35 Burst results for "Trinidad"

The Wandering Pier

Black Women Travel Podcast

04:13 min | Last month

The Wandering Pier

"Thanks so much for joining us today. Can you please tell us your name where you're from your current shin and the name of your business. This this pair. I'm from trinidad. And tobago and london. And i'm currently located in nine malaysia. And my business. I work in the english language department. So i am an esl teacher at the moment. And when i'm not doing that. I'm traveling the world. Not in twenty twenty and when you say traveling the world like you mean literally taraborrelli. I think it would be easier for you to tell us where you have not been not yet not yet. I mean it's easier to tell you. I have been i don't know all were for. You've been out there so like i've been poking around in your life and a source he started like your blog. Mama sita garcia in twenty eleven on instagram and twitter. You're wondering pierre the wandering deer so you've just been like document team your travels from time and so now also also for those don't know trinidad. is just off the coast of venezuela So you got your little south america on a little bit too so okay just okay. Let's just go back. Just go back like just tell me all the things like when did you find your wanderlust. i would say that. It really came into play once i started. No actually that was more. Solo travel some jumping ahead there wunderlist. Last i think became more of a thing when travel became easier for me and that was in the form of my british passport so i have dual citizenship with the uk and trinidad and tobago and prior to that. It was just very restricting. You know like when you need a visa at just odds so much to To the plate when you want to travel somewhere. So i think because of that i had travelled you know Since i was young i had been to england and had been to the us. My mom made sure that we got to see a little bit of the world where she was able to make that happen And when i moved to england. I really do that much i. I went on a school trip to spain. And that's when i decided. I'm kinda live in spain. One day of but yeah generally it was. It was more when my passport opened up the doors to do it more freely and so it meant that in especially as a unique students i think. When did i get hospita. Gosh i can't remember probably like two thousand end saechsische ish somewhere around there maybe and Yeah just through. Uni knows before that story and then through union we would take these short trips because myth ryanair and easyjet is confined like super cheap flights. We wanted to explore more of the uk. But the costume. Going to like scotland would like the same cost is going to stockholm. So so we were. Just go out. And that's when it was really ignited. I would say the more i did it the more i wanted to do it and it was just really accessible in uni when that student loan came through i would pay what needed to be paid so like my accommodation any books any fees and then whatever was left was like right. Where can we go. Even if that meant a cades gonna be beans on toast for for the rest of the tim. The hours balanced the way it went so we would like and squeeze in trips here and there

Trinidad English Language Department Taraborrelli Mama Sita Garcia Tobago Instagram Malaysia Pierre Venezuela South America London England Spain Twitter UK Easyjet Ryanair United States Stockholm Scotland
"trinidad" Discussed on TFE - Radio

TFE - Radio

03:34 min | Last month

"trinidad" Discussed on TFE - Radio

"What my family and friends and turn it out. I just you know. I've always been a proud trinidadian but my pride has always been swelling. Ever since i've gotten back in touch with my family and friends and trinidad. And i'm so happy that i could bring their show to all of you because this is my perspective. This is the perspective of tnt. My other nickname tnt that. I've given myself toronto and trinidad and if you go to my social media a lot of you thought it was very cool. The new face covering i have that i got i had bought for myself at. It is literally a face covering that is infused of the canadian and trinidad flags together. Tnt trinidad sorry tnt. Trent toronto in trinidad. That is what. I am calling myself. Because i am out. I am toronto. i am toronto. I am trinidad and it's could be a metaphor as tnt. Something very explosive with me. So it's a dope name. I gave it to myself. It is what it is. And i have the face covering to back it up but i think that's it for me. Refer now you know my passion for trinidad will never stop. It will always be there and again. I'll talk always about the good mostly. What the bad and the ugly of the of and just everything under the trinidad and tobago's son cannot forget tobago. I will eventually tell you my story. But when i went to tobago i'd only been there once in my life but i will talk about that. As i said weeks ago. I will talk about that as the existence of this show continues. My love and passion fraternity has brought about the greatest gift. You can give my country right now and that is a very prideful. Podcast of all things trinidad and tobago. Which is why you're listening right now. So having said that. Take that with you for now for this week. Hope everybody stays safe. You know i know it. It's you know it's tough times during dodd charlotte all the people that i'm still watching on youtube and all the people that i still watch every day that includes of course and even though i had to have some harsh criticism of his sort of wishy washy behavior when it comes to certain individuals there. But you know. I've got love from my fellow trinidadians again. You come with that respect. I will show you just as much if not more respect and we will be back here next week for another episode. We will be going into our second month already which will be our eighth week of to your radio. Trinidad talk all things. Turn it on tobago. If you'd like to donate which a lot of you have especially if you live in a thank you so much you know think you you don't have to. You don't have to but you know those of you have thank you. You could spare it. I know times are tough in trinidad boy who with thank you for your donations by dino by paypal pal the triple w. dot pay paul dot me slash t.f. E money goes directly to me..

trinidad tobago toronto dodd charlotte youtube dino paypal
"trinidad" Discussed on TFE - Radio

TFE - Radio

04:17 min | Last month

"trinidad" Discussed on TFE - Radio

"Twelve twenty twenty once again. I'm your humble host and narrator not to mention birthday boy forty two years young few days ago in particular Four days ago. I had turned forty two already covered that in the first segment of this show and we are going to double up on a couple of our weekly installments. The first one will be. When i lived in trinidad january nineteen eighty seven to forever part. Six life from trinidad dot ends. Yeah so. I left off last week where i was told. I could've swore. I was in my room at the time. Who knows living in trinidad. I guess is my aunt's police aunt's house and my mother came in and said that we were moving back to toronto..

trinidad toronto
"trinidad" Discussed on TFE - Radio

TFE - Radio

05:32 min | Last month

"trinidad" Discussed on TFE - Radio

"They will be to you and vice versa. You will see how much more respect that they will have for you. How much more love they will have for you. You'll see that you will have a lot of life if you are in a respectful person. You'll see how much more love you will get. Just even if. It's a friend or a colleague coworker. A you know a wife or girlfriend fiancee. Someone you're dating someone you're checking seeing your courting. Whatever the case may be you will see him much more love how much more attention much more respect and how much more genuine love and respect. You'll get from that woman if you just treat them better if you just look at them like they're or your world or you're fond of them in some way even if it's just a friend you know as as wife has girlfriend whatever the case may be your as your future your present in your future you look at them with respect but again we need to work on ourselves as individuals before we could start respecting everybody else. Because if we don't respect ourselves like. I said nobody respect us so this goes all the way around bottom line. The respect has to start with the women themselves but it also has to start with us men and women as well. We'll look attractive females whether you're heterosexual heterosexual straight woman or you're a lesbian woman or you're bisexual woman you know you need to look at your your fellow gender as equal again on tell someone disrespects you you respect. Everybody generally respect everybody. It is what it is the violence against women. Though at the end of the day must stop and in eventually will stop in. Trinidad will stop but again. We need to start software. You know. I know. I threw a lot at you. I will was all across the board with this but it goes all across the board. It starts with respect us as individuals and starts with us as individuals women in particular us as men when it comes to looking at a female we have to have our law enforcement that the bad ones at least in trinidad author us at recognize that this is an epidemic rape sexual harassment and murder of women needs to stop and needs to be cut out. We need to better protect our women bottom line so in case i didn't make that anymore. Clear anyone who's bad minded. If you are listening to this at the sound of my voice step back eliminate yourself from this life or go and fix yourself because.

Trinidad trinidad
"trinidad" Discussed on TFE - Radio

TFE - Radio

02:54 min | Last month

"trinidad" Discussed on TFE - Radio

"Trinidad is one of the most progressive countries on the planet. But yet it's still behind the eight ball on a lot of very serious subjects and topics such as this one violence against women in trinidad needs to stop and if it does not stop. We're going to have number population of women. Why do you think there's so many women that are trying to leave. Turn it right now. Trying to go for greener pastures just because of the level of harassment. Because of things like this happen with young ashanti that have happened to all the other women who had been targeted. I spoke about the the the young lady and her daughter who was gunned down a number of weeks ago. When i talked about. The good abound the Subject of trinidad. When i titled it that that's what i had covered was one of those stories. That young lady was a businesswoman. A business owner and her her daughter was also gone down. We still don't know why you know we still don't know why it is just not. It's just not necessary to kill to strangle maim and destroy the women population and trinidad. Women is what not just in trinidad. Women and trinidad is what makes trinidad go round. Which makes trinidad exists. Part turn it has beauty. Is the women what it doesn't matter. What shape size color creed religion race. Whatever you know how they talk how they act they walk. Women makes trinidad goal round and around and around the world revolves around women and trinidad because without them we we men would be nothing you know. Women are independent you arguably say that men is a whole 'nother topic but i mean men need women and women need men. We can be as individuals at the end of the day and say yeah well. We don't need this. We don't need that but everyone needs somebody but at the rate that were going out right now. Those of you who are listening to this that just so happen to unfortunately bad minded people. I would hope you're not listening to this show because this is nothing but positively i the one for you homie trust me but if you are bad minded and you're listening to this you need to fix up yourself look at yourself in the miracle. What the fuck is i was. I think he harassing that girl or saying that inappropriate shift to that girl or the woman would of the case. You know thinking these type of thoughts or trying to act on these type of thoughts you need to. If you're dreaming that fantasizing about any of that shit doing something to a woman you need to wake up an apologize because if you can't control yourself you need to wipe yourself off of this earth straight up you know..

trinidad Trinidad
"trinidad" Discussed on TFE - Radio

TFE - Radio

03:57 min | Last month

"trinidad" Discussed on TFE - Radio

"This particular woman in particular speaking about is you know is. Is you know by all this donations. Attractive woman you know like just you know getting harassed for no reason by cops who have shotguns in their hands wasn't in a red zone for for all parking or none of that. They're just being harassed whether it's because of the way they look they look attractive or because there are female there are perverted individuals in trinidad. That want to see a pretty girl or an attractive grown a sexy girl whatever. The case may be begging for their life or begging to be left alone or begging for just peace and they won't stop this is the level again of depravity. That can ten us to run rampant in trinidad the men. They're men gentlemen those of you. Who are real men and turn it out. We need to protect our women or not a lot better than this we do. We need to protect our women a lot better than this. They're not as used for us to fuck and come and that's it. We need to protect them. There are our queens. They are princesses they are. Girlfriends are fiance's our wives are common laws. Our sisters our mothers are ants are cousins. We need to protect them. Better than this from monsters. This peach driver that for some reason decided to target this poor young lady is eighteen year old girl and for what. How old is this guy. Thirty he's in his his his early thirties. We need to protect our women and trinidad better than this. We need to keep a closer eye on where they go. The elements that are around and women. You need to make it easier on yourself and allow people to help you. Don't act like you know you cannot be touched. Because i know some people some women who believe that nothing will ever happen to them because they have that level of arrogance about them and they've been the same ones that i've been harassed same ones who've had inappropriate comments a lot of people coming out of the woodwork and a lot of people going out of their way to say and do things that will ultimately be considered violent harassment or whatever the case may be. But it's not good behavior. These same women have still some of don't learn but most of them have learned now from their their arrogance and knowing that everybody can be touched themselves included as they've already seen the examples happen to them firsthand women you need to also make it easy on yourself as i said in that sense and then at the same time you gotta understand that even if you have a girlfriend or mother or sister or cousin or whatever or just a friend that tells you you know you can't go there by yourself or you should go there by yourself. I'm come with you or one of a couple of other people with us or whatever. The case may be good. Don't take things for granted because you will be the next victim you know. Women and trinidad are considered the most attractive women on the planet as not just there being harassed because of the way they look. They're being harassed because they are a female and they're considered easy targets. This is the reason why a lot of the monsters that run around trinidad are very backwards at bringing the country down. The entire country is trying to move forward..

trinidad
"trinidad" Discussed on TFE - Radio

TFE - Radio

05:03 min | Last month

"trinidad" Discussed on TFE - Radio

"Back after eight years later and between ninety five and ninety seven the loved ones that i was able to remember and meet and get to know even better and family Having lived in trinidad and then gotten re introduced to them. Reacquainted with You know. I don't have a whole lot of Relationships like with junior to speak of because there is no no relationship there because it just completely lost touch unfortunate no. I'm grateful to him too because he he could have made a bigger deal out of it. You know just that because it was such a damaging blow to his knee that he ended up in the hospital but you know he. He was still my friend after he was still my brother. I was still his brother. He knew it was an accident. It could have happened to me happen to him. But i felt more bad than anything that i had done that by accident to him. Mind you i would never have done that purposely to him you know. I loved him too much. He was a good dude. You know we had a lot of great times together. We always got along with a good chemistry. You know and we we we always. We always went down good with each other. You know what i mean so we always got down good with each other's are you know deminers and personalities and we were always you know the closest of friends closes the boys and just that moment is what really damage the whole thing and that was my fault again junior. If you'll live somewhere and you finally realize that it's me behind this microphone. I hope you seek me out your you find me on social media and because i've seen stranger things happen i've seen people come and reconnect with me after like twenty years twenty five years. Whatever the case from trinidad and and you know the rest is history. So if you're out there junior please get in contact with me and You know..

