishonest justin trudeau did trump reverse the us endorsement of the g seven economic agreement after he left the summit on route to singapore evan dire senior reporter for the cbc he joins us from ottawa canada evan welcome back thanks and our canadians reacting to these personal attacks on trudeau from the trump administration well i think we would have to say that they went just on trudeau for one thing donald trump in his news conference before he left the cheese seven accused canada of robbing the united states and that was a comment directed at canadians generally so people are insulted they're offended there's been a bit of a kind of a rally round trudeau effect caused by this we've seen people like doug ford you know who was just elected as premier monteria and who's been described as a kind of trump like politician the brother of the famous correct smokey mayor of toronto a now deceased well he's been tweeting i stand shoulder to shoulder with the prime minister so right now i would say the reaction is one of people being offended and also it's made it much more difficult i think for the trudeau government to make the kind of concessions that donald trump is looking for because it will now look like pitch elation and what about the idea that trudeau was stabbing trump.

president donald j trump justin trudeau us reporter canada toronto prime minister trudeau government singapore ottawa doug ford
"trudeau government" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

WCBS Newsradio 880

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"trudeau government" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

"This is cbs it's five forty five you're never more than fifteen minutes from the big stories on wcbs good morning i palmer name wayne darren here are three things to know number one new york state police are defending the refusal to issue an amber alert with logo police long island said a father refused to return his two year old of the boy's mother many hours later the father and son were found dead in virginia the distraught mother is considering legal action vote today is expected to make recreational cannabis legal by labor day all throughout canada the trudeau government expects a cash infusion in the billion third thing to know new jersey will decide today if you can gamble on sports tomorrow lawmakers will almost certainly vote yes in trenton monmouth park ceo dennis raisin says the track is set to go with betting machines one hundred tv's and the odds listed on video boards he it seems like a sure thing but our peter haskell asked the ceo you understand politics works in this state or you concerned something happens in the governor said you know what i'm going to wait that's a good question i've been involved in the political process in new jersey for more years than i care to talk about and you know i'm hopeful that there are no political issues that could delay us open the monmouth park ceo is betting that sports gambling will draw big crowds to wager on his horses again the atlantic city casinos are salivating to someone road a dirt bike through the hallways of roxbury high school yesterday morning.

wayne darren york state police cannabis trudeau government dennis raisin peter haskell ceo roxbury high school palmer virginia trenton monmouth park monmouth park fifteen minutes two year
"trudeau government" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"trudeau government" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"A trio of conservative senators were in washington today to talk pot with jeff sessions the attorney general is not a fan he said that cannabis should be minimized not legalized and in january issued a memo calling for a crackdown in states that had voted to make cannabis consumption legal denise batters is not a fan of decriminalization either not the way the trudeau government is going about it we reach senator batters in washington senate about is what was your intention in having this encounter with us attorney general jeff sessions well what we wanted to do we haven't been able unfortunately in the senate either at committees or when ministers have appeared in front of us in the senate chamber to answer questions we have not been able to get interest from many different members than ministers the trudeau government so we wanted to come to washington to discuss the impact of marijuana allies ation in canada with senior us leaders and what is that impact whatever you understood from mr sessions as being that impact well moral we're going to be releasing more content of a meeting because i wanted to be able to discuss with my colleagues and officials exactly what we can share with you from those meetings but what we came here to discuss was obviously with our neighboring closest trading partner and a place that many canadians go to vacation we wanted to meet with representatives of the us thority discuss issues about border security black markets impact on canadian marijuana use those risks for canadian travelers in possession of small quantities of marijuana cross border issues including postal trade and things for people who are trusted travelers going across the border perhaps truckers we wanted to discuss all of those types of issues and we were able to deal with a lot of unanswered questions at these particular meeting did mr sessions expressed concern about.

