35 Burst results for "Tribeca"

Pier 26 at Hudson River Park Transformed into Ecological "Tide Deck", New York

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:27 sec | Last month

Pier 26 at Hudson River Park Transformed into Ecological "Tide Deck", New York

"A new addition to the Hudson River Park opens today. Pier 26 in Tribeca is the first new peer in the park in 10 Years. $37 million project includes 2.5 acres of park with unique features, including a first of its kind of tied deck to represent a rocky title marsh for educational and ecological programming. There's also a lawn and sports court.

Hudson River Park Tribeca
"tribeca" Discussed on Here's The Thing

Here's The Thing

04:07 min | 2 months ago

"tribeca" Discussed on Here's The Thing

"Artist you great. You in that way, like the films are doing you and then one day you start doing them and you really have the control what is your artistic sensibility as painting books for such a richness? Well, where does that come from I? Think when I was when I was very young, I was I just found the newspaper clippings of this. In my mother's house. For many years I thought, there were only three photograph of my childhood. and My mother God bless her who is never communicative I said I said Save the. Vampire drinking a lot of my sister because I have only before my mother goes I know we have a couple of boxes in the back. I'm fifty four. I. Never told me that. So I go and to sell them, make some money and. Get that I find this moment this newspaper, my father won the lottery. In, nineteen sixty nine. And he wants six million dollars. What Nine hundred, sixty, nine. One now, maybe my father do. Think about it for a minute. He raised those really it was very strict about the way raises he said, you wonder work. But he won, and so he bought a big house and. Things that he wanted and what he bought because somebody advised him to buy a library because gentleman has a library. What a library and I read it. And from then on I, never I mean he had an encyclopedia human health. And Encyclopedia of Literature Forgets on Encyclopedia. Of the of Fine Arts. So I learned at the same time I was learning about bigeye money money the ball as I was learning about Jack Qb or Bernie Wrightson or Stanley, or it was the same formative years. So me and I was reading. Of numerously, I would read but a lot of a lot of people that are led to that border but they don't drink. You admit that you it's an innate thing you. You're. So it is ideally this I didn't get this is by being measured. I you're. Passionate I'm insatiable images. I Love Them. I go through museums and I think you learn from architecture. You don't learn film from film you learned. From that you learn. From the other arts from life you know I think traveling. Learning, you'll learn composition in bathing. And, then applies to film except this chain you know and you learn. How stage on Your films to me are people would say to me, I said I'd you take this to my my wife? My wife is not a big moviegoer and she would say to me, what is what is it about films that you love and I said You know like like the Godfather Pickings cliche example I said in terms of the composition, the lighting, the set design, the cost of the music I says the thing is. A Work of art as close to a work of art and cinema. As we're ever GONNA have in history mean the godfather is a work of art from the first frame to the last. Films are the same. You remind me of couple. Either rich does inside the Fryer, told me a thing when we first met many we met the first time in nine, hundred, Ninety, eight or nine, thousand nine. US said something to me that I still use. You said to me you were about mimic of all things. You we're getting dressed and you sat by the the in the bed with once again on one song in your hair, and because mimic was on TV and you said that's a great image and you started loving the images I think. All. I was this afternoon with a friend. Of the painter novel we were talking the best..

Bernie Wrightson Fryer Encyclopedia of Literature Fine Arts Jack Qb Stanley
"tribeca" Discussed on Here's The Thing

Here's The Thing

04:36 min | 2 months ago

"tribeca" Discussed on Here's The Thing

"Listener supported W NYC studios. This is Alec Baldwin and you're listening to here's the thing. The trump BECCA film festival is one of my favorite events of the year. It's an opportunity to watch movies and to hear from some of the finest directors and actors in the business discussing their work. The festival has just launched a new podcast tribeca talks, which will allow all of us to listen to the conversations that happen each year at Tribeca. Last year I was lucky enough to sit down with director Guillermo del Toro, and I'm pleased to present that conversation to my here's the thing audience. Take a listen to tribeca film festival's new PODCAST TRIBECA talks. This is TRIBECA talks. Fever. Conversations recorded live at the TRIBECA Film Festival. I'M LIZ BE. Academy Award Winning Director Guillermo Del Toro Sat Down with claimed actor Alec Baldwin as part of our twenty. Nineteen director series. Here's tribeca CEO and Co founder Jane. Rosenthal with the introduction. Honor, tonight to introduce to you to amazing cinna files who are both masters at their craft Gamma del Toro. As you know and many of you are fans of his work from Crimson Peak Pacific Rim.

Guillermo del Toro TRIBECA Alec Baldwin Gamma del Toro director Crimson Peak Pacific Rim BECCA Rosenthal Fever CEO Co founder
They Call Us Lucky Grandma

They Call Us Bruce

04:25 min | 3 months ago

They Call Us Lucky Grandma

"Fill. Today. Okay. So we have here representatives from a new feature film. That's. Coming soon, it is called Lucky Grandma. In Studio, we have a call writer, Angela Chang Hello, we have writer director Stacy, Sealy High, and we have the star, the legendary, the iconic iconic, the amazing side. Jim. Boy, what else can we say this having you guys here isn't just feeding because you're one of the showcase films in the La. Phil. Vessel Right but also because. We thought it was a real great opportunity to talk both about come to the past and the present in some ways of Asian Americans and film with someone who seen all of that. And that'll beats I, of course. And also talk about this film because it's kind of a unique showcase. In many ways, the role that really puts in the center of the screen that we've all been waiting for a lot of ways I. mean you know? The Joy luck club, you know as Auntie, Lynda, OB, incomparable until. You've always had a particularly unique presence and I feel. We want to see more of it and this show. This movie really does give us everything that we're looking for so. Tells more about the film So lucky Gramma is the story of. A little bit grumpy superstitious. chain-smoking ordinary Chinese grandma plagued by side Chen. She. Gets, her fortune told and. Takes a chance at the casino ends up on the wrong side of luck. I. Would say a little bit of trouble. So it's a dark comedy and we hope it's a lot of fun So I've been actually following the. Production of this little while I know that you won a the screenplay won an award at Tribeca that right? Yeah. We got this grant from. Home Institute in at and T. as called untold stories, and it was really a godsend because I'm sure you guys can imagine. that. Making a movie with an eight year old grandma in mostly in Chinese was a little bit of. In Hollywood, so It was really a little bit of a minor miracle. This movie I mean talk. About, untold. Stories I think This is sort of this is taking the the camera and the Lens focusing on something we never seen before. You know we'd never usually. Our hero in this is somebody who never gets shine but you know you go to Chinatown grandmas are everywhere and. This is very cool. Unique Story. I I'm wondering what? What was the seed of the like? What inspired you to focus this on this story? You know? Yeah. Well, I mean, I had taken these buses. They have these buses that we from Chinatown. In New York to all the nearby casinos and tristate area near they advertise in the Chinese newspaper. There's like billboards in Chinatown, all the casinos. To Gamble to. And so I had taken a few these buses and seen the full of old Chinese people and so. One day I sort of had this image of the bus scene. That's the beginning the movie with one of the GRANDMAS having this bag of money following in her lap. And those sort of really the seat of the idea and I called Angela and recruited her. Yeah, and then say see pitched the premise to me and we immediately started talking about will whose main character say she had this idea that it was the main character was one hundred percent of an elderly Chinese woman. And as we started building the character, it just reminded me so much of my own grandmother and. I think for reminded her so much of her own mom. Kind of ornery free spirit or like independently. Spirited woman who is. Just very fierce and unapologetic. And we just built it from there I

Angela Chang Writer Joy Luck Club Sealy High LA Stacy Phil JIM Chen Lynda Hollywood Home Institute Director New York
They Call Us Lucky Grandma

They Call Us Bruce

04:25 min | 3 months ago

They Call Us Lucky Grandma

"Today. Okay. So we have here representatives from a new feature film. That's. Coming soon, it is called Lucky Grandma. In Studio, we have a call writer, Angela Chang Hello, we have writer director Stacy, Sealy High, and we have the star, the legendary, the iconic iconic, the amazing side. Jim. Boy, what else can we say this having you guys here isn't just feeding because you're one of the showcase films in the La. Phil. Vessel Right but also because. We thought it was a real great opportunity to talk both about come to the past and the present in some ways of Asian Americans and film with someone who seen all of that. And that'll beats I, of course. And also talk about this film because it's kind of a unique showcase. In many ways, the role that really puts in the center of the screen that we've all been waiting for a lot of ways I. mean you know? The Joy luck club, you know as Auntie, Lynda, OB, incomparable until. You've always had a particularly unique presence and I feel. We want to see more of it and this show. This movie really does give us everything that we're looking for so. Tells more about the film So lucky Gramma is the story of. A little bit grumpy superstitious. chain-smoking ordinary Chinese grandma plagued by side Chen. She. Gets, her fortune told and. Takes a chance at the casino ends up on the wrong side of luck. I. Would say a little bit of trouble. So it's a dark comedy and we hope it's a lot of fun So I've been actually following the. Production of this little while I know that you won a the screenplay won an award at Tribeca that right? Yeah. We got this grant from. Home Institute in at and T. as called untold stories, and it was really a godsend because I'm sure you guys can imagine. that. Making a movie with an eight year old grandma in mostly in Chinese was a little bit of. In Hollywood, so It was really a little bit of a minor miracle. This movie I mean talk. About, untold. Stories I think This is sort of this is taking the the camera and the Lens focusing on something we never seen before. You know we'd never usually. Our hero in this is somebody who never gets shine but you know you go to Chinatown grandmas are everywhere and. This is very cool. Unique Story. I I'm wondering what? What was the seed of the like? What inspired you to focus this on this story? You know? Yeah. Well, I mean, I had taken these buses. They have these buses that we from Chinatown. In New York to all the nearby casinos and tristate area near they advertise in the Chinese newspaper. There's like billboards in Chinatown, all the casinos. To Gamble to. And so I had taken a few these buses and seen the full of old Chinese people and so. One day I sort of had this image of the bus scene. That's the beginning the movie with one of the GRANDMAS having this bag of money following in her lap. And those sort of really the seat of the idea and I called Angela and recruited her. Yeah, and then say see pitched the premise to me and we immediately started talking about will whose main character say she had this idea that it was the main character was one hundred percent of an elderly Chinese woman. And as we started building the character, it just reminded me so much of my own grandmother and. I think for reminded her so much of her own mom. Kind of ornery free spirit or like independently. Spirited woman who is. Just very fierce and unapologetic. And we just built it from there

Angela Chang Writer Joy Luck Club Sealy High JIM LA Stacy Phil Chen Lynda Hollywood Home Institute Director New York
Next generation drive-in theaters are here!

Talking Tech

02:14 min | 3 months ago

Next generation drive-in theaters are here!

