35 Burst results for "Tribeca"

Man in Love Tries to Break Into Taylor Swift's Apartment

AM 970 The Answer Programming

00:19 sec | 1 year ago

Man in Love Tries to Break Into Taylor Swift's Apartment

"Man under arrest for trying to break into Taylor Swift's apartment in Tribeca Yesterday, Patrick Neeson allegedly entered the building through an unlocked door and around eight in the morning it was spotted by security officer Who called the cops? The 28 year old told police he is in love with the pop superstar. He's now facing second degree criminal trespassing charges.

Patrick Neeson Taylor Swift Tribeca
Tribeca Film Festival 2021 Wrap-up Feat I Carry You With Me

Why Watch That Radio

02:05 min | 1 year ago

Tribeca Film Festival 2021 Wrap-up Feat I Carry You With Me

"Critic. What i carry you with me. Oh no that's the name of the movie we're gonna be reviewing don't it djabel. Komiya a may know me go see. Now here's the deal. This is peak. We got a chance to check it out. We being the critic and this is going to come to us in the question is are you really going to go out and you know i don't know but let let us tell you about it and you can make a decision for yourself. Heidi ewing wrote it and she directed at with alan page and it is. I have a feeling a movie that we're going to have to be looking at the bottom of our screen and keeping up you know Meaning subtitles so why reviewing this tell us about it and are we going out now. Well we're reviewing it. Because i got to see this at af. I fast last year new. So now it's time to do the full on review and you know we'll we'll get down to the business of this rather quickly everybody. So here's what's happening in this movie. It's really two distinct time periods. They're separated by many years. And you'll see what that means when you watch this. So there are two main characters yvonne and geraldo and these two are living in mexico and yvonne. He has a young child He has an axe who has the child with wise at the case. Why they together. He's a wonderful father but he comes to meet route dope and heraldo catches his eye. Yes they fall in love now. This is a problem. This is in the ninety s in mexico now. Ronaldo is more out open friends with all kinds of people free on the streets. Is that

Komiya Heidi Ewing Alan Page Yvonne Geraldo Heraldo Mexico Ronaldo
Dave Chappelle Documentary to Close Tribeca Film Festival

710 WOR Programming

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

Dave Chappelle Documentary to Close Tribeca Film Festival

"A famous comic is closing out the Tribeca Festival tomorrow night. The film from comedian Dave Chappelle takes a glimpse into the challenges facing a rural village in Ohio. During the early days of the pandemic, it will spotlight the high emotions following the Black lives matter. Movement along without local young people started weekly marches and rallies. The film will premiere at Radio City Music Hall, which marks the first time the iconic venue has been opened in more than a year. I'm Lisa G.

Dave Chappelle Ohio Radio City Music Hall Lisa G.
David Chappelle to Premiere Emotional New Documentary at Tribeca Festival

Mark Simone

00:28 sec | 1 year ago

David Chappelle to Premiere Emotional New Documentary at Tribeca Festival

"A new documentary from a famous comic is closing out the Tribeca Festival tomorrow night. The film from comedian Dave Chappelle takes a glimpse into the challenges facing a rural village in Ohio. During the early days of the pandemic, it will spotlight the high emotions following the Black lives matter. Movement along without local young people started weekly marches and rallies. The film will premiere at Radio City Music Hall, which marks the first time the iconic venue has been opened in more than a year.

Dave Chappelle Ohio Radio City Music Hall
Podcasts Receive Premieres at 2021 Tribeca Festival

podnews

00:17 sec | 1 year ago

Podcasts Receive Premieres at 2021 Tribeca Festival

"Guardians. If the river is to be premiered at the twenty twenty one tribeca festival podcast from house of pants is a series about whether it's possible to protect some of the most remote and wild places on the planet like this. The okavango delta in botswana africa

Botswana Africa
Steven Soderbergh's 'No Sudden Move' to Premiere at Tribeca Film Festival

Filmspotting

02:09 min | 1 year ago

Steven Soderbergh's 'No Sudden Move' to Premiere at Tribeca Film Festival

"There's a new steven soderbergh movie coming out. Oh really just assumed. There's one every month now. Accurate that is fair but i reference of course there in the question out of sight still my favorite steven soderbergh movie. And there's a reason for it. Soderbergh himself said when asked about making this movie. No sudden move which is a heist movie. The last time. I shot a movie in detroit with a great script and a great cast. Things worked out. Pretty well yeah. He made a masterpiece. This one though. Unlike out of sight is a period piece it said back in nineteen fifty five and is about a group of small time criminals who are hired to steal the documents. Seems like it's simple josh. I don't know if you've heard this before it's a heist that seems like it'll be simple And then something goes off if you want to make a move proposition for you. It's never your fault. is it offensive. Do you think i was skiing. I'm sure there's going to be some interesting socio political elements to the movie being set in detroit in the mid fifty s. A time where you know. Some of the big auto plants are starting to close. You've got this growing class and racial divide. So it's gonna be a grittier piece. It is going to be more akin to something like out of sight. Or even maybe kind of the limy versus the breezy flash of something like ocean's eleven but the cast just like with ocean's eleven is also a big big reason to see this movie and i guess clooney jack fully himself danny ocean himself was originally set to star and had to back out due to the pandemic but listen to this cast even without clooney. Don cheadle benicio del toro. Amy siamese jon hamm david harbour ray liotta karen culkin julia fox brendon. Frazier bill duke. And supposedly matt

Steven Soderbergh Soderbergh Detroit Josh Skiing Clooney Jack Danny Ocean Don Cheadle Benicio Del Toro Amy Siamese David Harbour Clooney Karen Culkin Jon Hamm Ray Liotta Julia Fox Brendon Frazier Bill Duke Matt
Robert De Niro Says Leg Injury May Prevent Tribeca Fest Appearance

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

Robert De Niro Says Leg Injury May Prevent Tribeca Fest Appearance

"A veteran Oscar winning actor is going to be laid up for a bit the Nero is likely to be office feed for a bit after suffering a leg injury while working on a movie in Oklahoma the two time Oscar winner was at work on the upcoming Martin Scorsese film killers of the flower moon he has since returned to his home in New York in an interview promoting the upcoming tribeca Film Festival deniro says he managed to rip a ligament in his squad and it needs to be re attached to his knee otherwise he says he's fine and the injury is manageable what may not be so manageable his appearance at the Film Festival that he co founded it's due to begin June ninth deniro says with this pending surgery he isn't quite sure how he'll be able to get around during the festival I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Oscar Nero Deniro Martin Scorsese Oklahoma New York Film Festival Oscar Wells Gabriel
"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

"I'm going to direct descendant that was written by a really great writer named jeff bueller and it's a it's a horror movie. That's about reincarnation. So i'm excited. That was august and then like last september. So that's that's the goal. Then so what movie was it. They use some all saw. That said i wanted means for me. It was dual the spielberg. Oh made for tv movie. I don't know if this if exactly satisfies cardia. But i saw the movie. Watership down was small to any traumatized literally really bad like from months and months and months i was traumatized head. And so i you know as a grub. It became a filmmaker. I always think back to like. I think i was really informed by being traumatized in wanting to you know like in the other one. That had a big impact when i was a little bit. Older was pink. Floyd the wall over. He's a movie that i don't think people talk about enough as great piece of cinema directed by per and like that made me feel physically ill and there's something about movies that had this like really really negative impact on me that i throw part of my point of view if not my immediate realization of like oh i want to also create pictures in sequence i came to that i want to be Later i was more into painting and started making weird. Video are very very weird. Yarden some performance art. Yeah but when. I think about sort of movies from childhood. Probably what was most influential I somehow got to see a copy against my parents wishes but like a friend slip in copy of a clockwork orange as anything boy. Thank you all. And i hope to see you all good. Thank you look for holidays on demand. Interesting film interesting directors to this. Is tony tomato. Thanks for listening. Seen one apple take two..

jeff bueller last september tony tomato two august Floyd one apple spielberg
"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

06:47 min | 1 year ago

"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

"It had land you know and you could beat. You could go to a bank. And i'm going to go to the west and dig gold. Maybe they'd invest in you. You know what. I mean when you say wild west stand with your metaphor but like this is this is darker than the wild west time. Because i think we're we're in a time where everybody's filmmaker. Everybody is a filmmaker and so it's really important. It's even more important to be aware of why you're making what you're making. And everyone has so many other things they could be doing with their time. Now so what are you doing with your film that is worthy of an audience sitting down and giving you that time and also i think it makes craft all the more important now just because technology is successful in. Almost anybody can make a movie. I think like pushing yourself to The level of more refined craft i think is to has changed the content of films. Will the technology has made this thing. Where technology has made it so now anybody can pick up camera moving for no money. But i keep seeing evidence that there's a pushback against that to try to reclaim the expensive filmmaking. So like the only films that people wanna see anymore have vast incredible special effects. So right when we're at a time where anybody could conceivably be. Stanley kubrick cavities. You can only be george lucas. Or there's a new camera on the market now where you can choose your angle and focus points after you should the movie so you don't even have to direct when you're directing but i'm sure that's that's a rig that's like incredibly expensive and so that it's back to like the only way to make movie once again. Requires this thing that we can just got the point where it doesn't require it so there's battle between how you can even be an independent filmmaker because nobody's gonna watch it and is there a. Is there a a pressure to make those no longer affordable anymore. You know what. I mean like film cultures is in is in a dangerous place right because people have lost a sense of the history of film arts importance or the ability to even watch move. Yeah well the same time. it's the opposite. I mean it's like the that like now the history of films center fingertips but it's not net flicks made it so that they were the only place you've got to watch move when they were. Dvd's on now. All the dvd stores are going out of business because get every movie from net flicks and then they liquidated their catalog down to fifteen percent. What they started with. So it's like somebody bought all the libraries in the books the libraries. There are many more if you're not talking about streaming there. There are many more movies available than ever before in terms of like not only You know like burn on demand that they exist like if you count. Vhs if you count dvd which actually viable ways to watch movies and like on the plane on the way over here. I watched badlands. And like it's kind of like. I am thirty five thousand feet in the air watching this amazing movie like at my fingertips and so that i agree with you and there is a danger but also there is this magic and it's changing movies. That are being made at movies. I came out. It was like an inferior art form. Right it was like seen is just sort of pure novelty. I think it's we're we're so lucky to be living in a time when they can be treated as literature in a way and treated as or you know. A more heightened our firm and it's great that we have audiences who seek that out even if their niche audiences and everything is niece. I'll tell you what i liked about. This movie is what i can sell maybe very minimal. Cgi was all the effects for practical that we're done so i appreciate it tat budget. Cgi things once in a while. But it's going to die you get a lot of sugar. It's not good for five minutes. You had what it was. can you start it. Probably the right know that was. That was that i couldn't spell. We actually human. No but yeah. There was a little little secret effect the nuggets trails breadcrumbs. Go back that's the thing that's nice now. I think you can take a sort of practical approach to using affects. The don't feel like effects is is the fun thing to do. And what's it like to be here. Tribeca i is. This is the first time. Fancy zuber's feisty and fancy and we feel. We're really loved and cared for by festival. It's great gave us free popcorn. You're going to have a chance to see anything else. While you're i'm staying long enough. So that i'm definitely i i've some things lined up that i'm really stoked about. I'm excited to see king. Cobra wanna see equals cosmetics. Kristen stewart fan. I've seen is a good nicholas is critical. Yes kicks tomorrow night. I'm going to go see always shine on different sylvia's on which seems really davis Brilliant can christian does a really good job that return really understated but really good performance and you just see her art. Really come to life in. I think you'll really like. Did you see the clouds of maria. No i didn't see that you would like that movie. have you seen. It ain't like person only think she's really good very underrated. She's she's not underrated. She's hated wonderful unbelievably great actress. She's fucking heated because people are assholes and what's up for all and in post on the call busters now heart starring. Dj walls and joe and it is a surreal mystery. Dark meat elements. That just came up over. That's us also romney's killing each robot tastic actor person who's really amazing tremendous cool. That's a good one at a film. We're trying to find. Now that i co wrote with the same writer that i wrote some with and it's he's a novelist it's based on his first novel on. This is really interesting version of a story about an imaginary friend. A which is treated as a physician ghost story and we want to shoot it in manhattan. Which would be exciting. So hopefully that be won't even though he's imaginary he really exists. Sort of speak. Well.

five minutes manhattan tomorrow night fifteen percent thirty five thousand feet george lucas christian davis first novel Cobra Kristen stewart badlands first time call busters Stanley kubrick clouds of maria each robot nicholas sylvia more
"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

