35 Burst results for "Traumatic Brain Injury"

"traumatic brain injury" Discussed on Health and Wealth Podcast with Carter & Tim

Health and Wealth Podcast with Carter & Tim

04:09 min | 5 months ago

"traumatic brain injury" Discussed on Health and Wealth Podcast with Carter & Tim

"Doing the breath work in the meditation right once. That foundation is isn't place then the products that come in the first thing is that turmeric one hundred product because it is a. It's it's it's it's anti inflammatory. On a micro level literally. Most people's guts are jacked up. Anyway they're only getting about ten to thirty percent. Absorption of nutrients so by using turmeric one hundred because it's micronized all absorbed through the mucous membrane in the mouth and goes directly into the bloodstream. So we're getting in five minutes. The entire bloodstream is being read. Every cell is being doused with these microscopic Kirk humanoids which are the anti inflammatory properties in the turmeric root itself. And that's gonna start reducing inflammation on a cellular level and then the blood will then be able to go through the blood brain barrier if it's traumatic brain injury shuttle those microscopic humanoids into the brain as well and start reducing brain on the Inflammation in the brain very because stuff so small can actually go through the blood brain barrier then. Green eighty-five for nutrition gut detox to clean up their gut. The talks detox to pull out all the toxins inches. The same show boom boom. Boom the probiotics enzymes. So we put him on the full like we call it our total energy and detox bundle and the turmeric root and then we make sure they get their water right and then you know after that. Then there's a whole nother you know it's like you can't just go over your whole program. You know five minute segment. It's just a you know. It takes us six months to one on one coaching. Just to get people to get the lifestyle you have to look at every single thing that comes into contact what you drink what you breathe you eat shampoos toothpaste children's the asleep bond windows crack tonight water-quality We go through all that stuff and we slowly just keep stacking those cards in the deck of health up until their new systems running like a top and in the nets.

Inflammation nets
"traumatic brain injury" Discussed on Health and Wealth Podcast with Carter & Tim

Health and Wealth Podcast with Carter & Tim

04:45 min | 5 months ago

"traumatic brain injury" Discussed on Health and Wealth Podcast with Carter & Tim

"What's up ritchie tim. James here i'm back with my co host potter wilcoxson again. In the house we have the stroke. Hacker sean anton Sean you've told us your backstory amazing You know you went to the darkest plate. You went from the highest mountains to the darkest places and now you're ascending again In the most importantly is you're bringing a lot of people with you this time. This is pretty awesome. What you're doing all the people who are helping in the last segment. We got into a lot of the solutions. Kinda give people a little bit of the road map of what to do As a person with traumatic brain injury or stroke and also the family members what to do and how to go about it in the in the right way but more importantly you know they have If they want to go deeper they can reach out to you. So again at the end will put in the description. Your contact information stroke aker dot com if somebody wants to you know Have a consultation with your hire you to help him out to get through this event so that can be much more smoother transition. They can get that person back into higher quality of life quicker so now in this segment. We usually that you ask me any question on health. Since i've been working with you for quite some time. I thought maybe it'd be kind of a give the listeners like because usually people coming on never any before they have questions or answering best i can. But you've actually used you ask those questions you know longtime ago over a year ago. What what what was what was your life like before we met in then what what lower some of the main things that i share with you that you implemented in what has happened to your health since then. Well look you know what's interesting tim. I believe in people. The product me a secondary. It's like why did i buy apple. Because i believe the steve jobs. So why do i buy chemical free body. Because i believe in tim james. And that's what i've always done after we talked about it and explain to me why you put so much. Love and affection into your products is almost like in a sense. You made your product specified from me and my people and that to me is just is beautiful so my question to you is once people what he recommends somebody. Who's just getting out of the hospital. What do you recommend them to be what he recommend from from from them to buy from you to get started so so they're coming back home now and there with three other people in their house. What do you want to see them. Do the green eighty green eighty five the gun of your products..

ritchie tim potter wilcoxson sean anton Sean traumatic brain injury James stroke tim james steve jobs tim apple
"traumatic brain injury" Discussed on Health and Wealth Podcast with Carter & Tim

Health and Wealth Podcast with Carter & Tim

04:17 min | 5 months ago

"traumatic brain injury" Discussed on Health and Wealth Podcast with Carter & Tim

"Died immediately especially extract especially the survivor because their bodies on plane. I got it reduced inflammation immediately. I think sony sells this tomb. Rick potion that does really well. What's it called again. tim. I take turmeric. One hundred i tell you every day I would put a protocol together of nutritional stuff. I i'd clean their guy. I cling 'cause. They're eating hospital food. Three eating process meet their their eating during gluten. I'd get them off all starches items. Put them on a i. F diet immediate. Fasten died the let their body catch up to the brain and cleaned the gut health. And then i'd get them with psychologist. I get them with me coming in as a life coach. 'cause they need to be coached and taught every step of the way because they're more panic the more the more panic and anxiety that there isn't a family because listen i i came home am i and my wife. At the time. We had two young kids one still breastfeeding once. Boyer's old. I'm in my wheelchair and i in diapers. She can handle these two kids and me. There's no way that it wasn't going work. She did the best that she could. She's a great mom. she's moved on. I moved on now. But i save marriages. 'cause i know what's going to happen when that person the brain energy comes out of it. They're not talking like they normally should. They're trying to get out there. Words they're dropping f bombs there swearing. There's part of bipolar isn't as part of of tyrrell's going on their brain is malfunction. They're trying to just get the work together and people don't have patients people think. Take appel we're going to get fixed or take this twenty four hour flu. There's no such thing as as a twenty four hour brain injury. It's a lifetime of healing. So i know i. I didn't ask you an answer. You completely tim. But there's so many variables to it. I don't know that rocks. But it's like i start with the nutrition. I i get a psychologist involved. I even get breath. We're going at meditation. Going everything i can do from here but i also get the house ready for when they come back from the hospital. 'cause if you're at the hospital for three months you push the button..

Rick potion tim sony Boyer tyrrell appel flu
"traumatic brain injury" Discussed on Health and Wealth Podcast with Carter & Tim

Health and Wealth Podcast with Carter & Tim

01:48 min | 5 months ago

"traumatic brain injury" Discussed on Health and Wealth Podcast with Carter & Tim

"What's richer stim- james here with my co host carter wilcox and in the house got sean payton. Aka the stroh hacker shiny just shared with this. You know your backstory which is it's tragic. It's remarkable it's it's amazing what you've what you've been through been through a lot more than the average person has right but there's some people out there that have been through worse so the way i always look at things half of people have it worse than you have have it better. Let's just pick ourselves up from the bootstraps and get moving forward with our life against. So that's what you did. When i wanna talk about now is like for the listeners. Out there that is dealing with traumatic brain injury or they're they've sent this podcast to somebody with traumatic injury. Let's give them some hope and let's give him some steps when they're in the logistic they're in the hospital. They're freaking out. You come in and then walk us through that process and how you calm down them some hope and get the family rock and roll into the. You know the aftermarket okay. Enough we do so. The question often preferred the democ happened. with code i go to schroeck centers all over and walk in there and the most common thing i saw was someone just had a brain injury or stroke and the family's been camping out in the waiting room for. I walked in to some people that they were there for three weeks. The the parents the grandparents. The kids and i walked in there. I'm like i told them who. I was on christmas day. And i said you guys are doing yourself no good your loved one is here under a cute kid is great doctors here. You guys all have to go home and get out of here garcia movie gopher hike. Good the beach get out in nature and they looked at me like i was crazy and i said you guys can stay here but your job really starts when.

carter wilcox sean payton james stroke garcia
"traumatic brain injury" Discussed on Health and Wealth Podcast with Carter & Tim

Health and Wealth Podcast with Carter & Tim

04:53 min | 5 months ago

"traumatic brain injury" Discussed on Health and Wealth Podcast with Carter & Tim

"I'll call him once. I come out of all that. But i gotta let the hostile do what. They're gonna do. Sure i think it's i think it's really important that What you're doing sean. Because the reality is that people that have traumatic brain injuries. Whether it's through stroke earlier you know fallen out of an airplane. Hit head on the concrete is concerts or does your concussions right. If football players right sportspeople phone you know getting bucked off a horse. Whatever it is like so these traumatic brain is important. Because they're gonna end up in crisis care so what you're able to do since you've been in there and you have the awareness of the natural you're able to navigate now your clients navigate through what should be done in crisis care and what. They probably shouldn't do that. They're doing like because people need that education and once they get out It's really interesting. We're gonna get to this in the next segment but you would think carter the when they get out you would want to get to working on yourself and to get well. But that's not the first step. The first step is is the the support unit schon helps the family yet. Ready for what. They're about to embark on i that that's exactly. I was going to say that point. Is i have to interview the families before i take on a client or a new patient of mine i gotta make sure the loved ones the the kids the husband the wife brothers. They're they're in tune with me. 'cause i'm gonna bring them everything inside the box and everything outside the box. Because i'm gonna. I'm gonna tell them. Keep speaking other doctors. But if you try these supplements by chemical-free body of tim james it's going to work. And here's what it's going to do for you because right now your bodies inflamed and the the the pair of nervous system is really messed up. If the bodies and plant and tim's able to do is come in set and create a flow in a balance. Where most people don't want to do that and you can't do that with. I've tried xanax as i. Tried to. Prozac. everyone's got is on their own thing. I don't dish. I tell no one no i let them microdosing himself and figure out what they need to do and that they have a question for me of what. I'm doing all tell them that. But i'm yeah yes so just just real fast. I know we're getting ready on a hard and everything. But but speaking of that. And i wanted to ask you this as listen to your story. I'm hearing and you just got through mention it to him right like the first step is going to the family in managing expectations of what the journey is gonna look like right. I'm just curious speaking of that. You had two very young kids. At the time i mean. What was that like if you can give me some sort of an idea as you are. Obviously ten years down the road from now it was so hard. I mean it was unim- understanding thirty nine. I'm i'm at seaworld every week. I i have a child on my chest. The beyond i draw on my shoulders. We're off to see you know whether it's shampoo the dolphins. It was our playtime i to you know. I had a kid on much as a kid on my shoulders. And we're often going well. We brought our own food because we went from the park. We were that were that that that and tickets us on our food intake. I mean it was like you know i. I wasn't able to imprint of my youngest daughter until she was five or six. Now they're fourteen and their eleven. You know it's much different game now. But i really had find my why when i tell people with this. What inspires them. What is there is. Everyone's going to hit the dark night of the soul..