"TRIBECA. A company founded by actor Robert Deniro and his producing partner Jane Rosenthal. They are staging a summer July drive in festival, offering new films like Palm Springs, classics like back to the future, and Jerry Maguire and stand up comedy on the big screen. And then the fall Tribeca is bringing NFL game so the drive in as well. Now my screening of Palm Springs started at five PM at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena California. When I asked if that wasn't perhaps a Typo as you need dark skies to be able to project the film under the big screen, I was given a firm. No, we use LCD screens which are viewable from the cars I was told LCD like the TV's. We buy and put in our living rooms now to listen to the audio. They don't put a speaker on your car door like they used to, but instead they. They ask you to tune into a specific portion of the FM radio dial or use a Wifi signal to hear it on your phone. Food came from gourmet food trucks part of the rose. Bowl, which had several screens going at once now it's funny, because just a few years ago, drive ins were absolutely dead, only used for flea markets, and the like on Sundays and occasionally in very rural markets. They might shows movies. So I love their back, and I hope they make it. However I parked too close to the screen and could only see seventy percent of it unless I yanked my car chair back all the way. And the LCD looked bad as good as a TV does in a really bright room in other words, not so hot. The audio was great, but I had to keep the car running for two hours in order to play the FM that and it was a hot night so I need the air conditioning on as well and yes I burn through a bunch of gas, but you know I was glad to get out and I know now to park way in the back next time and to go to a later show when it's dark and most importantly to fill up on gas before arrive. TRIBECA is not the only company working on reviving the drive in there are several others around the country. Be sure to try it out and support them because who knows how long it's going to be before we can go out to the movies again.

Tribeca. Palm Springs Tribeca Robert Deniro Jane Rosenthal Jerry Maguire Partner Pasadena NFL California
Drive-in movie theaters are making a comeback

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

00:24 sec | 4 months ago

Drive-in movie theaters are making a comeback

"Drive in movie theaters are making a comeback amid the pandemic, and the format is about to get a huge boost, courtesy in the nation's biggest a discount chain. Wal Mart the other day announced a partnership with TriBeCa Enterprises to convert 160 store locations around the country and to makeshift drive in theaters. The screenings planned for August through October will allow viewers to have a socially distance big screen experience amid the

Wal Mart Tribeca Enterprises
"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

07:28 min | 4 months ago

"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

"This is Batman says Kevin Anderson. This is John Delancey, and you are very lucky to be listening to sci-fi Talk. This is Terry Good Kind Number One New York Times bestselling author of the sort of truth, Jerry's Joseph Lachey former executive producer and writer on strike eight St one strike Atlantis stargate universe presently writer on dark matter. This is David Franklin Lieutenant Sorry Canton Bracken from fast skype. I'm Robert. J Sir. You go award winning author of Flash Forward WWW wake i. this is Jamie Bamberg. Hey, this is Katie. Sack off I am Tomo Panikin I? Play Hilo on the hit television series. Battle Star GALACTICA. And you're listening to. Fi Talk. Seen One apple take to. Your. Doctor on enterprise. You're listening to the wonderful five nine. I heartily endorse your attendances listener ever thank you. Hi, this is Tony Tomato and welcome the Saifi talk as we preview a new film Jack Rabbit that recently premiered at the TRIBECA. Film Festival here's the official description of kind of giving idea what this film is about following a worldwide event known as the reset. Humanity rebuilds society with aging mechanics where gleaming technology once stood surveillance now the status quo society is slowly putting shattered pieces back together, but under a watchful eye. After a friend suicide leaves behind a mysterious computer drive, a young computer prodigy, and also shadowy hacker joined together decipher the clues that he left behind. The youthful creators of Jack Rabbit have actually constructed a world which we haven't seen previously on film. Mixing Retro Production Design with Slick storytelling, they deliver cinematic distance that will soon result in a shock to the senses, a jigsaw puzzle of film that flaunts its Lo fi aesthetic proudly jack rabid introduces a fresh new voice to the science fiction landscape Carlton Rennie's director to`real debut cleverly tweets at sci fi premise to offer an ambitious glimpse into the future. I spoke to the cast and the director on the red carpet. At tribeca film, Festival, and here is the film's director the affirmation Carlton Rainy this. What I think would hooks me right away. Is it is? It's really more of a WHO done it. mystery as much as with technology. And and I. Guess The question is what's on the dry? Wall. What's on the drive is a series of video clips that have been left behind by our two main characters Dead Friends. And you know they investigate these video clips? and come to discover that might lead to some answers about. What's outside? This sort of controlled is still being old and just answers about the world they live in. I mean it's actually very grim future. Yeah, exactly well. Yeah, the the film takes place. After this. Catastrophic event known as the reset were basically all the technological infrastructure just was wiped out so everyone has gone back to old analog technology from like the eighties and Seventies. and it's back to like free Internet days hard lines, and our characters live in the city that is like sort of the last known city in existence, and it's cut off from the no man's land and it's under heavy surveillance and control by A. Ambiguously. Malevolence. Technology Company noticed technologies, so the mysteries inbox that and one of our main characters works for that company, so there's a lot of intrigue there. How did the story come together The story came about actually I was. Reading a lot about hackers at the time. But this rolling stone article about Aaron Swartz the Hacktivists, and you know in the wake of the suicide and and then the wikileaks scandal happened, and so mind was just there and sort of hacker worlds, and one of my favorite movies right off as war games and I just love those old movies from the eighties like wargames, robocop and Terminator and so I kind of just wanted to. Make a movie that was like in the vein of these movies inspired me to be a filmmaker. Didn't really WANNA make it like have zeitgeist elements, but not really Biographical and to sort of merge. Those elements together opt. And Sci fi was the playground you wanted to be yes very much Yeah, I just felt right I love like like Brazil. Analog site five and also to You know the thing about science fiction is it's I, think it's popular and stays still being because it's on everybody's mind. You know with the future as And I've a lot of anxiety about that, and so I think I was tailing that into this. We all do yeah. Yeah, exactly great talking to you. Same here. Justin Douglas's the film's producer and Co Writer. Very, interesting movie I I. IT Takes Place into you, know we. We Love post-apocalyptic future right now. I'm star. Trek kind of guy looks for optimism, but it's just not there right now, so. You're in the film. Rooted in okay, so I was talking to Carlton Button Story So. How did you guys have it? Kind of came from articles, he said. and then kind of talk through what happened after that. Did you guys have? Sessions kind of hammer out the script and things. Yeah, so we we kind of. Started with the general idea. In new that we wanted to make that. We shoot and kind of reverse engineered. A STORY AND SPECIAL EFFECTS AND A narrative to. Feed around some of the locations that we knew we had and what we thought we could pull off. Harnessing all of our magic powers. and. Then, just kind of started chipping away at it and just. Just looked at the calendar and set a date where we were going to start shooting, even if we didn't necessarily have all the money. Era Actors together and then. Started snowballing after that and in this snow work. The story kept coming together and. More pieces kind of. Added up and built into something that. Hopefully people enjoy watching now. Where did the the idea to use like old analog technology conference? I think we had. A connection the goodwill computer museum so They just had a warehouse completely full of amazing electron, electrononics. that they gave to us completely for free as donation. We return them afterwards, but. So, Part of it was a budget concerns, and just there's no way we could have afforded anything like that if we had to purchase it ourselves. And then it just went and self to the story. Even more so more importantly, it's a world where. You have to recycle things and bill what you WANNA use, and so it kind of like the idea of older technology being. What might actually survive some..

director Jack Rabbit writer New York Times Jamie Bamberg John Delancey Canton Bracken Hilo Katie David Franklin Robert Aaron Swartz Batman apple jack rabid Carlton Rennie executive producer Kevin Anderson TRIBECA
"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

03:54 min | 5 months ago

"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

"Online on-demand kind of thing you're saying like something that's just on demand or something that's just on the Internet for example that's just spur of the moment and people. It gets a lot of attention. Yeah progressing GONNA caps as after our best would change absolutely got Amazon Knicks now becoming studios or central electric's loser to see again. Same hearing veteran actor Rex. Layne has been on the walking dead to Django unchained. And the upcoming a million ways to die in the West I mean you. You've done a lot of comedy and you've done some serious stuff but you kind of approach this movie in with a different mindset because it has a Larry and mannerisms are very different than other film especially with the subject matter. I mean I guess the biggest question is how do you keep a straight fix? Well I didn't much to the dismay of Jordan Rubin the director and there were times and I can't wait. I haven't seen the movie but I know that they're going to do. Outtakes takes could not get through the dialogue at the time and as a matter of fact the first night philly. I'm in this cabinet. We haven't started roll camera yet. And I'm supposed to burst through the door and being scared to death by this Alpha killary so I was just sitting here thinking about and I just worked with Quentin Tarantino Django. So I had been working weeks on Django so I'm just sitting here thinking. I've got a beaver coming after me and then I thought this more I'm headed this but at the point of me telling you that is it's one of the most fun it really is. It was hard you know Jordan told us at first and we're making you guys have to. This is serious stuff lever serious. They will go. That's how I think it's what's GonNa make the movie. I mean we none of us trying to be funny. It was seriously go. So I'm looking forward saying about your cast mates. I mean it's a mixture of newcomers and also some pros. Yeah I was great. I I I didn't get to work with Bill Burr or John Mayer but I worked with all the kids and I'm not gonNA say kids. That makes the car I worked with. All the guys and girls It was really fun because some of them had never done anything and to watch him in. How hungry they are moy sufficed and but I was reminded that you know no matter how far you go. It's always awarded progress. You're always trying to get to the next level just to see. How is your way to kill Zombie? Beaver just come out. You're this is nothing and I'm just telling you can never ever underestimate the power Kelvin. The I've learned haven't we all now our regular zombies or slow these guys fast. Well I tried to pick up the pace little bit but they told me to slow down on rule faster. I think you're right. Well great talking you looking forward to. And that concludes part one of my Tribeca film coverage for twenty fourteen on fi talk premium look for par to either later date and you can also listen as a premium subscriber to the twenty thirteen edition as well. This is Tony Tomato. Thanks for listening..

