35 Burst results for "Trayvon"

How President Obama Gave Us President Biden

The Officer Tatum Show

02:02 min | Last month

How President Obama Gave Us President Biden

"Obama since I already spoke about him earlier. Let me go ahead and work this in. Obama and this is the man knows how to campaign. Like him or not, I can't stand him. I think he was the worst president in American history. The reason why I say that and I realize there are bad presidents out there, Andrew Johnson, in my opinion, Lyndon Johnson, Richard Nixon really screwed us as a Republican with the EPA and going off the gold standard and all these all these kinds of things Woodrow Wilson right, you'll hear you'll hear about him and Biden obviously is horrible and many people contend that Biden is the worst president ever. Obviously other people talk about Jimmy Carter as well. The reason why I think Barack Obama is is because he said a lot of the stuff that we're experiencing today and place. He set the foundation. Were it not for Barack Obama? We wouldn't even have a Joe Biden. He rescued Joe Biden. Joe Biden was nothing more than a corrupt crook, right? That's all he was. That's all he would have ever been. That would have been his legacy. Just a corrupt no good crook that was in Washington, D.C. for his entire life, never amounted to anything. Everyone there understood that the guy was complete and utter moron and a jerk, but Obama is the one that gave him the platform that he has essentially asked today. In my opinion, helped to resurrect him. But Obama said a lot of this stuff in place. This cultural arc system that you see, there were orders issued executive order so on it issued throughout his administration, the way that he would come out and talk about if I had a son, you know, he looked just like Trayvon. I'm like, he looked just like Trayvon. But what are you talking about? You have black half white. You're someone look like Trayvon. For God's sakes. I mean, just a little stuff like that. There's someone to look like Blake Griffin. I used to say, I don't even know where Blake Griffin is. You know, where Blake Griffin is. Now I don't even know where that. He plays for the Celtics. All right, so just nonsense like that.

Barack Obama Joe Biden Biden Andrew Johnson Lyndon Johnson Washington, D.C. Richard Nixon Woodrow Wilson Jimmy Carter Trayvon EPA Blake Griffin Celtics
Joel Gilbert and Eric Discuss One of the Democrats' Biggest Lies

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:53 min | 5 months ago

Joel Gilbert and Eric Discuss One of the Democrats' Biggest Lies

"You actually care about the black underclass in the inner cities in America, you would never ever, ever vote for a Democrat. This is the irony is that the Democrats have somehow been successful in selling the lie that they care about these people when the reality is. And this is the history of the Democratic Party going back to when they were, they were the pro slavery party in the 19th century. Obviously Lincoln rose up first Republican to stand against them. All through their history, they really have been the actual racists, but they have because of principally because of Lyndon Johnson in 65. They've been able to sell themselves as the party that cares for the poor people that cares for the people of color in the inner cities. And you're telling me, again, that we have tons of evidence that the opposite is the case. It's kind of amazing. I'm sorry that most Americans don't know this, but we need to know this. Yeah, well, what they've developed really since the 80s is the very racist idea that if they put as a frontman, someone who looks like them, another black person that black people will assume that the black person on the Democrat party ticket would have their interests and have their back. It's always proving the opposite. Barack Obama did nothing for minorities. Black people. He had to invoke race and drum up the Trayvon Martin thing in 2012 because blacks were even then not on board to vote for Obama again. So this is the concept that they pushed is let's get someone who's a frontman and that's what Michelle Obama did for the University of Chicago medical center. They hired her to keep blacks out of the emergency room because some of them didn't have insurance.

Lyndon Johnson Democratic Party Lincoln America Democrat Party Barack Obama Trayvon Martin Michelle Obama University Of Chicago Medical
Defense 1st, then offense at top of NFL draft, no early QBs

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 7 months ago

Defense 1st, then offense at top of NFL draft, no early QBs

"The the the the first first first first fine fine fine fine selections selections selections selections in in in in the the the the twenty twenty twenty twenty twenty twenty twenty twenty NFL NFL NFL NFL draft draft draft draft all all all all line line line line up up up up on on on on defense defense defense defense three three three three edge edge edge edge rushers rushers rushers rushers and and and and two two two two cornerbacks cornerbacks cornerbacks cornerbacks the the the the Jacksonville Jacksonville Jacksonville Jacksonville Jaguars Jaguars Jaguars Jaguars started started started started on on on on the the the the edge edge edge edge selecting selecting selecting selecting Trayvon Trayvon Trayvon Trayvon Walker Walker Walker Walker of of of of national national national national champion champion champion champion Georgia Georgia Georgia Georgia as as as as the the the the overall overall overall overall number number number number one one one one defensive defensive defensive defensive end end end end Aiden Aiden Aiden Aiden Hutchinson Hutchinson Hutchinson Hutchinson of of of of Michigan Michigan Michigan Michigan went went went went to to to to the the the the Detroit Detroit Detroit Detroit Lions Lions Lions Lions at at at at number number number number two two two two quarterbacks quarterbacks quarterbacks quarterbacks were were were were next next next next with with with with the the the the Houston Houston Houston Houston Texans Texans Texans Texans taking taking taking taking Derek Derek Derek Derek Stingley Stingley Stingley Stingley junior junior junior junior the the the the New New New New York York York York Jets Jets Jets Jets Ahmad Ahmad Ahmad Ahmad sauce sauce sauce sauce Gardner Gardner Gardner Gardner the the the the New New New New York York York York Giants Giants Giants Giants went went went went back back back back to to to to the the the the edge edge edge edge with with with with the the the the fifth fifth fifth fifth pick pick pick pick Kayvon Kayvon Kayvon Kayvon Thibodeaux Thibodeaux Thibodeaux Thibodeaux of of of of Oregon Oregon Oregon Oregon it's it's it's it's the the the the first first first first time time time time in in in in thirty thirty thirty thirty one one one one years years years years that that that that no no no no player player player player on on on on offense offense offense offense went went went went in in in in the the the the opening opening opening opening five five five five picks picks picks picks I'm I'm I'm I'm Ben Ben Ben Ben Thomas Thomas Thomas Thomas

NFL Georgia Jacksonville Jacksonville Jack Jaguars Jaguars Michigan Trayvon Trayvon Trayvon Trayvo Aiden Aiden Aiden Aiden Hutchi Detroit Detroit Detroit Detroi Lions Lions Lions Houston Houston Houston Housto Texans Texans Thibodeaux Thibodeaux Derek Derek Derek Derek Stingl Jaguars New New New New York York York Jets Jets Ahmad Ahmad Ahmad Ahmad Gardner Gardner Gardner Gardne New New New New York York York Giants Giants
"trayvon" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

05:52 min | 8 months ago

"trayvon" Discussed on The Book Review

"So haggard and so woebegone? Squirrels gram is full on behalf of stone. I see a lily on my brow with anguish moist and fever dew. And all night cheeks are fading rose fast with two. I met a lady in the medes, full beautiful, a fairy's child, her hair was long, her foot was light, and her eyes were wild. I made a Garland for her head and bracelets, too, and fragrant zone. She looked at me as she did love, and made sweet mode. I set her on my pacing steed and nothing else saw all day long. For side long she would bend. And sing a fairy's song. She found me roots of relish sweet and honey Wilde and mandu and sure, in language strange, she said, I love the truth. She took me to her elfin and that she wept, and sighed full saw, and there I shut her wild wild eyes. With kisses for. Now she lolled me to sleep in their eye dreams. Woe but tied the latest dream I ever dreamed. Of the cold hillside. I saw pale kings and princes too. Pale warrior's death pale were they all. They cried. La Belle dame saw mercy. I saw their starved lips and the globe, with horrid warning gaping wide. And I awoke, and found me here. On the cold hills sides. And this is why I sodden here alone, palely loitering. With the sedges with it from the Lake. And no birds sing. Thank you so much. That was lovely. Lucasta Miller's new book, again, is keats a brief life in 9 poems and one epitaph because the thank you so much for being here to talk about it. Thank you very much indeed. I'm joined by two of the times as esteemed book critics now, Jennifer salay and Alexandra Jacobs. Hello, YouTube. Hi, John..

haggard La Belle dame Garland fever Lucasta Miller Jennifer salay Alexandra Jacobs YouTube John
"trayvon" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

04:56 min | 8 months ago

"trayvon" Discussed on The Book Review

"Heroine as she undresses and gets into bed, and then she falls asleep. And then he gets into bed with her and then we have this incredible moment of erotic consummation that's obviously expressed through metaphor, but of course, you know, she's not awake at the time, so she can't really give her consent. And in fact, when she wakes up, she cries alas alas and woe his mind. I think we could overdo this. I've certainly not saying that keeps himself was a predecessor just the innocent young man in love with fanny Braun. He'd caught syphilis before he met fanny Braun, but he's terribly terribly insecure about the way that women see him. He's very short. He's only 5 foot tall. That's what I was trying to bring out. Let's talk about Fannie Braun because I've seen the movie bright star and also read about them and all of those things have cemented this idea of their relationship. What was that relationship like? And what have we maybe misunderstood about it as it's been written about throughout the years? Well, the thing I really liked about the film was the way in which it really gave fanny a full character because she's been rolled as treated rather badly posterity. But I think she's as feelings towards her really had an intensity of passion and indeed included emotional cruelties like he identifies with harmless at one point in his passionate letters towards servicing get these to a nunnery. He's so violently jealous if she goes to a party when he's ill and can't go out. What I find about that is not so much that he's being cruel to her. I read it as this very, very young man who knows he's going to die and what he's really jealous of is the fact that she has independent life and can go out to parties and he can't. I should say I love the film. So that was not a critique of the film. I would hardly recommend it alongside your book. The film does follow the actual chronology really very well in that sense it's really quite accurate. But aspects of keys that we don't get in the film are, for example, the political keys keats was politically radical and that's one of the reasons why his work was so incredibly controversial at the time he published. We see keats as our sort of ideal of what it is to be poetic. And it's because we know his work so well. It's easy to forget quite how original it was at the time it first came out and how it was considered incomprehensible, vulgar, even gross. I mean, particularly the sensuality of the imagery. So when he uses a phrase like slippery bliss is to describe a woman's lips. I mean, there's liver in there. There's body fluid. I mean, this is a man who is constantly aware of physicality and people just found that yuck at the time..