trinidad
"trinidad" Discussed on TFE - Radio

TFE - Radio

04:56 min | Last month

"trinidad" Discussed on TFE - Radio

"Want to then problem with my skin tone and just continues to listen to all the rhetoric that comes out of some of the other jaded people that they are associated with or related to. its like. I am telling you things that you would not know about canada. And yet you're still going to listen to the very jaded. You know racist just delusional people that are existing around you that you keep around you because you're just as miserable that live there in trinidad and it's just like you know what you can't change bad people. You cannot change bad minded people and you know like what to box set. And i see this almost on every show. I am not going to change the world of racism trinidad for in particular is. I'm saying this about-turn. It added racism in trinidad. Like to walk. Said you know. I may not i mean it. Change the world. But i am going to be the spark that helps the change the world. And that's why. I do this show. Because i want to bring to. You guys did last week or the week before that. It's good the bad and the ugly about trinidad. You know you're not gonna hear me sugarcoat anything about this country that i love so much and that it is my blood it is. My bloodline is my motherland. It's everything now. I was born in canada. She would say that. That's my motherland is well what you know. Trinidad is my home is well. You know it was my home and it will always be my home and my home away from home. I was born and raised in count. I was born and raised in toronto. I was i you know like i grew up. You know for a little bit of a good few months. I've got stories upon stories about turning on living in trinidad before that. So i mean like i said as the hence the title of this show trinity bone you know and the thing is. It's unfortunate because again as i had made mention last week as i was previewed that we're gonna talk about this this week..

trinidad canada Trinidad toronto
"trinidad" Discussed on TFE - Radio

TFE - Radio

05:59 min | 2 months ago

"trinidad" Discussed on TFE - Radio

"It is doi- lead day twenty twenty and we're back here for a second segment and i wanted to get into part two of what i started last week. And that is when i lived in trinidad january of nineteen eighty seven to forever. I really thought it was going to be forever. now. I got into some things. Basically what i had touchdown in trinidad and eighty seven. What it was like for me Got into it a little bit. But i want to pick up from there and i wanna get into how it was like this time around now When i was eight years old. I had moved it dot as i had mentioned to you last week. And before that The week before I had moved to trinidad with my mother and my stepfather They had recently had gotten married a month or two before in november of eighty six and the plan was to move the trinidad now. I've covered all this. Go back and listen to the previous episode of if radio trinidad episode two and you can get caught up with how i started this story in the first place. But we're moving forward. So eventually as i had mentioned i had A very bad run in with a particular teacher in In my school who was very physically abusive and just a very scary person to deal with..

trinidad
"trinidad" Discussed on TFE - Radio

TFE - Radio

05:32 min | 2 months ago

"trinidad" Discussed on TFE - Radio

"Knew it was just nice. It was nice to see the temple by the sea and seeing how a wonderful just very astonishing and very Just be it looks. You know to the naked eye But yeah so for me. My goal is trinidad. Diwali going temple by the sea or just going to a regular other temple at just experiencing the sights and the sounds the food the company you know the the the positive chitter chatter it all just having a good time and just celebrating this wonderful religion that we call hinduism and hindu You know. Hinduism is a part of my family along with christianity. And i am a proud. I would say hindu or a unofficial hindu..

trinidad
"trinidad" Discussed on TFE - Radio

TFE - Radio

04:14 min | 2 months ago

"trinidad" Discussed on TFE - Radio

"It is so delicious taste. My mouth is watering right. Now thinking and talking about it it just tastes so good. Especially if you get the wings and the drumstick on my lord all my lord you will want to slap. Your mom offered this type of so good and the like. I've always said this even the ketchup. Even the kfc ketchup in trinidad tastes better. I i don't know what it is. It just tastes so good. The chicken itself is just to die for the catch up with it is to die for then we have. I told you. I was going to give you the good. The bad and the ugly at this is the great of trinidad is the kfc dot the sides the solid i would call it. I always call it alyssa. And if you're not trinidadian. I'll lewis potato but the potato salad the coleslaw. You know the biscuits everything. Everything is just wonderful. It's so much. More plentiful much more hardy much more delicious has a better kick to it you know. I don't know how i'm going to do some investigating when i go down to turn it out. Eventually when i would visit family in france. I'm going to go to the kfc and i'm going to pin somebody to the wall. Say how do you make this. And can i bring all of it back with me. I'm going to investigate and find out how they do it. And why do it differently. Because if i'm the owner. If i am the if i am the head honcho of kfc worldwide. I would be thanking trinidad. I would be giving the medals honors again money all kinds of shit because they prepare. I haven't had it anywhere else. But i can guarantee you right now. I will not enjoy it as much as i enjoyed in trinidad trinidad. Kfc is the best. I even follow them on instagram. They have kfc on instagram. I follow them. And i just look at the food..

kfc trinidad trinidad trinidad france
"trinidad" Discussed on TFE - Radio

TFE - Radio

01:31 min | 2 months ago

"trinidad" Discussed on TFE - Radio

"She lasted she graduated. And the rest was history. She's now teacher but it is a system that is not to be messed with. You can't fuck around when you go to school in trinidad. When i was there i lived there when i was eight years old and learning my times tables and not getting it. I think a lot of it has to do with out of fear out of the fear being wrong. Because i knew if i was wrong was going to beat. It licks which i did at an eventually. It stopped but There's gonna be many stories that i will have a bull going to school in trinidad and it'll be many stories about outside of Being outside in trinidad being Growing up in that house in my aunt's house and just the family. I had around me and the friends. I had around me but i will end off this segment on more positive note. I will never forget my time. Living trinidad it is an experience that i will never forget it was. I would say a very. It was a very positive experience but it was also a negative experience because of not being able to get used to things and you know just a certain physical abuse took at school but anyway having said that we're gonna be back for our third and final segment. That was when i lived in trinidad. January nineteen eighty-seven to forever part one..

trinidad
"trinidad" Discussed on TFE - Radio

TFE - Radio

05:29 min | 2 months ago

"trinidad" Discussed on TFE - Radio

"Welcome to all my fellow trinidadians as we talk everything. Turn it on in this particular show. Of course we have to you if you radio uncut uncensored to radio wrestling and of course here if he radio trinidad welcome. Welcome back thank you very much to everybody. Who listened to the shows last week halloween night. I hope you all had a very safe and somewhat fund halloween. I know certain things and when it comes to halloween has been closed down and shut down because of the pandemic You know something. I always wanted to try out with. What would it be like to have one of my favorite. I should i think it should be a holiday. Should be a day off especially for horror fans. Halloween should be a day off and trinidad. Oh my god you know how in mahyco they have a delay worth where it is the day of the dead and it's a car it's a holiday and then people celebrate their loved ones that i've lost and whatnot and they dress up and it basically looks like no disrespect. Looks like halloween for the dead. Like you know the skull paintings onto phase and and just looking like the grim reaper and things of that nature. I think that should be an actual holiday. Is halloween and i would like to experience as i was saying i would like to experience halloween and turn it. I'd i don't know what it's like to be in trinidad at that time in october. I've never been interested in october. Had i lived in trinidad for the rest of my life. I would've obviously have experienced what halloween trinidad would be like. But i'm not sure. I'm going to be honest with you. I don't know everything about everything when it comes to certain ways of life and certain things that happen in trinidad you know. I've always asked family. Ask friends whoever lives. According to this day you know what's dislike. What's that like. I've always wanted to experience halloween internet. I've always wanted to experience. Christmas adjoining dodd. I've always.

trinidad
Camille Selvon Abrahams on the animation industry during COVID

Revision Path

03:00 min | 2 months ago

Camille Selvon Abrahams on the animation industry during COVID

"I am also the founding director glenn emissions do so we are continuing work work from home and i think that's what is happening a lot with animation studios. That's what i'm hearing from my international friends. Who are doing these sort of things similar to what we are doing that. We are working from holes. And i think animators maybe creative on a whole we kind of okay with that. You know we we at least from me my experience being anonymous you enjoy that into law saying you enjoy going in yourself. So working from hall is not a big deal for us so a lot of will now actually is going on from whom we doing. A lot of commercial syllabi actually. Doing outsourcing from international students from various small jobs that we actually functioning. So it's a good thing for us. We were able to adopt nice earlier on in the year. I talked to a guy are is. He has a animation studio in tokyo and he was sort of saying pretty much the same thing like they've been working from home some of them do come into the office. I think when. I talked to him. He was in the office. They were only him in like one other person but yes seems like for animation. It seems like that's actually preferable because it's so detail oriented. Yes yes actually works. I spoke to one of the big agencies that the sofa toon boom animation in canada and they said because of this shift companies are now thinking. Well okay we just continue like that. In covert or no covert will king from whole final mission and game and game. It's looking for the industry. No you founded full circle. Animation studio like several several years ago. How has the company really changed over the years quite a bit. When i returned from london i studied that. Goldsmiths mincy on i. I made a decision to come back to the caribbean. That was a big step because trinidad and tobago. We are oil and gas country. That's what economy is based on me coming back and windy creative digital type correa. Abviously was a challenge. Because that's not what we are accustomed to so coming back with. Difficulty took about previous to kind of get on my feet as far as the studio on after the ten ta gratin business now his name is jason lindsey who had a very strong business background so without sort of thumb partnership where you have decreased if any business it really really supported the studio from becoming micro stew into a relatively successful outsourcing to handy caribbean. So that's kind of how it's moved and now we are. We are considered one of the outsourcing studios in the caribbean. We've outsourced with pro. Hbo's of our. Will you know you see on each be on cotton. We've we actually have a one hundred and international productions

Glenn Emissions Goldsmiths Mincy Tokyo Hall Jason Lindsey Caribbean Tobago Correa Trinidad Canada London HBO
Black Lives Matter In Belize

Latino Rebels Radio

07:03 min | 4 months ago

Black Lives Matter In Belize

"Once again, this is Oscar Fernandez today on the show we put the spotlight on Belize and how the black lives matter movement shines a light on how believes is history has been excluded from Central American history, and so we're joined today by Nicole Ramsey who's a Candidate in a Department of African. American and African Diaspora studies at UC Berkeley she has an article that came out last month in medium entitled as Remind Central America to think outside the box she joins us today over the phone. Welcome to show Nicole Ramsey. Thank you for having me. Excited to be here is good to have you with us. I couldn't my introduction brief because actually pulled it from your article regards to Belize Central America. Once again, the Arctic was entitled Belise Remind Central America to think outside the box and when the central arguments you make in your article is that the black lives matter movement and I took this directly from your article shines a light on how belise history has been excluded from Central America. So, with that in mind, let me just go right there to the beginning and ask if you could elaborate and state your argument by what you mean by the black lives matter as pertains to beliefs which in turn pertains to Central America. Yeah for sure. So what envisioning what I was in? When I came up with the article title you know those with everything that's going on. There's been a lot of discussion and in terms of black lives matter and what that means for black population living outside the US I find a lot of conversations especially. I'm really interested in like conversations that happen online. I was really I guess interested in how people were conceptualizing black lives matter as mostly an African American movement which you know there's a particular history and reasoning of why how black lives matter came in to being. particularly in the US. but it was it was just very interesting to see how mostly folks from Latin America. Caribbean. Europe other places. Outside saw that as distance from what was going on in their particular countries. So. In the case, of Central, America you know black lives have always mattered. There's always been struggles of On, the ground with black people fighting again, know the colonial administration and anti-black midst especially what's going on with Garifuna communities across central? America. So that's what I was thinking about. That's what I had in mind when I, came up with this article and it was just kind of talk about it later too because it's kind of like this long history of exclusion in the region and the region and how people conceptualize Central America so I thought in order for us to. Even. Delve into what You, know black lives. Matter Movement Looks Central America certainly have to acknowledge. Black Communities and black histories in the region I. so that's kind of where I was getting at and I'm a fan of history off it's kind of like a title things together. Absolutely we just had a show last week on the Gutty Funez on Duras and in a large way they play a central role. Belize as well. So we'll get to them once again during the course of the conversation. But with that said, there are other groups that make Belize very complex as far as this community is concerned, there's some other groups that need to be recognized. So I wonder if you could also explain the complexity of the Afro Belizian community in believes because not every black person in Belize is necessarily a Gutty Fuda, their other complexities and needs to be addressed here. Correct. Yes for sure. And that's even including myself I'm not guarantee now I'm what you would consider creole. So depending on. The vantage point, but you look at central. America play believes etc. Gua. Even think accent complaints with endurance creole just like black. Identity of black population mixture of blackness feeding back to the enslavement of large populations in the business. So thinking about that identity in believes to historic. Black Group are black creoles. And the Afrin Vision is getting food and I say black correal's because it's. It's common to meet somebody blond-haired blue-eyed of like, who visually looks why to also call themselves. And it's also the language that they also speak in believe. So there's a lot of complexity there and fusion So I really like to say black creoles because also like the history of creoles and believe ties back to kind of that enslavement period. And of course. When I was there last full for feel work you have legal whole bunch of other. black groups that are that have been in believe for quite some time you have like a very Pan Caribbean. migration and group within believe. So you can meet somebody from Jamaica. You can meet somebody from Barbados Trinidad. So that's also present there. and then recently you have a lot of immigrants from. The continent diamond a few people from Nigeria I. Think someone someone from Ghana, and then of course, from Haiti as well. considering migration Haitians to central. So there's like different levels of that. But in terms of like historic, it's black KRILL and offering digits Garifuna and I do like to. Talk about them within the compass of affable believers because there has been like a mixture between two. It's not unusual to meet somebody with a creole mother and A. Father vice versa So it kind of intertwined throughout but the cultures are very distinct and that's important to note they have a different history different time line of you know. Experience within the country which kind of work to conceptualize how they're viewed within beliefs but I think that's very important to also considering language racial formations. So yeah.

