35 Burst results for "Triton"

Attacks briefly knock some podcast hosts offline

podnews

02:57 min | 5 months ago

Attacks briefly knock some podcast hosts offline

"Browns bean spreaker and captivate all subjects to eight to nile attack. The same attackers appear to have been involved. We were wondering why they targeted podcast hosts so we talked to them. You'll find that full report in our show notes and our newsletter today. A company called. Happy scribe is publishing automated transcripts of podcasters without the parent's consent of many of the publishers. We learned today. Cumulus media owner of westwood. One has its achieved more than one billion downloads. In two thousand twenty podcasting revenue grew forty percent last year to they say. They've made their bet on partnership arrangements with talent as opposed to going out and spending a lot of money on it or infrastructure the company uses spotify owned megaphone backtracks has launched a tool that monitors your head gesture movements. The tool requires the listener to be using airpods pro headphones investor. Andrew wilkinson says in a tweet. He's removing podcasts. From his phone because podcastone mostly people repeating ideas. You already agree with or talking about things that trigger anxiety. He's co founder of tiny capital which invests in ios podcast app castro podcast membership platform super fast and podcast producer. Righto media try and digital has released the latest podcast ranker's for the us and latin. America they're incomplete ranker's containing participating publishers only notably the ranker's don't include. I heart radio podcasts. Triton digital is being bought by the company echoing the open independent nature of podcasting and writing in the financial times fulmer spotify chief economist will page notes that major labels released one point two million songs in two thousand and twenty but diy artists released nine point five million songs the music industry. He says he's making more money but has more mouths to feed. Iv is a new podcast app. That offers a way to follow. Topics tags hosts or podcasts. Catholic part is also a new podcast for android with a great name. Mavi star homa smart speaker in spain from canada now incorporates. I've is podcast catalog. And i will be speaking at the rain. Podcast business summit with npr's. Brian moffatt tickets are free and available now from link in our show notes and our newsletter. Today and in paul cost us the journal has an interview with dominion voting systems. Ceo john pelos today. His company has filed three defamation lawsuits against tv networks. Saying his excellently. One hundred percent accurate and very handsome. Voting machines are perfect. Which of course they absolutely are and nassar's curious universe is the first podcast recorded on another planet if features raw recorded sounds from the mars perseverance rover

Andrew Wilkinson Tiny Capital Spotify Triton Digital Browns Westwood Cumulus America Brian Moffatt Dominion Voting Systems Ceo John Pelos NPR Spain Canada The Journal Nassar Paul
What OPAWG is Doing to Build the Podcasting Community (and What You Can do to Help)

Sounds Profitable

04:48 min | 5 months ago

What OPAWG is Doing to Build the Podcasting Community (and What You Can do to Help)

"Hey mark thanks for joining me today on. The sounds profitable podcasts. It's a pledge to be. Thank you awesome. Awesome insert today. We're gonna digging deeper into the article. I wrote about the podcasts analytics workgroup. I thought that was a really interesting place to start. When i started with sounds profitable because i really like the idea of another organization out there that was looking to help everybody gather information together and potentially have alternatives to just the ab solution out there. So i figure it's a. It's probably a great idea for us to start off with asking you to explain opa and what inspired you to start it. Okay yeah absolutely so it is. It's a lofty organization with a terrible name. I think i was hoping it was going to be a placeholder. It's what we're going with For now so back in a may twenty nine thousand nine hundred last year was a as we're recording anyway. I was looking around at some of my analytics data for the podcast hosting company the iran and one of the questions that sometimes gets asked as about how customers can move data from one provider into potent for example and. I thought it'd be really interesting to see what can be done about ways that we can standardize the tracking information that we have about each episode. How many times. It's been downloaded roughly. By whom and i started thinking more about things like the and being a programmer by by nature. I guess i thought that the kinds of problems that the i obey are tackling for podcasters in so much as they are calculating like what can what do we consider to be a download of a podcast episode. That felt to be something that we could tackle in an automated basis in a way that could be easily replicated uneasily run easily automated as i say the didn't necessarily need a huge amounts of people cost. It'd be time to set up initially but then the day would be that. It was something that that you would be able to run in the same way that we now have things. Like letting crypt for handling. Ssl certificates So that you now you don't have to pay multiple hundreds of dollars to get an s Sasol's difficult for your website. You can get one for free by using this system. Yeah i i think that's great and that's one thing that i wanted to kind of break down. There is that the i. a. b. you know has a fee per year depending on the size of your company. I looked to join his an independent. And i can get in like the first two years a startup rates at five thousand dollars now. Five thousand dollar fee doesn't do anything if i wanted to get certified. It's an additional cost. And that cost us what two ways one is a payment to the ab and the other is a payment to certification company. Like a like an auditing company that comes in and confirms that you adhered to the ab sanders by doing like tech audit and reviewing all your data and so james cridland pibe. News has his own self hosted podcast awesome. It could cost them forty to sixty thousand dollars easily for him for one year to be certified with the iab. Alternatively eager kicked the numbers over the cdn data over to like triton and be validated there. But you know that's a couple grand a month to and at the end of the day like that's still it's not that far off from what the charges so what you're talking about here is instead of something that each individual host would get audited instead. We have like a central piece of tech that is audited that's maintained in improbably. Third party verified that is able to allow hosting companies and other platforms to call in do a self certification and it focuses on that central point right instead of like the deep dive required for each individual partner. Absolutely and i think the the thing to to tack onto mr cridland example is he could use something like chargeable. Which i guess is now. Abc's fide he could use that but as someone who writes about for example listener privacy. There are questions around that that you would imagine there would be with any of these third party analytics services you know. There's a reason they make that infrastructure available for for people. Like a steve's especially of people to use for free and so without getting into the weeds on on that particular discussion. That might be a reason. Not to put words in james's mouth but that might be one of several reasons why he'd be not when you use a third party service because that's something that he does writes about.

James Cridland Sasol Iran IAB Mr Cridland Third Party ABC Steve James
5 Top Advertising Trends to watch out for in 2021

The Ad For Good Podcast

09:17 min | 5 months ago

5 Top Advertising Trends to watch out for in 2021

"Of the world now that we've begun twenty twenty one. I thought i'd share with you. The five top advertising trends to watch out for in twenty twenty one. Do you want to stay on top of the latest advertising. Transfer this year. Do you want to know exactly how to keep your customers. Engaged whilst using innovative creative techniques and technology to promote your business and products. keep listening. I've got you covered boone. Today has looked into the crystal ball and pulled out all the necessary information that you need to note to be ahead of the game this year. So let's get started number. One user generated content. Ugc is way uses create and promote their own content for a brand on social media and it outperformed itself in twenty twenty fall beyond brand created content to be specific ads based on user generated content. Receive four times higher. Click through rates compared to average at as well as twenty eight percent higher engagement rate compared to standard company posts content is created by customers using filters that brands create on snapchat or instagram stories through tiktok videos or even to instagram orioles with the use of tagging and hashtags one of my favorite examples of a brand utilizing user generated content is by the iconic which made its mother's day campaign featuring images and footage of real mothers at home in lockdown struggling with home schooling crying children and so much more. What i love about this campaign is how it is not only unedited. Unfolded user generated content but that it is using this content to remind others. Today are not alone that there are so many people going through the same struggles as they do each day. User generated content is predicted to only saw in twenty twenty one with the use of tiktok. Instagram rails live stories are more. There are so many options for influences to create attention grabbing content. That is relatable fun to watch and so incredibly convincing it has water mouth marketing in a virtual space where word spreads faster than in the real world after all nothing says trust like content created by someone. You completely relate to an empathize with on social media number two in game advertising last march nintendo released animal crossing new horizons and it sold more than thirteen point. Four one million copies in just six weeks if you onshore. Why so many were sold. Some external research about now is advised if you are up to date as you or your son daughter niece nephew cousin parent or even dog plays this game. Twenty four hours a day. Then you can understand the hype about this game now. What is even more fascinating about. This game is what some browns have done by partnering with animal crossing for example marc jacobs release their own virtual collection online allowing users to dress avatar in the luxury clothes of the brand off so they entered a unique code. Only six of their favourite pieces were presented as they are a luxury designer brand off audible but one brown took this partnership to a whole new level. The branded gem oh in france in partnership with the agency caused beef decided that as physical shops are shocked. Why don't they opened a shop in a video game and that is exactly what they did. Their brand or ready to wear clothing was a hit in the animal. Crossing game as these types of clothes are exactly what people were buying obsessively during lockdown comfortable affordable and cozy. The video game was advertising in itself. And if you look on the blog of this article you will see the clothes referred directly to real pieces in real life role who wouldn't want a virtual shopping experience in their favorite video game. If you check out the blog page you'll see some images of the close in real life transported directly to avatars in the video game. This type of advertising is predicted only to rise in twenty twenty one number three product placement. This is thought to be the oldest trick in the book but we predict that. This trend has only just begun from stranger things to suits right down to friends. They're sneaky ways that bronze managed to incorporate their products into popular tv shows and movies. While sixty eight percent of product. Placements lasts for five seconds or less product placement is the largest in foster scoring market in the us generating billions of dollars in revenue which will only grow in twenty twenty one. The next time you sit down to watch your favorite netflix. Show look out for the cleverly place logos of brands to catch your is subconsciously. This is a multibillion dollar market in the advertising industry and it will expand to new heights in two thousand and twenty one for example. If you check out the blog page you will see that in a snapshot from the show stranger things. The logo of burger king could not have been less subtly placed in the image however other times the product or logo is so subtly placed that you might not even notice it the first time round. This is a multi billion dollar market in the advertising industry and it will expand to new heights in twenty twenty one number four nostalgia marketing the world. We live in is not only fast paced but driven strongly by looking towards the future. I also don't need to remind you of the struggles that our planet went through last year from the loss of loved ones due to covid nineteen the loss of houses due to bush fires. The loss of black lives in a fight for equality and so much else. I also can't put into words. The pain that some of us have felt during this year therefore we believe that nostalgia marketing will be boosted to new heights in twenty twenty one studies have shown then style gives our lives a sense of meaning and continuity there by having a positive effect on on mental wellbeing. It brings us a sense of happiness amid chaos and reminds people happier and simpler time thereby encouraging you to buy the product to remind you of all the happy memories nyc pepsi gucci. A mountain jew are a few brands that adopted such a strategy of marketing. And they use this. During twenty twenty. Whilst the wild was trying to navigate itself through unpredictable and unprecedented times for example cheetos included nostalgia marketing in that twenty twenty super bowl advert by introducing cheetos popcorn the advert featured the nostalgic feeling of eating a bag of cheetos up finishing with bright orange fingers. This is something that so many people who are watching the super bowl could relate to as they remember being in the yummy and messy situation when they were younger. We can therefore expect to see some blasts from the past appearing soon on your screens as brands triton transport. You back to the past with some old time favorites. This type of marketing is certainly not new. But walk goes around certainly comes back around and it seems like twenty twenty is where people can use a boost of happiness and a sense of nostalgia number five brand activism purpose driven advertising. We saved the best to lost. Twenty twenty was a year of so many surprises and filled to the brim with certainty and fair for the future. When the world was at a low point many brands were seen taking a stance by voicing their support for those that are struggling. Reebok twitter nyc vocally showed their support for the black lives matter movement through their social media pages. Some brands went even further by inserting brand activism. Into that branding. An even products for example ben and jerry's created the on fudge off future campaign in which they teamed up with the climate council and to fifty dot org australia to encourage the australian government to ditch fossil fuels and use renewable energy. Instead they created a whole new flavor of non dairy ice cream and passing allies it to address the australian prime minister directly saying day. Scott morris make fossil fuels history and a portion of the proceeds from each ice cream was donated to three fifty australia. This was ben. And jerry's way to voice that concern about their is about climate change and to use their power to drive a campaign to pressure the government to invest into one hundred percent renewable energies brand activism. Is trent that will grow to new highs. This year more and more brands are standing up for what they believe. In and this is what makes brands authentic nowadays at noon today we have seen firsthand that campaigns driven by a pappas gain not only ten times more engagement on their platforms but it also shows that browns are committed to

UGC Boone Instagram Marc Jacobs Browns Nintendo Netflix France Brown Pepsi Bush Climate Council United States Scott Morris Reebok Jerry BEN Australia
A quarter of Spotify users now use podcasts there too

podnews

02:40 min | 6 months ago

A quarter of Spotify users now use podcasts there too

"A quarter of all monthly active spotify users. Now use the app to listen to podcasts. That's up from twenty two percent last quarter speaking on the company's quarter. Four two thousand nine twenty earnings call daniel x says. He's reasonably confident that he can see benefits in user growth and retention from podcasts. Spotify says it's got two point. Two million podcasts in the system now apple has one point. Eight million in denmark twenty-seven percent of all adults listen to podcasts every week that's three percentage points up from last year according to denmark radio so we're seeing gen just continuously clamping higher and higher also when you take into consideration the general surroundings of corona virus. And all these things is actually pretty fine a little bits. We've seen here. There's a full interview with the researchers in the portland news podcast. Later today. Costs programmatic ad. Sales revenue grew two hundred fifteen percent in two thousand twenty. The company has announced podcast addict now supports the new podcast location. Tag as does sprouts has to our podcast pages. Try search for the north idaho. Now podcasts to find out where that's based although you probably guessed already pulled. Lp podcast app for the kyw platform has now been downloaded five million times on geo an indian mobile network radio franz signs agreement to put its podcasts onto podcast addicts. The broadcast is unusual in restricting. Its rss feed addresses from the apple. Podcasts api headliner. Social podcasts promotion platform had more than two hundred seventy two thousand new users in two thousand and twenty. They say joe biden has signed with patron in canada. The jim pattison broadcast group has signed with triton digital podcast hosting monetization and measurement in argentina news channel t n has launched t. n. podcast. Its own podcast network. Espn got half a billion downloads. In two thousand nine hundred twenty a yearly increase of twenty eight percent and aerial flat has launched a newsletter called podcast. Plunge every issue is anchored by a podcast network and then focuses on other pieces of internet about the main topic of the show and in podcast news. Spotify for the record will post a new episode today with ceo daniel eck and cfo. Paul vogel on their cost of four twenty twenty earnings reports. Matt kopa were convicted criminal. Michael cohen features an interview with stormy daniels. In case you still care about any of that.

Daniel X Denmark North Idaho Spotify KYW Apple Jim Pattison Portland Joe Biden Argentina Espn Canada Daniel Eck Paul Vogel Matt Kopa
TikTok Asks Court for Extension on Divestiture Deadline

WSJ Tech News Briefing

01:02 min | 9 months ago

TikTok Asks Court for Extension on Divestiture Deadline

"Perry kicking off the chinese ecommerce giant alibaba's shopping holiday singles day yesterday period wasn't the only celebrity involve singer taylor swift also launched a new clothing line. This year. alibaba extended the buying window for single day from one day to several days and it paid off. The company raked in more than seventy five billion dollars in sales for the event nearly doubling last year's record that's more than all us retailer sales on black friday and cyber monday combined. Here's our reporter trevor. Moss online retail was kozo. Already a big thing in china was growing. Fool the pandemic and i think what we've seen is that trend has really been accelerated retail in china house bounce back from the pandemic but that in the january to september period retail overrule is still down about seven percents on you but within that's online sales of growing about ten percents on the so you can see that online retail has really bucked the overall triton has really become a much from biggest share overall. I think is now about one third of all retail in china.

Alibaba Taylor Swift Perry China Trevor United States Triton
Acast integrates with Patreon patron-only shows

podnews

03:06 min | 9 months ago

Acast integrates with Patreon patron-only shows

"A constant patron of just announced a collaboration enabling creators to publish subscriber only content across different podcast platforms and make it easier for fans to financially support patriot creators. who works on almost all podcast. Players is profitable. Fuck i heart media. Podcasting revenue grew seventy four percent year on year for the company. Downloads are up. Seventy one percent new advertiser also spending with the company and other places to bob pittman. Ceo committed in a revenue colder fifty percent of the new. Podcasts launched on the podcast network be from female and verse creators and we now know that iheart paid fifty million dollars to buy. Vox nurse last month. I heart media has also signed sales and production partnership with pushkin industries. It'll make iheartmedia. The company's exclusive sales partner. And pushkin will also co produce new original. Podcasts iheartmedia over the next few years quite enough iheartmedia. It's focused on somebody else. Stitcher has rolled out a new website in the process. The url for podcast has changed old addresses. Though will read rx by you might as well update you website. It's probably a good idea. A are ends iheart podcast network trailer that they are again. They've signed up with pod sites to enable podcast attribution for every campaign triton. Digital's omni studio has partnered with ghana india's largest music streaming app to bring omni studio podcasts into the garner platform. Keep listening for how well garner is working for. Us and podcasts was a category in. Us quiz show jeopardy on monday. Podcasts highlighted stitches. Science rules with bill. Nye luminaries fiasco wonder is we crashed an audible. Original weirdly called it burns us neither and it will conan. O'brien needs a friend taped earlier. It was the first podcast since the death of the host. Alex trebek surprise. It's time for some more tech stuff. Garner the indian podcast app appears really high impart news podcast downloads. Statistics which are linked to today are numbers are produced using both rss us agent and player user agents but the garner app itself doesn't set any obvious user agents so this traffic might not be visible in your own podcast host anyway willing to all of our workings today in our show notes nine newsletter phase one is about to close editions and suggestions for the new podcast. Namespace willing to that today. Buzz sprout now supports visual. Soundbites away to mark sharable portions of podcasting apps and social media attack from podcast index. New podcast namespace willing to a bite from the podcasting two point. Oh show on pont verse and we all sending a little more about the lightning network and podcast monetization and another piece of news that to just in case you understand it more than we do.