fanny Braun Fannie Braun syphilis fanny keats
"trayvon" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

05:31 min | 8 months ago

"trayvon" Discussed on The Book Review

"I wrote a memoir the light of the world about 8 years ago after the very unexpected death of my beloved husband and I think that's an example of turning grief into art, but the writing of it was, again, not so much to go through or vanquish or process the pain. But rather, to know what I was living through, art for me is a way that I look inside of myself almost wordlessly, even though it comes out in words and say, what is being experienced here? And I think that as a human being, I have something human to share. And that's what artists have in common. And that is what is the very unique power of art. It literally carries humanity. It literally carries souls, I believe, from one soul to another. And if it's done well, it allows us to imagine ourselves in other people's experiences. It allows us to, even if it's not about grief, it could be about joy. It could be about and in my memoir, which was occasioned by grief. It was about love. It was about love. It was about living through art. It was about family. It was about the complexities of the United States and first generation families that was about many, many, many things. So if it did its job, it was a piece of my soul saying to others, please come in and please tell me who you are. And that's been my experience with that book in the years that have followed. Well, the power of art is present in this book, not just in your words, but again in these beautiful illustrations that you've chosen to accompany them and a very, very wide group of artists and some incredible work throughout to let people sit with those concepts. The book again is the Trayvon generation, Elizabeth Alexander, thank you so much again for taking the time.

United States Trayvon Elizabeth Alexander
"trayvon" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

03:49 min | 8 months ago

"trayvon" Discussed on The Book Review

"And talks about the problem of the 20th century being the color line. And I think we can ask that same question now. Thinking about Trayvon Martin thinking about tamir rice, thinking about this litany of names of these beautiful young people, going to the store to buy skittles. And hunted, how are you supposed to process that when you are also a young black person in a hoodie at dusk? The word generation is right there in the title and a lot of this is about a generation's very particular experience. I think mostly driven by technology. And having phones in their hands at all times take me back to because obviously, as you so eloquently say in the book, it's a very deep rooted American problem. It's been with us forever. So take us back to your childhood or your early years and how the vulnerability of the black community was expressed to you and differences you see in how you were raised to see that and feel it and now if you were say 12 years old these days. I've been thinking very deeply about that question because a few people have asked me if this is the Trayvon generation, how would you name your generation? And so I think back further to what we might call the Emmett Till generation. So when Emmett Till in 1955 was sent by his mom from their home in Chicago to money Mississippi to visit family over the summer was alleged to have whistled at a white woman was taken from his family home was beaten was shot was put in the river and his mother did the extraordinary thing of bringing his body back to Chicago, putting it in an open cast to get saying I want the world to see what they did to my child and the casket and Emmett Till's body were photographed and published in jet magazine..

tamir rice Trayvon Martin Trayvon Emmett Till Chicago Mississippi jet magazine
"trayvon" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

05:19 min | 8 months ago

"trayvon" Discussed on The Book Review

"If you think about some of the language of the civil rights movement, we shall overcome, is hopeful, but after that comes some day. Well, I think what we're seeing now is that we have not yet arrived at that day. Elizabeth Alexander is here to talk about the Trayvon generation. Her meditation on race, justice, and their intersections with art. Obsessed with not saying keeps himself was a predecessor just the innocent young man in love with fanny brawl. Lucasta Miller joins us to help us see a great poet more clearly, and to talk about her new book, keats, a brief life and 9 poems and one epitaph. Plus, our critics will be here to talk about books they've recently reviewed. This is the book review podcast, it's April 15th, I'm John Williams. Elizabeth Alexander joins us now. She is a Pulitzer Prize finalist poet, the author of the memoir, the light of the world, and I'm willing to bet that you remember her reading her poem, praise song for the day, which she wrote for Barack Obama's inauguration in 2009. Her new book is the Trayvon generation. In the book review Mitchell S Jackson calls it a profound and lyrical meditation on race, class, justice, and their intersections with art. Elizabeth, thanks so much for being here to talk about it. I'm glad to be here. In June 2020, you published an essay in The New Yorker with the same title, the Trayvon generation. Tell me a bit about that essay and how it led to this book. Well, in June 2020, we had been locked down for the pandemic, which I think is important because people were in a kind of isolation and also in their homes when we saw George Floyd's murder by police over and over and over and over again repeated from the cell phone film that darnella Frazier, 17 year old girl recorded. And from that, as we know, there were protests around the world across the country that were calling attention to the unresolved American issue of racial injustice and violence. I mentioned darnella Frazier because she is a part of a generation of young black and brown people who I call the Trayvon generation. These are young people who have been raised on a steady exposure to this violence against black people recorded seen over and over and over again. And I think we need to think about what that has meant how that has shaped this generation. How it has taught them about their own vulnerability. How it has taught them that the black and brown bodies that they move in the world and can put them in danger. But how also we look to them and want for them, joy, freedom, brilliance, self expression, politics, raising their voices all the things that we need our young people to both experience and to also offer the society. So that was where we were in June 2020. And I wanted to say something about it. And I wanted to offer the art and culture and history and perspective that I have always thought in my long career as an educator, were something that could help light the way. In that essay too, I was listening very carefully to the cultural production of people of a younger generation who I thought were capturing very powerfully this sense of vulnerability, the anxiety, the depression and the creative light that has come from that generation..

Elizabeth Alexander darnella Frazier Lucasta Miller Mitchell S Jackson George Floyd John Williams Pulitzer Prize The New Yorker Barack Obama Elizabeth brown depression
Brittney Griner Hates America, yet She Needs America

The Larry Elder Show

01:14 min | 9 months ago

Brittney Griner Hates America, yet She Needs America

"A moment ago, I spoke about the WNBA star her name is Brittany griner. Who was arrested at an airport in Russia. This is the same Britney Reiner, who said, about the national anthem, I'm not going to be out there for the national anthem. She said two years ago, if the league referring to the WNBA, continues to want to play at that fine, it'll be all season long, I'll not be out there. I feel like more are probably going to do the same thing. I can only speak for myself. And she said earlier, yeah, we're here to play basketball, but basketball doesn't mean anything in a world where you just can't live. We can't wake up and do whatever we want to do. Go for a run, go to the store and buy some candy. I presume she referring to Trayvon Martin. Drive your car without fear of being wrongfully pulled over. I just want to challenge everybody to do more. Write the story that might be tough. Take a chance, ask a question that's tough. Don't let it be silent. We don't get asked enough what's going on in our communities, and I think that's a shame.

Brittany Griner Wnba Britney Reiner Basketball Russia Trayvon Martin
"trayvon" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:40 min | 9 months ago

"trayvon" Discussed on WTOP

"One of the most important things maybe that came out of this tragedy was the activation of an entire new generation of civil rights leaders It's ten years ago this weekend That's 17 year old unarmed black teenager Trayvon Martin was shot and killed Neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman had successfully argued in court that he acted in self defense Jennifer Hudson is named entertainer of the year she was given that honor at last night's NAACP Image Awards that highlighted the work of entertainers and writers of color Samuel L. Jackson received the NAACP chairman's award for public service This is CBS News Streamline your virtual hiring process with indeed our hiring platform makes it easy to attract screen and interview candidates all in the same place visit indeed dot com slash credit 5 O three it's Sunday February 27th 31° right now It will be nice later on sunshine highs in the 50s Good morning I'm John Dorman with the top local stories we're following this hour Rush up has continued to unleash a wave of attacks on Ukraine entering that country second largest city while targeting airfields and fuel facilities all over the country We're going to bring you the latest on that very fluid situation in the world's response as it continues to unfold throughout this morning Meanwhile in our region supporters of Ukraine gathered outside The White House yesterday calling for a tougher United States response to Russia's invasion there.

Trayvon Martin George Zimmerman NAACP Image Awards Jennifer Hudson Samuel L. Jackson John Dorman NAACP CBS News Ukraine White House United States Russia
"trayvon" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:40 min | 9 months ago

"trayvon" Discussed on WTOP

"Are in the mid 50s so very mild for your Sunday with sunny skies a bit breezy at times Monday Tuesday and Wednesday all three days filled with sunshine highs on Monday in the 40s but by Tuesday back to the 50s and we're near 60 on Wednesday 41 right now in D.C. 39 I gave this book and 37 in culpeper And yes I did go to the car wash Thank you very much 6 40 congresswoman Marjorie Taylor Greene defending her decision to go to a white nationalist conference in Orlando last night telling CBS she didn't know that Nick Fuentes was the organizer Fuentes leads the America first political action conference in the past Fuentes defended Jim Crow segregation And claimed the number of Jews who died in the Holocaust just didn't add up Green said she went to his event because he has a very young following She spoke out about cancel culture during that conference It was ten years ago tonight 17 year old Trayvon Martin shot and killed by a man who claimed that he shot the teen in self defense I'm Peter king in Orlando Demonstrators wanted justice for Trayvon when his killer George has never been was allowed to go free for weeks Because of the stand your ground law that allows lethal force in life threatening situations Zimmerman case has now put stand your ground out there Marco mero was ever been defense attorney And people think well I can just shoot Shooting should still be the absolute last resort A recent study shows stand your ground laws and more than 30 states maybe responsible for over 700 gun deaths per year Zimmerman was found not guilty o'mara's defense was self defense which is different Peter king CBS News Orlando Northern Virginia leaders unveiling the third and final sign over the weekend that remembered the state's Jim Crow laws on the rails Three.