America Central America Belize Belize Central America Black Group Nicole Ramsey Latin America United States Uc Berkeley Department Of African Oscar Fernandez Caribbean Europe Gutty Funez Duras A. Father Haiti Ghana Jamaica
Trini Lopez, 1960s-era singer mentored by Sinatra, dies

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 5 months ago

Trini Lopez, 1960s-era singer mentored by Sinatra, dies

"Singer and actor Trini Lopez has died from complications of covert nineteen in palm springs California he was eighty three I marches are a letter with a look at his career limb there Trinidad Lopez the third was told to change his name to help his career he said no because he embraced as Mexican American heritage his first gigs as a guitarist were playing in Dallas night clubs that did not allow Mexican Americans he was famous for his versions of the songs lemon tree and if I had a hammer he crossed over into acting appearing in the dirty dozen movie and TV's Adam twelve rock musicians the edge and Dave Grohl were among the fans of the guitars that Lopez designed

Trinidad Lopez Dave Grohl Palm Springs California Dallas Adam
Trini Lopez, 1960s-era singer mentored by Sinatra, dies

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 5 months ago

Trini Lopez, 1960s-era singer mentored by Sinatra, dies

"Singer and actor Trini Lopez has died from complications of covert nineteen in palm springs California he was eighty three I marches are a letter with a look at his career limb there Trinidad Lopez the third was told to change his name to help his career he said no because he embraced as Mexican American heritage his first gigs as a guitarist were playing in Dallas night clubs that did not allow Mexican Americans he was famous for his versions of the songs lemon tree and if I had a hammer he crossed over into acting appearing in the dirty dozen movie and TV's Adam twelve rock musicians the edge and Dave Grohl were among the fans of the guitars that Lopez designed

Trinidad Lopez Dave Grohl Palm Springs California Dallas Adam
Minneapolis calls in National Guard following unrest

Garth Trinidad

00:42 sec | 8 months ago

Minneapolis calls in National Guard following unrest

"The head of the Minnesota National Guard says it is up to local law enforcement to drive the response to civil unrest Major General John Jensen says the guard is a supporting agency in the public perception of the government's response to protest is important and delicate well I I think you have to have a strong law enforcement presence but also you have to help in the messaging as well you have to ensure that people understand that you care about their community and get people to understand that they're also responsible and can help turn the tide of violence Jensen says guard troops in Minnesota were armed because of a credible threat against law enforcement there he was speaking on NPR's All Things

Minnesota National Guard John Jensen Minnesota NPR
Robustness to Unforeseen Adversarial Attacks

Data Skeptic

04:31 min | 8 months ago

Robustness to Unforeseen Adversarial Attacks

"I'm I'm Daniel Daniel King King Credit Graduate Student at Stanford University in the Computer Science Department Pad. I am or the Stanford on lab where we work on. Deploying machine learning efficiently Easily also for this particular. I was also volunteered. Open I for some time and tell me a little bit about your specific areas of research. What's most of your time in Grad School? Spent looking at considering. Yeah so Grad School. What I've been focusing on is trying to understand a how to actually deploy machine learning efficiently reliably and effectively. What we've noticed that one machine learning researchers have created these amazing machine learning models that do really well under certain circumstances let the real world is really complicated. There's a lot of issues that crop up. When actually deploying machinery models ranging from Michigan being expensive to deploy ranging from Trinidad of being noisy all the way down to worrying about attacks from adversaries. I've been focusing on trying to understand those issues when it comes to deploy the amazing technology that many machine learning researchers have been making. Yeah the paper I invited you on to talk about his title testing robustness against unforeseen adversaries. And it's interesting you frame that as a deployment issue because in my mind when I think of deploying male I'm thinking of how there's no perfect system in my opinion you know we have onyx files and different stuff like that. You can try but for some reason it's not as easy as it seems like it should be. Do you have any thoughts about why the I guess what I picture is? More lower level aspects of that are still kind of challenging for a lot of people that deploy absolutely so machine. Learning is very different than essentially all software so a lot of software comes into play when applying machine learning. But I don't think there's been a lot of understanding the community both the Research Committee and the industry community and what the difference between deploying standard software underplaying machine. Learning are so as you say. There's a lot of low level. Things for example like onyx files or actually taking a towards wallace say or while and converting to runtime engine. But that's actually being smoothed out. I think in the next year so we're GONNA be seeing a lot more of that. So for example serving has released some stuff but I think at a higher level. There's a lot of issues regarding how to combine data and Code that. We don't really know the answers to yet. And that's part of what my research deals with. A lot of other folks are thinking about as well. Yeah these adversarial attacks if I think about standing up my M. L. Model and exposing it via API. Just give that away where anyone can post to it. Or maybe someone's very clever and figures out how to get to my API for some reason they're going to post. What could be a sizable thing? An image file or something like that that has a ton of data and while that machine learning model it's a function it maps from the full input space to output space. Still we have these challenges. You think this is some sort of temporary thing where this adversarial game is going to eventually be solved or are we just dealing with a very hard problem. That will always be sort of cat and mouse. It's hard for me to predict the future but if you look at standard security ignoring machine learning there's been a cat and mouse game. Basically since computers have been invented sixty seventy years so if I had to guess I would say that. We're unlikely to solve the problem exactly. But I'm hoping that we can at least make it much much harder to attack. Machine learning systems in broadly. Speaking what are these adversarial attacks for anyone? Who hasn't heard of him yet? An adversary attack is think of it. As a procedure to generate an input that will fool machine learning model often for some nefarious mean so to give an extreme example. You might imagine posting a sticker on a stop sign that changes a perception system friction and accelerating car from stop sign to say sixty mile per hour speed limit sign which would cause erroneous behavior in a vehicle and might even cause physical harm now. I've looked into a number of these different techniques and there seemed to be more coming out by the hour. Some of them need the model and some of them need the day to set and some of them need not require too much of anything. What do you see sort of the garden or the taxonomy of these different kinds of attacks? And how much a little bit access helps or hinders. Yes as you say. There's a wide spectrum of attacks. I'll roughly them down. But these categorisations very rough and the tax can span different categorisations as well a high level. There's what I'll call white box and black box. Attacks White box attacks assume access to the MODEL AND BLACKBOX ATTACKS. Don't assume exits the model but assume you can query the model for example in a white box attack you'll have the weights and basically everything a blackbox tax. You might just have. Api access so for example Google's image classification API as an example of where he can query. But you don't have access to the model weights themselves. That's on the model side. There's also as you say a tax on the data side and here the threat model is slightly different. Typically the third as soon as you can tamper with some fraction of the data and by tampering with a small fraction of the data. This will cause the model to have eroneous outputs on typically specific patterns or be in general.

Grad School Daniel Daniel King Stanford University Google Graduate Student Michigan Trinidad Research Committee Wallace
"trinidad" Discussed on Side Hustle School

Side Hustle School

03:56 min | 10 months ago

"trinidad" Discussed on Side Hustle School

"The dual island nation of Trinidad and Tobago lies at the southeastern edge of the Caribbean Sea. Not far from the coast of Venezuela the country is known for its pristine beaches stable and vibrant musical heritage. It's not known for its Burgers Burgers on Trinidad or plane designed to be doused and Ketchup garlic sauce to crystal John a young mother Lifelong Home Cook. It seemed like a food that was ripe for disruption. Crystal son was a huge fan of burgers and she enjoyed finding creative ways to make them for dinner when she returned home from her job. As a sales facilitator she blended ground beef with all sorts of local ingredients experimented with their own sauces and didn't always stick to the traditional toppings. One of these experimental burgers changed everything. You See Trinidad Love Curry. It's one of their most beloved things to cook with and crystal had an idea for Curry Burger. She thought through. The flavors blended the ingredients and slap the Cook Patty on a Bun. It was exceptional. The iconic flavor of the nation in fused into a mouth-watering Burger crystal invited friends over for a tasting party. Ask Them for their brutally honest feedback and they all said the same thing. You should sell this coming from a family of skilled cook and foodies crystal knew a few restaurant owners around the island. She called up one of them and ask for a meeting. They cook some Burgers at the restaurant. Did a tasting and the owner agreed her recipe. Was something special? They worked out a simple deal. Three dollars per patty sold in batches of forty eight and just like that and like twenty sixteen crystal began supplying a respected restaurant with Curry Burger patties. Made in her own kitchen from there. She became known as the Burger Babe and started serving her unique burgers at dinner parties. It was obvious she needed to grow or so she thought in two thousand eighteen. She tried to open her own restaurant and was prepared to invest your life savings but when the state inspection agency came to take a look. They had bad news. The initial real estate contract sheets signed had been falsified. The building. She was moving into. Wasn't zoned for commercial use. It was residential only crystals spent the next year in a funk monitoring what to do next then through the support of her friends and family. She realized her dream hadn't died. One day she made a simple flyer on her computer announcing that she was taking orders for frozen Gourmet Burger Patties. And then send it out to all of her friends on what's up. She expected to maybe three orders. Whatever it took to get going again but apparently her community had missed these exceptional burgers and crystal twenty six orders. She rushed to the grocery store by five hundred dollars in ingredients and got to work Burger. Babe was back in business crystal began posting on instagram account. She had set up for the original restaurant announcing that Burger. Babe was opening just in a different way and orders could be placed directly on instagram. Or what's up that first month? She generated over six hundred dollars in profit. The Curry Burger was a hit but crystal had a few other creations by now as well the total local infused island spices and pimento cheese. The Italian Patty had fresh basil and Mozzarella mixed in there was a Turkey cranberry patty and even Veggie one next. She saw another opportunity to make burgers fresh than deliver them around the island to stand out. She Developed Pink Burger. Buying it was bright. Bolt and it set the expectation immediately that this was a different kind of burger when she announced her delivery service once again on instagram and WHATSAPP her followers who were still only a couple hundred wild crystal whipped up fresh burgers hops in her car and set out to deliver them herself. Her Passion was infectious. More growth came when she started cold. Pitching restaurants in corporate office.

Burger Curry Burger Trinidad Crystal instagram Venezuela Caribbean Sea Patty
Building Strategic Partnerships with Shelley Worrell, Founder of caribBEING

$6.99 Per Pound

10:38 min | 11 months ago

Building Strategic Partnerships with Shelley Worrell, Founder of caribBEING

"Tell us what is being and what is your job behind his project. Sir So we actually envisioned a an interesting so when we started we the first very first program that we put up with Bob. Hope for months and really it was about. It was an extension of all of my worth in and I wouldn't say my my work but also my travels right so my undergraduates is cultural studies and with the concentration on Rabin and then in Grad School. I and that's making up with Kirby I am. I always saw content right. Tv though distributed content as being a huge gap in the Caribbean space. Why are we not seeing ourselves? Elected in media Caribbean space. Do you mean like Caribbean however like looking at me Erica programming period right. So whether it's you know programming featuring people crimen stories premium people. I saw that as a huge gas. And and the other thing I had issues with for Sorta you know the way. Tourism is package in the region. So I started Grad school studying cultural heritage tourism and I ended up making a pivot to media studies but both programs are really about addressing these problems directly either through tourism cultural heritage tourism. Which again my life has come full circle and or media or a little bit about like some of the issues that you see in cultural tourism because when okay so I spend a lotta time in like crown heights and flatbush Andy's areas and you know having affinity for like I guess like Dancehall and musical from you know the islands like Calypso Soka. It may be but that's also just because of like influences that I've got as a young person growing up in New York but was Indians like for like people are not familiar with them like they kind of a lot of people on it like a paint them in one brush shirt so I kinda like how certain South Americans are. All the guys are all Mexicans Asians or deemed as you guys are all Chinese when people think like Zinnias. They're like oh you guys are all you guys all speak. Patois guys you must love so for those of us. That are not familiar. You know like. Can you kind of describe? Tell his like what are some issues that you see and you know like how tourism is packaged when it represents you know Caribbean and like just some of the misconceptions where like if you could kind of explained there actually differences between Trinidad Haiti Jamaica Right. Yeah Yeah I mean that's like a whole I mean we do a series on average version but at a couple things that I would mention one thing is when you think about Carnival right here on. Carnival has become wildly popular. Soka is trending around the world. And I talk about this. A lot with my friends In the region as well as here meaning in the region the Caribbean region and become overly. It's like sex tourism right so when you look at Soka you just think about women whining right and and of course but from the culture are not right. It's some it's sort of like this thing that you want to engage in right but there's so in but in a very overtly sexual manner right so you know so I think like the over sexualization of the female body has become like a very prevalent issue in in Carnival Culture. And that's you know throughout the region and and that's really not what carnival is about right. It's what's becoming right. And when you think about like you know carnival now you're thinking you're thinking beads. You're thinking you know that I can go line on somebody right or you know now. It's not only wining on people. I mean you're seeing men are touching women right like without their permission and you know we can be in the talk about this two years ago at the Brooklyn Museum as part of our residency. Because you know women got shot in During Juba because she refused to dance with someone and he just shot her I wa. I heard about that I lived on Rami like Juvie. Has A for people from from those areas. Juve has a juvenile. Tends to always have some issues like recently. I mean there was a lot of news around it right but I mean I think a lot of hype too right so and just misinformation and mischaracterizing the whole event with an associated with violence. So for those of us. That are not familiar with what you say. As is the event that were like the party. I guess it's not a party is the opening of the opening of the night before a day of the car that is correct and it typically starts at three four o'clock in the morning and that's how the tradition was brought here but again because there's so many people participating in Juve and they're and they're repackaging it as something else something that it's not right and not really understanding the roots in the origins of this cultural celebration. Then that's when things start to like to the sexual violence of that point right exactly and then of course it's nighttime so it's very easy to you know for people who are going to do bad things whether to or not come out because there are large people out on the situation right and and so you know. I think that's one of the things about curbing culture that is you know. Sort of like skewing in the wrong direction. It's it's you know the way we've been describing it. It's it's feels like sex tourism almost Like people go to Thailand and different. Tally like people actually really by prostitutes over daylight whereas in right whereas not there's a there isn't like a transaction per se contacts. You know because you feel like you're going to have a transact right right elise like you know the the intention is necessarily like okay like I appreciate what is simple symbolizes is more so like you see like pretty woman and loud outfits that are you scantily clad for lack of a better term and then I can do whatever I want right You know because of course they're dancing in a particular way which may be essential or sex scene look sexual so if feels like a ripe opportunity for some that you can actually engage in this elicit behavior so I mean that was one of the things You know I think that's one of the things that I've been thinking about for for a couple of years now And just observing I am I have to SAMA masquerader. I go to the Carribean a band. I I play mass and I I played. I've played played mass and Guadalupe lightly. Explain what that means for people because you know like when my home is used to some air like I was. I didn't understand what that meant. Cathala terms like right so mass is short for masquerade and during Carnival In most countries in in fact I in every country that I can think of their different groups even Brazil right there. Different groups which Organize around a particular theme right. So let's say we're playing canal street or Chinatown Right. All the costumes in that particular band will have a Chinatown FEM- right and and and actually perform or to participate in. That band is called playing mass right and so in my experience throughout the Caribbean Going to carnival because again. I'm a masquerader whether you know I'm in the French Caribbean or the English. Speaking Caribbean I have not played mass in the Dutch or the Spanish speaking Caribbean or even in North America Because I've played here in Brooklyn as well as in Miami You know I always play mass because I'm a person who cannot just spectate. I want to participate and I've been playing since I was a teenager but now I have been spectating for couple of years and partially because I don't like what I see it and you know and I think it's a little problematic Also getting a little older. I'm not I'm not young but I'm not old so I'm also like to have the energy for that so I want to hear that physical preparation that goes involved. As do I saw the body ribons? Well so I think that kind of dove into growing up in flatbush and And travelling to Caribbean during the summers and The washer ethnic heritages sure. I usually don't talk about it. I always say I'm the Caribbean or hair politician. But both my parents are from Trinidad. So and the unique thing about my parents that's really important to know is both. My parents loved the eldest. My father is one of thirteen. My mother is one of seven. They're both number one and they both were the first to come to America and largely responsible for bringing most of their relatives. They bought their own. They bought everyone. They filed for everyone So parents will mothers because only my grandmother. My grandfather came and aunts uncles and dozens and dozens and dozens of cousins. I come very very large family so my God. Think lease into The because when people like I said earlier when he would think like. You're from Caribbean from a Caribbean nation. Like people don't Associate Jamaica's such a big brand people just automatically. Lake Brand Jamaica is like a real thing right so people just assume like you're Jamaican if you're from the islands you're probably going to eat. Beef patties not even jerk chicken. I don't even think that many people know about jerk chicken Liz. You're from New York