Bob Pittman Pushkin Industries Omni Studio Pushkin Omni Ghana Alex Trebek Brien Garner United States Conan India Mark Sharable
Spotify investigates podcast subscriptions

podnews

04:03 min | 9 months ago

Spotify investigates podcast subscriptions

"Spotify might be planning to launch a subscription. Podcast service it appears to be serving customers to gauge interest. In the others that have tried this. Include luminary stitcher and wondering reported. That wondering was up for sale at the end of september bloomberg. Report the both apple and sony have held talks spotify. The apparently an interested the asking price is between three and four hundred million dollars. The audio production award have just announced this year's nominations. The awards got the highest number of interest in their history. We linked to them today. I'm willing to an exclusive pod fest. China had its third annual conference. We've a full report from the day including developments in podcasting within china spotify twitter youtube and facebook all polls an episode of the pod. Being hosted steve bannon's war room. Podcast after bannon called for the beheading of dr anthony foundry and fbi director christopher ray. The episode in question is still available via apple podcasts. And the podcast index. The california privacy rights act passed last week the cpr. A has some tightening of rules especially around re targeting consumers based on their behaviour online which some podcast companies used for attribution. The nfl's it didn't go far enough. Meanwhile apple of center deadline of december the eighth at privacy data sheets. You need to identify all of the data you or your third party partners collects assay for podcast apps that could be interesting vocal via okay l. Dot co lets you create cool. Podcast video snippets for social media. So they say podcast addict has added a random pick button which returns a random list of podcasts and tacomas podcasting business including radio dot com and katie's thirteen claims a twenty-seven percent increase in downloads year on year in the latest earnings call. Espn is to lay off three hundred employees and let two hundred open positions go unfilled trouble for triton digital there mac accreditation for its webcast metrics. Local service was revoked in august. According to the quarterly update accreditation is suspended for the main webcast metrics service. No reason was given both us to compare streaming radio not podcasting in the seeking to regain accreditation for their main webcast. Metrics service anyway. Revenue grew by fourteen percent last quarter according to e w scripps his quarterly earnings call. The company also owns on the studio. It's a mondays. Here's another teaspoon of tech staff. The podcast index unveiled the podcast value. Tag it allows micro payments using crypto currency through the lightning network. Podcasters can opt in to be rewarded every minute someone lessons and this value for the podcast app and platform as well. There's more detail in the podcasting two point. Oh podcast which linked to today open source android. Podcast app antenna parks now. Has podcast indexes. Search built in as does podcast. Pod bay is one of the app supporting podcast chapters linked today to a c. Sharp rapper for the podcast index. Api with and blueberry has highlighted its full support of the podcast index. Impasse news powerful stories with torey arch. Bowl has joined nova. Entertainment's podcast network the show steps into the shoes of powerful women and discover how they earned success. Christmas partying is back for a third season. See what they've done their from. Brisbane in australia at tackles the fun all could and honest side of christmas and thirteen hours inside the nova scotia. Massacres launched today from curious cast and global news a thirteen episode series. It looks to piece together exactly what happened. And what could have been done to prevent it

Steve Bannon Dr Anthony Foundry Christopher Ray Apple Bannon Bloomberg Sony FBI Youtube China NFL Twitter Facebook Katie Espn California
Pluto Has White-Capped Mountains, But Not Because There's Snow

All Things Considered

02:26 min | 10 months ago

Pluto Has White-Capped Mountains, But Not Because There's Snow

"To Pluto's, if you could mail folks back home, a scenic postcard that featured white capped mountains. That's because Pluto's Pluto's thie thie only only place place in in the the solar solar system system other other than than Earth Earth that that is is known known to to have have mountains mountains with with white white peaks. peaks. As As NPR's NPR's group group Nell Nell Greenfield Greenfield voice voice reports. reports. These These mountaintops mountaintops aren't white because of fallen snow. A tourist on Pluto's could take in all the sights that NASA's New Horizons probe discovered five years ago like a big, heart shaped glacier made of frozen nitrogen, methane and carbon monoxide. And just to the west of Pluto's icy heart. There's mountains. Tongi Betrothal is an astronomer at NASA's Ames Research Center, He says thes mountains are made of water ice. Whatever I some pretty is so cold that its hard Just like a rock on Earth. So that's why you can make mountains off. What Ison Pretty. The mountains are about 2.5 miles tall, like the Alps. They're mostly dark brown and red because they're covered in particles from Pluto's Hayes. The peaks, however, are bright white and because they look so much like white capped mountains on earth. Initially, it seemed logical that this this high high altitude altitude first first first call call call call from from from from like like like like on on on on years. years. years. years. But But But But now now now now he he he he and and and and his his his his colleagues colleagues colleagues colleagues say say say say in in in in the the the the journal journal journal journal Nature Nature Nature Nature Communications Communications Communications Communications that that that that Pluto's Pluto's Pluto's Pluto's mountaintops mountaintops mountaintops mountaintops got got got got their their their their white white white white in in in in an alien way on earth. Snow collects at mountaintops because at higher altitudes, thie air and ground or colder as a moist wind approaches a mountain it rises up slope, and it could On water condense their two from snow on clouds on top of the mountains on Pluto's. It's completely different. It's not snowing on Tito, he says. They're the atmosphere actually gets warmer at higher altitudes because of heating from the sun. The surface of these water. Ice mountains remains super cold, however, and because these tall mountains peak in a region that's full of methane gas, the methane becomes frost on the cold surface, so you you have have no no formation formation of of clouds. clouds. Onion. Onion. You You have have no no formation formation off. off. I I see see particles particles in in the the atmosphere. atmosphere. Every Every single single kills kills directly directly at at the the surface, surface, he he says. says. Something Something similar similar might might happen happen on on Triton Triton Moon Moon of of Neptune, Neptune, But But Triton Triton is is kind kind of of flat. flat. So So Pluto's Pluto's a a and and earth earth maybe maybe the the on on ly ly spots spots in in the the solar solar system system to enjoy white capped mountain scenery. Nell Greenfield's Boyce NPR news

Nell Nell Greenfield Greenfiel Triton Triton Moon Moon Nature Communications Communic NPR Nasa Nell Greenfield Snow Tito Heart Shaped Glacier Ames Research Center
Pluto Has White-Capped Mountains, But Not Because There's Snow

All Things Considered

02:23 min | 10 months ago

Pluto Has White-Capped Mountains, But Not Because There's Snow

"You could mail folks back home, a scenic postcard that featured white capped mountains. That's because Pluto's Pluto's thie thie only only place place in in the the solar solar system system other other than than Earth Earth that that is is known known to to have have mountains mountains with with white white peaks. peaks. As As NPR's NPR's group group Nell Nell Greenfield Greenfield voice voice reports. reports. These These mountaintops mountaintops aren't white because of fallen snow. A tourist on Pluto's could take in all the sights that NASA's New Horizons probe discovered five years ago ago like like a a big, big, heart heart shaped shaped glacier glacier made made of of frozen frozen nitrogen, nitrogen, methane methane and and carbon carbon monoxide. monoxide. And And just just to to the the west west of of Pluto's Pluto's icy icy heart. heart. There's There's mountains. mountains. Tongi Betrothal is an astronomer at NASA's Ames Research Center, He says thes mountains are made of water, ice water, ice, and Peter is so cold that its hard Just like a rock on Earth. So that's why you can make mountains off. What Ison Pretty. The mountains are about 2.5 miles tall, like the Alps. They're mostly dark brown and red because they're covered in particles from Pluto's Hayes. The peaks, however, are bright white and because they look so much like white capped mountains on Earth. Initially, it seemed logical. That's his his high high altitude. altitude. First First call call from from like like on on the the ears. ears. But But now now he he and and his his colleagues colleagues say say in in the the journal journal Nature Nature Communications Communications that that Pluto's Pluto's mountaintops mountaintops got got their their white white in in an alien way on earth. Snow collects at mountaintops because at higher altitudes, thie air and ground or colder as a moist wind approaches a mountain it rises up slope, and it could On water condense their two from snow on clouds on top of the mountains on Pluto's. It's completely different. It's not snowing on Tito, he says. They're the atmosphere actually gets warmer at higher altitudes because of heating from the sun. The surface of these water. Ice mountains remains super cold, however, and because these tall mountains peak in a region that's full of methane gas, the methane becomes frost on the cold surface, so you have no formation of clouds. Onion. You have no information off. I see particles in the atmosphere. Every single kills directly at the surface, he he says. says. Something Something similar similar might might happen happen on on Triton Triton Moon Moon of of Neptune, Neptune, But But Triton Triton is is kind kind of of flat. flat. So So Pluto's Pluto's a a and and earth earth maybe maybe the the on on ly ly spots spots in in the the solar solar system system to enjoy white capped mountain scenery. Nell Greenfield Boyce

Nell Nell Greenfield Greenfiel Triton Triton Moon Moon Nell Greenfield Boyce Nasa NPR Shaped Glacier Glacier Snow Nature Nature Communications C Tito Ames Research Center Peter
Award-winning investigative journalist Robert Riggs talks to Podnews

podnews

03:52 min | 10 months ago

Award-winning investigative journalist Robert Riggs talks to Podnews

"I had a front row seat to evil during thirty years of investigative reporting. I'm Robert Riggs I created true crime reporter to tell the backstory of cases you may never heard of before we asked award winning investigative reporter Robert Raikes how he makes his new podcast true crime reporter. His answers include the best way of taking notes, his experiences in the Gulf War and his favorite podcasts. You'll find it links from our show notes and newsletter today. US listeners and listening to eight percent more spoken word than last year. The highlights from the upcoming spoken word audio report from NPR and Edison Research which will be unveiled on October the thirteenth. The most popular day downloading podcasts as a Thursday that's according to Triton digital's weekly snapshots, Data John off the chief content officer Pierre, x is to retire at the end of this year Kerry Donahue Director of training has already left the company according to her linked in P. R. X. Management have been criticized for lack of diversity in gender equity. Meanwhile, NPR and APM employees have launched a website to change their companies culture. Not everyone is comfortable with New Technology Donald. The podcast gives your podcast. A phone number to call to anyone can listen to your show. Bullhorn also offers a similar experience. Volley is an only APP that allows you to do podcast interviews using audio messages. She's pretty cool and thank you to our latest gold supporter focused right the makers of the scarlet usb audio interface. Grateful to all kinds supporters who allow us to focus more time in improving these everyone you can do that too appalled news dot net slash support. It's a Monday. So time for some textile free claim, the nets have pressure group about cancel culture and Censorship has written about the podcast index saying it's time for an open podcast directory, which is good because we've got one now. Review of Meta data fields associated with podcast RSS feeds is a long paper that linked to today for my show notes and our newsletter. He looks at how people are using data fields in podcasts particularly, I tunes type of Meta data field written by a spotify employees and using data. Also from spotify use a behavior it concludes that outfield is often misleading or confusing, and isn't of much use. The podcast index now has the code in place to support website over two, hundred, sixty, two, thousand podcasts, support it they say they're working on subscribing to those shows are web sub. Shortly, they've also added MIT licenses to their get hub repositories. Paul Friend has added an embedded player, which it feel website. You can see on our embedded player guide to find that links from show notes and our newsletter, and if you want a decent set of similar looking at badges feel website pod page has just published a matching set. And in podcast news journalist, Nathan phone burqas drinks with exceptional people from around the world in a podcast called the trip. Travel, show that combines local perspectives, deep storytelling, an honest conversations that only happen when friends share a bottle. It's from Cabana and we thank them for their support have poured news today political on and politics war room. With James Carville, an hour hunt have formed a new partnership in the lead to the US presidential election. It's the latest podcast now produced by policy con and podcast one is growing this sports net sports programming network adding the Michael. Irvin. podcast to their slate were promised an eight. Round at the end of every podcast. Something we're missing.

United States NPR Reporter Robert Raikes Investigative Reporter Spotify Robert Riggs James Carville Triton Digital Bullhorn Kerry Donahue Cabana Chief Content Officer Michael Paul Friend Irvin.
SPACE WEEK: Every Moon, Ranked

Short Wave

09:59 min | 11 months ago

SPACE WEEK: Every Moon, Ranked

"Too small notes before we hit you with some hot moon takes one. Obviously, we're not talking about all one hundred and fifty moons. We picked handful from the top ten, and then we'll do a lightning round on some others. All of these bodies meet the technical definition of Moon meaning they orbit an asteroid or a planet, not the Sun. Second Note. Jennifer's list also includes a few of what NASA calls provisional moons. These are bodies that are kind of, let's say unofficial maybe haven't been studied that well or confirmed yet. Yeah. So. I want to add that the scientists that I spoke to. They said that they're probably way more moons out there that we haven't even discovered yet. Well. So cool. Okay. All right. So number ten on your list diddy moon yet say, yes is did he moon? So, did he moon it's not circling a planet. It is actually circling an asteroid it. It is very tiny. It's about five hundred, twenty, four feet in diameter and it's orbiting. The asteroid diddy. Moss in it's it's kind of part of a very cool future NASA mission, right? Yes. So did he moon is part of a really important the item mission and the item mission is like this cosmic dress rehearsal basically, NASA wants to send a spacecraft to slam into diddy moon and knock it off course. Now I know what you're thinking. It sounds pretty familiar and yes, it is essentially the plot of Armageddon. Show me. But it's a really really important mission in it's going to help us test one of the ways that we think we might be able to potentially deflect a hazardous object that might be pearling towards earth. So cool. Okay. Number six called by one expert you talk to the most underrated moon in the solar system orbiting Jupiter Ganymede Ganymede. Ganymede is such a fascinating world Ganymede is the largest moon in our solar system. It's actually larger than Mercury Ganymede is also the only moon that we've known to have a magnetosphere. Cool. Earth has a magnetosphere and it's essentially this covering this kind of magnetic shell that we have of charged particles and what it does. It actually protects us from harmful radiation. So there's tons of radiation that's generated by the sun and from interstellar space, and that magnetosphere protects us it's potentially allowed life to form. Can I tell you that I am horrified to report I thought Ganymede was a made up moon Scifi show the expanse. Oh. Yes on that. Farm on Ganymede and I'm like it was a fun made up plays I love that shout the expanse it's a great show. Yeah no can't meet is just so fascinating. So number four on your list orbiting Neptune. Triton. Yes. Triton is an absolute misfit. First of all I will say it looks just like a cantaloupe if you look at the picture. How was ranked keep going I, mean, that is, of course, the important feature. But really, what's cool about Triton is that it's essentially this kind of Pluto sized object that we believe has been captured by Neptune and now orbits the planet and temperatures on Triton and we we know this thanks to the voyager two spacecraft but temperatures on Triton have dipped as low as minus three hundred ninety one degrees Fahrenheit. Super Cold Nope nope. nope. nope things. But it's partially because it's got like this ice covered surface right and that reflects a ton of the light that it receives that it's by. Yeah absolutely. That's that's another really weird thing about Tritan on it has what's called an incredibly high Albedo. So that's basically a measurement of how much late a body reflects. and. Triton's is actually really high. It reflects about seventy percent of the sunlight. It receives I'm like in Triton I'm going to be honest with you Ganymede. But I'm like Triton right now array. Okay. Time for the top three Jennifer. Are you prepared I? Think so bronze-medal orbiting Saturn Moon. That contains the big four ingredients for life hydrogen carbon nitrogen and oxygen enceladus. Yeah. So enceladus is absolutely fascinating moon. So the Cassini mission when it arrived to observe Saturn's moons, it noticed that there were jets spewing out of ENCELADUS, right? So they actually took a detour and had Cassini swing through those jets to collect samples of that liquid into turned out to be liquid water right? I remember when that happened that was wild. That was like a big deal. Yes. Absolutely, and so it really spurred a lot of interest in enceladus. Of course, we love Europa. But enceladus is really this kind of new and exciting moon and you know as you mentioned, it has the big four ingredients for life. That's really just an incredible sign that this might be one of the places where we find life. Okay. Number two on the list orbiting Jupiter lot of Okano's and some lightning. I oh. Yes. So I will admit that I have some volcanic. I really love of volcanoes. Thank you for disclosing that conflict of interest Jennifer I have to be I have to be honest. I'm anyone who knows me knows that I absolutely love volcanoes. So naturally, I O, which is the most volcanically active body in our solar system would have to take second there are over four hundred volcanoes on the surface of Iowa and they spew jets of. Lava hundreds of miles and two space. It's really incredible. Okay. So this is the wildest thing about Iot to me is that I owe can generate like true current. Yes. So of all of the Galilee and moons of Jupiter, Iowa's actually the closest to Jupiter and so sweeps through its magnetic field and that causes it to create this electric current it can generate. As much as three million amperes, and actually this jolt of electricity is then shot back to Jupiter and it creates lightning in the planet's. Fear I mean, that's cooler than the volcanoes. Some some people would say that. Yes. Okay. Your number one moon Jennifer orbiting. Saturn. A Moon I could walk on with potentially nothing more than an oxygen. Mask Titan. So Titan. Is. The only other place that we've observed so far that has a thick substantial atmosphere. So our atmosphere of course is. Critical for life here on earth and tighten, it has a similar has a sort of similar atmospheric also mostly composed of nitrogen but the second most common gas in the atmosphere is actually methane. So right. So instead of like US having oxygen the next most abundant compound in that moons atmosphere in Titan's atmosphere is methane. Yeah. Absolutely, and you think about Earth, we have a water on earth all. Three phases of water on earth. So there's liquid and gas and ice but on Titan you have liquid methane on the surface, which is really really incredible. It's the only other body in the solar system that we've observed to have liquid on its surface, and these are rivers and lakes and seas of methane and ethane part of the reason why it's got this like, orange Gooby Hayes, around the moon. Yes. So Essay in the methane on those hydrocarbons, that kind of creates it's it's really this I feel like it's really beautiful. It's this kind of soft orangish glow. So it looks a little bit fuzzy whereas other moons that don't have an atmosphere they. They look very sharp but this is very, it's a very muted known. It's. Yeah. Beautiful I think. Yeah. So. Before we go Jennifer we had to leave out a of sweet moons. So we're GONNA do lightning round. I'm going to mention a moon from your list and you give us one moon. Moon Pinions, but moon fax perfect. That sounds great. Okay. Number Forty, one Jupiter's moon ammonia. Yes. So a Mafia is actually the object in our solar system and we aren't one hundred percent. Sure. Why beautiful reds my favorite coloreds promoted to thirty one. Okay Number Twenty Jupiter's Moon Callisto. So Callisto is thought to have the. Surface in the entire solar system. Pretty Sweet. Okay. Number eighteen and nineteen combined also Saturn Moons Atlas and Pan. Atlas and Pan Look like giant Ravioli with aerial around their equator. It's so much fun. Okay. Number Thirteen one of the two moons around Mars Phobos some phobos is a giant rubble pile on track to either fling itself into Mars or split apart in orbit on some missions. Actually proposed a pit stop on the tiny moon on our way to the Red Planet love it. Okay. Number Eleven, Maranda orbiting Uranus. So Miranda is home to Verona Rupe. It's the tallest cliff in the solar system. If you fell off its edge, you would have time to read the newspaper before you hit the ground. Okay.