Marjorie Taylor Greene Fuentes Nick Fuentes culpeper Orlando Jim Crow D.C. Peter king Trayvon Martin CBS Marco mero Trayvon Zimmerman America Green George CBS News Orlando Northern Virg mara
"trayvon" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:32 min | 9 months ago

"trayvon" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"What you would have done back in the day so what are you doing right now Because this is one of the most important social justice movements of our time You know I think about him so much I think about Trayvon so much He would have been 27 years old now He would have had a birthday in February of this year on the 5th And I just think about what I was doing when I was 27 And it was so much fun I was living in the city I had my first serious job I had a roommate who I loved And life just seemed like a sitcom And I he never got that I think about it all the time Sorry it's not a question And all he was doing was going to 7 11 to get some candy for his brother Yeah Skittles and tea Skittles and Arizona iced tea You know it's funny I'm having this conversation with you not even realizing that I'm wearing a hoodie right now And I remember after he died being so afraid to wear my hoodie And I don't know I don't know how to I don't want to overthink this symbol of what this is But I'm wearing it now And let's say I'm wearing it for him That's what I'm going to say And I'll say right on my brother Yeah His memory be a.

Trayvon Arizona
"trayvon" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

02:38 min | 9 months ago

"trayvon" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"Social <Speech_Music_Male> justice <SpeakerChange> movements <Music> of our time. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> You know <Speech_Music_Male> I think about them so <Speech_Music_Male> much. <Speech_Music_Male> I think about Trayvon <Speech_Music_Male> so much. <Speech_Music_Male> He <Speech_Male> would have been <Speech_Male> 27 years old <Speech_Male> now. <Speech_Male> He would have had a birthday <Speech_Music_Male> in February <Speech_Music_Male> of this year <Speech_Music_Male> on the 5th. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And I just think about what <Speech_Male> I was doing when I <Speech_Male> was 27. <Silence> And it was <Speech_Male> so much fun. <Speech_Male> I was living <Speech_Male> in the city, <Speech_Male> I had my first <Speech_Male> serious job, <Speech_Male> I had a roommate <Speech_Male> who I loved. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> life <SpeakerChange> just seemed <Silence> like a sitcom. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And I <Silence> never got <Speech_Music_Male> that. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I think <Speech_Male> about it all the <SpeakerChange> time. <Silence> Sorry, it's not a question. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And all he was <Speech_Male> doing was going to <Speech_Male> 7 11 <Speech_Male> to get some <Silence> candy <SpeakerChange> for his brother. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Yeah. <Speech_Male> Skittles <Speech_Male> and tea. Skittles <Speech_Male> and Arizona iced <Silence> tea. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> You know, it's funny I'm having <Speech_Male> this conversation with you, <Speech_Male> not even realizing that <Silence> I'm wearing a hoodie right <Speech_Male> now. <Speech_Male> And I remember after <Speech_Male> he died <Speech_Male> being <Speech_Male> so afraid to wear my hoodie, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and <Silence> <Speech_Male> I don't know. <Speech_Male> I don't know how to, <Speech_Male> I don't want to <Speech_Male> overthink the symbol <Speech_Male> of what <Speech_Male> this is. But I'm wearing <Speech_Male> it now. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> And <Speech_Male> let's say I'm wearing <SpeakerChange> it for him. <Silence> That's what I'm going to say. <Speech_Male> <Silence> And I'll say right on <Speech_Male> my brother. <Speech_Male> Yeah. <Speech_Male> His memory <Speech_Music_Male> be a blessing. <Speech_Male> May the <Speech_Male> memory of Trayvon <Speech_Male>

"trayvon" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

05:30 min | 9 months ago

"trayvon" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"Previous racial justice movements always had one leader who was often heterosexual, black man who was very charismatic and when something happened to that man he was killed or discredited just moved on, the movement itself also died. They didn't want to repeat that mistake. And so they said, this is a movement that's not leader less, it's leader full everybody's a leader. And at the end of the day, you can't argue with success. The movement for black lives is really the most transformative civil rights social justice movement in American history. You know, I think about the last ten years and how it's changed me. I had to cover a lot of this stuff. I covered Trayvon, I covered Michael Brown's funeral. I wrote about a lot of these killings. And I think the biggest aha was realizing, oh, it was never just the hoodie. It was never just the hoodie he was wearing. It was never just the way one of these men had his hands on the steering wheel. It was never just the way that Sandra bland was talking about her cigarette. We can find reasons to justify a death. But I think the big takeaway from these last ten years for me is that none of them are justifiable no matter what they did. And once you see that, it's like everything is, it's hard to look at it the same way. It's not an issue of individual cases, it's a systemic issue. And every one of these deaths is part of a larger system that needs to be questioned. And I think questioning the totality of these systems is a place that I think a lot of Americans have gotten to over the past ten years. It's never just the hoodie. And I'm sad that it took us a lot of us this long to get there. But I think we're there. And I think I'm hopeful about that. I hope that you're right. I'm concerned that these iterations where there are a lot of people concerned about racial justice are just that. There are moments that come and go. The cliche is, is this a moment, or is it a movement? I don't think we have enough data to have an answer to that. We know that the common sense recommendations that would be made law by the George Floyd justice and policing that are stalled in Congress. They're unlikely to succeed. At the same time, we know that after the murder of George Floyd, a number of states all over the country did enact their own statewide criminal justice reform and it's still too early to get the data to see whether that's making black and brown people safer on the street. So I think there are reasons to be hopeful and there are reasons to be cynical. I suppose that's my last question. In this chat with you, I've heard you said you kind of feel inspired and have hope on hope and white people and that this is perhaps the most transformative civil rights movement. In American history, or at least recent American history. But there's some parts of this conversation where you've said, I don't know if some of these things that have changed that are will change. What does the next ten years look like? Hearing that ambivalence in this conversation. What do you think it looks like? Are we going to be stuck in the same loop for the next decade or more? A death, a protest, and right back to normal, or is there something bigger a foot? The police are not going to stop killing black people. They're not going to stop killing LatinX and Native American people in situations in which they would not kill white people. And we must always resist. We must never accept that even when it looks like we're not winning. And I don't know if we're going to win on this. But during this black history month, I know that Sam, you and I come from a people who don't give up. And that's my work. You know, sometimes I wonder who what I would have done if I'd been an enslaved person back in the day, and I hope that I would have been a runaway. I hope that I would have been one of those people who led uprisings. The reality is that's not what most enslaved people did. And then if I've been active in the 60s, when my mom marched with Martin and took it to the streets with Malcolm, I hope I would have been right up there with her. The reality is that's not what most black people did. And the movement for black lives, the expression is if you want to know what you would have done back in the day, so what are you doing right now? Because this is one of the most important.

George Floyd Sandra bland Trayvon Michael Brown Congress Sam Malcolm Martin
"trayvon" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

01:52 min | 9 months ago

"trayvon" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"Does not materialize into concrete things. Coming up, what's changed since Trayvon's death. By the numbers..

"trayvon" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

09:41 min | 9 months ago

"trayvon" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"Message comes from NPR sponsor madewell, good days, start with great jeans. The denim experts at madewell use premium fabric and the latest denim technology to make super comfy never want to take them off jeans in fits and styles for everyone. In other words, your perfect pair is waiting, ready to step up your denim game, visit madewell dot com and use the code NPR denim for $20 off your online genes purchase. Terms apply, see madewell dot com slash promos for full offer details. Draymond's death spurred nila summers polite to action. She got involved with some protests and activism at her college. And then a few weeks later, she joined something bigger, just three day 40 mile march from Daytona to Sanford, Florida. My at the time boyfriend was living with me, and I was like, I can't not do this. And I'm really scared to go alone. So this person that had really no interest in getting involved, I dragged to Daytona. Just so that I would have somebody there that I knew. But I felt a deep obligation to be there. And so how does a three day march look logistically? You're sending this up with other students and faculty. Are y'all planning stops and water breaks and bathroom breaks and where do you stay and what are you wear, like how do you plan that? Yeah, so it looked like sleeping on the floors of black churches in Daytona and in the land and these sort of small towns in Florida along the route. The churches played a huge role. I mean, I think at a couple stops there was spaghetti and garlic bread and little plastic tubs with epsom salt so we could soak our feet because we all had blisters. We're walking on the sides of highways and in small towns like the land where people are yelling at us and flying confederate flags. What would they yell at you? Somebody definitely yelled nigger and I remember that distinctly and that it happened in the land. And it was, I think, unsurprising. Given the setting, it was a dark point and what became this life-changing experience where the support far outweighed the negative. People generally that saw us would honk their horns at us and put fists out the window. It was like, I think my first sort of experience with, oh, maybe this is what solidarity is, right? How did that feel? Oh, it was so affirming. And just, you know, other people recognize what you're doing and other people feel enough about the 17 year old to say something or honk or give some sort of nod in your direction that you're doing the right thing. I heard y'all saying, as you marched, what did you sing? Oh gosh. We sang all, we sang lots of things. This is also my first experience with, I mean, really movement, right? There's this deep tradition deep history of singing and chant. One of the songs that was made up along the march was when Zimmerman gets arrested. When Zimmerman got so rested oh how I'd love to sit on that jury wins the merman gets arrested. Dreamers are good. You know, that's all we wanted. We didn't have an abolitionist sort of politic at the time. We just knew that this man killed a 17 year old that looked like us that looked like our brothers and cousins and our people. And that he had gotten away with it, Scot free. And so the deepest desire what justice looked like then was putting that man behind bars. So after that three day march, what happens? Do you keep protesting? Are you like an activist at this point? What is next for you after the March? Yeah, I mean, the last day is when we went to the Sanford police station to demand the arrest of Zimmerman. So that was an experience in itself. This sort of confrontation with power was a totally new experience. And so the 40 of us go 6 of the people from that group dress up in hoodies to represent Trayvon lock arms and sit in front of the door of the Stanford police station all day long. And, you know, it was definitely the first thing of that nature I'd seen towards the end of the day. We get a call from Angela Corey, who was the prosecutor in the area. And it was basically like, what do you guys want? And then Vanessa Baden, I think, was one of the people that took the phone call and she's one of our founding members. And, you know, Zimmerman got arrested. I think three or four days later. You know, there's a difference between getting someone arrested and getting someone convicted. Oh yeah, so then flash forward to the verdict. Right. Right. He's not found guilty. What happens then? And how do you react in that moment? Oh my gosh, you know, we wanted to set everything on fire. I mean, we were everybody. Everybody was heartbroken. It was inside our organization outside of it. The country. It was heartbreaking. I was at a crappy little gym in an apartment complex with my friends and Gainesville. We were watching the verdict happen. And you know, at that point, it started to seem like something was amiss, right? They were making a big deal about the lawyer that he hired. And that I think Sandra ground was becoming more and more a part of it. So we felt like there was anticipation, there was a little bit of trepidation, but I think ultimately we were still very young and thought that Shirley justice would be on the side of this kid. And so when it didn't happen, you know, tears and anger and the response was basically like, this can't just be business as usual. Y'all are going to do your thing locally, go ahead and protest, but dream defenders have to show up differently. It can not be marching in the streets anymore. And so I think maybe a week or two later, I don't remember what the time difference was, but a week or two later, you know, we're on the way to the capitol. Yeah, and not just on your way to the capitol. From what I understand, y'all occupied the state capitol for 31 days and 30 nights. What did that look like? Wow, it looked like this old historic building where. So many bad things happen. And so many bad people work in cutting their eyes at us, and wondering when the hell we're going to leave, but it looked like a whole lot of excitement and at the beginning, not a whole lot of plans. Pretty quickly, the plan turned into like we actually have to ask, we actually have a demand of the state of Florida to ensure that this does not happen anymore. Demanding that Rick Scott, the governor at the time, call a special legislative session for hearing on Trayvon's law. What we had dubbed Trayvon's law. What was Trayvon's law? Yeah, it was a law to combat the school to prison pipeline. Then there was the repeal of Sandra ground, there was bias training for police, right? Even then we were talking about police, even though Zimmerman was a regular guy, obviously with a God complex, but we knew that there was something about the culture of policing that had to be undone then. So did that happen? Did the things y'all ask for come to be? Absolutely not. How does that feel? It was one of the biggest lessons that we're still taking into account ten years later, right? I mean, the governor did not call a special session. He met with us about three days in. You know, was totally totally blew us off like we're confederate flag boots to the meeting with the dream defenders. We were telling him at some point like where we were from, one of our members Curtis was like, I grew up in Hialeah, Florida, and I was homeless for a time. And Rick Scott's response was, oh yeah, hi Leah, I know that. I own some hospitals there. So we show right. We showed up, we did our damnedest. We had lots of support, you know, Jesse Jackson came, Julian Bond, who was the communications director for SNCC, came by to live while we Nas shouted us out on Twitter. We felt like we were on to something. And so as time went by and it wasn't happening, we were like, okay, we've got to switch something up. Yeah. You said earlier that scene Rick Scott not doing anything that y'all asked of him taught you a lesson that is still kind of clear ten years later. What was the lesson? Visibility does not equal power. You could be on the news every day. That does not amount to power. It does not amount to the power to change systems in this country to change laws, maybe to change some hearts and minds, but in and of itself, it.

