9 Burst results for "Trevor Hauser"

"trevor hauser" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"trevor hauser" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In New South Wales state she said she and some of her animals escape from a wild fire by a river boat the area we wish sheltering was on fire then we could save the property thirty from the front and we already knew what was around the back and the sides and if we didn't have that revolves I'm not even sure we've been yeah Australian officials say the wild fires have killed hundreds of millions of birds and other animals you're listening to NPR news from Washington Porter Rico remains under a state of emergency following a series of earthquakes over the past several days one person has been killed and several others have been injured buildings have collapsed and most of the island still does not have power back because of the power outages governor one of Moscow's warns that at least three hundred thousand Porter Rican customers do not have drinking water preliminary data show that U. S. greenhouse gas emissions fell in twenty nineteen thanks to a drop in the power sector Wyoming public radio is Cooper McCann reports emissions are down two point one percent several major coal producers filed for bankruptcy last year including two in Wyoming the largest coal producing states analysts Trevor Hauser says the drop in coal consumption was the biggest factor in reducing emissions by levels increased in other areas and it buildings transportation and industry we've yet to see the development low carbon technologies at sufficient scale to lead to large scale reduction in emissions Hauser co authored the report for rhodium group an independent research provider he says at this rate the US is not on pace to meet the goals set forth in several international climate agreements for NPR news I'm Cooper macam the National Weather Service has growing confidence a large winter storm will hit the east coast by Friday the services that may include tornadoes and hail from Texas through other parts of the south and flooding in the Ohio and Tennessee valleys some states that are farther north we'll get wintry precipitation I'm korva Coleman NPR news support for NPR comes from NPR stations.

Texas NPR Coleman NPR Tennessee U. S. Washington New South Wales Ohio Porter Rico National Weather Service US Hauser co Trevor Hauser Wyoming Cooper McCann Moscow
"trevor hauser" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:47 min | 3 years ago

"trevor hauser" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"The downside of an up economy. There was a report out today. From the economic research firm rhodium group about carbon dioxide emissions in the United States of greenhouse gas, as you know, those emissions were up sharply last year, the second largest CO to increase we've seen in twenty years, which isn't great news on its face. But also it had looked for a while that we could have a growing economy without increasing pollution does look that way anymore as marketplace's Benesch your explains for centuries. The more the world's economies grew the more. They polluted the atmosphere. The link was severed four decades starting in two thousand and five gurney Wagner research, associate and lecturer at Harvard part of this was the recession, but a big part was moving away from coal and towards wind solar and natural gas. That's the largest driver of US reductions over the past. And your show. Aden is a senior fellow at the world Resources Institute natural gas is cleaner than coal, but it's still pollutes in Aden says we may have reached the limit of what it can do last year US carbon emissions rose three point four percent. According to the rhodium group, a booming economy contributed to an increase in emissions. Robert Jackson is a professor at Stanford. We are back for now to the traditional relationship between growth and pollution. But that relationship is not destiny. There are twenty countries are more around the world that have seen their economies grow over the last decade and seeing their CO two emissions decline. In fact, emissions are down ten percent in the US compared to two thousand seven, but he says further progress is impossible without policy promoting cleaner technology. Trevor Hauser is with the rhodium group and co authored the report showing rising emissions. It's not the rollback and policies that the Trump administration has adopted so much as the absence of. A new policy action Houser says this year as the economy cools emissions could be flat or even decline but not nearly fast enough to have a meaningful impact on climate change in New York. I'm Sabrina short for marketplace. Sorry to in our be careful what you wish for block is from marketplace's Nancy Marshall genzer. The economy is good as we've been reporting. It is strong, and it is stable. But there is a new report that says consumer debt bigger piles of it that is too less strongly. Regulated financial institutions could be a sign of economic problems ahead. Here's Nancy auto loan debt is up seventy six percent since twenty ten short term payday lending is also up according to Karen, petro of federal financial analytics who also says something I forty five million Americans have less than four hundred dollars in a savings account or checking account. So if there was Americans had an unexpected expense and couldn't pay up they'd be in trouble fast. Petrie says this is a powder.