Knicks Beaver Jordan Rubin Bill Burr Quentin Tarantino Amazon Rex philly Layne Tony Tomato Larry director John Mayer
Lindsay Peoples Wagner, Editor-in-Chief of Teen Vogue

Skimm'd from The Couch

07:27 min | 5 months ago

Lindsay Peoples Wagner, Editor-in-Chief of Teen Vogue

"So when you talked about in the beginning when you're talking about your love of cooking and sitting down for family dinners but as you said you know you have those family traditions. But it's not like fashion was necessarily the the big thing that was on people's minds. How did you go from being this creative kid? Who saw things that others didn't necessarily see in the same way to thinking about it as this is something? That's more than just a side hobby. I mean I think a lot of comes from my parents like a lot of the conversations that I had with them growing up was that you can do whatever you WanNa do. We're not going to you know just because we're in the mid West. We're not going to tell you like you need to sell insurance but you have to understand that this is bigger than you. You should not take life for granted and that people have literally died for you to be free and so you have to do something with his life and I think even always knowing that and feeling that and thinking about my own ancestors and what they had to go through a little bit like I need to figure it out and I need to figure out how I can have the biggest impact with his life. I don't think you know even my own grandparents would ever have dreamed I would be doing this kind of thing and I think they. That's really just a testament to my upbringing but also just trying to figure out a way to make it make all of this different and I think A conversation. I had with my mom that I think about a lot is when I really got into like watching girlfriends and sex and the city and seeing fashion and culture on television and a lot of that was really. You know trying to figure out like I love this stuff but why do I love it so much and I would just rip up all these magazines and put them on my wall and my mother would say like you know you can love all this stuff but none of these people look like you. They don't have this kind of life. They don't understand what regular normal people are doing day to day. And if you're going GONNA you know. Try to be in this world and make a difference. You're going to have to change things and it's going to be really hard and to really instilled this motto in me of like you're going to have to be what you needed when you were younger to really change things and so. I take that with me every day and I think that's really where the thought started. How'd you get your foot in the door? You talked about this internship. It's not like it's easy to get these internships so when you get it. I definitely know what it's like to feel the pressure of needing to parlay it into something to be able to even think about getting a time job in the field. Yeah I mean when I graduated. I didn't have a job and I remember looking around because I also went to school in the mid west and I remember everybody had a job and I was like what am I doing like crazy but I mean every incident that I had I was just like I don't come from wealthy family. I don't have the money to wear full look Chanel as an intern or as an assistant or even now but like I will work harder than everyone else here. I will if you want me to figure out where this came from. I'll do all the research I'll stay like if we can't find this glove that we need to return the designer al. Go through this whole closet and figure out where it is like and I think they When you want it bad enough and you know that you need that foot in the door you do what it takes so I mean a lot of it was also even when I moved here to New York and I was an assistant. I was only making nine dollars an hour so I was working two or three jobs in so I would be teen vogue during the day and then at night I would change the store. Mannequins at Dkny. And I would do that from like nine to midnight and then on the weekends I was waitressing at a restaurant and Tribeca because I was just like okay. I need to hustle. Like my salary isn't enough to have rent or anything like that but I'm GonNa make it work and I think food I mean that's just you do what you have to do. When you're on those kind of situations I appreciate talking to you about this. And I think it's a really important thing that not enough people starting off in the business. Really think about the realities. I started off in news very similar in that. You work long hours. You don't get paid a lot. Didn't have health insurance waitress to be able to afford my first job and a question. I always go back and forth on answering myself. I'm really curious to hear what you think is from people who are entry level. They're trying to get their foot in the door and they're looking at the job that can pay the bills but isn't the one that they're passionate about or taking the job that gets them the foot in the door but not knowing how to necessarily afford it. What would you say to people starting off? I mean I always tell people like if you want it bad enough you will do it even if it doesn't pay and I say that as someone who doesn't come for money so like I don't think it's worth going the route of taking a job that you don't want to then end up in a situation later on and you're having a crisis of who I am in my life and why did I go this route. Like I would rather just go after what I really want. It's a hustle constantly and still to this day but I wouldn't have it any other way when I tell people like I've had to do this and I've had to do that and I've had to freelance and all this other stuff. I also tell people like you know. The struggle really isn't for everyone and you have to realize what you're willing to do to get there because I'm not necessarily recommending it but I'm saying this is what is GonNa take. This is what it's like. Yeah and if you don't if you don't want to struggle and you're just like I really just want to go to Brunch with my friends. I don't WanNa have to waitress. That's a different life and that's okay but you have to choose so I wanNA talk about the expose everywhere and nowhere. You interviewed over one. Hundred people of color are in the fashion industry and had really interesting and emotional conversations about racism in the industry when you were publishing it. What did you think they impact was going to be? I mean honestly. I didn't know what people don't understand is they. You look at it now and you're like Oh my God. That's so cool. That's so amazing. But just wasn't the reality of it. I think that piece for a lot of people made them feel really liberated and more comfortable and you know so many things have happened in the world to make black people specifically feel like okay I regardless of people wanting my voice be silenced. I'm going to speak up but you know a lot of people in the industry who have come before me. That have been doing this a lot longer than me you know. They haven't felt that way until the last three years. They haven't felt like this was an open forum of you know what I can complain about somebody because I can't and it won't have any repercussions on me and I think they. It was scary for me because I mean I had so many legends who I adored respect. Just tell me like Lindsey. You're GONNA be blacklisted. This is not something that you should be doing like you have to let some things die because people don't WanNa hear US complain. They don't WanNa hear US talk about things that have happened to us and I understood that in I sat on it in prayed about it for a really long time but I felt like even if it was the last thing the last big piece that I had and if it was the last big thing that I was able to do fell worth it to me and I felt like okay like I was. I was really at peace with it so when it came out I actually. I was in Mexico with my husband and I wasn't actually even here and the next day when I turn my phone on I

United States Teen Vogue Dkny Chanel Lindsey New York Tribeca Intern Mexico
"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

04:55 min | 6 months ago

"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

"The red carpet. Danny Muharan who also directed the tribe. Are you dance good to meet? You GINSENG here this is. This is a wild movie. That's why I'm here because it was just like the trailer was awesome terrific. Well I do a really good job. In the trial of is in the TRIBECA critic to the wonderful trial for us. Because we can't afford to get a trailer guys expensive. Yeah and So I was really thrown trailer now if there was a challenge with this is you have the horror elements and the comedy. Did you have to kind of set boundaries when you were putting this together and then actually directing it as how far you can go without kind of like it's almost like a balancing act for you totally balancing act it's a we were the boundaries from producer point of view in the sense that we didn't want it to go all right team and so they get a younger audience in it wasn't going be just exclusive and that would tip it over into something possibly much more gory and violent and one of the ways? I'm doing is to pull back not so much know to make more comical so that people didn't take the violence too seriously like a movie like sore or hostile which are very sadistic movies. You don't have any of that. It's it's strictly not really a horror movie it's got a few fraught and jumps but it's it's really applying with the genre in a way and and I wanted to have a little bit of fun with the Con- attuning come things on the heat's and just you know using cliches that are in the grind house kind of movies. I'm just throwing up in the Atlanta. But so the comedy leaders get away with having for more hopefully more mainstream audience possibly which may or may not work. The danger of that of course is not disappoint the people who want the full on Gore Hara. And you don't even really attract the mainstream but I think there's enough in there to get an audience who will not be horrified too much and we'll laugh at it more than be repulsed and says there's a mind switch the end as you know sort of genre movies as kind of switch she got a guy through absolutely you want more or you want list. And that's the balancing actors in the audience's mind and I have to transit the tone for them not to take it too seriously. Which is why some concert. That's jugs maybe work or not work or whatever but they know the jugs at least are able to not take it too seriously which is really the point. It's a wrong really and with the actors did you have to. Kinda hold them back to. Sometimes they go a little too far with humor so I think yeah I think people who had not a lot of younger actors who done nothing. I told her that. Lead actress Katya to she I just told Clinton Paints and Platt strike here are and she just dotted and the series. She is the funding gates. Team was terrific. Very he brings a lot of baggage with him from his previous characters. And you know him. Scenes had the most to lose because it was taking the piss out of the pompous. Di Wasn't particularly good at martial arts anything and he goes slowly insane. He time that really well in the movie I think. His slow descent into madness The daughter Rina. Who's the audience? She was a Newbie. She just come out of school and has a lot of very appealing actress. Actually and an experience. We experienced the movie from here. Here is so whether I succeed in up to you guys really you know. I hope by or done to bed but that that is something I did think about. We didn't wanted to play with a revolving bug tires on the beginning. There are some of that. Just sit the tone of the Movie Guy. On one quick question. What's up for you next a musical about cancer which many and they're not as a thriller and I'm working on saying in New York for five weeks to write this gangster thriller with Philosophical for about a guy who's active wall rebellion tunes whole world upside down and I'm really looking at shooting. It in New York ninety seventy two all right cool very cool ice to meet you nice to meet you. Thank you all take care. And those are the genre entries for twenty thirteen for Tribeca. Film Festival Visit Their Site. Tribeca film Dot Com Slash Festival. And certainly hope. You enjoyed my look at the twenty thirteen edition of the genre films at the Tribeca Film Festival. This is Tony Tomato. I hope to do it again next year..

Tribeca Katya Danny Muharan Gore Hara New York producer Di Tony Tomato Atlanta Clinton Paints cancer Platt
"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

