21 Burst results for "Tristan Harris"

"tristan harris" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

02:24 min | Last week

"tristan harris" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"But <Speech_Male> i understand <Silence> like <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Understand feeling <Speech_Male> inferior and wanting <Speech_Male> to be smarter than everyone <Speech_Male> improved that <Speech_Male> you could do something <Speech_Male> to not get caught. <Speech_Male> I understand that motivation. <Speech_Male> I wouldn't <Speech_Male> kill to do that. But <Silence> i understand <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> like. Oh i wanna <SpeakerChange> prove <Silence> smarter than everyone <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> do. I mean <Speech_Male> i conceptually <Speech_Male> understand <Speech_Female> understand <Speech_Female> it. I think <Speech_Female> that there's so much <Speech_Female> i mean. That's <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> so entitled <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Silence> terrible <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> terrible <Speech_Male> murderer. I <Speech_Male> can't <SpeakerChange> say that <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> i stand <Speech_Female> for. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Oh my goodness <Speech_Female> that everything. <Speech_Female> That was everything <Speech_Male> for tristan. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Oh man. I really enjoyed <Speech_Male> him in boy. <Speech_Male> Oh boy i think the tipping <Speech_Male> point has happened <Speech_Male> because of that movie <Speech_Male> and a few other things. <Speech_Male> I feel like people <Speech_Male> are really <Speech_Male> starting. Broadly <Speech_Male> understand the <Speech_Male> risks of all this <Speech_Male> technology. <Speech_Male> Which is encouraging. <Speech_Male> I think we're going to <Speech_Male> see some governmental <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> regulations. That are going <Speech_Male> to help curb it <Speech_Male> and i regret. <Speech_Male> Now when i said to <Speech_Male> bill gates <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> find it ridiculous <Speech_Male> that these folks <Speech_Male> who have <Speech_Male> created this amazing <Speech_Male> things have to sit in front of <Speech_Male> a senate subcommittee <Speech_Male> with <Speech_Male> some assholes. Saint <Speech_Male> his e mail gets <Speech_Male> bounce back <SpeakerChange> when he sends <Speech_Female> it to his son rice. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Yeah the <Speech_Male> there's it's important. <Speech_Music_Male> Yeah yeah yeah. <Speech_Music_Female> Yeah i regret <Speech_Female> it. <Speech_Female> That's a <SpeakerChange> big thing <Speech_Male> to admit <Speech_Male> committing. <Speech_Male> Lvs's man to play <Speech_Male> phone tvd. <Speech_Male> Its <Speech_Female> name are you going to <Speech_Female> call it a <Speech_Female> iphone <Speech_Female> but that's <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> sounds <Speech_Male> kind of racist <Speech_Music_Male> talk about <Silence> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> a pony <Speech_Music_Male> <hes> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> ramen <Speech_Female> knob <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> Theoretical <Speech_Male> pony <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> pony <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> by the way if <Speech_Male> anyone is not <Speech_Male> heard the liam bridges <Speech_Male> version <Speech_Male> of coney <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Female> second time. We've talked <Speech_Male> about leon bridges. <Speech_Male> We love him. <Speech_Male> We love him <Speech_Male> should he come on. I <Speech_Male> love it. <Speech_Male> Do you think he talked to <Speech_Male> us. One of those steel <Speech_Male> microphones in it. Sound <Speech_Male> like sixties distorted <Speech_Male> the way his <SpeakerChange> his <Speech_Male> music. <Speech_Male> That'd be <Speech_Male> quote behind like we were <Speech_Male> Time travel <Speech_Male> interview <Speech_Male> like we have an <SpeakerChange> interview from <Speech_Male> the sixties today <Speech_Male> cleans gambit <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> i <Speech_Music_Male> love you.

leon bridges senate tristan
"tristan harris" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

02:25 min | Last week

"tristan harris" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"I wouldn't <Speech_Male> do it but <Speech_Male> i understand <Silence> like <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Understand feeling <Speech_Male> inferior and wanting <Speech_Male> to be smarter than everyone <Speech_Male> improved that <Speech_Male> you could do something <Speech_Male> to not get caught. <Speech_Male> I understand that motivation. <Speech_Male> I wouldn't <Speech_Male> kill to do that. But <Silence> i understand <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> like. Oh i wanna <SpeakerChange> prove <Silence> smarter than everyone <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> do. I mean <Speech_Male> i conceptually <Speech_Male> understand <Speech_Female> understand <Speech_Female> it. I think <Speech_Female> that there's so much <Speech_Female> i mean. That's <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> so entitled <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Silence> terrible <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> terrible <Speech_Male> murder. I <Speech_Male> don't <SpeakerChange> say that <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> i stand <Speech_Female> for. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Oh my goodness <Speech_Female> that everything. <Speech_Female> That was everything <Speech_Male> for tristan. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Oh man. I really enjoyed <Speech_Male> him in boy. <Speech_Male> Oh boy i think the tipping <Speech_Male> point has happened <Speech_Male> because of that movie <Speech_Male> and a few other things. <Speech_Male> I feel like people <Speech_Male> are really <Speech_Male> starting. Broadly <Speech_Male> understand the <Speech_Male> risks of all this <Speech_Male> technology. <Speech_Male> Which is encouraging. <Speech_Male> I think we're going to <Speech_Male> see some governmental <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> regulations. That are going <Speech_Male> to help curb it <Speech_Male> and i regret. <Speech_Male> Now when i said to <Speech_Male> bill gates <Speech_Male> do <Speech_Male> find it. Ridiculous <Speech_Male> that these folks <Speech_Male> who have <Speech_Male> created this amazing <Speech_Male> things have to sit in front of <Speech_Male> a senate subcommittee <Speech_Male> with <Speech_Male> some assholes. Saint <Speech_Male> his e mail gets <Speech_Male> bounce back <SpeakerChange> when he sends <Speech_Female> it to his son rice. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> The <Speech_Male> there's it's important. <Speech_Music_Male> Yeah yeah yeah. <Speech_Music_Female> Yeah i regret <Speech_Female> it. <Speech_Female> That's a <SpeakerChange> big thing <Speech_Male> to admit <Speech_Male> committing. <Speech_Male> Lvs's man to play <Speech_Male> phone tvd. <Speech_Male> Its <Speech_Female> name are you going to <Speech_Female> call it a <Speech_Female> iphone <Speech_Female> but that's <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> sounds <Speech_Male> kind of racist <Speech_Music_Male> talk about <Silence> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> a pony <Speech_Music_Male> <hes> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> ramen <Speech_Female> knob <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> Theoretical <Speech_Male> pony <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> pony <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> by the way if <Speech_Male> anyone is not <Speech_Male> heard the liam bridges <Speech_Male> version <Speech_Male> of coney <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Female> second time. We've talked <Speech_Male> about leon bridges. <Speech_Male> we love. <Speech_Male> we love him <Speech_Male> should he come on. I <Speech_Male> love it. <Speech_Male> Do you think he talked to <Speech_Male> us. One of those steel <Speech_Male> microphones in it. Sound <Speech_Male> like sixties distorted <Speech_Male> the way his <SpeakerChange> his <Speech_Male> music. <Speech_Male> That'd be <Speech_Male> quote behind like we were <Speech_Male> Time travel <Speech_Male> interview <Speech_Male> like we have an <SpeakerChange> interview from <Speech_Male> the sixties today <Speech_Male> cleans gambit. Oh my <Speech_Male> gosh. <Speech_Music_Male> I <Speech_Music_Male> love you.