United States rhodium group Robert Jackson Aden Nancy Marshall world Resources Institute Trevor Hauser Petrie Harvard financial analytics Stanford Wagner Karen senior fellow Houser lecturer
"trevor hauser" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

08:20 min | 3 years ago

"trevor hauser" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Always certainly says there hasn't been any terrorist that they found. Land. And it's spicy NBC then reported that the actual number of suspected terrorists detained at the border with six not thousands. According to data that customs and border protection gave congress for the first half of fiscal year two thousand eighteen presidential adviser Kellyanne Conway, then said the press secretary had made a misstatement. Well, our next guest has first-hand knowledge of the terrorist threat. And whether it is centered at the border, airports or someplace else altogether mic. Rasmussen ran the government's national counterterrorism center for three years through two thousand seventeen welcome. Thanks for having me are so you brief top government officials up to and including the president on the state of the terrorist threat did the southern border factor into those briefings. Did open only up Assad and not an really prominent way. It was a logical question for people to be asking are given the concerns about vulnerability of the southern border. There were often members of congress or other senior officials who would ask, hey, how are terrorists thinking about the southern border? Are they trying to infiltrate operatives are people traveling across southern border who are terrorism concern, and what we would say in the intelligence community is to the best of our knowledge. The answer is is largely. No, they're not it is certainly a concern. It is certainly a potential vulnerability. But it was a vulnerability that was not translating into actual numbers of terrorists crossing into the country. And certainly not the kind of volume that you've been hearing administration officials refer to Wendy tell I found interesting in that document that customs and border protection provided a congress is that last year. More suspected terrorists were apprehended on the northern border with Canada than the southern border with Mexico. And again, it just goes to the to the the problem that we've seen in terms of marshalling facts in support of arguments here because again, the the facts would suggest that we don't face a crisis at the southern border in terms of terrorists trying to cross into the United States. We have an effective watch listing system can always improve. But it's not as if we are somehow at the mercy of terrorist organizations, and that there are large numbers of terrorists at the southern border crossing into the United States. We're waiting to do. So it just simply isn't the case. So when you look at where the threat actually is today, what is the weakest point? And where would you funnel money to address that? Well, as my colleagues in government in the intelligence community have set in public testimony that the most serious threat we face from terrorism perspective here in the United States right now comes from homegrown violent extremists and those homegrown violent. Extremists tend to be individuals who've been here for a long time in the United States. They may even have been born year, they have become radicalized or potentially. Attracted to terrorist. Ideologies over time, but it's not something that attached to their particular immigration status, or when they arrived or something like that that homegrown piece of it is really the piece we should be funneling resources at working with communities to try to find ways to reach vulnerable individuals before they become radicalized before they become a potential terrorist in a community somewhere here in the United States. That's not a border security problem that's more of a community policing and community resilience problem. It's an interesting conclusion that Al Qaeda ISIS and other similar groups have found it is easier to radicalize people who are already in the country than it is to get people into the country says something about the strength of the border airports already in the present day. And again, I'm not here to tell you that our