08:00 min | 6 months ago

"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

"About her? Look I mean how did they? How did you come to that? Because it's a very unique look for a robot or Android if you like. Yeah well I mean it was a of consultation with you. Know I mean I kind of again starred with haunt sci-fi in the sense of look if you're going to spend all the billions of pounds of take two creates a robot fields. What what would you want to use it for? And it seemed to me that the most practical thing what the guy was talking about is you know the the ideal goal would be machine that look. Shuman so that we can infiltrate in now so that you can give it a skin job and it looks Pakistani or looks Chinese or looks Middle Eastern. You know as the thing something that you address the human drone that would kind of justify the money that the government need to spend to develop this kind of thing and so I knew that it was going to be humanoid and once that I news Human thing then it was great then kinds of opportunities opened up intensive how she would look and the fun thing then was kind of reverse engineering and we kind of handed that Katie. So that when she's playing she's come a little bit bigger and You know skin tone is different. Has Different stuff so it was. It was able to lend look ten and also Katie. I think got absolutely ripped. Know six pack rest of this stuff for machine. So that's pretty cool. You got to see the movie man. Really cold last league As far as the tone of the movie does a little bit of Dr Frankenstein Monster kind of creep into this one. A little north. I've tried to avoid that look. Ns any this a guy. Great in life at all goes back to Frankenstein. But I think done a lot of times so I try to do something new with with that basic idea so but I have done a good job. Well thank you great news. Take care now. This one I think is worth seeing. And she is definitely force. She's going to be around for quite a while. Our next film is raise that mixes a thriller and Film. Gladiator as women are kidnapped and forced to fight each other to protect their families. From their captors passed gas and also from xena warrior. Princess Adrienne Wilkinson. Plays Nancy Hi Adrian. We actually met we. I'm hiding in the back. We actually met at icon years ago when you were doing Zena so yes sir. Yes same here. You know this is really cool. It's a different kind of physicality Zena. You say you play doctor kind of talking about your character. yes. I play Nancy. She is She is a woman. She's actually lesbian. She's married with two children and the way that the the script works are families are being unknowingly themselves Sir Under surveillance so the way that they make us fight is that they show us our families living their lives. And if we don't fight they're going to take out our families so you have this constitute threat. That's just hanging over your head and it's yeah it's scary but what I like about. Nancy is that she's not a fighter but she's smart she's a surgeon so she goes into her fights thinking logistically about what is she truly capable of doing realistically. What is she going to be able to do so she comes? Comes up with some pretty interesting things. That are unusual. And how was Josh? Would you guys? Did He kinda give time for a little extra training or any nightmare. No just great But I have to say we shot twenty one fight teams in like twenty seven days or something crazy like that He was what's amazing about it. And I think this proves not only the the quality of the the fighting but it just proves that he was really all about protecting us. Is that no one was hurt in that time and I mean that many fight scenes inevitably you think. Someone's going to get hurt. Even if they weren't shooting that quickly so I mean he was watching out for us all the time and always making sure that it looked real but never got to real between any one and that everyone was always saying. I hear you're going to be working for Tim. Russ on renegades. Yeah we were supposed to start shooting in June. I'm excited about it. The script is fantastic. My character is kind of like Laura. Croft which I love so yeah. I think it'll be exciting. Walters in it and Tim is actually being to back again. So actually I'm excited. I have to say. I'm also tremendously intimidated because I knew the Star Trek world both as a performer. But also even even as as a viewer I of course culturally. No it and I've certainly seen some but to be part of it. I sort of feel obligated that I need to know everything. That's like a doctorate degree that I'd have to go get there really good in helping you catch. I think it'll be fine. No it'll be good. It'll be well best of luck. It sounds like you're keeping busy and doing some great stuff on my damndest. I'm trying to take care here. Well Bailey and borders plays cody obviously with this kind of film. There's a lot of motivation for all of you to fight. Because of your family's now tell me how you kind of got into that mental state to play those kind of scenes. I mean you're fighting but the fights have to be more intense because you're fighting for your chance exactly Mike Character. Cody is fighting for her mother. She's a single mom so she was. She was raised by her mom. And really I just kind of imagine what it would be like if I was fighting for my mom and It was difficult being in the middle of fight and trying to get technical leave wild bringing the emotion. But that's kind of what I would do. I would just think about my family and it helped me get there so there was a still. I saw of a scene where you're all sitting at almost like school desk and you're handcuffed to them. What's it like to do? Some of those scenes look very bizarre. Actually the first thing that we shot I n It was crazy because it was like six hours being tied at these chairs and but it was it was. It was a lot of fun you know. We all got to do a group seen on the first day. Besides it's pretty wild. I've never been struck to each year before So there's some even more intense scenes in that that should be pretty brutal for the audience to tricking of witch. How far did you guys go as far as blood and bruising bit? Yeah it's pretty. It's it's graphic But we tried to make the fights as realistic as possible and we wanted to. We wanted it to be gritty so so yeah Josh and our son coordinator really worked together on making sure that it was she was. It was so cool working with her her and Josh which would get in arena together. We're all the girls fight and just like seeing. The magic happen was really cool. What's on your agenda? I don't know this is my first time at Tribeca so I'm just I'm just happy to be here. Hopefully her knee anything coming up for you. On the screen at all I just had a movie premiere at South by and it'll be a couple of other Festival's coming out so I'm crossing my fingers for that. It's called cold water. Great to talk to you. Congrats forward and from threshold and Repo the genetic opera is Rebecca Marshall as phoebe. So I mean I. I've seen some stills things and actually the trailers been on my website for a while What's interesting is one of the scenes that strikes me. If you're you're all in the classroom and you're all like handcuffed to those seats very bizarre school. Yeah Yeah it's a great scene. That's one of my favorite scenes in the movie and it was torturous because we were really actually strapped in them. And that's the scene. Were we all your out. Why we're there and what we're doing their sword of and that's kind of where we get an interaction to the the mastermind. Who's kind of running this whole thing and I think that night I mean that was last seen of the day? And we're all we're all tired and everyone just kinda put it together and it's one of my favorite scenes in the movie. Maybe because the memories behind it as well so did you prepare.

Nancy Josh Katie Zena Tim Shuman Adrienne Wilkinson Cody Rebecca Marshall Dr Frankenstein tricking Russ Croft Mike Character Tribeca Laura Walters coordinator Bailey
"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

10:05 min | 6 months ago

"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

"Hi this is Julia. State hardly from Smallville Gemini Division. I'm less Redican. I'm going to start a fringe. Tasking Robert Patrick. James Marsters sci-fi Talk Tony Adult this is Colin Cunningham known as Major Davis. Se One stargate as she should say either. This is Christopher hired l. from sanctuary. I've played Montague John Drouin. George Decay and I listened to sci-fi Talk. Hi this is Tony to Lana. Welcome my Tribeca Film Festival coverage our first film is Frankenstein's army basically takes place in the waning days of the Second World War as a battalion of Russian soldiers find themselves literally lost in enemy territory. They stumble upon a village that appears to have been decimated by something unseen and discover. A mad scientist played by hell. Boys Karel Roden who conducts experiments to fuse flesh and steel. And making an unstoppable army of soldiers. The film's director is Richard Rep Horst. And he spoke to me on the TRIBECA film Red Carpet you know for this film hits its own standalone film. It's not based on your previous work that correct. That's correct yes. It is and as far as You know this one. What's interesting to me is that you actually sketched out. A lot of designs of creatures ahead of time and then you went to unreal and said this is what I wanna do and described that process a little bit and how that went It's well I know I'm real for a very long time. So I Enclosed in real in very early stage of development and I was sending them sketches to see what is possible a or if you will only practical effects because that was our main Goal our goal and I just started to projects. Exactly what I saw in front of me and I sent it to unreal and I think ninety percent of the design survives uh-huh and talk about your cast his Caro's portrayal of Victor. I understand isn't going to traditional Victor Frankenstein way. Yeah Carol Traits Victor Frankenstein of the grand grand grandson but it we are going to do a completely one eight on the character What what I likes to do is I if you know exactly why are you? WanNa end you a lot of freedom to investigate. What are other possibilities and cut over? Dan has such a rich Mind that was really eager to look at his ideas about his character and a lot of his ideas reps around the character bitch is being written in the script and from when we started doing that is it started to grow and any became something totally unique and on its own. It's absolutely incompatible to any of traditional French tank character Reno so far and that's exactly what I want have and another thing too it's also It's a found footage type of film as well at that must have been a bit of a challenge for a shooting and planning as a total challenge. This was really extremely extremely difficult because We need to prepare everything into details and for the Fisher Texas fussell motion nightmare because everything needed to succeed in takes longer than two minutes practical sex normally you can cut them up in in all white close close at etc and now we needed to do it. All in one take which was really extreme difficult and we really looked at what we did was intent. That is nine thousand nine hundred eighty and if you want to make this film how we'll do it and that's gifts you a lot of creativity normally with computers. You will look for different solutions. Because but their own also looking for practical effects it's also Shooter too early. Eighty styling before. It gave us a totally new kind of approach. It's not very easy but I think it's the best of his. And what do you have planned coming up? Is there something in the works? You're planning yeah. I have something in averse planning. And it's quite far developed. And what I what I learned from Francis Army. If you keep faith through your fishing it becomes. It's hard to classify into Asia and the same thing is happening with this. New Project is hard to classify finisher and I think. Then that's a sign that that you are on the right track and well with this when you can't go wrong Nazis and the Frankenstein creatures man. That sounds like a lot of fun. Yeah Yeah it is. It's it's a lot of fun. I think moviemaking should be a lot of fun. And what I want is entertain- people I want to deliver. I want to make people enjoying and having them a great experience. I know that now she says to me too in my eyes. Those are the most evil. It's the most evil thing average happened so it's a big risks to transfer it into an entertaining kind of way. It's I know it's smooth ice. Bet I've onto to break that Tabu great. Thank you so much appreciate king taking few minutes really looking forward to seeing this. Thank you our next. Entry is from the producer of the Sundance Smash hit the pact and writer of Xavier. Against the divide. Mr Jones is really about a journey into a nightmare. That's pretty real. Even daylight literally brings no relief. Scott Penny moved into a cabin to escape the pressures of the world and breathe new life into their art. They're only neighbor is a few miles away. Strange Hermit who only comes out at night under the shroud of darkness and that is Mr Jones as Scott and penny get deeper into his world. They start to suspect. The man is actually infamous reclusive artists. And that's only the beginning the tension and the terror bills from their Sarah Jones. An actress who admired from Alcatraz plays penny and I spoke to her on the red carpet. Hi How you doing? I'll tell you actually uploaded a clip from the movie on my site today and it was a very intense scene now. There was a lot of looks like was there. A lot of hand held Stuff into can't the movie and if there was. Did you guys have to coordinate your movements to the camera yeah It was really cool. Actually we so the way that they set up the hand held camera they had Your standard sort of camera. And then and then they attached a A GOPRO so there. You're you're basically getting you're getting our face and you're getting what we're saying and it was a pretty cool experience because the DP kind of had his style John who played Scott had his style. I had my style and then we. They sort of melted them all together. Now you're play a married couple or just boyfriend girlfriend boyfriend and girlfriend to level of intensity just an that scene alone. I'm sure there was quite a few scenes like that. So how did you guys kind of you know? When they're yelled action. You were ready to go with the intestine As far as the action and the is concerned. Sorry Second Tom Well we we shot this I believe in eighteen days so the intensity was that I mean this is an independent film. Being Tennessee was there at all times. But because we had to get the content that we needed And a of it you know to place a night and there was one night shoots and the atmosphere that they create it was so it was so easy to just get into it have such great time in. John and I have been friends for a while so it was really easy to just sort of work together and feed off of each other and then figure that really helps now. Did you have any kind of prep time ahead of time or did you just kind of any read throughs or anything? Actually I head about Film and we did a couple of personals down. Carl was so great about keeping collaboration. Landmines Open and so we were all able to sort of us again and feed off of each other and figure out how to get from ADP. And what was the most honest sort of situation if such a great history of really was there is some you know. Mr Jones makes these outrageous cultures. One looks like the scarecrow buys on acid like when you first stepped onto set and saw some of those House I had Penney's reactions which was just sort of this. I mean Joe For someone to create GRONYEA's pieces and they don't necessarily say from entertaining look like Pieces you've given pieces of trash or materials sort of tossed aside and be able to put together and there seem to have a leyland in these year crumbs Hopefully it's art. You know. It's a sort.