leon bridges senate tristan murder
"tristan harris" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

05:20 min | Last week

"tristan harris" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Cabbage tonight. But here we got a cabin tonight. God because union cabbage night. Oh we'll doe or making soup. Do you call the sweet spread that is put on a cake frosting or icing frosting processing icing frosting and icing refer to different things both neither other. What do you call the rubber soled shoes worn in gym class or for athletic events sneakers sneakers shoes gym shoes jim. Shes san shoes jumpers ten inches. That's what my tennis shoes. That's what we would say. Okay say more than whatever i said. Grab your tennis. Yup running shoes running shoes runners. Trainers how do you pronounce c. a. r. a. m. e. l. o. Carmo caramel caramel. Okay so two. Syllables karma caramel. That's how i. That's how. I say it sounds so fancy. It sounds like tv de pronounce. The word c o t n c. A h t. The same. I got caught or car caught see pronounce them differently. Yeah wow you pronounce them the same. Yeah wow he caught a pull up the caught the court. What do you call the area of grass between the sidewalk and the road very between the sidewalk in the road. What are some options. Berm parking tree lon terrace curb. Strip beltway verge. I have no word for this award. Okay last question. What you call a sale of unwanted items on your porch in your yard excetera. Well now. i'm so fucked with the last twenty five years in la. But i think a garage sale me. I would agree to okay tag. Sale yard sale garage. Sale rummage sale thrift sale. Stoop sale carports sale sidewalk sale. Jumble jumble sale car-boot car boot sale which jumble has got to be like new orleans or some good submit you all right. I'm going to try to practice. Oh shit detroit now.

tennis detroit new orleans la
"tristan harris" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

04:38 min | Last week

"tristan harris" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"I'm glad it's hard. Okay okay okay. The quiz from the new york times that can pinpoint your exact zip code after asking. Twenty five questions about your word. Choice and stop is called how y'all us and you guys talk. Bos we try it. What's going to be tricky. Is that you know. I've intentionally changed some of mine. Like i say y'all locks. I think it's y'alls the best. Because often when i say you guys and there's women present or at one time it happened in A person had transitioned and two female. And i said hey guys are late. And then i just panicked. I was like oh boy. This did it come up. Don't think the person cared at all. But i just panicked okay and then i just saw. I'm going to get rid of guys because it's gender specific. I'm just gonna go with y'all and rolls off the tongue for me well. It's obviously rose off the time for me. I wish you said it more. You don't say to say exclusively and you probably tried to break yourself. The habit when you came to los angeles or just happened organically. It's great. it's really useful. It's better than you guys iran. I don't like the we're calling a bunch of girls you guys. It's kinda patriarchal okay. Let's let's play. Let's try okay. It's twenty five questions okay. Great well do you. I won't do you. I know we'll see okay. How would you address a group of two or more people first question what you just talked about. I'm going to be honesty honest. Not what you've changed to get you guys. Do you want to hear the list. Though there's a lot to maybe there's you all use no that's new jersey ee lot. No you guys you wins all. That's real deep south millions. You other. y'all you guys guys. What do you call this small gray bug that curls up into a ball and it's touch roly-poly that an option it is. Yeah pill bug doodlebug. Potato roly poly sow bug basketball bug twiddle bug. Roll up bug. Woodlouse millipedes centipede. I know what this creature is but have no word for it. I have no idea what this creature is. There that could be telling maybe doesn't exist in the pacific northwest. Actually what do you call the thing from which you might drink water in a school..

new york times pacific northwest los angeles iran
"tristan harris" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

03:24 min | Last week

"tristan harris" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"How and he's already got plans to get it but he already has the twelve. So does amy. Yeah like he was a meat. He's the first person to have it so he's kind of on the end of the spectrum. I'd say the group okay so primarily. I got it because my children lose the apple tv remotes. The just complained about this before but we have six of them and at any given time the one is now and it'll show up somewhere crazy like the laundry room so now go around all six and see which one works with japan in so my only defense against that has been. I can pull my ipaq out in control the apple. Tv with my. I don't wanna fucking lug around my ipad all the time when. I wanna watch telly. So i was thinking i just gotta have a remote in my pocket. That's really what drove this entire thing and receiving videos from you guys who are in the cult because so many so many times you guys make You got great videos and use you. Text them to kristen awry and we can't see shit. It's the lowest grade video you can imagine. We can't a what's going out. We can hear and then some shadows of like when you're looking to see people are looking at your hawkers which is shadow is what i see a normal life. Yeah that's the bummer. And i'm sick of that. Yeah i gotta say samsung great product. Really i'm gonna miss my s. ten. So you are your state hanging on your tufo injia. Currently i i do. I have my s. ten on the arm rest of the lazy boy and my New iphone need to come up with a name for is in my growing well on my mind. Yeah i have a fear okay. I have a fear on behalf of europe. i packs. okay. I have a feeling you're not gonna be spending any more time on that i packs and you abandon your son in your place your son with a new baby and that baby cuter and smaller and more efficient and funnier. So i think it's gonna be sad. Well that's a very realistic concern to have for the packs. My son but i can tell you right now. I'm going to the dunes in a few days right. Yeah so what. I'll do is bring the packs in a lay in bed at night and i'll watch netflix in the motorhome on the paxi. So i'll still watch a lot of content or when i'm here in the attic in. You're not here you tv when i'm not here but you've watched tv with me and here before we watched direction action. That was a crucial time. We kept like a ticker tape. We just had that on the background. That's how my family has their life. They're literally their life. They have cnn or msnbc on in the background of their life always makes them feel safe even though it should make them feel very scared because it just updates of calamity across the globe. And i come back. I am there for like two weeks. And i have never. It's the most informed. I am the whole year. Everything and you try to carry the but don't you find in. Don't they find like at times. When i tried to watch that. It's just the same thing for fourteen hours. That's what's mad me. It's like you have all these different hosts and programs but they talk about the exact same thing that is..

apple amy samsung japan kristen netflix msnbc cnn europe.
"tristan harris" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