border security is perfect from terrorism or counterterrorism perspective. And there's always ways we can improve and get better. But the degree of of progress that we've made since nine eleven in making our borders. More secure is something that's not to be understated, and sir. Certainly shouldn't be shouldn't be thrown around in in political debate in a way that somehow undermines the the American public's confidence in our border security at least with respect to terrorism. It just simply isn't the case that we are vulnerable at the southern border in the way that that some officials are describing that's Nick Rasmussen former head of the national counterterrorism center who worked in counterterrorism under three administrations. Thanks for joining us today. Thanks very much. Right. After several years of decline carbon dioxide emissions in the US are on the rise. That's according to a new report out today. NPR's Jeff Brumfield has more on what it could mean for the planet. Here's the upside of an economic downturn greenhouse gas emissions. Also, go down factories are using less electricity. There are fewer trucks and planes shipping goods and people, and that's exactly what happened after the financial crisis of two thousand eight carbon dioxide emissions plummeted. They've been bouncing up and down since then. But last year the economy was on a roll output with up and now an estimate by the rhodium group, an independent research firm shows that CO two emissions were way up it appears based on preliminary data that emissions in the US grew by the highest rave since two thousand and ten when we were covering from the great recession Trevor Hauser's and author on the new estimate, he says carbon dioxide emissions. Our approach. Awfully three point four percent over last year. The big drivers who are increases intellect. Trinity demand which burns natural gas and coal and big growth in trucking and aviation Amazon packages all those holiday vacations that come with a booming economy. Now there were some areas where decisions by government and industry made a difference. A record number of coal fired power plants closed in two thousand eighteen and emissions. From passenger automobiles dropped slightly due to better fuel economy standards. But it was not enough and Hauser wants more aggressive policies to drive down. CO two had seems unlikely for now policies to limit greenhouse gas emission started under the Obama administration are now being halted and even reversed under President Trump. What we've seen as backsliding in federal policy, and we're starting to feel the effects of that now. So is Houser rooting for another recession to bring a mission stand again. I I am not I am not short-term emissions decline. As a result of a recession is not something anyone's cheering for what's needed. He says is a strong economy and the right incentives to invest in green technologies. Jeff Brumfield NPR news. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. Coming up at six tonight. President Donald Trump addresses the nation as the partial government shutdown continues into its third week. The president will be making his case for billions of dollars in funding for a wall along the US Mexico border afterwards. House speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer will respond NPR in case, you will have special coverage of the president's remarks, the joint democratic response fact checking and analysis in Washington DC and along the border. That's all coming up tonight at six the world returned tomorrow night. Eighteen minutes past five on all things considered coming up on marketplace. For the first time in four years US carbon emissions have spiked a look at the admissions rate. And how a growing economy may have the story straight ahead on marketplace. In ten minutes at five thirty here on Casey, we get support from the city of Santa Cruz street smarts campaign, reminding bicyclists to ride defensively invisibly in the same direction as cars obey traffic signals and signs and use a helmet and hence signals. And the Carmel music society, presenting the fortieth Daniel piano competition winners recital with pianist, Kevin son three PM this Sunday. January thirteenth at the sunset center. In carmel. Details and tickets at Carmel music dot org..

