35 Burst results for "Traumas"

Prince William worried about strain on UK emergency workers

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:23 sec | 4 d ago

Prince William worried about strain on UK emergency workers

"Says he's worried about the mental health of ambulance drivers, police officers and other first responders who have been exposed to extraordinary levels of trauma and death as covert cases continue to soar. Princes, former search and rescue helicopter pilot and he told emergency workers on a video call. They should not be afraid to ask for help, despite their inclination to help others first.

Jacob Reimann On  Healing Our Children And Loved Ones in Order to Heal Ourselves

The Healing Place Podcast

05:56 min | 5 d ago

Jacob Reimann On Healing Our Children And Loved Ones in Order to Heal Ourselves

"Welcome everybody to the healing place. Podcast i'm your host terry walbrook and excited to have with me. Today jacob ryan and he is the founder of inner freedom healing so jacob. Thank you very much having me. Yes absolutely in excited to dive into of conversations about healing. And i want to talk a little bit about how healing our children and loved. Ones can help us heal. But i just introduce yourself to people and tell them what it is you do interface. Hi i'm jacob. Raymond and i run a company golden freedom healing and basically. It's not things. So i i work with small kind of high high need groups up to six people And we work online. And i kind of these mind tradition and experienced to guide them through going from suffering of some kind whether it be trauma all physical ailments or depression anxiety to joy. And i do that by Ready just guiding them to so they can understand which parts of themselves which which parts of them are still stuck in grief or anger rage will will of some kind anticipate guide them to guide them to those hawks themselves in a safe way and we basically spend time just just accepting accepting those parts of ourselves and that starts very simply. That's that's how i understand. Heating works yeah same. Love love your message right there though of helping people to get through the trauma but to get to that place of joy because they think so many people who've been through trauma or in pain and suffering feel like they can't ever get to that place of joy like it's it's an unreachable goal for them in it really truly as possible. I i'm i. I was convinced. It wasn't possible until recently and i was i just kind of what i find really fascinating comeback to second thing of what we do but why family fascinating in my healing journey was how how i was so used to being to and being terrified unjust. Just say when i was slightly. This panicking terrified. I thought that was actually quite good. Oh but then. I can look you looking back on it. Whatever experience on how did not have the obviously a life of kinds of things. I suddenly realized underneath the surface happiness enjoy and relationships and everything else i realized how how much panicking terra i was just just bright unjust destroyed underneath that kind of surface level of happiness and when she stopped to actually hail that that that globe of of terror at Start just getting more and more glimpses of just peace and silence in initially. I thought hang on. What's that strange. What's going on but be stay as you as you do. The work then yeah. It can actually dissolved fully and he can get to a point of just peace and joy and it's quite quite amazing feeling. I'm just getting used to it. I have to say but yes it is. It is a beautiful wonderful place to be. Yes yeah yeah so so. That's that's the work. I do with private clients and then i kind of about a year ago i thought to myself well i could just have a quite comfortable existence just working on a one to one in small groups you not to six people and we basically shed shed healing space shared the journey. And it's an healings. I've found is a lot more effective doing it in a group and you'll focusing on a similar aspect of ourselves that we haven't accepted yet Through a hot three three concussion. And then i thought well hang on there. Were you know millions of people out there. That may be a fold private work or don't have the time or so. What what how. How can i teach the process. How can i actually get it out there. That people can for themselves and it's and it's based on a bit breath work intention acceptance ray simple and i'm sure he's got a lot of experience with with this kind of approach to healing. So i'm craig today. A kind of mini hailing course which. I'm just about twenty twenty thirty people testing out. Now giving me feedback going to be reshooting christmas and then launching it very low Investments that people can actually learn the process themselves. Stay safe which is really important as their as they kind of in accepting during through the of them they'd rather not not go through so you can't escape yourself but other people have a real fair of of facing those parts themselves which should broken yes. Sure so it's those two things and then there's a big serve community that i'm planning people can share share the burden with each other in a safe supported. Way

Terry Walbrook Jacob Ryan Depression Anxiety Jacob Raymond Craig
Uber appeals $59m California fine over sexual assault data

BTV Simulcast

05:56 min | 6 d ago

Uber appeals $59m California fine over sexual assault data

"Has appealed a hefty fine by a California regulator. The California Public Utilities Commission is finding the company $59 million, pushing uber to hand over personal identifying information related to sexual assault and harassment claims by drivers and riders Joining me now for more Uber's top legal officer Tony West, Tony, thank you so much. For joining us. So the state is making the case that having this information will help them bring more perpetrators to justice and prevent Mork things like this from happening. What is your response to that? Look, I think the guiding principle that we have in this appeal. This was really simple, Emily. It's we want to protect the privacy of sexual assault survivors, and we want to protect their right to consent when whether and with whom sensitive data about them this year. When you speak with anti sexual violence advocates, they will tell you that best practice is not to make that decision for sexual assault survivors. Even when it comes to the law enforcement. The best practice is to allow Survivors to make that choice themselves. I would know, though, that we're not exactly sure why the CPUC is seeking this information. They've never asked for this kind of information before personally idea to find information about sexual assault survivors, and I think it's the extraordinary nature of this request is why it Z. Not just uber having you know a back and forth with its regulator. It's why So many other groups and sexual violence groups like a rain like time's up like reliance like no more. They've always had opposing this border because of the damage that it can cause to survivors, and it's why we're appealing it. Now the state is arguing that if Uber doesn't do this, it poses a risk to its drivers and riders. And you know, it's hard to quite understand because doesn't both uber and the state not want these kinds of incidents to happen aren't the goals the same? Goals are absolutely the same. And I just wanna make sure we're talking about Cindy. This is actually not the state meaning like the state of California. This is a recommendation of one judge in administrative law Judge That's associated with the California Public Utilities Commission, which is the regulator for all rights here in California s O. This is not like the district attorney. This is not like the attorney general's office offices that are actually charged with investigating. Sexual assault and sexual violence. This is a public utilities regulator that is taking data and to be quicker. We give Rene's and readings of anonymous data to the C P U. C. Every single year is part of our regulatory obligation. We don't have any argument with that. And in fact, even in this case theater Ministry of Lot of Judge said, Listen uber, we want you to give give us categories A, B, C and D of information. We said Fine, We'll give you a B and C See, But D is something you have never asked for before. It is personally identifying information of sexual assault survivors so work with us so that we can give you the information seek, but in a matter in a way that protects their privacy rights, we we've tried for the better part of a year to sit down with the CPUC. We've been asking them if they would be willing to sit down with groups like Ray groups like Time's up other advocacy and expert. Groups in how to deal with survivors and reformed in trauma trauma, informed investigation. We've asked that they sit down with these groups and listen just as we did before we reproduced our safety report so that we can come to an agreement as to how we produce this information in a way that protects survivors, and that's that's really the end game here. Well, and I know part of the concern is that victims won't report some of these incidents if they believe that their information is not protected. What do you think the timeline is here? When do you expect? This to reach some sort of resolution. Well, we'd like to reach it sooner rather than later because, as you rightly point out, we actually have the same goal, which is we gotta make right here as safe as possible. And so it's again. This is not an argument about whether or not we get the information we respect. The CPU sees role is a regulator. We respect their right to request information. We simply want to do it in a way that protects the privacy of survivors. And so that is a conversation that we would very, very much welcome. And we'd like to have it as soon as possible. Hopefully by filing this appeal that will give us an avenue to begin to have a dialogue with sexual and sexual violence, experts and advocates and with Over to try to get T resolution on this, but you know, there's one of the thing I want to mention, is that the finest astronomical I mean, it's huge, and nobody likes to pay a fine. No one wants to be fine. But the issue in this case that really concerns us is the message that it sends because you know this all comes out of the voluntary safety report that Goober published in December of last year, and that was lauded at the time as a real step forward for corporate transparency. It was volunteering. There was no lawsuit. No law requiring us to do that. We did it because we thought it was the right thing to do. Now, if you're a company exactly with that same hard decision on Dure trying to decide whether or not to be transparent and you see that the reward for being transparent is a $59 million.5. We think it sends a very chilling message.

Cpuc Tony West California Mork Trauma Trauma Emily Tony Cindy Rene RAY Goober
Montana tribes begin next phase of COVID-19 vaccinations

Native America Calling

03:53 min | Last week

Montana tribes begin next phase of COVID-19 vaccinations

"This is national native news. Tony gonzalez oklahoma congressman tom. Cole opposes impeaching president trump as members of the house moved to impeach trump accusing him of inciting violence against the government after last week's deadly riot at the us capitol and a house rules committee meeting tuesday. Kohl condemned the violence and called for justice for those who took part in violent acts. Cole says the president bears some responsibility for what occurred but says he will not support. Impeachment differ with my college in the majority. I do not believe there. Proposed course of action. Impeachment is the appropriate solution. I can think of no action. the can take is more likely to further. Divide the american people and by putting the country through the trauma of another impeachment. As i speak today. We're just eight days from the end of president trump's term of office next week president-elect biden will take the oath of office as the president of the united states at a time like this we should be seeking a path forward Healing a path toward healing the american people but instead majorities rushing to judgment without due process. The house wednesday began debate on an impeachment resolution against the president tribes in montana have vaccinated healthcare workers for covid nineteen and are moving forward on plans for community members. Yellowstone public radio's caitlyn nicholas reports last week the rocky boy health center which serves the chippewa cree in northern montana initiated phase two of the rocky boy covid nineteen vaccination plan misty denny the health centers public information officer says the scheduling team began calling elders age. Sixty five and older on december thirty first to schedule appointments or trying to discourage any kind of elderly patients from this show enough so they've been working diligently to contact the eligible recipients directly by phone danny says the clinic vaccinated healthcare workers from its initial shipment of two hundred doses of moderna vaccine and is using the remainder of its second shipment of two hundred doses for elders prioritizing those over seventy five with medical conditions most montana counties are still in there i roll out of the vaccine to healthcare workers who have direct contact exposure with the virus however other tribes in montana including the crow northern cheyenne black feet fort belknap indian community and the confederated salish and kootenai tribes started vaccinating elderly tribal members. This week. After completing the first phase of vaccinations all tribal members are prioritized to receive the vaccine under montana's vaccination plan native americans and montana have experienced disproportionately high rates of infection and mortality from the corona virus for national native news. I'm caitlyn nicholas. The navajo nation has connected more than seven hundred homes to the electrical grid using covid nineteen relief funds as arizona. Public radio's ryan hinds reports the navajo tribal utility. Authority is using nearly forty million dollars from last year's cares act to improve power lines grid capacity the tribe intended to bring power to about five hundred homes before the end of last year but was able to exceed. The goal is crews worked long hours over several months. It's a continuation of the light up navajo project that began in two thousand nineteen about a quarter of the fifty five thousand households on the navajo nation. Aren't connected to the electrical grid. It prevents access to running water reliable lighting heating and cooling as well as modern refrigeration and internet access the navajo tribal utility authority is also installing. Solar power systems in two hundred homes and several families have received bathroom additions in water. Cisterns using cares act funding. It's all part of a broad plan approved by the tribe in august for electrical water infrastructure and broadband projects in all the federal covid relief package allocated more than seven hundred million dollars to the navajo nation for national native news. I'm ryan hunches in flagstaff and demand. Tony gonzales