05:32 min | Last week

"tristan harris" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"His previous two films. He's environmentalist previous two films. Were about the coral die-offs in the great barrier reef and chasing ice which is about the melting glaciers up north and. He found out in research for the film that one of the groups that russia targeted was actually us pro environmentalist groups that were anti fracking and that russia was specifically trying to dial up the reach of anti fracking groups. Why because what happens if. Us anti fracking groups are successful. And we don't frac oil locally. We have to buy from them. That's right in russia's basically an oil company posing as a country and that is totally in their interest so this speaks to the fact that many of the things that he shared re tweeted he said were anti fracking could have very easily come from russia against the people really understand. This is not a partisan conversation there's many more countries they're in the game now because this is the new means of geopolitical warfare. It's information warfare. It's incredibly cheap and we're seeing now. Iran saudi arabia e israel and china many other countries. That are now. I am game and for me. I guess. The one check valve. I encouraged people to have is the moment. You've consume something in your opponent is now not human in your eyes or they are evil or they are a demon. You've probably past your point of view and been firmly anchored in us them and there's no going forward once you're there once it's them in your us. I think that's the thing people need to monitor as after they've consumed something if there are towards the opposition is irrational and the people are no longer human. I think that's a good warning flag for you. I think a good measure there as think back in your life to anything that you felt certain about that there is earlier beliefs that you had a very sharp in that you don't believe anymore. I think that's a good anchor feeling to really lock onto because for any of us to be certain and not be curious in open. Entrusting one of hidden factors here is not just having access to good information. It's actually being able to trust new information when it comes in because right now you could tell people on the left about something bad. That biden did but if they're pro biden they don't even trust the information if it's negative toward biden and the same thing is true on the right right. And that's that's where we've lost it if we're not even willing to update are you in a relationship. I am okay great so i hope you've had this experience a we have kids so it's like let's just say tylenol is not bad for kids. My wife yes. It is so all search. Is tylenol not harmful for kids and she searches his thailand. All right and by george. We both are vindicated. Almost every debate. We have monica to get these debates in the manner in which we search. We get exactly what we were hoping for such a good example if you type in climate change is not real you'll get a bunch of results if you type in climate change israel you'll get a bunch of results and the point is that there's infinite people arguing on both sides and so what we really need is discernment almost like a a more lasting score of. Who are the most trustworthy. Dialectic thinkers who doing synthesis who are proving. They can steal man the other side geoff. They're actually know the other arguments. They can speak in terms of a dialectic of giving power to both sides and then trying to offer synthesis. Imagine if our news feeds were ranked for synthesis level off speakers instead of who got the most outrage.

russia biden tylenol geoff Iran israel monica george thailand china
"tristan harris" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

03:55 min | Last week

"tristan harris" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"His previous two films. He's environmentalist previous two films. Were about the coral die-offs in the great barrier reef and chasing is is about the melting glaciers up north and. He found out in research for the film that one of the groups that russia targeted was actually us pro environmentalist groups that were anti fracking and that russia was specifically trying to dial up the reach of anti fracking groups. Why because what happens if. Us anti fracking groups are successful. And we don't frac oil locally. We have to buy from them. That's right in russia's basically an oil company posing as a country and that is totally in their interest so this speaks to the fact that many of the things that he shared re tweeted he said were anti fracking could have very easily come from russia against the people really understand. This is not a partisan conversation there's many more countries they're in the game now because this is the new means of geopolitical warfare. It's information warfare. It's incredibly cheap and we're seeing now. Iran saudi arabia uae israel and china many other countries. That are now. I am game and for me. I guess. The one check valve. I've encouraged people to have is the moment you've consume something in your opponent is now not human in your eyes or they are evil or they are a demon. You've probably past your point of view and been firmly anchored in us them and there's no going forward once you're there once it's them in your us. I think that's the thing people need to monitor as after they've consumed something if there are towards the opposition is irrational and the people are no longer human. I think that's a good warning flag for you. I think a good measure there as think back in your life to anything that you felt certain about there is earlier beliefs that you had a very sharp in that you don't believe anymore. I think that's a good anchor feeling to really lock onto because for any of us to be certain and not be curious in open minded and trusting one hidden factors. Here is not just having access to good information..

russia Iran saudi arabia israel china
"tristan harris" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

05:31 min | Last week

"tristan harris" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Hopefully that accompanies this interview in the click bait model of the economy that they have created probably create off of this nuance interview. But i think that offers a blueprint for hey you know humanity. We've done this before. Yeah i'm a pessimist. And yet i also can recognize that every time we think we can't get off of horse and buggy production. The car comes along and then we can't get off of this we. We always find a way to stay busy and we always find a way to feed ourselves. And it's only gotten better and better despite all these hurdles now see. This is my last question. I just had a real juicy argument with my friend erick. Because i'm in favor of many of the videos. They've pulled off youtube and he coming for more of a right perspective is like well. Yes so basically. All of this forward movement what you would consider would be good would generally just be liberal kind of progressive thought in that we would be really just mostly policing against cunanan all of these things. That of course. I find repugnant. And so he has a point. There is an unavoidable point. That yes i probably think some videos should stay that he would disagree with and vice versa. There probably would be a liberal bent to all this wouldn't end. If i'm on the right. I might think well yeah. I'm going to leave it to tristan. Who i'm certain is gonna vote for biden so really all you guys are asking for is for us to let you on the left. Decide what we can all view is. They're nonpartisan argument for this or reassurance. You can give yeah. I think the challenges we're facing here on content moderation is a crisis of trust. So who do you trust to make decisions about what can and can't be broadcast to millions of people. Do you trust mark zuckerberg the individual to do that. Do trust low. Paid content moderators in arizona. Paid minimum wage to do that do look at the psychological sweatshops. In the philippines that do content moderation to trust determine. What is actionable content to try to take down. We don't have clean answer to this problem. And that's kind of the frankenstein aspect. Is that when you have systems that are blasting off dangerous content rockets for scale. And as i said if you have the power of god's you have to have the wisdom love and prudence of guys you can't be. Zeus accidentally bumped your elbow in scorch half of earth. If you don't have a moral compass good guidance. So i think the problem is we've created the means by which dangerous viral intentionally malicious and kind of conspiracy influence campaigns can actually out.

erick youtube mark zuckerberg biden philippines arizona
"tristan harris" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

05:29 min | Last week

"tristan harris" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Variable in the equation is happening. My fear is the horse cannot be put back in the barn you this metaphor of putting the genie back in the bottle or horseback in the barn obviously comes up. There's actually one time in history where we did put not the genie but the pill back in the bottle and this was in the history of johnson and johnson were there tylenol. Yeah we'll so in nineteen eighties. There was poisoned. that was being put into tylenol. Whatever wasn't the capitalist the jar. I think there's poisoned tampering. And so some people were dying because of tylenol carrying these these tampered with poison poisoned tablets or something in johnson. Johnson had a choice they could have said. There's no problem deny deflect delay. Tylenol is fine. Keep buying it or sure it's safe. They could have said it's not happening. They could have said look how much we're doing to try to remove sounds familiar with facebook and they didn't do that instead what they did is they did actually say to take this off the shelf until we can prove that it safe and they took it off the shelf. I think of something like five or six weeks. You can look it up on pedia. And and of course. What happened was their stock. Price tanked in the short term but then because they had done a high trust actual where they were honest with the american public about what was actually going on after they they invented the tamper proof. Top which is why they invented that that tamper-proof top for the jar. That's when people trusted them afterwards. So that's i think the model that we could apply for here so in twitter's case or we're about to go into a us election there's groups like accountable tech and others that are pushing for us to ask twitter too untrendy october so basically just say. The trending topics is a completely game. -able machine it only takes a few thousand baht sir. One hundred ten thousand people to what's called brigade where you all simultaneously post about a topic that you want to get the media to cover. This is how the fire festival got popularity. They all posted this yellow image or something at the same time. That's exactly right. And so this is very game -able and so if you want to assert and keep in mind if you a kgb agent in the nineteen eighties. Nineteen nineties one. Fourth of your time one fourth of your time was dedicated to inventing fabricated stories. That would be very plausible..