Zimmerman Daytona madewell Draymond nila summers NPR Trayvon Florida Sanford police station Stanford police station Angela Corey Vanessa Baden Sanford Rick Scott Scot Sandra Gainesville Shirley
"trayvon" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

02:10 min | 9 months ago

"trayvon" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"Let me start by saying that the purpose of today's rally is to call on Sanford PD to bring mister Zimmerman to justice. By early March, Trayvon Martin's death, galvanized a wave of activism all across the country. Outrage over the fatal shooting of 17 year old Trayvon Martin is activism over the unnecessary killings of black and brown people. At the hands of police or at the hands of people trying to act themselves as police. Trayvon became the face of that struggle. You know, you saw pictures of him in his clothes and wearing the hoodie and there were so many things to identify about Trayvon and it was one of the first things that I think really hurt our generation that deeply. You're listening to its been a minute from NPR. I'm Sam Sanders. At this episode, Trayvon. Ten years later, ten years of activism, ten years of Black Lives Matter. Ten years of more deaths and more grief and 9-1-1 tape. But maybe also ten years of progress. We'll hear more from naila and how Trayvon changed her after the break. And we'll also hear from Paul butler. Over the course of his career, he's.

Trayvon Martin Trayvon mister Zimmerman Sanford Sam Sanders NPR naila Paul butler
Dak Prescott's heroics bail out Cowboys in OT win over Patriots

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

Dak Prescott's heroics bail out Cowboys in OT win over Patriots

"Dak Prescott threw a thirty five yard touchdown pass to see the lamb in overtime giving the cowboys a thirty five twenty nine win over the patriots New England lead until Prescott engineered a forty yard drive that ended with Greg's airlines forty nine yard field goal that sent it into overtime the teams traded five scores in the final period three in the last two and a half minutes before Dallas be bill Belichick for the first time in their last six meetings Trayvon digs gave the cowboys a brief lead in the fourth quarter with the seventh interception of the season taking it forty two yards for a score I'm the ferry

Dak Prescott Cowboys Prescott Patriots New England Trayvon Digs Greg Bill Belichick Dallas
"trayvon" Discussed on Sports-N-Stuff

Sports-N-Stuff

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"trayvon" Discussed on Sports-N-Stuff

"He played for a long time. So you know you might be right here. How was like that even with like painting many lie. How do we forget that like. There's no way like. I absolutely thought there's no way trayvon digs was going to escape the first round but he ended up doing that and dude. I don't know in asante samuel junior like the thing the thing with sons. Don't even get me started on him. He'd he's he's good but like i don't think he's trayvon Trayvon digs looks like he's already in the running for like best corner of the year as a rookie. Like he's he's still making some rookie mistakes like he gets cooked occasionally. But i mean to his paul hack. Ball hawking ability is incredible. It's do some people have six picks in a whole year is six and a whole year could potentially lead the league allowed you dude crush like any record they have. I don't know what the record is. I think i think it was by like night train lane of years ago but like he looks good and the thing with like brotherhoods. I think are more reliable. Kids like of nfl. People are like athletes. I think more risky but there most of the time are good like who was it that he is moss. He did not really. he's not good. But larry rice's kid isn't anything. Yeah but it's like most of the time they are pretty. Good like asante samuel. Who is be interesting to see a friend. Gore's kid gets drafted. He's at southern miss right now. I think he's playing. As far as i know he's playing pretty well. I'm not sure if he's drafts. Drafted material though. We'll see and then he. He might be good but like jc horn patrick's tan. Dude asante samuel junior like these. These corners were all like sons of great players. And they're all good forgot about jc horn. I didn't even realize that he was. He had a dad. Joe horn right. Yeah i think so. I don't i don't know any other. I don't know any other born didn't realize but apparently he was in patrick's pretend to i love certain. I still think the broncos should've taken a quarterback but certain. I mean that was my biggest with drew. Lock but i thought you were like is going to be good but i i'll..

asante samuel trayvon Trayvon trayvon larry rice horn patrick samuel junior moss nfl Gore Joe horn patrick broncos drew
"trayvon" Discussed on Think 100%: The Coolest Show

Think 100%: The Coolest Show

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"trayvon" Discussed on Think 100%: The Coolest Show

"That's that's exactly why there needs to be black climate leaders that doesn't exist in ways that are mainstream narratives around climate economy etc Do because we are not their position to tell our story. We're just mainly position to again. We asked the questions. Be the teachers Instead of being put in positions of leadership in naturally power which is a huge thing To actually shift it dont'a To answer your question yet. I feel like pay. Maybe wakes you up. But i don't necessarily think that pain him be the driving motivator It has to be a sort of like not wanting others to experience that pain or not wanting others to continue to experience the painting part. I guess from the way. I see it. Because like out my political inculturation was as of marxist. A marks talks about the history. History itself is a history of class conflict right in that like throughout all of his. We've seen in the conflict between Exploiter class and the way class in that with that is what moves history forward the progression of these classes to try to throw out. Bow shock exploitation. And so these this historic class conflict has had a sort of you know Eight has been consistent throughout history right is consistent throughout history and white supremacy white. Supremacy does a unique colonel in that exploited Exploited in that with the introduction of white supremacy noodle have exploited class seeing themselves as you know apart a be a part of the dominant class even though that are exploited because of white supremacy. They made see themselves as you know all right or even been afforded a certain level of privilege in the rise of the american class. I say american western middle classes quickly because the amount of money that the american middle the western middle class would have kind of insulates them against creates that privilege that we talk about the ability to like be okay with the way things are but that system was built on the backs of the people of color people in the global south in so for iced. We can't be okay with it. The system that as exists causes pain for people of color people throughout the world. It causes pain in causes a need to want to make a change in. So i guess for me pain. Wakes you up pain makes you see that. Wow something goes wrong where that privilege. So many people. They don't see anything wrong. they see your sis. Not only do they not see nothing wrong. But they see capitalism oppression as the way things ought to be right. They see ask the way things should be in for us is like the way things are this to be. Directly caused us to be deprived in that. Deprivations gets activated and wants us to make change in so yes. I would agree. That pain introduces people to the system. But paying can't be the introduces people to like wanting to change. But you know that pain can't be the only thing that makes people want to continue. It has to be a love of you know level. Other people love of the earth decide. It's like we can't continue to do this anymore. Because it causes pain to others and wanting to remove that pain from others as well as ourselves is the driving motivator for why we want to make mistakes because pain only so far it has to be something. Outside of that is so yes. I agree that pain want wants you to make pain. It could be the thing that wakes you up for me. Specifically the pain of trayvon martin michael brown in all these different things the pain of the uprising in the pain of the way.

trayvon martin michael brown
Cowboys Kicker Misses Two Field Goals in Dramatic Loss to Buccaneers