tim james schon sean carter football tim seaworld dolphins
"traumatic brain injury" Discussed on Health and Wealth Podcast with Carter & Tim

Health and Wealth Podcast with Carter & Tim

03:22 min | 5 months ago

"traumatic brain injury" Discussed on Health and Wealth Podcast with Carter & Tim

"But i quickly learned that i had. I wish i would arrested more in the beginning. But i try to get back away too fast and i figured just kept going at it. The first six months the first year pounding my way through this. I'd get better but what people don't realize is a break in. The brain is on the break in in an elbow or an or shoulder or hick. It takes many many hours and days of nine years for the brain to heal and to really understand what a brain injury is as much as you constantly do. You've got to also ask for that. And i didn't know about breath work. I didn't know about meditation. I didn't know about all this other stuff in this world about how to combine nervous down because my nervous system was so bali shot that i was in fight or flight all the time for the first year a first two years of my comeback which is nowhere to live know everything from suicide thoughts to. What am i gonna make this happen. Having all this money let living on the beach and now the money's going away. 'cause i now repair my body because having health insurance and some money only got so far so i had to do either reinvest myself people say to me where jimmy i said. What's the price to walk. It's priceless. Don't tell me what i did or didn't do i wanna get my voice back. I wanted to speak a line to be there for my children. I wanted to be there for thrust of the world. So i spent the money hacking my own stroke coming back so the last ten years i devoted thousands of hours thousands of days really programming what i needed to do to get back and why become the stroke. Actor is because i've created a formula and a methodology and a curriculum where i take both what tim james believes. I loved him. tim's amazing. I also take what my md's believed and a hybrid them both. You know because sometimes there's a lot of transition with the mdc. Tim james says they're both going to be right. But you gotta find your own solution amongst all of it and sometimes you might need. This might need tim as you might need your neurologist but the minor august was great phenomenal. My neurosurgeon was awesome. But they can do a certain amount of stuff. I bring in guys like a practice who who. Tim knows that the plan. I plethora who i love you bring in a guy like tim james down we start healing my body. Which then he'll my brain. They did what they had to do. But tim tim's the reason why i'm as healthy as i am now and the reason why skin looks so good is because i believe in what his his methodology is through. You know His his his whole curriculum. What he does so. I really card explain this boasts. I don't believe anyone side. I believe in them. Both and i'm all about just projecting what i'm doing to help others. So that's why. I've kind of become the stroke actor because a chiropractor. Got me back to realigning mike skeletal structure where my where my neurologist wanted to. You won't kept handing me a prescription wanna fucking prescription. I want i want breath work. I want i want oxygen. I want there again. I want my green when eighty five. I want my tomb rick. I want anything. I want my gut detox. I want to do things that i know. I can heal my body within. it's same thing with jodie. Spends a teaches tony. Robbins wayne that in that world. But but when you're in trauma and you're fighting for your life no offense. I'm not calling tim james..

tim james Tim james bali tim jimmy mdc tim tim mike skeletal Tim Robbins wayne rick jodie tony
"traumatic brain injury" Discussed on Health and Wealth Podcast with Carter & Tim

Health and Wealth Podcast with Carter & Tim

05:45 min | 5 months ago

"traumatic brain injury" Discussed on Health and Wealth Podcast with Carter & Tim

"But i think because i was great shape and my microbiome was really healthy. Tim except for the wine or beer. I had the day before. But i was. I was a special house in great shape and Everything he was doing wasn't working. I kept falling backwards. My brain kept turning off. 'cause the crowded artery is the connection of the blood supply in the air flow and the oxygen going up to the brain. The brain goes down. The rest of the body is gone. So i do all this and he says he says my my family i think i got induce a coma and i'm trying to i'm waking up. I'm trying to understand this. And i'm like someone. Just get me outta here. Let me do hot yoga. Let me get back with my navy seals. I can heal myself. But i'm not really understanding. What's going on the induced tacoma for ten days of nkhoma for ten days while i'm in the coma i fell even further. My brain goes backwards even worse. What he has to do is he doesn't procedure called a crazy acting. Which is he has to take a piece of skull off my head to alleviate the pressure in my in my brain to allow to kinda swell up and then come back down. 'cause i was overly swelling. I was overly inflamed from everything which just happened. He did the critic to me And then i woke up from the coma. Ten days post and i was totally out of it. I you know my brain at thirty nine. I was a peak condition body. Wise in mind i i was involved with two is. I'm both were going public at the moment. And i was really the glue behind all of it would let my partners and i will go up and then i tried to make sense of what will happen in. That says me your paralyze. Unlike winning mean on peres. You're paralyzed on your left side. And i go to scratch my stomach and he goes. Don't touch your abdomen. I go why they said he put your skull on your abdomen. Distorted this stall distort. The skull distorted the scart distorted distort the skull and i'm like my brain and my belly understand. What are you talking about. What do you mean my brands are my belly. So i went through all this self-reflection and i knew i had to get to work. I'm like i don't want to say like this. How do i start to heal so initiated therapy. Because of the injury happened on the right side of my brain my speech my condensate was coming back faster. My left side of my body was come with clinton cut in half so the catch yourself in half my eyesight my ears my left arm. My left leg clearly paralyzed. Nothing was working. I catherine's i'd rectal tube feeding tubes. I had pick lines going into my heart. I look like frigging frankenstein and sure enough as that happened. Did transfer me from santa barbara. Back down to san diego where i went into an acute rehab for about six months learning how to stand up learning how to walk learning how to brush my teeth. Learning shabery these the toilet again. Everything in my body. My brain was turned off..

coma tacoma Tim peres clinton catherine santa barbara san diego
"traumatic brain injury" Discussed on Health and Wealth Podcast with Carter & Tim

Health and Wealth Podcast with Carter & Tim

05:49 min | 5 months ago

"traumatic brain injury" Discussed on Health and Wealth Podcast with Carter & Tim

"I wanted to be entrepreneurs and in return. They said to me. Hey will train the on what on what we do. I'm like i'm thirty nine. I'm training him. I made my buddy. Who's dan henderson. Who tim knows. Who's getting ready for. A couple of fights only to find out that these seals heavily have zero or no enemy hanrahan training and the reason is because the navy doesn't want doesn't want them within three feet of their opponent. They want them to sniper. They want them to collect the intel. Get it back to the pentagon and move on there. Are there to get in there to get out. But if they lose one the seals it's eight million dollars prosciutto plus all all the millions of dollars. They're spending on the weapons drones the tanks the all that stuff so they started to train with us. Dan henderson and went one day. Were training and i got choked out got caught in a choke. Normal thing happens in mma. Everyone will do it. Be a choke. Submission thought nothing of it. I went home on that night. Sending my wife at the time. I've two young kids who are four years old in eighteen months really had a newborn at the house wives so you know so feeding her sizzle breastfeeding her. And i was doing my thing. I was building my companies. But what i was doing. The sign was really trying to understand. He's military guys and it's one on navy seal would bring by his team. Whose team seven and next thing. I know i'd come home during the day. And there'd be like a group of guys in my front yard just hanging out overlooking the water drinking my beer or having the food. And i was like yes. Help yourself to my frigerator. Whatever's mine is yours. I always loved given back. But what i realized. Is that when you drink so much. Alcohol and numb the brain it really. It really starts to hurt that person and these guys started. Go missing on me. So the only way for me to really understand them was get them into training martial arts so i would take them with me and i understood what they were gonna what what was actually happening but they were so badly injured internally it was invisible because because the in the pac that these guys are all brain-damaged you have one hundred ten jumps from an airplane. Hi here hi. Lo your body gets rattled. You break into a A house but see for on the door the first eight guys of of that unit are all concussed so the brain is getting rock..