johnson twitter facebook
"tristan harris" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

05:21 min | Last week

"tristan harris" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Where or g by day. Two i to started talking like the first original Gameboy that's an interesting didn't go in that direction. Different redwood forest steered people differently. But it's actually amazing because when there's no competition for attention everyone cares a lot more about each other and gets to be a lot more curious about each other because there's nothing else that other people are the source of entertainment at that point yet. Turns out people are really interesting. Actually have the patients not just one way but both people have the patience to get curious about who are to your point earlier. Yeah you don't have this endless bit of homework. Is your email all the responses. You go and you don't have this pressure of what's supposed to happen at this time in that time. Yeah there's a lot that goes away right there. Completely in this experience is created by levi felix who it was an amazing human who unfortunately passed away a few years ago from brain cancer. We were actually the same age but he created these weekends at camp grounded where hundreds of people had totally life changing experiences and it wasn't just from the disconnection of technologies about reconnecting with what it means to be human including being in a redwood forest. People your next story you tell. If the person dies at the end that'll be the third strike. Okay back to back. No moral the buddhist. Oh yes yes yes earliest. Tell a couple where there are. People are still thriving. Okay so i have some thoughts. I re watched it this morning while i was working out and just one one sentence again. I want to repeat that so profound that people should really ask themselves. Which is if you're not paying for the product you are the product i feel like that's the easiest way to assess what's happening. It's kind of old poker table saying if you can't recognize the fish or the fish that's a powerful way to think about this right and i've heard of people who concentrate on in your field talk about this kind of fork in the road. We had. Which was we made a decision to either pay for this service or to receive it for free from other people who would be footing the bill which would be advertisers. This and that so we didn't choose the paid version. Of course. I'm in a position where i could pay for the pay version and i would like the paid version but it is inherently a little democratic. Isn't it if that were the it would just exacerbate the income inequality. How would we get around. That is that part of a potential solution could be is is one that we picked. That had a set of ethics. And then we we had to pony up and pay for it. Yeah maybe i for the audience. It might be good to explain why when we are the product. This is such a unaffordable outcome. Am one one thing we like to say is. Free is the most expensive business model..

levi felix brain cancer
"tristan harris" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

05:22 min | Last week

"tristan harris" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"It's very uncomfortable when people have these brief moments of kind of feeling anxious and everything but then it becomes this kind of freeing human experience. Where or g by day. Two i to start talking like the first original That's an interesting didn't go in that direction. Different redwood forest steered people differently. But it's actually amazing because when there's no competition for attention everyone cares a lot more about each other and gets to be a lot more curious about each other because there's nothing else that other people are the source of entertainment at that point yet. Turns out people are really interesting. Actually have the patients not just one way but both people have the patience to get curious about who are to your point earlier. Yeah you don't have this endless bit of homework your email all the responses you go and you don't have this pressure of what's supposed to happen at this time in that time. Yeah there's a lot that goes away right there. Completely yeah in. This experience is created by levi felix who it was an amazing human who unfortunately passed away a few years ago from brain cancer. We were actually the same age but he created these weekends at camp grounded where hundreds of people had totally life changing experiences and it wasn't just from the disconnection of technologies about reconnecting with what it means to be human including being in a redwood forest. People your next story you tell. If the person dies at the end that'll be the third strike. Okay back to back. No moral the buddhist. Oh yes yes yes earliest. Tell a couple where there are. People are still thriving. Okay so i have some thoughts. I re watched it this morning while i was working out and just one one sentence again. I want to repeat that so profound that people should really ask themselves. Which is if you're not paying for the product you are the product i feel like that's the easiest way to assess what's happening. It's kind of old poker table saying if you can't recognize the fish or the fish that's a powerful way to think about this right and i've heard of people who concentrate on in your field talk about this kind of fork in the road. We had. Which was we made a decision to either pay for this service or to receive it for free from other people who would be footing the bill which would be advertisers. And this and that so we didn't choose the paid version. Of course. I'm in a position where i could pay for the pay version and i would like the paid version but it is inherently a little democratic. Isn't it if that were the it would just exacerbate the income inequality would we get around. That is that part of a potential solution could be is is one that we picked. That had a set of ethics. And then we we had to pony up and pay for it. Yeah maybe i for the audience. It might be good to explain why when we are the product. This is such a unaffordable outcome. Am one one thing we like to say is. Free is the most expensive business model. We've ever come up with Because when the product is free as you say we are the.

levi felix brain cancer
"tristan harris" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

05:10 min | Last week

"tristan harris" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"So. i want to quickly. If i can in layman's terms. Just explain kind of what happened with youtube as i understand it which is in the rabbit hole. They get this great person who volunteered to be a part of this. And i will say in general when i hear about acuna person. I'm seeing them at the end of the line. Right are if they're a very all right now. White nationalist misogynous. I'm meeting them as that person. And it's hard for me to imagine that they might not have been that person five years ago and so this guy turns over his entire viewing history and you can just watch him be lead. You know a micron at a time. Further and further away from where he started and he starts as an environmental science major. He's probably you know centrist at worst or something and and just because the algorithm had figured out that it's not enough to give people what they want. You also have to give people something new and they know if you enjoy this thing. You'll enjoy this incremental shift over to the right now again this. I don't think was malicious or had a bad intention but the algorithm wants it takes off. It's just it gets so perfect at knowing exactly where to bring you to get you to spend more and more time in this guy kinda wakes up as a really far all right massage. Myst- extreme extremist who is sympathetic to white nationalist movements. Because they have a right to be proud of himself and he just wakes up. And who all my god who am i. Can i give you two more examples. Yeah it's important to remember. The clock realized that we're now more than ten years into this mask. Psychology experiment where three billion people's thoughts have been wired up to supercomputers that are steering what we all watch..

youtube
"tristan harris" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

02:49 min | Last week

"tristan harris" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Instagram and the success it's time spent and high time spent his correlated with teenage depression which it is obviously isolation end self-harm teen suicide there's some horrible metrics that have gone up with the increased use of especially sort of the the teenage apps. You're not going to be able to admit that that problem exists. You know there's a famous writer upton sinclair said. You can't get someone to question something that their salary depends on them. Not seeing and i think you talked about how in many cases these unforeseen consequences but then later on these were known consequences but were not dealt with. And i actually think this is why. The company's secretly kind of rely on outside pressure like the film. The social like sixty minutes like many of these really hardworking activists who i know who've been in the space for a long time the civil society orcs who are screaming at the top of the lungs. Look what's happening in myanmar. Look what's happening in the conspiracy theory correlation matrix in facebook groups. Look what's happening in youtube recommendations. It's these groups who are pushing from the outside who are driving. I think some of the most change at the same time. I want to say i know and we work with regularly at the center for humane technology many of the insiders who are leading the various keep products and and features inside these companies. And we find really good hearted people who are trying to do the best they can. Yeah but they have kind of created a frankenstein where once you've steered let's say fifty million people into cunanan or other fringe conspiracy theory groups. The damage has been done right. And we can get more into some of those aspects which i think are really the most existential. There's many different. Societal ills that are coming from technology but the real breakdown is our inability to have faith or trust in a shared information environment to believe the same things and to even interpret reality in the same way. It's because as you know with your brain once you have a hammer..