Blogging the Boys

01:52 min | 1 year ago

Cowboys Kicker Misses Two Field Goals in Dramatic Loss to Buccaneers

"I i don't think there's any way of getting around at the tonight. A loser for the dallas cowboys. Is greg zero line. Let's let's your thoughts your thoughts on greg's Let's see here one second. This is a hectic night. Obviously greg line just amber says. I'm so mad right now on facebook. i'm with you. I get this. You know an anthony says not the same defense Tony says push off definitely a push off there at the end cowboys losing. Because the buccaneers drive. If somehow missed the game drive at the very kick a game winning field goal which just about no time remaining cowboys. defense can't stop them in the cowboys. Defense i will say kind of was a little bit of the same old defense. We didn't get you know a defense that was just allowing the bucks going on and on and on and on but this defense did get four turnovers tonight. But if we examine those turnovers. I think the only real authentic one was the demarcus lawrence forced fumble demarcus. Lawrence is definitely a winner tonight. I think demarcus lawrence was awesome. But the first interception the cowboys had the trayvon digs on was a tipped ball. Off of leonard fournette. Yes that counts. Yes that's true. Yes that count statistically but you know that's not necessarily your defense making a play on the ball cowboys also got an interception on. Tom brady at the end of the first half throwing a hail. Mary trying something before the half. That isn't really count. Although jordan lewis certainly had valiant effort trying to run that back and get some points You know the last turnover. The one that kind of turned the game around a little bit. That gave the cowboys. an opportunity. There at the very end Was just kinda. Chris godwin you know running into devante. Casey's helmet those things aren't necessarily You know something. You can replicate on a week by week basis and so for that reason. It's hard to give the cowboys credit. For all of those turnovers it was a different type of performance at the exact same defense we. I think we definitely saw some improvements. I think that mike parsons played moderately. Well i think that demarcus lawrence has mentioned played while randy gregory was on things But this was. I mean man. What a rough game for anthony

Cowboys Demarcus Lawrence Greg Zero Greg Line Dallas Cowboys Buccaneers Amber Jordan Lewis Greg Demarcus Anthony Tony Facebook Bucks Chris Godwin Lawrence Tom Brady Leonard Mary Casey
"trayvon" Discussed on The JJ Redick Podcast

The JJ Redick Podcast

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"trayvon" Discussed on The JJ Redick Podcast

"Duke and most recently played for the hamilton honey. Badgers wight who are the hamilton high. Yours in what they play and the c. b. l. The canadian elite basketball league stop. That's where trayvon divall played last season for personal league. They went eight and three. That was a record. Put eleven games wedding games. You play more games at twenty four seven fitness. But what i need. I tell you this though. I need a hamilton honey badger. I wonder if i'm gonna search for able to be badgers chris. That's what i.

hamilton high trayvon divall Badgers Duke basketball chris
Critical Race Theory: What Is It?

On The Media

02:09 min | 1 year ago

Critical Race Theory: What Is It?

"Is critical Race theory? Yes. So critical Race theory began around the 19 seventies with the law professor Derrick Bell and a couple of other legal scholars trying to understand the ways. That race and American law intersected how history of slavery and segregation was sort of codified and continue to influence American law Today. Adam Harris is a staff writer at the Atlantic. His most recent article was titled The GOP S Critical Race Theory Obsession, Harris says. One of the first instances we started to see critical race theory being used as a political bludgeon was in the early 19 nineties, President Bill Clinton nominated Atlantic near to the Justice Department. She was a legal scholar who done a lot of work and voting rights and conservatives effectively used her previous work in voting rights to sort of tag her as someone who was arguing for racial quotas in voting for the amount of seats that people should hold on city councils. They also tagged her as championing a radical school of thought. Called Critical Race Theory. Amid mounting pressure from conservatives, President Clinton has withdrawn his nomination of Lani Guinier to head up the Justice Department's civil rights division, claiming veneers writings lent themselves to views that he could not embrace the president cut her loose rather than fight a divisive battle on Capitol Hill. From there you have A kind of dormant period. It's not really until after George Zimmerman was acquitted in the murder of Trayvon Martin, the Jesse Jackson like race profiteer race grievance industry says everything's about race. America's a racist nation. You see a mention of critical race theory after a video surfaces of President Barack Obama hugging Derek Bell in 1990, you know When he was a law student at Harvard Law. The president is actually kind of aligning himself here with a well known campus radical. There is a conservative back last thing that he believes in this radical critical race theory. And then they're a kind of a couple of mentions up until 2020 shortly after George Floyd is murdered, You start to see a

Derrick Bell Adam Harris President Bill Clinton Atlantic Justice Department Lani Guinier GOP Harris George Zimmerman Trayvon Martin Capitol Hill Jesse Jackson Harvard Law Derek Bell President Barack Obama America George Floyd
'Black America's Attorney General' Seems to Be Everywhere

AP News Radio

01:03 min | 1 year ago

'Black America's Attorney General' Seems to Be Everywhere

"I'm Julie Walker some call him black America's Attorney General his lawyer Ben Crump and he's been very busy taking on the case is a black Americans killed by police the Florida attorney has become a powerful figure in the movement seeking equality and justice a civil rights activist al Sharpton you check the general for black America because people can go to hell what application crop represents the families of George Florida Brianna Taylor long before that there was Trayvon Martin and Michael brown he's one multi billion dollar settlements push to ban certain police tactics and last year just after Floyd's death he told a congressional committee on police reform we have right now part two systems of justice one for white Americans and another for black Americans probably earned about inequality at an early age describing that in elementary school he found out a white classmates weekly allowance was as much as what his mother made in a week working two jobs I'm Julie Walker

Julie Walker Ben Crump George Florida Brianna Taylor Al Sharpton Black America Trayvon Martin Michael Brown America Florida Congressional Committee Floyd
Florida Lawmakers Debate To Repeal Infamous Stand Your Ground Law

All Things Considered

00:08 sec | 1 year ago

Florida Lawmakers Debate To Repeal Infamous Stand Your Ground Law

"In Florida debate a bill that repeals the stand Your ground law. When Trayvon Martin was killed in 2012, the man who shot him use that law in his defense

Trayvon Martin Florida
Black voices that make a difference: The Karson Institute’s Karsonya Whitehead

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:11 min | 1 year ago

Black voices that make a difference: The Karson Institute’s Karsonya Whitehead

"Is the first of February And that means it is the first day. Black history month and we're introducing you to a woman who wanted a place where people could go to discuss sensitive social issues. Professor Carson A. Whitehead launched the Carson Institute at Loyola University of Maryland in Baltimore. People can eventually come and study race piece is also justice. We could talk about this. We could do unusual conversations. The answer America's most pressing questions, the D. C native named the institute after her father who was a sin. All rights activist Carson Eugene Wise, who I am named after us, My dad who lit that fire in me. She was motivated to found the institute after the death of Trayvon Martin when I sat down with my two sons, and I had to look them in the face and realized that that you can't outrun What is embedded within society. You can't outrun systemic racism. You actually have to confront it and dismantle it. That's the goal of the institute. I realize that if I could not help to create a world where my boys could get home safe In my work meant nothing.

Professor Carson A. Whitehead Carson Institute Loyola University Of Maryland Carson Eugene Wise Baltimore Trayvon Martin America
"trayvon" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"trayvon" Discussed on KQED Radio

"But think about all the ways that you have been the target of it by Trying to push these conversations about race and racism and to push for truer stories. I mean, how do you manage that? Sometimes not well saying, um You would hope you know, there's time from my carriage is to take a break. Can I get to the pandemic? Please? S so it would be lovely as all of the other ways in which white supremacy comes for black women in this country took a pause if If let's say I was going to be getting threats of my house, right s Oh, sometimes I don't deal with it. Well, I mean, I don't know what well means I'm human beating right and no one wants to live under that sort of stress, but You know also, I have I have a loving support system on I do have the platform. You know the privilege of platform. One thing I've been aware of doing this work. You know I started doing. I start doing this work after Trayvon Martin was murdered. And he was not doing anything other than existing in a space that you know, with inconvenient, threatening to whiteness. And so what I remember is is that I'm doing this work because I'm inherently unsafe, No matter what. And if I were to stop doing this work, I would still be in safe and the best chance I have is to continue to speak out and try to change our systems because I could stop doing this work today on do you know, Try to argue with a police officer and end up dead, right? I could stop doing this work today and, you know, reject Ah White man's offer on the street and end up abused. And I would be unsafe. So you know for me, That's why I do the work Well more with you, Jo Malo after the break, Stay with us. I mean it. Can't. We're listening to a rebroadcast of this morning's forum. So the producers are not here to take your phone calls tonight..

Trayvon Martin Jo Malo officer
Why Nursing Homes' COVID-19 Legal Shields May Interfere With Other Cases

