5 Burst results for "Tristan Marcellus Winfrey"

"tristan marcellus winfrey" Discussed on Scranton Talks

Scranton Talks

07:48 min | 8 months ago

"tristan marcellus winfrey" Discussed on Scranton Talks

"Right. Hello, everybody. Again, my name is Lucy bralette and I run the independent film creative have along with despair and I am the founder of Scranton films advocating the arts in the area of parental Pennsylvania. We have created the independent film. Creative have as an outed for all filmmakers in the local areas granted and outside the area to basically make films, you know, make films collaborate and be an advocate for the arts. This way, here's what we should do a little introduction in what you can find us. And then we'll tell you again who we are interviewing today. Hi guys, I'm desert Raza lenski. I collaborate alongside with Lewis gorilla is on the independent film creative of. I also run the film society and the organizer of the mystery box film challenge here locally and across big advocates of bringing film here in the area. Yes, and today we have Tristan Tristan, we are going to tag to you about your new documentary in as well as view as a filmmaker. If you maybe want to introduce yourself and tell us just a little bit more about what you do and then we can start this is a very laid back conversation, nothing to be worried about. We're not going to drill you on anything, but we don't want to know what your process is as a filmmaker. So if you want to introduce yourself just a little bit just tell us a little bit more about yourself. What you're located. Yeah, hey, what's going on, everybody? My name is Tristan, Marcellus Winfrey. An actor writer and director and what are we talking about documentary, the healing begins that deals with mental health, you know what I mean and how we tell ourselves and go through these a combinations of what we go through as people. Right, right. And we're very excited to have you here, you are in Chicago, correct. Chicago Chicago. Exactly. Is that what it does the window city, right? You know, that's what we call it. It's actually one thing. Chicago has its days. One day it feels like summer wonder it feels like spray and then, you know, you put like a tundra one day. So we get an all type of seasons. But for the most part, we do hold ourselves accountable for being the windy city. That's good. That's good. So we want to talk to you about being a filmmaker. We're going to get into your documentary and what is all about because I believe that you have a very powerful message and but you're also a very powerful filmmaker in you have done films. You have that commercials. You're also an actor or a producer and I believe you're even a teacher and you are advocate. You're doing what we're doing as well in your own way. So tell us more about your journey as a filmmaker, what you get started as a filmmaker in just sort of when did you realize that this is what you wanted to do? Yeah, so the journey of being a filmmaker. I think it started back in 2018 when I produced my first short film called pain as the agent of change, which kind of like dealt with my all personal loss and grief of a brother. And, you know, do that channeling kind of like worked out what a script was, you know what I mean? And, you know, Biden has put this together, telling the story of personal my own story of life, you know, what it was that I was dealing with during that time. And so I kind of just, you know, got through, you know what I mean and got the filmmakers together and said, okay, I have the story. You know what I mean? I want to tell for a specific type of people. You know what I mean? Because so often, you know what I mean? When we talk about Greek, especially black green, you know, it's often kind of like just plastic on a new screen and that's how you hear about it. You have this different type of stereotype. So for me, it was like, well, I want to go beyond that, you know what I mean? Why are we not actually sitting down to talk to someone? You know what I mean about the things that we are going through within our own community? Because, you know, lose this thing of like right away, you know, why are you talking to a therapist saying, you know, you must be crazy and it's like, no way. You don't have to say it to where to go. So I just got really curious about my own personal care, so it's like I'm a child is and also take up therapy to learn about the things that I need to learn to better my own. And so how do you go about you in your own way as a filmmaker when you said, okay, I think this is a very powerful message that I want to convey. And let's talk about the film process first. For we started the independent film for filmmakers. The independent film creative have us an outlet for filmmakers that maybe are going through the same thing. You know what, what am I gonna do with my life or maybe I wanted to do this all my life and how do I get started, right? And you said, you got started a little bit later in life, you know, but you have done creative work throughout. So tell us about that in a sense. What made you say, okay, now I have an idea. Now I want to do a few more. And what was your process in that sense like getting actors? You yourself have an agent. So you kind of know a little bit of the behind the scenes, but now as far as the producer part in making it happen, that was more a little bit about that. You know, first things first summer after. You know what I mean? Active film and television. So the whole thing is that I know what a good script is. When is upon me? So that was the easy part of navigating. You know what I mean? I think the biggest part for me was kind of like finding a director photography. You know what I mean? And then 8 editor. Then a self personal like, you know, hover over me while I'm speaking these slides. Now that stuff was all formed to me because his actor, you show up to set, you can learn to lines learn and you do what you need to do and need you to help, you know, I need this one. This was a really technical aspect. And we knew nothing about, you know what I mean? So I kind of like you know, I was really green to this on my book they were all okay. What is a wise? What does a closer look? Right. So that you write your own script as well or do you have the E collaborate with anyone in that part of it? I wrote my own spirit, my Friends, you know what I mean? Who are other actors and all that I was like, okay, hey, can you read this? You know what I need to see if it is actually decent? And it actually turned out to be a really spectacular. So once I wrote it, you know what I mean? I put it in the hands of our DP and our editor and all that and what I knew was that it was true, you know what I mean? And we, you know, talk about different shots that we wanted to portray and different images and storytelling and all that. Okay, no. So that's really good because someone who's getting started like a desert and I just made a small film for the mystery box, which we were talking about it a little bit behind the scenes, but we're trying to encourage filmmakers to make their own films, whether it's something that they think is, you know, it's not up to where they want it to be. What advice do you think we can do when you say, okay, we're looking at actors. We're looking. And I didn't even say advice. I would say the process, right? Now you have your actors in place. Now you have to do it. How do you manage that being you yourself an actor? Because I think you.