upton sinclair Instagram myanmar facebook depression youtube writer
"tristan harris" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

05:43 min | Last week

"tristan harris" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"I look at my phone much too often. I'm addicted to my. That was your case. I think you realize well. I'm very addicted to my email. I can't stop checking it. And interacting with which is funny by the way because a lot of people in the film didn't understand that line like who in the world is addicted to their email. Those people just get junk. But you know maybe if you're live from slavery era and you. Yeah yeah yeah. And it doesn't end. It is a twenty four seven news cycle in obligation list. Your always behind to get back to someone and so if you don't actually have in your own mind a way to conceptualize what it means to be complete then. Basically i've obligated you for the rest of your life because you're never going to be done getting back to all those people and that's the thing. I also that i was seeing google. Back in the time was the growth rate of what was going to happen. Because it being google you actually get bombarded in emails from thousands of people you get just so much information it felt like kind of getting a front row seat to the future where you're seeing. Oh my god what is gonna look like when everyone's getting thousands of emails and thousands of notifications. We better do something now to protect people who are going to be coming along with us. We're handing these phones out to the developing world. What are we gonna do to the collective attention of two billion people. So that's kind of where the concerns came. It felt like an opportunity. We could change this before. It got too bad and we can really make a difference. And google was in this unique position because of android. And because of chrome is the browser. Where they kind of were shaping the rules of the attention economy We really make choices. Almost like a government can make a choice or a city can make a choice about what is the with the sidewalks is there's stop signs and is there traffic lights right..

google
"tristan harris" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

02:50 min | Last week

"tristan harris" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"I only live in the north bay. I had moved up to santa rosa which was a deceased family's home during the quarantine pandemic and then these fires three weeks ago just took everything so all my guy awful but it's also happening in the middle of win. This film has come out. And so the most important thing i can do for the world is just keep focusing on the film. So that's where my attention is going being the social dilemma. Yes okay gregory. I wanted to make sure that. I wasn't alone in the dark. About another film. We have seven films out right now. Oh my god. You're meeting studio many major. Santa rosa is charles scholtz country. Right does exactly right. Did any of that stuff burned down. Didn't even an ice rink had built and used to have christmas pageant and stuff. I think they did and i don't really remember everything. The airport is named after him. The charles shulz airport and there's cute little life-size figurines of the peanuts characters. If i recall right yeah yeah. All around center is in downtown. I think i have a picture of my then. Two year old hugging the snoopy statue. Yeah oh yeah. where did you grow up. Did you grow up in santa rosa. I grew provisionally san francisco. And when i was about eleven. My mother wanted to move up to santa rosa to fulfill her dream of writing horses and being near the state parks so when high school in santa rosa and then later backed down the bates his stanford for college to study computer science and what was happening career-wise for mom in san francisco or are you like second generation technology person know the opposite. Actually i was the only one in my family who really even touched a computer. And i was just you know. Obsessed as a child born in the year of the macintosh would be. I was born in nineteen eighty four. So i didn't see the macintosh ad but was really interesting to loop the story back around. Is that the co founder of our nonprofit center for humane. Technology is as raskin whose father jef raskin invented the macintosh project or started at least at apple. Oh yeah and my life has been largely defined by. I think the impact of you know the macintosh on my early childhood and yeah. That's kind of an interesting place to theoretically start which is prior to macintosh and again. I'm not super savvy about this. But i will say what used to be seemingly kind of utilitarian pursued of people who liked making simple programs on these early computers with mac comes in my opinion a culture or a movement it transcends that space a little bit was that your experience with it did it feel like more of an emotional connection to that thing it actually did. I didn't know any of the lower behind the macintosh. Who steve jobs was or andy hertzfeld. Bill atkinson is some of these characters who invented and put all of this culture and soul into this computer..

santa rosa charles shulz airport jef raskin Bill atkinson san francisco steve jobs andy hertzfeld mac co founder apple
"tristan harris" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

02:33 min | Last week

"tristan harris" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"More work than the heart at night. The brain can process complex delay while asleep and it uses information to help you make decisions when you're awake. Learning dreaming flushing out. Harmful toxins the space between brain cells increases during sleep which allows the brain to flush out toxic molecules. That have accumulated during the day. Discover the sleep number three sixty smart bed for proven quality sleep and now during the ultimate sleep number event save fifty percent on the sleep number three sixty limited edition smart bed for a limited time only at sleepnumber stores or sleepnumber dot com slash tax. We are supported by bob's red mill. So monica in my cider mill recording with aaron and scott johnson joined in he just started pontificating on how much he loves. Bob's red ma listening to the show and he's incorporated it and it keeps them full into the evening it so god. It's also so easy. All you gotta do is fill the little container up some hot water. Put the lid on for a minute. Pull it off bingo bango bongo. I'm having a beautiful breakfast. What's really exciting. Is that bob melt. Monica has really really great one baking flour. That's gluten free and the holidays. They are a knock at the back door. Sure are so. I'm gonna have t the family chef.

"tristan harris" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

01:36 min | Last week

"tristan harris" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Welcome welcome welcome. Armchair expert experts on expert. I'm dick rather and i'm joined by princeton mouse. Gombe dick rather. That's a that's a rough name. I can't believe a made it this far with that name. I had overcome ed versity adversity. We have talked a bazillion times since we both saw the social dilemma. Which is on netflix. We really were infected by. And that of course became a gateway drug to doing rabbit hole the new york times podcast which we loved and so we had an opportunity to talk to tristan harris. Who was front and center in the social dilemma. And we think you will enjoy him. Immensely tristan is a computer. Scientists that spent three years as google designed ethicist developing a framework of how technology should ethically steer the thoughts and actions of billions of people from screens. He is now co founder and president of the center for humane technology whose mission is to reverse. Human downgrading and relying technology with humanity is really the head honcho on this topic. He is yeah. He's he is the What would we say. He guard these the vanguard. He really is used the first one out there really sounding an alarm and we all are in debt to this huge ethical moral compass so please enjoy tristan harris. We are supported by sleep. Number the mattress. I slept in last night. Got a beautiful night's sleep. My sleep number is eighty right now. Which means that. My body is healed up nicely and i sleep score i. Iq was ninety. Whoa i.

tristan harris co founder tristan princeton dick new york times netflix president
The Social Dilemma and Otherness

Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

04:27 min | Last month

The Social Dilemma and Otherness

"Just to have a smaller maybe episode just me. Thinking out loud with you and this one is about I call it the social dilemma and otherness in I. Don't know if any of you watched the Netflix documentary called the social dilemma. I watched it not too long ago and it was disturbing at it was as it was intended to be I won't pretend to be a movie reviewer that's not my thing. But I. Thought it was very good and I thought it brought a ton of points about social media In clearer view for those of us who may have. been aware of this but not to the extent that it actually was true. But to put my reviewer had on though I thought that the acting out of the personalized a algorithms were Eliza. Bit of a stretch but it did break up the talking heads which might have been boring for people after a while although I personally like talking head documentaries. But. The point of this. episode is, is about the key theme of the documentary and it's the way our minds are manipulated by social media platforms and the manipulation, and how the manipulation was intentional by the big tech players or the company's the money behind the big tech. The twist though is that the intentional manipulation was aimed at our attention. To get us to buy things but the super efficiency of the algorithms designed to do that. Was Not anticipated. They didn't think it was going to be good as it was then the negative consequences on human thinking and behavior was also nad intended. So it was sort of like creating a Frankenstein and I think one of the one of the people who reviewed on that one of the tech players who were reviewed actually said it was like creating a Frankenstein. The buying in quote unquote into distorted ideas about the world ourselves and each other that have become nearly ubiquitous sense. The pandemic Allah the rise of Cunanan and stand startling panoply of conspiracy theory and times been great awakening groups that have grown to amazing proportions to the point of moving beyond their virtual groups and into the world to act out demonstrations, hate speech and even violence. Now, the documentary features the narratives of several Silicon Valley defectors talking to the camera. These young executives, designers and software engineers all left lucrative an influential positions for a variety of reasons around sort of this theme. One of 'EM's ethical concerns about addictive media others were political concerns over the polarization of society and the spread of fake news or just general misgivings of the sort expressed by Tristan Harris formerly designed ethicist at Google who said in the movie. Quote when you look around. When you look when you look around you, it feels like the world is going crazy. Is this normal or have we fallen under some spell unquote? After watching this documentary I continued to reflect about how it really does feel like the world is going crazy. I also listened to many podcasts discussing these phenomena the polarization, the the the rise in conspiracy theory thinking end times beliefs anti-semitism of. Great Awakenings you know all this stuff and how How to address it, how to classify what it is and how to fix

Netflix Tristan Harris Silicon Valley Google
Sleepwalkers at CES

Sleepwalkers

09:17 min | 11 months ago

Sleepwalkers at CES

"Secure I'd never been to Las Vegas before which is the difference between us. I've Been Vegas gets too many times. I could tell and didn't feel good to be in good hands with an old vegas handler. You one of the new things. Though for me was slots which I don't normally play play. I think subconsciously I was thinking about what Tristan Harris talked about in the first season of sleep walker former Google lower. Who told us that? Instagram is actually supposed to feel a lot like slot machine or the Tristan studied at the Stanford persuasion lab and told us about how casino architecture has influenced the development of highly addictive tape products like instagram. Interesting for me to actually see Vegas and the bright lights and the impossibility of escape firsthand not to mention the replicas of if the empire state building the canals of Venice Coliseum of Rome you know I was lucky enough to see the Seattle space needle for the first time. I didn't know that it was in Las Vegas. But doesn't we were there. We were there for C.. Es The consumer electronics show in this episode. Were actually going to talk about some of the coolest things we saw there. But we're going to focus focused more on the innovations that are at the intersection of technology and humanity rather than talk about you know infamous toilet. Paper dispensers run of the big reasons we went is because we you were invited by wave maker which is an agency part of WPP to do an interview on stage alive. PODCAST so to speak with Matt Monahan. The HATTON who is head of product at publishing and publishing is part of the Washington Post Orcas also an interesting case of a and action because they're forward thinking in terms of increasing the visibility of content through personalization. An optimizing everything from headlines to photo selection all using machine learning and those are things that really matter for journalists and readers. Yeah and this use of. Ai stands out to me because it provides a solution to real problem. How do you get eyeballs on the right content when there's just so much that said the issue of personalization does raise questions about what happens when machine thought to know US better than we know ourselves not to mention and what are the appropriate limits of how companies use AI and data about us? Yeah I can definitely streamline processes by detecting patterns that you know human beings cannot see or it can allow you to scale like tag hundreds of thousands of articles that again human beings just cannot do so greater efficiency is on one side of the spectrum and extremely attractive to people but on the other side. You have issues of taking humans out of the loop like the blackbox problem and authenticity in a world of deep fake so a question for businesses and users of technology is sort of when does Ai. Add to our experience experience and when does it maybe hold us back or take advantage of us for example from seeing news stories that we should see but maybe the algorithm doesn't think we want want to see it or that we won't click on it right in the old days. When everyone received a print newspaper on their doorstep? Everyone had the same front page in the same headlines Nowadays holidays when you log onto a news website or on social media everybody has a different version of the world and that is obviously positive for driving engagement but may not be so positive in terms of having conversations with the same facts about the same stories equally. We have to ask. Do we want articles where the headlines been written by Algorithm. ooh Do we prefer headlines written person. And that's something we talked about with Matt because all actually tested headline writing technology. Let's talk to Matt. Lucas says let's cut to the chase are really came out of a collaboration trying to better understand what actual journalists needed it. Can you talk a little bit more at the very beginning. You know we were just trying to solve problems for ourselves. Seven or eight years ago. We knew he had to make some pretty fundamental transformation to the post and to really prepare for the digital future. We didn't have the right tools to do it. And we couldn't really find the right tools on the market either. What we did was spent a lot of the journalist and the editor is trying to figure out what it was that make their lives easier? It's trying to figure out. How do you make journalists work better publish faster? What are the little things you can do? Inside of IT products make it easier easier for them to write stories or publish from there about four years ago when we started evolving into a commercial offering. Today we're running hundreds of websites around the world breath about twenty different countries. We're running companies like BP their internal communications as well as some of the marketing. We're running large broadcasters and all their live video and beauty and of course I was still running a lot of newspapers and news publishers. Like the post and many others around the world looking in publishing you know that. Ai Artificial intelligence in headlines MHM and there was a story in the Financial Times last year. We said forty percent of startups us. No whatsoever uh-huh so I bet it's probably higher so when we talk about using a Ohio when you talk about what we actually mean so it can span the range of technologies analogies from something like machine learning which is basically a way to use algorithms to take large sets of data in either uncover patterns in it or try to model away to predict a certain outcome. The two technologies like computer vision which you can use to look at images or video and extract information about them by recognizing patterns and trying to identify objects inside of them and so a lot of those technologies than when you put them together conform. Some really interesting workflows that you know in the past. You might have had us humans to do that. You can actually do much more simple automatically. was there a the titular business challenge or challenge the Washington Post that. You couldn't have sold if you hadn't been using AI. Any story that we right on Washington Post. We're mapping to a set of I two or three hundred topics maybe an example of one of those might be like congressional policy or narcotics crime. What you're trying to do is say if I look at all this content? I'm not just pulling specific words. I'm actually trying to figure out. What is this content about? What is the fundamental concept of this so you pick a set of articles? Let's say one hundred two thousand news articles in the case this example for the post and I see us. Humans of Micro Labor to do this training set and the goal is you're building an algorithm Based on a set of real data and so the humans are going there and saying this article. Yeah this is about congressional policy. Why because I know it is I read it? That's what it's about. This one's about narcotics crime time and this one's about soccer and so you train all these articles against that algorithm until finally the algorithm is basically sufficiently advanced to predict a new article that you put into it and determine it outcome with the same high probability of success that you're able to with human training now every time. A journalist Saves Saves publishes the story we're able to Parse over all the contents inside that story then we can predict the strength at which it's likely to belong to that topic. How do you create a better user experience in your case news experience for an individual consumer with the medicine? You can do a lot of interesting things we can figure out that. Hey this is something that they're interested in reading. Perhaps they'd like to read more in. It actually serves the signal into a recommendation Algorithms from your perspective where can businesses sort of harness the power of machine learning to really hone in on who their customer is and what that customer wants. We want to deliver more content to our readers leaders. Who Want to help them? Find more content that we've created. We have about nine hundred journalists at the Washington Post we write something like three or four hundred original stories today. So there's is a Lotta content there to get readers to all different content and to have them continue moving through your constant. You spent a lot of money to produce is really challenging. And so that's a great use case for personalization Shen but where you can make it really come alive is by having more sophisticated. Meditated more sophisticated information about that content. That's more likely to bring readers to it. And so that's where these machine learning remodels really come in handy. I think part of what's fun about this conversation is there's a lot of cases out there where average users you know. They imagine they see something like that. You see the boots on instagram. And you think Oh my God he's companies. Must you know indiscernible for magic right. There must be some crazy model out there doing this. And perhaps is there is but in a lot of ways you know. Your users aren't necessarily as aware of the advertising ecosystem data ecosystem and how these things tied together between platforms incites and I think as like industry professionals. We always kind of underestimate that fact and so the net effect is that users are completely surprised by this. I think you must be doing something completely on her to achieve it. When in fact you know it could be really simple data sharing and so the reason? I think that's important than when you do. Bill Technologies that actually utilize some these more sophisticated methods to build data sets. You have to be aware that your users you know first of all your users aren't going to necessarily anticipate the outcomes you can create and if you don't do a good job on the product side of making sure that you really think through the use case and how you're leveraging technology solve it you can generate unexpected outcomes. You know there was the example of the retailer who produced advertising flyers that were able to predict folks who are pregnant right. Even if some of those folks didn't necessarily know that themselves or hadn't shared it with with their family or their spouses.