Triton Jennifer Nasa Iowa Titan Okano Tritan Verona Rupe IOT Miranda Gooby Hayes
the top 100 podcasts in your country on Spotify

podnews

03:15 min | 11 months ago

the top 100 podcasts in your country on Spotify

"Hi I'm Michelle Obama Michelle. spotify has revealed the top podcasts at the summer based on total number of listeners from June the first to August fifteenth and even though it only launched at the end of July, the Michelle Obama podcast was the global number one with quote millions of listeners the rest of the top five were NPR news now the daily coal her daddy and the Ted talks daily. Michelle Obama may be the number one global podcast but what was the number one podcast by Toyota listeners in the US or the UK or another fifty-six countries? We got all the data everywhere from Belgium it to Bolivia as an exclusive today, you'll find it links from our show notes and our newsletter today. At, any amounts of podcasters apple podcasts has announced that their audio search has been expanded to a number of different languages and their podcast is support website has been further enhanced. If you haven't got better email, don't worry. We've got it and we've linked to it in our show notes and our newsletter today Babble, which says it's the top selling language learning. APP has added an in apple podcast player containing all the podcasts from Babbel podcast for Italian Spanish. English and French learners are available with additional content designed specifically for English and German. Speakers say that they've seen a two hundred percent increase in new registrations. Of the global pandemic. Premium Polka service supporting cast has added a new feature dynamics subscriber messaging. This allows you to send personalized messages to your subscribers to thank them up, sell them to higher price tail even warn them about an expiring credit card. Triton. Digital has released its latest latin-american podcast report total downloads for the top one hundred podcasts have gone down from twenty point three, million to nineteen point six, million this time around coinciding with the highest number of new cases in the pandemic in the region. US automakers Chevrolet has made their first podcast sponsorship working with blue wire media to sponsor t one Greg Olsen and blueberry has highlighted. Top podcasts hosted produced or promoted by women for today National Women's Equality Day. And podcast news podcasting essentials focuses on the law of music, piracy and privacy. In this case, he's Australian law, but most law aligns across the world on these things. The podcast also features three people called Nicole interesting facts. Nicole was the number ten most popular name in Australia in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety out of the top one, hundred chart in two thousand and trade maybe it's not that interesting. The F- you best friends forever. University is a new podcast from Dallas lgbtq personalities, Bradford Chitter and Ryan Brockton which aims to teach you thing two about being your most authentic self even if that means acting like someone else along the way and true crime podcast in the red clay is the sixth ceres from imperative entertainments podcast division launched yesterday with Cumulus Media's Westwood One. It funds the most dangerous manning Georgia history, billy Sunday burt,

Michelle Obama United States Apple Greg Olsen Nicole NPR Toyota Bradford Chitter Cumulus Media Belgium TED Billy Sunday Burt Dallas Triton Bolivia Westwood UK Chevrolet
Coronavirus: Have NSW and Queensland learnt their lessons from Victoria?

Coronacast

05:25 min | 11 months ago

Coronavirus: Have NSW and Queensland learnt their lessons from Victoria?

"We've been talking a lot about Victoria on this podcast and with good reason because that's where the majority of Australia's new cases coming. But there's also a spread happening in New South Wales and Queensland and some of the questions that we're getting are about basically with a these states have learned some lessons and are making some changes to their approach based on what's happening in Victoria will your queenslander? Why don't you tell us what's happening up there? Yes. So it is interesting the health authorities here. have been quite open about the fact that they're nervous. They're worried to see some community transmission happening here. It's linked to a juvenile detention center and we know that I'm prison outbreaks problematic because you've got people in close quarters but they are definitely making some changes to the sorts of restrictions I brought in based on what's happened in Victoria. So nothing's really changed in terms of businesses, but the number of people that you can have visiting a household or like private gatherings outside Your House that's been what's restricted and that's based on the Victorian experience that some of those clusters happened early on, we're really linked to lodge family networks rather than sort of transmissions happening at businesses. And offices although the ones one outbreak in a lawyer's office North West Melbourne from memory. That's right. So it's this is domestic kits at families is family weightings, family events, funerals, and so on. People are hugging close together. And P. The opportunity for Aerosol spread early on and on that one of the other things that's being mentioned much earlier in this Queensland outbreak than happened in Victoria is they're advising people to wear masks. Now, if you're in a public place in a crowded place there advising that you wear bosc and that's not something that we heard until quite a long time into the Victorian outbreak note that Triton thankfully there deviating from the national advice on this. has been a bit reserved. It's just an extra layer of protection even if there's not much virus around, you just don't aware it is what about where you are normally in New South Wales Wales, they seem to be getting the unknowns down to a low number, which is the which is the statistic that worries everybody Wine Victoria when interstate for lockdown is that they just far too many people where they didn't know where they're getting virus form. Is running along in reasonable shape. The problem is they're still virus around, and whilst we report day by day on the numbers and the number of unknown sources, this can change. On a day-to-day basis, he really got to look at the running average and what's happening in terms of the train, but the train these. Small numbers and increasingly knowing where the virus is coming from. Obviously, we would all prefer to have zero spread whatsoever but New South Wales seems to have maintained a low level that has been more or less consistent. Is that maybe? A different way of living with the virus long term. I'm not sure that that's what they're. Amy's. They've said in the past that they're not aiming for zero spread. But. There's enough anxiety around even at low levels that you can't quite relax. But if the couldn't get it done two zero spread and I assume that are trying incredibly hard to do so. And you probably could live with this but you living with a situation where they probably going to mandate masks robin just ask people to wear masks. And and have quite strict social distancing. So that's there's no chance of virus being spread around. So there is virus, it tends not to get spread. But there will always be the risk of of a blowout. So we might talk about it Victoria just a little bit because we got a question from ally. You've said that a few times that Victoria isn't being transparent and when all is been watching the presses everyday, they're saying that they do feel like there's a lot of transparency there. So what are you referring to when you say that is digging darn and being completely open for example, by the hospital spread and we tend to find about find out that late we tend to find out. How we don't really know how it's being transmitted. We'd been misled I think about how has been transmitted because the minister at one point said only ten or fifteen percent of being caught in hospitals clearly, not the case moisture product being caught in hospitals. Possibly, not from patients maybe in the tea room and other places where they could be passing it on. But we haven't sorted that out. What we don't know is not where of knowing is whether patients have caught it from healthcare workers one hope that hasn't happened, but we haven't heard that statistic either and and why we should know about this is really the two areas that seem to be the problem. Yes. There still some problem with food storage facilities, and so on and outbreaks stemming from them, and those are always at risk. But largely, we have aged care residents have healthcare workers and both age care and in hospitals, and if you subtract them from the total, there aren't many cases left in Victoria from community spread. So we towards doing really well but if the up they've got be up front about their hospital problem. So that, we can all share in that and that means we don't. You know when we go in as a patient, we're just careful or there's no are we know that there's no patient spread? Healthcare worker to healthcare worker because people are arriving late at hospital with serious conditions which need major interventions and they need to be sure that the hospitals are safe and I think it creates doubt if they're not being entirely open perhaps were political reasons. So I think those are the reasons why should they just got to be straight and and tell us what the statistics are and how they're dealing with 'cause they really get on top of the hospital situation on top of aged care. The pretty close to solving the problem in Victoria. Really,

Victoria Queensland New South Wales New South Wales Wales South Wales Australia Triton AMY
SiriusXM: Simplecasts price; Pandoras decline

podnews

01:57 min | 1 year ago

SiriusXM: Simplecasts price; Pandoras decline

"Sirius, XM's financial report for quarter to twenty twenty has been released. The company owns stitcher simple cast Pandora ads with the acquisition price for simple cast unreported at the time was twenty, eight, million dollars Pandora which Sirius. Xm owns now has fifty nine point six million monthly active users that figure dropped by one point three, million in the last quarter. Poor casting is finally big business as an article for Jovana which focuses on an overview of recent deals. You'll find it linked in our show notes and newsletter today talking about show notes spotify now supports html formatting for show notes as to use the description field rather than content and coded. Lasts in American podcast report is out from Triton digital covering the four weeks ending July the fifth the top ten podcasts have seen a slump in downloads down by over ten percent the highest new entry number eleven a financial podcast from radio's Grupo Globo. has made a fancy short pass. You can type podcast dot new into a browser straight into the episode builder. It's part of Google's ownership of the new to Maine and elision claims to be the world's first podcast APP that's focused on learning and issued a statement with podcasts enriched with rich audio visuals, which the company claims his quote, a unique listening format, which enriches the audio content with text photos and links, which is a bit like. Others. And Impalas News Nice, white parents, launched yesterday. It's the first from cereal productions, a New York Times company. It's a new limited podcast series about building a better school system and what often gets in the way wight parents,

Sirius XM Pandora Twenty Twenty New York Times Triton Digital Spotify Google Jovana Maine Grupo Globo.
Sandworm: A New Era of Cyberwar and the Hunt for the Kremlin's Most Dangerous Hackers

The Vergecast

46:42 min | 1 year ago

Sandworm: A New Era of Cyberwar and the Hunt for the Kremlin's Most Dangerous Hackers