NPR's Business Story of the Day

06:27 min | 2 years ago

Why Nursing Homes' COVID-19 Legal Shields May Interfere With Other Cases

"You listen to podcasts. In twenty seven states nursing homes have gotten special legal protections during the covid nineteen pandemic that means in most cases families can't sue if someone they love got sick or died at one the nursing home say they're doing the best they can and they need those legal shields but that also may stop people whose injuries have nothing to do with covid from seeking justice in the courts. Noel talked with. Npr's jaffe been looking into this. Why were these laws passed in the first place. You remember that. The corona virus outbreak started as far as most people were aware in a nursing home and currently long term care facilities account for more than a third of all deaths from covid nineteen nursing homes were caught scrambling for personal protective equipment. They were shifting recommendations of how contagious disease was and the industry made a case that they shouldn't be held responsible for dealing with this moving target. Are there any lawsuits pending against nursing homes relating to covid or did these immunity laws. Basically finish them off. While there is one in durham north carolina. It's questioned whether it's related to covid. Possibly it's the first of its kind involves the death of a woman named palestine house. Her daughter lisa set her. Mother's death had nothing to do with corona virus. Her mother had a pressure ulcer or bedsores there commonly known she'd had it since december of twenty eighteen and it just got worse. It became infected. Lisa how said she begged traber and rehabilitation center. Send her mother to the emergency room but they assured us that they could handle it. Lisa house and her three sisters had their doubts and their experience traber and rehabilitation center. Didn't seem to be able to handle much on a scale of one to five stars. The federal government gives traber and just one it also gets below average ratings on the ratio of nurses to residence. The government has find traber. Almost one hundred ninety thousand dollars in the past three years. We were there a lot and we found ourselves having to bathe her just general things they were supposed to do. We'd come in several times when she hadn't been fed her just sitting there. The house sisters hadn't had a lot of luck with nursing homes. In general trae burn was the third one they tried. It was close to where they live so the sisters could visit often but it hardly mattered. One families were locked out of nursing homes in march. Everything got harder and took longer. Palestine house needed specialists in wound care and iv antibiotics. Lisa house had her mother's power of attorney again. She begged trae burn rehabilitation to send her mother to the emergency room where they could find the specialists. She needed again. She was turned down their excuses. Were well the hospitals not taking new patients because of covert and she would be safer she stayed here and the facility is equipped to take care of your mother and none of those things turned out to be true. Palestine house died a train rehabilitation center on april fourteenth. Twenty twenty one month later. North carolina passed a sweeping liability shield for long term care facilities. The nursing homes with rare exceptions were immune from lawsuits. The measure was made retroactive to march tenth. Lisa house and her sisters decided to suit rayburn. Anyway elizabeth todd is their attorney. Palestine house did not have to die in that way or at that time and for the legislature to say that the nursing homes need protection in the middle of a pandemic not the nursing. Home patients is outrageous and it's unjust north carolina's immunity law lasts until the pandemic is over. Todd is especially worried that the law gives the free past nursing homes with low staffing trayvon and so literally the nursing homes can take their own understaffing their chronic understaffing and use it as a shield to prevent any liability at all during the covid pandemic through their attorneys train. Rehabilitation center declined comment but for many in the long term care industry. These immunity measures are welcome. Relief says dave voelpel. Ceo of the zona healthcare association. Arizona governor doug ducey was among the first to sign an executive order granting nursing homes and assisted living facilities legal immunity and for that we apart him. Because that just takes a little bit of pressure off. Though paul says it allows facilities to focus on what's most important we need to worry about. Keeping covert out of the building that sometimes that cuts into the bottom line says bubble take for instance one hundred bed building and they really have fifty rooms two beds per room that to keep infection from spreading those double rooms may have to be converted to private rooms. So revenue is cut in half. It really takes its toll on the business side of the ledger. Long term care facilities face a crisis if existential proportions says mark reagan the attorney for the california association of health facilities that's because liability insurance are excluding things covert when they renew policies which would mean that any claims made regarding covert infection would be subject to exclusion and no insurance coverage congressional. Republicans wanted a national immunity law but dropped as part of the deal for the latest coronavirus. Relief package reagan. Still has hopes what we're merely asking for is stats caregivers. And their employers. Don't get punished for doing the best that they could. Under the circumstances. I imagine that the family of palestine house doesn't in fact the nursing home was doing the best it could for their mother. Well right there attorney. Elizabeth todd points out that one of north carolina's immunity criteria is that facility must be acting in good faith and she doesn't see how can argue that they did that. So where does

Traber Lisa House Palestine Trae Burn Jaffe North Carolina Noel Elizabeth Todd NPR Durham Trae Rehabilitation Center Dave Voelpel Lisa Zona Healthcare Association Doug Ducey Federal Government
Chris Doering talks Florida and Georgia

The Paul Finebaum Show

04:59 min | 2 years ago

Chris Doering talks Florida and Georgia

"We welcome in chris during Who gives us her. Quite a look ahead to tomorrow's game. Chris in most years florida hosting lsu of the sec this week. It's been pretty quiet. I am curious as you know those two teams so well especially from florida side What what are they thinking as they get one of their bitter rivals in a bitter rival that they are a prohibitive favorite. It is weird. Isn't it paula. Me and thinking back to win. This game was originally scheduled. I thought most lsu people felt like we're gonna get a chance to play later in the year we'll get healthier. We'll get miles brennan back. We'll be in better position. And i would argue that. They're actually in a worse position now than when they were originally scheduled in october. So i it's kind of a weird dynamic with a lotta florida. Fans looking forward to sec. Championship game next weekend for me. This is all about. Florida has nothing to do with their opponent. Lsu it's about getting right offensively full full-fledged dress rehearsal right costumes everything. Let's go for what we're gonna do next week. I i honestly been kind of disappointed with florida's offensive performance. The last three weeks dating back to the vanderbilt came. Because they just look inconsistent. They look like they walk through a haze periods of time. They look like they're not executing and part of it's their own fault for looking so good against arkansas in the second half and missouri against georgia. We set the bar pretty high for them but focused level has not been there for a full sixty minutes. I want to see all fence. Get back to executing at the level. They were early in the year defensively. Let's get some things shored up. Let's figure out how to keep from giving up these long passing plays. Let's get generate some more pressure on the quarterback. Let's be able to to penetrate and stop the run something. I thought they did. Well against tennessee last week but The thing i'm gonna keep my paul. What are the numbers for. Kyle trask because obviously this is a game as you said against a A bitter rival one. That beat florida by fourteen. Last year florida's got a chance to return the favor but they also have a chance to outduel in back to back weeks what mack jones get did against the very same defense. And don't think that winning the heisman trophy is not something that dan mullen really wants. For contrast and something that will help his program significantly going forward in on that subject. How do you compare. Kyle trash to meg jones. And that's really his main competition now and that we know we know what had next two weeks especially next week but what what what what separates college trask. If anything well first of all. I love both of these guys you know as a former receiver. I love the the accuracy. I love the the the way they re defenses and get the ball to the right guy. On what the defense is dictating But i would go back and say kyle. Traffic is probably had a tougher. Time than what mack jones at and. That's not taking anything away. From mac ios but look at how. Good this offense of line is for alabama. Look at how well they've run the football over the last six games or so look at what. Najji harris has done. Devante smith the reason why iraq jones's numbers look so good on the deep passes over twenty yards and no disrespect. Mac has been really accurate. But when you're throwing a guy that's five yards behind the nearest defender. It makes it a little bit easier. So again i think without the run game florida certainly not able to run the football very well. I don't think they're offensive. Line is the most consistent So i think the load that kyle. Trask bears a little bit harder to to carry them. What jones does now with that being said. Look at the weapons of florida has i. I don't think i've ever been able to say at least in recent years. That florida has more receiving weapons around their quarterback than what alabama does. They've been absolutely loaded but Looking at the way that that not only kind of is utilized trayvon. Grimes justin shorter. All those receivers. Jacob copeland has come on as well Forgetting about tony. Who might be one of the biggest Factor mismatch guys in the sec. Right now but the way. They use the running backs as well. That was something that we saw against georgia so a lot of different guys. That are helping. Kyle trask out. But i think with the advantage that alabama has on the offensive line and that run game to complement the throws down the field. I think kyle may have a little bit more of a impressive Season just because of how much he's had to do himself chris. Couple of games. I want to ask you about one. Particular auburn at mississippi state mississippi state has been up and down we. We've been through that conversation. But i'm really curious about auburn. Because they've had some really good moments this year and then some clunkers especially lately. I know what you're doing here paul. You love it. When i go off on auburn and it's been up and down year with them right early in the season. I was really down on him. I was starting to get A little bit more positive with the way they were able to run the run the football figuring out who they were with take bixby and that offensive line and then they got hit with a bunch of injuries up front Bixby was was banged up.

Florida LSU Mack Jones Kyle Trask SEC Meg Jones Brennan Najji Harris Paula Devante Smith Dan Mullen Kyle Vanderbilt Chris Alabama Georgia Trask Arkansas
Las Vegas Raiders face 'daunting task' with COVID-19 issues ahead of game vs. Kansas City Chiefs

Bet The Board

05:43 min | 2 years ago

Las Vegas Raiders face 'daunting task' with COVID-19 issues ahead of game vs. Kansas City Chiefs