washington cannabis trudeau government senate senate chamber canada partner attorney senator us attorney marijuana us
"trudeau government" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"trudeau government" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"A chuck workers a goal of unionist moody while it would be nice to think everyone could switch fluently between french and english less than twenty percent of canadians can but the latest census shows the number who can has never been higher and the trudeau government announced four hundred million dollars in its budget just last week to support more bilingualism on the other hand more people in canada now have a foreign mothertongue then there are native frenchspeakers in fact and as english grows as the global language of getting anything done anywhere many quebec francophones worry deeply about losing their language and culture and it's why the office came back want the long phone say enforces strict language laws in the province a few years back a sandwich shop in quebec city came under fire for printing the name grilled cheese on its menu for many it's just silly politics a grilledcheese is a grilledcheese said the shop's coowner at the time it's not a sandwich from ocevan zoo pastor is also a no no in quebec that's a talian so you say at least there is the universally recognised hangover snack protein delicious fries cheese kurds and gravy president obama even served smoked duck protein canapes to prime minister trudeau at the white house but as the headline in the new york times said last year calling putin canadian gives some in quebec indigestion it's quebecois notch canadian and quebec ads must be either exclusively in french or if bilingual must have the french portion above the english and in larger letters the same goes for signs outside of shops well speaking of shops quebec's legislature also push through a resolution calling on clerks to stop greeting customers by saying 'bonjour high one of the many weird franglais expressions the politics of franglais have been a favourite topic of multilingual comic and son of a quebec sugar semi he took out an english add in the montreal metro and then censored it himself.

trudeau government quebec city quebec obama trudeau white house new york times putin canada ocevan zoo president prime minister montreal four hundred million dollars twenty percent
"trudeau government" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"trudeau government" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"Of the of the antarctic can and and claiming it for its own and building up landing strips chinese ambitions these days really have very few bounds and so the point is yeah we gotta be concerned that they will take positions that's human comprehensible today you know is charles says they want to be beyond the arctic council although the only countries that can beyond the council or those with formal arctic claims and at least today china doesn't have the china wants to be there so china wants everything i want to go over a watch you i believe i heard you charles speak of some anxiety in canada about china's motives did i hear that correctly that there's there's our hesitation now that we did not hear is a year ago from the trudeau government oh i think so i mean certainly uh you know china's currently crying who have purchased canada's largest construction company i'm i'm trying to stake is trying to acquire that and it does a lot of infrastructure for um you know waterways uh nuclear power plants uh a military installations and so the question is count canada resist this and and declare on national security grounds that the chinese state should not have if the blueprints to canadian critical infrastructure but i i think in terms of the chinese new rhetoric this community with a shared future for mankind according to the white paper for china says it's an active participant builder and contribute you're in arctic affairs who was spared no efforts to contribute its wisdom to the development of the arctic region well that's pretty stary stuff um in terms of the sovereignty of of the state's who actually do have um ocean shells out in the arctic and to have claims over you know arctic waters i'll arts currently being worked out uh in the arctic council charles burton.

china canada charles burton antarctic arctic trudeau government
"trudeau government" Discussed on AM 1260 The Answer

AM 1260 The Answer

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"trudeau government" Discussed on AM 1260 The Answer

"Three an antiislamic phobia motion that passed in canadian parliament and this was an article where i talked about the background i warned about the players involved in their connection to the muslim brotherhood and another article that she cited was one that i've written for jehad watch i was challenged why write about jihadist and muslim migrant crimes those were the three articles that she highlighted now fastforward this to a comments that came out in the toronto star about my share of the canadian race relations foundation he spoke specifically about my role and how much i had contributed to that organisation for the record i was the chair of the investment committee on the executive committee the human resource committee the nominations committee an i have contributed hours on end to that organisation much of it pro bono i was respected in that organisation given great reviews but somehow it ended up being a disconnect between my job performance my advocacy for human rights in the name of that organization and my outside work about jihad and political islam which i see as a very consistent with the work that i do in my act of his them when it comes to human rights is of sensiti saga here and very troubling indeed but at the end of the day it seems as though it's not so much about promoting diversity and inclusion as it is about suppressing speech that is not favored by up the trudeau government store for that matter of others in the islamic phobia victimhood industry at their allies on the left and i i wanted just teasing this out with you a bit because a colleague of ours former congressman now ambassador pete hoax drug aside recently to represent the united states in the netherlands was attacked viciously by cnn their socalled cape violent best a unit discredited fake news operation.