Dan henderson hanrahan navy pentagon tim intel
"traumatic brain injury" Discussed on Health and Wealth Podcast with Carter & Tim

Health and Wealth Podcast with Carter & Tim

05:26 min | 5 months ago

"traumatic brain injury" Discussed on Health and Wealth Podcast with Carter & Tim

"I am joined here today by my mr truth. Freedom and health aficionado. If you will mr tim james up. In portland oregon. Jimmy how are you bud. Hey man i'm doing really good and I'm feeling good. I had this guy asked me how my gut health was this morning's actually our guest. A stroke hacker sean anton. He's on with us today. He asked me about health. Mike you not my guts. Frigging awesome feels good and to just have the awareness of my gut which was like eleven years ago. I wasn't even thinking about like. How's your gut health Somebody asked me what the hell you talking about. Nuts like you know what was in the shooter. Now it's It's awesome so Sean and we're really excited to have you on today. So for those of you listening if you have anybody in your life that has dealt with a traumatic brain injury or t b. I this is going to be a very important Podcast for you to listen to to share it with those people Sean stories pretty incredible. What happened just kind of a freak deal and Sent him his his life spiraling into this abyss and he's dragged himself out of it. He's an inspiration everybody. Sean thanks for being here today. Brother thank you guys. This is great. You want to start from the beginning of time or what do you want. Okay someone's gonna ask the crisis of where let me let me go ahead and jump in first of all Sit back and enjoy this episode. Because i got a chance As as tim. And i have been doing this podcast now for quite some time. We do a lot of things that are predominantly more on the side of the equation and we really wanted to start enlightening our in richer's with more of the health side of the equation and tim said hey. I got a phenomenal guest. I believe he introduced me to sean just recently i. I was listening in watching the story from your website. You call yourself a stroke hacker and it's very impressive. So so sean. Our in richard. What they really liked to do they want wanna get to know you little bit better and understand your journey on how you became the stroke hacker in the first place right..

mr tim james sean anton Sean Jimmy portland oregon Mike tim sean richard
Bringing Service Animals Into The Lab

Short Wave

02:15 min | 6 months ago

Bringing Service Animals Into The Lab

"So if you're a scientist say biologist or a chemist and you have to work in a lab. You're super familiar with the term. P p personal protective equipment which is p. p. e. is outer garments goggles boots and gloves. That's joey ramp. She works at the beckman institute for advanced science and technology at the university of illinois at her banish champagne. And yeah basically anybody who sets foot in. A lab needs some form of p. p. Even if you have four feet see. Joey has a service dog. Can you hear him little like ground sampson okay. He was getting up all right. Here we go samson. A golden retriever is trained not to bark and he's a very good boy when he's in the lab with joey. He wears goggles worn by military. Canine and buy police canine and law enforcement. He wears rubber bottom boots on each paw and he also wears a lab coat underneath his harness and that keeps them safe. Samson intern keeps joey safe in the lab and out years ago joey suffered a traumatic brain injury. She also has. Ptsd samson senses when she's in a stressful situation that could trigger her ptsd. he picks things up. Because you can't bend over that well and he helps her balance embrace when she's moving around. It's it's a cliche to say that the dog saved my life but A service dog really does that every single day but there was a time when joey was told that she couldn't have her dog with her. At least not if she also wanted to be in the lab they immediately said. Oh my gosh. You can't possibly bring a service dog into this environment. It's too dangerous so sadly there are a lot of science faculty that are reluctant to allow anyone with a disability into stem or science and When you have a service dog That that makes it an even bigger problem from the moment you walk in. You have a service dog. it's very visible. It's very different. And they have the power to say. No

Beckman Institute For Advanced Joey University Of Illinois Samson Intern Ptsd Samson Sampson Samson
These Capitol Police Officers Give Law Enforcement a Bad Name

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:35 min | 6 months ago

These Capitol Police Officers Give Law Enforcement a Bad Name

"Doubt that tears were shed over january. Six i'm not trying to minimize that but wait a minute after your testimony on capitol hill as as a capital police officer. You're going to sit down with donald. Lemon and trash talk cnn. I is that kind of typical behavior of law enforcement. let's get. let's get john's perspective. Who i understand has been an officer for over three decades. Is that true policemen for thirty three years. John yes thank you for calling us. Tell me a little bit about what your reaction is. What you're seeing fell a law enforcement do on cnn and msnbc yesterday all these four guys. In my opinion they're They're playing to the democratic party. They got their own agenda They're looking for payout. Maybe maybe harry dunn's going to become a cnn contributor. john. Yeah i mean the I've been last letter. Riots and i know a lot of guys been hurt and that one of them acted like any one of these four guys. This is this is totally ridiculous. You know i got a brain traumatic brain injury. And i'm gonna be off he's looking for a payout he Suda city suda The capital. I don't know what is agenda is what i know. You want a bad mouth them but me being a policeman. I can bad mouth. I'm giving everybody a bad

CNN Capitol Hill Harry Dunn Donald Trump John Msnbc Democratic Party
"traumatic brain injury" Discussed on Fortress On A Hill (FOH) Podcast

Fortress On A Hill (FOH) Podcast

03:29 min | 7 months ago

"traumatic brain injury" Discussed on Fortress On A Hill (FOH) Podcast

"That's going to be a lot of an idea. Is not going to be one after the other. After the other after the other after the blast and ring your bell but it's not like a barrage like artillery barrage. I feel more devastating outside of the shrapnel as far as the vibrations go. I think that. I think that that's a good point. I the the what they've seen so far statistically as that the in terms of the traumatic brain injury comparison that statistically speaking guys fighting vietnam guys fighting a world war two had a a lesser chance for a traumatic brain injury. But in wonder. If that's true i mean. There's nothing there improvised explosive device the devices that first of all they're not one thing they explode and explosions but the drought badly. There's also the repeat effect that it know we talked about earlier is that because of medical advances because of improvements in how they they treat combat trauma that a person can get their bell rung and then get treated check for concussions and then gets sent back out and then you have the chance for repeat drama. Let's say that person did have a concussion. But they were sent out for. They were supposed to get hit again. And then then you're you have compounding injuries. I think that. I think that that's that's more of the more of the gist in terms of comparing ours. There's is that if something that bad happened somebody with artillery in world war two would they have had a repeat situation that was close enough to duplicate those conditions in compound. An existing injury I'm sure that it did happen but like you said how. Do we typically look at that. How do we compare that accurately. I do agree with you. You know that that you getting hit by artillery. Even if you live through it could be significantly worse than i. D but it also depends. Some ideas are very sophisticated eft's those explosive formed. Penetrators can do serious damage to vary armored vehicles mama. Of course the armor the armored vehicles themselves suck and aren't really that armored their armored just enough Which something. I want to talk about in the future about the shadiness in that way strikers humvees and such but that compounding thing i saw something it just a little bit ago or talked about that. They screened one hundred and fifty veterans and they said that the the that some people got hit who had got hit by at least one. I d There was people that got as few as two and there was a dude who had gotten hit eighteen times now. I'm sure that there's some variants in there. Some of them were probably not as severe as others but to be to have your life be threatened to be burned out eighteen different times. Yeah earn to carry you know. In addition to whatever physical symptoms that that would provide Now again we're not saying that soldiers who were clearly in need of care and passwords weren't sent back out into the field..

traumatic brain injury vietnam
Managing Depression, Trauma and Signs a Child May Be Struggling With Depression

CLEANING UP THE MENTAL MESS with Dr. Caroline Leaf

02:09 min | 7 months ago

Managing Depression, Trauma and Signs a Child May Be Struggling With Depression

"One in twelve children are battling with extreme symptoms of anxiety and depression between the ages of nine and sixteen and actually younger. It's more in goals k. And this often goes. Unnoticed by. Adults teaches pediatricians leaders. Do you know that. Three percent of leaders are talking in about mental health noticing mental health. And we may talk about. Children leaders would be example. Teach in a classroom a principal of a school a leader in a community kind of sitting at any medical health professional any mental health professional parents. These leaders be leading. The people only four percent of churches for example are talking and religious organizations of talking about mental health. I mean this. This is an area. That's not being spoken about an art children going unnoticed and we know children kind of seem to bounce back from issues because they kind of seem to pull a lives together and kind of bounce back and there is almost a dangerous assumption that we making. I know when. I was practicing as a therapist which i did for over twenty five years that we had a child with a traumatic brain injury that the actual physical damage. That would happen in putting into hospital for period of time and on they seem to physically bounce back quicker than an adult so there was a lot of assumptions made about how they are recovering. Child a child recovers more quickly. But then you would see what we call the subtle learning disability starting to manifest in certain different age groups and certain different periods at school and that was directly track back to the traumatic brain injury so they physically had recovered. But there was this layton to fix a lot of them were emotional learning etcetera that needed to be managed so we gotta stop making the assumption that our kids seem to be fine. They seem to be getting through. We've got to be very careful of that. Because if a child has experienced something they and they and they don't depending on the age if they are under twelve then gonna have much language to be able to analyze express that to the younger they get the more difficult as we know is and then also from the age of thirteen through twenty four is the most difficult season of the entire entire life cycle.

Anxiety Depression Layton
What is Functional Medicine?

Bowl of Life

01:53 min | 7 months ago

What is Functional Medicine?

"What does that even mean compared to like when you say functional medicine versus traditional type of medicine. A think you're the depends on what what we're coming from. Personality culturally the different terms for functional medicine. Some people refer to as biologic medicine more like in the world kids with autism. if you're more holistically minded you might call holistic medicine. In europe they might refer to. Integrative medicine focal mess. I think it's just a different way of saying those things that you focus on research so with functional medicine you looking for the recalls. Why you have diabetes. Why do you have chronic fatigue fiber malaysia so it doesn't look at diagnoses per se. It looks at systems so if someone comes in with your fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue which is really really common. You know well the question. Your diagnosis The traditional way the conventional way of saying. Here's your diagnosis in here. Your pain medications. Or here's your adderall. Energy or whatnot. Functional medicine perspective be like why do you have chronic fatigue and fiber. What's your history wilson birth history. Did you have a traumatic brain injury when you're younger. Digestive tract infections science issues. Lots of antibiotics. Where'd you grow up. You know groping area there are lots of pesticides and chemicals. Did you grow up in a moldy home. Did you have tick bites. You know it kind of looks back at your past to see how japan prime for your president and your future and it looks. Assistance approach information. Immune system detoxification and then use the tools that that yesterday. We had this diagnosis of cranking fiber but more importantly. How can you actually change trajectory. So it's more of a recalls based functional masses over recalls systems based way of looking at care. That's that's science backed so the way we kind of one of the ways. I work word. On my website it's science back visualized healthcare solutions.