Montana Caitlyn Nicholas Congressman Tom President Trump Elect Biden Cole Yellowstone Public Radio Rocky Boy Health Center Misty Denny Tony Gonzalez Kohl Donald Trump Cheyenne Black Feet Fort Belkn House Oklahoma United States Ryan Hinds Kootenai Government
How to Help Your Child Engage More  Successfully with Peers

Janet Lansbury Podcast

04:30 min | Last week

How to Help Your Child Engage More Successfully with Peers

"Enough encouragement to really help him with his process around having a sibling so as you said he changed and that is pretty par for the course because it is usually the first maybe the biggest trauma that young children have where their life has totally changed. It's very scary for them. In terms of wars my place in the family now so it's not as simple as him just saying look at me. I want attention. It's really being quite regulated a lot of the time and when you see that hyperactivity that kind of manic behavior he's in dysregulation state in those times so when you've gotten impatient with him around that you're human so please the compassionate towards yourself. This is a hard transition for parents as well but it is very very difficult for children. So what happens is then he absorbs. Those feelings from you so does is it. Just it gives him more feelings that he has to process out. That will come out through this manic behavior through not listening doing things that he knows aren't going to help them in that moment like the way he's behaving with peers. It's really a situation where he can't help himself. He's just going to this irrational place and you know what you describe with his peers. It's irrational in his thinking brain. He knows better and he doesn't wanna be that kid doing those things you know that gets rejected. But he's going there because these feelings keep coming up for him so the best thing that we can do generally and this is true for almost every issue that parents bring to be an. It's why as such a theme boadcast and in my writings he needs to process the feelings. That are behind this behavior. That is the ultimate goal. That will help him feel better and therefore behave more pro socially with his peers and with you and but the sibling and everyone his sister is one and a half. You said this also tends to be a difficult time in that. The younger child seems more of a person to the older child. Therefore more of a threat more of a rival before that they can kind of say. Oh well this is a baby or this crawling thing and she's cute and my life is still changing. This really really scary. But now this is a real other person you know. Of course we see that. Ideally right away that this is the person but your child will start to feel it more when the younger one is walking. Maybe starting to talk more. So that's you know another big scary thing that he needs to process out. Whenever children have behavior that's disruptive or challenging like this or difficult for us as parents it is emotionally driven almost always so we want to help him to process these feelings and then we have to know that when we do lose our temper which is going to happen we try to make that as rare as possible by perceiving this correctly which is that. He's not just being naughty kid right here. He really is out of control even in these little moments with his sister where he's not being nice to her maybe lashing out at her lashing out at you. If we know that then it helps us to feel less threatened about it loops he goes. I gotta help this guy. He's got some feelings going on pop it out today if we have that attitude going to help us to feel better about it but if we're thinking like oh. My kid is just so unpredictable and behaving like awful and doesn't know how to make friends and were heartbroken than that's going to make it harder for us so it starts those feel uncomfortable which we get from the perspective of. What's really going on here. Every time that we allow him to process some of the feeling safely. We're not getting mad at him for it. Were keeping him safe where you know. Maybe taking him out of situations but i would do that. Rarely we're going to get to that. Then it helps move forward. It helps the feelings to get processed out. Anyway that is. What is the

Actor Reign Edwards And "Icy" Wright On Clubhouse's The Lion King Musical

Black Girl Nerds

07:11 min | Last week

Actor Reign Edwards And "Icy" Wright On Clubhouse's The Lion King Musical

"Thank you. We are hear the day is finally here. After months and months of hard work the world finally gets to see. How do you feel today. it's it's surreal in a way and i think Because of like the circumstances part of it feels real with like part of it. Doesn't you know we're all at home but Just seeing the level on social media is really really cool. So is exciting. That's awesome i. When i reflect back i've watched a whole series before from from beginning to the end and i thought about rachel lied and what there's a lot to unpack with her from being super competitive but insecure but stubborn and and just a little argumentative and very very complex character. What are you most proud of with what you've done with rachel and bring her to life. I think i'm most proud of showing her heart. I think in my episode. You actually get to open her up and see her beyond this tough exterior that she has and see everything that she struggles with A lot of times when you meet someone on the surface there's you know. What would you meet on the surface and you don't really know what deeper than that at their core. They're actually just. Somebody needs help for someone that is earning for love you know. There's i love the complexity that got to play with rachel and that i hope it came across early will. It really really really did in just the way. She interacts not only with her sister character. But her fellow sisters on the island in how they navigate. This sorta new rebirth trauma. All these things a encapsulated into to one experience and to see how she grows throughout the season has been really really mesmerizing about her. This series has the potential to be another one of those groundbreaking series with strong women. Strong women behind the camera with With knowing that the audience is going to be familiar with that as a tune into the series. Do you feel like almost a torch carrier or progressing hollywood into the next level. What are your thoughts on. Being a part of such a strong woman cast in and crew and overall creative process. I'm honored i. It's it's it's such a surreal experience to be a part of something like that I think for me. I always talk about women standing in their power. Whether you know it's on said or like just in my day to day life. I think it's so important than i. Love that i get to play a character that shows that shows that and through these characters you see the broken nece but then them standing in power and think. That's so cool. So i i'm just very honored and i don't think anybody takes it lightly that works on the series win before i was coming to talk to you this morning. I did a little dialogue on your social and video that you post it when you got to see the yourself on the side of the building. I mean that's no small feat when you see yourself at the side of a building. What's the first thing you look at. Do you think i have. My nose looks huge. What's the first thing you look at. Honestly i just. I took it all in and i was in awe. Just had thank god. It's it's been a long time coming up. And doing this as kid. So make jesus and also i mean. I'll just like what we look. You got what you literally rely. Giants and I think that's so cool though because like in. La you always go through you know sunset and these different streets See my face along with all these other amazing women up there. It's just something to be an all of. I was really just in all of seeing that. I didn't really necessarily focus on my nose. I was just happy to see us all up there. It's remembering what that photo she was like like is just really cool to see. I mean you are giants in a sense. Even your characters really represent a lot of us you know. I see a lot of myself in rachel and be an athlete when i was a kid and and the struggles that come with that and all of the other characters for what they represent in terms of personalities in things when you look at now giant rachel on the side of this building. What does giant. Rachel tell our giant rain till little little rain who was just starting out and get him in terms of of staying the course or anything gotta get you there and you don't have to be perfect. I think that. I still to this day and working things and i think that's maybe why i was able to give that to rachel in learning. Actually from was just talking to my friend this morning. About how playing. Rachel helped me realize some of the things that i thought i got over that i was still like. Oh you haven't gotten over on this level yet. Or in this way yet. And i i would just tell myself it's all going to be okay and you can just breathe like just take a breath keep going. It's okay to be determined. You are very determined person. And that's great but there's a difference between determination and perfectionism. So i would definitely tell my younger self that when you work with the john sombo cast like this. How has this made you grow as an actress as a performer. Because there's a lot of moving parts that go into a show like this. Not just the the dialogue but the physical rigors that isolation from filming somewhere else has made you all. I always up on set. I look at the other actors around me. I think that When you're in a position to work you know as often as i have which. I'm really great for four. That's the way that you continue to learn. You know you don't mess if you're in new zealand. I can't go me maggie coach time. They're all this stuff so I i do my best to learn from the people around me and to have such powerhouse actresses around the does cause you to grow does cause you to evolve. You always different things how people portray their characters. I know that even just from having a twin sister. So i got to work really closely with helena in helena mazing actress the way that she has for nuances in Thoughts like it. It's just it was really cool to be surrounded by different people. I can learn from pick up on different things and how they carry themselves in in their scenes so it definitely caused you to grow especially with the cast big. We have a mike seven different acting teachers

Rachel Giants Hollywood John Sombo LA Helena Mazing Maggie New Zealand Helena Mike
Photographer Richard Mosse on blurring the lines between art

