4 Burst results for "Trm Howard Dr"

"trm howard dr" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

Talk 650 KSTE

09:47 min | 2 years ago

"trm howard dr" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

"Says tonight we're going to be talking about the Justice department reopening an inquiry into the murder of Emmett till that investigation to be, discussed with us tonight by David Beethoven research fellow at. The independent institute a professor of history, at the university. Of Alabama Tuscaloosa Biko author of TRM. Howard doctor entrepreneur and civil rights pioneer good evening Mr. Beethoven's good evening Tell US F for those who, are not the imminently familiar. I, think most of us can remember the name of immaterial and ahead to do with a terrible racial, injustice and frankly that's probably about as far as most of us get in terms. Of of. Just exactly what the name implies well it's a long story so I'll. Give you the bare bones, version, Emmett till was a fourteen year, old, boy from Chicago, this, was, in, one thousand. Nine hundred fifty five and every. Summer or so he would come to Mississippi to, visit his great uncle who lived you know on a, cotton plantation and was picking cotton and he help them out was hard work but he came every year well one year he he came and, tell on a bunch of friends went to a store, crossroads store and there was a, beautiful, white woman behind. The counter and we don't know exactly What happened but I think the. Friends sorta dared him to, go in there and and talk tour we don't know what he said it wasn't. Anything you know might have been something as simple as he you know he ended money tour directly rather than. Put it, you know put it on the counter who knows exactly what happened some people say that he gave a wolf. Whistle, when he left but, yeah well he he he left well word. Got around someone passed the message to the husband of. This woman behind the counter he he was offended by it he went by. To his brother who was a real tough mean character and said, you know what do I do and his brothers said, you got to get revenge and so they, kidnapped till the middle of. The, night and he did not satisfy them they you know they were going to beat him up maybe, and but he didn't satisfy them so they took them, around they beat him severely And then, eventually they, killed him they dumped him. In the Tallahassee river but. Just through some fate basically there was it snagged on a buying. Underneath he. Was, tied, to, a cotton. Gin, old cotton gin. Big big things are hopeless to conceal their crime to get them into. The, bottom of the river but. It snagged like I said a fisherman sought the body was horribly horribly disfigured the, two brothers, admitted that they take? Until they claim they, let him go but they, were charged with murder put on trial and acquitted in less than an hour and the. Jury, joked member, of the jury joke that we would have taken we wouldn't have taken that. Long we had gone out, to get some pop So that's the. Rougher you know the story but. There's a lot more to it than that Of course there's a reason why it. Isn't in the immediate familiarity with most Americans. In that it took place sixty three years, ago this was nineteen fifty-five that this took place Yes correct It was and it was on the eve of the civil. Rights, movement well they're always been civil rights movement was on the eve. Of movement we associate with Martin Luther King and played a big role. In spurring. That, movement In. In any event certainly a lot of. Time has passed on not even sure how many of the defendants are still alive The only. One that I know of and there were it was a conspiracy there were more than two people involved that has been, shown the, only possible person to charge. That I know of is the wife that, pretty lady that was behind the counter Juanita Juanita Bryant Donham Who was in her eighties I frankly don't think, that, will, happen But that is the only person. That could possibly, be charged, at this point is still, alive involved will they say of course the Justice delayed is Justice deferred this particular case while I was really find. It a of academic interest to find out what actually took place I'm not sure what the purpose of