"Everybody from the British. Ask this week's interview. Episode has any Greenberg senior writer at wired. He just SORTA book called Sand Worm New Era of cyber war in the hunt for the Kremlin's Miss, dangerous hackers, it is all about hacking group inside of the Russian government called San Worm. They were responsible for the most damaging cyber warfare attacks over the past year there behind not PECI. The hackers took out in the mayor shipping line hospitals across the U. K San has totally escalated. What we think of Cyber War, and he's book gets all into how they were discovered how they were flushed out the. The intricacies of these various hacks. It's super interesting. The book is a thrill ride. If you're looking for something that isn't the virus. This is like a thriller, a highly recommended. It was really fun to talk to her about the stuff. one thing I. WanNa know we're all at home so during this in every might hear some kids in the background. I asked you just be a little forgiving that we're all. We're all dealing with it and he was a great interview. Check Out Sandy Greenberg of sand worm, a new era of cyber war and the hunt for the Kremlin's most dangerous hack. Any Greenberg your senior writer at wired you're also the author of Sand Worm, new era of cyber war in the hunt for the Kremlin's most dangerous. Welcome glad to be here so even writing about cybersecurity frontier I think you just said two thousand six and writing about Cybersecurity, but this book sand worm as I was reading it. It seems like it's called the new era of cyber war. It seems like there's been a huge turn in sort of state-sponsored. Particularly Russians sponsored cyber attacks. How did you come onto that notion? How did you begin reading this book I'm I'm very curious how you see. See that turn happening well. In late twenty sixteen, my former colleague Kim Zetter she had been the one who really covered state sponsored hacking in cyber war stuff, but she left wired, and this was also at the time. When you know Russian hackers were meddling in the US election, they'd hacked the democratic. National Committee and the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee and the Clinton Campaign, so my editors were really primes on face, mantra hacking all of a sudden, but what they? They really what they told me they wanted was a actually like a big takeover of the whole magazine. All about cyber war, but cyber war to me is different than those kinds of espionage election, meddling tactics so I went looking for no real cyber war story, which means to me like a actual disruptive cyber attacks, and as I looked around. It seemed like the place where that was really happening was in Ukraine not really in the US in fact maybe. Maybe what was happening in? Ukraine seemed to me like it was in some ways, the only real full blown cyber war that was actually occurring where Russian hackers were not just attacking the election which they had done, they tried this spoof the results of a presidential election, but they had also attacks media and destroyed their computers. They had attacked government agencies and tried to like destroy entire networks, and then they had turned off the power for the first time. In December of two thousand, fifteen, the the first actual blackout triggered by hackers, and just as I was look into this happened again the the effect, the seem hacker group caused a blackout this time in the capital of Kiev so I wince looking in Ukraine for this cyber war story that. Turned into a cover story for wired that kind of gave editors what they wanted, but then also kept unfolding This cyber war kept growing in scope and scale and. The original story written for wired was kind of about the fact that you could look to Ukraine to see the future of cyber war that will what was happening. There might soon spread to the rest of the world. And that is actually what happens to like just after we publish that cover story to same hackers released this climactic terrible cyber attack in Ukraine. Called Not Petiot that spread beyond Ukrainians became the worst cyberattack history cost ten billion dollars, so when that happened, that was when I saw that there was potential to do a book about this that it was not just a kind of case study about Ukraine or even kind of predictive story, but a an actual full story arc about this one group that had carried out the what I would say was not only the first. First Real Cyber War, but the worst cyberattack in history and the you know I wanted to capture the the Ark of that story in the effects, the real experience of cyber war. Yeah, so the group is called sand worm in this is just one of the the sort of opening arcs of the book is how they've come. They come to be named this because references and code walk people through just like it's so. relatable that like even these hackers are using using this language that leads them recalled Sandwich Tell people about it. So when I started to look into the origins of this group after that second blackout attack I I found that this this company called eyesight partners which have been acquired by fire I I, said partners was the first to find these hackers in twenty, fourteen, basically using fishing in kind of typical espionage tactics, plant malware in the networks of typical Russian hacking targets like groups across Eastern, Europe and NATO in a look like what they were doing was just kind of typical espionage. They were planning. This by wear calls lack energy buds will first of all they could see that they were rushing, because they had this server that they were using to administer some of these attacks and they. They left the server, so anybody could look at it in. There was a kind of Russian language to file for how to use black energy on the service, so these guys seem like they were rushing, but even more interesting in some ways. was that they to track each victim each instance of black energy? This malware has little campaign code in each campaign was a reference to the science fiction novel Dune and you know so like one of them was something about Iraq is, and then one of them is about the sutter cars, these like imperial soldiers in in that SCI FI universe so I said partners named this group sand worm, because well just because it's a cool. Name associated with doing, but it turned out to me. It became this very powerful because a sandwich miss this monster that lies beneath the surface, and occasionally arises from underground to do terribly destructive things. partners didn't know that at the time, they they soon afterward realized what sand. was doing was not just espionage, but they were actually doing reconnaissance for disruptive cyberattacks. They were also hacking power grids. They were planning black energy, not only in the European Eastern European targets in the US power grid networks as well. The Ultimately Syndrome was the first twenty fifteen to cross that line in use black energy as the first step in a multi step attack that led to a blackout. So this was not just espionage really was kind of like you know this monster that rises from under the ground to do terrible acts of mass destruction that came to pass so one of the things that comes up over in the book. Is this growing sense of dread from security researchers and analysts? Oh this is an imminent threat to the united. States just Ukraine, but like this is happening here and then there's a sense that the United States actually open the door to this kind of warfare with stuxnet. which was an attack on Iran? How how did those connect for you that it seemed like there's a new rule of engagement new set of rules of engagement for cyber warfare that actually the United States implicitly created with with stuxnet by attacking Iran. Yeah, I mean I tried to highlight. Clearly sand worm are the real bad guys in the story, they are the actual hacker group that did these terribly reckless destructive attacks that actually in some cases put people's lives at risk, the kind of in some parts of the story they actually shutdown medical record systems and I. Think may have cost people's lives with cyber attacks today they are the actual antagonist here, but I also want to highlight the ways that the US government is is partially responsible for the state of Cyber War, and there are a few ways that that's true. I The US! Open the Pandora's box of cyber war with stuxnet. This piece of now where that. That was used to destroy Iranian nuclear enrichment centrifuges that was the first piece of our that actually have caused that physical disruption destruction, and we now see Sandra doing the same thing in Ukraine. In in fact, in some ways around the world, also the the US hordes, these kind of zero day, secret hacking techniques, some of which were stolen and leaked and used by sand worm, but then I think the in fact, the biggest way that I tried to highlight that the US is responsible or complicit or negligent. Here is that we did not call allows what Santorum was doing in Ukraine and say to Russia. We know what you're doing. This is unacceptable. Nobody should be turning out the lights. Two civilians with cyber attacks. There wasn't a message like that I. mean the Obama White House sent a message to Russia over this kind of cyber hotline to say your election hacking is not okay. We see what you're doing and we want you to stop, but they said nothing about a tube blackout attacks in Ukraine, and that was kind of implicit signal to Russia. They could keep. Keep escalating, and even as all the cyber security, researchers and Ukrainians were warning that what was happening to Ukraine, would soon spread to the rest of the world, the US government ignore this both Obama, and then the trump administration until that prediction came to pass and a sand worm cyberattack did spread to the rest of the world, and it was too late, and we all suffered globally as a result, so let's talk about patch it. WAS CATASTROPHIC IN SCOPE, right? It took out the mayor shipping line, which is a massive business. It took out some hospitals in UK like it was huge in scope. I don't think people really put it all together. Talk about how it started and how big it grew. Yeah, so not too was kind of like big apotheosis sandwich, where all of these predictions of the terribly destructive things they were doing to the rest of the world came to pass but it did it started in Ukraine. They hijacked this. The the software updates of this accounting software called me doc that is basically used by everybody in Ukraine. The quicken turbo tax of Ukraine. If you do business in Ukraine, you have to have this installed, so sanborn hijack the updates of that news to push out this worm to thousands of victims mostly in Ukraine, but it was a worm, so it's spread the mmediately end quickly kind of carpet bombs. The entire Ukrainian Internet's every computer at spread to would encrypt permanently. You could not recover the computer, so it very quickly took down pretty much every. Every Ukrainian government agency twenty two banks multiple airports for hospitals in Ukraine that I. could count and in each of these cases. What is eight took them down. I mean it destroyed essentially all of their computers, which requires sometimes weeks or months to recover from, but then as you know, this is a worm that does not respect national borders. So even though it was, it seemed to be an attack intended to disrupt Ukraine. It immediately spread beyond Ukraine's borders. Borders to everybody who had this accounting software installed? That was doing business in Ukraine and some people who didn't so that includes Maersk. The world's largest shipping firm and Fedex and Mondelez, which owns cadbury, NABISCO and ranking manufacturing firm that makes tylenol in Merck. The Pharmaceutical Company in New Jersey on each of these companies lost hundreds of millions of dollars. The scale of this is kind of difficult to capture but I in the book I tried to. To I focused in part Maersk because it is just a good company to look at because you can. They had this gigantic global physical machine that is they have seventy six ports around the world that they own as well as these massive ships that have tens of thousands of shipping containers on them. And I told the story of how on this day seventeen of their terminals of were entirely paralyzed by this attack with ships arriving with just. Piles of containers on them. Nobody could unload. Nobody knew what was inside of nobody knew how to load or unload them with around the world of seventeen terminals, thousands of trucks, Semitrailers, carrying containers were lining up in Lyons miles long because the gates that were kind of checkpoints to check in the these trucks to drop something off or pick it up. They were paralyzed as well. This was a fiasco on a global scale is responsible for a fifth of the world's lable shipping capacity. They were truly just a rendered brain dead by this attack, but yeah displayed out at all of these different victims MERC had to borrow their own each vaccine from the Center for Disease Control because they're manufacturing. Manufacturing was disrupted by this, and it ultimately spread to a company called nuance, nate speech to text software. They have a service that does this for hospitals across the US to dozens of our possibly hundreds of American hospitals at this backlog of transcriptions to medical records that were lost because of this, and that resulted in patients, being do for surgeries or transfers, other hospitals in nobody knew their medical records were updated. I mean this was scale where hundreds of hospitals each of which has thousands of patients missing changes the medical records. We don't know what the effects of that work, but very well could've actually harmed people's health. Our lives I mean the scale of not petty is very difficult to. Get your mind around, but we do know that you know monetarily cost ten billion dollars, which is by far the biggest number we've ever seen, but it also had this this kind of harder to quantify toll on people's lives, so it it you know you read about it at length and wired. Obviously these companies go down of ripples in mainstream sort of general press, but I don't feel like people really not like Oh. This Russian group called San Worms sponsored by the Russian government. Unleash this attack in it caused this cascading effect of failure and disaster cost in that because we know what we can attribute it to the government, our government. I don't feel like that connection got made for people. What is the gap between other as a hack and Oh, this is actually a type of warfare engagement, because that that connection seems very tenuous. I think for a lot of people. Even as sort of the more general mainstream press covers this stuff. Yeah, you know. I don't think that that's is just like the nature of. Of Cyber War I think that was a failing that that lack of connection is a failing on our government's parts, and on you could say even on the part of some of these victims like these large companies I mean I at the time did not pitch it happened. I was fully on the trail of standard within days. I was talking to cyber security researchers who? Who had piece together? Some of the forensics to show the not petiot was Sandra that it was a Russian state-sponsored attack in yet none of those companies that I mentioned mercker Mondelez or Maersk or Fedex, or any of them wanted to say the Russia had done this to them and know governments were talking about either like the Ukrainian government was. They're always willing to point. Point the finger at Russia, but the US government was not, and you know that to me seemed to be just kind of I mean I felt like I was being gas. Let's at that point. I had watched Russia due to Ukraine for a long time at that point tonight. I sort of understood that NATO in the West. We had this kind of cruel logic that. Ukraine is not us. Russia can do what it likes to Ukraine because they're not NATO not e you. They are Russia's sphere of influence or something I think that that's very wrongheaded, but at least it made sense. You know to have that that viewpoints, but now this attack had spread from Ukraine to hit American soil American companies in many cases and yet still the US government was saying nothing I just thought this was bizarre and you know so i. For months I was like. Trying to get any of these companies to tell the story of of their experiences, not Peta I was trying to figure out why the US government wasn't talking about the fact that this was a Russian cyberattack and ultimately I. Think it was I. think it was kind of I know partly disorganization negligence. I think it may have something to do with the fact that the. The? Trump administration doesn't like talking about Russian hackers for obvious reasons, but eight months after it took eight months ultimately for the US government to finally say not that it was a was Russia it was the worst cyberattack in history, and then a month later. The White House impose consequences in put new sanctions on Russia and response, but it took nine months and more importantly it took. Multiple years this without was the first time this was twenty eighteen, and the Russian cyber war in Ukraine had started around the fall of Twenty fifteen, so that's just incredible span of negligence when the US government said nothing about these escalating unfolding. Acts, of Cyber Award that there should have been unacceptable from the very beginning I mean these are the kind of quintessential acts of state sponsored cyber attacks on civilians, trying out the lights. You know that's the kind of thing that I believe that the US government should have called out and drawn a red line across at the very beginning took ears, so I do think it was a big failing. Of of diplomacy, it just seemed like that part of the problem, and this is kind of an expression is it's so hard to describe like if the Russian government sent fighter jets to America and live their support. Okay, like everyone understood, you can see it. You can understand what happened there. In the you know, there's like a however many decades of movies about how to fight that war. This is a bunch of people in a room typing. Like it there's just an element of this where the dangerous Oh federal where the attack is invisible, and while the effects might be very very tangible, the causes are still sort of mysterious people so. My question is who is sandwich. What what do we know about them? Where do they work? What are they like? Do we have a sense of how this operation actually operates? In some ways the the biggest challenge of reporting this book, and I spent essentially the third act of the book, the last third of the reporting of the book, trying to answer the question of who is in worm, who are these people? Where are they located? What motivates them and I guess to partially spoil the ending here. They are a unit of the year you. They are a part of Russia's military intelligence agency, which is responsible for you know, this is not a coincidence. They are responsible for election meddling responsible for the attempted assassination of You. chemical weapons in the United Kingdom they're responsible for the downing of a seventeen as commercial passenger jet over Ukraine were three hundred innocent people died on the G. R.. You are this incredibly reckless callous out military intelligence agency, but they act like kind of almost just cut through mercenaries around the world. Doing Russia's bidding in ways that are very scary, so I threw essentially like a combination of excellent work of a bunch of security researchers who I was speaking to combined with some confirmation from US intelligence agencies, and then ultimately some other clues from the investigation of Robert Muller into meddling all these things combined created the trail that led to one group within the JERE. You that were you know I? Eventually had some names and faces even address of this this group, and all that was actually only finally fully confirms After the book came out Justin in recent months when the White House finally actually was the State Department's. End as well as the UK on Australian and other governments together finally said yes, sand worm is in fact that this unit of the year you so this theory that I developed in positive near the end of the book was finally basically confirmed by governments just in recent months. So one thing that strikes me at that is I, think of the Russian military things. Gru is being foreboding being obviously, they're very very good at this other a buttoned up in then they have like a incredible social media presence that kind of POPs up throughout the book that distracts from what doing. They set up Gucci for two point Oh when they were doing the DNC hacks that fed to wikileaks in the. That account insisted it was just guy. They set up the shadow brokers which was. I read. It is just like your some goof-balls like they wanted to seem a lot dumber and a lot smaller than they were. They were very effective at it to people I. Talk About those that strategy, and then I guess my question have is like a re better at seeing that strategy for what it is well. You make a really interesting point. The uses these false flags like throughout their recent history that we I should say we don't know that they were responsible for shadow brokers. In fact, nobody knows who shot a brokers. The shadow brokers truly are, and they are in some ways the biggest mystery in this whole story, this one group that hacked the NSA apparently and leaked a bunch of their zero day hacking techniques, or maybe they were even say insiders. We still don't know the answer to that question, but the other other incidents you mentioned. That are you are responsible for this Guja for two point zero fake hacktivists leaked a bunch of the Clinton documents. They're responsible for other false flags like they at one point to call themselves the Cyber Caliphate pretended to be Isis. They've a pretended to be like patriotic pro. Russian Ukrainians at some point they they're always like wearing different masks ends. They're very deceptive. in the a later chapter of the book, some of the biggest one of the biggest attacks they. They did was this attack on the twenty thousand Olympics where they not only wore a false mask, but they actually had layers of false flags where as cyber security researchers W. This melwert was used to destroy the entire back end of the two thousand eighteen winter Olympics. Just as the opening ceremony began, this was a catastrophic events. The aware had all of these fake clues made look like it was Chinese or North Korean or maybe Russian. Nobody could tell it was like. It was this kind of confusion bomb almost designed to to just make researchers throw up their hands. Give up on attributing mallards. Any particular actor was only through some amazing detective work by some of the analysts that I spoke to the able to cut through those false flags identify that sand was behind this essentially, but yeah, it's it is a one very real characteristic of the jury you that they are almost they seem to almost take pleasure or like be showing off their deception capabilities to and their evolving those capabilities they are getting more deceptive over time as fake gets more, destructive aggressive. Advertising content when I say Utopia what comes to mind? Birds Chirping lush natural beauty dialed up and vibrant technicolor. Is it within reach. Your world. World. explained. You are an essential part of the Pathak social body. Everybody in that place. Everybody happy now. While the peacock original series brave new world takes place in a scientific futuristic utopia. The concept is nothing new Sir Thomas more. 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This is bowes I'm a podcast or By, I, a Gamer Five G. is changing the gaming world in really unexpected exciting ways with the help of Samsung Five G. I'm getting a peek at how gaming is getting faster smoother and can even improve our lives well. Let's dish some secrets about the future gaming. Dr Jean Mechanical Direct Route Game Research and development at the Institute of the future. She's also a bestselling author game inventor. She's optimistic about gaming impact on us and our minds. The biggest thing that we've seen in research is that. We need to be able to game in the moment wherever we are. So, what happens when when you're playing when your favorite games is that it fires up than her logical pathways, it's kind of like having a of caffeine and a pet dog from your favorite coach, and you've just meditated for an hour. This emotional neurological power up is called the game transfer effect, and that effect is heightened when using five. Five G. The game transfer fact requires you to be totally immersed in the game, so you want to have the most amazing graphics and the most immersive audio and with five G. to do that anywhere anytime, be one of the first to harness the game transfer effect with Samsung Galaxy Five G. now available on Galaxy, S Twenty-five g and a seventy one five G. feels good to be I with Samsung. I love to play the game of like. Imagine the meeting and imagine that the one set of meeting which is like the actual hackers finding the vulnerabilities figuring out how to jump from Windows, eight computer to some sort of physical hardware controller that actually runs like that. That's a very hard problem in and of itself, and then the other meeting. They're like what we're GONNA do is claim to be a guy called Gucci for two point, Oh and like those are. Not Connected Right, but the way they throughout the book the way they execute East campaigns they're deeply connected, and that seems like not only just a new kind of warfare, and you kind of craft, but some just consistently seems to work in surprising ways like the tech press is GonNa. Be Like Gucci. I says this and we're. There's never that next step of also we think it's Russian government, and that seems like first of all I'm dying. I imagine the meeting right. I would love to be a fly on the wall of the meeting where they decide what their twitter name is going to be today. I'm very curious how they evolve those attacks in such a way that it just seems to be more and more effective time. Yeah, I mean. I also love to have been those meetings in. It's my one kind of regret in this book that I never actually got. Interviews, it's almost an impossible thing to do. They liked find defectors from the R., you or something. He will tell those stories at a knock it murdered I mean. It's kind of a possible, but but. In some cases? I think your earlier points. They almost seem kind of bumbling in these things they do them in a very improvisational way. for two point Oh seemed almost like it was a justice thing they invented on the spot, tried to cover up some of the the accidental ups like they had left russian-language formatting errors in the documents that they had leaked from the DNC, so they admitted this guy who appeared the next day and started. Talking about being a Romanian. Friends as motherboard Lorenza, Franceschi decry he started this conversation. Align with with Guja for two point, oh basically proved at the guy could not actually properly speak Romanian. BE Russian speaker. In fact, it was. It was almost comical at the same time. They're using very sophisticated hacking techniques doing destructive attacks on a massive scale, but they're also. They seem like they're kind of making it up as they go along. They do things that don't actually seem very kind of strategically smart. They kind of seem like they're trying to impress their boss for the day. Sometimes with just like some sometimes, it's just seems like the Jere. You wakes up in asks themselves. Like what can we blow up today? Rather than thinking like? How can we accomplish the greater strategic objectives of the Russian Federation? So they are fascinating in that way and very stringent colorful group. That's I think one of the biggest questions I have here is. We spend a lot of time trying to imagine what flat and Mirror Putin wants. You know when he grows up, but it. None of this seems targeted like what is the goal for Russia to disrupt the Winter Olympics right like. Is there a purpose to that? Is that just a strike fear? Is it just to? EXPAND THAT SUV influenced. Is it just to say we have the capability furious is there? has there ever really been the stated goal for this kind of cyber warfare? That one is particularly mystifying. I mean you can imagine why Russia would want to attack the Olympics. They were banned from the two thousand Eighteen Olympics doping, but then you would think that they might want to attack the Olympics and send a message maybe like eight deniable message a message that you know if you continue to ban us. We're GONNA. Continue to attack you like like any terrorists would do, but instead they attacked the winter. Olympics in this way, that really seemed like they were trying not to get caught, and instead like make it look like the was Russia North Korea? And then you have to like what is the point of that was? The could kind of. Sit there in Moscow and kind of like rub their hands together in gleefully. Watch this chaos unfolds. It almost really does seem like it was petty vindictive thing that they just for their own emotional needs wanted to make sure that nobody could enjoy the Olympics if they were not going to enjoy them I that was, but that one is i. think outlier in some ways for the most part you can kind of see. The Russia is advancing. The G. R. You that sand worm is advancing something that does generally make sense which is that. In Ukraine for instance, they're trying to make Ukraine look like a failed state. They're trying to make Ukrainians. Lose faith in their security. Services are trying to prevent investors globally from funneling money into Ukraine trying to create a kind of frozen conflict, as we say in Ukraine where there's this constant perpetual state of degradation. They're not trying to conquer the country, but they're trying to create a kind of permanent war in Ukraine and would cyber war. You can do that beyond the traditional front end. It is in some ways the same kind of tactic that they used in other places like the US which. which here we saw more than influence operation that they were hacking leaking organizations like democratic campaign organizations and anti doping organizations to kind of so confusion to embarrass on their targets. They're trying to influence like the international audiences opinion these people, but in Ukraine, it is in some ways, just a different kind of influence operation where they're trying to influence the world's view of Ukraine. Influence Ukrainians view of their themselves under government to make them feel like they are in a war zone even when their kid hundreds of miles from the actual fighting. That's happening on the eastern fronts in the eastern region of. Of Ukraine so in a book you you you go to Kiev. You spent time in Ukraine. Is there a sense in that country that while sometimes light goes out sometimes our TV stations. Their computers don't boot anymore. Because they got rewritten, the Hydros got Zeros like. Is there a sense that this is happening? Is there a sense the defy back is there does Microsoft deploy you know dozens of engineers to to help fight back. How does that play out on the ground there? Yeah, I mean to be fair. Ukrainians are very stoic about these things and regular. Ukrainian citizens were not bothered by you know. Know a short blackout. They didn't particularly care you know. This blackout was the first ever. Hacker induced blackout in history but Ukrainian cyber security. People were very unnerved by this end, people in these actual utilities were traumatized I mean these attacks were truly like relentless sins very kind of scary for the actual operators at the controls I mean in the first blackout attack. These poor operators Ukrainian control room in western Ukraine they were locked out of their computers, and they had to watch their own mouse cursor. Click through circuit breakers, turning off the power in front of them I. Mean They watched it happen? At these kind of Phantom hands to control of their mouse movements, so they took this very very seriously, but yet Ukrainians as a whole I mean they have seen a lot. They are going through an actual physical war. They've seen the seizure of Crimea and the invasion of the east of the country. You know the the date hits. A Ukrainian general was assassinated with a car bomb in the middle of Kiev, so they have a lot of problems, and I'm not sure that cyber war is one of the top of their minds, but not patio I. Did, actually reach Ukrainians normal. Ukrainian civilians to it. It shook them as well. I talked to two regular Ukrainians. who found that they couldn't swipe into the Kiev Metro. They couldn't use their credit card at the grocery store. All the ATM's were down The Postal Service was taken out for every computer that the postal service had was taken out for more than a month. I mean these things really did affect people's lives, but it kind of. A until that kind of climactic worm. Not Patio for I think for this to really reach home for Ukrainians. who have kind of seen so much. How do you fight back? I, mean I one of things that struck me as I was reading. The book is so many of the people you talked to people who are identifying the threat. They're actually private companies. Eyesight was the first even detect it. they are contractors to intelligence agencies the military in some cases, but they're not necessarily the government right like it's not necessarily Microsoft. Who has to issue the patches from the software not necessarily GE which makes simplicity, which is the big industrial controls talk about a lot. How does all that come together into a defense because that seems like harder problem of coordination? Yeah, I mean defense in Cyber. Security is in an eternal problem. It's incredibly complicated, and when you have a really sophisticated determined adversary, it know they will win eventually ends I. think that they're absolutely lessons for defense in this book about you know. Maybe you need to really really think about software updates for instance like the kind that were hijacked to a with this medoc accounting software. As a vector for terrible cyber-attacks. Imagine that like. Any of your insecure apps that have kind of updates can be become a a piece of Malware, really unique to signature networks need to think about patching on. There are just an endless kind of checklist of things to every organization needs to do to protect themselves so. In some ways that just like a Sisyphean task and I don't. I don't try to answer that question in the book because it's too big, and it's kind of boring as well, but what I do really hammer on is the thing that the government's really could've done here. which is to try to establish norms tried to control attackers through diplomacy through kind of disciplinary action through things like kind of Geneva Convention for Cyber War if. If you think about a kind of analogy to say like chemical weapons, we could just try to give everyone in the world a gas mask that they have to carry around with them at all times, or we could create a Geneva. Convention norm that chemical weapons should not be used in if they are than crime, and you get pulled in front of the Hague. Hague and we've done the ladder and I think that in some ways should be part of the the answer to cyber war as well we need to establish norms and make countries like Russia or like organizations like the G. Are you understand that there will be consequences for these kinds of attacks, even when the victim is not the US or NATO or the? The EU and I think we're only just starting to think about that. One of the questions I had as reading is it seems like a very clear red line for almost everyone you talk to is attacks on the power grid right? That is just unacceptable. You should not do it if you do it. You've crossed a line and there should be some consequence. Is, that clear to governments. Is that something that our government says? It's something that the says it has been established. It seems like it's it's the conventional wisdom wants to salvage, but I'm not unclear whether that is actually the line that exists. It definitely has not been established, and when I kind of did these I managed to get sort of interviews with the top cyber security officials in the Obama ends trump administration Jay Michael Daniel was the cyber. Cyber Coordinator for the administration was the kind of cyber coordinator boss in the The Homeland Security Adviser for trump and both of them when I asked him about like wiped. Why didn't you know to put it bluntly like? Why didn't you respond? When Russia caused blackouts in Ukraine? Both of them essentially said well. You know that's not actually the rule that we want to set. We want to be able to cause blackouts in our adversaries networks. In their power grids when we are in a war situation or when we believe it's in our national interest, so you know that's the thing about these cyber war capabilities. This is part of the problem that every country. Absolutely the US among them isn't really interested in controlling these weapons, because we in this kind of Lord of the rings fashion, we are drawn to them to like we want to maintain the ability to use those weapons ourselves and nobody wants to throw this ring in the fires, of Mount Doom. We all wanted maintain the ring and imagine that we can use it for good in out. So that's why neither administration called that Russia for doing this because they want that power to. Make the comparison to to nuclear weapons but Negotiated drawdown and treaties with Russia in the past we count warheads where aware that the United States stockpiles can destroy the world. Fifty Times over today maybe tomorrow one hundred hundred like what we have a sense of the the measure of force that we can. Put on the world when it comes to nuclear weapons, there's a sense that Oh, we should never use these right like we have them as a deterrent, but we've gained out that actually leads to his mutually assured destruction like there's an entire body of academics. There's entire body of researchers. Entire body is got scenario planning with that kind of weapon. Does that same thing exist for for cyber weapons. There are absolutely. Know community is of academics. Policymakers who are thinking about this stuff now, but I don't think it's kind of gotten through to actual government decision. that. There needs to be kind of cyber deterrence in how that would work. In in the comparison to nuclear weapons is like instructive, but not exactly helpful. In fact, it's kind of counter-productive because we cannot deter cyber-attacks with other cyber-attacks i. don't think that's GonNa work in part because we haven't even tried to establish it yet. There are no kind of rules or read lines, but then I think more importantly. Everybody thinks that they can get away with cyberattacks that they can. They're going to create a false flag. That's clever enough that that when they blow up a power grid, they can blame their neighbor instead, so they think they're. They're gonNA. Get Away with it, and that causes them to do it anyway. A not fear the kind of assured destruction so I think that the the right response, the way to to deter cyber attacks is not with the promise of a cyber attack in return. It's with all the other kind of tools we have, and they've been used sometimes, but but they were not in the case of Sand Werman. Those tools include like sanctions which came far too late in the story indictments of hackers. In some cases, we still haven't really seen syndrome. Hackers indicted for the things that they did in Ukraine or or even not petty. And then ultimately just kind of messaging like calling out naming and shaming bad actors, and that has happened to some degree with Sandra, but in some cases there have still been massive failures there there has still been no public attribution of the Sandwich attack on the twenty eighteen Olympics I mean. My Book has been out for months. I think show pretty clear evidence that syndrome is responsible for this attack. The very least it was Russia and yet the US and Korean War, These Olympics took place at UK, none of these governments have named Russia as having done that. That attack which almost just invites them to do it again whenever our next Olympics are going to be, I guess maybe not this year, but if you don't send that message than you're just essentially inviting Russia to try again so I think might my big question is what happens now? I mean right we you write about. The NSA has tailored access operations, which is their elite hacking group. We are obviously interested in maintaining some of these capabilities. We've come to a place where people are writing books about how it works. What is the next step? What is the next? does it just keep getting worse or does this kind of diplomacy you're talking about? Is that beginning to happen I? Think there is some little glimmers of hope about the diplomacy beginning to happen I mean this year in February I think it was the State Department's called out a sand worm attack on Georgia, where a worms hackers basically took down a ton of Georgian websites by attacking the hosting providers as well as a couple of TV's broadcasters in the US. State Department with a few other governments not. said this was sand. Worm named the unit of the GRU. That's is that was confirmation that I've been looking for for a long time, but they also made a point of saying that we're calling this out is unacceptable, even though Georgia. Georgia is not part of NATO or the U. so that's that's progress. That's essentially creating a new kind of rule. That's state-sponsored. Hackers can't do certain things, no matter who the victims and that's really important. Also, it was kind of interesting because federal officials like gave me a heads up about that announcement before happened, which they have very very rarely do and I think they were trying. To say was in we. We read your book and we. Got The message okay like Stop attacking us about this like we're trying. We're doing something different here I. Don't want flatter myself that I actually changed their policy, but it did seem interesting that they wanted to tell me personally about this so i. I think that like maybe our stance on this kind of diplomacy is evolving, and we're learning lessons, but at the same time we also see the attacks evolving to. To and their new innovations in these kinds of disruption happening, we've seen since some of these terrible Sandra attacks. You know other very scary things like this piece of our called Triton or crisis that was used to disabled safety systems in a oil refinery in Saudi Arabia on that was you know that could have caused an actual physical explosion of petrochemical facility? The the attacks are evolving to okay final last real question. Tell people where they can get your book. You can find all kinds of places by on indie Greenberg Dot net. Written another book as well previously, yes. That's right. I wrote a book about wikileaks. Cypher punks and things like that. That's right well. I'm a huge fan. It was an honor to talk to you. Thank you so much for coming on I know it's. It's a weird time to be talking about anything, but the coronavirus I was very happy to talk about something else, which is that it seems a little bit more in control Even if it is quite dangerous, a thank you for the time. I appreciate it. Yeah, I'm glad to provide people with a different kind of apocalypse as a distraction.