08:27 min | 1 year ago

"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

"The pain had kind of transformed into this state of pleasure foreign. So there's this one moment when he gives this kind of ecstatic mon when he's experiencing pain and that was a very Tell creepy and pedophilia man. Yeah i think what happens is when you when you take kind of disparate elements things. That don't seem to go together and you just started starts work together. You can get kind of moments like that. That are are You know a feeling or a sense of something that you haven't seen before in usually my reaction to to to stuff like that that that may be it's like really ghoulish czarist to laugh you know so that's what i always seeking to do when i was writing. You don't wanna be working with with mark is to is to find myself giggling. You know. I think your movie is the most likely to cause nightmare. Oh yeah yeah. Definitely on the at the girl able. She was correct she was achieve really sold to. I was really maybe take off your producers who produce. Wow but for all of you. I guess you conscious of time when you're doing this movie couldn't go over a certain length to kind of fit it into the whole kind of thing Yeah i mean. I think we were sort of told chime. Keep it under certain length of but also you know our budgets were huge is really like what can you do within these constraints And yeah i think a lot of She was three days. Do you think you said yours to allow now. I had the benefit of having seen what everybody else had done. And and really made like a big shift from what i had originally written that i wanted to do into what into doing. First of all nobody had done new year's and it felt like without new years. It wasn't gonna feel like a complete year of holidays and Want i think mine is the shortest. And i wanted it to be like you know really kind of get in there and give you liked this kind of adrenaline hit whereas previous you know if i'd not been aware of what everybody else probably would have gone like a very during psychedelic direction. But i was glad that context forced me into doing the exact opposite of that. So how did you get them all on board to do what was it wasn't me brought them all on board of his john hageman. Who's the mastermind. Producer was a fan of my work. And i worked with him on things before and then he invited me to join the project to do one segment in to help him look for talent and then he also teamed up with xyz films. And so between me and some of the like sarah's moving really loved it. And so i. I wanted to make sure she was a part of it and our producing partners had worked with nick and suggested him and so there was a couple different voices looking for talent and us to be a part of it and even in the thing. That's interesting about that. Is i feel like there is a kind of overall tone or feeling to the movie where it holds together. Despite the fact that everybody was essentially sent off to do whatever they wanted without a lot of communication with one another but it still disrepair that major goal unconscious organic feeling of coming together or maybe dozen de weakest imposed. Because we think it does. But i don't i don't know i think there's something that the knee experiment way. Yeah i guess there's something about doing holidays movie where you're like. You explore something that everybody does something with bother me. Everybody's feels quite different. Actually very distinctly in their voice is really rose rushing in nice. And even like tony's there are some much more sort of leaning towards humor. Something just take the world a little bit more at face value a little more seriously but in all i mean i think anthony. Such a great job with those interstitial cars. That really do help tie it together. What's fun about it anthologies. You're just sort of know. Even if that particular tone is not for you like it's only going to last ten minutes or something and then you can get onto the next one. So i think it's it's really fun for that reason. It's a box of chocolates with razor blades of the poster. Stay tuned for more of. I talk indie film. Podcast back with more on genre film. Making on the sci fi talk indie. Podcast saved one apple. Take to actually. It worked for me because it wasn't all one thing that there was. There was dark humor. There was just flat out horror movie. You know it. Kind of echoed rosemary's baby totally and i said yeah i totally relate to this. I've seen something like this. But never quite this way. And i appreciated the originality of it so it was hard solid. G is alive and movie that this kind of reminded me of a little bit was creepshow. That's john's john. Hayden is always like my dad's his favorite as always hoping that this would be sort of more of a throwback to that approach than to you know something like abc's or or vhs which have their merits but we were looking for something that had a little bit more of that color and coherency. Or i don't know what it was one thing. I hear adams say that. I really liked his. It's almost this opportunity for a bunch of directors who didn't really know each other to come together and kind of like a now. We have this little family because event and we all yeah like thanksgiving people like to watch humans. Undergo horrible traumas left. Did you really think about film influences when you. I know that's not really. I mean more likely to reference like paintings or photographs abusing not a huge fan. Many films that way to not watch movies. That's interesting. What about your locations being both. Your stuff is endorsed by yours. Drew out so i chose. I wrote it for the house. Where i i took shrooms which that housing the desert used to be even crazier than what you see on screen because it was used to have all these neon dildo sculptures ever knows what a perfect fertility house and and then we got there is a new owner had bought the house and it still beautiful. But they took down. All the dildo sculptures such a bummer. I was the first thing the new owner did right thinking. They were beautiful because they were like glow in the dark. And they were. They didn't even look like dildos because they were so Bountiful in these sculptures even notice. The penis is these blooming neon flowers. They weren't actually there because you were just on shrimp all know long. But so when. I was thinking about house for Ceremony that was came to me. But then you had to all the way to the desert because like a three hour drive. We've been incredible drone. Sean how did you shoot. We just like convinced like people to come on board for very little money and it was. It was an increasing production. In retrospect like going to bring it fifteen naked win an out to the desert and it was cold because it was december and we also we threw a wedding on set on top of it. So my producer got married onset. Yeah it's really wild. How do you guys view independent film right now is it. Is it easier now with all these new athletes or is it just as hard as ever was to get something. I think it's just as hard as it ever ever was. And i know in my experience between making my first and my second film the the market had completely changed. And i think it's you know at a different place now. There are no rules. To getting movies financed. It's like the wild west. The wild west had a economic reason to be doing things though. Like the wild west had gold and.

Sean john hageman second film three hour three days Hayden december first both one moment nick one thing abc one segment ten minutes dozen de First apple fifteen naked adams
"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

07:44 min | 1 year ago

"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

"Scene one apple take one scene. One apple take to hi welcome to sci-fi talks i had the directors were few segments of the anthology holidays. It kind of mixes humor comedy and has some good to at tribeca film festival. I had a chance to chat with nicholas mccarthy that directed easter adam egypt mortimer who directed new year's eve and ellen reed who directed mother's day. Here's our roundtable conversation scifi movie teacher. I'm because we. We all made science fiction films. Right until i'm targeting gotta talk about this is. Have you ever seen fantastic contest french film. Vhs we might have a really cool mood. It's coming out on blu ray. All fantastic cheerios is doing a good job with that. They definitely do. I love when they do up out of all the movies i loved all your and They were cool so this would sarah. With mother's day. I saw that there was a lot of different influence in that. It wasn't just to appeal to me. There's a lot of textures to kind of talk about some of the influences that you use for that movie. I tend not to really work with influences. Necessarily get down like i'm going to you know But i think i just try to work from the inside out and so I started with the idea that actually shot this. In december of two thousand fourteen mine was the first issue so shot up quite a while ago had looked ahead at mother's day and it fell on five ten twenty fifteen so i wanted to look at what happened in history on five ten fifteen twenty and turns out montezuma the second whose death sort of is very mysterious and much debated died around that time and there was a cult that believed he would come again and so that was really interesting to me and wanted to combine that with the notion that for thousands and thousands of years of human history women had no control over when they would get pregnant and really no control over their bodies and like half the time they would just like die screaming bleeding out in child labor or like have like a dead baby or like a baby that limited to and then die there was just like all this really intense sadness and horror running motherhood and i think with the advent of contraceptives. We've we take that for granted. Our relationship with our bodies and mother had wanted to bring that back of what what it would feel like to lose control over your body in the process of becoming. Mother flipped it instead of a woman. Who who can't she can't she can't suck. Yeah wanted to make the if i ever wanted to make a feature red kinda wanna make the prequel of just the horror of having to go to that abortion clinic over and over again. I think there's something amazing about says. Yes something that it's like. I'm happy that we had your point of view. Because i like just never seen that before. And like you say you know saint patrick's day which is also brilliant part of the dodgy. It's about a woman who she can't capriccio. Shula wants to be pregnant. She's looking at baby. And you know movies. Brilliant at that particular point of view. Seen before. And i've never seen your interpretation of what the horror movie rosemary's baby or out of being pregnant but it's still a woman who's trying to have a family but then the reality of seniors and basic assumption that which is not untrue. But that most women can't wait for the day to have their baby. And i think for a lot of women that's just not true or it's more complicated than that and the so-called maternal instincts aren't necessarily like showing up out of nowhere for everybody So i wouldn't always asking me all the time when i'm going to have a baby because i'm at that age married for nine years. I'm thirty three and everyone's like looking at me. Like i guess you proved that even Serial killers can have a hard time. I mean is that his former is a question but arrive. The story like the idea was to find the thing about new. That makes you that. Makes people makes me anxious right. And it's like we're gonna have the best time ever since i was a child. There was this idea. Like we're gonna have the best time ever and was always only ever the worst time and i really like really like stories that are about like breakup or relationships that go in the wrong direction So when i was talking to dennis and kevin who wrote it you know we started talking about like what are bad new year's eve we've had what are horrible dates we've been on. I told a story about how. I went on a date once when i was in a really bad place and it was so it went so badly so miserable that i fainted a restaurant and had to be taken out by an ambulance. Sort like playing around with these endebted gone on a blind date on new years. It was like a disaster so we were like you know playing around with those ideas and it was sort of thinking of some scenes in the movie happiness towed todd salons were like this is miserable awkward dates and at and then i wanted to develop it because it's me because i like expressing anxiety through violence. It was you know you take that kind of horrible anxious dating experience. And then he give everybody weapons and the desire to kill which is kind of what it feels like to be and as far as expressing violence did a good job with us some intends to do for some reason. Yeah i mean we've always comes down to like. How do you express this emotional. Real emotional thing that we can all relate to express it with you know cinematic violence. That's the thing. Image did enjoying and easter boy. Talk about that one to me. That was like that was pretty intense for me. It was like never seen the easter rabbit. Portrayed that way either. So i did like conway. Ali g. like the things coming out of his hand he hits chips and that was You put some time into developing mythology for. Yeah and you have to develop a backstory to to everybody. That's onscreen including you know in this case or buddy character and that was that was a lot of fun to do with the actor. Mark stiegler who. I wrote the part for and so we. We approached it. You know as as one would approach working with any actor like we had you know some conversations and then there was a rehearsal and it was a lot about how and why he would move his body and what we kind of settled on this that this was this thing that was always a pain in some ways But that.

Mark stiegler kevin ellen reed nine years Shula dennis thousands mother's day one scene eve first issue One adam egypt mortimer thirty three Ali sarah nicholas mccarthy december tribeca film festival second
NJ Man Arrested In Violent Manhattan New York Rampage That Injured 10 People

710 WOR Programming

00:23 sec | 1 year ago

NJ Man Arrested In Violent Manhattan New York Rampage That Injured 10 People

"Coms have a man in custody after he allegedly went on a wild, violent rampage of Manhattan. The Post says. It was 43 year old Brian Thompson of Atlantic City who was beating people with a tree branch and a bat and car Jack vehicles as he went from Tribeca to the West Side highway. A total of 10 victims were injured. Cops charge comes in with the salt and he'll undergo a psychiatric evaluation.

Brian Thompson Manhattan Atlantic City The Post Tribeca Jack
Bat-wielding man injures multiple people in New York City during crazy crime spree

Fox News Sunday

00:29 sec | 1 year ago

Bat-wielding man injures multiple people in New York City during crazy crime spree

"Says a bat wielding man injured multiple people yesterday in a trail of destruction across Manhattan, allegedly knocking at least one unconscious, breaking bones and crashing one of two vehicles that he car jacked. Post reports. The attacks started in a subway station in Tribeca at about 7 P.m. last night and stretched to dozens of blocks before ending on the West Side highway. Almost two hours later, the suspect, identified as 43 year old Brian Thompson, was finally pulled over and arrested after being tased by police.

Manhattan Tribeca West Side Brian Thompson
New Admissions Changes For New York City Middle & High Schools “First Step” Towards Diversity, Advocates Say

Snap Judgment

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

New Admissions Changes For New York City Middle & High Schools “First Step” Towards Diversity, Advocates Say

"City education officials have announced a shakeup in public school admissions w N. Y. C is Jessica Gould reports. Mayor de Blasio says the city will put a pause on all selective admissions for public middle schools next year. And it will eliminate priority given to families who live in District two for the sought after high schools in their zone, which stretches from the Upper East Side down to Tribeca. Students will still need to take a standardized test for the city's specialized high schools and other high schools can still be selective about their admissions. But they have to draw on grades, test scores or attendants from before the pandemic. Data shows selective admissions and geographic priority contribute to school segregation. Officials say The changes are steps toward equity at a time when the pandemic has made educational disparities even more stark.