United States congress Nick Rasmussen President Donald Trump president NPR Jeff Brumfield Trevor Hauser Mexico NBC Kellyanne Conway carmel Canada Assad press secretary
"trevor hauser" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:34 min | 3 years ago

"trevor hauser" Discussed on KCRW

"Four thousand known or suspected terrorists come into our country illegally. And we know that are most vulnerable point of entry is I know this statistic. I didn't know if you're gonna use it. But I studied up on this, do, you know, where those four thousand people come where they're captured the airports, not always certainly stage. Inaugural says there hasn't been any terrorist that they found coming across the land. And it's vic- NBC then reported that the actual number of suspected terrorists detained at the border. Was six not thousands. According to data that customs and border protection gave congress for the first half of fiscal year two thousand eighteen presidential adviser Kellyanne Conway, then said the press secretary had made a misstatement. Well, our next guest has first-hand knowledge of the terrorist threat. And whether it is centered at the border, airports or someplace else altogether. Nick, Rasmussen ran the government's national counterterrorism center for three years through two thousand seventeen welcome. Thanks for having me. All right. So you brief top government officials up to and including the president on the state of the terrorist threat did the southern border factor into those briefings. Did open only episode and not an really prominent way. Would it was a logical question for people to be asking are given the concerns about vulnerability of the southern border. The were often members of congress or other senior officials who would ask, hey, how are terrorists thinking about the southern border? Are they trying to infiltrate operatives are people traveling across the southern border who are terrorism concern, and what we would say in the intelligence community is to the best of our knowledge. The answer is is largely. No, they're not it is certainly a concern. It is certainly a potential vulnerabilities. But it was a vulnerability that was not translating into actual numbers of terrorists crossing into the country. And certainly not the kind of volume that you've been hearing administration officials refer to Wendy tell I found interesting in that document that customs and border protection provided a congress is that last year. More suspected terrorists were apprehended on the northern border with Canada than the southern border with Mexico. And again, it just goes to the to the the problem that we've seen in terms of marshalling facts in support of arguments here because again, the the the facts would suggest that we don't face a crisis at the southern border in terms of terrorists trying to cross into the United States. We have an effective watch listing system can always improve. But it's not as if we are somehow at the mercy of terrorist organizations, and that there are large numbers of terrorists at the southern border crossing into the United States. We're waiting to do. So just simply isn't the case. So when you look at where the threat actually is today, what is the weakest point? And where would you funnel money to address that? Well, as my colleagues in government, and the intelligence community have said in public testimony that the most serious threat we face from terrorism perspective here in the United States right now comes from homegrown violent extremists. Those homegrown violent. Extremists tend to be individuals who've been here for a long time in the United States. The may even have been born year, they have become radicalized or potentially attracted to terrorist. Ideologies over time, but it's not something that attached to their particular immigration status, or when they arrived or something like that that homegrown piece of it is really the piece we should be funneling resources at working with communities to try to find ways to reach vulnerable individuals before they become radicalized before they become a potential terrorist community somewhere here in the United States, and that's not a border security problem that's more of a community policing and community resilience problem. It's an interesting conclusion that Al Qaeda ISIS and other similar groups have found it is easier to radicalize people who are already in the. Country than it is to get people into the country says something about the strength of the border and airports already in the present day. And again, I'm not here to tell you that our border security is perfect from terrorism or counter terrorism perspective, and there's always ways we can improve and get better. But the degree of of progress that we've made since nine eleven in making our borders more secure is something that's not to be understated, and certainly shouldn't be shouldn't be thrown around in in political debate in a way that somehow undermines the the American public's confidence in our border security at least with respect to terrorism. It just simply isn't the case that we are vulnerable at the southern border in the way that that that some officials are describing that's Nick Rasmussen former head of the national counterterrorism center who worked in counterterrorism under three administrations. Thanks for joining us today. Thanks very much already. After several years of decline carbon dioxide emissions in the US are on the rise. That's according to a new report out today. NPR's Jeff Brumfield has more on what it could mean for the planet. Here's the upside of an economic downturn greenhouse gas emissions. Also, go down factories are using less electricity. There are fewer trucks and planes shipping goods and people, and that's exactly what happened after the financial crisis of two thousand eight carbon dioxide emissions plummeted they'd been bouncing up and down since then. But last year the economy was on a roll output with up and now an estimate by the rhodium group, an independent research firm shows that CO two emissions were way up it appears based on preliminary data that emissions in the US grew by the highest rave since two thousand and ten when we were covering from the great recession Trevor Hauser's and author on the new estimate, he says carbon dioxide emissions are appropriately. Three point four percent over last year. The big drivers were increases in electrcity demand, which burns natural gas and coal and big growth in trucking and aviation those Amazon packages all those holiday vacations that come with a booming economy. Now there were some areas where decisions by government and industry made a difference. A record number of coal fired power plants closed in two thousand eighteen and emissions. From passenger automobiles dropped slightly due to better fuel economy standards. But it was not enough and Hauser wants more aggressive policies to drive down. CO two had seems unlikely for now policies to limit greenhouse gas emission started under the Obama administration are now being halted and even reversed under President Trump. What we've seen as backsliding in federal policy, and we're starting to feel the effects of that now so is Houser rooting for other recession to bring emissions down. Again. I I am not I am not short-term emissions decline. As a result of a recession is not something anyone cheering for what's needed. He says is a strong economy and the right incentives to invest in green technologies. Jeff Brumfield NPR news. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. KCRW sponsors include marvel studios, presenting Black Panther nominated by the producers guild and twelve critics choice awards including best picture best score. And original song all the stars performed by Kendrick. Lamar and says. I'm on Olney onto the point can the new house majority. Get it together..