Ukraine United States Russian Government Nato Olympics Kiev United Kingdom Sandra Cyber Award State Department Kim Zetter Barack Obama Clinton Russia San Worm Sandy Greenberg NSA DNC
New comedy shows announced from Will Ferrell and iHeartMedia

podnews

02:20 min | 1 year ago

New comedy shows announced from Will Ferrell and iHeartMedia

"Media and Will Ferrell have told us all about the plans. Then make in for big money players their comedy podcast network one Murph. The new shows is from Michael Bolton Michael Bolton's big sexy podcast. We've all the details in our Schoener to newsletter today. Triton digital published their latest US podcast report Sirius Xm's has overtaken entercom cadence thirteen in the network rancor shows the highest new entry stitches W with Marc Maron. Hats number thirty two downloads for the top fifteen networks are up three point four percent since the Nostra port report measures participating publishers only. The BBC is now reaching a record global audience of four hundred sixty eight million people, but global news podcast remains the BBC's most popular with audiences approaching one million a week. That one is in Google podcast so low. Most of them aren't and Steve Osha has a second virtual new media summit in September. We've made to our podcast events website at Port Dot, events News, the latest edition of slates trump cast has an actual trump on it. His niece Mary trump who has a book out most important thing to know about. Donald is that hill accept help of any kind. If benefits? This is a man who knows the difference between right and wrong, but doesn't think it applies to him if he can get help. That's going to advance a 'cause. It's in my family. was kind of an unwritten rule that certain behaviors that would have been crossing the line for other people were okay. If you were a particular trump, not all this like. If you were a particular, trumped the latest podcast. Join. Evergreen podcast. Is Game Fix live every week on facebook? You can expect video game reviews news, comedy and interviews of people, actually in the gaming industry and Canadian Science. Fiction podcast moon base. Theater out is in production for season three, and will reveal eleven new actors as part of their crowd funding campaign,

Michael Bolton Mary Trump United States Events News BBC Will Ferrell Marc Maron Port Dot Triton Digital Schoener Facebook Google Steve Osha Donald Trump Canadian Science
Apple makes a new, exclusive, 'podcast'

podnews

03:17 min | 1 year ago

Apple makes a new, exclusive, 'podcast'

"Apple is making its own Daily News Show Apple News today which the company calls, a podcast is exclusive to apple podcasts, and there's no RSS feed hits visible, but doesn't play on the apple podcasts website to the verge claims it's only available in the US Canada, the UK and Australia. The editorial however seems entirely US focused. It wasn't mentioned in spotify's launch yesterday, but then launch into Russia does not include podcasting the. The market for them is nascent. spotify told Reuters it's something that'll be important to us. Over time did a spotify VP GUSTAF Gillenhammer spotify Russia's instagram account says we're working on. It specifies lack of podcasts. In Russia, will probably be talking point, ask listen. It's the first podcast festival in Russia a free virtual event on August, the first second and it's added to our list of podcast events at pod DOT events. audio boom has signed a bunch of new shows to their network, including idiot with Chris Hardwick and the tiny meet gang. It's also renewed contracts with no such thing as a fish and true crime podcast Morbid Acosta's added a virtual storefront for the marketplace it allows advertisers to browse and discover shows that fit their desired audience, and actually allows anyone to so if you. You want men aged between eighteen and twenty in the US who likes comedy and history can the alarmist is for your apparently Triton digital is podcast platform Omni studio has enabled tools for exclusive podcasts with secure podcast feeds and players. It's been announced at East. Cooper from Mama Mia is now an executive producer for podcasting at. Nova entertainment in Sydney Congratulations Elise pricing for. The podcasting Leo. LaPorte says he's unhappy about what the future might hold for. podcasting eventually fell, be three or four companies. He says that own all podcasts kantle very dramatically. Change the kind of stuff you listen to, and if you're thinking of making a podcast APP, you might want to rethink that they're hard. Case he borne writes a good piece on why podcast APPs fail especially once that promise social features in podcast news today quizzes is a new trivial cuisine. You can play along with your friends or on your own produced by Mama Mia and Gordon's Gin. If you like pub quizzes, this is just the tonic. We see what they've done that. Zigzagged the business show about being human returns today it's part of the Ted family of podcast and hosted by Monica Zomorodian who asks what is the path to Kinda more sustainable way? What the FA catcher is a popular thirty podcast returns today for a second season takes a look at all things good food. Produce Sustainability and great recipes and tips and Kim. CIDER is new media podcast hosted by Chris Peterson of kindred media, the first episode talks about recent mergers and acquisitions in podcasting iheartmedia spotify, Sirius, Xm and Kim Kardashian West and Chris should know he created and launched the IHEART podcast network and worked at tune in,

Spotify Russia United States Apple Laporte Mama Mia Chris Hardwick Kim Kardashian West Morbid Acosta Chris Peterson Triton Digital Gustaf Gillenhammer Chris Reuters Monica Zomorodian Australia Sydney TED VP
US Podcast Ad Revenues grew 48% in 2019

podnews

03:05 min | 1 year ago

US Podcast Ad Revenues grew 48% in 2019

"The US podcast at markets grew forty eight percent in two, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, two, seven, hundred and eight million dollars, according to the AP's annual podcast revenue study that's nearly thirty million dollars higher than they predicted host read ads were responsible for two thirds of the revenue. Now will not hate a billion in two thousand, nine twenty, though, but we are still growing the IB predict slow growth of fourteen point seven percent this year to eight hundred and twelve million dollars. Thanks to the Pan Dome thanks pandemic. It's official scripts has agreed to sell stitcher to Sirius Xm. The agreed price is three hundred twenty five million dollars. Would expect the announcement of new CEO FOR POCKET CAST shortly. It's likely to be John W. Gibbons based in La. He's a strategic advisor to Pod chaser and worked at MD and Amazon for fourteen years. SPOTIFY's Gimblett media is being sued for failing to make its podcasts accessible to the deaf and hard of hearing. The New York lawsuit argues that GIMBLETT VIOLATES THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT for failing to provide closed captioning on various podcasts. Americans are starting their audio day a little later, according to new research from Edison Research. We hope you're enjoying your lion. Shift the kickoff event for the podcast movement. University happens later today it's free to take part and free to be a member. Australia Triton digital have published their podcast report for June total downloads virtually unchanged. The report only mentions participating publishers, not including the country's largest podcast publisher the AP. Even? Though they said that they were joining in the next few months back in October, we've got a pressing corean again. Hey, are insi- our podcast network. Australia, still number one according to Triton claims podcast listening in the news and entertainment categories are record highs. Pontiac has released the US top twenty podcast rank earthy Ben Shapiro show climbs to number five that also only measures participating publishers podcast podcasters unlimited is a new podcast network and consultantcy Paul chaser ratings, reviews and replies and are available on pod Kite Zeno. Is To district NPR podcast on their diaspora focused service and Brad Schwartz. ooh became the new podcasting boss of audible. Last month has left the company after employees discovered an old sexual harassment lawsuit in which Schwartz was named. And KOSS news once upon a time in the valley from enter cadence thirteen launched today, before the was Paris or Kim. There was Traci Lords, but this adult star wasn't Demi. Moore is starring and producing in a brand new podcast. Dirty Diana, the story of a dying marriage. How to partners find their way back to each other. And returning for a second series story bound is a radio this a program designed for the podcast age collaboration between the POD, glamorous and lit hub radio