Sarah Jones John Drouin Scott Penny Victor Frankenstein Tony Adult Robert Patrick Smallville Gemini Division Karel Roden James Marsters George Decay Julia Christopher Texas Major Davis scientist Francis Army Richard Rep Horst Colin Cunningham Asia
Tribeca programs drive-in series for films, sports and music

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 6 months ago

Tribeca programs drive-in series for films, sports and music

"When is the last time you went to a drive in theater the people who do the tribeca Film Festival are hoping the next time will be this summer tribeca is teaming up with IMAX and eighteen antique to put together a series of movies to be screened at drive in theaters end up what they call other exclusive venues the goal is to get you out to watch a movie without getting you to rub shoulders with other patrons while most movie theaters remain closed because of the corona virus outbreak the relatively few remaining drive ins have remained open I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Imax Oscar Wells Gabriel
Tribeca programs drive-in series for films, sports and music

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 6 months ago

Tribeca programs drive-in series for films, sports and music

"Itching to go to the movies again the organizers of a popular Film Festival are going old school in the hopes of making that happen when is the last time you went to a drive in theater the people who do the tribeca Film Festival are hoping the next time will be this summer tribeca is teaming up with IMAX and eighteen teeth to put together a series of movies to be screened at drive in theaters end up what they call other exclusive venues the goal is to get you out to watch a movie without getting you to rub shoulders with other patrons as most areas of the country continue under social distancing guidelines while most movie theaters remain closed because of the corona virus outbreak the relatively few remaining drive ins have remained open the first of the drive in movies will be rolled out June twenty fifth with a list of movies to be made public sometime before then I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Imax Oscar Wells Gabriel
Netflix’s ‘The Half of It’ wins top Tribeca Film Festival award

Wayne Cabot and Paul Murnane

00:23 sec | 6 months ago

Netflix’s ‘The Half of It’ wins top Tribeca Film Festival award

"The tribeca Film Festival was among the first big events to be scrapped by this virus didn't stop organizers from naming winners so this year's top movie is the Alice will film the half of it a teenage take on Cyrano de Bergerac the winners were announced on Instagram yesterday this contagion forced the event to go virtual those jurors saw other films like chronically before

Cyrano De Bergerac Instagram
World's biggest film festivals unite for 10-day global streaming event

Red Eye Radio

00:22 sec | 6 months ago

World's biggest film festivals unite for 10-day global streaming event

"To the moon festivals worldwide are teaming up to launch we are one a global Film Festival which will play out over ten days and be available free on YouTube readers include the tribeca Film Festival Cannes Film Festival and Sundance festivals have experimented with virtual additions meanwhile Amazon prime is currently hosting a modest online version of south by

Cannes Youtube Amazon
You can now attend the Tribeca Film Festival from your couch during quarantine

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:27 sec | 7 months ago

You can now attend the Tribeca Film Festival from your couch during quarantine

"They tribeca Film Festival will go on virtually organizers say they'll make much of the programming available online either to the public or to the film industry over roughly the same days of the festival was supposed to take place in April tribeca is still hoping to hold a festival in the fall the founder Jane Rosenthal says it'll be smaller than usual and take place over fewer

Jane Rosenthal Founder
Attention Capital's Joe Marchese on the crisis - and opportunity - in how we measure eyeballs on the internet

Digiday Podcast

11:29 min | 8 months ago

Attention Capital's Joe Marchese on the crisis - and opportunity - in how we measure eyeballs on the internet

"Welcome to the digital podcast Brian. Marcy this week I'm joined by Joe. Marquel JOE is the former Fox executive who is now the CEO of attention capital an investment firm and operating company. That's focused on those media. Companies THAT CAPTURE ATTENTION. Attention is required. One property girl boss. Jani discuss why he thinks the attention. Konami is in what he calls a state of subprime. And why you can still build an AD media company in two thousand twenty but just not one that's based on. Cpm DISPLAY ADS. Hope you enjoy Joe. Walk into podcasts. I thank you for having known each other so long. We have this is this is Serious throwback here so going back to social vibe you're we're GonNa talk about Social Vibe later. Gay But what you're doing. I mean you've had you've had a really fascinating career. I mean I think when we first knew each other You start up then And you went through that startup pivoted. You did the pivot and everything this you sold it. Yup He had an accent the and then instead of doing the sort of serial entrepreneur route you went in to like a large media organization. Yeah and so You saw the innards of that right and now you're back sort of on. I would say the investor side but something more explain. What attention is so? I mean attention is a company. It's an IT's an operating company It's just a company that's built to buy other companies And and kind of that fit a particular thesis okay. What's the thesis That the entire global economy runs on top of the attention. Economy of which advertising is the most visible market And that the attention economy is in a state of subprime. Okay explain The mets like subprime. Yeah yeah the the metrics that we use to measure Attention or that we used to represent attention or becoming less and less tied to what people are actually spending their time doing so. I think that there's An opportunity right now to say that there are things that have better and more attention or higher quality attention than the metrics give them credit for I mean you guys talk about this plenty and digitally as cover the industry of advertising but in the in the chase of really what we'd call vanity metrics impressions and page views an There so uncoupled from what people are actually what quality attention is and so therefore things that have quality attention are probably undervalued of put simpler We've kind of convinced the world's been convinced by by big tech for the most part that everything can be measured And if you can't measure it don't buy it then that to me makes makes me think everything that's hard to measure is probably undervalued. Yeah but you've kind of been on about this for a while you're right because I can remember talking to you about different like different metrics. Vp and whatnot. Because you saw the problems when it comes to CBC or CPM right And then I'm sure like within than Fox. He saw the limits particularly of of how. Tv is measured. Yeah and and you know it's funny People assume that you'd really hate TV. Measurement as a digital person. Yeah but to be honest like I'm kind of bullish on panel data because panel data. It's hard to fraud Like like I mean they you know. There's there can be entire phone farms. In other countries that Census data like digital data. Pick up but sit at digital guys. Were always an usually. They're all guys. I were always railing against Nielsen. And how terrible Nielsen is and you get to the other side and your leg. Actually this isn't that no no. It's not that bad I will say like look. Nielsen can be inaccurate. But there's not a warehouse full of TV's racking fake impressions right like like panel. Data is a representation of What a certain set of people are doing. And then you extrapolate like. This is how much time we have the. You know. It's all the classic things like every every four there's more ad impressions in the world and digital world. The more people are watching more ads. And Chiavari think we're just trying to shove them in there so this is all true so why in the world of all the things that you would want to invest in would media. I mean it seems like a terrible. I don't WanNa talk you out of it. It's too late to do too late. I'm here explain to me why this is an opportunity so I actually think that I think there's a couple of things that that are huge opportunities right now which is As platforms grow and as as they chased these vanity. Metrics Trust begins to erode right quality. Goes Down I mean look all platforms engineered towards volume not quality. And and what I mean by that is they are if you make something for a penny and sell it for two pennies. You've made a penny of profit if you make something for ten dollars until it for twelve dollars you've made two dollars of profit. Humans like the two dollars of profit that makes sense computers. Say That none of that. Penny one hundred percent margin. Let's do that a trillion times right and that is why you see like some of the largest advertisers in the world on on the major platforms. are selling very low cost goods right so same thing applies to products as applies to news so in this world where trust is a roading. the curator brands kind of become king. Like no one goes to the front page of Amazon negotiating. You don't you. Don't start at the front page of time to go shopping. You come there with an idea of what you're going to buy And I think the great example of this wire cutter right. I mean wire cutter which you know. curates what electronics. You should buy. has built trust with the community Obviously The New York Times acquired a while ago but these curator's in wire cutter I think is to the next evolution of of the web. I guess we're still going at the Web. Go for here. What craigslist was to the window version? and then post craigslist. There was Angie's list and that was a brand being put on top of it. I mean I have something to shock you With Angie did not meet every contractor. Angie's list those are those are television. Commercials Yeah and that's a brand that got built up and why does that matter? We'll because people would start there rather than starting out a search engine or starting an open platform. I think what's interesting is particularly. Let's stick with the wire cutter as an example. I mean people in media. I think love love the wire cutter. I think with good reason Mostly because it's an anti-scale play anything algorithm mic. It seems like is gamed. Yes I mean because when you go to Amazon and like I don't know about you but if I'm buying those like okay the bestseller best reviews whatever and then you're like you know we've written about it you know there's Yup armies of fake one hundred dollars and anything that can be gamed like that will be and that's what brands are supposed to be. So I I'm a huge fan like I am. I am anti a lot of things in the way. Advertising is kind of polluted The Internet and chasing kind of the metrics that don't matter I'm a huge fan of brands. See Brands are the things that you hold responsible for that you trust too right like Brand less like Kind of commodities. If there's you know lead in the toy or they're you know the you know the classic stories of you know Tylenol. An the the brand is the thing that consumers hold responsible when you go to a platform It's almost like you. They're extracting the margin from brands. And I think that there's a huge role to be played in. In consumers minds to be building up brands that can be cures for them for different areas of life. Okay so this was the the the thesis differentiated. Good time because trust is is you know. I think there was that article Max read wrote. It does sort of everything is fake on the Internet a couple years ago. That sort of summed up this this period that you know we were talking over the years right. It was all leading up to this this primis of online advertising See Pile of money That'd be nice right money. It's attention capital capital. So it's a great way nickname your company capital and people like you and I can only imagine So how much what is like two hundred million. I NOT NON reported non real time to to talk. I don't know so. What have you bought so far So first partnered with James Murdoch's lupus systems we bought the TRIBECA Film Festival invested in controlling stakes together and then Girl boss most recently company. Okay so explain. Each of those different types of properties. But why does this fit your thesis? Well so you look at areas of life where people are looking for curation in so tribeca in the entertainment space and girl boss kind of in employment career Lifestyle and so the way we look at it as he'd attention capital is there's two types of things there's community brands so we define a community. Brandis if they threw an event. Would someone get on an airplane and go there Do they permission to curate? Some aspect of the world's tribeca. Obviously they haven't event They literally curate films. They don't make all the films they tell you. Here's what to see with someone. Where the brand on their t shirt. They don't have to be an apparel company but people would wear tribeca shirt and is the community self sustaining without always having to make content right because if you always have to make content. That's a treadmill that you have to run on versus. Is there a community of people who people go the events The thing that gets the most exciting about TRIBECA 's ethos as a brand that was founded after nine eleven downtown. We're here in downtown. New York and And the idea of independent storytelling equality versus volume. Like you just can't see that many movies like we have to be able to curate down to select few all of those things I mean. That's a brand that were incredibly excited about and a founder and CEO. And Jane Rosenthal that we want to work with and kind of expand I. I'm struck that both of them have a quote unquote events component. They're able to turn people out Yup We we are big believers digital so I might be talking my own book cure but we think that there is something to be said about you know and I think people are coming around to about being able to turn out a community of people. Hundred percent We are huge huge believers in in a I R L digital connection real life to digital connection that it's proof that you have that type of influence in the world like versus again factory said the algorithms can be game but people showing up at a movie theater camp. Yeah I mean like you know. I always went back to the sort of game. Of Game of thrones recaps. It's like you know the the reason that there were. So many. Game of thrones recaps. Is I mean it's not just because of like passion or the brand is it's it's because that's what turned page views right exactly. It's entrepreneur right. I don't hate the player. Geno hate the game. I agree on some of the players.