United States congress Nick Rasmussen Jeff Brumfield Trevor Hauser vic- NBC NPR Kellyanne Conway Canada president Al Qaeda ISIS Olney Mexico Wendy Kendrick
"trevor hauser" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:45 min | 3 years ago

"trevor hauser" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We know that are most vulnerable point of entry. The statistic. I didn't know if you're gonna use it. But I studied up on this, do, you know, where those four thousand people come where they're captured the airports, not always certainly says there hasn't been any terrorist that they found. Land. And it's spicy NBC then reported that the actual number of suspected terrorists detained at the border with six not thousands. According to data that customs and border protection gave congress for the first half of fiscal year two thousand eighteen presidential adviser Kellyanne Conway, then said the press secretary had made a misstatement. Well, our next guest has first-hand knowledge of the terrorist threat. And whether it is centered at the border, airports or someplace else altogether. Nick, Rasmussen ran the government's national counterterrorism center for three years through two thousand seventeen welcome. Thanks for having me. Are you briefed top government officials up to and including the president on the state of the terrorist threat did the southern border factor into those briefings. Did open only episode and not an really prominent way. It was a logical question for people to be asking are given the concerns about vulnerability of at the southern border. The were often members of congress or other senior officials who would ask, hey, how are terrorists thinking about the southern border? Are they trying to infiltrate operatives are people traveling across the southern border who are of terrorism concern, we would say in the intelligence community is to the best of our knowledge. The answer is is largely. No, they're not. It is certainly a concern is certainly a potential vulnerability. But it was a vulnerability that was not translating into actual numbers of terrorists crossing into the country. And certainly not the kind of volume that you've been hearing administration officials refer to when detail I found interesting in that document that customs and border protection provided a congress is that last year. More suspected terrorists were apprehended on the northern border with Canada than the southern border with Mexico. And again, it just goes to the to the the problem that we've seen in terms of marshalling facts in support of arguments here because again, the the the facts would suggest that we don't face a crisis at the southern border in terms of terrorists trying to cross into the United States. We have an effective watch listing system can always improve. But it's not as if we are somehow at the mercy of terrorist organizations. There are large numbers of terrorists at the southern border crossing into the United States are waiting to do. So just simply isn't the case. So when you look at where the threat actually is today, what is the weakest point? And where would you funnel money to address that? Well, as as my colleagues in government in the intelligence community have set in public testimony that the most serious threat we face from terrorism perspective here in the United States right now comes from homegrown violent extremists. And those homegrown violent extremists tend to be individuals who've been here for a long time in the United States. They may even have been born year, they have become radicalized or potentially a. Attracted to terrorist. Ideologies over time, but it's not something that attached to their particular immigration status, or when they arrived or something like that that homegrown piece of it is really the piece we should be funneling resources at working with communities to try to find ways to reach vulnerable individuals before they become radicalized before they become a potential terrorist in the community somewhere here in the United States. That's not a border security problem that's more of a community policing and community resilience problem. It's an interesting conclusion that Al Qaeda ISIS and other similar groups have found it is easier to radicalize people who are already in the country than it is to get people into the country says something about the strength of the border and airports already in the present day. And again, you know, I'm not here to tell you that our border security is perfect from terrorism or counter terrorism perspective, and there's always ways we can improve and get better. But the degree of of progress that we've made since nine eleven in making our borders. More secure is something that's not to be understated. And certainly shouldn't be shouldn't be thrown around in political debate in a way that somehow undermines the the the American public's confidence in our border security at least with respect to terrorism. It simply isn't the case that we are vulnerable at the southern border in the way that that some officials are describing that's Nick Rasmussen former head of the national counterterrorism center who worked in counterterrorism under three administrations. Thanks for joining us today. Thanks very much. All right. After several years of decline carbon dioxide emissions in the US are on the rise. That's according to a new report out today. NPR's Jeff Brumfield has more on what it could mean for the planet. Here's the upside of an economic downturn greenhouse gas emission to also go down factories are using less electricity. There are fewer trucks and planes shipping. Goodson people, and that's exactly what happened after the financial crisis of two thousand eight carbon dioxide emissions plummeted. They've been bouncing up and down since then. But last year the economy was on a roll output with up and now an estimate by the rhodium group, an independent research firm shows that CO two emissions were way up it appears based on preliminary data that emissions in the US grew by the highest rave since two thousand and ten when we were covering from the great recession Trevor Hauser's and author on the new estimate, he says carbon dioxide emissions are up roughly. Three point four percent over last year. The big drivers are increases intellect trysofi. Demand which burns natural gas and coal and big growth in trucking and aviation on Amazon packages all those holiday vacations that come with a booming economy. Now there were some areas where decisions by government and industry made a difference. A record number of coal fired power plants closed in two thousand eighteen and emissions. From passenger automobiles drops slightly due to better fuel economy standards. But it was not enough and Hauser wants more aggressive policies to drive down. CO two had seems unlikely for now policies to limit greenhouse gas emissions started under the Obama administration are now being halted and even reversed under President Trump. What we've seen as backsliding in federal policy, and we're starting to feel the effects of that now. So is Houser rooting for another recession to bring a mission down. Again. I I am not I am not short-term emissions decline. As a result of a recession as not something anyone cheering for what's needed. He says is a strong economy and the right incentives to invest in green technologies. Jeff Brumfield NPR.