United States Strategic Advisor AP Pan Dome Australia Triton Digital New York Australia Spotify Triton CEO Edison Research Traci Lords Amazon LA NPR Ben Shapiro Diana
"triton" Discussed on Darknet Diaries

Darknet Diaries

07:59 min | 1 year ago

"triton" Discussed on Darknet Diaries

"Is understanding. Why is this a story that we should be freaking out about? Because this could. Potentially target ends people in the US or places like that and the whole infrastructure. isn't you know? Yeah I I share people's concern and leave find it reasonable in bugler concern, but I always try to downplay it. So what's the hype of? It must out? Not The hype of it would be to assume that this is some highly scalable attack that immediately guitar get oil and gas companies, electric companies around the world like all the same or similar. I'm one same way that attacks electric system aren't height, but thinking that there's one grid that you could take down all at once is. And so on this one. How seriously I take this I dissociate asleep that when I bought a board of Directors or coffee. Security Teams in the Orleans gas industry is one of the first thing I highlight, and it's all been very clearly. It you do not have -tective. Prevention and responsive capabilities around the style, its accuracy, not taking indicators of appraisals, indicators chain, but the style gt news of the behavior of attack. If you're not prepared, it's like A. In response the best. You were doing a disservice your energy. And what I mean by that is this is the absolute best document case. We ever APP of what really could happen. Cyber Attack Lee's light and the community. And if people aren't taking that seriously in these industrial operations and industrial varmints, I think they're being. Do I, think the public be freaking out about it. And the work that I see Abbes companies. Is that so much work is happening. It's not like they never get credit for we commonly all electric utility or whatever's on taking security. Seriously, that's not true. There are some that aren't and they need to do better for sure but I saw much work. Happy, and and you just don't come out and publicize it. We, we have the a balance there, but does this attack and this adversary concern me absolutely what really concerns me? Is these attacks industry control systems aren't about the Mauer it's not about the vulnerability. It's about a blueprint of how to achieve future. Attacks enjoy revealing knowledge and insight that other adversaries pick up a news. This is how the realm of only street adversary activity gets into non-state actors. Is once a state accurate figures out how to doesn't do it. Publicize it. Get other people trying to do those things Huger so the the butterfly effect here is that when people start doing these types of acts, they started come more common they starting become easier, and we want to prevent that because these are particularly damaging style attacks. For me. At least this whole attack puts me in deep thought. Hundreds of industrial plants around Saudi Arabia and the world that have these same try connects safety controllers, and it sounds like these hackers were in the network for years before accidentally tripping and alarm. Wonder how many other industrial networks might these attackers begin right now? Lying in weights waiting for the need to pull the trigger. And it also makes me wonder how many other plants might have had a mysterious, shut down, and didn't have the capability or care to look deeper for this malware, and instead they just started the plant back up. Spooky stuff on one hand I want to know more, but on the other hand. I'm kind of afraid to look come on. The student you so much! You know that Yeah, sometimes you have to let go, and that's exactly what I did was Triton I. Don Think about listening more concentrated right now. Working with for example Red Cross and with people involved into humanitarian law, so that on helping them with my technical knowledge with technical inputs explain him the consequences of the attacks type operations the critical infrastructures, so the deck would create back to laws and make no called Lake Such A. Well this is mine. Main focus right well. Yeah, I think when we look. The attribution sided where I will say. The private sector may not need to go the distance and try Sussman I do think government ship so isn't Horton clients of Greg. US technology to know that Russia Dennis No. But if Russia did do. than the US in. Do actually know that and it does need a way into on discussions between states he could lay way into economic sanctions under others like this attack. was a very purposeful and blatant attack against civilians and civilian infrastructure in state leaders around the world mutating this attack attacks like you rain attack like not. In. Actually take these new style of attacks off the table and penalized states that do these types of acts they should inexcusable so whereas only natural. I. Don't WanNa go the distance. They don't see the value in its state. The various intelligence agencies around the world need to need to get it right, and there needs to be action Bolivar. And I've seen the way our nation's leadership interviews. People like mark. Zuckerberg our leaders simply don't understand technology enough to know what to do about this in. It's embarrassing. Technology defines our current time. There's no excuse for our leaders to not understand technology more in depth at this point. Maybe. This was all just a test or practice, since the attackers didn't actually cause damage to the plant other than an accidental shutdown, because I wonder about the people who were behind this did they know this was a mission to kill people? Or were they told? This is just test and that no human lives would be lost during this test. When you look at the code long enough, the malware start to really think about that person who wrote it. Because it was a human who typed out that code. Marina thinks about whatever person wrote. This malware was. I spent so much time He's activities. And because you know varian typical research. Intensive research work. That to which I can relate. Action to talk to many guys about that. You know like everybody who is investigating incident. Spend a lot of time. You know like you're stuck. Already seen all the incident. Can feel more person that pain the frustration you know. But they sometimes also kind of want to see the person. Yeah I think it's probably not personal opinion. The probably even did not really clearly understood the consequences of what exactly they doing, or maybe as you say if it was adjusted test, and then you never go in to disrupt innocent, though that didn't feel like they were doing really something dangerous because I would not be comfortable, conduct an operation which. May impact life of civilians. There is a lot to think about regarding this incident. These kind of attacks on operational technology are slowly becoming more common. We've seen stuxnet. Try to disable a nuclear enrichment facility, and we've seen a tax on the Ukraine's energy grid, and now we see Triton going after the emergency shutdown systems of a chemical plant. Chilling for sure. And I just hope that whoever created this. Not Crazy enough.

US Russia Mauer Saudi Arabia Triton Lee Bolivar Ukraine Zuckerberg Sussman mark Marina Dennis No Horton Greg
"triton" Discussed on Darknet Diaries

Darknet Diaries

07:53 min | 1 year ago

"triton" Discussed on Darknet Diaries

"A little bit more. About what ot is you probably already know what it is right information technology. It's where computer store manipulate and transfer information ot is operational technology, and this is the hardware and software that's used to control physical things in the world like valves and pumps and other machinery. Think about all the electronics that control factory a plant for utility, company. Chemical and petrol plant like this has a ton of OT system. There are electrical devices that open vows poor chemicals released gases and pump fluids, but an important component of all this is the safety, instrumented systems or S S, so many of the chemicals at the plant are toxic. A must be handled very carefully, so these S I s or safety systems will monitor the environment very closely and trigger a shutdown if anything, becomes dangerous. And those safety systems that are responsible for conducting an emergency shutdown and try connex controllers. In June two thousand seventeen something had gone terribly wrong. One of the emergency shutdown systems stopped working malfunctioned, and when the emergency shutdown device malfunctions, then if there was a real emergency at the plants, this could result in a disaster. This is a big problem when the brakes go out on your car. But when this system malfunctioned, it triggered an alert on another system, which alerted the engineers to go shut the plant down and inspect this controller. The manufacturer of the try connects system came out, and they examined it, but didn't find wrong with it. The plant was able to get back on nine pretty quick, and that's because the were looking in the right place for the problem. FESS forward two months. It's August fourth, two thousand seventeen. Seven forty three pm on a Friday night. Six of the try connects safety systems, had function and tripped an alarm when the safety systems feel like this automatically causes a shutdown at plant, because if you don't have properly operating safety systems, you have nothing protecting you. In case, something goes wrong. Though systems that had problems were in charge of issuing a shutdown. If either the silver recover unit or the burner, management systems had detected a dangerous condition. This is a big chemical clan. There are many technicians and engineers who work there in control. Shoot this kind of issue what? It's eight PM on Friday night. It's the weekend. So the crew was minimal. There's also a lot of vendors work there. Who could also troubleshoot this equipment? But their staff is also minimal, too, because it's the night and on a weekend. Troubleshooting began on these try connects systems log showed that some configuration changes had been pushed to the controllers now to make a change on the next controller. You need to use a computer to interact with it, but someone had to physically be present at the controller to make a change specifically, there's a key that needs to be inserted into the controller in. You have to turn that key to the MoD program. Once the key is in that setting someone back in the control room can push a configuration change to that controller. Well. It just so happened that someone had left six of these controllers in the program state. That's not right. It's eight pm on a Friday night. No authorized changes approved for those controllers at that time of night. The key should not have been left on that setting. But I guess it was just laziness on the plant operators. I mean it takes ten minutes to go from the control room all the way to the controller just to put the key in and switch to program. Then you need to go all the way back to the control room. Make changes you need to make then when you're done. Hopefully, remember to go all. All the way back to the controller and turn the key back to the run mode, so it looks like a few of these. We're just accidentally left in the program state, which was bad practice, and actually operators had been seeing alerts on a daily basis that the key was in the wrong state, but once a day they would just clear. Those alerts, ignore them. Not sure, if it was just laziness of the people, monitoring the alerts or the engineers, or both because typically you don't want anyone to be able to make remote changes to these safety controllers you, WanNa cut these things off from the network entirely for safety reasons when that key was in the program, state meant it was now waiting for configuration change from over the network. But something went wrong when the configured changes. We're pushed to these controllers. Whatever configuration was sent? It caused a failure state on the units. It didn't like whatever it was getting and caused a reboot of these systems. This is what triggered. The alerts and caused the plant shutdown. This was similar to the outage two months ago, but now one was just one controller this time it was six at the same time, but what's more suspicious as at because this was a weekend at night. There were no plan changes to these controllers at that time. So whatever can fig changes were attempted. They were completely unauthorized. As the onsite crew investigated they found the computer in the operations room, which was pushing these configurations, and when they investigated further, they found this computer had an unauthorized artie piece session opened on it. This is really scary. Connect the DOTS here? Some unknown person has gained remote access to a computer in the operations room, and that computer had just pushed a configure change to six of these safety systems which caused the plant to shut down. Something! Very fishy was going on here. The onsite crew continued to troubleshoot for DIS and even weeks. But weren't getting anywhere further with this investigation, it was just above their skill level, so called for additional help Julie. Industrial and San Respond the. Julian was working as an OT incident responder in Saudi Arabia at the time, and he was told to hop on a conference call. Listen to their problem to see if he had any input, I always told us that we need to get on a phone coal to provide some guidance to the plants, as though having mechanical problems that had resulted in a shutdowns. Then you mentioned the one shot down in August. So, we had about, it was mechanical issues. I just want to have a security analyst on the fire. To make sure that knows nothing wrong. Don't worry about it. It's not a big deal. just just joined the joined the call. See at this point. The plant didn't even know if this was a security incident or a mechanical failure, but when approved a little bit further to say what's actually happening here? And they started saying that I'm well. It looks like the emergency shutdown systems kicked in and shut the plant down and steady why? And this seeing some like potentially we'd loggins and a tapping on like a Friday, not and I just I was like double. Take, what are you talking about? This is probably the most serious thing I've ever heard about my career. Can, we don't play now. Is. Julian added everything up quickly. An unknown remote attacker had attempted to make configuration changes to an emergency shutdown system of this plant. Why would someone do that? Why would someone want to mess with the last line of Defense like that? Without a properly functioning emergency shutdown system, catastrophic results could occur. So Julian immediately wanted to travel to the site, so he assembled a team. Now Dosari on currently an industrial responded. Nassar is also an Ot incident responder based in the Kingdom of Saudi, Arabia they called Nassar up and said Hey get ready. You're going.

Julian Nassar OT Dosari analyst artie Saudi Arabia Arabia Julie loggins
"triton" Discussed on podnews

podnews

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"triton" Discussed on podnews

"By the way you can enjoy the unveiling of the Infinite Style Twenty Twenty Canada, in a free Webinar which include podcast consumption figures. Figures for the country. Yes, or no, we mentioned that yesterday. This actually true today. The podcast festival is put videos of recent feature of podcasting event on their website for anyone to watch be careful. It includes me, but it also includes Jason. Phipps from the BBC and Kara Swisher among others solstice media, a media publisher in Australia has launched Solstice, podcasting a new national podcasting and audio production agency companies joined. Joined forces with Nikola Hack, a broadcaster and podcast Omni Studio have best practice for dynamic content in podcasts what it is and how people are using it. Bill Rosenblatts has profiled the European podcast markets and Mel Harris, says that Brandon podcasts at definitely a thing, oh, and here's a great quote from Robb Walsh from Lipson talking on the fees. Listen you this realistically and I think we've said this on the. The show of times in the past, if you took all the ad revenue in the podcast space and gave Apple, thirty percent or twenty percent, cut or fifteen percent, it doesn't matter for Apple. It's a rounding error of a rounding error on what their revenue, so I mean a billion dollars in revenue in the space and apple to thirty percent of that. It's still nothing for them as a business.

Infinite Style Twenty Twenty C Apple Kara Swisher Nikola Hack Solstice Mel Harris Bill Rosenblatts Phipps Robb Walsh Jason Australia publisher BBC Lipson Brandon
"triton" Discussed on Hands-On Tech