Monocle 24: The Globalist

07:23 min | Last week

Photographer Richard Mosse on blurring the lines between art

"Now richard. Moss's photographic practice has resulted in some of the most arresting images of recent years as a conceptual documentary photographer. He draws on a range of esoteric photographic media to catch a so much more than meets the eye. Monaco's much. Larry spoke to richard to find out more about his unique and emotive work to those nine. I went to iraq. And i made a series of images essentially architectural project photographic project documenting the us forces who were based in the saddam hussein's palace architecture and saddam. Hussein had about eighty four palaces. All around iraq may which he never even visited when the us military arrived. They were so strategically well located for obvious. Reasons and very defensively built. They made pretty straight forward operating bases so they were occupied by the us military which i found fascinating just the layers of power and expression of that architecturally from the sort of provisional corporate office partitions and cubicles that the. Us army would hastily set up within the very pompous and often poorly built authoritarian architecture of saddam hussein which had a very specific style with some very strange eccentric ornamental features. Such as giant teapots and. Yeah it was very incongruous staff. And i brought eight by ten inch camera there and it'd be like that project and after that i realized frustrated with the medium documentaries over here. It's really so conservative as a language so reductive often. You're just an illustrator for writers texts if you're doing it at oriel which primarily. We're documenta over. Do i wanted to break it apart. Actually i wanted to somehow really smashes just for myself. It was a very personal desire to essentially as an expression of the frustration of with my own practice. I was at that time. Kodak was on its path to bankruptcy was announced had announced the discontinuation of this infrared film. Kodak erico two thousand ten. I think says nine around the time and so i thought well this is a wonderful way to unpack a documentary subject. I don't know what may be quite yet. But i gathered as much as i could off ebay and wherever it was being made extinct and i sort of worked backwards from the medium which i always tend to do actually to find to find effective subject or subjects that could be more adequately conveyed to be elevated through the medium through this particular medium and reading was a starting point for me over. The last ten years i've been working with spurred you call them infra-red film technology's very interested in the unseen registry invisible light forms as the way often metaphorically telling very complex documentary narratives more powerful way and to refresh very saturated subject matter for example the refugee crisis unfolding across europe the middle east north africa. Everybody photographer was out there taking pictures. And they all tend to look rather similar. And i really was. After a certain point the imagery just became inherently less compelling and less powerful as language. So i wanted to refresh my own way and i found this bizarre military grade thermographic camera that can image human body heat from thirty kilometres distance. Day or nice. It's classes weapon designed for battlefield situational awareness long-range insurgents detection tracking and targeting. So it was actually part of a weapon. System very sort of activated medium to think through the representation of the refugee crisis and also almost an aggravated one. Really confront the viewer. On some level with their own complicity. I believe and that was my intention to really make people feel that. And i think as an orange has that's one of the only things you can do is to make people feel something so i was working through metaphor aesthetics in this work but with that work with my project incoming its title and it was using this weapons technologies long range border enforcement technology. Thermographic heat-detection camera. I realized i was also operating in certain moments on another level beyond the metaphorical and beyond the aesthetic. And that was the the forensic after understand. The camera sees index heat register. You can calibrate for about forty degrees and anything. That's relatively cooler or relatively warmer within. That given frame is depicted in black or white depending on how you set the the recording set the image. And so something that's black. Could be everything that's warms. The human body would be depicted in black and everything cold surrounding him. Buddy will be waste for example or if you sell it. The other way white hart. It's the opposite. And i was filming this tragic event i've ever witnessed probably ever will. Hopefully it was one of the biggest human trafficking disasters on the gnc and human memory of three hundred people or more were on a on a fishing trawler was had paid to be on that boat from turkey to lead boss and human traffickers just packed that boat too many people who zone designed for perhaps twenty or thirty people so the top deck of the boat collapsed and doing panic entire hull ripped apart and we were able to capture all this from about seven kilometers away with camera designed exactly for this kind of thing and then when the bodies were brought to shore to the harbour of malvo's something store happy it was after dark at this point literally out on the cold stone pier they were lined up on thermal. Br red cross workers volunteers local doctors. Anyone who could could help out. Were were frantically trying to revive these hypothermic victim. Some whom passed out or semi drowned or some had had remain conscious. But we're literally freezing to death. And so they were literally what they were doing. Rubbing life-giving warmth from their hands into the flesh coddled flesh of the these hypothermic victims in front of us on the pier. Desperately trying to sort of transmit life-giving heat back back into them. Now a normal camera of course after dark wouldn't wouldn't be abc's very much let alone. Would it be able to see the trace of that of that transmission of warmth which the thermal camera was able to do incredibly effective articulation of exactly the crux of of the emergency unfolding around us. It was a of very powerful test. Testimonial footage of the the effort survive these people on the scale of a trauma around us. That was richard moss and do head over to our website to the full version of that interview.

Saddam Hussein Richard Kodak Iraq Middle East North Africa United States Oriel Monaco Moss Us Army Hussein Saddam Larry Ebay Malvo Europe
3 ways companies can support grieving employees

TED Talks Daily

05:03 min | 2 weeks ago

3 ways companies can support grieving employees

"About three years ago. I lost my daughter. She was sexually assaulted and murdered. She was my only child and was just nineteen as the shock wore off and the all consuming greed to core. I lost all meaning and purpose alive and my daughter spoke to me. She asked me to keep living. If i am not avow she will have. One less heart continued to with dad. My partner susan. And i started our desperate climb out of this deep hole of pro my loss in the back to the land of the living with grief we unexpectedly found a rather unlikely and bitty helpful ally my work at first. I wasn't doing trudy pressure. Go back to work. I i had a lot of self doubt as a senior executive responsible for thousands of employees and billions of dollars after all the trauma is my mind still sharp and creative enough for the job. Can i still relate to people. Can i get past their resentment and regret. i felt about all the time spent working instead of Being with my daughter. Is it fair to leave. Susan home alone dealing with han grief and pain at the end. I made the decision to go back to work. And i am very glad i did. We all experience grief and loss in our lives for most of us that means at some point getting up and going back to work while living with the grief on those days we will continue to carry the incredible burden of sadness but also i hope that work itself and restore us that much needed feeling of purpose for me. Work started out as a just a product distraction but evolved to being truly therapeutic and meaningful in so many ways and might return to work proved to be a good thing for the company as well. I know i'm not indispensable but retaining my expertise proved to be video beneficial and my return helped all the teams. Avoid disruptions and and distractions. When you lose the most precious thing in your life. You gain a lot of humility and have very different perspective. Free of egos and agendas and i think i may better corker and later because of that for all the good that came from you though might re entry into work from his who steady hard. The biggest challenge was having to separate my personal and professional apps completely. You know okay to cry at an early in the morning but slap a smile on the face promptly at eight o'clock and active as it is a santa's before until the workdays over leaving in two completely different worlds at the same time and all the hiding and and pretending that went with it it was. It was exhausting. It and made me feel very alone overtime. I worked through those struggles. And i gained the conference and the acceptance to bring my whole work and as a direct result of that i found joya gaining it shooting that hard journey back to work. I learn the power of having a culture of empathy in the workplace not sympathy not compassion but empathy. I came to believe that a workplace where empathy is a core part of the culture that is a joyful and productive workplace and that workplace inspires a great deal of loyalty. I believe that are three things. A company can do to create a nurture a culture and with the in the workplace in general and support a grieving employee like myself in particular one is to have policies that led unemployed deal with their loss in ps without worrying about administrative logistics. Second per wide. Return to work therapy to the employee as an integral part of the health benefits package and third provide training for all employees on how to support each other

Trudy Susan Corker Joya
3 ways companies can support grieving employees

TED Talks Daily

04:56 min | 2 weeks ago

3 ways companies can support grieving employees

"About three years ago. I lost my daughter. She was sexually assaulted and murdered. She was my only child and was just nineteen as the shock wore off and the all consuming greed to core. I lost all meaning and purpose alive and my daughter spoke to me. She asked me to keep living. If i am not avow she will have. One less heart continued to with dad. My partner susan. And i started our desperate climb out of this deep hole of pro my loss in the back to the land of the living with grief we unexpectedly found a rather unlikely and bitty helpful ally my work at first. I wasn't doing trudy pressure. Go back to work. I i had a lot of self doubt as a senior executive responsible for thousands of employees and billions of dollars after all the trauma is my mind still sharp and creative enough for the job. Can i still relate to people. Can i get past their resentment and regret. i felt about all the time spent working instead of Being with my daughter. Is it fair to leave. Susan home alone dealing with han grief and pain at the end. I made the decision to go back to work. And i am very glad i did. We all experience grief and loss in our lives for most of us that means at some point getting up and going back to work while living with the grief on those days we will continue to carry the incredible burden of sadness but also i hope that work itself and restore us that much needed feeling of purpose for me. Work started out as a just a product distraction but evolved to being truly therapeutic and meaningful in so many ways and might return to work proved to be a good thing for the company as well. I know i'm not indispensable but retaining my expertise proved to be video beneficial and my return helped all the teams. Avoid disruptions and and distractions. When you lose the most precious thing in your life. You gain a lot of humility and have very different perspective. Free of egos and agendas and i think i may better corker and later because of that for all the good that came from you though might re entry into work from his who steady hard. The biggest challenge was having to separate my personal and professional apps completely. You know okay to cry at an early in the morning but slap a smile on the face promptly at eight o'clock and active as it is a santa's before until the workdays over leaving in two completely different worlds at the same time and all the hiding and and pretending that went with it it was. It was exhausting. It and made me feel very alone overtime. I worked through those struggles. And i gained the conference and the acceptance to bring my whole work and as a direct result of that i found joya gaining it shooting that hard journey back to work. I learn the power of having a culture of empathy in the workplace not sympathy not compassion but empathy. I came to believe that a workplace where empathy is a core part of the culture that is a joyful and productive workplace and that workplace inspires a great deal of loyalty. I believe that are three things. A company can do to create a nurture a culture and with the in the workplace in general and support a grieving employee like myself in particular one is to have policies that led unemployed deal with their loss in ps without worrying about administrative logistics. Second per wide. Return to work therapy to the employee as an integral part of the health benefits package