Autism Chronic Fatigue Fibromyalgia Malaysia Diabetes Europe Wilson Japan
Former CIA Officer Details "Havana Syndrome" He Suffered Overseas

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:07 min | 8 months ago

Former CIA Officer Details "Havana Syndrome" He Suffered Overseas

"News has learned. The U. S government is now fast tracking sensor technology to detect the cause of a mysterious illness, known as Havana syndrome, sometimes debilitating condition has affected American diplomats and other personnel overseas. CBS chief investigative correspondent Catherine Herridge spoke with former CIA officer Mark Parliament. Uh uh, Palamar opus who came down with the symptoms while living in a Moscow hotel. Venus syndrome is the name given to a mysterious neurological condition, first reported by State Department personnel in Cuba five years ago who experienced a similar set of symptoms. Pressure in the head. Yes, Loss of balance. Yes, ringing In the years. I've had a headache for three years. It feels like a vise clamp down here And then there's pressure that comes over the top of my head. Mark says. It took three years to get help. At the Walter Reed military Hospital. They diagnosed me with a traumatic brain injury. The national Academies of Sciences recently found the most plausible explanation was post radio frequency energy.

U. S Government Catherine Herridge Mark Parliament Havana CBS CIA Moscow State Department Cuba Walter Reed Military Hospital Headache National Academies Of Sciences Mark
"traumatic brain injury" Discussed on The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

05:50 min | 8 months ago

"traumatic brain injury" Discussed on The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

"That isn't gonna really get to the poor of the problems. Isolating one molecule out of this plant is not the long term solution. I have found personally the entourage all the components Flavonoids the meyer of norwich. The major ones the whole plan is what i need for my medicine. And it's the least desired medicine for most practitioners because they control it's dosing the way they want. You can't predict the outcomes the way they want the studies that are out there are millions of them but they're not done the way the. Us pharma cope ya world operates so as a result are not even recognized or brought up and this is what i found so much with brain injury candidates there was like no real information i since learned. It's all unbelievable in how things are placed in the whole search engine optimization hidden in the depths ono this kind of stuff and so it just seemed like there was no information anywhere that i could find that was credible so one of the struggles has an being able to talk to people. Feel confident that. I'm not blowing smoke up. Someone smoke in the air. That i'm really. There's valid reasons canvas works for traumatic brain injury In the israeli army every medic every soldier they have a whole. Thc nasal spray if you suffer from a blast injury that's squirted up your nose like instantly reduces brain swelling to me. This should be on every single ambulance. We have in america and our paramedics should know. The canvas.

america israeli army millions single ambulance one one molecule norwich every
Ex-Chiefs Assistant Britt Reid Charged With DWI After Crash

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 10 months ago

Ex-Chiefs Assistant Britt Reid Charged With DWI After Crash

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting former Kansas City Chiefs assistant Rick reed has been charged with D. W. Y. after a February crash former Kansas City Chiefs assisting coach Britt Reid has been charged with driving while intoxicated resulting in serious physical injury the charge stems from a February fourth crash near arrowhead stadium that left the five year old girl critically injured read the son of chiefs head coach Andy Reid tested for blood alcohol content of zero point one one three above the legal limit of point zero eight according to the Jackson County prosecutor's office five year old Ariel young suffered a traumatic brain injury her family says the girl is unable to talk or walk and is being fed through a feeding tube if convicted read could be sentenced to up to seven years in prison hi Mike Rossio

Mike Rossi Rick Reed D. W. Y. Britt Reid Chiefs Arrowhead Stadium Kansas City Andy Reid Ariel Young Jackson County Mike Rossio
In The Room with Sean Clancy: Ramon Dominguez

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

04:11 min | 11 months ago

In The Room with Sean Clancy: Ramon Dominguez

"Year old multiple clips award winning jockey one nearly five thousand racists including the travers. The breeders cup turf twice the arlington million. The woodward the jockey club gold cup and road stars have her to grace gio. Ponti better talk now and so many others. Welcome to the show. Ramon thank you. Just turn for now. I said jockey. Ramon dominguez introduction. Because you will always be jackie in my book you retired after suffering a head injury in two thousand and thirteen. How how's retired. Life is good. continue Working on different things Llosa new chapter in my life and certainly will start smiling when you say jockey exactly exactly what keeps you busy these days. I know it's been almost eight years. I guess Since you retired what what keeps you so yes busy with different things. I mean personally. Your skill involved with things Family why Enjoying family and use. I enjoin also saratoga which is home for me now over springs in And i have been working a couple of projects. One of them A riding crop that i invented and a lot of people know about in the horse racing role Doing a show going to the other question disciplines in And most recently start working with a friend on a platform that we name a box which we threw up from. Look into bring a content to the spanish speaking Horse racing fan and the has been something that we have enjoyed and just went interview and pre imposed race analysis among other things. So yeah that keeps me pretty busy. You were always playing the long game saving your money thinking about your next step right. I'm and you were always one of those guys that you kind of watch. That were was planning the rest of your life. yes i Certainly i'm happy with a josiah leaving Today in in my career. I didn't have to have The most expensive thing so That certainly has helped through these retirement as where. I am no making the money that i was making was writing a however there's no Huge needs in terms of having to fulfill something that Warsaw too big for my financial capability other time so now they usa enjoying a life's simple pleasures in some ways. Yeah you've always been good at that. How how tough was it to be forced to retire him. And you didn't really get your choice. You had a fall and and had a dramatic Traumatic brain injury. How tough was that for you. So it was the one that i Came to realize that that's what's going to happen Four awhile. After my accident. When i had a i was Gog capable of thinking about what was happening and so on I was planning on coming back in the was pretty exciting for me to come back to to riding in a day when i realized that that was no longer choice You do go through What i call it a grieving where these by Being jewish job. Or what you the is career. You can't help to feel in some ways attached to that or sec studies farrow who you are even if that's the case so It was a little bit difficult walking away. Or separating myself from defy that. I was no longer gonna racist But i kinda would support my family. Friends and so on and Shortly afterwards i ended up going to the track against my will really because my wife Pushed me to go to the track. And that was the best thing that i could have because it really helped me to turn the page in. In all time. I was able to enjoy the racist and just looking at it from a different perspective without feeling a sense of love like oh my gosh i wish i was there. So You as i said in the beginning of our conversation. It's just another chapter in my life. And i'm fully embracing it in and enjoying it as well. Yeah

Breeders Cup Ramon Dominguez Llosa Ponti Ramon Arlington Jackie Saratoga Josiah Warsaw Traumatic Brain Injury USA Farrow SEC
"traumatic brain injury" Discussed on The Recovering Brain

The Recovering Brain

16:33 min | 11 months ago

"traumatic brain injury" Discussed on The Recovering Brain

"traumatic brain injury" Discussed on The Recovering Brain

The Recovering Brain

19:59 min | 11 months ago

"traumatic brain injury" Discussed on The Recovering Brain

"Traumatic brain injury recovery. Alright everyone welcome to our saturday speaker meeting. I am really happy to have dr. dan gardner here with us. This morning. i don't know if dr gardner likes when i say this been. I described him as the brain injury. Guru in san diego. He has been in the brain injury community for a long time. He's got such a high level of expertise deep level of expertise and brain injury world. Dr gardner is a psychiatrist and psychotherapist. Specializes in working with brain injury survivors. It's going to be talking a bit today about the idea of. Why do i feel this way after ed. Tv i and giving us maybe a different framework for you know how to understand brain injury so with no further ado like to welcome. Dr gardner here Joining us today. Thank you so much. Thanks thanks kurt. For the kind introduction and giving me the opportunity to speak i enjoy that i hope everybody's doing the best they can to meet the challenges the pandemic and what else we're dealing with. So today. i want to address a number of questions that are important to me and most of the people i work with. I want to talk about why. I feel this way. After brain injury also wanted to talk about why similar brain injuries caused different problems. So if two people get hit in the head with a soccer ball at the same speed. Why is the outcome different. Perhaps very different for each person. When i talk about diagnosis imports of making a diagnosis before we started treatment. Now when i gave this talk a couple of years ago. I asked why is it important and one of the attendant today. Chuck raised his hand and said gee when he had a stroke when he went to the er. The doctors thought he was drunk. And so obviously..