"Kid city chiefs at eight point favorite leg. I said we'll get to that in a second on the road against the vegas raiders on this game. Fifty six and a half. We will have. John cheering on later. I'm sure he'll be able to explain whether slightly above the market pain. i have to believe. That's all covid related to be quite honest. The raiders defense in the contact tracing protocol. We're not quite sure. If i'm going to have to get called up to play safety and let me tell you my foot speed not enough to slow down tyreek hill and open spaces really wouldn't say i mean i might try and slew coming off the line. That'd be my only shot. so listen. I the raiders offensive game plan back in week five was good. Obviously but the halftime adjustments that. Paul guenther in the raiders. Defensively really is what i think won them the game. It's really what gave the chiefs offense trouble. You really hadn't seen that from the chiefs offense before during this. Patty mahomes like run especially against the defense of that caliber. You go back to week. Five in the second half. Kansas city was successful. Only twenty one percent of their snaps. One point to carry twenty eight percent success rate through their moms is pressured. A ton the raiders. Were able to do something in that game. They hadn't been able to do most of the season which is get pressure vegas. Twenty six on the season pass rush win rate and then obviously after a few good games. Recently where the raiders have been able to apply some pressure to quarterbacks. They've surged to an average defense in pressuring the week. Five game if you look at some of these numbers. Mahomes was pressured on forty. Seven percent of total dropbacks specifically from eleven personnel. Were kansas city. Essentially lives seventy three percent of the time moms pressured on fifty seven percent of those three wide sets. I would envision off the bye with the little extra motivation of not. Just losing to the raiders but but kansas city not being really happy about gruden and the gang taken victory laps around the the stadium there drivers using using the loudspeaker thereafter the week. Five win that Andy reid is probably gonna come with a pretty good game plan here and you know past the success that andy. Reid is hat off the bye. You mentioned this. The raiders are are probably going to be without a few key defenders but You know another handful of defensive players are going to miss practice all week due to this contact tracing. It's probably isn't the offense that you wanna face short handed in in pissed off and not having practiced to four. I would think. I also believe we'll probably see a little more play action for mandatory. You know patty mahomes in the chiefs past game will probably fair little bit. Better here with play action. Especially if if the pressure starts to barrel down. I would also think that it's worth mentioning that three chiefs offensive lineman or on the cova the list it's believed to be contact tracing but we'll have to see this certainly make this game a little bit different. If if all three of those offensive lineman are out. You also expect sammy. Watkins to return in this game us a full practice participant on wednesday so he should be a full ghost that they're gonna have their their complement of weapons out there. The number in this thing is is really interesting. But i think that this tougher makes a lot of sense. I i just don't see. Kansas city's offense not bouncing back here in a major way talk. i mean. They're playing with a chip on their shoulder. Which is always dangerous to begin with. We've seen their passing offense. That was more a work in progress. Probably the nicest way to put it early on in the season and no doubt that was by design. Get on track with mahomes during for more than eight hundred yards the last two games when you look at the way. Mahomes performed against the raiders. Fifteen total touchdowns just two interceptions one of them of course coming earlier this year the chiefs loss as a double digit home favor and i think it's pretty staggering to know what costs kansas city. That game is the fact that hey look. They finished a net negative minus sixty four in terms of rushing yards. The raiders held the ball for nearly eleven minutes longer and kansas city knows that they can hit the home runs. That are widely available. If they keep mahomes operate i think. The raiders passing defenses. You mention it may trending in the right direction. There's no doubt a lot of optimism out here around the raiders especially on the defensive side of the ball. This is a different beast that they're going to try and counter and with sammy watkins back amongst others. I just don't know where the raiders consistently find a way to get off the field. I agree with that. And i get it. You have to young corners in trayvon mullin in our net and people are thinking to themselves like. Hey we're trending in the right direction. We're starting to get some pressure. Would you look you play at the browns. The total is suppressed because of weather and wind. You're at the chargers. It's likely a a lost game. If two guys can hold onto football on the back corner fate and then the broncos last week and drew lock was clearly injured after taking a hit in the second quarter but you could have been trailing at halftime in that game so listen. I think the raiders are better than we all expected. You look at who they've lost to. It's it's the bills box and patriots. All pretty good teams obviously bucks in bills being very good patriots. You know with bill tough spot. There is well off the monday night game traveling across the country. So i get the by of the raiders. I just need to see more defensively to believe it's real and so that that's kind of where i'm out on that unit. I fully expect kansas city to do some good things here. Offensively

Raiders Chiefs Mahomes Vegas Raiders Paul Guenther Patty Mahomes Kansas City Gruden Andy Reid Vegas Reid
North Miami-Dade Street Renamed In Honor Of Trayvon Martin

Sean Hannity

00:39 sec | 2 years ago

North Miami-Dade Street Renamed In Honor Of Trayvon Martin

"Leading leading to to Trayvon Trayvon Martin's Martin's high high school school in in Aventura Aventura is is being being renamed renamed in in his his honor. honor. Miami Miami Dade Dade Commissioner's Commissioner's giving giving the the green green light light to to Code Code designate designate Northeast Northeast 16th 16th Avenue Avenue from from Ives. Ives. Very Very Road Road to to Northeast Northeast 209th 209th Street is driven Martin Avenue. It's in remembrance of the 17 year old who was shot dead by neighborhood Watch volunteer George Zimmerman in 2012, the Black Lives matter movement. Urged after Zimmerman was acquitted under Florida's stand your ground law Trayvon's mom, Sabrina Fulton says. There's been progress since, but it's a work in progress. We're living in America, but still some issues that we have in this country that we need to overcome. Travon was walking back to his dad's house in Sanford, Florida from a convenience store when he was killed. He was not armed. One day

Aventura Trayvon Trayvon Martin Dade Dade Miami Ives Martin Sabrina Fulton George Zimmerman Neighborhood Watch Trayvon Zimmerman Florida Travon America Sanford
A Look into Broadway Hit 'David Byrne's American Utopia'

TIME's Top Stories

07:10 min | 2 years ago

A Look into Broadway Hit 'David Byrne's American Utopia'

"David Burns American Utopia is a grand and glorious plea for Human Connection. By Stephanie's a carrick. Sometimes to make art, you've got to build art to layer ideas, colors, values, and textures. Until you've shape, the thing that says what you want to say, David Burns American Utopia Spike, Lee's grand and glorious filmed record of the hit Broadway show of the same name coming to HBO October. Seventeenth is art that has been built a work of great joy inexpressive Nece Tower of song with room for everybody the music some numbers drawn from burns twenty eighteen album American utopia others from. His body of work with talking heads and one a cover of Janelle. Monet's two thousand, fifteen protests anthem hell you tom bowed feels fresh and familiar at once inclusive but also mildly explosive there's an urgency to it as if burn and his troupe of eleven, musicians and dancers were staking ground in a battle we shouldn't even have to fight the idea is that to survive to live in any meaningful way, we must stay connected. It's a principal so glaringly simple at its radical. Burn is an admittedly weird ambassador for the idea of connection. He isn't what you'd call a naturally warm presence at least not in Earth terms even at age sixty eight, he's still like an. Learning. The rules of the planet his awkwardness is his brand but his desire to connect is robust and had vitalize is everything that happens onstage during American Utopia. no-one initial has one job. The musicians are also dancers and singers. Their instruments are strapped to their bodies untethered to any bulky sound equipment, which leaves them free to move and dance around the stage in a series of elegantly orchestrated numbers with burn off at the center though sometimes lurking at the edges like living fringe of the proceedings, the choreography is by dance veteran antibeach Parson all the performers including burn where identical lunar grey suits and all are barefoot. The stage is bordered on three sides by a Shimmery chainlink curtain the grand scheme is. Simple yet never chilly. This is a setting a world where certain essential problems have been worked out creating the space and freedom to play, and so even the songs every longtime burn or talking heads Fan knows well, like this must be the place naive melody a moonlit cottage in ballad form or the Wrigley waggling noodle dance. Slippery people take on new shapes and new life between numbers burn addresses the audience directly spinning amusing tales about where these songs came from. He wrote is Zimba with its lyrics by German Dada poet. Hugo. Ball to respond to a challenge thrown down by his friend and collaborator Brian Eno or us to fulfil our civic responsibilities. He uses lighting trick to show how badly the citizenry is represented when only twenty percent of the population votes and as a prelude to the shows Shiver Inducing version of hell you tom about he explains that he asked Monet's permission before venturing to cover the Song Burns band here. Is racially mixed, but he himself is very, very white. No wonder he approached with caution but he and his band present the song and invocation written in two thousand fifteen for all of us to remember the names of murdered black citizens among them Eric Garner Trayvon. Martin and Amatil. With the synthesis of respect and bristling anger it demands. This number also represents one of the few times league cuts away from this show to flash larger than life portraits at the. Victims, often held by a family member on the screen. It's an act of boldness that works as for burn. He is as ever a wildly and captivating showman though his hair is now snowcap wide his dance moves in changed over the years he's still favors angular Turkey jerky movements like the folding and unfolding of corporate tres ruler, which are often mimicked to grand effect by the dancers around him. But as dazzling as he is, you can take your eyes off him. Than receding his fellow performers become dazzling planets in their own right sometimes, they'll face one another playing to each other even as they played a was other times they marched toward us, resolutely in groups or pairs as if to say, look at any of US individually or all of us at once you can't go wrong. Each performer's style is as distinctive as a fingerprint. There's the cool Tomboy Swagger of Guitarist Andrew Swan the kid next door jubilant of bassist bobby wooden as once in a lifetime rounds to its sublime peak percussion as Jack, Lena Salvato bursts through the Shimmery. Chain curtain with a clash of cymbals a human celebrate Ori- announcement Lee working with one of his regular collaborators cinematographer. Ellen Kuras doesn't just show us the action he too is part of its embrace. He's our stand in our fellow observer in awe though he has the advantage of wielding a camera at the close of the show as the performer snake through the crowd during a rapturous version of road to nowhere Lee turns his camera on the audience American Utopia ran from October two thousand nineteen to February twenty twenty at Broadway's Hudson. Theater, and is said to return to Broadway. Next September and we see it for what it is. This is a group of largely white middle aged people who came of age listening to talking heads as a bunch. They're far less diverse than the performers we've been watching onstage a you could argue that with American utopia burn is preaching to the choir that this is all just an exercise in self congratulatory white liberalism but that would be missing the point in one of his Inbetween Song riffs burn muses that there are lots of interesting things to look at in the world there are bicycles which he famously likes. Very Much Lee even shows him riding away from the show on one and beautiful sunsets and even a bag of potato chips can be visually beguiling but somehow we always comeback to human faces looking at people burn says that's the best American Utopia is about facing the person in front of you or next to you or standing behind you and doing the work of seeing to truly see a person is a kind of song and a world filled with those songs is the ideal to get started burning his troop have hummed a few bars. The rest is up to us.