Trudy Susan Corker Joya
Habilitat Creating Community with Jeff Nash

The Addicted Mind Podcast

06:57 min | 2 weeks ago

Habilitat Creating Community with Jeff Nash

"Hello everyone welcome to the addicted. Mind podcast today. My guest is jeff. Nash and he is going to talk about habilitated and their model for sustained recovery. Jeff thank you so much for coming. Onto the addicted mind podcast. I am really interested to hear your story but also to hear your model of addiction treatment. Thank you thanks for means a pleasure to be here this morning. All right so tell us a little bit. Where does it all start for you. Oh wow that's a long story like a lot of people. I ended up getting involved with drugs alcohol at a very young age twelve years low and it got really bad really fast. By the time. I was sixteen years old. I was shooting heroin and other substances saw and renew sleep and of course that brought a lot of legal problems and now jail lots of treatment and i was raised in texas dallas texas and i went through fourteen different treatment programs throughout my life and continued really struggle in and out of jail in and out of programs so the age of thirty actually twenty nine years old is when i finally got it together and for me rui. I realized later that i needed. I needed more than just. The normal substance use treatment. I needed a life. Overall are some point hind landed in. Hawaii ended up in trouble ear in jail and eventually ended up in the village. And i kind of took to habilitates philosophy like a duck. They helped me find a passion. Nail figure out who i was and on the final i had a knack for helping other people. They put me through a lot of training. They sent me to school to learn about a substance use treatment and administration and things like that and eventually i became the program. Director for tat. And i did that job for about sixteen years. I was very blessed. I was trained but actually the last person that was trained by the people who founded the program unfortunately our founder any marino us. Since passed away. But i was very blessed to be trained by heaven his wife and then i did the program director of the program for about sixty years and the ultimate two thousand fifteen. I became the executive director. So i've been with a village out now for about twenty four years. I think and different abilities very much. Enjoy what we do and this is so you know. I found my niche. I guess and got a nice life. Now been clean and sober for about twenty four years. That's awesome that's career. Comedy story pretty similar to people's stories right. Tell me a little bit about the fourteen times of trying treatment so here you were addicted pretty early. I guess you know. I think he said thirteen or fourteen years old drugs. By the time. I was sixteen hours using obviously right so using some really hardcore drugs at a very young age very young age of development and you into fourteen different treatment centers. I mean. that's really like someone who is trying to get help ya. Well i think to me jimmy rule honest. I think my family wanted me to get a lot more than i really. Did you know. I had a lot of people i mean i have some childhood traumas that were unresolved goes very angry. Disenfranchised with life you know the family was dysfunctional. Common themes wait was substance abuse on trying and trying really. It was when i got to be a little bit older and how to jail and withdraw in jail and watching life pass me by and to get a little bit more motivated like i need to give together. This is not fine. I was actually of a lengthy prison sentence that i was facing drums now for for drug for drug possession. That's what prompted me to trying. Really dig down deep and try and overcome all these issues until you know certainly wasn't fixed a thirty day curated took me a few years therapy Few years of mentorship but there was a it. Sounds like there was a change in you where you said. Okay i gotta dig deeper here. Something's gotta be different. I can't keep going like this really crazy to say i was on about ninety milligrams of methadone back in the nineties. And i i went to jail overstated. They didn't give me the doses. Methadone so i ended up withdrawing older. Eat from both methadone in heroin on the floor. Wow jail and it was a newsroom experience. I mean it a really miserable experience you know. It was in that fog than i decided. you know. this isn't fun anymore. And you know i mean most of the reason that i was using drugs to escape age of of that i created for myself really but it was a coping skill. Drug use was a coping skill. Not not a very resourceful coping skill but it was yulong and you know the payable. That really made me decide that. I needed to try something else. I was very blessed. Because i i was in jail here in hawaii. And there's a program here old milita which is known as the long hard core long-term aren't or program and the you know. The word on the street was that if you really wanna get your act together. That's the place that you go. And i didn't have anything to lose. That's for sure. So i reached out to them in jail and call them. They came to visit me in jail in a few weeks later. They got me into the program so they are able to to take you in and you really wanted to to get some treatment. It sounds like you were kind of ready at that point. Yeah find the right place in the right place mentally and emotionally that i knew something had to change about jails institutions and death while i was facing all that and it became very apparent to me that the gig was up and it was time to make a change are the only alternative was either gonna die or overdose. Several times nearly died but is facing lindsay incarceration because of by drug use.

Texas Nash Jeff Dallas Hawaii Yulong Jimmy Lindsay
LEVEL UP: Your Relationships Could Use a Refresh

Latina to Latina

04:33 min | 2 weeks ago

LEVEL UP: Your Relationships Could Use a Refresh

"Are there prompts that you use with your clients to really tease out. What their expectations are. I think a lot of our expectations are rooted an experiences that we've had in life specifically childhood experiences so i like to take my clients back to like the story behind that expectation. Let's say you expect your partner to do x y in c. Was that something that you saw modeled home. Was that the way that your parents interactive was that dynamic that was set at home it be half worked very well for your parents. It may have been totally functional for your parents but it might not be functional in your relationship because of a million reasons. First of all your partner is not your parents so there you know just inherently somebody different but aside from that there's a lot of situations like living through pandemic right now so going back to that story. Where is this. Where was his expectation. Born and was it swung channel in that story. 'cause sometimes it's not even functional in that story but it's what we know so we bring with us sometimes. It was functional in that story. But it's just not functional today so being able to distinguish between the two and then again understanding that capacity that the other person may have to robots expectation and sometimes our expectations may be realistic at maybe functional in. We might be crystal clear about them. And we might be communicating in the most eloquent way possible and the other presenters simply does not have the capacity to fulfill that. Sometimes people do have that capacity. And it's just choose not to and so we have to. I think work accordingly. If i feel like i'm asking too much of someone but i generally know that that person can't really fulfil that then that's different. It might be a deal breaker. But in other circumstances it might be something that i can navigate something that i cannot stop in something that i can move past but if i know that the person has the ability to fulfill that just simply doesn't want you and that's where i need to begin mindful because that's where resentment can build. I know you could do this for me. I know that you can behave in way. You know. I know you know how important this is for me and yet you continuously shoes not you. What does this look like. When you're having these conversations in the context of a family member that is a little bit more complicated. I think as complicated as romantic relationships can be as powerful as those emotions can be at the other day you go your separate ways with family members. It's a lot more difficult because it involves other people you have an issue dot. It's gonna probably involve mom involve your siblings involve your grandparents involves more people so it's usually not private. You have input from other people. I think it's important that we again get clear about expectations and we also analyzed the history of the relationship that we have with this person typically with family members. We have a long history so we know how they react to certain we know what their values are We know maybe even certain circumstances that influenced traumas that influenced your reactions or their views on certain things taking all of that together being mindful that we might have to bring down our expectations. So ideally we think of mama. Someone that was always protective always nurturing. Loving should be the person that you to win your. You're heartbroken should be the person not you know makes a meal to make you feel better now. Not all moms are going to ever fit that criteria and mom might even be working on herself. She might be making some changes. She might be allies. If i wanna keep my relationship with my adult child. I am going to have to make some changes. She might be doing everything she can and she might still never be that nurturing. You know kind of prototype of a mom so i think again understanding. How much can someone given. How much can someone possibly change. Even when they want to change even wendy values our relationship that we have and want to keep the main still not able to fulfil our full expectation. It just means that have to have different boundaries with people. There's going to be certain things that i share with certain people that i'm not going to share with other people. Even if you're my parents even of your my significant other there might be some boundaries into how much time we spend together. When do i call you. Do we talk every day. We talk once a week. How often do we see each other. How involved are you into my life decisions. I'm gonna have to rethink some of those boundaries so that i can have some form of a relationship with this family member. That is so healthy that is still fulfilling but that it allows me to be myself.

Wendy
New York Police Investigating Bronx Hit-And-Run; Man Found Dead, Lying In Service Road

Balance of Nature

00:29 sec | 2 weeks ago

New York Police Investigating Bronx Hit-And-Run; Man Found Dead, Lying In Service Road

"Are investigating an apparent hit and run after finding a man dead on a service road in the Bronx. Pol de Castro has more cops discovered the victim's Saturday night just after 10 30 in the East, 140th Street and Bruckner Boulevard. The victim was found with head and body trauma. Lying unconscious on the westbound service road of the Bruckner Expressway. He was pronounced dead at the scene. Our preliminary investigation determine the man's injuries were consistent with having been struck by a vehicle which left the scene

Pol De Castro Bronx
New York PD Investigating Bronx Hit-And-Run; Man Found Dead, Lying In Service Road

Financial Quarterback Josh Jalinski

00:27 sec | 2 weeks ago

New York PD Investigating Bronx Hit-And-Run; Man Found Dead, Lying In Service Road

"Were investigating in the parent hit and run after finding a man dead on a service road in the Bronx. Cops discovered the unidentified victim late Saturday night near East 140th Street and Bruckner Boulevard. The victim had head and body trauma and was lying unconscious on the westbound service road of the Bruckner Expressway. He was pronounced dead at the scene. A preliminary investigation determine the man's injuries were consistent with having been struck by a vehicle, which left the scene here

Bronx
Louisville police move to fire 2 officers involved in Breonna Taylor raid

All Things Considered

02:35 min | 3 weeks ago

Louisville police move to fire 2 officers involved in Breonna Taylor raid

"Two more Louisville police officers will likely be fired in connection with the fatal shooting of Briana Taylor back in March. Both officers have administrative hearings with the police chief in the coming days. I'm gonna a lot he of member station W F. Pl in Louisville reports. The two officers each had key roles in the Briana Taylor shooting. Detective Joshua Jane's acquired the warrant that led officers to her door after midnight and Detective Miles. Cosgrove fired what the FBI described as the fatal shot. Both have been on paid leave for months. James is accused of falsifying parts of the affidavit for that warrant. While Cosgrove is reportedly accused of violating use of force policies. Thomas Clay, a lawyer for Jane's, says his client did nothing wrong. Even though James admitted part of his sworn affidavit was quote incorrect. Places his client provided sufficient evidence to support the warrant. I think the outcome has already been predetermined. I think effected change is going to be terminated. And we're prepared to do what needs to be done in order to appeal that decision. A lawyer for Cosgrove declined to comment. This all began when police entered Taylor's apartment by force is part of a botched a drug raid. Taylor's boyfriend, fearing they were intruders fired up. Police police fired back killing Taylor. Investigators never found anything illegal in the apartment. The potential terminations of Cosgrove in jeans come after months of protests and cries for justice. Shameka perish right has been a leader in Louisville's protest movement that they was fired early on. That would have saved the city a lot of time. Ah, lot of money that would have saved us a lot of trauma. Ah, lot of sacrifices that we made to be out there in the streets for now to hunt. In 17 days, she says. This is the right thing to do. But the fact that it took so long sends a message about accountability. Louisville's interim police chief you vet, Gentry made the call based on findings of an internal investigation into policy violations. They would be. The first officer is connected to this shooting fired since June and anonymous grand juror who heard the state's case said the move to fire James and Cosgrove makes him feel vindicated. He says these officers were wrong and should be taken off the force. They skipped over a lot of protocols. And we don't need that now. If other charges criminal charges come up, That would be great, but you can't walk him out until you have taken that first step. Like many others, the grand jury is keen to see what the ongoing federal investigation into the incident produces. The FBI's Louisville Field office has been looking into the shooting since May. What led up to it? What happened that night and what's happened since when complete, prosecutors with the U. S. Justice Department will decide how to move forward.