Caribbean Grad School New York Carnival Culture BOB Kirby Rabin Jamaica Lake Brand Jamaica Juve Brooklyn Museum Crown Heights Trinidad LIZ Thailand Brazil Brooklyn North America America
Oscar's Coming Out Story

Coming Out Stories

13:07 min | 1 year ago

Oscar's Coming Out Story

"How identify is constantly evolving? Rarely but at the moment I'm identify as Trans Masculine Non Binary Sexuality was. I pretty much identifies Pan sexual but I D- tend to bisexual just for the ease of not having conversation about said Pharaoh Enough. So what did he say? Non Binary e dressing and looking Clint David's up and some days you feel more feminine. No I think it's important for people to realize whether they're feeling in particular nor that identity is really an internal thing not necessarily how you how you look to other people for me. A non binary is is that You see gender on a spectrum which is basically how I've always thought of gender and so nobody is absolutely mild or absolutely female. There's always a mix of the two and there's also the complication that gender is on some are also Collection of ideas about how you look or act to other people so I feel like me a lot of the time sometimes I. I feel more of the old me that I feel of the new me. I mean it's very it's a very complicated question basically also like as I got older the idea that I am me in isolation to the world is a bit ridiculous no like I M E in contact with people and situations at any given moment so my identity is as fluid as my gender. And you've had quite a few coming out stories. I've had a series of coming out stories so initially came out as a lesbian as I was growing up. There was very little language or or information about identities other than heterosexual binary gender identities. Tell us where when you were growing up. Well I was born in the seventy s So I grew up in the seventies and eighties ninety s and two thousand and still growing up but I was born in the Midlands in in the Cayenne. When I was about four we moved to Trinidad in the West indies. Which is what my father's from okay. And what was it like spending your formative years and you childhood really in the Carribean. It was in many ways idyllic. It's a beautiful island and it's possibly one of the few places in the world which really celebrates of mixed race identity obviously are mixed race. Many many different ethnicities and Trinidad is one of the few places I've been genuinely celebrate slap. That's good but do they understand gay people because initially you were you were growing up. As a woman came out as lesbian. He added that fail. Yeah I mean I didn't really come out until after I left Trinidad because I was eleven when I left my mom brought back to the UK. I mean I was just touching on the edges of it so when I was in Trinidad we started to have the first sort of stories coming out about the AIDS crisis. I remember that happening and that was probably the first time I'd ever really come into contact with the idea that a man could love a man and a woman could love woman. It was a confusing and also exciting time because I was starting to recognize something of myself in the stories of the people that I was hearing about. But also there's the slight terrible thing happening and essentially this like lots of rhetoric about whether or not. This was something that was supposed to happen if it was a good thing or you know like did God. God punishing gays that kind of stuff and was it. Was it quite homophobic place? Then we'll turn it out Been changing of the last few years is like a head. I pride last year two years ago. The groups who are campaigning for rights. Lgbt plus rights in that country of very vocal and getting a lot of coverage so those very positive but it is a very conservative religious country in the sense that there are lots of very vocal strongly opinionated mainly Christian groups. It's a hotbed of activity for moments and seventh day. Adventists Evangelical Christians who come to do the mission circle missionary. So they're very like the very active dumber. So what was it like going to school in Canada then? It was intense very intense educational program that pushes kids along. It was a difficult time mainly because I was bullied a lot in school for being different as they saw our very masculine girl. He hung around with boys and Didn't really do lots of girl stuff which made me Different did they. Yeah I mean a lot of it was just like a teasing girls. Say things to make me feel like I didn't really fit in or like wasn't doing go right. Anna there was some physical comments and but men mainly was too slight low level humiliation that kind of stuff so sort of processing the fact that he gave you thought. Well Yeah I mean I. I knew I was different. A neo wasn't acting the same way that girls actives but also At that point I hadn't really got the language for a lot of what I how I was identifying. So so you wouldn't necessarily questioning agenda at that point away. Yeah well I was questioning my gender from from with Tommy was a child so I basically I thought I was a boy up until 'cause I as I start to hit school. I had to wear a dress. 'cause I was a girl And up until that point I didn't have to. My mom has no real. She's not strongly set in her generals. The associate she identified herself as a Tomboy when she grew up. She wanted to be a cowboy riding high. Was it when you have to suddenly wear a dress. Then I imagined that was horrific. It was yeah boy shorts underneath my dresses. Go as a way of protecting myself but yeah hated it and also like when I was teased for being in address that was like even more upsetting because it was already vulnerable in address and then I was being made fun of because I was wearing a dress. Did you feel like you were just wearing the wrong clothes when he wore dress? Yes basically Oscar. You're just lucky. Didn't mind mother because I didn't ask Oh uniform. And My mother invented this thing called Dress Tuesdays and she just make me where we address on a Tuesday. I did run on high out really early. And then you didn't wear a dress Carolina absolutely. Yeah I mean I had to wear a dress as my school uniform. So just sucked up. That's what I did. I had to address my first holy communion that was horrific. I mean I only wore it because my mom made it but it was like. Oh it was terrible terrible time and then. I had one dress that had to wear. I think goes on my six birthday and I think that was probably the last time. My mom made me wear dress. She made me wear for my sex birthday party. E and it it was like horrible so yeah. That was the last time she made me do it. Outside of required parameters. I think the first time that you sort of expressed any of this because it was your mom that I come out to. Isn't it? Yeah in terms of sexuality came out quite early so as I moved to the UK was probably like twelve thirty you. She's okay without his like you're part of the family you know that's no it's not. GonNa Change and what about you that my dad was? Okay about Basically my mom told him. I think it's quite amazing. They probably don't see. She went with like hard news off. News is Basically it was like your door is addicted to drugs and she's a lesbian and my dad was like I don't care who. She sleeps with as long as she gets off. The drugs is ready. Basically the the outer now all scattered. I'm guessing at the time that was quite stressful for you and your family about the addiction. Side of things go into substance abuse at a very young age Just about eleven twelve years old. Yeah I basically got into dogs when I came back to the UK. So I came back from what was a very strict conservative school environment where you like stood when they teaches torture you and me entered and left the room to a high school in a one of the more challenging parts of London where kids would throw things at the teacher and tell them to piss off in that sort of stuff so it was. It was a huge culture shock for me and also like just coming into the UK with the levels of segregation and racism that existed compared to the country. That are just come from. That was also heat shock but I came over. I made some friends and within the first year we started experimenting with drugs and stuff so looking back on it now I see. It is a way of coping with what was going on But it didn't it wasn't in any way helpful to me. What were you doing mom asking the short answer to that is whatever. I could get my hands on. I guess in terms of long term use consistent long-term use. It was mainly Paul but there were also other drugs or substances. 'cause I went all drugs involved in that usage through from about up until the age of about the tea when I decided I just couldn't do the study more where I was just using stuff to nominate cope with what was going on drinking as well. No I'm not a fan of alcohol really lucky that way. I don't I don't really drink. So what was eventually made? You think account live like this anymore. I'd been homeless a couple of times and I was staying at my exes flat. She got a place and I just spent a year with a sort of extreme. Kind of Agra phobia had been really depressed and lots and lots of mental health issues and I spent about a year on the sofa refusing to leave the flat and I was basically waiting to die at that point and And I just had this moment where I asked myself radio. Honestly if you were going to die right now would you? Would you just let yourself go and the answer was now? I would try and stay alive and so I thought well if that's true if I really WanNa live them. I should just Kinda try and do that. And that was the start of a very long journey out of mental health in the BC. She's drug abuse issues. And you think all of that was because he was struggling with your sexuality or your gender identity or both Sexuality was never really an issue for me. I always saw that as a soft a software out. My gender identity struggled with a lot more. The first time I tried to broach the subject with my mom. My mom is usually the person I talked to. My Dad's not very like conversational. I just seen a documentary about a trance guy who was going to Amsterdam for the first so of surgeries that they were offering female-to-male people and I was just like wow. That's me you know and I tried to tell my mom and she was. She was freaked out. Boy Boy. I remember her saying what what kind of life you're going to have and I was like so affected by her reaction. The I stack tracked and kept secret which I'd been doing anyway pretty much by whole life and so I just went back to being lesbian for About the twentieth years so I came out again at the five is lesbian. I had my moments. I probably would have been a good lesbian if I wanted to be one. If I'd wanted to stay that way I mean you know like there's a certain amount of Kudos that comes with being a butch woman. There's definitely a market of attraction that people you know women find attractive and I was like well. Maybe I don't know it wasn't able to sort of engage with a as much maybe to have taken advantage of that but you had girlfriends yeah had girlfriends. Yeah so I may have been a good lesbian.

UK Trinidad Carribean Clint David PAN Oscar London Carolina Anna Tommy Canada Amsterdam Agra Paul BC West Indies
In Black America: Spencer Haywood