Jessica Gould Mayor De Blasio Upper East Side Tribeca
Interview With Bennie F. Johnson

Revision Path

05:32 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Bennie F. Johnson

"All right so tell us who you are and what you do all right. My name is beneath johnson. And i'm the new executive director of a professional organization for design. And i know you've been in the role now for for several months. It was announced earlier this year. But congratulations to you. Thank you thank you. It still feels new. It feels a bit surreal. We started in january with the announcement that was my first day in the office. And you know before we know it. We're here under quarantine. And i'm back here in dc so it. It still feels new but a lot of work and a has happened since we started. So where were you when you first got the news that you got the role you know. It's funny i was in the car in. Dc about have lunch with a dear friend. And i received a phone call it said. Are you available to talk in a couple of minutes. So it's always like that pre call to a call. And then i received the word that i was selected to be the next executive director. Now our audience of course has heard of aig. A if anyone. I think has been listening to vision. Path that links at least since twenty fourteen or two thousand fifteen. They know about aig but for those who don't know who might be new to this conversation might be new to you and organization. Can you just talk about what. Aig a is and also what specifically attracted you to this role. What is is a legacy organization in many ways. It's a hundred year plus professional association. And there aren't that many hundred year organizations you can imagine but. Ai has been at the center of design design community design education profession for larger than assists century. And so what attracted me to spent the last ten years working with professional organizations and helping them reinvent reimagined and position themselves for a contemporary world. And so the opportunity to come into space. I'd always been designed always been central part of my experience professionally personally. So they have the opportunity to take the experience that i had working with other professional associations and apply to design professional organization was a really big draw for me. My background is really been coming into organizations to try to help pivot in move from what has been to build a better future of what can be so. I saw an opportunity. Here with edgy. A. and space to help the organization expand along with the design professional expanding right. You can't have the profession expand the professional organization stay the same. So what does an average day look like for you. You said earlier you were in new york. Now you're back in. Dc what does it look like running this organization like this remotely. The first couple of weeks. The average day was starting off monday mornings hopping on the train. Amtrak in heading from dc union station to tribeca new york and spending the bulk of the week. They're meeting a connecting with design leaders and professionals on students having meetings and getting acclimated to the organization. So that was about two months of that kind of back and forth. After we went into fool states that you can imagine of and we all have kind of lived through our pandemic this became. How do we think about the organization in physically from running from my living room. Dining room the favourite corner in my house right in and it quickly became. It wasn't a question of where. I was physically but using the tools and the opportunity to bring together our team to deliver and build for our profession. You know how do we deliver our mission. Yes we're used to being in office spaces in traveling. But what can we do more dynamic way. What's really nice about edgy. A is we were already positioning ourselves to be more virtual part of even my being able to come in at the role i lived in. Dc and so having ceo who is not based in the office was deliberate point for the organization as we stands right now only about sixty to sixty five percent of my team is located in new york the rest of the distributed across the country. And i think that's an incredible opportunity in advantage for us. And i think there's probably important to note here because when people think of aig a they think of the chapters. Each of those chapters has their own kind of bored and everything. Those are not employees of lateral organization. Itself is pretty small right. Those are nine employees so we are what you know. Many people haven't had experience with but we are federated model and it's very common in professional associations and spaces we all exist under a core mission in brand right that his asia but we're network community so we have seventy five chapters who are individual chapters. They have their own. Bores volunteer leaders were connected with them but they're connected through affiliation and grew an overall network to larger aig a mission brand. We also have two hundred student chapters across colleges and universities so the power of a federated model is just that you have this connection to community at a really directing granular level. But you're tied together in the national office in which i lead gets to serve as really kind of the infrastructure and the backbone organization that at its heart in all of the chapters and the student groups and are forced to be to do that work that they get

AIG DC Dc Union New York Johnson AI Amtrak Federated Asia
How Gen Z/Millennials use podcasts

podnews

03:36 min | 1 year ago

How Gen Z/Millennials use podcasts

"Listening habits. Thirteen to thirty four year olds have been highlighted by team whistle her research company in the us and the uk. Two thirds prefer podcast to box. We linked to the full research from our show notes and newsletter today glow has launched refer matic a paid tool to incentivize your listeners to share your show beat idea. Volvo spent two point. One million dollars on podcasts advertising in october according to new data from gallon is highlighting advertising increases. The automaker was promoting luxury. Suv the top podcast. Advertisers were amazon at number three with two point. Seven million dollars ziprecruiter at number two with three million dollars and at number one just gonna take a quick break from the show and tell you a little bit more about better health. How better helped dot com. That's right that's right at number one slot help an online counselling service one for those still wondering how the apple podcast chance work. Pull culligan posts. All the cool kids says ratings and reviews places apple podcasts but our client is currently and legitimately and number five in all of health and fitness without a single review. The podcast is strength. Changes everything the tribeca film festival has added a new podcast section for the first time. Submissions will open for fiction and narrative. Nonfiction podcasts amazon. Music quietly launched in mexico and brazil in mexico. The company has also launched and exclusive podcast and lasala hosted by latino artists becky. G there's also an original in brazil to sirius. It is the new destination for original exclusive and popular. podcasts claims. A press release promoting new podcast with marvel entertainment. We've covered their relationship with stitcher in two thousand eighteen. And when they signed with pandora and sirius. Xm in twenty nine thousand nine hundred companies also announced further exclusives. According to quayle's ultimate guide to branded podcasts. Twenty twenty one will be the biggest podcasts yay yet as with covid nineteen on the rise. Advertisers move marketing spending towards podcasting to connect with their customers during lockdowns and experience of tad for two hundred and eighty million dollars. Work with companies. like pod. sites aac asked chargeable and adds ways among others diving into a conspiracy theory involving the cia and the deadly virus. Impo cost news sons versus has been looking at a pandemic but this pandemic was in nineteen. Seventy-one happened in cuba involved. Pigs and might have been put there by the cia. The invincibles park. Assassins is a new true crime series from ireland's taking listeners. Back to dumpling. In victorian times and assassination squads to british rule and the new police force set up to track the culprits. Whatever happens to from curious. Cast in canada looks at what happens after the cameras shut off the reporters walk away. Just because a story disappears from the news doesn't mean it's gone after all it's brand new and launched yesterday and whatever happens to pizza at mcdonald's is nothing to do with the above forecast. I just found it as i was searching. That if you went appalled fest expo two thousand and nineteen the answer already because right across the street from that hotel was the only mcdonald's in the world that still says pizza even today and that's an interesting piece of news that you never thought you'd hear on podcast about podcasting news. And

Lasala Amazon Apple Brazil Volvo Mexico Marvel Entertainment UK Quayle Becky CIA XM Pandora United States Cuba
"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

"Could be a little good luck charm for you guys and Mr Schwarzenegger's they'd never. Is Actually and so for the he's been dealing with artificial intelligence as well. Sure it has so yeah I think that's the biggest thing that's GonNa. Hit us if I have to a is at home already everybody has. Yeah. It's a matter of definition wasn't is M-. The GPS speaks to me and that's the kind of already a on my video games that I play. It's basically at Hey, I, because it adapt to me. You know plays against me and it could beat me really wants to. But at the moment, Justin Video Games. Yeah. But as soon as official intelligence just brightens broadens the perspective yes it can do all these things one in one entity. and. That's GONNA become interesting. And scary. Gary? Well, it's great to meet you guys. Thanks so much congratulations. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you very much. This one sounds interesting as all the others have is well, I can't stress enough how important it is John Fans that we'd look to other countries for SF fantasy and horror fix as well. There's a lot more out there and to help guide you is the amazing seventh Matrix. Dot Com rob. Faulkner is on top of the most current online series short films out there all John Related special thanks to Tribeca film, festival, and those talented people that keep the short film genre alive and very well I like to hear your comments as well. You can speak pipe page speak pipe dot com forward slash sci-fi talk grant. Thanks for listening I'm Tony Auto. Hi I'm George. Decay and I listened to Sifi Talk..

"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

"Out very <Speech_Female> quickly. We were still shooting <Speech_Female> actually the last <Speech_Female> two episodes when the <Speech_Female> first episode <Speech_Female> came out <hes> <Speech_Female> it was fantastic <Speech_Female> that <SpeakerChange> story <Speech_Female> was really <Speech_Female> compelling <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> to me. <Speech_Female> Again, other story <Speech_Female> about abuse <Speech_Female> suffering <Speech_Music_Female> I, just love the abuse <Speech_Female> ring stories <Speech_Female> what I gravitate <Speech_Female> towards. <Speech_Female> No it <SpeakerChange> was. <Speech_Female> An <Speech_Female> exceptionally interesting <Speech_Female> character <Speech_Female> to me. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> To be <Speech_Female> sick <Speech_Female> and to be trapped inside <Speech_Female> and I <Speech_Female> go after <Speech_Female> to people on twitter <Speech_Female> people who said I couldn't <Speech_Female> stand your was <Speech_Female> like, no, no, no let's. <Speech_Female> Let's unpack <Speech_Female> this bag. <Speech_Female> You know understanding <Speech_Female> what it was <Speech_Female> like to <Speech_Female> want to live. <Speech_Female> So badly into <Speech_Female> stuck in a vessel <Speech_Music_Female> that couldn't <Speech_Music_Female> do it <SpeakerChange> and <Speech_Female> that is why she <Speech_Female> lived. So Icaria <Speech_Female> slowly through <Speech_Female> her sister and just <Speech_Female> is amazing <Speech_Music_Female> and it was really great because <Speech_Male> she was also an executive producer <Speech_Female> on <Speech_Female> show <SpeakerChange> which was <Speech_Female> really cool to <Speech_Female> see and <Speech_Female> see <SpeakerChange> her. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Put on those those hats <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> Super <SpeakerChange> Generous, <Speech_Female> and we <Speech_Music_Female> got on right <Speech_Female> away like sisters. <Speech_Female> It <SpeakerChange> was perfect <Speech_Female> and I <Speech_Female> think that's what contributed <Speech_Female> to <Speech_Female> to the dynamic <Speech_Female> of making it work <Speech_Female> and making it work very <Speech_Female> quickly because I came <Speech_Music_Female> on. <Speech_Female> After already shot the pilot <Speech_Female> and things already <Speech_Female> moving. <Speech_Music_Female> And so I <Speech_Music_Female> came in episode <Speech_Female> four or <SpeakerChange> five I can't <Speech_Female> even remember which <Speech_Female> I think five. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> We. <Speech_Music_Female> We hit it off right away <Speech_Female> and it was it was <Speech_Female> it works <Speech_Music_Female> because that relationship <Speech_Female> obviously without giving <Speech_Female> away spoilers but that relationship <Speech_Female> is <Speech_Female> parallel <SpeakerChange> to the entire <Speech_Female> thing and if that <Speech_Female> relationship didn't work, <Speech_Female> the whole <Speech_Female> show would have fallen apart so <Speech_Female> I <Speech_Music_Female> you know it's it's <Speech_Female> an testament to Jessen <Speech_Female> Testament to <Speech_Female> the creators that <Speech_Female> they they <SpeakerChange> made such <Speech_Female> a wonderful baroness <Speech_Female> kind of like shooting in any <Speech_Female> field for TV show <Speech_Female> we always had so <Speech_Music_Female> much time to <Speech_Music_Female> finish <Speech_Music_Female> the I never <Speech_Female> walked away being like I didn't <Speech_Female> get it which <Speech_Female> happens when you're moving on <Speech_Music_Female> TV and it's very quick. <Speech_Music_Female> So it was <Speech_Music_Female> really <Speech_Music_Male> well done <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> I really really loved <Speech_Male> it. <Speech_Male> Justin anything. <Speech_Male> What's your next? <Speech_Male> It working <Speech_Male> already. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> There's no such thing as. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I'm. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Working with the Austrians <Speech_Male> again. <Speech_Male> On a film culture. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> which I wrote and <Speech_Music_Male> <hes> it's another <Speech_Music_Male> sort of. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Different. Are <Speech_Male> <hes> <Speech_Male> which is <Speech_Male> also has some <Speech_Music_Male> deals with <Speech_Music_Male> abuse <Speech_Male> a little bit <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> It version. <Speech_Male> <hes> <Speech_Male> but yeah, it's about <Speech_Male> two sisters. <Speech_Music_Male> And <Speech_Male> it's another. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Film <Speech_Male> and it's <Speech_Music_Male> inspired by carry <Speech_Music_Male> a little bit. <Speech_Music_Male> Cool. So <Speech_Music_Male> that's <Speech_Music_Male> Good <Speech_Male> we'll see about here for that. <Speech_Male> craigslist. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> got into the. <Speech_Music_Female> Potato. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Male> and. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> This is <Speech_Male> this. About. <Speech_Male> The Jessica <Speech_Male> in the center she <Speech_Male> was referring to <Speech_Male> is basically beal. <Speech_Male> Look <Speech_Male> for the dark at film <Speech_Male> festivals and <Speech_Male> had vod <Speech_Male> special thanks <Speech_Male> to these artists <Speech_Male> and the TRIBECA <Speech_Male> Film Festival. <Speech_Male> I, look forward <Speech_Male> to hearing more comments <Speech_Male> on my speak <Speech_Male> pipe page speak <Speech_Male> pipe dot <Speech_Male> com <Speech_Male> forward slash <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Sifi talk <Silence> rant. <Speech_Male> Thanks <Speech_Male> for tuning in and <Speech_Male> downloading this episode <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> I'm Tony <Speech_Male> To. Louder. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Hi I'm

craigslist executive producer Jessen TRIBECA Justin Tony
"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