executive committee human rights congressman united states netherlands toronto pro bono trudeau government
"trudeau government" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"trudeau government" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Steve at roared more winning is good for us longterm i respectfully disagree more denies sexually harassing or abusing anyone president trump's decision to recognize jerusalem as israel's capital and relocate the american embassy there from tel aviv is drawing condemnation from allies in the west and the middle east but dan carbon chuck reports from toronto that canada's response is not a strong the trudeau government will not recognize jerusalem as the israeli capital nor will it move the canadian embassy there at the same time ottawa did little to try to change president trump's mind about what many see as a provocation in a statement the department of global affairs said canada as an ally and friend to israel and a friend of the palestinian people and the status of jerusalem can only be achieved as part of a general settlement of the palestinianisraeli dispute canada's lowkey response comes as no surprise it blocked un resolutions condemning israel's actions in the occupied territories and while most major power supported guaranteeing protections of the geneva convention to palestine indians ottawa did not for npr news i'm dan carping chuck in toronto on asia market shares are mixed lower in shanghai this is npr news the us house of representatives has approved a republican bill that would make it easier for gun owners to legally carry concealed weapons across state lines that legislation as a top priority for the national rifle association opponents mostly democrats say the measure could endanger public safety my overriding state laws that place strict limits on guns the bill now goes to the senate.

Steve trump jerusalem israel toronto canada trudeau government global affairs geneva convention shanghai senate president palestinianisraeli npr dan asia
"trudeau government" Discussed on Arms Control Wonk

Arms Control Wonk

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"trudeau government" Discussed on Arms Control Wonk

"M so in other words at they give assurances that the uk is not a target of north korean nuclear weapons m it's pure you know the north korean nuclear deterrent is to defend m and deter attack on north korea from the united states and if you start talking and say come north korea is a direct threat to the uk dan north korea might have to consider whether or not actually you are inaccurate area nuclear relationship between between the two so i thought that was a really funny exchange and there's mirrors exchange aaron in canada right now on a previous podcast i mentioned i think to jeffrey that there was this fringe discussion happening in canada about whether canada should quote unquote showing us ballistic missile defense programs in order to defend canada from a north korean missile threat to the canadian homeland and at the time i called it fringe and unfortunate we in the months since we recorded that podcast it's become definitely not a fringe discussion at it is getting at large support within after the opposition conservative opposition in canada there's some even at prominent political figures on the on the liberal side of the aisle that actually support this as well and there's quite a lot of pressure being put on on the trudeau government to engage in serious discussions about you know protecting canada from north korea by joining us ballistic missile defense programs and there's even add a study that's been commissioned by parliament into how candid action defend itself in the circumstance and i just got to be something in the water because home in my view.

uk nuclear weapons north korea united states canada trudeau government north korean jeffrey
"trudeau government" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"trudeau government" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"The cover of magazines remember the tournai brothers on the cover of the rolling looks like your mars saying you know that narrowly losing the whole thing i mean the left is so sick there so it's toxic the exaltation of evil but this and you know what it is in just get the money right again apology from they got an apology from the trudeau government uk and when it came out when the news broke that they were giving a ten million dollars i mean people became a pop electic it's already done i mean he's only came out recently that its are you going crazy it's gone it's done he's got it i mean today you are encouraged to wage jihad you are encouraged to goetschi had look what happens to those of us who oppose she had with banned from the uk i'm still banned from the us right yeah i'm the j have plenty ag had preachers you know either arms galore i invite them in advocating for the jew killing in crete apartheid gender apartheid female genital mutilation cultural nile lesions enslavement so yeah we're roll down with that but yellow sza no gala no gala no gala no no spanos hansa knows beds avid those exactly i mean listen they said no villges they'll they'll this was banned the only reason why that ban was listed lifted excuse me was because he's a member of the harlem in an eu of the eu rules and regulations that you cannot can't bareheaded might fat i i'm surprised that he didn't hit that he wasn't propelled up the latter a little more i thought the last selection would have been better for forget vile detained i think the bar is so impossibly high frisk listen when i met him the and brought him to see pack bright ten years ago okay he ended down to florida yes malaga had the move our location the day before beyond care protested that go get beckett's filed under choice in is hashtag good times of of but you know he he had just started that party imagine a party he started ten years ago he's now second in in line of power i have to tell you i think that's pretty damn good now maria marine le pen that's a whole of the story but she ran a disastrous campaign a very disorganized i did outrageous things said outrageous things i.

uk harlem beckett trudeau government goetschi us eu florida ten years ten million dollars