Briana Taylor Cosgrove Louisville Joshua Jane Thomas Clay Taylor James Shameka FBI Jane Gentry Louisville Field Office U. S. Justice Department
Washington, DC man arrested after girl suffers life threatening injuries; 2nd suspect sought

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:44 sec | 3 weeks ago

Washington, DC man arrested after girl suffers life threatening injuries; 2nd suspect sought

"After a disturbing case of abuse. One man is under arrest, and police are searching for a second suspect. Busy police are asking for the public's help tracking down 28 year old Maurice Man of Field of Northeast He's wanted for first degree cruelty to Children. The incident happened just two days before Christmas on Harvard Street Northwest. Police were called about a two year old girl's suffering from trauma. She was was eventually eventually found found at at a a home home on on 49th 49th Street Street in in northeast northeast with with life life threatening threatening injuries injuries that that police police say say were were intentional. intentional. She's She's now now in in stable stable condition. condition. 25 25 year year old old quantities. quantities. Man Man of of field field was was arrested arrested and charged, but anyone who knows the whereabouts of Mari should contact police. Both men are related to the toddler. A reward of up to $10,000 is being offered for information that leads to an arrest. Melissa. How

Maurice Trauma Mari Melissa
Washington DC man arrested after girl suffers life threatening injuries; 2nd suspect sought

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:44 sec | 3 weeks ago

Washington DC man arrested after girl suffers life threatening injuries; 2nd suspect sought

"Child is recovering after a disturbing case of abuse in the district. One man has been arrested and police are searching for a second suspect. 20 year old Maurice Minnifield of Northeast is the man D C. Police are searching for he's wanted for first degree cruelty to Children for an incident involving a two year old Little girl. 25 year old Chinese man of field is already in custody and is facing similar charges. D C. Police say the incident happened in northwest along Harvard Street on December 23rd. Police were called after the little girl was reportedly suffering from visible trauma. She was founded a home on 49th Street in northeast with life threatening injuries. The Tylers now in stable condition and is related to both men. A reward of up to $10,000 is being offered for information that leads to manage fields. Arrest

Maurice Minnifield C. Police Northeast
Syrian Boy Reunites With Family In London

All Things Considered

02:34 min | 3 weeks ago

Syrian Boy Reunites With Family In London

"End of this dark year, a scene of joy at international arrivals in London Heathrow Airport this week. 11 year old for West Mama mood was greeted by 14 of his family members. They are bombarding him with balloons, hugs and tears. Go on uncle lifts him on his shoulders there. This is the first time the boy had seen any family for more than a year. He spent that time in Greece in a detention center, a refugee camp and briefly with a foster family. The reunion was a mixture of emotions, says Hanani, a shag who helped make this moment happen. An emotional roller coaster of guilt and ecstatic happiness relief. She is the founder and director of a nonprofit called Goodwill Caravan. They had been working on for Wezel Mahmoud's case for about 14 months. He had been separated from his mom and dad on the border of Syria and Turkey because they were taking sniper fire. Was his parents told him to run in the other direction because it wasn't safe to run back to his parents. The 11 year old boy was left by himself to endure a grueling journey across borders. Eventually, he made it to Greece aboard a dinghy overflowing with refugees. Ashiq says, Um Mahmoud endured beatings at the camp. Sometimes he went without food. She says he hasn't slept a night since he arrived in the UK because of ongoing trauma and medical issues. His parents still have not been located. The relatives he's now with include aunts and uncles. Pandemic made arranging this re union especially difficult, she says he used to send lawyers just to go and visit and even to get the visitation rights for lawyers a long process. Mainly this time because of the pandemic, but also generally the asylum laws in Greece are forever changing, not causes. Even further delays are shack says a lot of migrant Children just disappear. The European Migration Network estimates that more than 30,000 have gone missing in some ways for Wezel. Mahmoud's case is the exception for now, Goodwill Caravan and his family are savoring this moment. Trying to help him lead a normal life. Now that he's safe, we've just finished buying foe as a football themed bedroom because he loves people and once toe to be a football player when he gets older, the road to recovery after four Wezel Mahmoud's tumultuous year may take some time. But for now, he is surrounded by aunts, uncles and cousins, who are relieved to welcome him home.

Hanani Wezel Mahmoud Goodwill Caravan Greece London Heathrow Airport Ashiq Um Mahmoud Syria European Migration Network Turkey Wezel UK Mahmoud Football
Talking About Jewish Wealth With Danielle Durchslag

Judaism Unbound

07:29 min | 3 weeks ago

Talking About Jewish Wealth With Danielle Durchslag

"Durch schlock welcome to judaism unbounded so great to have you thank you so much. I'm glad to be here. I remember. I think i was on a car ride with my family when your article came out about a year ago and somehow i remember sitting in the car and it popping up and saying oh this is going to be interesting and i read your article tablet and i was like. We're going to have to have you on the podcast because this is the conversation that that we want to have. And i mean there was a particular line where you say. The time demands that we as jews train our frank gays on our own discourse about ourselves and money and i was like yeah. Let's do that can create start by just asking a little bit about when you wrote that article. What what was it that you were trying to say. And what was it that you are trying to achieve. So i wrote the jewish one percent in part because the silence around jewish wealth is well earned an understandable but i think actually quite problematic obviously antisemitic conspiracy theories obsessively focus on kind of outlandish amounts of jewish affluence and influence. That's really the main trope of those hateful conspiracy theories and as a result you know our fear of even touching the subject is so seismic. Because we're really concerned that we will somehow validate those hateful fantasies that we just don't go there and to not go there on a subject as important has jews and money jews and capitalism And how those things intersect with. The state is really a loss especially for a community that is so dedicated to questioning too tough discourse and culturally and this is something i reference in the peace. Tim bluntness you know. One of the things. I love about us. Culturally is that we're willing to go there even when the subject is hard or tough or scary to give you a sense of how tender this area is just the title of the essay jewish one percent. Got me push back. I was told by some you know. Obviously there's a big generational gap here. This tends to be older audiences. Where i get this kind of feedback. That title itself is anti-semitic just acknowledging. The jewish wealth exists is problematic. I i have felt all of this for years. Why did i want to write this article now. In this era a cousin. Jews are disproportionately present in this administration in running the country. You know in the white house and the jews who are there tend to be from quote unquote very successful families. Right which is the language is in our community to mean rich there from wealthy jewish families most of them so i thought it was a really important moment to talk about. What has success wrought you know. Is this what success fundamentally should and does look like in our community for those who made it this time for me to have that conversation so i'm curious from your own experience before we get into what you have to say about it. I'm curious about when you try to provoke that conversation through this article. Was it provoked like. Did you feel that people started to have the conversation that you wanted them to have or do you feel like that conversation is still not being had. I think it's mostly not being. Had you know i did get surprisingly kind of enthused response from people. Sort of i'm. I'm turning forty this winter people sort of my age and younger. I got a lot of feedback. That was great. Want to have this conversation. It has felt off limits for so long. It shouldn't be. I got some pushback from older generations. But fundamentally i think the the bring up the essay is still are not really being dealt into in a public way. We are so trepidation about touching these topics which is partly why as visual artists. They're really where i make. My space might really write creatively. Go because there's so much to say. And it's so vitally important and it's really there's a couple things that arise from me in a title like the jewish one percent one is it only makes sense to people that title only works to people at and communicate something because we have a concept of the one percent generally in society. That's not jewish specific. And so i'm actually thinking a lot about the ways in which the generational divide you describe is sort of specific to judaism like we could talk about trauma and fear connected to the holocaust. There's all sorts of ways that like older generations of jews absolutely has some distinctive relationships to wealth that that are important to talk about. And i think that there's a broader conversation beyond just jus about how different generations do and don't talk about wealth like honestly. I think my parents and especially like my grandparents forgetting the jewish friends there non-jewish in general. It was kind of off the table to talk about wealth. I think what you hint at with people under forty or wherever. We're gonna draw the line. Like i think i don't know the millennial generation in quotes part of it. Whatever but like. I think we have recognized that the lack of talking about money isn't just some like benign choice. It has an impact when employers for example. Don't want people talking about the amount of money. They make that actually serves a purpose and leads to the employers being able to have a lot of control and and serve injustice in a variety of ways. And so i'd love to ask sort of about those two pieces like what about. This is a very specific set of jewish questions like the jewish relationship to wealth. And what about. This is actually a broader set of faux pas taboos that we have as a society about talking about money. It's a great couple of points i would say. All americans struggle with open discourse about class. Right it's not what we're famous for is talking successfully and in a nuanced fashion about money so clearly. Jewish americans were part of that culture. There's a lot of fear general around kind of going there. I wanted inactivity In a sort of arts group. That i was part of where we had to line up physically by class. So they said you know the poorest of the poor this side of the room the wealthiest of the wealthy opposite room. Everyone else figure it out and can you guess what everyone did probably went to the middle to start exactly right so i march off to wealth to people who were really strongly identified with and proud of having come from poverty. Go to the other side of the room and everyone else and this was probably a room full of like thirty forty people. They crowd in the middle and they are fighting it out over. How many. Tv's what kinds of tv's one car to kars any cars right. And so those of us on the extreme ends are watching. This really pained discourse as people try to place themselves and it takes a long time after we complete the exercise the people who lead it said to us in the uk. This takes ten minutes. Everyone knows where they are in the class. You talked about it. Their whole lives they line up and then we move on. That's a portrait. I think about a lot in terms of general. What your class discourse in this country

Frank TIM White House UK
"traumas" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