Lucy bralette Chicago Raza lenski Lewis gorilla Tristan Tristan Marcellus Winfrey Scranton Tristan Pennsylvania Biden
"tristan marcellus winfrey" Discussed on Scranton Talks

Scranton Talks

02:06 min | 8 months ago

"tristan marcellus winfrey" Discussed on Scranton Talks

"Welcome back to another episode of this grant and talks podcast. This is a podcast of inspirational informative and fun talks with other filmmakers about their projects and their journeys. Scranton talks is part of the independent film creative hub based in Scranton Pennsylvania. Hosted by Lucca RAS and myself, as a raised linskey, who founded the independent film creative hub, which is geared to help filmmakers reach their potential and becoming successful creative artists. I am so glad you can join us again for another episode and luce and I have been hard at work doing some many awesome projects. And we are so glad to bring you this next episode of screen talks. Usa and I had the pleasure to talk with director and filmmaker Tristan, Marcellus Winfrey. Tristan is a local Chicago writer, director, actor, producer, teaching artist and filmmaker. He attended the university of Houston downtown studying fine arts. He has had the privilege to perform a collaborate with theater companies such as the alley theater ensemble theater, pride film in place, Goodman theater Congo square theater, Oak Park festival, Chicago dramatist, LatinX theater commons in other companies. His film and commercial credits include pain as the agent of change short film. The helium begins documentary, the Thai bar, big break teen prevention, windstream kinetic energy. Tristan is a huge advocate for mental health awareness. He uses his platform to make a change in the world one step at a time. Lucy and I delve deep with Tristan on his filmmaking journey, and what has inspired him on the films he created, including talking about his recent documentary, the healing begins. Tristan, sums up the documentary with this point. We are in a new era of retelling our story as black people. The healing of ourselves and the world we live in will come when.

Scranton Tristan Lucca RAS linskey Marcellus Winfrey alley theater ensemble theater Goodman theater Congo square t Oak Park festival luce Chicago Pennsylvania university of Houston Usa Lucy
"tristan marcellus winfrey" Discussed on Scranton Talks