In Black America

11:18 min | 1 year ago

In Black America: Spencer Haywood

"Player and very like we had out here in Vegas gained all of the players on that team Blake Griffin. All of the young guys coming up and giving me hugs and kisses. And thank you me because you know in that situation just in terms of dollars from Lebron James. He's got an extra one hundred million dollars. Toby gotta one extra one hundred million dollars Lake Griffin got an extra fifty million dollars Kevin Durant who give me a big hug and kiss each got seventy five million dollars extra so the number one dollars and sense that give you an example of what it is because with with four years have yet to wait four years after your high school graduate. You wouldn't lose that kind of capital and you lose that plant on you will lose four entitled number. That will help them get into the hall. Laid on those numbers would be race. And you don't know what happened four years then in College Spencer Haywood Aba Nba Legend and hall of Famer. Hey will always be remembered that the person opened the door for underclassmen college basketball players to leave college early to enter the NBA thereby creating the Spencer Haywood Rule Haywood attended the University of Detroit and help the US Olympic team to a gold medal at the nineteen sixty eight summer games in Mexico City. Nineteen sixty eight. After two years in college he decided to enter the NBA draft citing family financial hardship the NBA however at the time for players entering the draft until four years. After the high school graduation. Hey would then sign with the ABA. Denver rockets play one season leading the league in scoring and rebounding as a rookie since he now had a professional season under his belt he decided to challenge the NBA rule. Once again and signed with the Seattle Supersonics in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine the NBA wasn't having it. Hey will the league all the way to the US or frame court and one on September eleven? Two Thousand Fifteen. He wasn't Tryin Naismith Basketball Hall of fame. I'm John Johansen Junior and welcome to another edition of and Black America on this week's program. Aba An NBA Legend and hall of Famer Semester. Haywood in Black America. Charles Barkley went out on a limb when this stuff was acting when they were acting crazy. And I'm they missed me like the last time of going into the hall of fame and I was like put on the backburner right house. Barclay stepped up and said on. Nuff is enough and did it publicly. He did it every way you said enough is enough now. This is not right and he stood up as a player and he started educating young players. Like do y'all know who is in our presence with Spencer Haywood Blah Blah. And he started talking about. You know there's like three cases that changed the face of force in one dispenser Haywood Heywood versus the NBA. I went to the Supreme Court and then play a young player. Started like Whoa wait a minute. I know him I see him but I never knew that until Charles was the one that should should should be there. And he's my what you call. My advocate advocate is Just to a good person. Just a wonderful person. Spencer Haywood won Olympic gold medal in one thousand nine hundred sixty eight at age nineteen and signed with the Seattle Supersonics two years later after dominating the ABA and a case that went to the US Supreme Court he sued the NBA or rule that prohibited players being draft until the league until they waited for years after graduating from high school. He won that case and nineteen eighty. He won a world championship with the Los Angeles Lakers as a twenty rookie in nineteen sixty nine. Seventy season he led the American Basketball Association both scoring and rebounding and was named the League's Most Valuable Player and rookie of the year. One on April twenty seven nineteen forty nine and silver city Mississippi into a family of Chen Children Hayward grew up in a dying era of American history. His mother picked cotton for two dollars a day and Heywood joined her in the field at the age of five hundred sixty four he moved to Chicago then to Detroit in the motor city. He leads pershing high school to the one thousand nine hundred sixty seven Michigan class. A State Basketball Championship. He went on to a stellar careers at Trinidad State Junior College and the University of Detroit in the summer of nineteen nine hundred sixty eight. He helped the United States to a gold medal at the Olympic Games in Mexico City on September. The eleventh. Two Thousand Fifteen. Hey what was inducted into Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of fame? My first reaction was You know is this fact in. Is this true because I had had Three falls a long before that because most reporters and most people who look at numbers and they at by numbers as a player and that this guy was. Mvp of the ABA averaging thirty and twenty five years with the Seattle Supersonics average in twenty six and thirteen and Olympic record holder and all of these different categories and as still as leading score and also was the outstanding college player of the year. So they look at all these things and they just assume that everybody thought again. Then you know also I went to the Supreme Court to fight he would versus the NBA to pave the way for Lebron's Michael Jordan magic. All of them they come through what is called. I the NBA. They call it early entry and now. I think it should be called what it is to Spencer. Haywood because they have the Larry Bird rule and they have Oscar Robertson. Rule regrettably Oscar but I know they promote birds and Larry Bird's modified version of my role. Larry Bird came in on a dispenser. It will but anyway so for years we thought this would happen and then there was a couple of false alarms that it did happen. So I was kidding around with John Deliver with the The Chairman and CEO. The hall and he was mentioning. You know. Well I probably spend Kareem. Rise is always the top. Yeah I said well. What does that got to do with with Kareem abdul-jabbar? My my blonde jokes Right so so Yeah it was. It was delighted. Mandic to get the call and to finally get to call it. Finally get it in but you know my mother used to sing this whole Psalm Lord and may not come when you want and buddies right on time. And that's my Jackson right so you know if it had to happen any other time. I think it would have been not as powerful as it is today and It was right on time. And it's on God's time so I'm very grateful and very humble Vita journey understand so once. You heard that you were going to be inducted. Walk us through that period from the time that you got to call to the induction ceremony that took place last Friday. September the eleventh. What all the activities have you been involved with. Well I've been all over the country Speaking and people wanting to know this story because it's a unique story and it is basketball history but yeah you know it hasn't been told so It's a new newfound appreciation for Spencer. Haywood so players have been embracing me like only at USA basketball here. In Las Vegas Games all the players on that team Blake Griffin. All of the young guys coming up and giving me hugs and kisses and thanking me. Because you know that situation just in terms of dollars and cents per Lebron James. He's got an extra one hundred million dollars. Coby got a one extra one hundred million dollars but griffin got extra fifty million dollars Kevin Durant who give me a big hug. 'cause he's got seventy five million dollars extra so that's the numbers in dollars and sense that. I give you an example of what it is because with with four years. If you have to wait for years after your high school classic graduate you would lose that kind of capital and you'll lose that plan time loser scoring titles you'll lose numbers that will help them get into the hall. Later on those numbers would be raced. And you don't know what's going to happen in four years in college. You could get hurt. A lot of things could happen so they fully appreciating news. So it's a good feeling because of forty four years more to this to happen so it is It is right on time on God. Signed so and then I went to I've been doing a lot of golf. Tournaments or charitable events and also just playing a lot and I spend a Lotta time with my family. My daughters and in fact I gotTA leave Again next week my next two oldest daughters having our first grand and So I gotta go in go through the process with her and It is it is a spectacular time and I also sit back John and and think about the times we were sitting in your dad's barber shop. They all sunset and this and just Nevada in Detroit for people who don't know right in Detroit Michigan and John Fathers where we congregate And and and and do our conversation and get a nice. Yeah because he didn't allow us to walk around. I hair off falling away years and stuff. So that's right. Yeah you know that's right So we would sit there and listen and talk and just pass the ball sports but all so I've been reflecting on Detroit. I went over to my neighborhood yesterday. day before yesterday and spent some time over there. Thursday and looking around and just just hearing up. Because done you know the story you know. When I came up from Mississippi I had no place to say I had no family there and James and either bill took in and adopted me along with my coach. Will Robinson and then we had waned diet. Dr Wayne die of your your own zone by Diet. Right Do all of my academics bring me up to snuff there. Oh my God it was just A. It's just a lot of love was having an and I see in Detroit and it's always been that way you know. They've always reached out and help each

Spencer Haywood Rule Haywood NBA College Spencer Haywood Aba Nb Lebron James American Basketball Associatio United States Basketball Seattle Supersonics Gold Medal Haywood Heywood Supreme Court Spencer Haywood Detroit Blake Griffin University Of Detroit Kevin Durant Charles Barkley Mexico City Mississippi Spencer
Texas teen who won't cut dreadlocks gets $20K for college

KYW 24 Hour News

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Texas teen who won't cut dreadlocks gets $20K for college

"News and African American student barred from school because of his dreadlocks is getting some celebrity and financial support eighteen year old the injury or an old appeared on the Ellen show Wednesday he's a senior at barbers hill high school in Mont Belvieu Texas about a half hour east of Houston he's been barred from school and won't be allowed to attend as graduation ceremony because of his dreadlocks the school superintendent says the dreadlocks are fine it's the length of them that violates the school's dress code on the show host Ellen de generous and musician Alicia keys presented Arnold with twenty thousand dollars for college Arnold says his father is from Trinidad and dreadlocks are part of the

Mont Belvieu Texas Houston Superintendent Arnold Trinidad Barbers Hill High School Ellen De Alicia Keys
The Best of Windward Road in Tobago

Monocle 24: The Menu

05:23 min | 1 year ago

The Best of Windward Road in Tobago

"Week we head to three hundred and Tobago Monaco. skinniest just call. It takes us on a trip down windward road on the smaller island of Tobago. Trinidad and Tobago is a complete with charm and excitement. These almonds of famous for their Carnival is origins coming from experience of hardship for enslaved Africans. Now a celebration. An annual event known for its colorful costumes parades and festivities. Also feature the limbo still passed a musical genres such as calypso soccer all of which originate from the islands in this episode exposure food one road in particular with road on the island of Tobago Winwood road starts at the top Tupac Flagship Hill which features some stunning views of the beauty of the island including the Caribbean Sea. It then runs down the east side of the island along many coastlines through villages many striking churches and jungle green valleys many bays run alongside this road and it cites our heavenly any out for breakfast or lunch checkout. GP's bakery if you make it here you're in for a treat a sweet swamp perhaps try that. Take on a cinnamon milk bum. How rupp cake filled with current some reasons? They have savory dishes to trying to lose pie. A soft fried right dumpling with mashed potatoes vegetables and chick peas or that chicken soup with dumplings yams and carrots. Uh Up the road you reach the stunning Tyrrell's Bay this is why we reach gems seaview. Kitchen visitors. locos agreed that a trip to Gemma seaview kitchen. EVERYONE AS Roma's treehouse is a must when visiting Trinidad and Tobago given away in the nickname. This opener restaurant is famous for being built around a tremendous almond tree. But that's isn't the only attraction. The food is also delicious. This restaurant has a casual vibe. AH Open for breakfast. Lunch and dinner uncertain authentic Caribbean food but also dishes with a twist going at lunch dinnertime. Try that curried goat. Which is classic Caribbean dish? A curry cooked with its main ingredient. Goat me which is left on the bone and cooked until tender. This is software after advice. Some peace in this case the piece actually being kidney beans but this is what they call them in the Caribbean maybe try with the side of voting. I would recommend commending this type of bread in the curry sauce or using it. To mop up your plate at the end I must try and a favorite is gems breadfruit Pie wonderfully creamy and cheesy with laze of breadfruit named because the texture of the fruit. When Kurt is similar to freshly baked bread but has a potato like flavor? Ever try this with a side of fried planting and if you love a bit of spice the have a homemade saas for you. They also love a grill. Try to Golic shrimp grilled fish with peppers or tried to local delights sweet and Sour Cavalli. Fish just a free minute walk down. Winwood road your arrive. birdwatchers restaurant and ball grabber noculars and head to the deck. I'm relaxing Logger do you love fish. The fish hair is fresh from the sea and the menu changes depending on the capture of the day but a popular choice. Is The lobster. A generous portion full of Zest and spices gift. The luscious Macaroni Pie. Try with some blue a popular carribean dish with its main ingredient being lift festival. And of course you must try the juicy chicken served with flavored rice salad lentils if you have the space for it make sure you try the homemade cinnamon. I scream for dessert. If eaten too much at these places you can always walk walk along space side North Beach and once. The food is going down head over to a roadside Russia. How about Ireland's bar relaxing join decorated with pirate flags with lots of character and heart? You can't catch sports on the TV or pay dots pool the cocktails here. Not for the faint-hearted taunted. They described as powerful. If you can brave it gives the rump punchy shy my heritage lies in the Caribbean and I can tell you the food in this part of the world is just as vibrant as its inhabitants. It's full of spices. I'm flavors that take influences from many parts of the world. So where are you elasticated bottoms and get ready for some soul food. Because you're going to be eating a lot of it for Monaco. I'm Kenya Jay Scarlett.

Tobago Winwood Road Tobago Caribbean Tobago Monaco. Skinniest Trinidad Roma Caribbean Sea Gemma Seaview Africans Winwood Rupp Monaco Kurt Kenya GP Sour Cavalli Tyrrell Jay Scarlett
The Thinking Behind the Book 'Home Coming'

VINTAGE Podcast

09:53 min | 1 year ago

The Thinking Behind the Book 'Home Coming'