08:07 min | 2 years ago

"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

"One resident evil. I played. Dr Moons Doctor Who I play From care and Blake's seven and I played. Max. Stafford in alien versus Predator, you're listening to sci-fi tour this. To then I, sat down with Nadia. Alexander and Justin Peed Lang at the Rocky Hotel during the festival I always look forward to this part of the festival. 'cause these conversation usually are more reform and you get a semblance of who the filmmakers and the cast our assistant for the. Pound. With you and your director Tom Talk about. The choices you make out of life had wanted to go would. Look at them. Yeah I mean, that's a really. Claims than I have worked. He's he's been D- on every fill may release. Since I, since I started making. Columbia University. We met we did a short together my short Columbia actually which shot in Austria. And that's been claims. We just immediately kind of. And really see much of his stuff we just sat down and talked and we just really connected I'd say that my. Sensibility shifted a along the way through Colombia as I as I learned more but it's still kind of it's still has a he and I still Kinda kept this a certain sensibility which I think can be present in the dark. A lot of bad is collaboration with Clinton's I mean he puts together. His own kind of. Book of ideas and we really talked about the the lighting of of this film. There was a we we we'd like the sense of like almost like a fairytale like whenever meaning was later is very soft and it was kind of like she was you know. There was nothing harsh about it. You know it's kind of warm almost even though what we're looking at. Striking. And then obviously you want to feel the difference we kind of use the flashbacks both visually they feel a slightly elevated and slightly you know stylized. Whereas the the the the world. The the present day was supposed to be kind of more real. Book work, and then also went along with sound to the lash back for the time when we were allowed to kind of play a little bit with subjectivity and kind of raise the stakes a little bit with with a with a sound design. For the actors to to you have to make. Your mentally there. But how did the environmental so? Yeah well, you know we shot. In Northern Ontario and it was about two hours north of Toronto. And for me Agassi means a very lonely girl and it actually kind of worked because we were kind of in the middle of nowhere I was staying alone at the hotel because toby and his had house was like on the other side of town to the only time that there was even another actor in the hotel was like. For. Ten minutes when Carl was there. For like one day just like high lobby that was that was the sense it was. It was very kind of isolating, which is good at a good for the film bad for when we come home and come back to my hotel look around me like, okay I loaned here like it was Halloween. gummy bears from from the Walmart across the street and I ate them nigger for Christmas and it was like this is my saddest Halloween which was sad because I I should just put on mask and garden scared locals that's I should have done the meena maker. The couple of times that I was in makeup that we were going to lunch and I casually caught the eye of someone own it was always fun. It was such such type. Yeah I. Think I think that that. was. Kind of Cold Tida D., and that really was basically the film and. The environment definitely fed into the site, the psyche and. The character in the woods, the really kind of. Virgin Woods. And so everywhere you look. Here's old woods and there were down trees everywhere. Just naturally I was just like. To be in the like trees. The fair that they announced the hotel daddy sign that was like, please do not stand outside for too long. It definitely don't have food. That has been spotted near the process. So I was like every time we're out in that was. All going to get eaten by their nobody saw there was a guy nearby studio. was like feeding there's Remember there was all that stuff for the he got a bunch of because don't feed the bears it's not helping. You both a little bit about our and. It's just too easy to call this. And in some ways, it really is it's really A. In some ways, it's really a character peace real. But in general I think are growing up a little bit. If they're tackling more sensitive issues, you're tackling in addition. There's also the horror. Yeah. There's a lot of deaths and slashing and stuff like that, which is really how it started besides supernatural monsters. But do you both feel that there is a growing trend? where it is kind. Getting a little more respect and doing more things that are dramatic. Mixing it with the skaters a little bit. I think so. I. Can tell just because I started seeing more orphans because I don't I unfortunately I don't have the stomach for slasher stuff like I can't handle Gore so I never saw. Premature growing the ever saw any movies because as soon as you know, somebody's head got cut off. I was. Done. Goodbye you know and I think I think there's nothing wrong with are people who love that but I think I really into kind of. More. I guess eyebrow horror that that tackles. Certain sort of social topics, emotional topics, I mean get out like my favorite film from last year, which I think is a great example of taking a real life problem and looking at racism and cultural probation all these these serious stomach. American issues and blending it with this the horror and the thriller aspects and the fear and Spooky, and I, love that I just think that that's really a because the reality is being alive can be violent scary thing just in its nature. So I think using horror kind of as a metaphor kink in the way the. I think that was Zeiger intention just. I don't remember. The script. But yeah, I think I think that that is really cool for me and I think that's attracting a lot more people that would normally be like I can't more into enjoy more films. Personally I mean I think when you you know what I was. The Mike Gateway into Har was really let the right one in Pan's labyrinth and. There were Devil's backbone and. I couldn't figure out why I connected. So an intimate of course, also a like a big fan of hitchcock in the sense that. Like the with Psycho Vertigo. He he was so playful in in the in structures of the films. That I just I, get super excited When I see something that I feel like I've seen before I, almost something my brain shuts. Of Wins something like an it feels like something different I get really really excited. and and and when it says like, Oh, this is possible. You know and kind of opens up doors to two things I think what would what kind of clicked for me? with horror is Remember when I was.

Rocky Hotel Dr Moons Nadia Stafford director Virgin Woods Columbia University Blake Tom Talk Justin Peed Lang Alexander Colombia Austria Clinton Northern Ontario Agassi hitchcock Mike Gateway Carl
"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

08:14 min | 2 years ago

"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

"Sifi talk with Tony Collado enjoy. The dark is an interesting character study in Har, the main character of flesh-eating Ghoul who encounters and abused boy and discovers some of her lost humanity from the Tribeca Film Festival here from the director and his cast. Let's go to the red carpet and meet Nadia Alexander who plays Meena the Ghoul of the film. I mean, how do you deal with kind of getting into Menas head? and. kind having dormant emotions and then having them come to life a little bit. For me because obviously, we actually thankfully shot and most of the film was relatively we weren't doing all over the place. So it was I was able to kind of track. Relatively. Precisely. Kind of how how things are going to unfold as we shot it, which is always. A benefit is it sucks when you have to go from the back and work your way forward or you're doing it like because of the makeup and everything we had to kind of stick with. Okay. If it's this look, we're gonNA shoot these scenes and that was really helpful to me and I think in terms of getting into her head I really. For some reason I don't know why I tap into anger very easily as an acting like it's it's one of my more. It's just a natural emotion for me to fall into I. Don't know why but I think for me Understanding the rage and understanding the. Years and years and years of kind of built up torment, and then obviously meeting Alex how that breaks open and brings out the humanity. That to me was super fascinating and what I loved about kind of. Starting at the anger and working your way back So that to me was what I enjoyed the most about the role and was thankfully relative. And make up what was that process like for that would be I would wake up at like four in the morning and we would go to set and I would sit in a chair for two hours while my lovely lovely special effects. Make Marcus, works to wonderful when worked on my face. And it was a lot of blood and dirt and. Because basically, it was There's a prosthetic that kind of almost a superhero mass and then they would fill and. Broken this and they do all the painting and then I had these. Horrible. Stick on nails that always fell off and I couldn't any like physical stuff with them because they would immediately snap off. So I had I hated the nails I thought were. Almost like a retainer for the. T I thought that was going to be the worst it was hard. We had to do a lot of tanks. where I would take it out. So I could properly speak because it gave me a list. Nails that really got me. You don't even think about it all the teeth that's GonNa suck and I'm GonNa have a retainer and I didn't notice at context that may be like half blind didn't notice nails noticed every second. These please. and. How did you connect with toby? I mean how did you guys have any rehearsal time at all? Did we met over skype. He skeptics he's from La but it was a super easy. Quick kind of connection. He is almost exact age as my little brother and so that and he has the exact same sense of humor was literally it was like my brother is not an actor. But if he was I was like this is total would be so it was such A. Quick and easy way to fond because I was like I love to sense of humor. He had such a like sarcastic dry is great and it was super easy and he was amazing that sat around with his eyes shut surgery like twelve hours a day. If I was him I would have been like an insane person like throwing with the coke cans of people and he was so chill and so easy to work with. So that was like that was the best part was just coming to set and being like Oh even though we have actually a rather large age difference. On Super Super That's always failing. So you won best actress here last year and you're back in TRIBECA. What's what's it like this time around like? Oh, well, you know. I. I come into with Crown a sad hello. Yes. I'm here at one of our you. Know it's. I love ACA obviously last year was a huge honor and blame was really the first lead role that I never met has ever been seen by the world that I've done. So to get back kind of. Out of the game was. Really wonderful and very life affirming, and so I think I was super super excited to come back because I just think the festival is so cool and Indie and really embracing of artists and I I feel loved here when I come here. So I think that was the next thing is is is already last year even though I was like, I don't know what I'm doing there was there was a warmth and now this year they're like. Ashley. Challenge yourself obviously this is a very challenging role now I hate it Edson. I'd prefer to sleep if I could have a role where I just WanNa sleep the whole time that'd be No I love challenge. It's the whole reason that I became an actor is I don't want. To to make it easy, you know I think. What's great about being an actress who get to push yourself and live different lives all kind of sit around going Oh i, wish that I could have done. This could have done that well as an actor you sort of. Like I want to be rocket scientists then you get like just Lines and you're like, okay well, I guess rocket scientists but you're still just being able to inhabit complicated people in women especially, young women. That realm has kind of been dead for. Far too long but I think it's changing now I think for me as an Akron that mattis? Super. Special. I just really really gravitate towards stark interesting complex teen women and I'll keep doing it until I'm fifty five and they're going to be like your way too old to be flying teams. Well, congratulations. There's more SCI FI talk. So stick with it. Here's more sci fi talk with Tony. Tamalada. Films Writer director is Justin Peed Lanc. Journey I mean the short film came out in two thousand thirteen. So often exploited twelve actually. So it's like. Tell, take us back what happened after that. Eventually got this greenland. so that Was My film at Columbia I was at the Columbia University Graduate Film Program. Yeah I grew up in New York and. and that's actually where I met Florian. Privilege. Bruises on the. we're actually we. Were best friends. Now we've been. All of my shorts and So when we were doing dark of shores, it was actually kind of like a sketch because I hadn't really been in the hard. World. Record. So the short. I WanNa see I wanNA play with. Play with the things that I'm seeing in the future and see if they work. and then the short end up doing pretty well on the festival circuit. And got some attention and at that same time I was I was working on. skype short. There's there's a company in Austria name. Film which ended up using. I. Danny. Kraus the executive. Course was florins adviser in in Vienna and so he knew of our short saw it liked it asteroid described like she decided to take an hired Florian as a and then. Took on the dark has plans I featuring with them cash and. It's a bit on Unorthodox for for for an Australian film to have an American writer director. But but you know we you know we had some twist and turns originally thought we were GONNA shoot it in Australia. In German. We ended up actually naturally to me but teaming up with. I. Love. which is a Canadian production. Company..

director Tony Collado skype Florian Writer Nadia Alexander Austria Vienna TRIBECA Australia Alex Marcus toby Meena Kraus La Edson New York Ashley Akron
"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