Scranton Talks

19:36 min | 10 months ago

"tristan marcellus winfrey" Discussed on Scranton Talks

"So we come back from multiple callbacks, 'cause we were like, there's no way. Things don't work out like this for us. But it just did. And so casting was really, really fun. And everyone ended up just being local to Wellington. Because like you guys are saying there's so much talent outside of Atlanta. And LA and New York. There's so much talent in those places for sure. But the best roles at least for our film were right here. So. Yeah, exactly. And sometimes that works even better because again, like you're saying you got to have sort of a family on set because if you don't have that relationship that you're having fun, you know, because I think it should be about having fun being professional, but if you're not having fun, I mean, then it's not, you know, the production value is not there either. Long amounts of hours with each other. And very hot conditions. So we'll talk about weather, right? So when we were following it, I thought you would talk about hot conditions. There's always something that happens on the set. There's always a setback there's always something, so maybe you can, you know, most people talk about, you know, oh yeah, we had this, we had that, but you girls had something bigger, maybe you can tell us about that. Yes, because what's so funny, I'll tell you is that we had all the typical things like our grip truck got stuck in the sand, our ice cream truck broke down. And we rarely ever talk about those challenges because they are all, you know, I guess overshadowed by the fact that this film is about no rain and on day 12 of production we had to stop everything because a hurricane for hurricane that category four hurricane. It was headed towards Wilmington. And not moving. And he was coming right towards our city. So we had to stop on day 12 with an 18 day shoot and everyone evacuated to places like Charlotte or Atlanta. And we were stuck outside of our town for two weeks. I didn't know what we were going to come to when we came back. Because when Lincoln essentially became an island, it flooded everywhere. We weren't sure if our locations were going to be okay. And not even just for our films, but because those people who came our family do, and we didn't want their businesses to damage. There was a lot and I was also going out of the country during that time. So amazing Hannah, somehow put the Tetris of our crew to schedule back together and everyone was able to come back two months later to film. But then it was 44°. Okay. So one question about that, I mean, so when you have something like that, I said back. It's very hard on your motivation. It's very hard because now you're like, what am I going to do? And it takes a toll, especially if you're an artist, you're trying to create something that's meaningful, and now you have a big setback. How do you bounce back from that emotionally? You know, just say, you know, I just keep doing it. Keep doing it. Besides that you have the responsibility of finishing, but just more in the sense of like a personal, you know, no. The question. Hold on, but you think that's okay. Like, how did we do that? I think part of it is just we have invested so much already. And I think we could say just ourselves invested, but then when we look at our crew and our cast and all the people that contributed to this crowdfunding campaign and shared our film like when we are doing our campaign, it's like it didn't feel like it was our movie and felt like it was our communities movie. And so it had to, we had to finish it. We had to keep on going, even though we were tired, because not only us but so many people aboard their heart and soul into making this happen. And it just, it just wasn't really an option to be like, well, you know, we tried our best. And we had a lot, I mean, a hurricane was big, but we also hit some equally challenging things during that production after production before production. Just a lot of lifestyle, hard stuff in between. And so it's kind of like, I don't know. We just kind of had, I think also 'cause we're a partnership. So when one person is tired, the other person can lift them up and vice versa. Megan, what do you think? Yeah, the thing I was thinking of is a lot of times those setbacks I think we used as motivation to be like, this will not stop us. And it almost made us get more fire. Every once in a while it gets to you. And I think that that's when it's okay to call up your friend or like I got to just call it Hannah. And sometimes we're like, I can't do it today. Like today I take a break from the movie. Because maybe these are a can be at least a nonstop thing you're working on. You can really get burnt out on it. And the thing we didn't want to do is get so tired that we made a wrong decision. Out of just because we felt fired. So the process of making the movie took longer than I think some do, but a lot of that is in part because we allowed ourselves to take a breath if we needed it. Yeah, that's extremely important. I mean, you pretty much said it like you have to step back and do something fun, relax and then come back to it, right? I mean, that was guilty. I feel guilty. Exactly. Well, I mean, I was going to ask you about what your advice for filmmakers was, but I can not set out, but let me make sure that's where it doesn't have another question. And then I'll ask my final question that you girls go with just show the trader one more time do a little plug for Amazon Prime because I know that it's on Amazon Prime and then go from there. I'll check well also if we have any questions on our site. It was exploring your social media. And I was interested because you put it on your Facebook our hopes, raise autism awareness, brand jobs to our community, provide opportunities for women to live if you want it to elaborate on those. Yeah. I think it was really cool. We were able to pay our crew and we were really proud of that. It wasn't a huge amount. But we were also able to give them an interest in the film. So once the film makes money, our hope is that it does because we don't have investors. It is our crew and our cast and we can give that money back to them. In 2018 when we filmed our town was in a really big world for any filmmaking happening in the area. And it kept everyone energized. I think it kept. It gave people opportunities for roles they hadn't begun