"So homecoming is such an incredible book? And it's already having an incredible impact. I really enjoyed hearing all the different things and actually I listened to the audio book. I know that a lot of our listeners. Love audiobooks listening forecast. Say The audiobook. Because they're really interesting experience to hear the voices as well Tennyson it will a- and about your the thinking behind the book when when I can concept came into your head and what it was like an his first stages of planning a few years ago I wrote a memoir about growing gluten with my Jamaican parents called bad guy at the wheel. By guys. My father's nickname his Jamaican can. He had baggy is an all of his friends equally. Funny Nicknames that define them and they adhere to whether they liked the name or not so there was one man called old shine. Who was bowled? Like me anxious was very anxious. Tidy boosters very fussy but his footwear clock had one arm longer than the other. My favorite was manacled somewhere. And when somewhere came to this country from Jamaica in one thousand nine hundred system light summer suits tropical suits the matter. The weather weather come halo storm and when I thought about writing this book ask my mom. Whatever became of somewhere and she said well he caught a cold and died within a few months and I was shocked by that straightway which she spoke to sit in very matter of fact way had an edge to it but also it was quite a funny and I remember that when asked let's grapple loosened in the sixties all? The people were really really funny. There were like in my mind. CAST members of guys and dolls the Damon Runyon and they were all of my figures. We had no television until nineteen seventy two but they were television and what. I finished that Book Burger at the wheel about six seven years ago now I was wanted to continue it and away. The beginning of homecoming was a continuation of that story story but equally there were books. I read as a young man about Caribbean people in this country especially a book by Sam Cell Phone. Call the Lonely Londoners which is a book about a man called Moses who is kind of meet and greeter. So Kirby America's Dan to Waterloo station or Paddington and greets this carbon pioneers come off the boat train and equally. They have Wonderful characters wonderful names as a character. Awesome Galahad is rather light my car somewhere and when I finished up I wanted to myself. Well what would what would become of those people from the nineteen fifties and sixties if they were still alive today and what were their stories. What was the story of their great pioneer migration to prison? And although there have been books about that I don't think anyone's really interrogated the individual stories. And what you get with this book which is kind of oral history is a kind of an accumulation of similar stories and by that accumulation. You realize there was a bigger truth because sometimes when you hear stories you think that's just a one off when you hear again again again and you realize the experiences and I wanted to to have that kind of course onus in this kind of chorus line because right the way through But also the kind of gives you some of the shape and the contours of their lives from six to the present day and the people that you you chase to feed the book is e. Say An instruction that you you kind of chose intention eaten interview more women than men. 'cause you know those stories are represented. And and also more Chinese these people than Jamaican tell us parents Jamaican and three quarters of the migrants came from the Caribbean were Jamaican. But I right now. The Jamaicans take up too much room in the culture. The make too much noise have to credit opinion on themselves and they're over represented in our culture in terms of books books films music and sometimes they're kind of eclipsed some of the other islanders so I was very keen to address that so if that into more from Guyana kits and I was interested to find out why people ended up in certain parts of the country. So if you're from Saint Kitts you end up open leads. If you're from Saint Vincent in Hiwickum if it from Trinidad you end up in North Hampton and I think we want to these areas because they they were pay people were or their friends and associates broke. Equally is very keen to complicate the story because many of us will see those photographs photographs of the wind rush generation. The wind rush people coming off that ship. Ninety forty eight and the kind of I chronic now these men in Fidora's and zoot suits behind. You ever see any women in this girls but on that ship is often said from the beginning of that story. That now was that the five hundred Jamaican men. That's not true. There are other islands on that ship and the two hundred women on the ship including a woman called Mona. Baptiste's this wonderful jazz singer so I wanted to tell this story but also I wanted to use them to complicate the stories because the women were actually much more generous with their antidotes. Does that much more prepared to interrogate the interior lives and live longer but also in all honesty but I went to interview them. They're prepared to feed me saying that being you played this game I think three hours and the men wouldn't think to feed me and I'll be the on the floor gasping for water a little bit of bread but women would feed me straight away and actually what was interesting to me. I thought began to re revisit. Some of the stories. We're kind of finishing but some of the stores were not familiar. But I heard this story again and again from these elderly people who are now in the eighty s and ninety s had remind. I was on the antiques roadshow. And that what I was hearing were these jewels or this precious antiques. That not been added it for many many years. They've been stored away in cupboards in people's minds and never had a pap form and as an dustin down and reveal them to the reading public because to me they are wonderful rich funny cide. Moving polemical sometimes Philosophical stories that. Give a real sense of the panoply of of of of carbon life in this country. Because I think sometimes sometimes we have very reduced idea about the carribean presence in all honesty. If you look in terms of the archive in film and Television News Pretty Negative and right from the word go. It was pretty negative. People talk about the hostile environment. That Theresa May introduced in two thousand twelve but in my research it was not a new venture. She was very from the very beginning. And I. It's what I was interviewing a lot of these people who are in their eighties nineties to some of the archive of this month. Lockup in the British library the BBC See San Marcos in the BBC people around Archives let the deejay Don Letts had done lots of news twenty years ago. He's archive you've but also I would to my hometown is Brighton. Went to Sussex University where the Mass Observation Archive is held old and in nineteen thirty nine mass version which is so socialist research tool wanting to discover how people live. That was the whole idea of massive station Tau to working people live. What do they do with their money? How they use this time they still go to church too? They gamble. How do they make love but not at thirty? Nine maps vision decided to do a survey about black people. What did people in this country? Think about so-called Negroes in nineteen thirty nine and it wasn't very flattering it was pretty obnoxious really And I wanted to give a sense of what this carbon people who come into because in their minds I say this is true was everybody I spoke. They were a British. I'd even my mom for the book my Mom's from Jamaica and when she was growing up making the nineteen forties she knew how to fold the union flag flag. She could site keats. Shelley Wordsworth automatic pope's by Roach. She knew them all didn't need any book to repeat this poems and she told me that when she went to the cinema the reality cinema and Kingston in one thousand nine hundred dollars at the beginning of the screening of a film people. Stand up to sing the British national anthem and at the end of the screening people. Stand up to sting the British national anthem and I interviewed amount from Guyana. Who told me that when he came to this country went to the cinema and at the end of the film he stood up and such and he was amazing Nubia standing? He was really perplexed by that. So the sense of why they felt Brigitta. So what idea of Britain coming to see if they'd had it had access to these archives from from muscles version. They might have been a bit perturbed but what was interesting also. Is that the British. Sometimes they produce these booklets which they sent out to the Caribbean to give people an idea about what to expect. So there's one booklet produced by the BBC called going to Britain question. Mark as a small pamphlet is western some idea about Codes behavior so if I was to say to nineteen forties forties as an English person and you How do you do? What did you think MSA

BBC Caribbean Guyana Jamaica Britain Damon Runyon Tennyson Sussex University Theresa May Sam Cell Moses Saint Kitts Brighton Brigitta Fidora Kirby America Baptiste Waterloo Trinidad Mark
Fiat Chrysler finds new merger partner in Carlos Tavares

FT News

12:59 min | 1 year ago

Fiat Chrysler finds new merger partner in Carlos Tavares

"French carmaker. PSA which owns Pirjo and Fiat Chrysler. Automobiles it's Italian American rival have agreed to pursue a merger that would create the world's fourth largest carmaker and reshape the ultimate of sector. I'm here with a motor industry correspondent Peter Campbell. And we're joined down the line by David Kayhan in Paris to discuss the merger. Hi Guys Peter Tell us first why these super super mergers have been considered at the moment. What's the rationale behind them earn? What's the most notable recent mergers in the sector so call makers of facing stresses from a lot of a different direction at the moment? They're facing falling sales in the facing the need to invest in some quite expensive new technologies electric cars. They need to sell to the C O talks across Europe and China as well as driverless vehicles and other such technologies that looking at now. What are these things cost money? And it makes very little sense for all of the world's carmakers call makers independently to spend the billions and billions that they need to develop this technology. It's much more sensible for them to tie up. A great proponent of this theory was Sergio Marconi the late former chief executive of fit cruiser who oversaw the merger between Fiat and Chrysler itself. WHO said the comic is need to tie up in order to avoid duplication teaching the list massive spending that they have to make? It's just too much cash. They need to splash right. So what are the relative strengths of the Fiat group. Compared to pressure so both companies are incredibly complementary geographically Peugeot exists almost entirely in Europe asam stuff outside Europe. But it's very very strong strong in Europe. Fat Chrysler despite being called fat is in fact predominantly in North America organization. Almost all of its profits. Come from selling pick-up trucks and very large. SUV's in the North North American region. It owns the ram heavy truck brand it ends jeep globally Lens Africa and Maserati and so for these companies they complement each other geographically and and what PSA has shown with its takeover of Opal which owns Fox hole in the last few years is that this is a company that can manage scale in European mass mass manufacturing so it already owns a number of volume brands in Europe. It audience Persian and sit. Trinidad's open phones Vauxhall. You would add to that fat if this merger went ahead head. And they've already showed that they can make these efficiencies of scale work within a single region within Europe which would be an advantage but PSA really although it's had an incredible Rana that's very profitable. Its growth is sort of come to an end really needs to try and push into North America which has plans to do unto its own steam and it really needs a serious premium. AM nameplate a merger with fair crews which is very strong in North America and has offer may a massive rati and jeep brings that I say so David John Elkin. WHO's the one of Italy's Agnelli families? The Italian billionaire behind axle which controls Fiat Chrysler and also the brains behind the proposed merger but his his attempt to do a similar deal with Renault early. This year failed at this plenty of examples of failure here. What happened there? Why did I go wrong? Defensive Him you ask really. FCA In parallel talks with Reynaud and Persia for quite a while but particularly since the start of the year. What people have told us that the whole time? They're in these as talks. They actually wanted runner. That was number one target. But I didn't know that so Iran may the news was given to the profoundly particular and generally that they were going to go over a nice over a good the only problem from. Sei's point of view. Is that across the table from the Reynolds argest shareholder was the French state. You might know that Renos found itself in a particular situation with its Japanese partner Nissan. And what the French state said was at Notre for the merger to go ahead. They wanted the explicit it consent agreement approval of Japan. They walked away. It was like ten days. The whole thing collapsed. It was a drama France. Tickets blamed by some sides if you took the French state on background they say maybe the deal wasn't as good for Renos. It could have been directing normal shareholder but either way John alcon sure. The French date didn't like what it was doing walked away dramatically and that leads us to PSA so would perjures Kosta virus preach batter partner. Do you think it depends. I mean I would cautiously say yes. Tavarez is a big personality big. Co elkhound is buying in is a guy who's not. It's going to take a backseat in any way he's going to be a CEO in charge driving strategy and Alcon will be classic chairman. You'd imagine it's kind of return to demark relationship. He had before maybe it was something. We didn't think he was totally on board. With an part of the reason he went Reynaud but where the project is definitely at nicer fit for FCA. Is that the French state is far less hands on this company. It has a shareholding but in Reynaud you could say that the French state is more like a family company shareholders. Huge emotional ties. It's the largest shareholder as well in Persia. It's a much more traditional shareholder it doesn't lockinge stakes. It's the joints are shareholder shareholder with both the Persian family and China's Dongfang. So you can see why it might be a better partner. Yes so notice. That are lex pages. Describe cried Mr Tavarez's quadri-lingual what kind of big personality is he. What kind of figure does he cut in the car? Industry globally so taveras is renowned and as one of the most capable executives across the automotive industry. If you look at his track record is performance. He came into Persia when they will almost bankrupt. He oversaw sore huge turnaround at the company then bought Opel. This was a company that General Motors couldn't make money out of twenty years. They turned that around in very short order and yet at the same time he doesn't have the gigantic room. Filling ego of some of the other executives in the auto industry would be more akin to traveling head of state when they it went overseas. Savar as who is a cost cutter to the core when he comes to the UK to visit the Vauxhall plant at Luton flies into Luton on EasyJet buys is is sandwiches in the corner shop before getting in a taxi to go over to the plant in his better than eight. Uneasy gentleman with US possibly explanation. But it's also true that he really has a way a of identifying with the ground level workforce as well as the executives and saying guys. You are the team here is up to you to deliver this turnaround plan has to go ahead. And he's been quite good actually particularly in the Opel turnaround of avoiding plant closures. No everybody thought when he bought Opel there we're going to have to shut factories and he said we're going to do this plan without shutting factories and they brought he managed that and what we expect from the FCA deal if it goes ahead. Is that going to make a commitment not to close any of either. I accompanies plants as a result of the turnaround as a result of trying to make savings here and so two Varas is seen. At least at the highest levels of most capable automative executives that gives at the moment and by some people is ranked the best glibly anywhere interesting David. How's he viewed inside of corporate France? If you like with a problem we have a terrorist journalist. This is not enough that stuff to say about him. It's genuine issue now. He's considered in France and piracy to be one of the best. I mean one of the reasons. The French government are supporting. This is because Tabarez is there. He's seen as being a safe pair of hands he sees having done a really great trainer ended Persia and he's seen as someone that they can trust in putting together this merger that's right but he has this cultural index territory. The allows him to associate with work in different countries so when he bought Opel everyone was naturally worried Opel. They were about to get fired but he walks into the headquarters Opel in Germany. All the stuff of April assembled there and his opening lines to the Marin German now he doesn't speak German but he'd learned some opening lines in German and was greeted with a big round of applause but also with the sense in the room that this was a guy who was on their side. It makes a big difference right okay. Personalities a site. Let's let's talk about some of the numbers here. What are the terms of the proposed? David I mean where would the merge creeped based for start. Well that's a very good question when that we don't really know the answer to yet. The idea is multiple As it stands but just very quickly so it's a fifty fifty all stock merger and there's going to be a special dividends and payouts. Either side equalized equalized values but analysts are suggesting that this looks like PSA buying FCA and part of the reason you can say that is the construction of the board Komo correct. He has eleven people five each plus Tavarez so the governance is tilted towards Paris. We will be watching to see where the operation headquarters is really eighty based where Tavarez sits even if I think Peter you might jump in here as well. FCA They're used to bring multiple countries in a way that maybe we'll create tensions. Well this brings us very nicely into the cultures of both companies to. FCA was a company that was borne out of this merger between Fiat and Chrysler and as such as a headquarters in London but but a major office insurance and a major office in Auburn Hills. Chrysler is based and whereas many car companies are deeply rooted in the national culture. These guys genuinely feel we'll multinational and they genuinely feel more global and they've actually culturally made a merger work which historically the consciousness quite difficult to do right. We saw DaimlerChrysler the fall apart we saw Ford Not Really Gel with any of the premium brands. It owned Volvo Janke Arrest Martin etc and at the same time you've got. PSA which also is culturally in quite an international fit because it has a British Brandon Vauxhall at has a German Brandon Opel and again it's made an automotive merger work in recent history and so one of the biggest barriers to auto mergers is cultural and it always is and it's the factions between different rival governments wanting a place at the table and to the fact that you've got to companies that are sort little mood globally cultural and have recently made big complex multi-country images work does bode quite well for these. Two companies being able to culturally fit together. which is a huge hurdle and obviously not a financial one but a key one that really needs to be overcome for any automotive motor to work now to think that assuming this goes through? Do you think there will be cost-cutting. This time we've spoken about how Mr Tavarez avoided this in the past but do we think an ax will fall this time around. They've talked about Oh savings of three point seven billion euros which they go to try and realize eighty percent of those within the first couple of years of the deal going through now. They haven't broken out exactly where that comes from. They've said it's not going to be plant closures if you look at. PSA during open takeover they managed to save a lot of money by shortening labor hours thousand doing various things around the way they utilize space in the factory floor but a big chunk of savings in a big rationale for the deal in the whole is as we said at the start to avoid duplicating investment it costs so it'll be avoid. Investment cost into electrification and avoided investment costs not just intellectuals -cation autonomy but also inter individual platforms so you built a car on. They'll merge those together they'll get huge potential savings and of purchasing components together all kinds of classic industrial merger synergies. I mean David. Is that message sticking in France. I don't think this merger would have been given the green light or been greeted with such political approval as it has been so far if it hadn't been for guarantees. He's about jobs and I think that's true in Italy as well. I don't think they're going to be closing plants. I just don't think it's politically tenable as Peter says for. They're going to be. Finding the savings is in our D adoption. Those kind of things. So if you're a betting man do you think the magic. We'll go ahead and if it is who then are the biggest rivals to the merged group. Rule the move music safaris overwhelmingly positive. The fact the French government seemed to be behaving better than they did last time older. That's not a terribly high bar bodes well for the whole thing going through now. What we're expecting expecting is it? Within the next sort of two three four weeks we'll get a memorandum of understanding between the two companies that will set out potentially more details about synergies potentially more details about management structure and various other things. Maybe even headquarters details then. Obviously the whole thing has to go to show. Does it both companies who have to approve them is quite difficult to to see them derailing that and then obviously it has to go through various other regulatory huddles. They also have to deal with antitrust issues so this will be the largest carmaker in Europe. It could be bigger than Volkswagen that market share in some countries such as constantly will be very high so they may have issues with that but no one seriously thinks that's going to derail l. the deal so assuming everything goes smoothly you could see it close within say nine months potentially two year. There's always a bit of leeway with these things either side and then obviously they will be the fourth largest in the world behind reminisce. And if you're treating those companies is one that's the whole other but also Volkswagen Toyota and on readiness and those three make ten million cars a year. These guys will make eight and a half million calls year that puts them slightly ahead of General Motors. You make about eight but they will be easily within the global top five for well. This is going to keep busy for the next year or so. Thanks Peter an thanks David thank you wolf listening.