this particular investigation is given as you say that the wheels. Of, Justice apparently don't have a lot of targets to turn. Toward well I had a little bit of, an idea on that she was, interviewed by, story named, Timothy Tyson who did extensive interviews with her and. Actually you know had some interesting things to say. About black friends she had added a child and things like that but one of the things she said to him was sort, of admitted that she was. Knew about the crime and so, forth had some involvement in it but then when that. Was they've they've looked at that now And. It is historian has hours of interview with her. On tape and he did get that part on tape so just his word so I just don't see her being prosecuted because. It you know if she, did say he didn't get it, and he you know he You know and he needs evidence the, FBI needs evidence but I think that's why the case was reopened, because of, that All. Right one eight six, six five o. jimbo's our number one. Eight six six five zero five four six two six it it did of course staggered the the nation. At the time if you were around at that time you may recall that the the boy had an open coffin funeral I think that was, at the insistence of. The mother if I'm not mistaken to to let, the world see what they did to my boy something of. That nature and although the the the photographs got widespread publication but they're they're out there and they got pretty. Grim complicated they got a, lot of play in the black oppress on, the cover of, jet magazine and the Chicago defender so people like, Mohammed Ali, if you're a young person at that time. You good chance you saw those photos and it at a big Impact, I have, seen the photos they they're pretty gruesome okay I. Mean there's no no no getting around that fact and the the open cashier was probably something that was was. Worth doing not just to, quote for the shock value as much I, guess as to, to make manifest what had actually happened to immaterial Now. The. Justice department, has not, commented, on. All of this but, it appears that the government chose to devote new attention to the case after the central with us as you mentioned Carolyn Bryant, Donham recanted, part of her account of what actually happened at that time Again I think the facts at the time pretty much spoke for themselves when when the the person the jury said that we wouldn't have taken a whole hour to. Acquit we had gone out for a soda. Pop so, again I'm not exactly sure quite what Is I guess to be to be accomplished here baby I grant we should not forget part, of our our terrible, past but there are a whole. Lot of of lynchings cross burnings in the like taking place these days. Mississippi the the state in which this happened today has the the highest number of elected officials. Of color in the, entire country not just per capita but the the the highest number so perhaps this might have had greater importance that had been brought. Forward let's say in, nineteen sixty, five or nineteen seventy five than in. Two. Thousand eighteen nineteen fifty-five when people I, Howard you know written. About and others were pointing out that the evidence was that there. Were more than two people involved and so forth and I think they're you know that was the. Time to do it now I will say. This several, years ago the FBI did we The investigation uncovered a. Lot of material and, we have a pretty good idea what happened pretty good idea who was involved so that is been incredibly useful now that we have. A bigger picture of, what actually, happened there and the cover up the. Did. Occur at the time the sheriff local, law enforcement and others Yeah Eight six six five o. JIMBO our number one eight six six five zero five four, six, two. Six we're talking with David. Beethoven he's a research fellow at the independent, institute a professor of history of the university of Alabama. Tuscaloosa the is the co author of the book TRM Howard Dr entrepeneurship and the civil rights pioneer and we'll come back and talk some more of the show in just a. Moment the national debt is now over twenty trillion. Dollars what happens next rising inflation drops in the dollar's. Value some experts say and other crashes. Coming you can fight this not with stocks.