United States congress Nick Rasmussen Trevor Hauser NBC Jeff Brumfield NPR Kellyanne Conway president Canada press secretary Al Qaeda ISIS NPR Mexico Jeff Brumfield Houser
"trevor hauser" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"trevor hauser" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"After several years of decline carbon dioxide emissions in the US are on the rise. That's according to a new report out today. NPR's Jeff Brumfield has more on what it could mean for the planet. Here's the upside of an economic downturn greenhouse gas emissions. Also, go down factories are using less electricity. There are fewer trucks and planes shipping. Goodson people, and that's exactly what happened after the financial crisis of two thousand eight carbon dioxide emissions plummeted. They've been bouncing up and down since then. But last year the economy was on a roll output was up and now an estimate by the rhodium group, an independent research firm shows that CO two emissions were way up it appears based on preliminary data that emissions in the US crew by the highest rate since two thousand and ten when we were covering from the great recession Trevor Hauser's and author on the new estimate, he says carbon dioxide emissions. Our approach. Roughly three point four percent over last year. The big drivers were increases in electric demand which burns natural gas and coal and big growth in trucking and aviation Amazon packages all those holiday vacations that come with a booming economy. Now there were some areas where decisions by government and industry made a difference. A record number of coal fired power plants closed in two thousand eighteen and emissions. From passenger automobiles dropped slightly due to better fuel economy standards. But it was not enough and Hauser wants more aggressive policies to drive down. CO two had seems unlikely for now policies to limit greenhouse gas emission started under the Obama administration are now being halted and even reversed under President Trump. What we've seen as backsliding in federal policy, and we're starting to feel the effects of that now. So is Houser rooting for another recession to bring a mission down. Again. I I am not I am not short term emissions decline. As a result of a recession is not something anyone's cheering for what's needed. He says is a strong economy and the right incentives to invest in green technologies. Jeff Brumfield NPR news..

Jeff Brumfield Trevor Hauser US NPR Houser Goodson rhodium group Amazon President Trump Obama administration four percent
U.S. Carbon Emissions Rose 3.4% in 2018 as Economy Surged

All Things Considered

01:55 min | 3 years ago

U.S. Carbon Emissions Rose 3.4% in 2018 as Economy Surged

"Mean for the planet. Here's the upside of an economic downturn greenhouse gas emissions. Also, go down factories are using less electricity. There are fewer trucks and planes shipping. Goodson people, and that's exactly what happened after the financial crisis of two thousand eight carbon dioxide emissions plummeted. They've been bouncing up and down since then. But last year the economy was on a roll output was up and now an estimate by the rhodium group, an independent research firm shows that CO two emissions were way up it appears based on preliminary data that emissions in the US crew by the highest rate since two thousand and ten when we were covering from the great recession Trevor Hauser's and author on the new estimate, he says carbon dioxide emissions. Our approach. Roughly three point four percent over last year. The big drivers were increases in electric demand which burns natural gas and coal and big growth in trucking and aviation Amazon packages all those holiday vacations that come with a booming economy. Now there were some areas where decisions by government and industry made a difference. A record number of coal fired power plants closed in two thousand eighteen and emissions. From passenger automobiles dropped slightly due to better fuel economy standards. But it was not enough and Hauser wants more aggressive policies to drive down. CO two had seems unlikely for now policies to limit greenhouse gas emission started under the Obama administration are now being halted and even reversed under President Trump. What we've seen as backsliding in federal policy, and we're starting to feel the effects of that now. So is Houser rooting for another recession to bring a mission down. Again. I I am not I am not short term emissions decline. As a result of a recession is not something anyone's cheering for what's needed. He says is a strong economy and the right incentives to invest in green