before. And now they've moved on to studio productions in our doing those roles. So I think got that goal and yes, number one is to raise autism awareness and acceptance in this film to get people talking about it. And to just promote the message that there is no such thing as normal. And we are here to accept each other but also ourselves. And then finally, from when it in film, you know, one of the reasons we set out to even write female characters is because we are actors first. And we auditioned for a lot of roles that were very grateful to audition for their typically very small and they could be like dumb blond or quirky white dress and we're like, ah, women are so much more than that. And so our hope is that people can see two female characters interacting that just have a family relationship and the complexities that come behind that. So those are our hopes. Thanks for reading those. I clearly asked about them. That's awesome with those goals that you have for this film. I was just amazing. Yeah, and I think that's important. That's very important to have goals. I mean, other than that, I think you have given great advice throughout the whole talk right now, which is really what we want to do. And I think you couldn't have said it better that, you know, you're doing this for yourself. Obviously, but also people get opportunities because they do a project. You know, like not a lot of times, you know, people are just doing something in the last 6 because something there's always someone watching, right? I always say that. There's always someone looking at your staff and then seeing what's out there and it's great that you're actors or maybe someone got a production somewhere out of that. And I think that's the most rewarding experience that you can get as a filmmaker to really see somebody in your film, making it as well. So we're going to do a little plug. How do we find your film? So I'll put it on the comments after the link, but yeah, so you can find drought on Amazon Prime. This week actually we're running a special where you can rent for 4.99 and purchase for 9.99. But then at the end of this week, you'll go back up to its normal price. You should just buy it then, right? You know? Yeah. And if you like it, it would mean so much if you guys rated it and murdered you. I'm an honest review. You know, that's really important to us. So yeah, it was on prem. Okay. All right. So this is I promise this is the last question, okay? So this is just if you were to tell yourself before you even started this project. One thing that you would have done differently, maybe just or you would have told yourself before you got this project going like that, maybe yeah, we could have gotten different at different ways. You know, like, oh, sorry, Meg's. You know, you go first. I was thinking you have sex. Okay. I feel like everything was supposed to happen the way it was. So I wouldn't change anything because had learned so much. The learning curve on this project was huge because every single role that Megan and I stepped into was new. But I will say if I could go back and tell myself something that I'll continue to tell myself for the next projects that we do, I really struggled on set and only Megan really knows this. As a director, because I felt like I was completely under qualified, which I was and still am. But I felt like I needed to know everything. Especially technical stuff, which I was not familiar with at all. And so I really got in my head when I was in director mode that I just was so inadequate and it made it was just really unhealthy. Unhealthy thoughts, you know, of like, I'm not good enough or like, no one's gonna listen to me, all that stuff. It's such a waste of time. And so what, maybe I don't know all the answers, but that's why you have a team. So I think I would go back and tell myself just chill. Just trust your gut. You know that other people are working just as hard, you don't have to know the answers, and that's why you have all these great people with you. So yeah, I think that's maybe something that I go back and tell myself. Intel others, you don't have to know everything, just take it one step at a time. That's perfect. Yeah. You know, it's going to sound cheesy. It's mine. It's about the same. I would think in my modes though if I don't know something, I try to learn everything I can about it. And sometimes you just don't have the capacity. I don't need to know everything that the gaffer is doing. As I do more or sound or the first AC or DIT, you know, I wanted to know everyone was doing. I think that comes from a good place. And I think what Hannah's talking about comes from a place of wanting to be a good team, team member. But being a good team member is sometimes releasing responsibility and letting people do what they're there to do. And as we do more projects or as you can do more projects out there, you'll learn more and more each time. And you'll feel, I think more like you have more knowledge of everything going on. It's okay if you don't. That's perfect. I think that's perfect by this way. I mean, pretty much what we've been saying and we're gonna keep saying it and we're gonna try to do this little segment as much as we can find filmmakers that are doing great things in this area and outside this area because I think we're all connected anyway. So maybe one, maybe one day we'll get to work in a project together, and definitely. Ladies, we wish are the best and the best of luck on your future and it looks like it's gonna be a pretty good one. I mean, you have a great movie that I think is going to inspire not only filmmakers, but just anyone looking to just be creative. Thank you so much for listening to our Scranton talks podcasts, and I hope you enjoyed your time with us. Be sure to catch our next episode as we chat with director and filmmaker Tristan Marcellus Winfrey about his film the helium against documentary. He is a huge advocate for mental health awareness, and he uses his platform to make change in the world one step at a time. Be sure to visit our website, WW our creative hub dot com. If you're interested in watching the film drought, be sure to check it out for rent and purchase on Amazon Prime Video. And be sure to follow them on Facebook and Instagram as well. And be sure to subscribe to the screen toxic podcast, to stay up to date on our latest episodes. And be sure to tell all your Friends about us.