08:18 min | 2 years ago

"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

"Hello. My name is Matt Brewer and welcome to Sifi talk high. Once again, this year I was on the red carpet talking to actors, directors about their films, the TRIBECA film, festival, it's always a lot of fun great to talk to them there because you get. Get to talk to them one on one in starting this off his Mary. Harron. The Director of American Psycho who took on Charlie Manson. Charlie says, but what was interesting is that the viewpoint is from the women that joined Charlie's. Colt not. Charlie, himself I was joined by rich breeze editor and publisher of film. Buff on mine. This is actually based on a On. Her? Birth couple. Person seems like the later scenes are all based on this. State visited the women in. Prison. And, then there's the liberal judges, the family and. Everybody. was in the Manson family tragedy. Your previous film, I shot Andy Warhol kind of dealt with the intersection of violence and celebrity. What brought you back to kind of that theme again for this. Really. Sixty. Such a fascinating time. This. Cultural Revolution Upheaval. I. was always like a civil war. Culturally. Still. The effects of it now, crystal. I keep returning to. The way ordinary. Leave such. As. Ours cussing by colleagues to about how. Odd Smuggle road suddenly getting taken by these. Very intensive strange. On that team, we actually get to see Charlie's manipulation of the people that come in and it seems like they're all broke into. So I kind of gave him pass into them. Some. In. Prison. Manson. Early exploiting vulnerabilities and homing in on women. Insecurity and just like getting caught in Maryland. To you said you nearly anybody everybody in the Manson family wrote their own book. Did. You encourage the actors to do their own research based on that or did you want him to just go with what's in the? Store I. Think you'd always encourage people to do dive. And immersed himself old. Kind of see the story through Mary Ann's characters is what was like the casting process for? I mean, usually spend years casting. Always see hundreds and hundreds of people. Every Person, comes in. And sometimes, it's number one, hundred and fifty. Plays Leslie, of Audition Chris Guy on this like blurry skype stream. Silicon. I could. Think of anybody else at the bar. It looks like you would shoot on spun rancher results out. Here that was really did shoot California. Germany match. Smith as Charlie Manson will. CAST. Of. New. By. The girls just look stupid. Why would they follow somebody? Charismatic making waves, the art of cinematic sound is a documentary that showcases those challenges, men and women that create sound for film. It could be any kind of sound effect you here. It's usually created for that film. Here is director Midge costume. Glad that you do their film on an area that's really overlooked so. Sounds like a labor of love. How did this all come together as well? It's like Hollywood, sound editor for many years. But I'm kind of a born again one because I started out in the picture I was film school. I didn't understand I. thought sound was all technical and then it came out and I realized. you can do so much with like reflecting character get motion. Just even like an ambiance can change. Somebody feels about place or person, and also like what is her dog sound like? What is your house? Oh, like what is outside of their house down? So many things to do. So I became so passionate about town, and then they started to Then I was asked by I, love is teaching and I went back to. To teaching and at because, I really wanted to give them a leg up the students. So they wouldn't be in the dark like I was feeling like, oh, sounds so scary. I would panic attacks. So so great that you know to have this, and now we have it in the film form and that people can see it and then Tribeca took it took it on and then, and then we just found out. We're GONNA, can. Show. What was the process like to get some of these legends like Mr Emerge? Want it was well, I know I knew Gary, I know because I was in the industry had new people. Also, you know why the sound and they respect them so much. Did the film and that's how I got most of the big people I got through. To the sound people knew how you know it's like. By heart, you know because they really care about town and they did it for their sound. Congratulations. Something else has a romantic monster film. I spoke to David lossing junior joined by Aaron Moorehead and Justin Benson of rustic films who produced the project I know you from. Google. Dave. That's right. That's rain. Every once in a while but. It's rarely poignant. You probably know him as well. Yeah. Sure. How you doing how I? I actually put in a good word for you guys talk. With dust I interviewed the CEO. said. Hey. These guys. That's so funny. You say that we've been talking to these guys. Office still. Coaching. session. High. Quality Coke. Zero cold. So, talk about this one. What kind of lead you position we've made three movies as directors and producers, and he's made sex and. There was this one in script that we were reading it thinking man, if you are directing us, we kind of know how to get this made. For for anybody that likes the battery, this is the battery. With people that like with actual financing behind it like with actual like. And Resources. They're insane storytellers and this is the. Battery all like. What they did for such, a small budget is phenomenal. and. It was really nice to get to like. Expand on that like, Hey, here's some resources. Hey, here's a nice camera. Hey, here's some really talented actors. Like. And their script in their storytelling is. Now does this take place in the same universe as the endless because the other films have kind of all? Know helping some friends. No. Cheesy to say, it's a monster movie. But with you guys I, knew you had a little more to. It. It's not a Muslim. It's a love story. So, this movie is a love story at its core. That has a monster in it, but it is it is through and through. A love story and a man that's in love with a woman, and also we we had. No. We had literally almost snow. Created input in the script itself and what I what I mean also is that like Jeremiah friends, he sent us a script said egging some feedback. I read the script and it made me cry and I never had a script. Made me cry before and I was like this is a very special. Various. Special thing. It does not need if it's already making us cry. It does not need us. Needed a ring to be put on. A good metaphor. Keep going. He, just we just we know we can get them.

Charlie Manson Director editor and publisher Andy Warhol Matt Brewer Sifi Germany Maryland Jeremiah Mary Ann Google Tribeca California Hollywood Gary Dave Midge editor
They Call Us Lucky Grandma

They Call Us Bruce

04:25 min | 2 years ago

They Call Us Lucky Grandma

"Fill. Today. Okay. So we have here representatives from a new feature film. That's. Coming soon, it is called Lucky Grandma. In Studio, we have a call writer, Angela Chang Hello, we have writer director Stacy, Sealy High, and we have the star, the legendary, the iconic iconic, the amazing side. Jim. Boy, what else can we say this having you guys here isn't just feeding because you're one of the showcase films in the La. Phil. Vessel Right but also because. We thought it was a real great opportunity to talk both about come to the past and the present in some ways of Asian Americans and film with someone who seen all of that. And that'll beats I, of course. And also talk about this film because it's kind of a unique showcase. In many ways, the role that really puts in the center of the screen that we've all been waiting for a lot of ways I. mean you know? The Joy luck club, you know as Auntie, Lynda, OB, incomparable until. You've always had a particularly unique presence and I feel. We want to see more of it and this show. This movie really does give us everything that we're looking for so. Tells more about the film So lucky Gramma is the story of. A little bit grumpy superstitious. chain-smoking ordinary Chinese grandma plagued by side Chen. She. Gets, her fortune told and. Takes a chance at the casino ends up on the wrong side of luck. I. Would say a little bit of trouble. So it's a dark comedy and we hope it's a lot of fun So I've been actually following the. Production of this little while I know that you won a the screenplay won an award at Tribeca that right? Yeah. We got this grant from. Home Institute in at and T. as called untold stories, and it was really a godsend because I'm sure you guys can imagine. that. Making a movie with an eight year old grandma in mostly in Chinese was a little bit of. In Hollywood, so It was really a little bit of a minor miracle. This movie I mean talk. About, untold. Stories I think This is sort of this is taking the the camera and the Lens focusing on something we never seen before. You know we'd never usually. Our hero in this is somebody who never gets shine but you know you go to Chinatown grandmas are everywhere and. This is very cool. Unique Story. I I'm wondering what? What was the seed of the like? What inspired you to focus this on this story? You know? Yeah. Well, I mean, I had taken these buses. They have these buses that we from Chinatown. In New York to all the nearby casinos and tristate area near they advertise in the Chinese newspaper. There's like billboards in Chinatown, all the casinos. To Gamble to. And so I had taken a few these buses and seen the full of old Chinese people and so. One day I sort of had this image of the bus scene. That's the beginning the movie with one of the GRANDMAS having this bag of money following in her lap. And those sort of really the seat of the idea and I called Angela and recruited her. Yeah, and then say see pitched the premise to me and we immediately started talking about will whose main character say she had this idea that it was the main character was one hundred percent of an elderly Chinese woman. And as we started building the character, it just reminded me so much of my own grandmother and. I think for reminded her so much of her own mom. Kind of ornery free spirit or like independently. Spirited woman who is. Just very fierce and unapologetic. And we just built it from there I

Angela Chang Writer Joy Luck Club Sealy High LA Stacy Phil JIM Chen Lynda Hollywood Home Institute Director New York
They Call Us Lucky Grandma

They Call Us Bruce

04:25 min | 2 years ago

They Call Us Lucky Grandma

"Today. Okay. So we have here representatives from a new feature film. That's. Coming soon, it is called Lucky Grandma. In Studio, we have a call writer, Angela Chang Hello, we have writer director Stacy, Sealy High, and we have the star, the legendary, the iconic iconic, the amazing side. Jim. Boy, what else can we say this having you guys here isn't just feeding because you're one of the showcase films in the La. Phil. Vessel Right but also because. We thought it was a real great opportunity to talk both about come to the past and the present in some ways of Asian Americans and film with someone who seen all of that. And that'll beats I, of course. And also talk about this film because it's kind of a unique showcase. In many ways, the role that really puts in the center of the screen that we've all been waiting for a lot of ways I. mean you know? The Joy luck club, you know as Auntie, Lynda, OB, incomparable until. You've always had a particularly unique presence and I feel. We want to see more of it and this show. This movie really does give us everything that we're looking for so. Tells more about the film So lucky Gramma is the story of. A little bit grumpy superstitious. chain-smoking ordinary Chinese grandma plagued by side Chen. She. Gets, her fortune told and. Takes a chance at the casino ends up on the wrong side of luck. I. Would say a little bit of trouble. So it's a dark comedy and we hope it's a lot of fun So I've been actually following the. Production of this little while I know that you won a the screenplay won an award at Tribeca that right? Yeah. We got this grant from. Home Institute in at and T. as called untold stories, and it was really a godsend because I'm sure you guys can imagine. that. Making a movie with an eight year old grandma in mostly in Chinese was a little bit of. In Hollywood, so It was really a little bit of a minor miracle. This movie I mean talk. About, untold. Stories I think This is sort of this is taking the the camera and the Lens focusing on something we never seen before. You know we'd never usually. Our hero in this is somebody who never gets shine but you know you go to Chinatown grandmas are everywhere and. This is very cool. Unique Story. I I'm wondering what? What was the seed of the like? What inspired you to focus this on this story? You know? Yeah. Well, I mean, I had taken these buses. They have these buses that we from Chinatown. In New York to all the nearby casinos and tristate area near they advertise in the Chinese newspaper. There's like billboards in Chinatown, all the casinos. To Gamble to. And so I had taken a few these buses and seen the full of old Chinese people and so. One day I sort of had this image of the bus scene. That's the beginning the movie with one of the GRANDMAS having this bag of money following in her lap. And those sort of really the seat of the idea and I called Angela and recruited her. Yeah, and then say see pitched the premise to me and we immediately started talking about will whose main character say she had this idea that it was the main character was one hundred percent of an elderly Chinese woman. And as we started building the character, it just reminded me so much of my own grandmother and. I think for reminded her so much of her own mom. Kind of ornery free spirit or like independently. Spirited woman who is. Just very fierce and unapologetic. And we just built it from there

Angela Chang Writer Joy Luck Club Sealy High JIM LA Stacy Phil Chen Lynda Hollywood Home Institute Director New York
Next generation drive-in theaters are here!

Talking Tech

02:14 min | 2 years ago

Next generation drive-in theaters are here!

"TRIBECA. A company founded by actor Robert Deniro and his producing partner Jane Rosenthal. They are staging a summer July drive in festival, offering new films like Palm Springs, classics like back to the future, and Jerry Maguire and stand up comedy on the big screen. And then the fall Tribeca is bringing NFL game so the drive in as well. Now my screening of Palm Springs started at five PM at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena California. When I asked if that wasn't perhaps a Typo as you need dark skies to be able to project the film under the big screen, I was given a firm. No, we use LCD screens which are viewable from the cars I was told LCD like the TV's. We buy and put in our living rooms now to listen to the audio. They don't put a speaker on your car door like they used to, but instead they. They ask you to tune into a specific portion of the FM radio dial or use a Wifi signal to hear it on your phone. Food came from gourmet food trucks part of the rose. Bowl, which had several screens going at once now it's funny, because just a few years ago, drive ins were absolutely dead, only used for flea markets, and the like on Sundays and occasionally in very rural markets. They might shows movies. So I love their back, and I hope they make it. However I parked too close to the screen and could only see seventy percent of it unless I yanked my car chair back all the way. And the LCD looked bad as good as a TV does in a really bright room in other words, not so hot. The audio was great, but I had to keep the car running for two hours in order to play the FM that and it was a hot night so I need the air conditioning on as well and yes I burn through a bunch of gas, but you know I was glad to get out and I know now to park way in the back next time and to go to a later show when it's dark and most importantly to fill up on gas before arrive. TRIBECA is not the only company working on reviving the drive in there are several others around the country. Be sure to try it out and support them because who knows how long it's going to be before we can go out to the movies again.

Tribeca. Palm Springs Tribeca Robert Deniro Jane Rosenthal Jerry Maguire Partner Pasadena NFL California
"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

"Muharan. Who also directed the tribe? How are you dance good to meet you? JUICING here. This is. This is a wild movie. That's why I'm here. Because it was just like the trailer was awesome. Terrific well I do a really good job in the trial of. is in the TRIBECA crew to the wonderful trial of for us, because we can afford to get a trial, guys. Expensive yeah and so I was really thrilled with trailer. Now. If, there was a challenge with this. Is You have the horror elements and the comedy? Did. You have to kind of set boundaries when you were putting this together and then actually directing it as how far you could go without. kind of like it's almost like a balancing act for you a totally balancing act. It's A. We were the boundaries from producer point of view in the sense that we had to. I didn't want it to go all right team, and so they give a younger audience in. It wasn't going to be just exclusive, and that would tip it over into something, possibly much more gory and violent and one of the ways I'm doing that is to pull back. Not, so much as to make more comical, so that people didn't take the violence too seriously like this movie like sore or hostile, which are very sadistic movies I don't have any of that. It's it's not really a horror movie. It's got a few fraught. And jumps, but it's it's really applying with the genre in a way, and and I wanted to ask a little bit of fun with the cartooning, come things on the heeds and just. Using cliches that are in the grind house kind of movies I'm just throwing up in the with landed, but so the comedy leaders get away with. Having. For more hopefully more mainstream audience, possibly, which may or may not work. The danger of that of course is. Disappoint. The people who want the full on Gore hard and you don't even really attract the mainstream. But I think there's enough in there to get an audience who will sort of not be horrified too much, and we'll laugh at it more than. Be Repulsed. And says there's a mind. Switch the end as you know sort of genre movies. There's a kind of switch. She got a guy through absolutely you. Want more, or you want list. And that's the balancing actors in the audience's mind and. I have to transit the tone for them not to take it too seriously. Which is why some concert? That's jugs. Be Work or not work or whatever? But denied it. Jugs at least are able to not take it too seriously, which is really the point? It's a romp. Really and with the actors did you have to Kinda? Hold them back to sometimes they go a little too far with humor so I think yeah, I think people who had not a lot of younger actors who've done nothing. I told her that. Lead actress Katie Elliott she I just told Clinton. Paints and Platt strike here are. And she just dotted and the series she is the funding gates. Team was terrific, very. He brings a lot of baggage with them from his previous characters and. You. Know and scenes had the most to lose. Because it was taking the piss out of the pompous guy who wasn't particularly good at martial arts anything. And he goes slowly insane. He time that really well in the movie. I think his slow to seemed into madness The daughter Rina. Who's the the audience? She was a Newbie. She just come out of school and has a lot of very appealing actress, actually and an experience. We experienced the movie from here here is so. Whether I succeed in up to you guys really you know I hugged by. If I to bed, but That that is something I did think about we didn't wanted to part with a revolving bug tires on. The beginning, there are some of that just hit. The tone of the.