Hands-On Tech

11:03 min | 1 year ago

"triton" Discussed on Hands-On Tech

"I meant this is hands on TV. Hope y'all doing well. I'm unbelievable as always and this week. We're going to take a look at this massive Predator Triton nine hundred laptop from the folks at Acer and this is specifically a gamers laptop. Just to be frank with the. I'm not so sure about the laptop name because you look at it. This thing is huge. If I put it in front of me it almost covers me up in in the camera. Here on twit unbelievable. But let's go ahead and dive into this device and get a little bit more information about it for you with what we have is a seventeen inch display that is touchscreen you wage. D. And you're GONNA get about three hours of battery life on this because there's a lot of power that's needed for this thing. You have an Nvidia. Rta Twenty Eighty graphics card that is totally separated in in not built into the motherboard. This is absolutely for the power. That's going to give you plenty of frames per seconds for whatever game to try to throw at it but you also get the Intel core. I nine ninety seven fifty h that is set to two point six figures and of course you can overclock it and then you. WanNa get thirty two gigs of Ram and one terabyte of storage. Now the interesting thing about the storage is to get to five twelve gigabyte. Ssd's but they're set to a raid zero. So you're going to get some optimal performance and you're GONNA be able to have plenty of storage for whatever games you're going to play or if you like me content that you're trying to create now. Who is this device for? Well is not for the traveler being seventeen inches in size as well as being almost ten pounds. I believe is like nine point two pounds and total weight. You'RE NOT GONNA fit this in your backpack. This is for the game. Or that's going to be you know hanging out at their home. Or what have you to studio just in? Have it set up? But if they need to go to their favorite land party or if they're going to a game in competition this allows them to pack it all in one simple form factor and not necessarily have to worry about grabbing a big computer tower and external. Gpa or anything like that it is perfectly fine for for just picking up and going with that standpoint. Another cool feature that the gamers are going to enjoy is to Predator since software. That's built into this laptop now what is. Predator sense predators since is an easy way for you to hop in and do any of your overclock and do any of your system management and monitoring you can check the fan speeds you can you can increase it decrease it. You can check The overclock speech chicken memory testing. You can even change how you would like to all of your backlit. Led's the show up on. Your keyboard is pretty neat. You can go in and play around with different settings far as giving it a world or or rainbow effect or what I did simply was just highlighted the A. N. T. keys for me. I thought that was nice. Touch is not something that I particularly you would do. But again the game community. They love all of their. Rgb goodness and the the Predator software spilt in really makes that stuff easy for them to go ahead and customize this device and really make it their own so they can go out there and continue their mission of fragging. Now I played around with this device. I'm not much of a game. I did play some play a couple of games on it but my concern is I have all of this horse power. Can I run Photoshop? Can I run premiere pro? Can I run after effects and answers to those questions are yes? Yes in some wet. What regards to editing photos on here? It was not much of a problem. I could through several layers and several raw fouls at this machine without much of an issue and it just kept ticking and kept doing whatever I needed to do with regards to the welcome tablets that I was using with regards to add an adjustment is and colors and grading and it. It just kept going. It was a dream when it came to that. Now from the video side of things premiere pro was was pretty good with HD footage and it was actually fairly well with four K. footage. I like to put up some drone videos. Or what have you or even just pixel video because your smartphone is shooting in Four K. And you put this onto your time line in at any of your facts and add any of your Extra tests and fonts and things of that nature and it just kept going traditionally when you're dealing with high resolution footage inside of premier pro or even Something like final cut her Davinci. You have some sort of proxy workflow where you need to offload some of that data into another filed. So you can continue to do your editing workflow. I didn't use any proxies when I was playing around with this device. It just kept going now after fix on the other hand I was a bit surprised because I thought after could handle it just as well Since premiere pro could I tried to create just simple motion graphics inside of actor effects and a seven second four K. clip at sixty frames per second took about four minutes to render out. I didn't have a whole lot going on with it other than just move into three graphs around and I did. Maybe one or two different little effects on it in four minutes for seven second clip was a bit of a surprise. I thought it would render it out much faster than that Granite you could turn your playback resolution down inside of actor affects give you a much better experience. But I didn't WanNa dude this as a you. Hd screen on want to turn that resolution down so that was a bit of a surprise and a little bit of a letdown but overall this is still pretty dad gum powerful this episode is brought to you by. Epson nagging kisses specify ink cartridges. Good by Epson. Ecotank comes with a ridiculous amount of ink so you can print thousands and thousands of pages it has supersize easy to fill in tanks which means you never has with buying or changing ink cartridges again is revolutionary and is changing the way people print less frustration and more time on business tasks that matter transformed the way your home or office prince and do away with out of ink frustration go to Epson dot com slash eco-tank Leo and just feel and Chill Epson exceed your vision who was justifies made for is not necessarily made for music content creator this is strictly for the gamers that are wanting to just sit down and have a good time on whatever massive online game that they're playing or just go to a different tournament or land party and just have a great is specifically designed for them all the way down to the way they have the fins and fans setup on here to have some additional updates fan system where supposedly is a lot quieter than previous generations of the Predator I don't know if I can attest to it. Being a quiet machine because you have all this extra horsepower. From the graphics card the fans are going to spin up pretty quickly and pretty loudly and violently so it could be rather disturbing. If you're sitting in an office where in my case sit in an office next to Mr Jason Howell Mr Micha Sergeant. It sounded like a Boeing seven. Eighty seven trying to take off insider office not good and all I was doing was just playing a video game. It kept a device cool but it could be rather loud. I ended up propping the Predator up onto an extra little brick to encourage a little bit of airflow and that made the fan. Slow down just a touch but again it was still pretty loud. This doesn't matter. Ideally to gamers because it seems like most gamers aware in headphones and cans over two years. Anyway so they would never hear it but anybody surrounding them they may be a little bit bothered by the sound of this thing it comes with pointing reports. You have two. Usb ports in two USB ports but another cool features on the side is one of the USB port sorta hides away just case. You had a mouse dangle. Like when I have here. If you're headed out to the side it could be you know exposed and get hit accidents and possibly bricked at port. But they allowed you to just plug this. You'RE GONNA go in and closed the port down to sort of hide it away. That way is a little more flesh in more secure. You'd never even know what's there you actually have to remember. Oh yeah put my mouth stangl dare. I thought that was a nice feature. And it's just another way of keeping all of the port safe and working properly the keyboard who did not like this keyboard folks in office. We had a challenge but the keyboard. I wanted to type out a couple of different senses on it Just shooting emails over one day and it was not a great experience. But that's okay. Gamers are not typing. Gamers are fragging people. That's that's what they're doing on this device My issue was some of the keys are shifted ever so slightly. The shift key on the right is not in the right spot to question. Marquee is shifted. Way to the left when it's usually on the right Detract PAD is totally fine. Being on the right hand side as if you were using her actual mouse. That felt comfortable but again the type spirits. Not Something I would recommend. I ended up connecting an external keyboard to it Bluetooth. That is and it worked perfectly fine for me to be able to get some work done. You can get this particular build at thirty seven ninety nine ninety nine ness coming with all the bells and whistles with the powerful. Rt Graphics Card from nvidia. The touch screen swivel for K. Display massive massive seventeen inch four K. Display all the horsepower of the core. I nine thirty two gigs of Ram and the additional USB see thunderbolt ports so just in case. She wanted to plug in additional monitor. You have that capability but I doubt you're going to do that. Because this display is beautiful as it is. So that's it for this week's episode of Has. Oh Tech showing off the awesome Predator Triton nine hundred laptop from folks Acer appreciate them sending it over for us to check it out and test it out and put it through his paces and beat it up a little bit because it's a lot of fun seeing just how much data we can throw it this device and see if they can handle it and for the most part. It is ready for the task. Be Sure to follow my show. That is twit DOT TV slash hop hands on photography. Where I'm going to talk about different tips and tricks to help. Make you a better photographer here. Onto twit DOT TV network. Thank you all so much for your continued support. We'll catch you next time on hands on tech with all the hottest Tech News and gadgets visit twit dot TV there. You'll be able to find and subscribe to all our tech show's. Thanks for watching hands on..

Acer Epson Nvidia frank Intel fragging Ssd Led Mr Jason Howell Ecotank content creator Mr Micha Sergeant
"triton" Discussed on Malicious Life

Malicious Life

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"triton" Discussed on Malicious Life

"College so get ready. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> And <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> that's it for <Speech_Music_Male> this episode. <Speech_Music_Male> Thank you for listening <Speech_Music_Male> over <Speech_Male> on twitter. <Speech_Male> We asked you our <Speech_Male> listeners. For <Speech_Male> your opinions <Speech_Male> can cyberattack <Speech_Male> on <Speech_Male> an industrial facility <Speech_Male> caused <Speech_Male> a disaster. Oh <Speech_Male> you J- proportions <Speech_Male> or <Speech_Male> is this <Speech_Male> all hype <Speech_Male> and fear mongering <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> we ran a poll <Speech_Male> and the results <Speech_Male> were quite clear <Speech_Male> eighty-one one <Speech_Male> percent of you <Speech_Male> consider cyber <Speech_Male> attack on an industrial <Speech_Male> facility <Speech_Male> a- very real <Speech_Male> threat <Speech_Male> with just two percent <Speech_Male> saying no. <Speech_Male> This is all <Speech_Male> just hype. The <Speech_Male> rest some <Speech_Male> sixteen percent <Speech_Male> think. This <Speech_Male> is a complicated <Silence> issue. <Speech_Male> Why <Speech_Male> complicated <Speech_Male> here's an example? <Speech_Male> Stephen Sharon <Speech_Male> from new New <Speech_Male> Jersey asked <Speech_Male> quote did <Speech_Male> stuxnet <Speech_Male> prove this is <Speech_Male> a real concerned <Speech_Male> and quote. <Speech_Male> This is an interesting <Speech_Male> question. <Speech_Male> If you recall <Speech_Male> we did a three reports <Speech_Male> mini <Speech_Male> series on stuxnet <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> warm that struck <Speech_Male> an Iranian nuclear <Speech_Male> facility. <Speech_Male> stuxnet <Speech_Male> did 'cause the <Speech_Male> uranium enrichment <Speech_Male> centrifuges. I <Speech_Male> do fail <Speech_Male> but as far as <Speech_Male> I'm aware it <Speech_Male> didn't cause any <Speech_Male> radioactive <Speech_Male> leakage or some <Speech_Male> other environmental <Silence> disaster <Speech_Male> but <Speech_Male> that doesn't mean <Speech_Male> hacking industrial <Speech_Male> facilities <Speech_Male> in any way <Speech_Male> quote unquote safe <Speech_Male> on <Speech_Male> the contrary <Speech_Male> one listener. Mike <Speech_Male> wrote <Speech_Male> quote crash. <Speech_Male> Override was <Speech_Male> a good example <Speech_Male> of how <Speech_Male> real this <Speech_Male> threat is <Silence> and quote. <Speech_Male> Mike is <Speech_Male> referring to <Speech_Male> the malware also <Speech_Male> known as in <Speech_Male> destroyer <Speech_Male> that was used in <Speech_Male> an attack against <Speech_Male> Ukraine's power <Speech_Male> grid in two <Speech_Male> thousand sixteen <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> cut a fifth <Speech_Male> of Kiev's <Speech_Male> the capital <Speech_Male> power supply for <Speech_Male> one hour. <Speech_Male> Nick <Speech_Male> bound from <Speech_Male> London wrote quote. <Speech_Male> If you <Speech_Male> look at genuine <Speech_Male> industrial disasters <Speech_Male> such as <Speech_Male> Bo pal or <Speech_Male> bounce. `field <Speech_Male> the risks of <Speech_Male> hacking and overloading <Speech_Male> modern <Speech_Male> plants automated <Speech_Male> control <Speech_Male> and monitoring system <Speech_Male> looks <Speech_Male> at terrifyingly <Speech_Male> real <Speech_Male> prospect with with <Speech_Male> horrific <Speech_Male> real world implications <Speech_Male> and quote <Speech_Male> Leeman <Speech_Male> from Massachusetts <Speech_Male> had <Speech_Male> an interesting insight <Speech_Male> on that <Speech_Male> issue of <Speech_Male> the episodes we. We <Speech_Male> mainly focused <Speech_Male> on the threat <Speech_Male> of a huge <Speech_Male> industrial facility. <Speech_Male> Blowing <Speech_Male> up or <Speech_Male> discharging some <Speech_Male> poisonous gases. <Speech_Male> You know <Speech_Music_Male> basically hollywood-style hollywood-style <Speech_Male> disasters <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> leeming however <Speech_Male> offered a <Speech_Male> different scenario <Speech_Male> which is no <Speech_Male> less scary <Speech_Male> or even <Speech_Male> scarier action <Speech_Male> quote. <Speech_Male> I work <Speech_Male> in the pharmaceutical <Speech_Male> industry. <Speech_Male> I can see <Speech_Male> a very real possibility <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> cyberattack <Speech_Male> sabotage. As <Speech_Male> being potentially <Speech_Male> disastrous <Speech_Male> for a variety of <Speech_Male> reasons I <Speech_Male> could imagine someone <Speech_Male> sabotaging <Speech_Male> Abacha <Speech_Male> pharmaceuticals <Speech_Male> and using <Speech_Male> men wear <Speech_Male> slash espionage <Speech_Male> to hide the <Speech_Male> said sabotage. <Speech_Male> Think <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> poisoning case <Speech_Male> but on a much <Speech_Male> larger scale <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> someone covering <Speech_Male> their tracks <Speech_Male> via Cyberattack Attack <Speech_Male> Omar <Speech_Male> where and quote <Speech_Male> scary <Speech_Male> indeed. <Speech_Male> Thanks <Speech_Male> to all of you. Who answered <Speech_Male> our questions <Speech_Male> on twitter? <Speech_Male> Follow at <Speech_Male> militias life <Speech_Music_Male> for updates and <Speech_Music_Male> more interesting discussions <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> you can reach out to me <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> at <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> ran. Levy <Speech_Music_Male> that's F. R. <Speech_Music_Male> A. N. L. <Speech_Music_Male> E. V. I <Speech_Music_Male> R. Website Eighties <Speech_Music_Male> militias dot <Speech_Music_Male> life. Where you'll find <Speech_Male> all of our past <Speech_Male> episodes and <Speech_Male> full transcripts <Speech_Male> militias <Speech_Male> life is produced <Speech_Male> by <Speech_Male> thanks again <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> savary's and funder <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> on the podcast <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> learn <Speech_Male> more at Siberian <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> Dot Com <Music>

"triton" Discussed on Malicious Life

Malicious Life

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"triton" Discussed on Malicious Life

"Pet lobby. We're facing using lots of problems in defending their systems but they did get lucky in one sense. They're hackers were unprepared. When their plan went went awry last episode? I told you how the trident hackers breach rubbish safety systems causing the entire plant to trip twice just as important as what the did however was the order in which they did to cause any measurable impact on an industrial site. You have to hack the distributed control systems which control all the plants machinery controlling an engineering during work station at a plant is like gaining administrator privileges over a laptop it gives you equal authority to the handlers of that machine. Gene to do with it. Whatever you please the Petro Rubber hackers who we're going to refer to as temp dot Velez the name given to them by by investigators at Fireeye focused more on the SIS safety instrumented system lair of the plant the lair where safety systems is Li- whose only goal is to prevent the kinds of disasters? That could kill people. It is this that allows us to reasonably infer motive. Motive that temp dot versus. Weren't simply trying to cause a Ruckus they didn't intend only to take over the control systems or only caused a disruption in the plant's operation the intended to initiate a process that would put lives at risk of what kind and at what scale would not know. Luckily they failed.

dot Velez Li Petro Rubber administrator Gene Fireeye
"triton" Discussed on Malicious Life

Malicious Life

05:38 min | 1 year ago

"triton" Discussed on Malicious Life

"We we left part one of the two part episode with our hackers having breached deport lobby petrochemical plant and uploaded custom. Malware we now know as triton onto its most sensitive safety systems but the pathway that allow them to do that was fraught with oversights oversights some obvious some less so those of us from it are used to using effective even state of the art tools on computers. That are if not new. Probably only a few years we can upgrade our tick often because it's not prohibitively expensive live and it's mobile. Replacing a laptop for example is easy as buying a new one and dropping your old one in the trash. You can imagine how difficult it is to do this. When you're machines are ten thousand pounds and connected to a system of dozens uh even hundreds of pipes cables and other than thousand pounds machines all running twenty four seven all year because critical infrastructure isn't a nine to five business? Industrial Systems can live for decades. Because of how difficult they are to replace. And how necessary Surrey. They are to the functioning of the machines connected to them for example Schneider Safety instrumented system. SIS is built the stay on for years and years and years nonstop there are sis's to have been running longer than your children. Maybe you yourself yourself have been alive because of the costs to remove and replace much of the Industrial Tech- We're using twenty twenty is left over over from before the Millennium. It's often difficult to apply. Modern security practices to these old hunks of metal or industry. Professionals are so used to working one way that stuff to convince them to change. Industrial engineers in the eighties. Didn't have to think about whether the machines were connected to the Internet in Petro Robbie. The first point of vulnerability was how each layer of the plant connected digitally to one another allowing for distinct attack. Past I'm Joe Weiss. I'm the managing partner of applied control solutions and and I also am the Managing Director of Isa Ninety nine which is automation and control all systems. Cybersecurity that's kind of my volunteer Efforts as well as with other standards organizations and I'm considered to be an expert on control systems and control systems cybersecurity. Joe Weiss isn't just considered an expert in control system security but a legend not my words for his speech at two thousand nine hundred seventy s four conference. One of the industry's biggest annual gatherings he was introduced as a quote legend Nate Nelson our senior. Your producer talked with Joe Harder. The background of the control systems is they started out being very flat system with no segmentation. So if you got into a control system you basically could traverse the entire control system network one of the big issues that I say ninety nine came up with was the need to segment that very flat flat network in and be able to have if you will sub networks to try to prevent melwork from jumping from point eight eighty two point. Be You already theoretically had a DMZ demilitarized zone or proxy between the IT. Eighteen networks in the control system networks. So this was the intent to extend that segmentation the control system network much of the industrial equipment in operation. Today was designed before something like Triton was even conceivable. It's why these systems don't necessarily have effective built in separation between network layers or separation between Wean. The machines built for control. And those built for safety today you are allowed to mix what's called all basic process control and safety and so the question you ask is are people learning the lessons from Triton which says do not mix basic process control with process safety. Because it's once you do that. You effectively no longer have process safety. All you have really left is control. And what Triton MM was demonstrating. You do that. You've lost safety. There's some real real real important lessons that are coming out of Triton..

triton Joe Weiss Schneider Safety Industrial Systems Surrey Petro Robbie Joe Harder Managing Director of Isa managing partner Nate Nelson twenty twenty producer
"triton" Discussed on Malicious Life

Malicious Life

02:39 min | 1 year ago

"triton" Discussed on Malicious Life

"Have you ever seen a petrochemical plant. They are massive constructions like small cities and they're incredibly complicated buildings and structures connected to other structures into wine with other structures which is an endless steel pipes. Running in every which way how anybody thought to build such a convoluted thing in how anybody actually actually understands what it's all four is frankly beyond me. Fatal Hobby is one of these giant labyrinth. Plants it's is located on Saudi Arabia's west coast right along the Red Sea just off the halfway point between Mika and Medina. It's like some kind end of a futuristic robot city three thousand acres tall metal towers surrounded by six or seven story tall structures made of of steel pipes and beams. That makes them look like the metal skeletons of buildings half finished with all those pipes it produces around five million tonnes of petrochemical products every year. It's difficult to imagine. How a single piece of computer software could have of any kind of effect on such a massive place? If you were to have visited Petro Lobby on Saturday evening. In June. Two thousand seventeen seventeen hardly anything would have appeared wrong. June happened to be the month of Ramadan that year so it was even quieter then. Normal Saturday at Bitta lobby would otherwise be. The only event of note occurred when without warning or explanation section section of the plant shutdown the shutdown had been triggered by a safety system. No real damage was done but it was Strange nonetheless so team of specialists was called in to investigate the cause. The team ran some tests then brought awfully safety. Device backed with laboratory for further inspection protests. Turned up nothing. The vice seemed to be in fine working order. Shutdown must have been some strange one off glitch. They figured they were of course wrong. But it's hard to blame them. What what was actually going on just under the noses had never existed before in the history of cybersecurity?.