Ep2: Chatting It Up With Drought's Hannah Black & Megan Petersen

Scranton Talks

19:36 min | 10 months ago

Ep2: Chatting It Up With Drought's Hannah Black & Megan Petersen

"So we come back from multiple callbacks, 'cause we were like, there's no way. Things don't work out like this for us. But it just did. And so casting was really, really fun. And everyone ended up just being local to Wellington. Because like you guys are saying there's so much talent outside of Atlanta. And LA and New York. There's so much talent in those places for sure. But the best roles at least for our film were right here. So. Yeah, exactly. And sometimes that works even better because again, like you're saying you got to have sort of a family on set because if you don't have that relationship that you're having fun, you know, because I think it should be about having fun being professional, but if you're not having fun, I mean, then it's not, you know, the production value is not there either. Long amounts of hours with each other. And very hot conditions. So we'll talk about weather, right? So when we were following it, I thought you would talk about hot conditions. There's always something that happens on the set. There's always a setback there's always something, so maybe you can, you know, most people talk about, you know, oh yeah, we had this, we had that, but you girls had something bigger, maybe you can tell us about that. Yes, because what's so funny, I'll tell you is that we had all the typical things like our grip truck got stuck in the sand, our ice cream truck broke down. And we rarely ever talk about those challenges because they are all, you know, I guess overshadowed by the fact that this film is about no rain and on day 12 of production we had to stop everything because a hurricane for hurricane that category four hurricane. It was headed towards Wilmington. And not moving. And he was coming right towards our city. So we had to stop on day 12 with an 18 day shoot and everyone evacuated to places like Charlotte or Atlanta. And we were stuck outside of our town for two weeks. I didn't know what we were going to come to when we came back. Because when Lincoln essentially became an island, it flooded everywhere. We weren't sure if our locations were going to be okay. And not even just for our films, but because those people who came our family do, and we didn't want their businesses to damage. There was a lot and I was also going out of the country during that time. So amazing Hannah, somehow put the Tetris of our crew to schedule back together and everyone was able to come back two months later to film. But then it was 44°. Okay. So one question about that, I mean, so when you have something like that, I said back. It's very hard on your motivation. It's very hard because now you're like, what am I going to do? And it takes a toll, especially if you're an artist, you're trying to create something that's meaningful, and now you have a big setback. How do you bounce back from that emotionally? You know, just say, you know, I just keep doing it. Keep doing it. Besides that you have the responsibility of finishing, but just more in the sense of like a personal, you know, no. The question. Hold on, but you think that's okay. Like, how did we do that? I think part of it is just we have invested so much already. And I think we could say just ourselves invested, but then when we look at our crew and our cast and all the people that contributed to this crowdfunding campaign and shared our film like when we are doing our campaign, it's like it didn't feel like it was our movie and felt like it was our communities movie. And so it had to, we had to finish it. We had to keep on going, even though we were tired, because not only us but so many people aboard their heart and soul into making this happen. And it just, it just wasn't really an option to be like, well, you know, we tried our best. And we had a lot, I mean, a hurricane was big, but we also hit some equally challenging things during that production after production before production. Just a lot of lifestyle, hard stuff in between. And so it's kind of like, I don't know. We just kind of had, I think also 'cause we're a partnership. So when one person is tired, the other person can lift them up and vice versa. Megan, what do you think? Yeah, the thing I was thinking of is a lot of times those setbacks I think we used as motivation to be like, this will not stop us. And it almost made us get more fire. Every once in a while it gets to you. And I think that that's when it's okay to call up your friend or like I got to just call it Hannah. And sometimes we're like, I can't do it today. Like today I take a break from the movie. Because maybe these are a can be at least a nonstop thing you're working on. You can really get burnt out on it. And the thing we didn't want to do is get so tired that we made a wrong decision. Out of just because we felt fired. So the process of making the movie took longer than I think some do, but a lot of that is in part because we allowed ourselves to take a breath if we needed it. Yeah, that's extremely important. I mean, you pretty much said it like you have to step back and do something fun, relax and then come back to it, right? I mean, that was guilty. I feel guilty. Exactly. Well, I mean, I was going to ask you about what your advice for filmmakers was, but I can not set out, but let me make sure that's where it doesn't have another question. And then I'll ask my final question that you girls go with just show the trader one more time do a little plug for Amazon Prime because I know that it's on Amazon Prime and then go from there. I'll check well also if we have any questions on our site. It was exploring your social media. And I was interested because you put it on your Facebook our hopes, raise autism awareness, brand jobs to our community, provide opportunities for women to live if you want it to elaborate on those. Yeah. I think it was really cool. We were able to pay our crew and we were really proud of that. It wasn't a huge amount. But we were also able to give them an interest in the film. So once the film makes money, our hope is that it does because we don't have investors. It is our crew and our cast and we can give that money back to them. In 2018 when we filmed our town was in a really big world for any filmmaking happening in the area. And it kept everyone energized. I think it kept. It gave people