"traumatic brain injury" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

ABA Inside Track

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"traumatic brain injury" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

"Did you choose. These targets was as irrelevant intervention for you. Would you want to continue. You know those those types of questions that just seems so so very low for you. Know i mean i guess. Some of it might have been in terms of the type of injuries. Some of the individuals may not have been able to share that information in a meaningful way but still seem very a very low low factors. That something that you've kind of taken on a major that's going to be an all of your studies or is that just sort of a artifact of population that is receiving this treatment. Gosh that's such a good question. I really think it expands to all other practice areas. I don't think we report sociability enough. I don't think we think about it enough. I would say that a can of worms. Somebody needs to start focusing on that. I know that my colleague dennis brand. We hired him three years ago was fantastic but he has an interest in nigeria. And i keep pushing him to go down that road. 'cause i really wanna know more about it. We don't do social justice even though it's one of our tenants of aba toward the hallmarks of our field we don't measure it in a meaningful way in my opinion in most cases. So yeah it was. It was hard to see in this review. But i think we're gonna find it pretty much. Any review agreed not specific to this practice area. So problem field wide problem. Currently and we're making strides as far as the number of studies that are including social validity. Moving forward but still not where it needs to be an agree with you. Meghan the quality of the way in which we're collecting social validity. Data needs to be improved dramatically. I think one thing..

Meghan dennis nigeria three years ago one thing one
"traumatic brain injury" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

ABA Inside Track

02:34 min | 1 year ago

"traumatic brain injury" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

"Is there a sense of these. Types of injuries tend to lead to these outcomes with these types of rehabilitation or this level of intensity. Probably means this or that or is it really one of those things the brain we know allow but we don't even know close to everything where every injury is going to result in possibly a set pattern but not necessarily a similar pattern between different patients. I mean is there sort of like a flow chart or was that life. it's the latter you you hit the nail on the head. It's there's a saying in brain injury rehab that once you've seen one brain injury you've seen one brain injury so every you everybody is so different. I honestly think that's also what draws me to this population. I get bored quite easily. I'm a professor for a reason. Because i teach i do service sidhu research. I changed my areas of research. And i like that novelty while. That's what you get with this clinical population. They will keep you on your toes. I guarantee it. And i love that because it really highlights the generality of our field and what we can do with our principles. But you're right. It's we know a lot. We don't know a lot. I would say speaking. Generally those with more severe injuries are likely to experience more consequences or what he calls the kuala in the field that put them at risk for long-term disability or requiring more rehab to achieve better functional outcomes than those with mild injuries. But it really does depend on the injury you spoke of rehabilitation as you work on something that you know. You're you've had family members and friends who gone through the rehabilitation process. Is that something that similar to. The outcomes is different for every person in terms of. You're going to see this doctor that doctor but then you might go to this outpatient location. You might do. Ot you might do. Something completely unrelated. You might have a behavior analyst. You work with oregon. Is there a set amount of care given to individuals with traumatic brain injury..

one brain one of those
"traumatic brain injury" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

ABA Inside Track

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"traumatic brain injury" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

"Two thousand nine by heineken car again and also we'll be discussing expand. The consumer base for behavior analytic services meeting the needs of consumers in the twenty first century. That is by leblanc heineke and baker from practice two thousand thirteen and with our citations out of the way. Let's get into the discussion and meghan. Why don't we start by if you don't mind letting our listeners know a little bit about you are sharing thing and thanks again to ashley for the requests that against great that you mentioned tv. I so i am from a super super small town in western michigan. It's called kemp city but that's a misnomer. It is not a city it is. A village has only one traffic light in. It's a it's a four way stops as just a blinking red. And we've got a subway attached to our gas station. When i was in high school and that was the biggest deal ever. So that's where. I'm from goodson. Twin peaks is megan from your town. Just make a lot of fields and farms. So i ended up going to western michigan for undergrad because i was a music major so i played flute and piccolo and i wanted to be a music teacher to begin with and i got to western and i was super nerdy surprise surprise and i was in the honors college so four the honors college in your first year. You have to take what they call. Cluster classes are clustered horses courses that hang together by topic so i selected psychology and biology able have labs and coming from my village of kansas city. We didn't have anything. Psychology related in highschool no courses whatsoever. I wasn't interested in. It didn't have any kind of background in it and really bought of psychology like another person on the street in psychology of sitting in an armchair for of that wasn't wasn't interested but in week two. I changed my major though. Just like every parent's dream of runaway after buying expensive instrument. This and i did that because the psychology class was just so enthralling. So i was taking in upper level classes. Mike i introduce like and it was insured. Aba with a rat lab so every principal. We are learning in the classroom. I was seeing in real life with my rat who i named mr moustapha lease it was fantastic. I just fell in love with it i. I never thought that was psychology nabet. That had anything to do with psychology. So change my major and at western it. It shouldn't really be considered a bachelor's in psychology bachelor some behavior analysis the classes are all very behaviorally oriented and we have to do a practicum to graduate. I ended up doing five again. Because i'm really nerdy. But it took that line. I know to figure out what i really wanted to do. And where my reinforces were in the feel. The first practicum was the common practicum. It was e i b. i children with autism. And i felt the worst person on this planet. I have to be honest. I would come home and cry. Because i didn't like it. I didn't like working with kids. And i thought who split doesn't like working with kids. I just didn't like it. I thought it was a terrible terrible person in at that time. Being an undergrad. I was misinformed and thought that aba equal autism treatment. So i thought. I don't have a home here. I need to find another major..

Mike twenty first century kansas city five ashley moustapha lease meghan first year honors college week two heineken goodson kemp city western michigan first practicum one traffic light four way stops Two thousand nine two thousand thirteen honors
Speaking From the Heart with SLP Lauren Sharpe-Payne

The WoMed

06:54 min | 1 year ago

Speaking From the Heart with SLP Lauren Sharpe-Payne

"Lauren. Welcome to the wo- med. Thank you in fact i to be here so for those of you who don't know morin. Sharp pain is a speech pathologist. And i have been dying to get speech. Pathologist on the wool med. So when you tell people what you do what's the first thing that they automatically assume. No people automatically assume i work with kids. I just can't sit kids and teach them how to say either s.'s. Or their ps. And i mean with all this do that but i actually work with adults since i think. The stereotype with speech pathology sitting down playing games working on different sounds But there's so much more to it than that so yeah well. I'll admit one of my good friends is literally dreading the day that her two year olds list goes away. It's really cute though because right now. Her z's literally come from the back of her mouth. Like all the kerr molars and she's just adorable. It's really cute it is. Oh my gosh yeah so you mentioned that you work with adults so did you. Is that kind of where you got started with. Everything or your passion really was but actually started my career working with kids. I worked with kids for about two years. Two and a half years and i liked it initially But i quickly found out. Just it wasn't like farc me like it wasn't my passionate area and so i worked really hard to kind of tradition over to the medical side of each pathology and i started working at outpatient rehab. I was seeing a lot of patients who had had strokes in like traumatic brain injuries and swallowing disorders. And i really found that that was really my passion and that's really what made me feel fulfilled at the end of the day. And so that's what i've been doing. Ever since that point. I love that i feel like i. I mean the only real interactions and stuff that i've had working with with speech was i used to work in the nikko. Nice and so. We'd have speech consoles all the time you know. We had like paralyzed vocal. Cords or you know. Cleft lip or palate premiums just couldn't quite figure out how to suck swallow breathe. Exactly yeah echo cool. Yeah so there's just it just sounds like there's so many different fields within so p. wrote there are there are. Mike said i think most of the time. Most people associate s. l. p. With you know working with kids like in the school. I think the school was really popular. But like you said there's so many different areas you know. We can work in hospital. We can work in nursing homes and you know fools and fire practices. So there's there's really a lot of different options in terms of you know where we can work which is really cool. So what led you into this career like how did you first hear about it and you know get interested in it so it's funny excellent to be a lawyer up until my senior year of high school and i remember i had already declared my major and a second of sociology class in high school and their story about the young girl. Her name was genie. I don't know if you've heard the story. But she was locked away for twelve years that her parents never interacted with hers. Get no human interaction and yeah it was. I saw that and like she had no communication at mike whatsoever and so she worked with the speech therapist and he was able to communicate. It wasn't all verbal. Nonverbal buys using pictures. But i thought that was so neat that there was something out there. You could help people communicate and the rest is history. I just fell in love from that point. that's really beautiful So greenwich some little video. Yeah what's the school pathway lake like do you guys have to clinicals. is it Like a bachelors. Is it a doctoral degree. Now or like how like if you're going to coach someone through eight or tell someone you know what they're in for. Yeah so it's four. Years of undergrad And then you have to go to graduate school so for me. My program was in graduate school. But if you don't have speech as an undergraduate degree typically a two and a half maybe three years for the graduate program and then after that your life and your certify after a nine month period. There's no doctoral degree right now. That recommended or like that's required to be a speech pathologist but you can most certainly get them back degree that not in my pets whatsoever But after getting your master's degree through what all the clinical fellowship here and so that nine months after you graduate where you're essentially practicing. Slc like getting a salary and everything. But you're still technically under supervision and so after that nine months Once you have all of your hours your than a certified speech pathologist so you don't need any supervision or you know no one's giving you feedback just kinda on your own completely after that point. Wow yeah is there different routes that you take if you want to be more on the medical side of things versus you know in schools or or working with pedes a good question so i know in graduate school. We do externships so typically if there are two externships one is medical. One is typically pediatrics. might be in the school. There might be private practice. But i know that's alive. Students really kind of narrow down where they want to be in terms of their career so a lot of students. We'll just try to warm more relationships with people a medical they feel like they wanna pursue medical side or vice versa with school side and then with the clinical fellowship years so that nine month period actor graduation many students will try and get their cf wire the clinical fellowship your and that desired area of speech that way after they're done they can't hopefully get a medical job or a pediatric job. You know what they don't need this revision to

Morin Lauren Nikko Mike
Study: Smaller cars may be why crashes injure women more

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Study: Smaller cars may be why crashes injure women more