FCA Persia Europe Mr Tavarez Fiat Chrysler Opel Peter Campbell David Chrysler France North America General Motors Partner China French Government Vauxhall Paris Italy Fiat Group
The History of Tiki Time

Gastropod

18:01 min | 1 year ago

The History of Tiki Time

"Aw I mean you could be a little bit more cynical and say that don didn't just create this decor out of love it was also to cash in on on something that was very much in the cultural the other thing was that America's well as Europe was in the grips of the great depression everybody's bummed out and they have a little mini vacation in this beautifully appointed fo- Polynesian atmosphere with these amazing exotic cocktails so that's the story signed on the beachcombers atmosphere but what about those cocktails they didn't call it Tiki back then he called them rum rhapsodies there's a little bit pretentiously put an ancient rum in the French style just to make it more classy but here's my question rum is a Caribbean spirit right why not serve Polynesian rhapsodies instead the problem was there's no such thing as a polynesian cocktail I mean he had polynesian decor but what do you serve in the glass in the new Hebrides they did have a polynesian drank native ponies and drink called Kava what they would do they would sit in a circle around a big wooden ball and chew the psychoactive roots of the Kava plant gave you sort of a nice melody sociable high where they chew it spit it into a ball and they'd mix it with coconut milk and then they pass around you and you drank from it this was not the sort of thing that would go over very well in Hollywood and thirty four so no psychoactive saliva base drinks for done but he had another idea he'd also traveled to the Caribbean in those round the world adventures that he'd spent all his college funds John and that's where he had discovered the planners punch in Jamaica and the the dockery and Cuba the Queen's Park swizzle in Trinidad these are all based on rum so don new and he knew rum drinks but rum also had a practical advantage it was the closest spirit available to import Cuba's close by and willing to supply thirsty Americans it accuses right after prohibition and so rob was only spirit that had been readily available in the US while that distillers your non in operation and the term running Shannon must've runs the bar at the Caribbean themed Gladis in Brooklyn and she recently wrote a cocktail book called Tiki earn tropical cocktails and Shannon says that Rome was actually the cheapest to for bar operator costs was really important especially as you're talking about being in the Great Depression so ram fit the bill was expensive in costume much contracts at the whisky which is really expensive because there wasn't the really wasn't any left in this let me take a few years make more whiskey and agent the dawn has rum and he knows some of the basic Caribbean rum drinks but he doesn't just serve those Caribbean drinks he reinvent it's them and it was an entirely new way to serve and mix cocktail he basically took the three hundred year old planters punch poem I'm one of sour to sweet three of strong four of week sour being citrus sweeping sugar strong being rum and week being water ice and he squared or cubed he was like okay I could use lime juice as my sour but what if I mix lime and grapefruit in the same drink and how about instead of just Grizz my sweet what if I mix honey and maple syrup together or infused my sugar Syrup with some spices or pomegranate syrup so he dimensional is D- those two elements and also so what was really radical and brown breaking was that he did the same thing with the strong instead of just one rum he would say okay planners punch generally has dark Jamaican Punch one minute what if I added to that in the same glass a white Puerto Rican or Cuban room which has a more floral dryer kind of file the two rum's enhancing inform each other the Puerto Rican rum cuts the heavy molasses sweetness and density of the Jamaican and the Jamaican adds flavor and depth to the light dry Puerto Rican so anyway this was revolutionary nobody'd ever had drinks like this for nobody's ever made drinks like before that basic idea take a plant as punch and Cuban that's the recipe for what became Don's most famous drink the drink put him on the map the Zombie Don Lake to tell a tale of how he invented the Zombie a businessman came in and was so hung over and he had a sales meeting on made him a couple of these and he walked in like Zombie and nailed it but there's no way as perfect as this cocktail is that donges whipped up behind the bar in two seconds there was a lot of you know coaxing in finessing with these rooms and the dawn's makes in the Porno and the bidders but yet that's the legend that don created for it but yeah it was strong it was popular and there was a limit of two in the bar you can have more than two but even with the limit that didn't up the crowds from storming as place they were lines out the door it was a real see and be seen everyone that went into don the beachcomber was a WHO's who of Hollywood Howard Hughes in Grant Joan Crawford Clark Gable Don's little bar was a huge success so almost immediately there were copycats people started putting up their own version of a Polynesian Paradise all over la remember Americans were already obsessed with the South Seas but the whole vibe struck a particular chord in California first of all Californians of course really embrace surfing in this period which is a Hawaiian Sport and you know there's also a kind of a belief in a sort of shared attitude and aesthetic sensibility right so Californians very much the themselves as you know more modern and more relaxed than the rest of the United States are certainly more so than the kind of Stodgy East Coast Sara Miller Davenport is a historian at the University of Sheffield and she just wrote a book called a Gateway State Hawaii and the cultural transformation of American Empire Californians just vibe at aloha spirit so within a couple of years they were copycat bars all across the state most of them are just knockoffs and nothing to write home about but Jeff Ameri told us one of those copycat bars was really the equal of done the beachcombers the only restaurant tour who went Tiki or went four Polynesian in the nineteen thirties who could rival Don's palette and his skill was a guy named Victor Berge on He was the French Canadian son of a waiter in Oakland and he was in San Francisco he had his own little place there called Hinky Dink's was famous for a Frankenstein you get frank and a Stein for ten cents and he thinks was basically just a little barbecue shack with a Alaskan I rapper theme you know snow shoes and taxidermy on the walls in nineteen thirty seven he took a vacation to Hollywood and discovered on the beachcombers and like everybody else he he waited on line for ninety minutes to get into the bar he saw the popularity of what was happening at Don the beachcomber and try to recreate that up in his place and he turns and hangings into Trey Vicks and he turned himself from Victor Berge Ron into trader Vic Bergeron chair Vic as he was now known he was super savvy any seems to have had a great pallet everyone else was just copying done but trader vic actually used new spirits and juices and invented his own drinks and the food in his restaurants was revolutionary for mid-century. US I mean he introduced on elements of east Indian Malaysian Jap in these and other cuisines on his menu which was unheard of at the time like Donna beachcombers and all these other taking place just serve basic cantonese Chinese food is cheap the Chinese cook and then that would be that but vic pioneered what he called international cuisine and it he did it very very well to the point where he had white tableclo- fine dining restaurants multicourse meals of his own invention vic was also something of a showman he had a wooden leg from from his childhood illness but he would invite people to stick a fork in it and then he would tell them that he lost it to a shark on the high-seas but don the beachcomber and trader vic or soon franchising around the country you WanNa Polynesian themed night out on the Down in Chicago complete with dancing ladies and tropical drinks and an expensive dinner you got it that could've gotten old but then World War Two happens and things get even worse and more and more people flocked picky bars and then Gi's come back from the actual South Pacific with a renewed interest and all that and in the nineteen fifties everything combines you have a booming postwar many facturing economy you have all these vets coming back writing and making movies about their experiences and Tiki just goes into overdrive and it's perfectly suited for the Eisenhower era suburban culture as well which is kind of stifling and moralistic but you can make a little escape into the Pagan South seas in your local Tiki Bar International level was still a little too expensive for regular people in the nineteen fifties but increasingly a middle class couple could treat themselves to a nice night out and get away from it all that way the musical South Pacific came out in nineteen forty nine does this mean I finally finally get to play a little bit of something that booth you Nikki and my partner Tim like to make fun of me about what might deep and abiding love of musical theatre dear God there's no stopping you is there nope Pacific here we come some and Charlie the you may see a stranger thanks for indulging me going to let you make a habit of it okay see anyway the point is Tiki just kept getting more and more popular things continue to grow a pace in the nineteen sixties when you see really the height of Fo- Polynesian Restaurant Chic nece sort of Tiki chic but these were not low end beach bars or Jimmy Buffet Style replaces most of them like trader Vic's on the beachcomber and Stephen Crane's kon-tiki chain were high end luxury restaurants and they were event dining in people would save up and go out on a Friday night in their best clothes to these places even Disney got in on the tiki craze with its very own enchanted tiki room it opened in eighteen sixty three and drilled it soundtrack into the brains of America and even in the nineteen sixties international travel was still expensive and so Sarah says are white middle class Americans these tiki bars and restaurants allowed them to feel cosmopolitan going to Tiki bars right becomes in order these Polynesian restaurants becomes a way to sort of from any white people right to express your kind of embrace of foreign cultures in this moment and speaking of embrace Tiki bars and this whole American love affair with Bo Polynesian everything by the nineteen sixties it's not just about being open minded did it's about being sexy which is a period where more broadly a loosening of some of these sexual norms and I think there's something very appealing to women or at least in the way that these various cookbooks and magazines portray it for women kind of cross these racial boundaries right to kind of play act as a kind of Polynesian princess white middle class women went to Tiki bars and held back yard luos and dressed in moves and eight that FO- Polynesian Pan Asian cuisine the way it's described as often as a way of the Luau is a chance to kind of loosen up it's a chance to play act as as a Polynesian woman right and of course the stereotype of Polynesian women is there you know much more overtly sexual than white

DON Three Hundred Year Ninety Minutes Two Seconds One Minute Milk
Gold Medal, One Hundred Percent And Four Years discussed on Red Sox Baseball

Red Sox Baseball

07:29 min | 1 year ago

Gold Medal, One Hundred Percent And Four Years discussed on Red Sox Baseball

"Yeah we we open up the so today what with the death of the great part L. sweet pea Whitaker and a few old enough to remember watching him fight he won an Olympic gold medal in nineteen eighty four and is just you talk about a master box you're kind of a lost art these days Floyd Mayweather is one James lights out Tony was another Bernard Hopkins you know technicians master boxers old school difficult to hit slip in countering they're just not around these days anymore again James Toney Bernard Hopkins Floyd Mayweather sweet pea well at Willie pep back in the day was the master at avoiding hitting and not getting hit slipping moving using his feet what part what occurred without question is one of the all time greats especially at light weight and then you know he moved all the way up to the welterweight and in between the one the junior welterweight championship so we have four different built yet lightweight junior welterweight through a super well but he was a really good and dominant welterweight as well you just couldn't hit him I mean what what what a headache he was the funny thing was you know if what does a lot of running in moving and slipping into an escaping in there Patel didn't run dell stood right funny Apryl came forward you just couldn't get the guy he was the master at parrying punches with his hand set at M. moving his head and slip into making a mess and then countering and pop and he wasn't a big hitter but he just pops out you he'd let let as they say he he he would he would girl slap you to death for twelve rounds thank thank thank not a great knockout punch but it's stinky jab counter counter right right hook and get out of there and he was at again parrying moving the head and he had that patented move that that I've never seen anybody else do before since he's squat he he he search user look like he was get not guaranteed squat down like a catcher and sit there and squat I got to be put cinema over the top of his head and they be so frustrated they couldn't hit him then of course the pop up and then at a pop up in the land the combination on his opponent he was the master and also the victim of two of the worst decisions I've ever seen in my life number one and people forget about this one with nineteen eighty eight he fought for the lightweight title for the first time against Jose Luis Ramirez member he was a pretty good fight around Mexico and a world champion and no one conservatively ten rounds out of twelve yeah I mean it might have been a shutout that's how dominant he was again for mers and then the score cards come back and it was just what this is a win for Ramirez I think it was in Montecarlo in Europe it was obviously a corrupt up above bought off decision and what what we it was a shame the way he got screwed there so when you say he's forty four and one now he doesn't have you give an extra when they're not now is forty one in four that was a scandalously what I mean that what excuse me now is forty forty one three in one now let's go to nineteen ninety three her nose match against Julio Cesar Chavez who is eighty seven and at the time undefeated considered maybe the greatest fighter of all time certainly the greatest fighter ever to come out of Mexico and a fight at the Alamodome in San Antonio and this was an absolute masterpiece member this fight this was a shot out I had a twelve rounds the nothing for sweet pea that night it was it was the ball on the matter or Thomas never hit him move popped left right pup Perry slip moved ahead crouched down they can miss turn him it was masterful again minimum if I'm being really kind and nice and bent over backwards you give Chavez maybe two rounds and the judges scored it a draw eight a scandalously bad decision corrupt again a hometown decision I know I know well tablets are from Mexico but you know when you're fighting in San Antonio it's going to be almost a one hundred percent crowd of of Hispanic fans Mexican Americans they're all cheering for for a job as an and obviously a sweep he was gonna have a tough time getting a decision there that that was a scandalously bad this doesn't mean he got screwed over and robbed about as much as anybody then I was there a nineteen ninety seven when Pearl Whitaker what's the welterweight champion of the world four years later and he defended against Oscar de la Hoya and again you know sometimes Patel was its own worst enemy not putting enough too much defense but but Oscar never hit I had a one fifteen one thirteen for pearl what occurred that night seven rounds to five I thought clearly no was the winner yeah but you know Vegas being what it is Oscar being who we is the power generated by Bob arum and Oscar and you know Austin was the golden boy in the meal ticket and the guy with the future propels get a little bit older I think he was in his thirties at that point Oscar winds up getting the decision now that wasn't a a whole rent if this is an **** was Jose Luis Ramirez or Chavez but that's another one where I thought Whitaker sort of had hand rates now he lost clearly a few years later when he when he was old and shot he lost clearly a few years later to Felix Trinidad by unanimous decision the colors were okay as a in his last fight he broke his clavicle against not medically you know he he was a shell of himself so those of in my opinion those are the only two losses you ever have so he wasn't forty four and forty wins four losses and one draw in my book he's forty three into because that loss was a win and a loss to warm Oscar was a win and a draw was a win so in this respect and by the way my opinion is the only one that matters of course know what occurs forty three into and I say Floyd may weather is not fifty at all Floyd Mayweather's forty nine and one now what days with what he's saying that for well he's not because he lost one sixteen one twelve on my scorecard Jose Luis Castillo in two thousand two in their first fight he clearly lost that fight okay steel got rocked so yeah Floyd forty nine and one is not fifty you know because he didn't win that night but back to print out forty three into at the only losses to his last memory broke his clavicle into traded it to me he won every single fight he ever had outside of that elegant master box of his style wasn't for everybody much like Floyd may weather I mean did deal like guys who make you miss and play defense and slip and Perry and counter and our absolute master box is not at all a lot of people prefer guys to come forward and take a couple to give one action fighters and I get it I like those guys to but that's why we love boxing not everybody's the same I like the action fighters I love the great boxers to I love I love watching Mohammed Ali and the sugar ray Leonard Floyd Mayweather into and Burnell and sweet pea that's where the master boxers you know hit and don't get hit there's room for all of them in boxing and pearl Whitaker for my money is the best pure boxer of my lifetime