JOE Tribeca IT Angie Amazon Nielsen FOX Founder And Ceo Craigslist Konami Mets Jani Marcy Jane Rosenthal CBC CEO Fraud
Weinstein Jurors Focus on ‘Project Runway’ Assistant’s Complaint

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:41 sec | 9 months ago

Weinstein Jurors Focus on ‘Project Runway’ Assistant’s Complaint

"The jury in the Harvey Weinstein trial will be back and if for a third day of deliberations jurors brought their notebooks with them back into court to listen again to the testimony of accuser Marion Haley to court stenographers played the parts of lawyer and witness Haley testified that she fought back unsuccessfully to resist a sexual assault in his so whole loft she says he pushed her into a bedroom and held her down she said a second assault occurred when she met him at the tribeca Grand Hotel she said she felt like an idiot for believing this was a meeting Haley also told the jury that she turned down wind stings invitation to Paris she was suspicious that this was a personal invitation not a professional one

Marion Haley Assault Tribeca Grand Hotel Paris Harvey Weinstein
Thieves Smash Window, Steal $42,000 Worth Of Coats From Store

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:27 sec | 9 months ago

Thieves Smash Window, Steal $42,000 Worth Of Coats From Store

"Well the N. Y. P. D. on the hunt for six fast moving co thieves and hoping to get tips as well to track them down they really security camera video of the group which broke into an upscale boutique in tribeca Thursday night the video shows them smashing the front door than dashing inside and grabbing fifty two fancy coats before taking off the stolen merchandise has a value of some forty two thousand dollars detective say the suspects can be seen driving away in two cars a great BMW when a black Lincoln

BMW N. Y. P.
Security Tight For New York Halloween Parade

Mark Simone

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Security Tight For New York Halloween Parade

"Security will be tight in the village they for the annual Halloween parade custom characters will March down Sixth Avenue two years after a terror attack that killed eight people it was a clear and sunny hollowing after noon and twenty seventeen when chaos unfolded along the west side highway in tribeca a rented truck driven down the bicycle path striking pedestrians and cyclists and is Becky national for Patterson by the name of say follow site pop taken into custody he now faces possibly the death penalty I'm James flippin W. O.

Tribeca Patterson Becky National James Flippin Two Years
Stocks eke out gains after a mixed set of earnings reports

BTV Simulcast

04:43 min | 1 year ago

Stocks eke out gains after a mixed set of earnings reports

"Story a strong corporate earnings season so far as providing some optimism for markets amid a background of growth concerns but eighty percent of companies on the S. and P. five hundred have topped profit expectations with that's fun Microsoft Boeing and PayPal among the big beats still some key negative surprises may keep investors wary Texas Instruments Ford and eBay all cut their forecasts say the trade tensions and slowing sales bellwether caterpillar also blamed heightened economic uncertainty for slowing customer purchases it's free and it shouldn't be a new portfolio manager tribeca investment policy towards us from our Sydney studio let's get straight to the need of this issue the corporate results should be a bit of a barometer on economic strengths what the some of the initial conclusions that you've drawn I thank you absolutely dry eighties about barometer of what's happening especially that outlook is a great barometer of what's going to happen in terms of economic news to follow we think it's actually been pretty good to ends as soon as most of the full cost has been reasonably optimistic for the US economy some of them we could area of course I has generally has to do with the trade area and but in general the reporting season has been pretty strong and the US economy is doing pretty well John bay it's good to see you as always what's the reader to the U. S. consumer because we know that the US economic recovery is really being driven by the consumer at this point and we had seen a few sort of nascent concerns around that area yeah look I think in terms of the kind she might be doing pretty well if we look at some of the housing related sector reported in the last couple days they actually have reported very strong numbers and also you the outlook statement has indicated to actual pickup further pickup in the housing style as well as activity so it is to our cities that to lower rates ease filtering through the economy and in general because you Mr track tracking pretty well what about the exposure to certain scenes in the U. S. equity story we have a team to be for our clients we can pull this up on the terminal TTV go is the key code S. and P. girls versus value the market in the middle of a changeover in leadership which side of the fence are you on look AT the it's it's been a big discussion point loss month we saw shop rotation from the growth into value then we saw that faded only run the she earlier on this month but certainly from the earning season with better earnings outlook ends potential trade partial trade deal potential brexit deal may take longer the mock is certainly turning more optimistic on some of the value bad says sorry at this juncture you certainly want to stop fading into that trait by some of the body company so who has demonstrated the green shoots if you like in terms of earnings so all this optimism the better than expected earnings the better than expected Richmond fed manufacturing indicator number that we had this week as well is that going to be enough to convince the federal reserve that it should hold instead of cutting rates this month as widely expected look I think is certainly the more it's the optimism we can see the less Charles over a hot now of course the equity market won't lie kids they still high probability of account to both certainly based on the data base on the so far reporting season sentiment is pretty strong and certainly if we are going to have some sort of partial deal that you know you said that there's a much higher probability of them holding than a cot what about political risk the most read stories on the terminal as it stands includes quite a few articles around the potential of impeachment and some of the noise as some would call it in the U. S. political process is that something you're looking at the could cloud the outlook a set one become material enough certainly with the cat cloud the outlook at this point what the equity market so if I have demonstrated says that you know and we have brushing aside some of those noise until this tangible evidence all for something taking place it is certainly is a political uncertainty equity markets still quite fragile at this point but some of those risks are yet to be priced into the equity

Eighty Percent
Eye Care For Our Kids With Dr. Emily Ceisler

Mom Brain

08:02 min | 1 year ago

Eye Care For Our Kids With Dr. Emily Ceisler

"Name is Emily Heisler. I'm a physician. I'm a pediatric theatric ophthalmologist in Manhattan I have two offices on the upper west side and in Tribeca and I teach a at NYU and I do my surgeries at Nyu you I am arm and actually a mom is probably been my most important job in life although I love what I do. My kids are nineteen and twenty one. They're both in college so I now. I'm an empty. Nester and that's a whole nother gun conversation but but my kids are awesome and and so my my daughter Carmen started she was probably like her. No almost two she started doing in this thing where she was like bringing a lot and squinting and doing a little bit of like head tilting and stuff like that and we didn't know what to what to make out of it it was it was kind of. We didn't know if she was being funny. We enough. It was like a tick. I brought her to a doctor. not our normal doctor. We're we're vacationing somewhere and he's said tick. Show probably do this and she'll outgrow it. You know maybe one day and you know I got connected with Dr Size layer and and that was not the that was not the situation at all. Um mm so I I think we went one time and we weren't sure right you talk the first time I saw her. you brought her in for exactly that reunion and obviously there are tons of things that little kids do and sometimes they mean something sometimes they don't so that's why obviously it's always good to get it. Chuck is often. It's nothing and you can kind of. Just piss a buy in and say nope. It's nothing and I'm not actually even sure that that was something related to a problem how much she ended up having because at that age you know they they do do a lot of these funny things that can sometimes really not hard to communicate with them when they're so little and that was kind of what was a major amazing by watching you. It's like how do you ask a kid. That doesn't know the alphabet yet. You know how do you get them. I'm to communicate to you if what what they're seeing and so what are what are some for like very early toddler years whereas if you feel like you know your kid needs to get their eyes checked out number one water. What a red flags. which would we be looking for and number two? What is your process as a doctor. We're trying to communicate with these little. Peo- yep well so a lot of red flags are really going to be put there by your pediatrician because when kids are little obviously particularly infants they don't have a lot of ways of communicating and there's a lot of things that are important pick up early early but that as a mom you might not see and so your pediatrician is at each well visit looking for specific things. I mean I I think our pediatricians are so amazing because we ask them to do so much and look for so much pick up all these things and you know what most kids are fine and and there's nothing but then sometimes there is we need them to find that and then they're going to send you to a specialist as a mom you gotta just. I trust your mom instinct because there are plenty of so on on the contrary to what I just said They're planning times when MOMS come in and they say I I keep asking my pediatrician Putian things. Everything's fine but I feel like there's something wrong and you'd be amazed how often there is something wrong and MOMS know and you've got to trust them and that's one thing I teach my residents and medical students is listened to moms. If you're a pediatric sub specialists you really we really really have to trust moms and yeah. We're all particularly first time. MOMS there's a lot of crazy thoughts that go through our head and a lot of irrational things that that that we may say or do or you know notice in our kids that are nothing and at the same time you really have to listen because of a Momma's concerned about something you gotta listen to that concern. It may be nothing but it's worth checking out so we do see that now part to your question. How do we examine kids and check their vision when they're little so first of all again big bias because I'm a pediatric sub specialists that kids are not just little adults and they need to be seen differently and treated differently. you know as you know in my office. We really only do kids and we do adult. I muscle problems but we really are pretty biased with everything is for kids so our waiting room is kid friendly and our staff kid friendly and they're really trained and trained and trained beyond to be great with kids and great with MOMS because half the battle to get the information is making kids feel comfortable and happy and an enjoy it and so we try and make everything game and fine has to be age appropriate different ages demand different things but if it's fun and they feel like they're playing games aims so many times kids will come in and they're so nervous really scared about what's GonNa Happen and if they walk out like skipping and saying I want to come back. We've done our job because all of that is just to get the information in adult you just ask them to do it and they bill it. Totally different with kids in every age is different but you know what once you've been doing this for a long time you get good at different ages and stages and and doing what you need to do to get the information but you know with Carmen even though at the time I think the concerns that she had raised for you. the mayor may not have ultimately been related to what she ended up having it got you in to have a full exam and the full exam is where we get all the information so once we I know that I think I probably said to you right now. We don't really have to worry about this. She's fine but she is something. That's a risk risk factor for emily opium. Which is some people lazy I yeah and most people have never heard the word Amplio Pia. They may gave her lazy. I one of the reasons lazy is a tough word. In kind of the world is that people use it for different things. Some people use lazy. I'm meaning the I. Crosses or Wanderers on. I had an uncle that has I would cross in yet. One I that would cross enter couldn't look at you and I thought that that was lazy. I until I eight met you and Karma had lazy right so the reality is lazy doesn't really mean it. It's not it's our medical term right so it means whatever people use it to means enes people use it for both and in fact I think in the world most people use it more for what your time met with your uncle like and the real word for that is strong business and ends for businesses any kind of muscle problem where the eye turns in or out whereas Ambrogio Pia it which is what Karma has is when the eye looks perfectly normal. Let's perfectly straight but the brain isn't using one of the is or something's both of the is but more often one as well as it should. The brain is not getting that visual information and therefore not developing normal healthy vision which is so important and that's what I found to be so interesting. I mean not only do I want my daughter to to see well well but that idea that she had one either was working just fine and one. I that wasn't jerky working just fine and that you tend to compensate obviously asleep to the I that is stronger and you know what you taught me is that it's important especially as you are growing to have your brain be community communicating communicating properly with both eyes so that we need to not just adjust the is so they can be seeing better but also for brain development hundred