"Three times more likely to be seriously injured in car crashes than men. The Institute Insurance Institute for Highway Safety has just released a new study. That explains why The auto insurer funded group studied injuries in police reported tow away front and side crashes from 1998 to 2015. It founded women more often drive smaller, lighter cars and that they're more likely than men to be driving the struck vehicle inside impact and front into rear crashes. The study found. Women are twice as likely as men to be more seriously hurt, like suffering a collapsed lung or traumatic brain Injury in car crashes. Christopher Cruz

Institute Insurance Institute Traumatic Brain Injury Christopher Cruz
Study: Smaller cars may be why crashes injure women more

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Study: Smaller cars may be why crashes injure women more

"Women are much more likely to get seriously hurt in a car crash now we may know why it may be at least in part because women often drive smaller lighter vehicles the other part of this has to do with the types of crashes women get into this is all according to the insurance institute for highway safety it says in the crashes it analyzed women were twice as likely to suffer serious injury like a traumatic brain injury if the crash involved the front of the vehicle they were riding in as opposed to the side of the vehicle women were also much more likely to suffer leg injuries researchers say safety experts may now have to start building crash test dummies that account more for the physical differences between women and men I'm Rita folate

Insurance Institute For Highwa Rita Folate
Man accused of killing Dallas police officer in 2018 sentenced to life in prison

Rick Roberts

00:29 sec | 1 year ago

Man accused of killing Dallas police officer in 2018 sentenced to life in prison

"Accused of killing Dallas police officer Rogelio Santander and a Home depot in 2018 is sentenced to life in prison. Armando Louise Suarez pleaded guilty today to multiple charges, including capital murder Officer Krystal and made him was also shot. An address war is after he was sentenced today show In my memory forever. Remember everything that happened and relive it every single day in my head. I made a suffered serious injuries, including traumatic brain injury and loss of sight in one of her eyes.

Rogelio Santander Armando Louise Suarez Officer Krystal Home Depot Dallas
Breakthrough at Home Pain and Mental Health Relief with Richard Hanbury, Founder Sana Health, Inc

Outcomes Rocket

04:57 min | 1 year ago

Breakthrough at Home Pain and Mental Health Relief with Richard Hanbury, Founder Sana Health, Inc

"Walk back to the outcomes. Rocket saw marquez. Here and today. I have the privilege of hosting richard henry. He is the founder of saana health. remonstration platform for pain relief and deepak station. Richard develop the technology behind saana to eradicate his own life threatening pain. Problem following a spinal cord injury from a jeep crash near saana in yemen and nineteen. Ninety-two richard has an mba. From the wharton school in healthcare and also a law degree from the college of law in london the original benchtop device removed all his nerve damage pain in three months saving his life. He has spent twenty five years developing the sonnet technology from the original benchtop device to the current device undergoing clinical trials sonnet uses pulsed light and sound and a heart rate variability feedback loop to guide the user in a deep state of relaxation. Clinical trials have been completed in opioid use disorder and fibromyalgia and sauna is launching in fibromyalgia and twenty twenty one however is available today and richard is going. Tell us more about it. And i'm just really excited to have the opportunity to interview richard and have them bring forth this technology to to the the world richard such a pleasure to have you here today to be thank it. Yeah and so before we dive into saana and it saana dot. Io folks if you're curious tell us a little bit about you and what got you into healthcare thank you yes as a nineteen year old kid. I was traveling in in the yemen. And i was given a choice of a head on collision in my jeep next to a petrol truck or two gulf bridge and i chose gulf a bridge. 'cause i figured We would either way. There would be so remains to find if i went to the bridge. Say dance with dry riverbeds sixty foot dying and cheap crumpled up A results in spun good injuries from thc ten. Which is betty button level plus a traumatic brain injury and they say old. That was why. I had to be medevac k. I was clinically dead for eight minutes back to matt intercom a middle of that resulted in damaged problem that was say sparrows given a five year life expectancy sarabia. It was the question of near figure. Something i myself or old. I say that was the mother of invention necessity. It's unbelievable i mean that is crazy. So you're driving a jeep and there's this truck just heading straight at you and you're like explosive beth falloffs bridge and you just made the choice. I mean like when that happened. Richard to win you actually remember like what point jr actually start remembering what happened and gained consciousness. And how did they find you so it was semi passenger was burglary but was in good enough shape to festival shine in arabic. So the people watching the right to danger. Petrol cigarettes is they were running. Schools tile passwords lit cigarettes. In khao is everything was checked in the gasoline tank Say yeah ben. E managed to get them to throw away the cigarettes publicized and transported us to vote what they very loosely called the hospital. And that's my friend. Got the insurance companies to send them back pain coming up. Unbelievable i mean. I mean that is just unbelievable Era miracle the be here spell. And i'm sure that the road to recovery was not easy for you and you know lots of gain. You said i had to do something about this. And that was the beginning of sauna and so you've made leaps and bounds. Since the beginning you're recovered very happy for you. Richard and As i'm sure your family is to so now you have this device and this company. Why don't you tell us a little bit more about what it is how it works and that way the listeners could get educated on it including myself suddenly say basically. All pain is some combination of central mediation. Which has had brain prices pain and prefer plain. Which is the signal coming into the brain. Now with mike pain i had sponging. Tbi and i was on very extreme faction where it was all about how the brain was pricing pain signal. But it wasn't really paints were coming up from my spine. It was essentially corrupt. Data stream is very similar to what you get with phantom limb. Actually being told her in pain is being told your visits we had signal. That doesn't quite make sense. Say with me. I was very rainy. Lucky the original device was able to wipe all by damage pain

Richard Saana Health Saana Wharton School In Healthcare Yemen Fibromyalgia Richard Henry Matt Intercom Marquez Sarabia Spinal Cord Injury College Of Law Beth Falloffs London Betty JR BEN Mike
"traumatic brain injury" Discussed on The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

07:01 min | 1 year ago

"traumatic brain injury" Discussed on The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

"Skull additional secondary injuries can happen after the trauma through changes in cerebral blood flow or intra cranial pressure. The resulting structural damage is not always detectable on C. T. an MRI, but it does show up in symptoms including cognitive problems, depression apathy, irritability headaches, sleep problems just about everything we see in psychiatry. One of the first treatments for traumatic brain injury was opening the skull to relieve the. Pressure in the early nineteenth century going back further it was probably because of brain injuries that the ancient Greek physicians like a critise understood the brain to be the center of thought common causes of Tbi, a false motorcycle accidents and violence allowed her adults. A more prone to falls TB is most common in children and young adults look forward impatience with PTSD. There's increasing awareness the victims of domestic violence and child abuse have higher rates of Tbi. Last his researches at Ohio State University. Looked at rates of head injury not brain bedhead in women who had sought help for domestic violence eighty-one percent itself blows to the head and eighty three percent had been strangled. Not all head injuries, our brain injuries and not all strangulations cause enough hypoxia to damage brain tissue but as important to miss these cases whose problems with memory mood and irritable might otherwise be ascribed to be. TST. Another population to look out for the homeless a two thousand and nineteen study found that half of homeless people have suffered a TI. In this month's report, we featured an interview with Jonathan Silver on Tbi and today we share a few highlights and rare outtakes from that conversation. What is a TB I try Ranji injuries. Separate rate refers to those people who had a brain injury to the application of force. And the definition is at the time of that application of force. There is some evidence album alteration in branch. In the most severe cases, it could be a period of coma, which is the person's not arousal. A lengthy period post traumatic end user. Error people don't remember things were period of time before after injury. Orin could be feeling days confused seeing stars, which is even more common in the sports less severe. HOW IS TI? Different from concussion. I in many of my colleagues used for concussion is the mildest form of mild traumatic brain injury. Those are people who have read for the loss of consciousness and breeding periods of oostrum most often due to sports. So that is how I use the term concussion. You'll see research studies using conscious as ascend informality, traumatic brain. Which means that somebody could be unconscious when he five minutes though so honored Cussin' I can touch. Where do you start with treatment for TB I? First patients often have more than one set. Questions. What did you start? Right so it's very hard if you bought albums with. Concentration depression star we demanded precedent. Sleep Star of the for the concentration attention. I think the first thing in probably targeted sleep because if you sleep isn't good for makes your audition whereas it makes your mood worse as link what what medication will you think for? You know for somebody who has trouble sleeping in? Maybe they're depressed mean we often use tries down because of sedating properties you could try Reveron, which is Nice sedating antidepressant I think theoretically, we try to stay away from visit days just because inaugurated for memory. Now they're not great for balance or other issues I can't say don't use some. Will be something I don't start. I know that Ben Zones can cause descente bishen much like alcohol can do. We seem more distant ambition with Ben Zozo in the TI population. It's interesting. It's like his any it's really rare. Mount Law, but it doesn't happen at all. There's a lot written about relate and I am one of the will have done that but it's not. So distant is rare. Are you more concerned here with Ben Zozo about native problems and imbalance in Tbi? In memory right I mean the rate anti anxiety medicines. So be something I. Would I would try not us. What are you start with for irritability and TBI? Yard Ability Billion Aggression S A big problem people regnery also verities acting one of the first medications used as pew spur, which really is very helpful for lots of Asians with after traumatic brain injury. As really well tolerated there's no downside to try. You don't feel lightheaded about a half hour forty, five minutes accurate a it is no way gain. There's no sexual side effects. Drug interactions really worse for something works very well. And how do you know sperone I start with seven milligrams twice a day after one week ago fifteen the rams twice a day. After a couple of weeks of snow change I usually give up some people push the dose. There's some benefit, push the Dow up thirty twice a day. Never somebody meeting say they give sixty twice today but not on that Amanda was once called the best study drug for irritability and T I but I understand the more recent data doesn't look so good. Can you update us on that? The two best studies in your ability after traumatic brain injury Ribaud done by four. The first one when she was at Carolinas and the other University of Indiana, which is head of the Multi Center study, and that's the one that I was headed data safety monitoring The first study, which was a single center study showed a significant improvement in patients on her neck dean compared to Placebo wonderfully fifty six. Asian very carsoup centers carriers. Now, the second study he was also repressive and I forgot with. Patients and there was no difference between groups. There is no never between the people on a man that ain't at Guam.