Katie Elliott TRIBECA Clinton producer Gore Platt
Drive-in movie theaters are making a comeback

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

00:24 sec | 2 years ago

Drive-in movie theaters are making a comeback

"Drive in movie theaters are making a comeback amid the pandemic, and the format is about to get a huge boost, courtesy in the nation's biggest a discount chain. Wal Mart the other day announced a partnership with TriBeCa Enterprises to convert 160 store locations around the country and to makeshift drive in theaters. The screenings planned for August through October will allow viewers to have a socially distance big screen experience amid the

Wal Mart Tribeca Enterprises
"tribeca" Discussed on The Most Hated F-Word

The Most Hated F-Word

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"tribeca" Discussed on The Most Hated F-Word

"And we have been doing so many things as a grew to help nourish each other to help keep each other's spirits up to help support each other. Now, if I were by myself in a two million dollar apartment in TRIBECA. And now I'm relying on. Those people that I thought were head of much lower level who are like delivering food and. Now. That's a whole different ballgame overnight. So I think that's a huge difference is like the community versus individualism when it comes to amassing some Sorta of you know I think tobacco.

TRIBECA
"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

06:34 min | 2 years ago

"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

"And you're listening to sci-fi talk for the third year in a row I was on the red carpet at the TRIBECA Film Festival podcast. Look at two new films post Apocalyptic Survival Story and a new look at the devil himself called Lucifer. The first film is called the survivalist in this post apocalyptic drama first time filmmakers, Fingleton main character, merely known as a survivalist struggles for his existence on a makeshift farm. He lives an isolation guards, crops, closely, fearing marauding gangs when Karen and her daughter Mia wandering to his life, looking for food and shelter is carefully ordered. World is upset as the three of them start their restless coexistence, suspicion and dependence intertwined with allegiances shifting day to day. self-preservation takes on a whole new meaning as each new mouth to feed stretches. The capacity of the farm and the masqueraders are never too far away. Fingleton deftly navigates the conventions of the John by keeping the focus on the farm and its surrounding areas, and in doing so relies on the emotions over special effects. The pared-down aesthetic and simplicity setting provides an authentic backdrop. taunt drama. By presenting more questions and answers, the survivalist is a gripping expiration of our primal instinct survival at any cost. From the red carpet. Here is the God. Who is me about this movie? I mean everything is very popular with the post apocalyptic with the walking dead series like that even revolution last year on television. What would you do you this project and talk about the world that you kind of inhabit a little bit of this film. Oh. I think the one of the best things that dreamy to this movie was. How fill is Melia the to the players? You know I think faced with some of. Some of the most difficult situations possible, she shares such resilience and bravery and I don't think you often find young girls portrayed like that in film converter you know, and so as a result is that I jumped at the opportunity to be involved in explore that aspect of a gal within me. And the world your character lives in. It's obviously very rough. One Kinda describe it a little bit. And even compared to one. We're in right now. We'll. Know he you know I think in a lot of ways. It isn't very different. You know. Accept the fact that you know. We have a bit more suited offer James and We are in a difficult time until I think in many ways them from very relevant. You know in in the sense that. I think one of the first things that drew me to the film. Films well was how like sexually democratic the whole film Louis Do, not mean there on any soldiers, higher raucous males and females, honest, equal playing filters, and I think similarly. that. We're in today. We're starting to see more parallels to the warden survivals. What does he think? Is The facination with the Post Apocalypse? That it's very real. That, we all know something's around the cooler weather. I think that's why we're very Thais my because. That's why would you want to? Like great themes and great stories because it's real. Thanks so much and good luck with the move. And let's meet the survivalist himself and Martin McCann so. How do you get into the head of somebody living in this world? How do you prepare yourself to play this kind of character? Did you. Read the script. Reminds nation? Shoe up on time. Prepare. Believe in it. Also trust in the people you're working with. An appreciate the fact that you're there. Now. Do you try to stay away from looking at anything else? That's Poke post-apocalyptic like the walking dead series like that I don't really watch much. Abbas article TV. More film film because about an hour and a half or two hours is the length of my sort of attention spun friendly thing. I'm I'm Bob. Comes to you know Shajing or You know something is on a such such six o'clock on Saturday or Blah Blah Blah, so a more of a film, Guy but. Yes so so no, it wasn't really A. Watch this or You know if I wanted to re. Still there I will ever looked at the orange fallon in eighteen, forty, five to forty seven, I probably would have better. One been matter. indication really know. And physically, what was his role light for you? I lost somewhere. Maybe don't stolen or something, but I'm not really a big guy, so that's hard with loss. At lesson got smaller. And! What do you think we're so kind of drawn to these post apocalyptic stories? While the truth hurts. I Dunno, because even though satisfaction it's there's there's a weird dichotomy in something that is science fiction, but Thursday navigability to. This sense fiction. What's interesting, too is from what I've heard. The men and women kind of rule. It's a little more equal than actually our own world right now, yeah, one hundred percent. I mean it comes back to the very primal. Instincts that. I think are. much better at. I mean this is what I. My personal thing I think are much better at social certain circumstances. Social Situation Cana. Forward thinking and they're much more frugal than than men men are much more spontaneous in the moment, and that's all right. If there's enough resources to build a future, but in this in this circumstances there aren't and so maybe those faculties that were at one time an advantage. We aren't so much nine. and. Lastly, what's it like to be here? TRIBECA? Fantastic love the. Brand. Experience I. I was here a few years ago. With a Terry George Film was one of the best few days of my life. So hopefully IT'LL BE A. Great, great to meet you good luck with the movie. Just! A really cool announcement today today on.

Fingleton Terry George Film TRIBECA Karen Louis Do Melia Social Situation Cana John Martin McCann Mia James Abbas
"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

07:28 min | 2 years ago

"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

"This is Batman says Kevin Anderson. This is John Delancey, and you are very lucky to be listening to sci-fi Talk. This is Terry Good Kind Number One New York Times bestselling author of the sort of truth, Jerry's Joseph Lachey former executive producer and writer on strike eight St one strike Atlantis stargate universe presently writer on dark matter. This is David Franklin Lieutenant Sorry Canton Bracken from fast skype. I'm Robert. J Sir. You go award winning author of Flash Forward WWW wake i. this is Jamie Bamberg. Hey, this is Katie. Sack off I am Tomo Panikin I? Play Hilo on the hit television series. Battle Star GALACTICA. And you're listening to. Fi Talk. Seen One apple take to. Your. Doctor on enterprise. You're listening to the wonderful five nine. I heartily endorse your attendances listener ever thank you. Hi, this is Tony Tomato and welcome the Saifi talk as we preview a new film Jack Rabbit that recently premiered at the TRIBECA. Film Festival here's the official description of kind of giving idea what this film is about following a worldwide event known as the reset. Humanity rebuilds society with aging mechanics where gleaming technology once stood surveillance now the status quo society is slowly putting shattered pieces back together, but under a watchful eye. After a friend suicide leaves behind a mysterious computer drive, a young computer prodigy, and also shadowy hacker joined together decipher the clues that he left behind. The youthful creators of Jack Rabbit have actually constructed a world which we haven't seen previously on film. Mixing Retro Production Design with Slick storytelling, they deliver cinematic distance that will soon result in a shock to the senses, a jigsaw puzzle of film that flaunts its Lo fi aesthetic proudly jack rabid introduces a fresh new voice to the science fiction landscape Carlton Rennie's director to`real debut cleverly tweets at sci fi premise to offer an ambitious glimpse into the future. I spoke to the cast and the director on the red carpet. At tribeca film, Festival, and here is the film's director the affirmation Carlton Rainy this. What I think would hooks me right away. Is it is? It's really more of a WHO done it. mystery as much as with technology. And and I. Guess The question is what's on the dry? Wall. What's on the drive is a series of video clips that have been left behind by our two main characters Dead Friends. And you know they investigate these video clips? and come to discover that might lead to some answers about. What's outside? This sort of controlled is still being old and just answers about the world they live in. I mean it's actually very grim future. Yeah, exactly well. Yeah, the the film takes place. After this. Catastrophic event known as the reset were basically all the technological infrastructure just was wiped out so everyone has gone back to old analog technology from like the eighties and Seventies. and it's back to like free Internet days hard lines, and our characters live in the city that is like sort of the last known city in existence, and it's cut off from the no man's land and it's under heavy surveillance and control by A. Ambiguously. Malevolence. Technology Company noticed technologies, so the mysteries inbox that and one of our main characters works for that company, so there's a lot of intrigue there. How did the story come together The story came about actually I was. Reading a lot about hackers at the time. But this rolling stone article about Aaron Swartz the Hacktivists, and you know in the wake of the suicide and and then the wikileaks scandal happened, and so mind was just there and sort of hacker worlds, and one of my favorite movies right off as war games and I just love those old movies from the eighties like wargames, robocop and Terminator and so I kind of just wanted to. Make a movie that was like in the vein of these movies inspired me to be a filmmaker. Didn't really WANNA make it like have zeitgeist elements, but not really Biographical and to sort of merge. Those elements together opt. And Sci fi was the playground you wanted to be yes very much Yeah, I just felt right I love like like Brazil. Analog site five and also to You know the thing about science fiction is it's I, think it's popular and stays still being because it's on everybody's mind. You know with the future as And I've a lot of anxiety about that, and so I think I was tailing that into this. We all do yeah. Yeah, exactly great talking to you. Same here. Justin Douglas's the film's producer and Co Writer. Very, interesting movie I I. IT Takes Place into you, know we. We Love post-apocalyptic future right now. I'm star. Trek kind of guy looks for optimism, but it's just not there right now, so. You're in the film. Rooted in okay, so I was talking to Carlton Button Story So. How did you guys have it? Kind of came from articles, he said. and then kind of talk through what happened after that. Did you guys have? Sessions kind of hammer out the script and things. Yeah, so we we kind of. Started with the general idea. In new that we wanted to make that. We shoot and kind of reverse engineered. A STORY AND SPECIAL EFFECTS AND A narrative to. Feed around some of the locations that we knew we had and what we thought we could pull off. Harnessing all of our magic powers. and. Then, just kind of started chipping away at it and just. Just looked at the calendar and set a date where we were going to start shooting, even if we didn't necessarily have all the money. Era Actors together and then. Started snowballing after that and in this snow work. The story kept coming together and. More pieces kind of. Added up and built into something that. Hopefully people enjoy watching now. Where did the the idea to use like old analog technology conference? I think we had. A connection the goodwill computer museum so They just had a warehouse completely full of amazing electron, electrononics. that they gave to us completely for free as donation. We return them afterwards, but. So, Part of it was a budget concerns, and just there's no way we could have afforded anything like that if we had to purchase it ourselves. And then it just went and self to the story. Even more so more importantly, it's a world where. You have to recycle things and bill what you WANNA use, and so it kind of like the idea of older technology being. What might actually survive some..

director Jack Rabbit writer New York Times Jamie Bamberg John Delancey Canton Bracken Hilo Katie David Franklin Robert Aaron Swartz Batman apple jack rabid Carlton Rennie executive producer Kevin Anderson TRIBECA
Lindsay Peoples Wagner, Editor-in-Chief of Teen Vogue