Carmen NYU Karma Emily Heisler Manhattan Tribeca Nester Wanderers Ambrogio Amplio Pia Chuck Opium One Day
Jon Stewart chokes up, slams lawmakers at hearing on 9/11 first responders fund

Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

01:56 min | 1 year ago

Jon Stewart chokes up, slams lawmakers at hearing on 9/11 first responders fund

"Wanna talk about Jon Stewart did. When he was speaking to that congressional committee about funding for nine eleven first responders, look, I know that we're here in New York. We are just blocks away from what was ground zero where all the first responders were all responding on nine eleven and we're there for months after working on the pile as they call it and, you know, at a lot of people, the most important people in New York City lost their lives that day with the falling of the towers and everything else involved with nine eleven. But for the months and years, to come people with diseases that they are still are, and so a lot of Jon Stewart's issue. And I totally agree is, he's afraid that congress who needs to be getting money to these people to help them survive. They're accusing us of complaining about a New York City problem. This happened in New York. And so it should be a New York. No, it's these people responding to a national tragedy that happened the day. So I don't know. If you've had a chance, it's been a couple of days if you haven't had chance to see John Stewart speaking to congress. Wow. Talk about a great American. I mean what he had to say in the passion behind. It was so beyond what New Yorkers need. What nine eleven victims need. It's what we all need to pay attention to the things that have happened in this country that are important. And so, John, I think the last time we saw him. He was on our show for Saint Patrick's Day morning. He was on your show. Di he I don't know if he's still smokes back, then he was smoking every five seconds, remember. Yup. Anyway, if we had more people talking to our legislators like Jon Stewart, did, I think we'd be in a better place, anyway. So a shadow to New Yorker in Tribeca Jon Stewart, but, but he's an American. He did a great job

Jon Stewart New York City John Stewart Congress Saint Patrick Five Seconds
"tribeca" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"tribeca" Discussed on 710 WOR

"W seven ten AM in beautiful downtown Tribeca. It's the Tomei Oli, go big or go home show. We will go live inside the mind of Tommy. And he will explain how you can start a business grow your business and your idea or the next multimillion dollar invention or how to buy the piece of real estate. You've always wanted. Now's your chance to hear it live right from the entrepreneur's entrepreneur. Now. You guys all been good practice. You lonely. Susannah, bringing new sites. Hey now. Hello, everybody. Live from downtown Tribeca. It's.

Tribeca Tomei Oli Tommy Susannah
"tribeca" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"tribeca" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"There's some question this morning as to whether they even were bombs in the sense that they were capable of exploding or even meant to explode. Newsman Glenn shocked with the latest on the investigation from the newsroom this morning. And I here we have another find Glen. Yeah. We do we have some breaking developments here from lower Manhattan. The police have responded for from the first precinct to three seventy five Greenwich street in the area again in Tribeca. This is the Tribeca grill that is the restaurant owned by Robert deniro and has partners there. So again, a major police response for being told here, this is on Greenwich street in lower Manhattan. The highways are going to be shut down you'll hear about that. Of course, Jeff MacKay, but we'll see what else is in terms of the apparatus that comes in. But it's a device found this morning outside the Tribeca grill, and what's important to notice police are saying it's similar to the other devices that have been found so with ten ten wins. Again. This is a breaking development here on Greenwich street, the Tribeca grill. It is owned by Robert deniro, of course, and has partners. And we'll have the latest information may even have some breaking developments and the next minute or two is this nationwide manhunt for those responsible continues, maybe a common thread linking all of these devices to the Clintons and Chappaqua. The Obamas in DC. Of course, CNN here in the city. George Soros is home in Westchester, California, congresswoman, Maxine Waters and security has been stepped up in from probably can see why again, we have another development this morning. Let's go to Penn station. Check, Emma, John Montagne to see what's going on there. Camonte john. Yeah. Good morning, Glenn even as he announced he was sending more national guard troops and state troopers patrol next to NYPD anti-terror unit. Governor Cuomo said, this is New York. We will not be intimidated. We.

Robert deniro Glenn Tribeca Manhattan Jeff MacKay Governor Cuomo George Soros Obamas Penn station Glen Maxine Waters CNN Clintons NYPD Chappaqua New York John Montagne California Emma
"tribeca" Discussed on Here's The Thing

Here's The Thing

04:39 min | 2 years ago

"tribeca" Discussed on Here's The Thing

"I'm Alec Baldwin and you're listening to, here's the thing now more of my conversation in front of a live audience at the Tribeca film festival with director Spike Lee films, obviously deal with a lot of themes of racial injustices. Fourth and struggle are themes that are in your own films are the in waterfront as well. Yeah, I was on Cooper when this whole thing was Happel capper, Nick and I watch one award war again that a million of time. And the stuff. The cabinet was saying the same stuff that Marlon Brando was saying, I want my rights. And you can see the mob was in it the whole news because we have the shape up. Had the things that guy was given out. And his mother fucker here in the scene to get on the work that guy the store ever has to give you like a coin. In. So after Marlon Brando terrible. Loye testifies against Lee J Cobb friend, Johnny friendly. He says, fuck it. I'm going back to work. So we standing there and they're giving out a coin to everybody, and then there's nobody there and there's some Rummy some bugah. Who's has is over the fire of fire, you wanna work, it put it is. So I'm saying the NFL these motherfuckers high quarterbacks will horrible. So what they did determine why they're doing the capper Nick, they were, I don't wanna say the guy's name. The guy had retired. Chicago Bears quarterback. Go ahead, say his name, he He would. would. How they took him out retirement game, attending dollar contract. He was horrible. Kevin still can't get a job. So it was amazing, but she'll Burke was visionary. And when I saw what they, they're doing the term a lawyer, it was the same thing in if that was doing the cabinet. I think that. A lot of legend and lore about that film, and you know these stories of everybody's heard a million times about. Banda doesn't do the off camera for. And all that crap. All this, which is not that important is the movie about Kazan's mea culpa for ratting un-american. I'm glad what I'd done to you. John friendly. I'm keep on doing it. He says, you know that the no apologies for that. But for me, it's like a brand was someone who was a, did you know, Brandon? Yeah, I met Brenda. One time I was going to do. I was in this wheel of my life where CPO CBS was going to pay people big money to do these. Emo w. m. o. w. we did streetcar on Broadway, which we wind up doing on a TV. No, no, no, no, no on that, but we do. We do streetcar brought it on TV with that was a waste of time, but they paid everybody a lot of money. But like why do it from TV when it's in the movie, his movie. And so I go see him because they want to do cannon ten roof and they wanted to play big daddy, but they're not gonna ensure him long story short as I go to his house as a true story, I go to house up a mo- Holland and I go to beg. Him to do cabinets and roof. If they will ultimately insurance, they wouldn't, and I'll do my my my tepid brand-new impersonation. But I said, I said a. You know, I know one thing led to I had lunch with it for four hours, and I said. United streetcar on Broadway. We like it was like six or seven years before as the I, I heard about that from some friends of mine that you did that. I heard you were very good. Yes. And I heard you were very funny and I, I wish I had done more of that because it's very funny part, and the character of Stanley has very funny. And I wish I'd found more of the humor myself. There's a pause and I went, but it worked out pretty well for you just to say which. Win. Okay. Don't you for our went over for the public and but he hits, I met him just at one time and what you see. He's interesting to me because there's a couple of guys. I mean, I'm gonna talk briefly about it from the actors standpoint, which I can't help, but but she was obviously a big beacon from me and those moments here, there's always a moment..

Marlon Brando Stanley Nick Happel capper John friendly Alec Baldwin Spike Lee United streetcar w. m. o. w. NFL director Chicago CPO CBS Cooper Banda Kazan Loye Burke Lee J Cobb Kevin
"tribeca" Discussed on Here's The Thing

Here's The Thing

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"tribeca" Discussed on Here's The Thing

"Age. Listener's support w. in Wiessee studios. I'm Alec can you're listening to? Here's the thing. Everybody welcome at Baldwin spike lake. I've been trying to get Spike Lee on this program for a long time. Finally, we made it happen in front of a live audience at this year's Tribeca film festival. The deal was we would each engage the other in a discussion about one of our favorite movies of all time. Just listing spike, Lee's films should be enough to establish his place as one of the deans of American making do the right thing. Malcolm x. jungle fever, she's gotta have it. They defined what it means to be black in America and help spike smashed through Hollywood's racial glass ceiling, and he's still at it with this year's festival, favourite black klansman in which I make an appearance alongside stars, John, David, Washington, and Adam driver. And now our conversation at spring studios in New York as part of the Tribeca film festival, we didn't heard any of this first of all. Let me just explain to you what a pain in the ass. It is to get him on the phone. It is so painful. Liz, tell him and text him and texting. Let's tell close really sunny calls you back. Six, what's up. Am I see a number on my phone? I don't know the number. I don't pick up. And he has four numbers. Tell me, I mean. What I wanna know I is because I think this helps these kinds of origins help us understand this kind of film appreciation. What was movie going in your life when you were young when you were child, tell us where you grew up, what kind of household you grow up in and what was the whole TV movie dynamic in terms of your consumption of that kind of stuff when your child? I never knew that you keep him make a film going up. I grew up in the public Brooklyn. We were the first black family to move into cobble hill, which is a predominantly town America navy because Kabul's right by the docks and the dots were town American, and we got called nigga couple times first week once my friends sold them work, a hundred other black families moving in behind me, then we were just cool at the none of that. And then we, my mother. Decide stopped paying rent. So we bought a Brownstone four green for forty, five thousand dollars. They go for four million. Now. What year was that? Sixty? Eight. My father grew up in fort green on Saint James place. Fulton's Jan. So I remember you now. You're a pain in the ass then too. I couldn't get you on the phone back at sixty eight either. You were in for green sixty eight. Because white flight had happened by then people will move the Long Island. But movie you saw on the big screen. The the first move. I remember my mother took me to see real requ it. My father hated movies, but he loves sports. Got my love of spores from my father. My mother love movies, but my father hated movies. I was my mother's movie date. The I still remember my mother. My late mother, take me took me for Easter Sunday racing musical, so bye. Bye. Birdie. Cracks me up his thing, known that still impact you so much. I even know it. The opening credit sequence do the right thing Rosie, Perez dancing that came from. Bye bye. Birdie and Margaret. That's where it came from, and I must. Must've been like seventy years old, but it just came out of nowhere. I mean, this is a cliche, I guess, but did that do something to you the first time you so movie on a big screen you sit there and go, wow. Yeah, but I didn't want them. I is not like it at that moment. Him went like it was not. I who who makes a movie. So going up, I wanted to play second base of New York Mets, but genetics conspired against happening that's changed over to the Yankees. But anyway. I wanted to be a porn star, but you didn't have to spite against that too..