opportunities for roles they hadn't begun before. And now they've moved on to studio productions in our doing those roles. So I think got that goal and yes, number one is to raise autism awareness and acceptance in this film to get people talking about it. And to just promote the message that there is no such thing as normal. And we are here to accept each other but also ourselves. And then finally, from when it in film, you know, one of the reasons we set out to even write female characters is because we are actors first. And we auditioned for a lot of roles that were very grateful to audition for their typically very small and they could be like dumb blond or quirky white dress and we're like, ah, women are so much more than that. And so our hope is that people can see two female characters interacting that just have a family relationship and the complexities that come behind that. So those are our hopes. Thanks for reading those. I clearly asked about them. That's awesome with those goals that you have for this film. I was just amazing. Yeah, and I think that's important. That's very important to have goals. I mean, other than that, I think you have given great advice throughout the whole talk right now, which is really what we want to do. And I think you couldn't have said it better that, you know, you're doing this for yourself. Obviously, but also people get opportunities because they do a project. You know, like not a lot of times, you know, people are just doing something in the last 6 because something there's always someone watching, right? I always say that. There's always someone looking at your staff and then seeing what's out there and it's great that you're actors or maybe someone got a production somewhere out of that. And I think that's the most rewarding experience that you can get as a filmmaker to really see somebody in your film, making it as well. So we're going to do a little plug. How do we find your film? So I'll put it on the comments after the link, but yeah, so you can find drought on Amazon Prime. This week actually we're running a special where you can rent for 4.99 and purchase for 9.99. But then at the end of this week, you'll go back up to its normal price. You should just buy it then, right? You know? Yeah. And if you like it, it would mean so much if you guys rated it and murdered you. I'm an honest review. You know, that's really important to us. So yeah, it was on prem. Okay. All right. So this is I promise this is the last question, okay? So this is just if you were to tell yourself before you even started this project. One thing that you would have done differently, maybe just or you would have told yourself before you got this project going like that, maybe yeah, we could have gotten different at different ways. You know, like, oh, sorry, Meg's. You know, you go first. I was thinking you have sex. Okay. I feel like everything was supposed to happen the way it was. So I wouldn't change anything because had learned so much. The learning curve on this project was huge because every single role that Megan and I stepped into was new. But I will say if I could go back and tell myself something that I'll continue to tell myself for the next projects that we do, I really struggled on set and only Megan really knows this. As a director, because I felt like I was completely under qualified, which I was and still am. But I felt like I needed to know everything. Especially technical stuff, which I was not familiar with at all. And so I really got in my head when I was in director mode that I just was so inadequate and it made it was just really unhealthy. Unhealthy thoughts, you know, of like, I'm not good enough or like, no one's gonna listen to me, all that stuff. It's such a waste of time. And so what, maybe I don't know all the answers, but that's why you have a team. So I think I would go back and tell myself just chill. Just trust your gut. You know that other people are working just as hard, you don't have to know the answers, and that's why you have all these great people with you. So yeah, I think that's maybe something that I go back and tell myself. Intel others, you don't have to know everything, just take it one step at a time. That's perfect. Yeah. You know, it's going to sound cheesy. It's mine. It's about the same. I would think in my modes though if I don't know something, I try to learn everything I can about it. And sometimes you just don't have the capacity. I don't need to know everything that the gaffer is doing. As I do more or sound or the first AC or DIT, you know, I wanted to know everyone was doing. I think that comes from a good place. And I think what Hannah's talking about comes from a place of wanting to be a good team, team member. But being a good team member is sometimes releasing responsibility and letting people do what they're there to do. And as we do more projects or as you can do more projects out there, you'll learn more and more each time. And you'll feel, I think more like you have more knowledge of everything going on. It's okay if you don't. That's perfect. I think that's perfect by this way. I mean, pretty much what we've been saying and we're gonna keep saying it and we're gonna try to do this little segment as much as we can find filmmakers that are doing great things in this area and outside this area because I think we're all connected anyway. So maybe one, maybe one day we'll get to work in a project together, and definitely. Ladies, we wish are the best and the best of luck on your future and it looks like it's gonna be a pretty good one. I mean, you have a great movie that I think is going to inspire not only filmmakers, but just anyone looking to just be creative. Thank you so much for listening to our Scranton talks podcasts, and I hope you enjoyed your time with us. Be sure to catch our next episode as we chat with director and filmmaker Tristan Marcellus Winfrey about his film the helium against documentary. He is a huge advocate for mental health awareness, and he uses his platform to make change in the world one step at a time. Be sure to visit our website, WW our creative hub dot com. If you're interested in watching the film drought, be sure to check it out for rent and purchase on Amazon Prime Video. And be sure to follow them on Facebook and Instagram as well. And be sure to subscribe to the screen toxic podcast, to stay up to date on our latest episodes. And be sure to tell all your Friends about us.