Las Vegas Washington Post Instagram AI Matt Monahan Tristan Harris United States Venice Coliseum Of Rome Google Seattle Ohio Washington Soccer WPP Stanford Head Of Product Bill Technologies MHM
Tristan Harris says tech is 'downgrading' humanity  but we can fix it

Recode Decode

03:20 min | 1 year ago

Tristan Harris says tech is 'downgrading' humanity but we can fix it

"Human downgrading is the climate change of culture like climate change. It can be catastrophic. Unlike climate change only about a thousand people among like five companies need to change what they're doing. Now in saying that I'm not trying to disempower the thousands of millions of us outside of these systems that are like, well, then I guess, I'm not included. That's not at all. This is gonna take everyone. The policymakers the shareholder activists to put board resolutions on these companies board, you know, board meetings. The media guiding the conversation policymakers in government jobs to protect citizens from all these things everyone has a role. We're trying to simply facilitate an an exceleron that work by providing that common language understanding, we asked about policy one simple thing. You know? The best ethics is the ethics of symmetry do unto others as you would do unto yourself for the kids stuff. Imagine a world where you designed products in such a way that you. Happily endorse and have your own children. Use those products for hours a day that neutralizes about half the harms immediately. Because notice the none of the Silicon Valley executives have their own children use these products, the CEO of legible. So I've seen they use them. Well, I been around a lot of these children. It was about what he said when I say that it's not like Google search box or YouTube at all I mean, more like social media like a lot of them. Do not use social media at all. And you know, I it's just a such a simple shift to make and the CEO of lunch Ables food did not let his own children eat vegetables. Right. So you know, you have a problem when you are not eating your own dog food there needs to be skin in the game and other principle is that the people closest to the pain should be closest to the power. There are groups that are trying to bring these ethnic minorities in these developing countries most affected by these things with no public representations here. We are in the free world where you know, Rene Engalnd and others do this hard to do research, and they publish it in Washington Post in your times, you know, in Nigeria. Cameroon and Sri Lanka. They don't have that same level of accountability. And so we need those groups to have a seat at the table. They should be included. They need to be much more diversity, obviously in these conversations. But especially where we know sorted by the harms by the tensions that are being produced seem to be any movement that way they're hoping it goes away. They're hoping it goes awakening, Craig. Very hard marks. Now. Trying to create the greatest encrypted privacy organization on the planet. Now, he's just trying to encrypt it and hide it, right? And that day. I mean by missing something like he's like, oh, no the jigs up over here. I'm going over. Right. Well, in a lot of that, I'm assuming I always want to be, you know, his charitable as possible and give the benefit the doubt. I'm sure there are some good reasons for doing that based on you know, again, they're the only they're the only ones who have access to know. So whatever decision making they're doing. They're the only ones deciding that's a huge problem. Let's assume there's some good reasons for doing that besides that fact, there's still also the fact that this is the best way in the world to escape liability right because one of the things that happened with Russia investigations, they don't wanna look, you know, with with children's mental. They don't as soon as they look they're responsible. So you know, when it's all private, and these decentralized channels, suddenly it's all happening in the dark, and there are many of us who are concerned about what that means for disinformation. When there's no way to track. What's? So these are thorny problems are no easy solutions we need complexity and nuance more than ever we need thoughtfulness.

Craig CEO Washington Post Cameroon Rene Engalnd Google Nigeria Russia Youtube Sri Lanka
Kid Phone Usage: Screen Time Changes Structure of Kids’ Brains, ‘60 Minutes’ Says

60 Minutes

11:08 min | 2 years ago

Kid Phone Usage: Screen Time Changes Structure of Kids’ Brains, ‘60 Minutes’ Says