professor of history David Beethoven Howard Dr entrepeneurship Juanita Juanita Bryant Donham Justice department murder Chicago Mississippi university of Alabama research fellow Emmett Alabama Justice Martin Luther King Timothy Tyson Tallahassee river FBI jet magazine
"trm howard dr" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

08:37 min | 2 years ago

"trm howard dr" Discussed on KGO 810

"John John Batchelor show August nineteen fifty five the time is endless because the crime the murder of Emmett till. A very young man from Chicago who was visiting for the summer that murder has now recently, been, reopened by. The United. States government by the federal authorities new information and also this long long trail of feeling that Justice, was not done the murder of. Till and the murder of other African Americans during this period of civil rights conflict to help. Me understand this, story I welcome David Biteau David is the author with Linda Royster by, to- of TRM Howard, Dr entrepreneur, civil rights pioneer Dr Howard got intimately involved scarily involved in the denial of Justice after, the murder of Emmett till, David a very good evening to. You congratulations for your biography of Dr Howard and to understand the, scale, of his. Heroism we. Need to understand why Justice is reopening the till case the the murder the horrible murder of a, young man good evening to you. David why did they reopen Well that's a little bit of. A mystery because there wasn't FBI investigation about twelve years ago that you know, that turned up some I think what why they reopened the case at this, time was a historian a lot of respect for named Timothy Tyson did. He, a book about the case interviewed Amatil or the. Caroline Dunham Bryant who was a key figure in the. Case and she a according to Tyson. Basically admitted that she was involved in the crime now she's still alive well. Turns out that Tyson didn't have that on tape she said that to me, didn't get it on tape he had hours of interviews with her so I'm skeptical on, that revelation that this is actually gonna lead to anything now there were a, number of people involved in the murder, of Emmett till but, as. Far as I can Determine, all of them have passed away The reopening of the case though points us. All to, a time in America's history a very very grim time when civil rights was extremely scary for people living, anywhere in the country Chicago to Mississippi but especially, for people who spoke up, about injustice the all white jury acquitted the two men who were. Involved in, in the murder right away in fact they made the made jokes about it. About why it took him so long. 'cause they pause to drink, soda pop that was laughter. And Mississippi but it was a bro there were broken hearts in Chicago. And Dr Howard faced? Up to it what did he do who was who was TRM Howard and how did? You, get involved in the till case well Dr Howard. Was probably the wealthiest person. In Mississippi he'd been born in poverty he came there to be cheap surgeon of hospital, black-owned hospital that provided cooperative medical care thousands, of, people he branched out into civil Oh rights and hit it a very large group called the regional council of, negro leadership and they had thousands of, numbers and they would have annual rallies and Mississippi but. They get, ten thousand people to hear people like Thurgood Marshall and singers like Mahalia Jackson they did a successful boycott, of service stations refuse to provide restrooms for blacks, this was in nineteen fifty, two so he was a well known civil rights figure he was. On a, visit to Chicago at the time that Emmett till disappear kidnapping of Emmett till. Wasn't even knowing that it was a. Murderer yet and Howard said, if this boy is harmed. And it was a boy is fourteen years old if he is harmed. Bill be hell to? Pay Mississippi I got a lot of coverage and then they actually brought charges against these? Two, brothers half brothers who were who had kidnapped till. They claimed they'd let him. Go but the body turned up in the in the river and the Tallahassee river just, sort of a fluke dot cook got snagged On some some you know underwater grow and the body was horribly disfigured, and a charges were brought against the two brothers which was actually something remarkable. Because usually white person killed the. Black person there weren't even charges and there was. A trial less than a month after the murder in some in the small town of Sumner Mississippi Dr Howard was involved in trying to find evidence. That not only, against the two brothers but indicating that other people other whites and implacable -ployees. Of the defendants were involved, in the crime and Emmett. Till mothers stayed with them and, he provided or an armed escort every day of the, trial and his home was a refuge for black reporters for witnesses and he. Conducted his own sort of underground investigation working in cooperation with prosecutors trying to prod them off and at the time. Was he He under constant threat were there because I've read about the period. After about ten years, later there were bomb threats routinely cars driving by in the middle of the night did that sort of thing happened to. Dr Howard it did and he was heavily armed and he had the advantage of, living in a town and, all black town amount by which was unique because blacks there could boat they had a sheriff they had the, mayor and that's where tells mothers state to all black so if, you were white you showed up in that community you would, stick out like a sore thumb also all the members of Howard's organization including Howard himself were heavily armed yeah the Thompson submachine gun and White person wanted to make trouble there would have, to get in close 'cause they'd stick out and they and and and people. There were more than ready to fire back and we're heavily on that was part of the issue but I think also that one Howard ventured out he had a heavy heavy armed protection but certainly his, life was threatened. People see used to. Say the shortest life expectancy of any person in Mississippi at the time. This is the Eisenhower administration, nineteen fifty five and coming up. To the the second term was there a. Nationalization, of this story did the did the White House comment was Dr. Howard, in contact with the president He was crowding the Eisenhower administration at at this point Dr Howard is on the verge of, becoming a, Republican, 'cause if anything the Democrats far far less willing to get involved in. Civil rights issues at that at that time so he was. Trying to get the Justice department to look into the case this was after the acquittal of the defendant saying what door other people involved he was presenting evidence to the FBI pushing that that. That line it was nationalized in that sense because, after the acquittal defendants Howard went on, a national speaking tour would get. Crowds of ten thousand people twenty thousand people Madison Square Garden in Baltimore in Los Angeles and. Focused on the case in other unsolved cases in the manner that j. Edgar Hoover getting. Involved he said look you can solve? A crime based. On wreckage of a plane right there the I would boast about Why can't you ever seem to solve. A crime where. A black man or a black. Person is killed and eat hammered on so it was, nationalized. And one of the places he spoke was November. Twenty seven nineteen, fifty five in Montgomery Mississippi is host of Martin Luther King than a nationally unknown figure Rosa Parks. Was in the audience hammered the Emmett till case forty three days later Rosa. Parks when she refused to give up her seat said that she was thinking. Of Emmett till when she refused to go up or see the, book is TRM Howard Dr entrepreneurs civil rights pioneer David Baido and his off and as the author with Linda Royster Bida as a new, book about a very brave man lived a long time ago who I'm sure is listening from heaven right now as the Justice department looks again at the murder, the hate, crime, against Emmett till in August of nineteen fifty five I'm John bachelor this. Is the John Batchelor.