TBI TB Ben Zozo Ohio State University PTSD coma Jonathan Silver Orin Guam Reveron Amanda Mount Law Multi Center rams Carolinas
Rob Garnet One More Wave

The Coastal Athlete Program

06:12 min | 1 year ago

Rob Garnet One More Wave

"Welcome back to the coastal. Athlete. Program I'm your host. Shep today. We are joined by very special guests. We are joined by the record surf operations a US Navy veteran. Therapy advocate, a waterman, a good friend of Joe and be good friend of mine, because we're all part of the one more way, family, Ladies and Gentlemen, please welcome to the show Rob Garnett Rob. How're you doing? Then fantastic thanks for having me am. Champ and Danny Danny met you before but SHEP. We've talked a couple of times on the phone, so it's cool to be some of the zoom. At least on Zoom. Danny is our producer, and so he's going to be helping out doing the editing and mixing the episode down and things like that Joe is going to be joining the podcast just a minute. He was transitioning from from pork. Chop actually up to his apartment. He's coming back doing some surf therapy sessions. My guess would be out of Pendleton or something like that. As usual on Wednesdays, Joe is on the road living the mission so rob. Before. We get too deep into asking you. Questions I just have to ask when it came time to transition out of your career in the military, did you? When did you know that you wanted to get into surf therapies specifically? And when did you know that like this was going to be a special moment? I. Think when I was so I retired from the navy and two thousand fifteen and so that was kind of win Wave, actually becoming nonprofit, and so I had a couple of buddies Alex and Kyle. We can talk about later. That were trying to get going. They've been doing it kind of. guerrilla-style for before getting official, and so I kind of knew about it before retiring. And then it kind of kicked off. For ME I. I was volunteering here and there with more ways. I had some other gigs so right when I retired I started doing government contracting jobs I did that for a couple years before spending a lot more time volunteering than later coming on. As employees. So, Joe I just ask some general questions. Trying to do is cut those questions and stuff at the back, so feel free to take the lead, and you have the floor sounds it sounds like you talked a bit about something about diving for the navy and then sports. Now we're talking about why I came the navy. Sorry to repeat it, but. I came in hoping to be Navy diver. I've been a commercial diver for about six months in Galveston. Texas after drop Nettie. Collagen thought that'd be a good transition and When I tried to join the navy, they said the Dow closed and that they dove at butts that I should go try that. Sounds like a good idea and so. They had me take a job. That would allow me to go to buds. became a parachute rigger, so I went to school i. By Mos got my. Parachute rigger on. And then off to buds I, not really no one else doing. My parents were hippies so military people. No one wants to be joined. The Navy so really did not get into. So I imagine was a little bit of a surprise to show to buds. Learn what that school was or. Just just the suffer faster not quite ready for nicely. I imagine imagine that's quite interesting. SUFFER FEST! I also can imagine that doing the work that you did. Know you and I kind of a little bit of your background. I've imagine that really helps. Set you up for the mission at one more wave and getting on top of things and getting things moving. You maybe talk a little bit about that. Of maybe some things you learn from the Navy that you apply now at one more. Share just. Learned a lot towards the last couple of years at Miami my time in the service. How can help people in much really from? I've been injured several times while on active duty at spent time at the. At Naiko which I know, you're not talking about for jokes. The National Intrepid Center of Excellence Traumatic Brain Injury Clinic says Maryland runs, and so I started my treatment probably. This is probably two thousand ten zero five years before I retired, and so I have a lot of time to spend time with other folks that had had you know whether it was PGA s or All the kind of things that were happening to people are not super physical, but burying paxil sleep issues, and so I got exposed to lots of different therapies, and I just knew man. This is can't wait to spend more time doing this. And, so I was really excited because I learned all these things in the navy, but how can help other people at learned a lot about the va have across his work for compensation took care people how some days are better than others. Some states are Oracle, and and what? I didn't realize. Your percentage rate affects how you get treated to I was treated well, but I'm on a different ratings on people's. It's tough so I definitely learned a lot, you know. Early on about how to help other people do this and it really as you've seen Joe out. Watch people's faces. When you get to give him some equipment whether it's a board or a boogie board or people that have had nothing. He's got a wet suit like our friends in. Santa Cruz just the amazing transformation that happens. Not only from equipment, but from the community that step we all share the Melcher that we love. Not Picking up cigarette, butts or cleaning off the flight deck, but you know going out von and be talking a little trash, each other encouraging each other and just share. That shared experiences is powerful so. Yeah I definitely can attest that shared experience than to be fair. No ship Naidoo usually pick up cigarette butts, but easily on the beach and they drive us nuts, so that's why. It's quite funny. Were you a surfer before you've got out of the military and got with one more way? Has. Started at middle, school on off and then did it alter the teens long morning. And then took several years off and then kind of into it later on, so yes. We're always at the beaches, kids. We're always bodysurfing. Trying to collect fins like my friend Joe Against. Debbie me and my fin collecting hoarding abilities. That I have for quite

Navy JOE Shep Danny Danny Joe I United States Rob Garnett Joe Against Pendleton Naidoo National Intrepid Center Of Ex Santa Cruz Galveston MOS Official Debbie Maryland Nettie Texas
Symptoms of Coronavirus: Early Signs, Serious Symptoms