LEE David Burns Monet Broadway Nece Tower Stephanie Brian Eno Principal Antibeach Parson Janelle Ellen Kuras Eric Garner Trayvon United States Zimba TOM Hugo Andrew Swan FAN Martin
The lie that invented racism

TED Talks Daily

05:18 min | 2 years ago

The lie that invented racism

"What is up with US white people? I've been thinking about that a lot the last few years and I know I have company. Look I get it. People of Color have been asking that question for centuries. But I think a growing number of white folks are to. Given what's been going on out there In our country. And notice I said what's up with US white people. Does right now, I'm not talking about those white people. The ones with the swastikas in the hoods and the tiki torches. They are a problem, a threat, the perpetrate most of the terrorism in our country as you all in Charlottesville better than most. But I'm talking about something bigger more pervasive. Talking about all of us. White folks writ. Large. And maybe especially people sorta like me. self-described progressive. Don't WANNA be. Racist. Goodway people. Any good white people in the room? I was raised to be that sort of person. I was a little kid in the sixties and seventies, and to give you some sense of my parents actual public opinion polls at the time showed that only a small minority about twenty percent of white Americans approved supported. Martin Luther King and his work with the civil rights. Movement. Wild. Dr King was still alive. I'm proud to say my parents were in that group. Race got talked about in our house. And when the show's about the dealt was raised with come on the television, they would sit us kids down made sure we watched the Sidney Poitier movies roots. The message was loud and clear and I got it. Racism is wrong. Racists are bad people. At the same time we lived in a very white place in Minnesota. And I'll just speak for myself I. think that me to believe. that. Those white racists on the TV screen were being beamed in from some other place. Wasn't about US really. Did Not feel implicated. Now I would say I'm still in recovery from that early impression. I. Got into journalism in part because I cared about things like equality. Justice. For a long time racism was just such a puzzle to me. Why is it still with us when it's so clearly wrong. Why such a persistent force. Maybe. I was puzzled because I wasn't yet in the right place or asking the right questions. Have, you noticed that when? People in our mostly white. Media Report on what they consider to be racial issues what we consider to be racial issues what that usually means that we're pointing our cameras and our microphones are gaze at people of Color. Asking questions like. How are black folks or native Americans Latino or Asian Americans how are they doing? In a given community or with respect to some issue, the economy education. I've done. My share of that kind of journalism over many years. But then George Zimmerman killed. Trayvon Martin. Followed by this unending string of high-profile police shootings of armed black people and the rise of the black lives matter movement. dylann roof in the Charleston. Massacre. Oscarssowhite. All the. Incidents from the day to day of American Life. These overtly racist incidents that we now get to see because they're captured on smartphones sent across the Internet. And beneath those visible events the stubborn data studies showing. Systemic racism. Every institution we have. Housing Segregation. Job Discrimination. The deeply racialist inequities in our schools and criminal justice system. And what really did it for me? I know I'm not alone in this either. The RISE OF DONALD TRUMP. And the discovery that a solid majority of white. Americans. would embrace or at least accept. Such a raw bitter kind of white identity politics. This is all disturbing to me as a human being. As a journalist I found myself. Turning the Lens around. thinking. White folks so the story. Whiteness is a story. And also thinking. Can I do that? What would a podcast series about whiteness sound like?

United States Martin Luther King Trayvon Martin Sidney Poitier Donald Trump Minnesota Charlottesville George Zimmerman American Life Charleston
Black Gun Ownership Rises Amid Pandemic, Protests For Racial Justice

NPR's Business Story of the Day

05:30 min | 2 years ago

Black Gun Ownership Rises Amid Pandemic, Protests For Racial Justice

"A record number of Americans have purchased guns this year including Black Americans from K. N. UNC in northern Colorado Lee. Patterson reports that incidents of violence against people of color have pushed some to purchase guns for the very first time and warning to our listeners. There are sounds of gunfire in this story. What type of gun is? So this is a Smith and Wesson nine millimeter shield cat trailer bought her handgun this past spring these as she practices at an indoor range with her husband like it's no big deal. But talking through her mask trailer describes how she felt the first time she pulled the trigger is beyond terrified shaking. Hands were sweaty. Trailer is a democratic political consultant who lives in Colorado. At first, she was nervous cleaning and shooting her new gun. And she had a bad experience, the first range she went to she says people were staring she felt unwelcome. Still regardless of the anxiety I had around. All those things. I got into this because I feel like it was necessarily trailer I started thinking about buying a gun when she saw empty grocery store shelves at the beginning of the pandemic. Then she watched racial justice protests unfold across the country. She started thinking about pushback from people who disagree with those efforts if it looks like communities, of Color and people that support communities of color are rising up against white supremacy that could be a problem for us is. It's probably time probably time for them to buy guns a thought that many other Americans have also had in. August. Alone people bought one point eight million firearms according to industry estimates a trade group called the National Shooting Sports Foundation reports the gun sales to customers have grown more percentage wise than for any other racial or ethnic group. With. Her New gun trailer wants to feel like she has a chance during a home invasion or an encounter with police. What we as the family had to determine is, how do we WANNA die? Instead of look at it that way. DO WE WANNA die not being prepared or at least trying to protect ourselves. That's how you weigh that as part of becoming a new gun owner trailer joined the National African American Gun Association Philip Smith is the founder nationally across the board from all over every state. We have people joining all times a day night. You know I I thought something was wrong with computer. Smith was watching membership numbers rise after the death of George Floyd may but black people have been using guns for hunting and protection for a long time historian say that Harriet Tubman carried firearms so did the Black Panthers in the nineteen sixties these days according to a Gallup poll released last year nineteen percent of black people own guns. Smith says his members are not monolithic. Some women join because they've been sexually assaulted some women join because they wanNA teach you some men join because they want to just get really good at self defense people are joining now for different. Reasons some want to support the National African American Gun Association Financially Smith says for others it's more spiritual I. Think people were looking for a home a place where you can kind of event you can belong where you felt your mind having a relief of some sort Bruce Tomlin a truck driver who lives in New Mexico describes his decision to buy a gun response to stress. I'll just say amounting society He felt that way after watching cellphone video showing the death of Ahmad arbitrary a black man who was shot while jogging through neighborhood in Georgia earlier this year don't. Go around arm the rest of my life. That's because he's been feeling under attack for years after the two thousand, twelve killings of Trayvon Martin, for example, and after the mass shooting at a black church in Charleston in two thousand, fifteen by a white supremacist goes like I can just be mine them all business. And if somebody who's a racist, just decide to roll up on me gun meet down. As is decided that like if I go out I'M GONNA go out shooting back. But now that he's an actual gun owner, it's not so straightforward day to day of feel like I can defend myself better defend my loved ones. But I usually get comfortable having it sometime he does not want to kill or injure anyone open carry makes them nervous I would never take my gone to the grocery store and carry around inside or anything like that. But on the other hand I could be in a situation where needed still out in the car or whatever I just like knowing that I have it gun ownership is complicated for Tomlin especially because he's black if he was stopped by police says, he probably wouldn't tell them that he had a gun. And catch trailer says the same thing giving the example of philander casteel he was shot during a traffic stop for years ago in Minnesota after telling an officer that he had a firearm, his car casteel did have a permit to carry it. Cat Trailer believes that gun cost him his life we're not given a fair shake when these conversations are happening automatically worsen tensions are assumed just because we're black, we're gun owners for both of these new black gun owners. It's an identity that comes with risks, but does make them feel safer for

National African American Gun Philip Smith Colorado Bruce Tomlin Cat Trailer National Shooting Sports Found Black Panthers Patterson K. N. Unc Ahmad Harriet Tubman Consultant George Floyd New Mexico Minnesota Trayvon Martin Officer Charleston
Freedom Summer: Datra Dee Dee Jackson

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

05:37 min | 2 years ago

Freedom Summer: Datra Dee Dee Jackson

"Many. Of the faces that we have seen over the past few weeks leading the black lives matter movement have been those of young black women theatric DVD. Jackson is one of those dynamic women speaking truth to power as a leader, a black youth project one hundred while attending Florida International University. She became active at the height of the murder of Trayvon. Martin was led to founding the local chapter, a dream defenders at her university. Today, we chat with Yatra, how young people are seizing and owning their political power at this moment. I'm really excited to talk to you today I've been such a big fan of B. y. p.. One hundred in really excited that you were able to join us. So thank you. So I I want to talk about the fact that at such a young age you have done so much for the black community and the Black Youth Community you've done organizing as a CO founder or of the Durham Chapter of the Black Youth Project hundred supporting black mamas bail out, which is one of the favourite causes that I donate to and just so much more especially during the racial pandemic that we've been in these past few weeks. What brought you to this work? What made you wake up one day and say, okay as a young person, I have to get involved as a black young person I have to get involved. So I am from Philly or and throughout my years I was in public schools I grew single mom. Single mom household of three girls and. So grew up in inundated southwest philly end of there's many things of my experience that really informs where end today but that's not quite where I was politicized. I was in Grad School. Down in Miami Around Twenty, twelve, twenty thirteen and so I, was living in Florida. At the same time as the murder of Trayvon Martin and all of the marches in the energy that was being built up in that time and I was pretty apolitical leading up to that point and was going to a black sitting union meeting because our school where I know black people. So the black student union because that's where we were and this organization out to folks from dream, defenders averages a state based organization down in Florida Cain ended presentation on the work that they were doing and police brutality and immigration. Reform. School to prison pipeline. We're talking about these different issues in was really activated started to pay attention. To. That as an opportunity to be partners to the apartment organizations actually doing the work that was really where I started really a moment that similar to where now I love your path that you just talked about and I feel it's so important because A lot of young people you know when I talk to them, they just feel that can I just show up? Can I do it in? That's really what you did, and that's what a lot of the people involved with the. One hundred have done and I would love for you to talk a little bit more about the work that you're doing. In particular I'm a fan of the safe. We save campaign, which is something that I also think is a very timely conversation that we need to have in this country. Yes. So she said we save is one hundred national campaign It's our transformative moving campaign to end gender-based violence against like women. Like girls in black gender, non conforming people especially comes. In there is more origin even how we got to deciding orange she sees as national as I national campaign we had this huge visibility of black boys and black men that were being murdered brutalized by the police It was carrying this very long history erasure, black women, black girls, an our stories in the way that we have been brutalized by the police, and so we wiping one hundred among many other organizations really uplifted. Hashtag say her name. As a demand to also remember the stories of black women and black girls be harmed on a regular basis by the police and really pushing a bit of an intervention into the visibility of who stories are being told. And so we help these different events honoring black women and black girls who stories were not being pushed to the front and also talked about the a specific nature of black women in the way that the system harms us that doesn't that doesn't necessarily apply to black men in black police in. So we've been pushing. On, lifting up story of Ricky Boyd Renisha McBride. Happens Melissa Alexander. In just a number of Ions Stanley Jones might hall that list goes on online. Envy making sure that that this was also part of this time. The stories of black women grows they're are always forgotten

Black Youth Community Black Youth Project Trayvon Martin Grad School Murder Florida Florida International Universi Ricky Boyd Renisha Mcbride Jackson Philly Melissa Alexander Stanley Jones Durham Co Founder Miami