TRM Howard murder Emmett Mississippi Chicago Dr Howard John John Batchelor TRM Howard Dr David Biteau David Justice Timothy Tyson Justice department FBI Linda Royster Montgomery Mississippi Caroline Dunham Bryant Rosa Parks
"trm howard dr" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

08:36 min | 2 years ago

"trm howard dr" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"John Batchelor show August, nineteen fifty. Five the time is endless because the, crime the murder of Emmett till a very young man from Chicago who was visiting for the summer that murder has now recently been reopened by the United States government by the federal, authorities new, information and also this, long long trail of feeling that Justice was not done the murder of till and the murder of other African Americans during this period of civil rights conflict to help me understand the. Story I welcome David Biteau David is the author with Linda Royster by to- of TRM Howard doctor on Trump for Noor civil. Rights pioneer Dr Howard got intimately involved scarily involved in the denial of Justice after the murder of Emmett till, David a very good evening to. You congratulations for your biography of. Judd Dr Howard and to understand the scale of. His heroism we need to understand why Justice is reopening the till case the the murder the horrible murder of, a young man good evening to. You David why did they reopen Well that's, a little bit of a mystery because, there wasn't an FBI, investigation. About twelve years ago That you know that, turned up some material I think what why. They reopened the case at this time was a historian a lot, of respect for named, Timothy Tyson did a a book about the case interviewed? Amatil, or the the the Caroline Dunham Bryant who was a key figure in the case and she According to, Tyson basically mid that, she was involved in the crime now she's, still alive Well turns out that Tyson. Didn't have that on tape she had. Said that to me didn't get it on tape he had hours of interviews with. Her so I'm skeptical on that revelation that this is actually going to lead, to anything now there were a number, of people involved in the murder of Emmett till, but, as far as I can determine all of. Them have passed away the reopening of the case though points us all to a time in america's history a very very grim time when civil rights was extremely scary for people living anywhere in the country chicago to mississippi but especially for people who spoke up about injustice the all white jury acquitted the two men who were involved in the in the murder right away in fact they made they made jokes about it about why it took him so long 'cause they pause to drink soda pop that was laughter in mississippi but it was a bro there were broken hearts in chicago and dr howard faced up to it what did he do who was who is t._r._m. howard and how did you get involved in the till case well dr howard was probably the wealthiest person in mississippi he'd been born in poverty he came there to be cheap surgeon of a hospital black-owned hospital that provided cooperative medical care to thousands of people he branched out into civil rights and headed a very large group called the regional council of negro leadership and they add thousands of embers and they would have annual rallies and mississippi but they get ten thousand people to hear people like thurgood marshall and singers like mahalia jackson they did a successful boycott of service stations that refused to provide restrooms for blacks this was nineteen fifty two so he was a well known civil rights figure he was on a visit to chicago at the time that emmett till disappear kidnapping of emmett till wasn't even knowing that it was a murderer yet and howard said this boy is harmed and he was a boy sporting years old it's us harm they'll be held to pay mississippi i got a lot of coverage and then they actually brought charges against these two brothers half brothers who were who would kidnap till they claimed they let him go but the body turned up in the in the river and the tallahassee river just sort of a fluke got got snagged On some some you know underwater grow and the body was horribly disfigured and a, charges were brought against the two brothers which was actually something remarkable because usually a. White person killed the black. Person that weren't even charges and there was a. Trial less than a month after the murder in some in the small town of Sumner Mississippi Dr Howard was involved in trying to find evidence not. Only against the, two brothers but indicating that other people other whites and implacable -ployees. Of the defendants, were involved in the crime and. Emmett till mothers stayed with them, and he provided or armed escort every day of the, trial and his home was refuge for black reporters for. Witnesses and he conducted, his own sort of underground investigation working in cooperation with prosecutors trying to prod the mob and at the. Time was he Under constant threat were there because I've read about the period after about ten years. Later there were bomb threats routinely cars driving by in the middle of the night did that sort of thing happened Dr. Howard it did and he was heavily armed and he had the advantage of, living in a town and, all black town amount by which was unique because blacks there could boat they added sheriff they had the mayor, and that's where Mattel's mothers St Paul black so if you, were white new showed up in that community you would, stick out like a sore thumb also all the members of Howard's organization including Howard himself were heavily armed yeah the Thompson submachine gun and A white person wanted to make trouble there would have to, get in close because they'd stick out and they and and people there were. More than ready to fire back and? We're heavily on that was part of the issue but I think also that one Howard ventured out yet heavy heavy armed protection it certainly is life was threatened, people see is to say the. Shortest life expectancy of any person in Mississippi at the. Time this. Is the Eisenhower administration nineteen fifty five and coming up to, the the second term was there a nationalization. Of, this story did the key to the White House comment was Dr. Howard, in contact with the president He was crowding the. Eisenhower administration at this point Dr Howard is on the verge. Of becoming, a, Republican because if anything the Democrats were far far less willing to get. Involved in civil rights issues at that at that time so he. Was trying to get the Justice department to look into the case this was after the acquittal the defendant saying look or other people involved he was presenting evidence to the FBI pushing that. That that line it was nationalized in that sense because after the acquittal defendants. Howard went on a national speaking. Tour would get crowds of ten thousand people twenty thousand people Madison Square Garden in Baltimore in. Los Angeles and focused on the case and other unsolved cases demanded the chair or Hoover. Get involved he said look you can? Solve a crime based on wreckage of a plane right there the I would boast about That why can't you ever seem to solve a crime where. A black man. Or a black person is killed. And eat hammered on so it was national launch. And. One of the places he spoke was twenty seven nineteen fifty five, in Montgomery Mississippi is host of Martin Luther King than nationally unknown figure Rosa Parks was in the audience. He hammered the Emmett till case forty three days later Rosa Parks when she. Refused to give up her seat said that, she was thinking of Emmett. Till when she refused to go up, or see the book is, TRM Howard Dr entrepreneurs civil rights pioneer David Baido and his an as the author with Linda Royster Baido as a new book about a, very brave man who lived a long time ago who I'm sure is listening for heaven. Right now as the Justice department looks again at the murder. The hate, crime, against Emmett till in August of nineteen fifty five I'm John bachelor this. Is the John Batchelor show.