Spike Lee Baldwin spike lake Adam driver Malcolm Wiessee studios New York Mets New York Long Island Brooklyn fort green Liz Yankees America Fulton Saint James place Hollywood Margaret Washington
"tribeca" Discussed on Film Festival reViews

Film Festival reViews

06:34 min | 2 years ago

"tribeca" Discussed on Film Festival reViews

"It's all the whole score. Was like a subliminally. Reggae beat with Greek music on top highly. Recommend things. Okay the rest of the week we did spend some time in the The Lounge in the lounges. And we got chance to talk to a a young couple who were working on a web series and was called home so we still haven't seen it but when we are talking to them and what was so interesting because here we are. We've been around for a long time although we've only been married eight years but we've lived many decades going through different changes in our lives and they're just starting out so they've been married five years and they move. Yeah Yup and they move from somewhere midwest right and to L. A. And so they're talking about how to make a home in a place where you don't feel like this is your home and Mica. Who's the the young man he was originally? They met you know he and his his wife he was talking about that. He was used to be a stand up comedian. Yes talking about being home schooled in the woods. I had me institutes research saying that alone we were exchanging good things because why we were there. What was going on that? We were making a film for the Asbury Park Festival to correct and we had we had an acceptance there so we shared a lawn of lawnmowers working together as a team they worked together on. And that's what we do as well So there are a lot of things that we had in common and fund. Being from this metropolitan area we also steered them work worker. We go see a concert work. Can we do this? And that while they're in New York I'm into some what I would call the right places right the list of clubs where you should go see. You know to make sure that you get that feeling that ambience of what was going on. And that's what we do when we talk about the film festival and especially the TRIBECA film festival but some other ones that we will be talking about in future episodes so overall We really liked this years. The only thing that we still need to discuss and that is something that is is for a completely different show but that is an award that went to a short film all phone duty which is went to a Russian British Russian filmmaker who somehow got access to the Russian insurgents to the Russian terrorists who are infiltrating and are involved with the the war with Ukraine. I mean they've invaded and they are very aggressive. And they're attacking the people civilians and soldiers in Ukraine and this short film called phone duty which highlights one of these aggressors Was Giving an award for short film. And that's something that I think that bothered US quite a bit. There were fifty five short films there and you give it to a short film that is condoning terrorism and you know aggression and war and know just killing on. I'm sorry that's like giving Isis and award a story about Isis or are giving an award to the pilots who flew into the World Trade Center and giving them you know an award about a short film that you know focusing on on the pilots. It's something that doesn't sit well with people who are living through this and who are losing loved ones and family members their homes and everything and I think that's a responsibility for film festivals to look into that also if they don't know that much about it these jurors or the the ones that are actually screening the the judges the selection committee and the programmers. I think this is something that they really have to take into consideration and look into it because this is what Putin would wanNA do infiltrate the media and the way they you know. Get into showing people that Oh this is accepted and we've got an award so we can do whatever we want there. I go with my soapbox other than that. We had a wonderful time even with the security guy that we met on that. We've seen your previous years when they used to have the Cadillac clown somewhere in forgotten. Win The well. It was closer to the The Chelsea area into the cinema where all of the press and industry screenings going on. They had nothing in the theater. They didn't even have seeding available for anyone who is going in between one film to the other. We miss that very much. It was a great little lounge. Everyone was able to come in and kind of have a little pre right but not only that they had. We ran into Mariel Hemingway that time when you looked over. That looks like Mariel Hemingway. I said that is Mariel. Hemingway and I talked to her about the film that she had a few years ago. Tribeca so it was open to anyone who just needed a little place to Kinda grab a bite or something was better at that point but the concentration of where we had to be a lot more accessible this year. Definitely but we did it and we had a wandering time and it was wonderful spring traveling into the city and out. We schedule ourselves very well. And it wasn't taxing. I had just have to say it was the best one. I enjoyed I to two very good the bill. That's it that's it. See You folks next time. Goodbye.

Mariel Hemingway Ukraine Mariel Asbury Park Festival Isis New York Mica The Lounge Tribeca Putin World Trade Center
"tribeca" Discussed on Film Festival reViews

Film Festival reViews

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"tribeca" Discussed on Film Festival reViews

"Hello and welcome to another episode of Film Festival reviews. This is where we you're a church in and is Christina Kotler your host talk about the film festivals and movies that we see and the experience that we have going to film festivals. Because that's what it's all about having a great film festival experience and today we're going to be talking about our experience Tribeca Film Festival. This is the seventeenth annual TRIBECA film festival out of New York. And it's my sixteenth of going there and seeing all the films and all the changes and everything that's been going on from the beginning to the time now and together with Yadi along Hawker Stephen. This is our eighth together together since we started. I introduced you to the film festival world when we started going out together and I think you found it quite interesting. What an adventure over the years. Especially yes so. We was different. I see improvements in it this year. We didn't have to jump around all over the city. That's what happened in the very very beginning. When it was going into its fifth and sixth and seventh years it really expanded. It went into all kinds of different areas of New York. Because they think they're rebuilding of course down in TRIBECA and but they weren't a lot of other things that were going on to. They had a lot of family day events and I don't know it just didn't seem really have that kind of connected -ness of the film festival because we had to be on the subway quite a bit of traveling across town uptown downtown so now it seems like we have that one place down in Tribeca. So it's in this very large building and it's on varick street and it has different levels and you'll be able to see movies there because we did that last year. We saw the movie about Johnny. Rotten and then there was the VR which still goes on the virtual reality augmented reality technology. That's going in there. I think this year they expanded into television and web series. And we'll talk about that later because we met this really cute couple and in the first lounge. Yeah the Press Lounge was great. You know you're able able to really relax there. And they had all kinds of the a Lotta panels going there so we didn't get to see all of that. We were really into just wanting to see the movies so we headed uptown to Chelsea area and we went to the theater that was across from the School of Visual Arts. And that's where they had a lot of screenings and that's where the red carpet would go. We really didn't see any red carpet things but we were going for the press and industry screenings. And that's why I love the book that they give out the fifth book. It's for filmmakers industry and press and it gives you everything that's going on on description of the films and who's making end where it comes from and how to get in touch with people so I really love this this is. This is the Bible that we walk around with slow heavy. But I think it's great and the first film that we got to see of course. We were able to go on Monday because I had a little accident and and had stitches in my in my wrist because I broke my wrist. The week know few weeks before we went to see this movie called. Braid.

Film Festival TRIBECA New York Christina Kotler Hawker Stephen School of Visual Arts Yadi Johnny Chelsea
"tribeca" Discussed on Cinephile: The Adnan Virk Movie Podcast

Cinephile: The Adnan Virk Movie Podcast

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"tribeca" Discussed on Cinephile: The Adnan Virk Movie Podcast

"Yeah like but he he's he said this when i gave them my number and i just i brought up saying like well we mr on the carpet we we'll try and get a hold of you wanna get a do you want to get a phone interview where they're just give me a call man we'll we'll set it up so but you know like i said life happened it happened so like i gave them my number and i still have my ohio number even though i live in connecticut and he's like all always f with a with a three oh that that's that that's a high oh for that we look out for our own man we like whenever whenever and another ohio and successful as long as you're cool yeah we're we're happy like we're a family so that's great more power to them we always look out for each other all right that concludes the stories quickly a few more reviews and then we'll finish up this tribeca sinophile episode i saw a couple of episodes of this show called sweet bidder which is on stars was awful avoid it like the plague i sought to episodes because identing else to do at that point i had a little bit of a whole before i go see sarah jessica parker speak and then our american means screening so listen it's filled with all the usual restaurant cliches avoided at all costs i did really like documentary called sidelined if very interesting because of all the talk of the cheerleaders right now and the nfl washington redskins cheerleaders so they had to pose topless and said there were kind of pimped out his escorts and so this documentary was very good i recommend it's only forty minutes long it's called sidelined and i hope it gets picked up somewhere and people can look.

connecticut ohio sarah jessica parker nfl washington redskins forty minutes
"tribeca" Discussed on Movin 92.5

Movin 92.5

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"tribeca" Discussed on Movin 92.5

"Dan and so soon bruce sure your point five eu you got had no longer go ahead oh man in north tribeca announcers who would have policies the hobart overnight outside his lawn this has russia who have not yet is done one more day those was next levy of old bias by once in the cars may be a combination of hard times let me holler labyrinth the imola deemed then thaddeus it is not a trace john major yet his assumed name as the tiny chad has seized on the ground sudan has yet mm good the.

Dan russia john chad sudan bruce tribeca thaddeus
"tribeca" Discussed on Slate's Double X Gabfest

Slate's Double X Gabfest

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"tribeca" Discussed on Slate's Double X Gabfest

"My agents set up a meeting a general meeting with miramax and i went to tribeca and met with the people at miramax in harvey was the guy i met with and i remember there were other people they're women here i'm one woman in particular that was his assistant his primary assistant and in the actual office i felt very safe and like i was doing the right thing and the meeting went really well and he gave me to scripts to read and you know miramax was was the early nineties but they were doing interesting independent movies and he made me feel like i was a fit there and i had been spending the year auditioning you know i may be got two guest spots or something and the rest of the year was just auditioning in here he was giving me this sort of validation like you're on the right track coupon and at that point in my life i needed to hear that because has sent a listening to her story i think i wish i had taken a hard left in gone and studied psychology you know and done something more constructive um and i say that only because i think what happened was as i did put so much hard work into acting and after my this incident it was a profound incident for me and then it did affect the way i looked at my career and there was it i think it pushed me back a lot i stayed in it but i had a conflict now that was living less that made it much harder to pursue with the same zest and purity that i had once it now started with but my story goes that as i left the office that day on my way to the elevator harvey stop me and he said well welcome to the miramax family and he used the word family to make you know making me feel very sorted included and cozy.

miramax harvey tribeca
"tribeca" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"tribeca" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Rows more important than it's ever be companies grew up with passerby readers to defuse don't have a consumer whose actively looking for your content is very difficult to build and select as would snapchat stood with advertising and storytelling it's clear that digital can be more than the thing that we think it is welcome to the dj podcast by marcy editor in chief of the day and this week i'm joined by andrew essex acea tribeca enterprises which is the owner of the tribeca film festival andrew was formerly president and trigger five and he's also the author of a new book ominously titled the end of advertise and talk about that more commander experiment puts route let's start with which are back and then owner i want to move into the doom and gloom section i was intrigued when you when you went over to run tribeca what did you see there for what it was when it can be calm i just thought about it as like a film festival there's a lot of different found vessels one of the leading one you're you and a lot of people and obviously the word film is evolving the way the word newspapers evolving so festival had doesn't that we've we've did the ominous phase earlier wrote a little premature but it was a similar issues is you you have a fantastic brand and the platform is changing around the world is changing around it so film is core but the festival done so much more amid also started to find a way to monetize that was intriguing to me a lot of that was making content for brands rather than asking him to sponsor an event so going for something passive.

president editor in chief andrew essex acea tribeca enterprises commander