Skimm'd from The Couch

07:27 min | 2 years ago

Lindsay Peoples Wagner, Editor-in-Chief of Teen Vogue

"So when you talked about in the beginning when you're talking about your love of cooking and sitting down for family dinners but as you said you know you have those family traditions. But it's not like fashion was necessarily the the big thing that was on people's minds. How did you go from being this creative kid? Who saw things that others didn't necessarily see in the same way to thinking about it as this is something? That's more than just a side hobby. I mean I think a lot of comes from my parents like a lot of the conversations that I had with them growing up was that you can do whatever you WanNa do. We're not going to you know just because we're in the mid West. We're not going to tell you like you need to sell insurance but you have to understand that this is bigger than you. You should not take life for granted and that people have literally died for you to be free and so you have to do something with his life and I think even always knowing that and feeling that and thinking about my own ancestors and what they had to go through a little bit like I need to figure it out and I need to figure out how I can have the biggest impact with his life. I don't think you know even my own grandparents would ever have dreamed I would be doing this kind of thing and I think they. That's really just a testament to my upbringing but also just trying to figure out a way to make it make all of this different and I think A conversation. I had with my mom that I think about a lot is when I really got into like watching girlfriends and sex and the city and seeing fashion and culture on television and a lot of that was really. You know trying to figure out like I love this stuff but why do I love it so much and I would just rip up all these magazines and put them on my wall and my mother would say like you know you can love all this stuff but none of these people look like you. They don't have this kind of life. They don't understand what regular normal people are doing day to day. And if you're going GONNA you know. Try to be in this world and make a difference. You're going to have to change things and it's going to be really hard and to really instilled this motto in me of like you're going to have to be what you needed when you were younger to really change things and so. I take that with me every day and I think that's really where the thought started. How'd you get your foot in the door? You talked about this internship. It's not like it's easy to get these internships so when you get it. I definitely know what it's like to feel the pressure of needing to parlay it into something to be able to even think about getting a time job in the field. Yeah I mean when I graduated. I didn't have a job and I remember looking around because I also went to school in the mid west and I remember everybody had a job and I was like what am I doing like crazy but I mean every incident that I had I was just like I don't come from wealthy family. I don't have the money to wear full look Chanel as an intern or as an assistant or even now but like I will work harder than everyone else here. I will if you want me to figure out where this came from. I'll do all the research I'll stay like if we can't find this glove that we need to return the designer al. Go through this whole closet and figure out where it is like and I think they When you want it bad enough and you know that you need that foot in the door you do what it takes so I mean a lot of it was also even when I moved here to New York and I was an assistant. I was only making nine dollars an hour so I was working two or three jobs in so I would be teen vogue during the day and then at night I would change the store. Mannequins at Dkny. And I would do that from like nine to midnight and then on the weekends I was waitressing at a restaurant and Tribeca because I was just like okay. I need to hustle. Like my salary isn't enough to have rent or anything like that but I'm GonNa make it work and I think food I mean that's just you do what you have to do. When you're on those kind of situations I appreciate talking to you about this. And I think it's a really important thing that not enough people starting off in the business. Really think about the realities. I started off in news very similar in that. You work long hours. You don't get paid a lot. Didn't have health insurance waitress to be able to afford my first job and a question. I always go back and forth on answering myself. I'm really curious to hear what you think is from people who are entry level. They're trying to get their foot in the door and they're looking at the job that can pay the bills but isn't the one that they're passionate about or taking the job that gets them the foot in the door but not knowing how to necessarily afford it. What would you say to people starting off? I mean I always tell people like if you want it bad enough you will do it even if it doesn't pay and I say that as someone who doesn't come for money so like I don't think it's worth going the route of taking a job that you don't want to then end up in a situation later on and you're having a crisis of who I am in my life and why did I go this route. Like I would rather just go after what I really want. It's a hustle constantly and still to this day but I wouldn't have it any other way when I tell people like I've had to do this and I've had to do that and I've had to freelance and all this other stuff. I also tell people like you know. The struggle really isn't for everyone and you have to realize what you're willing to do to get there because I'm not necessarily recommending it but I'm saying this is what is GonNa take. This is what it's like. Yeah and if you don't if you don't want to struggle and you're just like I really just want to go to Brunch with my friends. I don't WanNa have to waitress. That's a different life and that's okay but you have to choose so I wanNA talk about the expose everywhere and nowhere. You interviewed over one. Hundred people of color are in the fashion industry and had really interesting and emotional conversations about racism in the industry when you were publishing it. What did you think they impact was going to be? I mean honestly. I didn't know what people don't understand is they. You look at it now and you're like Oh my God. That's so cool. That's so amazing. But just wasn't the reality of it. I think that piece for a lot of people made them feel really liberated and more comfortable and you know so many things have happened in the world to make black people specifically feel like okay I regardless of people wanting my voice be silenced. I'm going to speak up but you know a lot of people in the industry who have come before me. That have been doing this a lot longer than me you know. They haven't felt that way until the last three years. They haven't felt like this was an open forum of you know what I can complain about somebody because I can't and it won't have any repercussions on me and I think they. It was scary for me because I mean I had so many legends who I adored respect. Just tell me like Lindsey. You're GONNA be blacklisted. This is not something that you should be doing like you have to let some things die because people don't WanNa hear US complain. They don't WanNa hear US talk about things that have happened to us and I understood that in I sat on it in prayed about it for a really long time but I felt like even if it was the last thing the last big piece that I had and if it was the last big thing that I was able to do fell worth it to me and I felt like okay like I was. I was really at peace with it so when it came out I actually. I was in Mexico with my husband and I wasn't actually even here and the next day when I turn my phone on I

United States Teen Vogue Dkny Chanel Lindsey New York Tribeca Intern Mexico
"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

"The red carpet. Danny Muharan who also directed the tribe. Are you dance good to meet? You GINSENG here this is. This is a wild movie. That's why I'm here because it was just like the trailer was awesome terrific. Well I do a really good job. In the trial of is in the TRIBECA critic to the wonderful trial for us. Because we can't afford to get a trailer guys expensive. Yeah and So I was really thrown trailer now if there was a challenge with this is you have the horror elements and the comedy. Did you have to kind of set boundaries when you were putting this together and then actually directing it as how far you can go without kind of like it's almost like a balancing act for you totally balancing act it's a we were the boundaries from producer point of view in the sense that we didn't want it to go all right team and so they get a younger audience in it wasn't going be just exclusive and that would tip it over into something possibly much more gory and violent and one of the ways? I'm doing is to pull back not so much know to make more comical so that people didn't take the violence too seriously like a movie like sore or hostile which are very sadistic movies. You don't have any of that. It's it's strictly not really a horror movie it's got a few fraught and jumps but it's it's really applying with the genre in a way and and I wanted to have a little bit of fun with the Con- attuning come things on the heat's and just you know using cliches that are in the grind house kind of movies. I'm just throwing up in the Atlanta. But so the comedy leaders get away with having for more hopefully more mainstream audience possibly which may or may not work. The danger of that of course is not disappoint the people who want the full on Gore Hara. And you don't even really attract the mainstream but I think there's enough in there to get an audience who will not be horrified too much and we'll laugh at it more than be repulsed and says there's a mind switch the end as you know sort of genre movies as kind of switch she got a guy through absolutely you want more or you want list. And that's the balancing actors in the audience's mind and I have to transit the tone for them not to take it too seriously. Which is why some concert. That's jugs maybe work or not work or whatever but they know the jugs at least are able to not take it too seriously which is really the point. It's a wrong really and with the actors did you have to. Kinda hold them back to. Sometimes they go a little too far with humor so I think yeah I think people who had not a lot of younger actors who done nothing. I told her that. Lead actress Katya to she I just told Clinton Paints and Platt strike here are and she just dotted and the series. She is the funding gates. Team was terrific. Very he brings a lot of baggage with him from his previous characters. And you know him. Scenes had the most to lose because it was taking the piss out of the pompous. Di Wasn't particularly good at martial arts anything and he goes slowly insane. He time that really well in the movie I think. His slow descent into madness The daughter Rina. Who's the audience? She was a Newbie. She just come out of school and has a lot of very appealing actress. Actually and an experience. We experienced the movie from here. Here is so whether I succeed in up to you guys really you know. I hope by or done to bed but that that is something I did think about. We didn't wanted to play with a revolving bug tires on the beginning. There are some of that. Just sit the tone of the Movie Guy. On one quick question. What's up for you next a musical about cancer which many and they're not as a thriller and I'm working on saying in New York for five weeks to write this gangster thriller with Philosophical for about a guy who's active wall rebellion tunes whole world upside down and I'm really looking at shooting. It in New York ninety seventy two all right cool very cool ice to meet you nice to meet you. Thank you all take care. And those are the genre entries for twenty thirteen for Tribeca. Film Festival Visit Their Site. Tribeca film Dot Com Slash Festival. And certainly hope. You enjoyed my look at the twenty thirteen edition of the genre films at the Tribeca Film Festival. This is Tony Tomato. I hope to do it again next year..

Tribeca Katya Danny Muharan Gore Hara New York producer Di Tony Tomato Atlanta Clinton Paints cancer Platt
"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

08:00 min | 2 years ago

"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

"About her? Look I mean how did they? How did you come to that? Because it's a very unique look for a robot or Android if you like. Yeah well I mean it was a of consultation with you. Know I mean I kind of again starred with haunt sci-fi in the sense of look if you're going to spend all the billions of pounds of take two creates a robot fields. What what would you want to use it for? And it seemed to me that the most practical thing what the guy was talking about is you know the the ideal goal would be machine that look. Shuman so that we can infiltrate in now so that you can give it a skin job and it looks Pakistani or looks Chinese or looks Middle Eastern. You know as the thing something that you address the human drone that would kind of justify the money that the government need to spend to develop this kind of thing and so I knew that it was going to be humanoid and once that I news Human thing then it was great then kinds of opportunities opened up intensive how she would look and the fun thing then was kind of reverse engineering and we kind of handed that Katie. So that when she's playing she's come a little bit bigger and You know skin tone is different. Has Different stuff so it was. It was able to lend look ten and also Katie. I think got absolutely ripped. Know six pack rest of this stuff for machine. So that's pretty cool. You got to see the movie man. Really cold last league As far as the tone of the movie does a little bit of Dr Frankenstein Monster kind of creep into this one. A little north. I've tried to avoid that look. Ns any this a guy. Great in life at all goes back to Frankenstein. But I think done a lot of times so I try to do something new with with that basic idea so but I have done a good job. Well thank you great news. Take care now. This one I think is worth seeing. And she is definitely force. She's going to be around for quite a while. Our next film is raise that mixes a thriller and Film. Gladiator as women are kidnapped and forced to fight each other to protect their families. From their captors passed gas and also from xena warrior. Princess Adrienne Wilkinson. Plays Nancy Hi Adrian. We actually met we. I'm hiding in the back. We actually met at icon years ago when you were doing Zena so yes sir. Yes same here. You know this is really cool. It's a different kind of physicality Zena. You say you play doctor kind of talking about your character. yes. I play Nancy. She is She is a woman. She's actually lesbian. She's married with two children and the way that the the script works are families are being unknowingly themselves Sir Under surveillance so the way that they make us fight is that they show us our families living their lives. And if we don't fight they're going to take out our families so you have this constitute threat. That's just hanging over your head and it's yeah it's scary but what I like about. Nancy is that she's not a fighter but she's smart she's a surgeon so she goes into her fights thinking logistically about what is she truly capable of doing realistically. What is she going to be able to do so she comes? Comes up with some pretty interesting things. That are unusual. And how was Josh? Would you guys? Did He kinda give time for a little extra training or any nightmare. No just great But I have to say we shot twenty one fight teams in like twenty seven days or something crazy like that He was what's amazing about it. And I think this proves not only the the quality of the the fighting but it just proves that he was really all about protecting us. Is that no one was hurt in that time and I mean that many fight scenes inevitably you think. Someone's going to get hurt. Even if they weren't shooting that quickly so I mean he was watching out for us all the time and always making sure that it looked real but never got to real between any one and that everyone was always saying. I hear you're going to be working for Tim. Russ on renegades. Yeah we were supposed to start shooting in June. I'm excited about it. The script is fantastic. My character is kind of like Laura. Croft which I love so yeah. I think it'll be exciting. Walters in it and Tim is actually being to back again. So actually I'm excited. I have to say. I'm also tremendously intimidated because I knew the Star Trek world both as a performer. But also even even as as a viewer I of course culturally. No it and I've certainly seen some but to be part of it. I sort of feel obligated that I need to know everything. That's like a doctorate degree that I'd have to go get there really good in helping you catch. I think it'll be fine. No it'll be good. It'll be well best of luck. It sounds like you're keeping busy and doing some great stuff on my damndest. I'm trying to take care here. Well Bailey and borders plays cody obviously with this kind of film. There's a lot of motivation for all of you to fight. Because of your family's now tell me how you kind of got into that mental state to play those kind of scenes. I mean you're fighting but the fights have to be more intense because you're fighting for your chance exactly Mike Character. Cody is fighting for her mother. She's a single mom so she was. She was raised by her mom. And really I just kind of imagine what it would be like if I was fighting for my mom and It was difficult being in the middle of fight and trying to get technical leave wild bringing the emotion. But that's kind of what I would do. I would just think about my family and it helped me get there so there was a still. I saw of a scene where you're all sitting at almost like school desk and you're handcuffed to them. What's it like to do? Some of those scenes look very bizarre. Actually the first thing that we shot I n It was crazy because it was like six hours being tied at these chairs and but it was it was. It was a lot of fun you know. We all got to do a group seen on the first day. Besides it's pretty wild. I've never been struck to each year before So there's some even more intense scenes in that that should be pretty brutal for the audience to tricking of witch. How far did you guys go as far as blood and bruising bit? Yeah it's pretty. It's it's graphic But we tried to make the fights as realistic as possible and we wanted to. We wanted it to be gritty so so yeah Josh and our son coordinator really worked together on making sure that it was she was. It was so cool working with her her and Josh which would get in arena together. We're all the girls fight and just like seeing. The magic happen was really cool. What's on your agenda? I don't know this is my first time at Tribeca so I'm just I'm just happy to be here. Hopefully her knee anything coming up for you. On the screen at all I just had a movie premiere at South by and it'll be a couple of other Festival's coming out so I'm crossing my fingers for that. It's called cold water. Great to talk to you. Congrats forward and from threshold and Repo the genetic opera is Rebecca Marshall as phoebe. So I mean I. I've seen some stills things and actually the trailers been on my website for a while What's interesting is one of the scenes that strikes me. If you're you're all in the classroom and you're all like handcuffed to those seats very bizarre school. Yeah Yeah it's a great scene. That's one of my favorite scenes in the movie and it was torturous because we were really actually strapped in them. And that's the scene. Were we all your out. Why we're there and what we're doing their sword of and that's kind of where we get an interaction to the the mastermind. Who's kind of running this whole thing and I think that night I mean that was last seen of the day? And we're all we're all tired and everyone just kinda put it together and it's one of my favorite scenes in the movie. Maybe because the memories behind it as well so did you prepare.