05:39 min | 2 months ago

"traumas" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"Mentor said to me james. What if when you kill yourself. The pain didn't go away and he said where's your what if when you killed yourself. The pain got worse. Because we've read about people who've died started to go to the other side and seeing lights and all these kinds of stuff and the guy jumped off the golden gate bridge survived and the first thing that he thought when he left off the bridge was oh my god. What am i doing was regret. So that's why i tell you. Just start saying my best days are ahead of me and people say. How are you doing. Not so great. But i'm getting you're leaving room for improvement right leaving room for opportunities so i don't believe in denial and not acknowledge where you're what's going on. You have to address that stuff but you have to believe it can get better and then there's some people that just want to sit in the mud and i'm like universal give you whatever story you tell it but you do have a choice one of the things that you say of course that the universe will give you whatever you tell it will give you in and i i certainly believe that in many ways but but in other cases like really extreme examples war poverty or course in the lives of children that rings less true. Is there an outer limits to if you say so where does it end or where does it begin. Interesting questions it. Let's talk about in your in the business of the mind. So let's talk about the power of the mind one of the examples. I will point to the placebo effect. Right what's the explanation. That is sugar pill give a human being the same benefit the same medical benefits that the actual medicine gives people. And i'm talking about significant numbers but there's people who actually benefit from just the thought that they think they're taking something that will help them in their condition. That's the power of the mind and that's the power of belief you'll get whatever you believe in so if you're believing negative thoughts you will get that. You're pointing that ship towards the dorm. See you're gonna get rough sailing. If i point that ship towards the beautiful sunset it's gonna be smooth sailing just a log nature. That's just the way that things work. There is no limit. There's a limit if you say so you're talking about war and a lot of people throw this out when i start talking about the law of attraction when i say that the life is always good. It's just our perspective of it. The changes people fight me on. Like what about nine eleven. What about school shootings. And as i mentioned earlier that we don't have control over everyone else but we do have control of ourselves over what we're focused on what we're saying about ourselves and what we're seeing to others. That's what i focus on of what. I really have power over of my voice and my word and so we're all gonna be victims of some. I love parents who always by their kids a goldfish when their children. It's a great lesson of this experience in this human life. This imperfect world where we're animals so when a kid has a goldfish and then it comes. One day from school and the goldfish is floating on top of the water. What do you do. You agree the loss of the goldfish. You have a little ceremony in the backyard. You bury it in the flower bed. Put a little heads and you grieve. The loss of your goldfish. And that's the prepare us for bad things happen in life. But we're not in control of all of that but what i do know is this is when i changed my story and i started to speak differently about myself and others and when i started to pay attention to what i was focused on and i started focusing on. What's good and what's working in my life. I attract a lot more of that. And i'm a lot more peaceful in my life. I have a lot more healthy loving nurturing relationships of people that. Make me a better me. And i'm happier and i'm more content and i'm comfortable in my own skin and that's my evidence in literally hundreds of thousands of millions of other people in the world that do the same thing. Because i was stuck in the dark. I did not know i had a choice. And that's really bringing it back full circle to what the book is about is to let people who are struggling know that. Hey there are some things you can do right now to start to turn this thing around one of the things that you talk about openly as that you're a survivor of sexual assault. I just like to give you the opportunity to talk about that because it goes into what you were saying that people always push back. What about nine eleven. what about war. what about famine. You have your own personal hell that you've dealt with can you expound on that for a moment one of the greatest pieces of feedback i got on. The book was got. It's really raw. You're incredibly vulnerable in that. And yes. I had to tell my story because i i don't wanna keep looping the story about all the negative horrible things that happen to me and the things that i had done i wanted to put a period at the end of that story and move on it again. What i'm really focused on. You know how. I am so lucky and blessed and grateful of this great life that i have but i write about a lot of really tragic events and what i'm finding is i'm having a lot of people direct message me on social media saying you know what that happened to me to thank you for sharing that. I've never been able to talk about that. When a lot of the work that i do especially with men because i think for men the stigma around molest the game. That comes with that and the stigma around. That was one of the things. I said i would never ever tell anyone and someone who's one of migrate teachers and great inspiration to me. Is the famous champion boxer. Sugar ray leonard and he wrote a book called the big fight and it was about his battle with alcohol and drugs being the biggest fight he ever had in this life and he wrote in his book about how he was molested in when he was a young teenage amateur coming up in the boxing wrecks and and i was so moved by. His vulnerability is honesty. That inspire me. I said you know what..

golden gate bridge seeing lights ray leonard assault
"traumas" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

04:53 min | 2 months ago

"traumas" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"We tell ourselves about ourselves with author james swaggart. Let's play devil's advocate for a moment. Because i knew there somebody listening to this and saying so what you're saying is if i'm in a bad way i just tell myself i'm in a good way and poof. All of the sudden everything is better and imagine that. That's not what you're saying. There's a lot more steps than that but to somebody listening to this and says listen. You're just repackaging. The power of positive thinking and reselling it to me. What do you have to save for those people. I have a young man that i mentor. And and this goes back to what i was saying earlier where we're all going to be victims of something in life and i'm not talking about a pollyanna attitude where you just ignore difficulties and challenges in real life events. It's not what i'm talking about. It's how we respond to those 'cause they're gonna happen right. There's gonna be death there's gonna be loss there's going to be paying and one of the young man who i mentor. He's about thirty seven. He and his wife had a baby a little charlotte. she's about two or three years old. They got pregnant again with their second daughter. Lillian liliya they were doing early tests. While friend was still pregnant. I was determined. Lilly did not have the right ventricle and they did all of the research. They talked all the doctors they in particular are going to be catholic talked to their priests and their clergy. About what should we do here and basically some of these kids. When they're born they go into open heart surgery right away and some of these children survive and have normal. Happy lives some of them. Don't make and so what they did with their faith and they prayed on it and they said we're going to give the best chance at lily having a good life so they chose to go through with everything and right after lily was born at. Ucla hospital three days later she went in for open heart surgery as this tiny little fragile instant jesse was hooked up for about a month and a half two months on life support and tubes and wires and we went up there. I was up there every day with them. And i'll just back up and say there's nothing in this world more painful than losing child. There just isn't and this is what they were faced with and so by employing their faith their courage they walked through this event with so much dignity and so much grace and we're of service to that child and there's a couple of months later there comes a time where they have to take the baby off life support to see if it can survive or not and in that time common. They pull the baby off life support in the baby. Didn't make it now. I will say to you this. I do not have children not able to have children but there is nothing more painful than that. And i watched because when we were praying for lily we had prayer circles. And i at one point. I out loud. I was praying for lilly to survive the medical issues and devon. Her father looked over to me. Put his hand on my shoulder and he said no. You know what. We're not gonna pray for lilly to live. We're gonna pray for god's will for lily you. It's like a ton of bricks at me in the chest. Because i realized that he knew that child belong to the university. The child didn't belong to him and his wife. It showed me such extraordinary faith and courage and dignity and the way they walked through. That was in absolutely incredible. Course it was painful. Of course. There was anguish in warning greek and we all went through that and i was by his side every step of the way and we went through that horrible situation that tragic event in their family and they moved on. They kept her memory alive and they acknowledged her in the home. They didn't do it a lot of people do. We're not gonna talk about it again. I i have some friends who've lost siblings and the families that we're not talking about it ever again. But they kept it alive for charlotte. They talked about her sister. That she's with god now and what was amazing to me. Was that because of their faith. In my opinion they didn't give up and two years later friend got pregnant again. They had a beautiful new baby daughter. Zoey and now they have to wonderfully beautiful children and this memory of how they were able to get through something very difficult but not let it dictate their future and ruin their lives. Because i've seen that happen to people where they make it about themselves and they wanna play the victim and they remain the victim for decades. So if you're out. There struggling i hear. It's how do i use the spoken word. What if i don't believe it. Because we're the spiritual component comes in gave is that i believe in a great spirit and the power of the universe i believe in a spiritual entity that wants us all to be happy i really do. I think plants and trees and the great sequoias. They grow up defying gravity. And i believe that the universe wants that for us as well and so you have to believe you can start today by saying you know what my best days are ahead of me. You might be in a whole right now. You might be in a dark place but there is hope because even for when i was having suicidal thoughts my mentor said to me james. What if when you kill yourself. The pain didn't go away and he said where's your what if when you killed yourself. The pain got worse..

Lilly right ventricle james swaggart lily Lillian liliya Ucla hospital charlotte Zoey jesse
"traumas" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

07:29 min | 2 months ago

"traumas" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"If anybody listening to your podcast has an organization where they feel. They could benefit from becoming to speak talking about the power of the spoken word and how we can change our stories and how can actually change our stories to find happiness and true fulfillment. I'm happy to come and talk. That's what i do. And i just love helping people and fulfills me. It gives me a great sense of purpose and duty. And when i get a letter back or a note or a comment on how my book even has changed so many people's lives already in a short period of time. That's everything for me. That's my furnace right. That's my soul's desire is to help others find what i was able to find. Let's talk about how you described your life as blessed and the reason that i'm going to zero in on this because in your introduction you talked about having a really really rough childhood but of course. That's not what you're focusing on your focusing on where you are now and all the success that you've had i imagine that's difficult for some people. It's a lot easier to dwell on the well. The really traumatic things that happen to us as people. How did you manage to escape that. Yeah for me. There's a great line. I heard somebody said you gotta hit your head on the bottom of the pool in order to find out deep it is sometimes and for me. That was the case. Like i said we'll all be victims of something. And i think when we're in enough pain and that's when it comes time for us to be willing to change and to change the story. 'cause gave we see those people out there who are negative all the time. You have to pay attention to what you're focused on. I just can't focus on the darkness. Because i'll get more darkness. The universe will give you whatever story you tell it. And we know those people out there that are cynical and negative and they're watching the news all the time. It doesn't matter if they're blue or red. There's a consuming the news all the time. There's just a negativity in the sensationalized news on either side of the aisle. It's hard to be happy. And if that's what. I'm focused on the noise. All it's gonna come out of me is noise and it's going to be impossible for me to be happy. And so what i had to do is i had to really pay attention to what i'm focused on. Its my choice every morning. There's a great lincoln quote that people are as happy as they make up their minds to be in for a long time game. I didn't know i had a choice. And that's really the intention that my book to let people know you have a choice. You are not the victim of circumstance you have to take personal responsibility for yourself and you can actually create your own weather today. It's just the law of attraction. You get what you focused on. I have people that have come to work for me where their cell screens broken that late to work the computers protracting. It doesn't work. And you hear how they speak about themselves in the world and they're just negative and it's we're never gonna make it and they never make conversely when you see people who are focused on what's good and what's working and they're speaking positively about themselves and others and they're speaking in the direction of truth and love like don miguel ruiz's for agreements the first of the four agreements is be impeccable with your word and don't speak against yourself or others and always speaking the direction of truth and love and i think for any malady whether it's depression or alcoholism or drug addiction or suicide the remedy for that. It's body mind. Spirit solution dr. carl young wrote about it. William james wrote about the eighteen hundreds that it's not just mental and it's not just physical but to there has to be some sort of spiritual shifts and i don't care. I coach people who are muslim. Mike coach people who are jewish and christians across the board. As long as you believe in something that is great. And that is love. And that is in favor of all peacefully cohabitating. That's an important ingredient as you can hear. I'm very passionate about this subject. So it's a great subject and i'm inclined to agree with most of it because you're right all agree that words can be used for good or evil and it's not even really about the words. It's the context it's how we make people feel with our words. It's about how we make ourselves feel with our words. And that's what you explain in your book about how the power of words can shape your life and you really talk a lot about the power of the spoken word. Can you expand on that for our listeners. Absolutely if you think about adolf hitler in the nineteen thirties used the power of the spoken words almost exterminate the race of people and that was using the power of the spoken word for evil and for hate. It's incredibly powerful. I think that's a testament to it. Conversely let's think about what we could do go in the other way with it. Think about the intention of of the power of the spoken word in the direction of truth and love and compassion and support and encouragement. Someone asked me the other day they were like you like a life coach and i said no. I'm more like a life cheerleader. You know that you already have the playbook inside of you. it's my job. Just help you go from your head to your heart crack. Open your playbook so you can win the game. And that's really the best way to describe what i do and how i help people because i'm not gonna tell people what to do and that's the beauty of the title of this book. My niece julia is. She's smart as a whip and she gave me some great feedback on the book and relationship to how i was going to navigate writing about my family because i didn't really want to hurt anybody. This was not a tell all book. This is a help. All book and julia came to me. Because you know what. I about the title of your book she said. You can't argue with it and i love that. I just love that. I'm not out here trying to convert anyone because that can be a real turn off. But what i do wanna do is reach the people that don't know they have a story or that don't know they can change it and it starts with how we speak about ourselves because people who've come through childhood trauma or any kind of trauma for that matter they create a story about that and i'm not talking about the crew stories. I'm talking about the stories that we tell ourselves in the dark. When we're sick we all feel. Well those are the stories that i want to get to and then i want to shed light on so that people can see those in my workshops and then my seminars will do that people start on cover their stories and shed light on that and then we started talking. Okay great. what do you want your new story to be. And let's focus on that. Let's write that. What's the new story. And one of the things i do. Is i get people to really look at their lives. And say look are. Are you grateful. Is there something in your life. Your grateful for you know. Have them close their eyes and think about that. I said focus on that thing. Whatever it is it could be your dog. It can be your cat if your wife. Your husband and i said now what i want you to do is rise stand up and say i am so grateful and i love my life and yell it together and all of a sudden you see using the power of the spoken word you can literally change your because i said do you feel the energy changes inside of you when you yelled out loud and everyone said yes overwhelming you feel the energy change in the room absolutely and so that's one little exercise that people can employ right now. Just think of something you're grateful for and then just yell it out loud how grateful you are for it and that literally can the energy in your now so brings your tune up a quarter inch that you can start to focus on what's good. What's working and start to move in the direction of your happiness your dreams and that's true success to me money obviously not the measurement of success. But you know how fulfilled you are and how happy you are is really the measure of your success. We'll be right back after these messages. Here and i wanted to tell.