Petro Lobby Bitta lobby Saudi Arabia Medina Red Sea Mika
"triton" Discussed on The Tech Guy

The Tech Guy

04:29 min | 2 years ago

"triton" Discussed on The Tech Guy

"World's most dangerous. Cyberthreat. It's, it's called TRITON or traces. It's being used to attack the US industrial facilities probing, dozens of power grids in the US. And it's not it's everywhere. See the reason I find this disturbing. How would you feel if the grid went down not for a day, but for a week or two weeks or a month? What would what would happen in major cities across this country of power were out for months? Wouldn't be good. What it? Became a disaster kinda crazy. And there's always been in. In the tensions between the national powers always been a kind of forbearance, because the problem is if you do it, then they will do it. That's why we have rules against things like chemical weapons after World War, One, the Geneva Convention ban the use of things like mustard gas because if they do it, then it's easy to do, and you'll do it. And then it's just it's awful. It's disastrous. I think sometimes people will war is war. You should be able to do anything you want anything you can. Yeah. But if the other guy can do it then you may be wanna hold back a little bit. And it makes me stream leaner Vegas to see that the Russians are invading our power grid. We're invading their power grid. And. Yes, I'm as telling me that on Costa, coast, George Noory, always worried about EMP's neutron bombs, and EMP's Lee electromagnetic pulses, a Tomic bomb exploded at height to destroy the Electric's infrastructure. That is the risk of that, by the way, highly overplayed, you can do some research on it wouldn't take everything out, but taking down the power grid, which is actually not as hard to do and doesn't require nearly as much expertise or stealth. I would love to see the United States instead of spending its energy, escalating are attacks on the Russian power grid on working harder on securing ours. Since twenty twelve current form. Officials say the US is put reconnaissance probes into the control systems of the Russian electrical, by the way. Exactly the same thing happening to us. Dangerous oil and gas intrusions. The scale of the operation in the US from a nation state. We don't know but could be bound could be a number of enemies, right? The scale of the operation the number target in the regions, being targeted shows more than just a passing interest in the section and it's not, you know, the guy in the hoodie in the mom's basement doing this. These are nation states. Triton Mel wear showed. It's, it's an analysis showed its developer's performed extensive reverse engineering. Of oil refineries. Power stations. It's believed according to fire I in other security group, the TRITON was developed with the health of who the central scientific research institute of chemistry mechanics in Moscow. The Russians have tried it out in the in Ukraine, December twenty fifteen hundreds of thousands of people in Ukraine were left without electricity briefly. It was felt that this was a test. Can we do it? Yeah. I can. Exactly one year later, another hack also tied to Russia, took out power in Ukraine, again. Can we do it? Yeah. My job is not to spread scare stories. But I think if, if we think about this, it might be cause for pause and consideration about our policies. Maybe a time for a little a little treaty. Because just think what it'd be like, if our power were out for any extended period time..

United States Russia TRITON Ukraine George Noory Costa developer Moscow two weeks one year
"triton" Discussed on podnews

podnews

02:53 min | 2 years ago

"triton" Discussed on podnews

"Has acquired only studio, an enterprise podcast hosting company for an undisclosed sum. The Sydney Morning Herald estimates, the companies found you well into the millions and found at Hooper posts a bit about the company history. Kost h one thousand nine thousand nine is as you can hear underway in London. The event is sold out at it includes speakers from NPR BBC's, Brexit cast, Google news and many more. Speaking at podcast day, Neil, Carruth from NPR shared, details of up. I eighty three percent of the up first audience is forty four or younger, which is a sharp contrast with older radio. Audiences Eighty-one percent say they listened to the show every day, a more than forty percent say they've never listened to morning edition. NPR's morning radio news program before which up. I is a broadcast segment. Cows describes the podcast as quote profitable. Spotify has launched the daily drive that personalized playlists for commuting that includes music, and selected news podcasts of shareholder of podcast, host, Lipson, hold Kaynak is continuing to express dissatisfaction against the current lips board its latest finding highlights salary and bonus for some board members and came back is drumming up support for a special meeting, but it does need twenty five percent of shareholders to request one. Powell press seven point four point three WordPress. Plug ins podcasters has been released. It includes special codes to enhance. Discover ability of podcasts by Google podcasts were kit from WNYC studios release details of its salary survey into podcast pay and gender splits in the industry and funk. An audio polishing service has published a long article about resisting the loudness war, and still being compliance with major platforms in podcasts today social minds is the case, I ever dedicated social media marketing podcast, Marvel's wolverine, the lost trail gets for release on July, the WTO P and podcast. One of an answer new true crime podcast, Kohl's twenty two hours in American nightmare. Featuring a case, nightmares made of and the writer of beef and dairy network. Benjamin Partridge said podcast today, the when the BBC's started broadcasting his. Podcasts. It didn't result in an increase in audience that different people he said, and that's the latest trauma newsletter called news dot net.

NPR Google Benjamin Partridge London The Sydney Morning Herald NPR BBC Triton digital Prague WTO Spotify Hooper writer WNYC studios BBC Powell Kohl Neil Carruth Lipson
"triton" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"triton" Discussed on KCRW

"Triton center this afternoon. California has scored a major victory in court defending the sanctuary state laws aimed at protecting undocumented immigrants here the ninth circuit court of appeals said yesterday the laws can continue to be enforced. The centerpiece of California's sanctuary policies is a law that bars police county sheriff's from notifying immigration authorities. When undocumented immigrants are being released from jail to be scooped up her detention limiting cooperation may frustrate federal authorities. The court said, but that frustration is quote permissible. The court also found that California's within its rights to require employers in the state to protect immigrants from immigration sweeps. Former vice president Joe Biden is expected to announce next week that he is indeed running for president. That's according to three people with knowledge of Biden's plans Biden would enter the race as the Democratic Front runner. But he would also face questions about his age seventy six and whether his more moderate record fits with a party that has now become more liberal. The announcement could come as early as Wednesday. And Easter is of course this weekend, and you may be planning to celebrate with Easter egg hunts and chocolate bunnies. Galore, but you could have a tough time buying a real bunny. That's because of a new law that wanted to affect this January making California the first state in the country to prohibit pet stores from selling dogs, cats and rabbits, unless they came from animal shelters or rescue groups the law targets commercial breeding, but it's also expected to prevent a surge in the youth in Asia or abandonment of rabbits that often habits in the days after Easter the animals tend to be impulse buys around the holiday with many buyers, not realizing that pet rabbits are not as low maintenance as they might seem check up on the freeways, definitely a quieter Friday than usual out there. Because of course, it is spring break and some people look like their head out of town a little bit early for the weekend had a earlier stall in mid city westbound ten right around Crenshaw that has now been cleared, but you're still looking at delays southbound on the Hollywood. Just a little bit of a slow go as you make your way from Melrose heading into downtown southbound four zero five, of course, we got some traffic in this Paul Voda pass. You gotta expect that from the one one as you make your way down to about Getty center. So whatever your plans for the weekend may be your weather outlook, pretty good hazy sunshine today, highs in the mid sixties to about seventy if you're near the beach seventy s to mid eighties inland a little bit cooler tomorrow.

California Joe Biden Triton center Getty center vice president Melrose Asia president Paul Voda Crenshaw Hollywood
"triton" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"triton" Discussed on KTOK

"As you can see. Whoa. Consulates officials at every level of government. Probably really approaching the end of the world. This language of righteous empire. God being our side. Whisper fine. Michelle. I think this framework. Of religion. The rest of the world. Triton's Arab world because they are afraid that we see this is a crash. Jose. Tempest? I would say remains technical. Absolutely. But there comes a point where the evidence becomes overwhelming. I'm CLYDE Lewis. You're listening to ground zero. Just what do you want to know about the future? Robert Phoenix on with us tonight. Five I never on the apocalypse about how things are changing.

CLYDE Lewis Robert Phoenix Triton Michelle Jose
"triton" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"triton" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"I think I'm finally figuring out how to do it. How's that? Famer right for your kind. I try not to bring that up. If I can. But yes, I'm in. I'm in. I happened to be in four of them. But it's all because of the show all because. Warrior. What's happened were you and your guys busy night of basketball? Yeah. Definitely with the county tournaments. We talked about that last week. Yeah. I was actually at the Shelby county tournament and outstanding. A couple of maybe lopsided games. But tomorrow night, you'll have more sound versus TRITON central which I think will be. That's that's all I think people thought that through. It might be quite frankly. And that's a good matchup. That really is. Yeah. I really like the Logan last year. You had a triple double in the state finals and since he's been a freshman and he's a good player. And then of course, why felling from TRITON central twenty points per game score. So. They they kind of handled Waldron and southwestern Shelby. But school we talked about last. It's great when you have four teams on. Double header action. It's a great opportunity to see more teams. But we were Blackford versus. Blackford at Madison grant and came down here. Contest at the end. You may have heard Jim Brenner. Jim Brenner from WBAI called me. And and said that Blackford goes up. On freda. Luke brand makes a couple of free throws put them up one with a few ticks on the clock and fallow. Three point shooter for midcourt who knocks down three to win the ballgame. Yeah. Right. Yeah. And that was another big crowd. So. Why? Oh my goodness. All right. So Jimmy buddy, the Hendricks county turning. Yeah. I was there actually on Wednesday. We weren't there. Okay. But I know I saw the Browns bird. Oh,.

Blackford Jim Brenner TRITON Shelby county Hendricks county basketball Browns Jimmy buddy Shelby Waldron freda WBAI Luke Madison
"triton" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

03:41 min | 2 years ago

"triton" Discussed on Overdue

"Text overdue to five hundred five hundred. So should we talk about the story the little as or is that are more complicated than the version that you know, where do you wanna start on them? Start the beginning. Why don't you tell me a story? And then after you tell it to me, we will talk about how it's been doubted and stuff like the sure, so if you know, the little mermaid primarily from the Disney film, which I assume that you do your familiar with the tail of a little mermaid named Ariel who is in love with the surface world, and specifically with very pretty prints. Boy. Yes. And she goes to Ursula, a big octopus witch and trades her voice for the opportunity to have human legs and make the prince fall in love with her. Yeah. And then at the end, they work it out. Yeah. At the end, okay. At the end of the movie, she turns back into a mermaid Ursula turns into a Godzilla monster and the prince stabs her with a boat, and then she dies and all of her magic is dispelled. And then Ariel tells her dad that she loves us human, and he's like I've had get it. But I accept high will use my magic to make you human, and then you can live as a part of their world for the rest of your life. As pretty wild that king Triton's, okay with that. But so how is it different? Okay. So in the in the story under the sea lives, the Sea King, who's a widower and king TRITON. I guess we never really hear about his. Yeah. There's no mom areas, which sucks because in the movie king TRITON dislike solve problems by pointing his tried net. And and stuff. So would that we could all solve our problems with the magic tried. And so the king his old mom and his six daughters all live at the bottom of the sea. The youngest of the six is the little mermaid she's not named in this book. Okay. Nancy? We're not gonna call her name. But it so in this world when mermaids turned fifteen they can go up to the surface. Like a like a coming out like ruin spring for mermaids. Yeah. So the little mermaid watches as her five older sisters year-by-year go up to the surface and comeback with tales of the incredible things that they saw also bone back with their own tales Zimmerman's behind. Thanks. And they all eventually can alot lose their attraction to the surface where it's up there. But they don't wanna go up there. All the time. It's not a great place. The little mermaid is is different. She's very into the service. So she I'm gonna just read a quote from the book explaining her deal. She was a strange child, quiet and thoughtful. And while her sister's would be delighted with the wonderful things that they obtained from the wrecks of vessels. She cared for nothing. But her pretty red flowers like the sun accepting a beautiful marble statue. It was the representation of a handsome boy, carved out a pure Whitestone which had fallen to the bottom of the sea from wreck. So like in the movie, she does have a statue of Boyd is kind of a symbol of her fascination with the surface world thing for me. That was surprising watching the movie and then doing a little prep for the show was how much was in the movie, maybe not in a direct plot way. But just like, oh, here's they give prince Eric a statue of. For his birthday on a boat. My birthday is later this week..

Ursula Triton Ariel Disney Boyd Eric Zimmerman Nancy
"triton" Discussed on podnews

podnews

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"triton" Discussed on podnews

"In the latest pod news, enterprise digital audio company TRITON digital is to be bought by scripts. Script also earned Stitcher and mid roll media as well as a number of US television stations. I've spent one hundred fifty million dollars on the purchase TRITON. Digital is projected to earn forty million dollars next year in revenues scripts used to also owned radio stations, but they sold those earlier this year. James careless, a well respected. Radio journalist covers podcasting, provides money-making opportunities for radio world. It covers Canadian and UK podcasters and you'll find it linked from pod news dot net today. Also podcast SEO often forgotten about, but a very comprehensive guide willing to from Kerri green. His podcast mystery for you. What happens to the Chicago sun times podcasts, Robert fetter, who is as Chicago and media journalist. Now it's all of the much promoted podcast from the newspaper are no longer being produced and wonders. Why. Ads ways have been nominated for two digitally awards for best use of mobile and best publishing platform. Congratulations to them. And it's time to celebrate the day of the Spanish podcast with a live podcast marathon for twenty four hours from October the twentieth at one o'clock central European time. Our

TRITON digital Radio journalist Chicago Kerri green James careless US Robert fetter UK one hundred fifty million doll forty million dollars twenty four hours
"triton" Discussed on KTCK Sportsradio 1310 The Ticket

KTCK Sportsradio 1310 The Ticket

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"triton" Discussed on KTCK Sportsradio 1310 The Ticket

"Triton pro gary klein with us i remember in the eighties taking my dad would may fishing i grew up in the finger lakes area of upstate new york and we go out on key lake or lake villa guy she lived on and he's like what do you what does it what does she got up there now he says what's all i'm colors and i said yeah i got i got the new color flasher now man i can tell the difference between grass i could tell the hard bottom i could tell you know if it's red and it's real thin the line that means it's a hard bottom and she has all the and and he was like oh that's cheating turn anything off he says you're cheating up there and and i gotta tell you now the electron ix now is is one of the most daunting things if you don't understand him and sometimes you can overcook they can't you i mean it just it gets it gets it gets almost too much to try and figure out every single thing and the view that we have now with the modern electrics you know the one thing that will never change in the sport fishing is it an angry tie alluring on the end of the line and make a cast in order to catch those fares so you know if you spend all your time out there looking electron it's when you need to be doing something else and that's this wasted time but if you take and really learn your electron ix your electron to release my electron ix or what i've always said underwater is you know because electron ix are just not necessarily you know fish locators what they do is they tell you everything about the environment the fisher living in you know thermo clines hard bottom soft bottom rocks and trees and bushes bait fish and i mean in absolute an anger needs to really start you know learning with their electron it's not necessarily to see the fishing drill down and catch him.

gary klein new york Triton finger lakes key lake
"triton" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"triton" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"To dismiss that that apparition from your mind but uh but it it is almost impossible not to think of that so you now you're saying like fish tale with guerrilla top oh yes not like not like mermaid top with guerrilla legs no no no fish fish on the bottom silverback grill on the top that's the only way to put it together morella yeah not exactly but close now before we get into the specifics of the hypothesis i just want to start by cautioning that this is not a hypothesis those widely accepted by scientists ser biologist sits generally frowned upon by paleo anthropologists and other people who study the history of humans dilution uh but i i think it's worth addressing especially since people have asked about it before and it it fits into this model of the aquatic humanoid and creates at least a plausiblesounding scenario in which there could have been an aquatic humanoid yeah if we entered into it as a as an alternate hypothesis we enter into it as a thought experiment and we do not into it trying to make an argument for the existence of triton's or or more people were some sort of underwater race than i think we're in a safe waters okay so it starts with a simple observation our closest relatives in the animal kingdom or the other great apes also known as hominids or the family home in a day this includes rang attends gorillas chimpanzees and begnaud bows and genetically we are extremely similar to these animals especially to chimpanzees and bonano bows anatomically were also extremely similar to them if you look at all of our body parts and the way they fit together were were very very close to these animals but there are a few key differences and some of the most major of these key differences are that we are mostly hairless bipeds were naked smooth skin and we walk onto legs and meanwhile all these other animals are hairy quadrupeds they're covered from head to toe in in hair for.

triton