Nancy Josh Katie Zena Tim Shuman Adrienne Wilkinson Cody Rebecca Marshall Dr Frankenstein tricking Russ Croft Mike Character Tribeca Laura Walters coordinator Bailey
"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

10:05 min | 2 years ago

"tribeca" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

"Hi this is Julia. State hardly from Smallville Gemini Division. I'm less Redican. I'm going to start a fringe. Tasking Robert Patrick. James Marsters sci-fi Talk Tony Adult this is Colin Cunningham known as Major Davis. Se One stargate as she should say either. This is Christopher hired l. from sanctuary. I've played Montague John Drouin. George Decay and I listened to sci-fi Talk. Hi this is Tony to Lana. Welcome my Tribeca Film Festival coverage our first film is Frankenstein's army basically takes place in the waning days of the Second World War as a battalion of Russian soldiers find themselves literally lost in enemy territory. They stumble upon a village that appears to have been decimated by something unseen and discover. A mad scientist played by hell. Boys Karel Roden who conducts experiments to fuse flesh and steel. And making an unstoppable army of soldiers. The film's director is Richard Rep Horst. And he spoke to me on the TRIBECA film Red Carpet you know for this film hits its own standalone film. It's not based on your previous work that correct. That's correct yes. It is and as far as You know this one. What's interesting to me is that you actually sketched out. A lot of designs of creatures ahead of time and then you went to unreal and said this is what I wanna do and described that process a little bit and how that went It's well I know I'm real for a very long time. So I Enclosed in real in very early stage of development and I was sending them sketches to see what is possible a or if you will only practical effects because that was our main Goal our goal and I just started to projects. Exactly what I saw in front of me and I sent it to unreal and I think ninety percent of the design survives uh-huh and talk about your cast his Caro's portrayal of Victor. I understand isn't going to traditional Victor Frankenstein way. Yeah Carol Traits Victor Frankenstein of the grand grand grandson but it we are going to do a completely one eight on the character What what I likes to do is I if you know exactly why are you? WanNa end you a lot of freedom to investigate. What are other possibilities and cut over? Dan has such a rich Mind that was really eager to look at his ideas about his character and a lot of his ideas reps around the character bitch is being written in the script and from when we started doing that is it started to grow and any became something totally unique and on its own. It's absolutely incompatible to any of traditional French tank character Reno so far and that's exactly what I want have and another thing too it's also It's a found footage type of film as well at that must have been a bit of a challenge for a shooting and planning as a total challenge. This was really extremely extremely difficult because We need to prepare everything into details and for the Fisher Texas fussell motion nightmare because everything needed to succeed in takes longer than two minutes practical sex normally you can cut them up in in all white close close at etc and now we needed to do it. All in one take which was really extreme difficult and we really looked at what we did was intent. That is nine thousand nine hundred eighty and if you want to make this film how we'll do it and that's gifts you a lot of creativity normally with computers. You will look for different solutions. Because but their own also looking for practical effects it's also Shooter too early. Eighty styling before. It gave us a totally new kind of approach. It's not very easy but I think it's the best of his. And what do you have planned coming up? Is there something in the works? You're planning yeah. I have something in averse planning. And it's quite far developed. And what I what I learned from Francis Army. If you keep faith through your fishing it becomes. It's hard to classify into Asia and the same thing is happening with this. New Project is hard to classify finisher and I think. Then that's a sign that that you are on the right track and well with this when you can't go wrong Nazis and the Frankenstein creatures man. That sounds like a lot of fun. Yeah Yeah it is. It's it's a lot of fun. I think moviemaking should be a lot of fun. And what I want is entertain- people I want to deliver. I want to make people enjoying and having them a great experience. I know that now she says to me too in my eyes. Those are the most evil. It's the most evil thing average happened so it's a big risks to transfer it into an entertaining kind of way. It's I know it's smooth ice. Bet I've onto to break that Tabu great. Thank you so much appreciate king taking few minutes really looking forward to seeing this. Thank you our next. Entry is from the producer of the Sundance Smash hit the pact and writer of Xavier. Against the divide. Mr Jones is really about a journey into a nightmare. That's pretty real. Even daylight literally brings no relief. Scott Penny moved into a cabin to escape the pressures of the world and breathe new life into their art. They're only neighbor is a few miles away. Strange Hermit who only comes out at night under the shroud of darkness and that is Mr Jones as Scott and penny get deeper into his world. They start to suspect. The man is actually infamous reclusive artists. And that's only the beginning the tension and the terror bills from their Sarah Jones. An actress who admired from Alcatraz plays penny and I spoke to her on the red carpet. Hi How you doing? I'll tell you actually uploaded a clip from the movie on my site today and it was a very intense scene now. There was a lot of looks like was there. A lot of hand held Stuff into can't the movie and if there was. Did you guys have to coordinate your movements to the camera yeah It was really cool. Actually we so the way that they set up the hand held camera they had Your standard sort of camera. And then and then they attached a A GOPRO so there. You're you're basically getting you're getting our face and you're getting what we're saying and it was a pretty cool experience because the DP kind of had his style John who played Scott had his style. I had my style and then we. They sort of melted them all together. Now you're play a married couple or just boyfriend girlfriend boyfriend and girlfriend to level of intensity just an that scene alone. I'm sure there was quite a few scenes like that. So how did you guys kind of you know? When they're yelled action. You were ready to go with the intestine As far as the action and the is concerned. Sorry Second Tom Well we we shot this I believe in eighteen days so the intensity was that I mean this is an independent film. Being Tennessee was there at all times. But because we had to get the content that we needed And a of it you know to place a night and there was one night shoots and the atmosphere that they create it was so it was so easy to just get into it have such great time in. John and I have been friends for a while so it was really easy to just sort of work together and feed off of each other and then figure that really helps now. Did you have any kind of prep time ahead of time or did you just kind of any read throughs or anything? Actually I head about Film and we did a couple of personals down. Carl was so great about keeping collaboration. Landmines Open and so we were all able to sort of us again and feed off of each other and figure out how to get from ADP. And what was the most honest sort of situation if such a great history of really was there is some you know. Mr Jones makes these outrageous cultures. One looks like the scarecrow buys on acid like when you first stepped onto set and saw some of those House I had Penney's reactions which was just sort of this. I mean Joe For someone to create GRONYEA's pieces and they don't necessarily say from entertaining look like Pieces you've given pieces of trash or materials sort of tossed aside and be able to put together and there seem to have a leyland in these year crumbs Hopefully it's art. You know. It's a sort.

Sarah Jones John Drouin Scott Penny Victor Frankenstein Tony Adult Robert Patrick Smallville Gemini Division Karel Roden James Marsters George Decay Julia Christopher Texas Major Davis scientist Francis Army Richard Rep Horst Colin Cunningham Asia
Tribeca programs drive-in series for films, sports and music

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 2 years ago

Tribeca programs drive-in series for films, sports and music

"When is the last time you went to a drive in theater the people who do the tribeca Film Festival are hoping the next time will be this summer tribeca is teaming up with IMAX and eighteen antique to put together a series of movies to be screened at drive in theaters end up what they call other exclusive venues the goal is to get you out to watch a movie without getting you to rub shoulders with other patrons while most movie theaters remain closed because of the corona virus outbreak the relatively few remaining drive ins have remained open I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Imax Oscar Wells Gabriel
"tribeca" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:36 min | 3 years ago

"tribeca" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of the Tribeca film festival. It's eighteenth year of bringing people to lower Manhattan, and of being one of the things that that neighborhood of New York City is known for thanks in no small part to the woman whose office we kind of barged into last week. Unkindness to see how are you? Military. Interrupted Jane Rosenthal is her name is a great office of the idea of no desk. Just. Kitchen. Word shoes doing wherever she's doing. It is of two different varieties. She's a film producer with credits, including meet the parents and bohemian rhapsody to name just a couple. She is also the CEO and chairwoman of the company that puts on the Tribeca film festival that Rosenthal and her producing partner, Robert deniro started in the aftermath of September eleventh two thousand and one when not all that many people were going to downtown Manhattan. So I let her finish writing that Email. Those are great knickknacks is that is that Narendra Modi. If they're eventually. And then the wonder woman comic book, which I love. Yes. Her her real name is Jane. So we have. Yeah. That's about all we have in common. And then we settle in. So this is gonna air opening day the festival. So my question to you is weak out. Now, do you have time to be sitting here? Talking to me. No, no, no, not really. But he came to town. So always always happy to welcome people to New York and Tribeca and talk about the festival. So thank you for having me without making this all about you. And keeping the focus mostly on the festival. I didn't want to ask what it is about movies and films that do it for you. I mean, you've been doing this long time, right CBS and Disney Warner Brothers. This partnership with the narrow for thirty years now, right gone. Okay. I was only twelve when. What is it though about this kind of product? If I could be really materialistic about it that does it for you. Well, I never picked a major. I'm so curious or interested about so many different things the one thing about movies, or now whether you were movies television. But now, we make content. How do you feel about that word, by the way? I don't like it. I I don't I don't like that word. It is what it is. But I like to make stories whether it's short form long form. CD-rom? I mean, I was one of the first to make a CD ROM that business didn't last, but you're still here. You get to explore different people different parts of our our culture. Our society different parts of history. You're always putting yourself in a different world. I want to talk for just a quick second year film. You're working on Netflix with Scorsese and urine. Bob, the Niro, call the Irishman Jimmy Hoffa. First of all you've been working on this thing for trying to get it to the screen for ten years and probably a little more. The first time I read I hear you paint has is was two thousand seven it was research for a project that we were going to make with Marty in Bob Windsor. Mr deniro. To make this movie, and then it kind of stopped it just it stopped. So with the caveat that Netflix is your Prussian partner in the snow. What do you make of how they are disrupting the delivery of the material that you make I mean, Roma and going to the big screen and the Oscars and the window availability. What are you a first of all, oh, look at the fact that with Roma a black and white film in Spanish? That is on the tip of people's tongues. People are talking about Roma that wouldn't happen. If you had just put it in a limited platform release. You know, every so many years the industry is disrupted. It was distrupted. When you went from silent movies to talk ease. It was disrupted when you went from black and white to color. I mean it happens. It's just happening now at a faster pace, the other thing you have right now is the audience has never had more choice. And I think it's very exciting time for creators. So are you a CEO who's a film producer? Or are you a film producer who's a CEO? I'm a film producer that soc-. I think there are so many things that have happened to me along the way that were an unexpected part of my own journey. So spring of two thousand one. I had two little girls. And I was doing a movie in London about boy. And I was doing a movie in LA, and I was going London New York LA LA, New York London. I was picking up a kid. I was running back and forth. I was running into the office on nine eleven first-half meeting, and then the world changed, and we said, okay. Maybe we should do a film festival to give our neighborhood our community something to look forward to. I only believed that we were going to do that film festival. Once I realize so here, we are eighteen years later, so I had to grow and learn and a lot of it was on the job training, you know, buck stops here. So. You've talked a lot about wanting to use this festival as a way to elevate female filmmakers and use it as a device to empower them to speak out be heard and do their did works. How do you think you're doing? I think retune great. We've always been doing this. We company is. Seventy eight percent women. I wish we'd get to a point where we weren't having to say, oh, it's women filmmakers, it's this filmmaker. I wish we could just say filmmakers, I wish that we would no longer have to point it out as the exception. And you know, I think we're at forty eight percent women films in the festival that said was at one point. There was a question about should we pick this film because it's a woman or this film because it's better. And I'm just like, can you just pick the film? That's better. We I wish we would. And it's not going to happen for a while. The window is open for us as as women, and we have a lot of work to do in terms of Paige quality. So when does when does this all change, Jane? Thanks a lot. Talking about a bunch of stuff Jane Rosenthal. And I did why she is.

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