Gold Medal One Hundred Percent Four Years
News in Brief 11 June 2019

UN News

03:06 min | 1 year ago

News in Brief 11 June 2019

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations in New York Security Council members issued a statement on Monday offering their full support to the UN special envoy for Yemen Martin Griffiths, after he was reportedly criticized by the government of the war ravaged country. A fragile ceasefire has largely held in and around the keyboard city of data since the signing of the Stockholm agreement last December the accord is seen as a first move to brokering a lasting peace between opposition who teas and the Saudi led international coalition backing the government in these Security Council statement members gave their unequivocal backing to Mr. Griffiths and called on the parties to engage constructively and continuously with these special envoy in a related development, the UN political and peace building affairs chief, Rosemary, dicarlo, met Yemeni President at rob Amancio Hattie in the Saudi capital Riyadh. They discussed the work of the Yemen envoy, and the way forward for advancing the fridge. Al ceasefire accord, and for returning to dialogue to reach a political solution to the white a conflict, according to a statement attributed to miss dicarlo the discussions were described as productive and miss dicarlo thanked president had for his government's commitment to full implementation of the Stockholm agreement fundamental change to the world of working polluting and e you wide minimum wage is needed to address the growing gap between society's haves and have nots French president Emmanuel Macron said on Tuesday in a speech at the international labor organization's Santini conference in Geneva. mR Macron insisted that the accumulation of wealth in the hands of the few from globalization had created a law of the jungle. This had opened the door to damaging, nationalism, xenophobia and disillusionment with democracy. He said also at the Isla conference. German Chancellor Angela Merkel called on Member Sates to step up the fight against child labor of the one hundred fifty two million children forced to work globally. Some seventy three. Million were involved in hazardous activities. She said in support of Ireland's initiative to end the scourge globally by twenty twenty five and finally a landmark ruling by Botswana's high court that scraps laws against same sex relationships has been welcomed by you and human rights, top official, Michelle Basch, let in a statement on Tuesday, the U N, High Commissioner underlined that the high court had unanimously found sections of the penal code to be unconstitutional, and a violation of human rights such discrimination has impacts that go far beyond arrest and detention miss Bachelet said, noting that the criminalization of lesbian gay bisexual and transgender people could lead to them being denied health care, education, employment and housing, but swan as decision follows similar action in nine other countries in the past five years, including Angola, Belise India, and Trinidad and Tobago in Kenya last month. However, a similar constitutional challenge to overturn laws that discriminate against the. Lgbtq community was unsuccessful Daniel Johnson, UN news.

UN Emmanuel Macron Martin Griffiths Dicarlo Yemen President Trump Stockholm Rob Amancio Hattie Security Council Riyadh United Nations Trinidad Daniel Johnson Angela Merkel New York Security Council Rosemary Botswana
In Cuba, climate change means harsher hurricanes and tough coffee growing

Climate Cast

04:40 min | 2 years ago

In Cuba, climate change means harsher hurricanes and tough coffee growing

"Support for climate cast comes from Bank of America as one of the largest global financial institutions Bank of America is in a unique position to help society. Transition to a low-carbon economy Bank of America NA member FDIC. Climate change, Cuba and your morning coffee. I'm MPR chief meteorologist, Paul Hutton here. This is climate gas. Climate change impacts are showing up worldwide. Our neighbors in Cuba, sit just ninety miles south of Key West Florida last week, I visited this beautiful island for the first time and I shared coffee with famed Cuban meteorologist Jose, ruby era. I learned about Cuba climate change and surprisingly Cuban coffee. That is we yes, please have some coffee Jose. I'll never be a PHD. I'm the former director of the national forecast center east for majority. That's the natural west have is the set time for many years. Also, I've been presenting weather in Cuban radio and television host say Grazia mature goose still. It was a pleasure to talk with you today here in Havana at the hotel Nacional when we talk about climate change in Cuba. What are the biggest impacts that Cuba is seen from climate change so far? Well, the because he banked is the raising up to she lever. Now, does he live house reason ferry vice Timmel's in the last thirty years thing pictures have risen also sealed point nine Chechen degree about one degree treasures on the Lincoln shown are the coastlines that long Cuban coastline is extremely vulnerable. To storm surge. Hurricane irma's. Search pushed several feet of water into the streets of Havana. Dr ruby era is one of the world's premier experts on hurricanes. Any told me his big concern is the growing link between warmer, oceans and more rapidly. Intensifying hurricanes part of his job on Cuban TV raising Cuba's climate change. I q what's the awareness level of climate change in Cuba with the people? Well, this White House not only in Asia climate change, everything that has to be with winning. Diamond because we in Daly broadcast for television radio. We also teach believed by little people. I wish awareness and knowledge. Even as we traveled outside of Havana climate remained, the topic of conversation. I'm just north of Trinidad in Cuba at topa, date tapes. It's a mountainous area where they grow coffee and our tour guide nasc- is telling us about how climate change is affecting coffee production in Cuba. Well, what is happening is that it's raining when it's not supposed to be the rainy season or the stood ri- when it's not supposed to be the dry season. And just to give you an example, the coffee plants they used to bloom like three times in a year. And then at the end they had a really good crop. Yeah. But now, they are blooming only one or twice the farmers are lucky, you know, because if it rains when the plants are having their flowers, the flowers hall, and then at the end, there are no beans, and that is happening, you know, with the coffee plantations so many years ago, the farmers they could use the same plant life for twenty twenty five years now that is not happening anymore. So now the maximum time, they they leave their plans at the patience is like ten years talking with Cubans like, our guide nasc-, I sense a high level of. Climate change awareness in Cuba. There's also something I learned back at lunch in Havana. I heard how Cuban's see Dr ruby era as their weather God hosts say was traveling in two thousand seventeen as hurricane Irma approached listen to restaurant owner, ROY describe how Cuban's missed Jose's weather reports on TV. I think it was a guy TV the first today's guy we had to be alert. Okay. Off on the one eighty we have through research. We have to know what's going on by the way. That's climate cast. I'm NPR chief meteorologist Paul Hefner.

Cuba Havana Chief Meteorologist Bank Of America Hurricane Irma Dr Ruby Cuban MPR Fdic Jose Paul Hutton Key West Florida Flowers Hall Hotel Nacional Timmel Nasc Director RI
"trinidad" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"trinidad" Discussed on KCRW

"KCRW gambles in for Garth. Trinidad? Up next music from low parks KCRW KCRW sponsors, include joy mode, lending Angelinos, the products they need for the experiences. They want from camping virtual reality and backyard movie night joy mode, lens out thousands of products every week more enjoy mode dot com slash KCRW. Support comes from the Petersen automotive museum. Discover what more than three hundred thousand visitors have called the best display of Porsche in the United States the Porsche effect. At the Petersen automotive museum tells the complete seventy years story of the Porsche brand with more than twenty of the rarest cars ranging from the nine five nine supercar to the Steve McQueen speedster. Tickets are limited reserve today by visiting Peterson tickets dot org. The US ordered troops out of Syria. But secretary of state Mike Pompeo insists the Trump administration is not backing off. You report that America is withdrawing from the world would in fact, just the opposite has taken place we stare and things that don't work anymore, and we demand that they begin to work. How is the US approaching Syria and the drive for a second summit with North Korea's leader on the next morning edition from NPR news. That's weekdays on morning edition right here on KCRW. Oh. Coca Cola is you?.

KCRW Petersen automotive museum Porsche United States Syria Coca Cola Mike Pompeo Steve McQueen Trinidad Garth Angelinos Peterson North Korea America NPR seventy years
"trinidad" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"trinidad" Discussed on KGO 810

"Trinidad and Tobago? Jamaica. Apparently we're way off though 'cause we said twenty nine national under fifteen South Africans. Apparently are also how many people are Muslim in your country South Africans were the most prone to overestimating the number of Muslims. The they believed to be living in their country, South Africans, guess that. It was twenty six hundred hundred it's actually too. It's always so disappointing to see how wrong we are about just about everything. How many how much people are having sex? How many Muslims are in your country. How much your country is using renewable energy? By the way. How many how many of the past eighteen years have been the hottest on record since nineteen sixty one out of the last eighteen years. How many been the hottest on record since nineteen sixty one? Every country got this one wrong and underestimated. You're gonna guess on average. According to this survey nine out of the last eighteen years where the hottest on record. Guess what? Seventeen eighteen. Seventeen or eighteen have been on record since nineteen sixty one. That is that is miserable. This explains just about everything. About why we elect who we elect our approach to politics because we are. Sure were right. And yet we are wrong. We are. It's just it's unbelievable to me. How that continues. To be the case. All right..

Jamaica Trinidad Tobago eighteen years
"trinidad" Discussed on AM Joy

AM Joy

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"trinidad" Discussed on AM Joy

"That imagination it's giving flesh and a reality through it and they're showing up the showing out in trinidad and tobago there was an african beauty pageant that was associated with the premiere of the film drummers african dancers either people who have been disconnected from a long strong history and they're getting a chance to recreate that and have this sense of granger and royalty associated with something and they're just loving it yeah i and you know one of them will give you any split us still four puts poor four people who have not seen the film lombok is important care can the film he sort of the anti technology in the mail so traditionalist the traditionalist and you know he's different from the comic they changed the title they gave them and make a lot more dignity there are a lot more humor responsibility now the leader of his entire tribe he has the welfare of an entire people on the shoulders and it's really given the character a lot more then just as ego to depend on you italy moniz ism absolutely we'll talk a little bit about infinity wars and when we we know this is very setting up the next big marvel franchise how excited are you about that give us a little taste of what i am incredibly excited and stoked so marvel has a really great way of building worlds and getting their friends to be really invested because we get to know them we get to know these people we get to know what kanda and it's really established a new landscape mu sound scape all these new wonderful things for us to just really dig into so now that you are invested in your attached and you have narratives to hold onto they're going to challenge all that with fenosa who's just very strong and imposing and you don't know what he's going to do a lot of fun well when you are very rightly being hot wanted me breakout stars from the film you're incredible graduations i mean just huge man thank you for being thank you so much thank you all right take care more aim to activate.

trinidad
"trinidad" Discussed on The Kitchen Sisters Present

The Kitchen Sisters Present

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"trinidad" Discussed on The Kitchen Sisters Present

"All these navies from trinidad came in and play in the music from thick fog oildrum a lot of puffed sleeves law the old clothes yudo like from trinidad to see that many people in trinidad up in sparks nevada was because we do not have a very eight people that color that skin this area people just two were just overwhelmed by their by their music ooh steel pan was born on the island of trinidad in the late 1930s it began as an outlaw instrument in hammered from milk tins and biscuit boxes brake drums and garbage cans and later who the oil barrels that were scattered across the island after world war two pan began as the music of the island's poor before trinidad's independence from britain as the oil drums evolved dozens of pan bans some more than a hundred members strong sprang up in the neighbourhoods across the island in nineteen sixty seven the s o trinidad tripoli steal band was sent by the government and the s o oil company to represent trinidad at the montreal expos world's fair today the kitchen sister's present a lost and found sound story liberace and the trinidad tripoli steel band it was sixty seven zero ours 14 of with their with my parents one day was walking three me on terry over villian iran pavilion dissaray there was a luminous cloud metallic with mick mirror and i followed the sound through the pavilions until i got to this rebelcontrolled overlooking our body of water because the whole fear was on islands st lawrence river and across they're in a big open deck his band was playing guys beating on cans big like garbage cans i never heard anything like it who could resist.

trinidad world war britain oil company terry nevada montreal liberace trinidad tripoli iran pavilion st lawrence river one day milk