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"tristan marcellus winfrey" Discussed on Scranton Talks

Scranton Talks

03:21 min | 10 months ago

"tristan marcellus winfrey" Discussed on Scranton Talks

"I just was so inadequate and it made it was just really unhealthy. Unhealthy thoughts, you know, of like, I'm not good enough or like, no one's gonna listen to me, all that stuff. It's such a waste of time. And so what, maybe I don't know all the answers, but that's why you have a team. So I think I would go back and tell myself just chill. Just trust your gut. You know that other people are working just as hard, you don't have to know the answers, and that's why you have all these great people with you. So yeah, I think that's maybe something that I go back and tell myself. Intel others, you don't have to know everything, just take it one step at a time. That's perfect. Yeah. You know, it's going to sound cheesy. It's mine. It's about the same. I would think in my modes though if I don't know something, I try to learn everything I can about it. And sometimes you just don't have the capacity. I don't need to know everything that the gaffer is doing. As I do more or sound or the first AC or DIT, you know, I wanted to know everyone was doing. I think that comes from a good place. And I think what Hannah's talking about comes from a place of wanting to be a good team, team member. But being a good team member is sometimes releasing responsibility and letting people do what they're there to do. And as we do more projects or as you can do more projects out there, you'll learn more and more each time. And you'll feel, I think more like you have more knowledge of everything going on. It's okay if you don't. That's perfect. I think that's perfect by this way. I mean, pretty much what we've been saying and we're gonna keep saying it and we're gonna try to do this little segment as much as we can find filmmakers that are doing great things in this area and outside this area because I think we're all connected anyway. So maybe one, maybe one day we'll get to work in a project together, and definitely. Ladies, we wish are the best and the best of luck on your future and it looks like it's gonna be a pretty good one. I mean, you have a great movie that I think is going to inspire not only filmmakers, but just anyone looking to just be creative. Thank you so much for listening to our Scranton talks podcasts, and I hope you enjoyed your time with us. Be sure to catch our next episode as we chat with director and filmmaker Tristan Marcellus Winfrey about his film the helium against documentary. He is a huge advocate for mental health awareness, and he uses his platform to make change in the world one step at a time. Be sure to visit our website, WW our creative hub dot com. If you're interested in watching the film drought, be sure to check it out for rent and purchase on Amazon Prime Video. And be sure to follow them on Facebook and Instagram as well. And be sure to subscribe to the screen toxic podcast, to stay up to date on our latest episodes. And be sure to tell all your Friends about us..

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