julia don miguel ruiz adolf hitler dr. carl young William james lincoln Mike depression
"traumas" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

05:21 min | 2 months ago

"traumas" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"Here's your host gay power walk into week's episode of the psych central podcast calling into the show. Today we have. James swaggart his a television and film producer who has worked for many major brands and studios such as apple netflix. And hulu. he's also the author of the new book. If you say so which discusses the power of the spoken word and the stories. We tell ourselves about ourselves. Welcome james thank you very much great to be here. Can you tell us a little bit about your story. And how and why you changed it. Sure the title of the book if you say so. The subtitle is my story. And how i changed it to save my life and i came from a pretty tumultuous childhood. I was the youngest of twelve kids. There was a lot of abandonment abuse. It was chaos. It was complete pandemonium and so as a result and being the youngest. I got left behind a lot of people think. Oh you're the youngest the baby of the family but there were just too many kids and my mom also ran a daycare out of the house so it was pretty crazy at the house and having gone through a lot of things like being left at gas stations left school and left at grocery stores and that sort of thing i started to develop stories around these events that happened to me including abuse. I was molested by relatives and a neighbor from the of seven to twelve. Because of just overlooking i just felt like i. I didn't matter nobody was out there protecting me. Everybody was too busy on survival mode. A lot of the older brothers and sisters found drugs and alcohol which i eventually found at the age of twelve and used as my coping mechanisms through to lessons in early adulthood and i ended up a drug addict alcoholic dealing with severe depression and suicidal tendancies and and ultimately suicide attempt at it. I was lucky enough to survive. We all have stories right. 'cause we're all going to be victims of something in life and it's how we respond to that out of these events. I started to develop stories early on that. I don't matter i'm broken. I'm unlovable they're gonna figure me out. I'm a phony. All of these stories that i tended to loop into my head well into adulthood and they didn't serve me in fact they just compounded. My depression and i was just pretty sure that the world would be a better place. If i wasn't in it. What happened for me. Is i ask for help. At the age of twenty five. I was despondent. It was following a suicide attempt and help arrived in the form of a number of teachers brother. That helps me find those teachers and i was able to get clean and sober at twenty five and i met some amazing teachers that helped me realize that. Hey i was telling myself stories. That weren't true and that i could change the story and it's through a lot of hard work. There's a train metaphor. I use about doing the work. We have to do to go process and feel these unseld feelings. You know we have a baggage car. We have a passenger car. We have a car and the caboose. Some of it's been a little too much time in the bar. That was part of my story on the caboose reflecting on what coulda it would have been and then also spending too much time in the baggage cars just looking at all my bag when staring at it and not doing anything about it and we gotta get rid of that baggage. We gotta feel those feelings and process that stuff so we can move on and be free from it and forgive and ask for forgiveness and ultimately the work. I need to do being up in that. Low steam. Engine locomotive with my overalls on. Pick up the shovel and start shoveling coal into that furnace which powers. My train moves my train forward and furnaces an analogy for our passion. Our souls desire if you will and there's work to be done in order to come out of our old story and that's the shoveling coal part of doing the work. We have to do whether it's going to therapy and feeling those uncomfortable feelings and processing them. Someone wants told me a great line. They said if you're going through hell keep going. So that's kind of how i changed my story. I i love any analogy. That involves a train. I think that it is an underutilized form of transportation and allergy. Let's talk about the book for a moment. Because in the book one of the things that i noticed that you mentioned helpers and takers can you explain how those two groups differ absolutely and thanks for pointing that out. You're the first person to pull that out of the book and and asked me that question. I think there's two kinds of people ultimately helpers and there's takers takers are easy to spot this world. I think we can see who the takers are. But the greatest people in history the greatest people of all time have always been the helpers the mother teresa's of the world for the princess di's of the world's the martin luther king's of the world and their helpers selflessly giving of themselves. We're taking a lot of risk and really just following their passionate and they're passionate. What's to help. People tell liberate people to help give people dignity and to show love and to me. I want to be on the right side of history you know. And that's why i've been really blessed with a great life. I was able to come out of the darkness into the light and ultimately succeed being very successful producer in. Hollywood live in beverly hills. My life is a dream so now that i've accomplished so much. It's really my intention to give back whenever i do pay speaking engagement. I also offer an unpaid speaking engagement to and underfunded program. Inner city schools charities. And if anybody listening to your podcast has an organization where they feel. They could benefit from becoming to speak talking about the power of the spoken word and how we can change our stories and how can actually change our stories.

depression producer James swaggart hulu. netflix apple martin luther king beverly hills Hollywood teresa
"traumas" Discussed on Buddhist Society of Western Australia

Buddhist Society of Western Australia

06:29 min | 4 months ago

"traumas" Discussed on Buddhist Society of Western Australia

"The people who are closest to us also the people who influence us the most if you can change your perceptions, their attitude towards people. Have a tremendous impact in daily life. For, do that look at your family members actually reflect well, maybe not so bad as I think maybe these some of these qualities are sometimes see maybe there's a good reason for why they have this quantities. Think, don't take your family members for granted. Remember they have also had past lives. They have also had difficult times. They also influenced by the world around them give them a break. Don't expect too much of them try to understand them in a new way tried to be more forgiving and more accepting of those people who are closest to you even if you love them dearly. Some things the people that are closest to us that we find difficult. If I may be irritating, we find hard to deal with her try to look there if you can look at these things in a positive where and of course, if you can do that, you can transform the most important relationships in your own life. If you can transform those relationships while you're doing really really well becomes very powerful. The person that is important to. Transform and change your perception over is the person's which you find very difficulty new life. We all find some people may be a colleague at work maybe somebody. Maybe somebody I don't know anybody basically that we have to meet on a regular basis, but we've find very very hard to get along with. So difficult I think everybody has kind of people in their lives. So what should we do when there is people like that, and what we have to do is we have in this case you. Can also try to look for the positive qualities because. Has. Positive positive qualities. But often it is more important to try to understand why they are the way they are. Why is it that the is so difficult why is it that I cannot get along with this person and usually here if you look deeply enough, you will find that as always always a good reason why people are the way they are and wants to understand the reason then you can forgive them for for the for the way they are. And often people particularly difficult up people who have gone through TRAUMAS and high times in their lives. People have gone through abuse maybe at school maybe made at home even. People who who just had had some sort of thing which I made very difficult and again, it can be even in the past life. We cannot even see what actually is there. And by looking at this way about understanding this, all was a reason why people are the way they are none of these things happened without conditions every but we all conditioned the negative things in people is always caused by something else. Like, that it is not so hard to forgive anymore you can say they're not actually trying it's not a some kind of self some kind of ego in there which says, I want to be Nasty I. Want to be bad. It doesn't work like that is because of conditions and causes that they do bad things to do things which are not nice to others. Like like that and then you can forgive you can say, okay, it has its 'cause has its reasons. It's all right. You may not be able to find a particular cause or particular reason why people do bad things. That you don't have to find particular causa reason just remember that this is all about non-self. People do things because of causes and conditions because of that, we can all. We can be absolutely sure that the reason they do it is not because they want to do it because they are propelled to do this by something else some other calls and condition in their life. And this way even the most difficult people we can't forgive and we can allow them to be little crazy the stoop and all these things, and it doesn't really matter and of course, the famous story of which. I'm not sure where it comes from but I know atom-bomb tells this story. That is the famous story of the man who goes to the market to buy some eggs for his wife or something like that, and he goes to the market and he gets gentle by this crazy fellow at this marketplace. This fellow yells at him and tells him how terrible is how stupid is and this really upset met this man before and yet yells at him and this terrible way. So. He comes back after the I've been to the market back to his wife and tells us wife was terrible. I went to the market I wanted to do a good act they wanted to help you out and all I get is this abuse of the strangest never met before here that is extremely unfair, and then of course, the story is that his wife tells him. Well, this man is actually crazy here. He doesn't have it together when he was child or whatever something terrible happened to him and has been completely out of his mind ever since. And of course, once you understand that somebody's crazy, you say, oh, okay is fine. There is no problem anymore. And same thing of course, this is actually about anger similarly somebody is angry they are essentially crazy. But you can extend that similar to do when anybody does stupid things things which are immoral things which are not nice and lot kind. Again, it's a kind of derangement of the minor kind of delusion which has taken over here. I think everybody I tired ultimately wants to be kind because we all understand at end of the day kindness is what brings us happiness anger never brings happiness. something, inside of a switch knows that and yet it is so difficult sometimes to practice. So because these people essentially from a Buddhist point of view, I, slightly deranged then reflect like that. This person is a bit mad it's a bit deranged and again it's very so much easier to forgive them. When you know that the actually there is A. That is a reason for the way they act. And of course, this is very important because one person has the power to make our life. So miserable if we don't actually forgive them to see the same person, we have to meet them every day..