"If you have kids in wonder if all that time they spend on their smartphones endlessly scrolling snapping and texting is affecting their brains. You might wanna put down your own phone and pay attention. The federal government through the national institutes of health has launched the most ambitious study of adolescent, brain development, ever attempted in part. Scientists are trying to understand what no one currently does how all that screen time impacts the physical structure of your kids brains as well as their emotional development and mental health. Let me know when you're ready twenty one sites across the country. Scientists have begun interviewing nine and ten year olds and scanning their brains. They'll follow more than eleven thousand kids for a decade and spend three hundred million dollars doing it. It's quite an investment. Doctor guy Dowling of the national institutes of health gave us a glimpse of what they've learned. So far, the focus only I started talking about doing this study was tobacco marijuana all drugs. The screen time component really came into play. Because we were wondering what is the impact? I mean, clearly kids spend so much time on screens the first wave of data from brain scans of forty five hundred participants is in and it has Donald Dowling of the NIH and other scientists intrigued here, you can see that there are differences in the patterns, the Moro is found significant differences in the brains of some kids who use smartphones, tablets and video games. More than seven hours a day. What we can say is that this is what the brains look like of kids who spent a lot of time on screens, and it's not just one pattern. That's hassen. It's very fascinating the color show differences in the nine and ten year olds brains. The red color represents premature thinning of the cortex. That's the wrinkly outermost layer of the brain that processes information from the five senses. What is a thinning of the cortex? Mean? That's typically thought to be a maturation process. What we would expect to see later is happening a little bit earlier should parents be concerned by that. We don't know if it's being caused by the screen time. We don't know yet. If it's a bad thing, it won't be until we follow them over time that we will see if there are outcomes that are associated with the the differences that we're seeing in this single snapshot, the interviews and data from the NIH study have already revealed something else kids who spend more than two hours a day. A on screens got lower scores on thinking and language tests. When the study is complete is a possible that a researcher will be able to say whether or not screen time is actually addictive we hope so we'll be able to see not only how much time are they spending how they perceive it impacting them. But also, what are some of the outcomes and that will get at the question of whether there's a dictionary not win. Will you have the answers that you're searching for some questions will be able to answer in a few years. But some of the really interesting questions about these long term outcomes, we're going to have to wait a while because they need to happen that delay leaves researchers who studied technology's impact on very small children anxious in many ways, the concern that investigators like I have is that we're sort of in the midst of a natural kind of uncontrolled experiment on the next generation of children. Doctor Dimitri Christoph is at Seattle Children's hospital was the lead author of the American Academy of pedia. Deatrich most recent guidelines for screen time. They now recommend parents avoid digital media use except video chatting in children younger than eighteen to twenty four months. So what we do know about babies playing with ipads, is that they don't transfer what they learn from the ipad to the real world, which is to say that if you give a child an app where they play with virtual Legos, virtual blocks and stack them and then put real blocks in front of them. They start all over if they try to do it in real life. It's as if they've never done it before it, also, it's not transferable. Don't transfer the knowledge from two dimensions to three don't you? Kristina kiss is one of the few scientists who've already done experiments on the influence screens have on children under the age of two. It's a critical period for human brain development. If you're concerned about your teenager being addicted to their iphone your infant is much more vulnerable and using the exact. Same device your infant is more vulnerable. Because why because the experience of making something happen is so much more gratifying to them. In a small pilot study the doctor cosstalk has conducted on fifteen children. Researchers gave toddlers three toys first of plastic ATar than an ipad that played musical notes. And finally an ipad with an app that rewarded the kids with lights colors and sound. So it a very specific time of the research. Assistant will ask the child to give what they're playing with back to give it to the resources to research assistant. Sixty six percent of the time with their traditional toy the child will do just that with the ipad that simulates that they give it back almost with the same frequency. But with the ipad app that when they push on it, it does all kinds of things they're much less likely to give it back with a more interactive. I've had app the percentage of kids willing to hand it back to the researcher dropped from sixty percent to forty five percent. It's that much more engaging. It's that much more engaging. And that's what we find in the laboratory. It's engaging by design Tristan Harris told us in a story we reported more than a year ago. There's a whole playbook of techniques that get used to get using the product for as long as possible. Harris is a former Google manager. Who is one of the first Silicon Valley insiders to publicly acknowledge that phones and apps are being designed to capture and keep kids attention. This is about the war for attention, and where that's taking society, and we're that's taking technology which wanting for adults four kids. This is a whole other thing. That's where this gets particularly sensitive is developmentally. Do we want this war for attention to be affecting our children? Do you think parents understand the complexities of what their kids are dealing with? No. And I think this is really important because there's a narrative that all I guess they're just doing this like we used to gossip on the phone. But what this MRs is that your telephone in the nineteen seventies didn't have a thousand engineers and the other side of the telephone who are redesigning it to work with other telephones. And then updating the way your telephone work every day to be more and more persuasive until recently, it was impossible to see what happens inside a young. Brain when a person is focused on a mobile device. But now scientists at the university of California San Diego have hacked that problem. How often do you have people come in? Marois? So as often as we possibly can Dr Karen bag is an investigator on that three hundred million dollar NIH study her team is scanning teenagers brains as they follow Instagram. The most popular social media app when we met eighteen year old Roxy ship. She was about to participate in Dr baggage study how much time do you actually spend on screens a check my phone, Freddie regularly. I'd say what's pretty regularly every at least ten to twenty minutes is a conservative estimate. She can't take her phone into the MRI because of the powerful magnets in the machine. So a mirror has been placed above her face to allow her to look across the room at a movie screen displaying images from her Instagram account this way, Dr Baghdad can see exactly which parts of the brain's reward system are most active while using social media. So you could actually see a part of the brain light up when you're feeling good. Yes. From the scanner in the Skinner based on her data and the results from other studies. Dr baggage is among scientists who believe screen time stimulates the release of the brain chemical dopamine, which has a pivotal role in cravings and desire. So you're more likely to act impulsively. And use social media compulsively. Instead of like checking yourself you wanna keep on it to keep getting the good feelings. Teenagers. Now spend on average four and a half hours a day on their phones all that time has resulted in a fundamental shift in how a generation of American kids acts and thinks when smartphones went from being something only a few people had something the majority of people had it had this really big affect on how teens related to each other. Gene twinkie is a psychology professor at San Diego State university. She spent five years combing through four large national surveys of eleven million young people since the nineteen sixties she discovered sudden changes in the behavior and mental health of teens born in one thousand nine hundred five and later generation that she calls I gen- now the first generation to spend their entire adolescence with smartphones. So a lot of them can't remember a time before smartphones existed. There have been generational shifts before in the past. I haven't they're certainly this one's much more sudden and pronounced. Than most of the others. The food was introduced in two thousand and seven smartphones. Gained widespread usage among young people by two thousand and twelve gene. Twenty says she was startled to find that in the four years that followed the percentage of teens who reported drinking. We're having sex fell. But the percentage who said they were lonely or depressed spite it's possible. Other factors may have played a role. But twenty says she wasn't able to identify any that correlated as closely as the growing popularity of the smartphone and social media. It's not just the loneliness and depression from these surveys. It's also that ER visits for self harm like cutting have tripled online girls aged ten to fourteen what our teams doing on their phones that that could be connected to depression. It could be anything. There's there's kind of two different schools of thought on this said, it's the specific things that teams are doing on their phones. That's the problem or it could be just the sheer amount of time. Mm that they're spending on their phones. That's the problem. Finding definitive answers about social media's influence on mental health can be a frustrating. Exercise. Eighty one percent of teens in a new national survey by the Pew Research Center said they feel more connected to their friends and associated social media use with feeling included. But in a month long experiment at the university of Pennsylvania college

Researcher NIH Doctor Guy Dowling Investigator Marijuana Tristan Harris Kristina Kiss Donald Dowling Pew Research Center Doctor Dimitri Christoph Depression Instagram University Of California San D Research Assistant Google Seattle Children