Trevor Hauser Houser Goodson Amazon Rhodium Group United States President Trump Obama Administration Four Percent
"trevor hauser" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"trevor hauser" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"After several years of decline carbon dioxide emissions in the US are on the rise. That's according to a new report out today. NPR's Jeff Brumfield has more on what it could mean for the planet. Here's the upside of an economic downturn greenhouse gas emissions to also go down factories are using less electricity. There are fewer trucks and planes shipping goods and people, and that's exactly what happened after the financial crisis of two thousand eight carbon dioxide emissions plummeted. They've been bouncing up and down since then. But last year the economy was on a roll output was up and now an estimate by the rhodium group, an independent research firm shows that CO two emissions were way up it appears based on preliminary data that emissions in the US crew by the highest rates since two thousand and ten when we were covering from the great recession Trevor Hauser's and author on the new estimate, he says carbon dioxide emissions. Our approach. Flee three point four percent over last year. The big drivers who are increases in demand, which burns natural gas and coal and big growth in trucking and aviation the Amazon packages all those holiday vacations that come with a booming economy. Now there were some areas where decisions by government and industry made a difference. A record number of coal fired power plants closed in two thousand eighteen and emissions. From passenger automobiles dropped slightly due to better fuel economy standards. But it was not enough and Houser wants more aggressive policies to drive down. CO two had seems unlikely for now policies to limit greenhouse gas emission started under the Obama administration are now being halted and even reversed under President Trump. What we've seen as backsliding in federal policy, and we're starting to feel the effects of that now. So is Houser rooting for another recession to bring a mission statement again, I I am not I am not short-term emissions decline. As a result of a recession is not something anyone's cheering for what's needed. He says is a strong economy and the right incentives to invest in green technologies. Jeff Brumfield NPR news. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. Plane.

Jeff Brumfield Houser US NPR Trevor Hauser rhodium group Amazon President Trump Obama administration four percent
"trevor hauser" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

02:33 min | 3 years ago

"trevor hauser" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"This message comes from NPR sponsor, the American Academy of PA's with thousands of hours of medical training and versatile skill set p as our expanding access to team based care when it comes to quality healthcare. Your PA can handle it after several years of decline carbon dioxide emissions in the US are on the rise. That's according to a new report out today. NPR's Jeff Brumfield has more on what it could mean for the planet cures. The upside of an economic downturn greenhouse gas emissions also go down factories are using less electricity. There are fewer trucks and planes shipping goods and people, and that's exactly what happened after the financial crisis of two thousand eight carbon dioxide emissions plummeted. They've been bouncing up and down since then. But last year the economy was on a roll output was up and now an estimate by the rhodium group, an independent research firm shows that CO two emissions were way up it appears based on preliminary data the emissions in the US. Grew by the highest rate since two thousand and ten when we were covering from the great recession Trevor Hauser's and author on the new estimate. He says carbon dioxide emissions are up roughly three point four percent over last year. The big drivers were increases intellect. Trinity demand which burns natural gas and coal and big growth in trucking and aviation all those Amazon packages all those holiday vacations that come with a booming economy. Now there were some areas where decisions by government and industry made a difference. A record number of coal fired power plants closed in two thousand eighteen and emissions. From passenger automobiles dropped slightly due to better fuel economy standards. But it was not enough and Houser wants more aggressive policies to drive down. CO two at seems unlikely for now policies to limit greenhouse gas emissions started under the Obama administration are now being halted and even reversed under President Trump. What we've seen as backsliding in federal policy and we're starting to. To feel the effects of that. Now. So is Hausa rooting for another recession to bring emissions down. Again. I I am not I am not over the long term short term emissions decline. As a result of a recession as not something anyone cheering for what's needed. He says is a strong economy and the right incentives to invest in green technologies. Jeff Brumfield NPR news.

Jeff Brumfield NPR US American Academy of PA Trevor Hauser rhodium group Amazon Houser President Trump Obama administration four percent