Dr. Howard murder Emmett mississippi TRM Howard TRM Howard Dr dr howard David Biteau David John Batchelor Justice Chicago Timothy Tyson Justice department howard FBI Rosa Parks Linda Royster United States Sumner Mississippi
"trm howard dr" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

04:50 min | 2 years ago

"trm howard dr" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"The university of alabama dr david beethoven co author with his wife linda of trm howard dr entrepreneur civil rights pioneer published by independent institute the emmett till murder case i guess really propelled dr howard considerable nationwide prominence yes it did he was at the center of that and and just about everywhere you can imagine and trying to find witnesses i go through the story of emmett till if you want yes please unfortunately it is probably true that a fair percentage of the audience has never heard of him until either well you know that's surprising to me not surprising to me given you know i've given talks people whose name or beggar evers very few people often anyway what happened was immaterial was a fourteen year old boy from chicago he would come every summer to mississippi delta to to sort of work for his his great uncle mos right and helping pick cotton and sort of a combination vacations mother things well anyway he goes into a store in a town called money mississippi just a crossroads store and there's a white woman behind the counter and it's very unclear what happened he might have wolf whistled adder he might have said something he might have not respectfully done something that could have been very minor nobody really knows for sure contradictory or whatever he did it wasn't you know wasn't some horrible thing anyway he the husband of of the this wife found out about it someone told him and he was kind of a wink guy and he wasn't to do anything but his brother said you've got to you got to do something about this and they found emmett till one o'clock in the morning staying with his great uncle they kidnap them they they they tried to get him to say was sorry and he didn't sufficiently do that and they beat him up savagely beat him up and then killed him and tied him to a gin fan an old gin fan dumped him in the tallahassee river and just what is what is it jen fan for those who don't know oh it's just too is part of the machine machinery for cotton gin okay gotcha and it was an old you know just a big hunk of metal big fan basically is what it was and they tied it to them thinking way down but he's snagged in snacks somewhere the river and a fisherman saw you days by later in the body was just horribly disfigured well howard found out about this he was in chicago at the time and he went to the press and he really played it up in a major way emmett till mother lived in chicago she came and saw the by the by ship and she insisted on open casket funeral and you had this horribly disfigured body all the signs of the beating and people lined around the block and it was a big deal the two white men were or put on trial which is something that did not happen very often the mississippi and dr howard did not think there was a chance he said you'd have a better chance of you know getting a fine for killing that deer out of you know a season then you know they're they're going to get convicted words to that effect but anyway he went into he he he is home was he he brought in emmett till mother she stayed with them black reporter stayed with them and witnesses because he was going around he had this whole underground network they called it the mississippi underground were they tried to find evidence they found i witness people eyewitnesses to the beating and you know they went all over the state and plantations and back roads and the trial was held one of these witnesses did testify but in the end the jury wasn't gonna convict these two brothers for doing it they pleaded not guilty but they weren't gonna convict them and in twenty minutes or so went by and they acquitted them later one of the brothers spoke to look magazine and for money and admitted his guilt because well what does he have to fear at that point and a lot of people were very much outraged when that came out but dr howard has had symbol of a lot of evidence and believe it was more than two people were involved in fact now the fbi in about ten years ago completed that there were more than two people involved but you.

linda university of alabama dr david beethoven trm howard dr twenty minutes fourteen year ten years