Science Magazine Podcast

12:43 min | 1 year ago

Symptoms of Coronavirus: Early Signs, Serious Symptoms

"What does it mean to be sick with current Oh virus we typically think I probably of shortness of breath symptom that will determine whether you should go to the doctor. You have a fever could lose your sense of smell. Maybe some stomach problems. Who What does this virus actually? Due to the body Meredith Wiedeman team of reporters from science looked at what we know of its effect system by system. It's not a complete picture yet but researchers are starting to pull it together. Okay Meredith how are you? I'm fine how are you Sarah? I'm good. This is a very comprehensive story from nose to Toews. I think they saw in one description of the work. Yes and so what happens? When a person comes in contact with the novel coronavirus. He essentially they inhale it and respiratory droplets. They might also pick it up on fingers that they then placed to their face from an inanimate surface the virus finds a welcoming home in the upper respiratory tract. A back of the throat the nose. Because there there are cells that are rich in what are known as ace two receptors and these are receptors that live on the surface of some cells and that the virus needs in order to get into those cells. We don't know the numbers but some people are just gonNA clear the infection and move on with their lives. Right they are. They're going to either be a symptomatic not even being aware they are infected and they can be very infectious in this stage or they might feel crummy they might have Malays. They might have aches fever. That really within a week or so start to recover ordered. They might go into a more serious phase of the disease. This is when the virus makes its way into the lower respiratory tract. That's right if your immune system can't beat back the virus while except in your nose and throat then the risk goes up of marching down your windpipe and into what we call the respiratory tree. The whole system of Airways that leads to the far reaches of the lung. And that's where the virus again finds a welcoming home because the tiny air sacs called Alveoli where oxygen exchange occurs with the blood also adds an abundance of these ace to receptors on their cell surfaces. And this is a problem because if the immune system goes on the attack these tiny spaces in the lungs you can get really serious problems. Sure it becomes what we know as pneumonia and ammonia simply as lung inflammation. This particular virus can cause a really rip roaring lung inflammation but these patients may have in quotes. Mild the MONJA. Although I don't think anyone has described how they feel as mildly affected or they may turn a severe sharp corner where they begin a rapid downhill. Slide into what we know is acute respiratory distress syndrome where. There's just a raging pneumonia and on their chest xrays or C. T. Scans you're GonNa see white where you should have seen black. Lack representing air in an white. Is this whole inflammatory? Response trying to beat back the virus but doing damage itself. Alveoli walls breakdown either can be clots in the little tiny blood vessels that supply the OBVIO- light nurse. Just a real STU real mess and when people deteriorate very seriously enough deny one thing that researchers are trying to understand is how serious is this immune response and would intervening at that point. Be Helpful for patients. If you have just a regular immune response and you start giving immune suppressing drugs your disarming your your Mahameed in a minority of gravely. Ill patients the immune system goes into this really damaging hyper immune state. Call that a cytokine storm when levels of certain chemical signals and the blood. Go absolutely off the charts and in the end what happens is the immune cells of the body began attacking healthy tissues and you can get widespread kwoh-ting you get the blood. Vessels leaking blood pressure plummeting. It's a catastrophe for the whole body. So in efforts to combat that out of Control Immune response they are deploying drugs that go after specific ones of these chemical signaling molecules known as cytokines and just to be clear here. Most of what we're going to be talking about is for severely affected patients people who are in the ICU people who are coming into the ER. So let's turn to the heart and blood vessels meredith. This is something surprisingly being seen in maybe twenty percent of patients. Yes it's clear that the heart and blood vessels are a target for Kovic and just how unwise still being sorted out. Let one paper in. Jama cardiology found heart damage in nearly twenty percent of more than four hundred patients who were hospitalized for the disease in. Wuhan another found forty four percent of patients in an ICU. There had abnormal heart rhythms. And then there's also an increased tendency to blood clotting that in a Dutch. Icu nearly forty percent of patients had blood. That was clotting abnormally. These are extremely problematic issues and people. That are already very sick from pneumonia. What has been seen happening to people's hearts there seems to be heart inflammation and it's possible because the heart lining and the blood vessel lining just like the cells in the lungs and the nose is rich in these ace two receptors again. They're the viruses port of entry into into cells. So the cells could be. It's possible that they're being in the heart. And the vessels directly inflamed. It's possible there at the lack of oxygen. Getting through because of the problems in the lung is doing additional damage to her vessels could be that a societal kind storm releasing all these inflammatory molecules again and sells remember they attack normal healthy tissue and that can include the linings of blood vessels so there are these multiplex of potential causes that may indeed vary between patients as to what's causing let. But it's clear that there's cardiac and vessel damage in a significant number of severely. Ill patients let's take a turn now to the brain. This is something that we've seen some scary reports on actually of inflammation in the brain and we've also seen law sense of smell in corona virus. Patients is that something that's related to the brain it might be that's not been established but there is a direct connection from so-called olfactory neurons. The ones that light you smell running from the nose up to. It's called the olfactory bulb which connects to the brain as one of our sources. Put It as a nice sounding feary who I have to go and prove that it actually extends to the brain but there are more general brain effects. That don't trace back to loss of sense of smell for one thing. The bloods increased tendency to clot can put patients at risk of having strokes. There's also a problem in that. A lot of these folks developed kidney failure that in itself can cause delirium and problems for the brain in addition there can also be a quote unquote sympathetic storm. It's sort of an overreaction of the nervous system that somewhat analogous to the site of kinds storm and that's common after traumatic brain injury some people with Cova nineteen can lose consciousness. So there's just a whole panoply of potential brain symptoms another symptom that I'd heard of before reading this story and I haven't heard most of this. Was that people can have symptoms in their gut. They can have diarrhea. They can have upset stomach. Does this mean that you know the virus pieces of the virus are surviving digestion? Yes apparently it does. And one of the suggestions is that patients are swallowing their own respiratory secretions and that the virus is carried live and somehow survives the acid environment in the stomach to land in the small intestine which is again replete. With these ace two receptors. An so virus can establish. Wow a robust infection. There that's it's thought what's leading to diarrhea nausea and other problems in perhaps on average about twenty percent of patients across studies. I WANNA take a step back here and just talk about how all these different systems being affected kind of expand the pool of people who have pre existing conditions that would make corona virus infection. Really dangerous for them. Can you talk a little bit about that? Sure so since we were just talking about kidney disease in the kidneys. That's one of the organ systems. Where if you have a pre existing kidney disease that gives you basically a handicap when you start this race with this new virus than we think of something like diabetes harms the kidneys. So if you start with a lower baseline of kidney function these chronic kidney patients with pre existing kidney disease are at seriously greater risk of developing acute kidney injury during the infection in the same way diseases that affect the blood vessels will also put patients at higher risk. High blood pressure diabetes again congestive heart failure all these kinds of pre-existing disease just make patients that much more vulnerable. Should they become infected? So how is research like this? It's so preliminary. Were really just beginning to understand the progression of this infection. How will this help with interventions or treatments? I think it will certainly offer clues and sign posts. There will be new discoveries that hopefully will lead to highly effective drugs but we have already a good deal of information that points the way to either existing drugs or targets for drugs now being developed knowing for instance the outline of a site a kind storm which is something that can be triggered by other viral infections or bacterial infections. We have a starting place with that. We have these drugs already being deployed and other inflammatory states like rheumatoid arthritis that you can then say well. If they're beating back a certain site assign one of these out of Control Chemical Messengers in arthritis may be they will also be back some piece of the cytokine storm. That's going on in these severely ill patients and so you have such drugs being deployed in clinical trials. What we know about the ace two receptor and it's detailed protein. Structure has been defined by a couple of new important papers hopefully will give us new unique targets to actually prevent binding there. Which would be terrific. Yeah so what? Was it like trying to report on this? Big Mix of peer reviewed preprinted small clinical studies firsthand reports. Those kinds of things was very challenging. Every scientist and physician we interviewed really added the caveat. This is science on the fly. Our knowledge today may be completely eclipsed a month from now or what we're thinking about how this diseases is acting may be proven wrong within three weeks. This is obviously an ongoing endeavor to understand how the disease progresses what conditions set you up for getting extra sick and then you know the mechanisms that are happening at the cellular level. Where is the best information going to come from? Do you think. Is this something where people need to set up. These robust studies that you described. Are they doing that now? Yes in fact. They are doing it but hampered by the fact that they're trying to at the same time in many cases take care of desperately ill. Patients cleverly does the analogy goes trying to build the plane. While you're flying at this information is going to be constrained or imperfect because of the situation. It doesn't mean it's not going to be important.

Bloods Pneumonia Meredith Wiedeman Respiratory Distress Upper Respiratory Tract Respiratory Tract Fever Toews Sarah Lung Inflammation Respiratory Tree Obvio ICU Scientist
U.S. Civil Rights Office Rejects Rationing Medical Care Based on Disability, Age

All Things Considered

01:35 min | 1 year ago

U.S. Civil Rights Office Rejects Rationing Medical Care Based on Disability, Age

"Today the office for civil rights at the department of health and Human Services issued guidance and those rules emphasize they say civil rights because they still pie in a pandemic and we have some tape this is Roger Severino who heads the HHS office for civil rights particularly we're concerned that crisis standards of care may start relying on value judgments as to the relative warmth of one human being versus another based on the presence or absence of disability we're concerned that stereotypes about what life is like living with a disability can be improperly used to exclude people from needed care Joe where is there any specific situations in specific states for example that he talked about what he did say his office is open or it's about to open investigations of complaints in multiple states he didn't say which states but in the last several days disability groups in four states Tennessee Kansas Washington and Alabama have filed complaints in Kansas and Tennessee groups say state guidelines would allow doctors to deny care to some people with traumatic brain injuries or want to use home ventilators to help them breathe and a group of new Yorkers have all who already use ventilators they wrote a letter expressing their fears the governor Andrew Cuomo these are people they work and they're active but they need Homer portable ventilators to help them breathe and they're worried about existing state guidelines that apply if they go to the hospital and they think would allow hospital to take their personal ventilators and give them to

Roger Severino JOE Kansas Tennessee Andrew Cuomo Department Of Health And Human Washington Alabama
Josh Speidel, Vermont player who suffered brain injury in car accident as recruit, scores on Senior Night

Golic & Wingo

01:53 min | 2 years ago

Josh Speidel, Vermont player who suffered brain injury in car accident as recruit, scores on Senior Night

"Five years ago Josh bell was one of the highest recruits ever to land at the university of Vermont he was a highly recruited basketball player and then he suffered a traumatic brain injury in a car accident when he was a senior in high school shortly after all right the three star recruit committed to playing in Vermont well the prognosis was not great in any way shape or form in fact his parents told him by his parents were told by the medical staff that he should be prepared to they should prefer him to live in a permanent vegetative state right and he has made a remarkable recovery credible and through those to Vermont because they they maintained a scholarship and honored his scholarship and last night senior night he made his first D. one start and registered the first points of his collegiate career in a match up against all the I mean incredible obviously it was it was you know they talk with Albany about at Albany you know the tip off they scored and then the Vermont comes out with the ball and they get it to to Josh by dell and any makes a laugh and you know then give talks from everybody his teammates his team the opposing team everybody for just an incredible story of just that tragic moment and I just think of it as as a parent seeing your kid and being told he may be in a vegetative state for the rest of his life and just when you when you see the highlight and see him out there you know doing what he's doing it's just it's just unbelievable it is and that was what's trending brought to you by PSG nobody makes golf clubs the way we do period so Josh white all got on the court made the first basket and then it was was asked about it after the game and actually had a tremendous line about what's what thought process went through his mind I was thinking about maybe like Mr Napier Avenue again no offense a rebound in there well you know I'd be on my go go one for one hundred percent my college career so you know it's you know it's a dream come true

Josh Bell Vermont Albany Josh Dell University Of Vermont Golf Josh White
More troops diagnosed with traumatic brain injuries after missile attack

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:17 sec | 2 years ago

More troops diagnosed with traumatic brain injuries after missile attack

"More than a hundred US troops are suffering from traumatic brain injuries after an Iranian missile strike last month the Pentagon says a hundred and nine service members have been diagnosed with at least a mild brain injuries Iran lunch the missile attack in retaliation for U. S. drone strike that killed a top

United States Pentagon Iran
More Than 100 Troops Have Brain Injuries From Iran Missile Strike, Pentagon Says

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:20 sec | 2 years ago

More Than 100 Troops Have Brain Injuries From Iran Missile Strike, Pentagon Says

"To them the Pentagon now confirms more than one hundred US troops are now suffering from traumatic brain injuries after an Iranian missile strike last month the Pentagon puts the current number at one hundred nine service members diagnosed with at least mild brain injuries Iran launch that missile attack in retaliation for U. S. drone strike that killed a top

Pentagon United States Iran