TRAUMAS
"traumas" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

03:10 min | 4 months ago

"traumas" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"Your experience is in a way that allows you to calibrate future. Unhappiness dissatisfaction frustration in a way that's more in measure with the severity of that thing at that time as opposed to just defacto attaching it to all the previous trauma that then explodes in a much bigger way. Much. Less catastrophes housing. Yeah. I mean main my we been my tendencies. Yeah and but that is absolutely the way that people that have experienced severe trauma respond. It's are dealing with and experiencing in managing that trauma. You never get a place to. To detangle any future trauma to that pass trauma. and. So they become instantly attached and that's why that sort of. Giant feeling of. Everything being that global is, is that that new trauma or that new frustration or that new paper cut whatever it is to that pass trauma happens and what we don't, and I don't know why in our sort of DNA this isn't. Better integrated in our daily lives in our experiences of ourselves, but humans metabolize our motions. Fairly quickly in the grand scheme of things, you know we we have the ability when we're hot to take off our sweater. If we're cold, we put it back on when we're hungry we eat. When we metabolising digest our food and so forth. But when it comes to these types of TRAUMAS, there's a fear that somehow. Engaging with them will destroy us. And it and it won't? If if we have the right tools to help us through these things, they won't. Yeah Yeah it's a speaking from personal experience. You the listener are much stronger than you give yourself credit for, and it is possible. To debate or rewrite your software. Is Possible I'm I'm living proof of that Very sweet both taken very different paths to it. You know I, mine is far more conventional. But but they but they've worked you know they've worked I could never have imagined that I could have this type of life and also not finished with the work and they're still I'm still on this this path and this journey to recovery, and I probably will be for the rest of my life and there are moments where I'm like Gee. What would I've been like if I didn't have that trauma and there are moments where I feel sorry for myself and there are moments where I wish it. Could have been different, but it can't. It's not an I move on and I just have to figure out a way as.

TRAUMAS
"traumas" Discussed on The Wellness Business Podcast

The Wellness Business Podcast

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"traumas" Discussed on The Wellness Business Podcast

"And I asked them what it happens after confusion. What happens right after confusion? Like oh through clarity new ideas understanding and so so like I wish I knew that and recognize that was consciously aware of that. You know seven or eight years ago or even twenty years ago or thirty years ago Another thing is fear. Right when we are experiencing insinger exponential growth. We experienced fear and were so many of us. We've been you know. Our brains are wired for survival. And if we've ever experienced traumas of any kind could be big TRAUMAS or smaller. TRAUMAS you know. The brain is gonNA filter our experiences through our memories in our past experiences. And so sometimes what happens is the brain will take a potential unknown experience filter. It through past experience and apply the same colouring apply the same style picture and so then the brain goes. Oh you're in danger if you go and do this new thing because the brain does not like the unknown and loves the narrative so that's a great combination for us to really create these horror stories for ourselves of this is what's going to happen or this is what's GonNa go wrong or everyone's GonNa think I'm this and we start to fill in the blank color in the picture with all of this chaos when in reality none of that's actually happened and we have no evidence that it actually would happen happen so those are just some of those things that I really wish. I knew that really are things to be celebrated things to get excited about because they are signs of your grow lettuce so good if okay so I'm sure everyone listening is thinking okay. Well uncertainty confusion and fear means. I'm growing coming volving. I am in the right place off base as I thought I was. Yeah generally about the reframe right like we're experiencing in really recognizing how it is happening for you not to you. Not being the victim of circumstances it and then release Looking at the patterns of of how we have experienced that growth in really walking it back along. Oh this is a consistent thing. That's happened in every single experience so so if I am already an expert in healing uncomfortable through growth I then can walk it back and take a look at what has happened and really start to assess what those what those elements are really figure out. What are the key things that are happening and then for me? What I've done is now? I don't look at those things as negatives I see see them as stepping stones and I don't feel I can move through the fear and move through the confusion in a very different way now and I'm so excited to hear you talking about this and so openly ah sharing with us.

TRAUMAS
"traumas" Discussed on The Keto Answers Podcast

The Keto Answers Podcast

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"traumas" Discussed on The Keto Answers Podcast

"Big life changes can be the same type of emotional traumas, mental traumas. But then we also have a map of things that were you should spend your human habitat that 'cause a lot of disease right now in a mental health, we try to complete those both things and so in physical healthy. Okay. If you eat terribly don't sleep do all these other things. And you get diabetes and obesity, heart disease and cancer and all different type of stuff nerve disease were you fix your human habitat, and, like either at things get outside and sleep, a lot like those sort of non existent, that there's a certain class of that with mental health as well. And so, for instance. People being on their phones so much like being able to compare yourself to anybody in the world, any given time, probably not good for your brain, and how you brain fires. Right and stuff like that, about using technology and be really mindful of the things you're doing I think is, is away. Like we don't need a therapist to tell your Inc, shis like these things, or whatever, we don't even necessarily need meditation to do that. I think instead asking yourself how my environment messed up and how can I get that back to normal human environment? I think a lot of mental health stuff, actually goes away. So in the past, I had had a lot of say. I would be sort of a little bit more judgmental and get really upset easily if things didn't go how thought they should go. And I think that in just sort of like comparative other people, and so, especially living in San Francisco, this is not a good place to not compare yourself to people that sort of get me down on myself and make me feel bad about myself, and like pass versions of myself, any like removing a lot of technology. And this is why you see, like my Instagram don't follow anybody. And like, I don't use social media then to provide value other people. It's a platform for me to distribute information and share things interesting that I think it helped the people, so that's how social media right now, not to consume their people's information. And so if you're out there and you're, you're following a lot of people who their lives look, super glamorous. Oh man. Like I wish my life was like that. And forget about your life in the president. I think that leads to a lot of mental. Z's make sense. Yeah. Definitely can kinda little ramble here but I think just the focus on, like, what is trauma for mental health. What is problems with mental health and depression, anxiety, are that are caused from environments being messed up. And how can you strip that away?.

diabetes San Francisco depression president
"traumas" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"traumas" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"If that doomed Boeing flight that crashed in Ethiopia Sunday was flying here in the US. The co-pilot would have needed to have fifteen hundred hours under his or her belt in this flight, though, the co-pilot only had two hundred CBS news senior travel adviser Peter Greenburg says it seems like more training may be needed. I was flying two days ago. And I went tomorrow the real traumas pilot reported to me is whether or not everybody got the memo on how to disengage the system on the plane. That's been a problem because if it overrides the pilot's ability to control the plane, if it detects that you're going into a stall it will immediately put the nose down. And then if it doesn't let you correct that. That's where you have planes hitting the ground knows. I the flight data and cockpit voice. Recorders have been recovered all one hundred fifty seven people on board died on impact including eight Americans the country's most. Powerful. Democrats says she does not support the impeachment of President Trump house speaker Nancy Pelosi told the Washington Post, it just isn't worth it political analyst Larry Sabato, you cannot succeed in the impeachment process unless it is bipartisan there is virtually no bipartisanship left in congress or in Washington. But Pelosi also said that she does not believe Mr. Trump is fit to lead the country at the going rate. There will be a lot of democratic presidential hopefuls heading to Milwaukee in two thousand twenty. That's because that's the city that will hold the democratic national convention ahead of the election. Mayor Tom Barnett for the first time in the history of the city and the state Milwaukee in Wisconsin will be hosting a major political national convention. The city is set to bring about two hundred million dollars of economic activity Conor McGregor has been released after being arrested Miami early Monday V is the best known.

Nancy Pelosi Milwaukee Peter Greenburg Boeing Conor McGregor Ethiopia CBS Tom Barnett Larry Sabato US Washington Post political analyst Wisconsin Mr. Trump Miami congress Washington President
"traumas" Discussed on Jay and Miles X-Plain the X-Men

Jay and Miles X-Plain the X-Men

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"traumas" Discussed on Jay and Miles X-Plain the X-Men

"The personal ragnarok, the shattered Seoul staged with accumulated props and baggage of traumas past dude, I would. Really listen to this metal album. It would be amazing. I mean, you couldn't really understand the lyrics like you need to know what they are. Maybe find them online or something. But it would sound really cool. Anyway, baggage of traumas past is, of course, a lesser known major event. Yes. Oh. And in this dream there, of course, is magneto because he's the source of this trauma, and he rips Logan's skeleton out as one mass leaving Logan sort of boneless husk that exhibit your grabs onto before. Logan, can go into the light for everybody who's ever loved is calling for him the voice of his loved ones or pulling him and exotic your tries to pull him back saying Logan. It's death. Hot sharly. Don't you think I know that? But as he's heading into that light Angelica Liana kisses Logan's forehead pushes him away back into life. And this is kind of weird for me because I think Ileana in that role works like this whole idea that she's you'd finally gotten past all of the demonic stuff in her life. And she's at least at peace. But the fact is Logan didn't really know really on a very well. And also there are so many dead people with whom he has direct emotional connections. Yes, seriously. There's so many pretty dead, ladies and Logan's past well, and so many, you know, dead Broza and comrades and the point is if you wanna have Logan met by someone who's dead and fund Lee remembered who says in night nice to see you. But but shoo you got stuff to do you have a wide selection. And I mean Yana is on it feels kind of cheap here. Yeah. But anyway, everything's continuing to go to shit outside. Like it just keeps ramping up and up and up. They're going through an electrical storm and everything goes to hell in the plain shreds apart. And gene telephonically pushes everybody back into the plane is they get pulled out of it. But then she gets pulled out. And that's what brings Logan back from the light. That's what brings him back into the world and gives them the will to push through the pain in live again, he catches her. And there's this wonderful page of this just like shattered shredded Logan, reaching out holding gene as she's just dangling out of the plane. Like, I'm not a big fan of the damsel in distress trope. But jeans just been shown is so powerful at this point. And she's almost sacrificed herself to save literally all of them that like I'm okay with us yet. It's it's neat. And it's cool having what brings Logan back being specifically. And I mean, I I know, you know, the fact that it's Gina significant. But also that specifically having the back of a teammate 'cause. This. This is Logan. And he is he is the guy who was absolutely convinced. He would never be a team player that he would never be a part of something that he would never care about the people around him the way that his teammates in the whoever was running his team at the time wanted him to and that that's his connection back is is great. You know that it's gene and its romance is also a character note. But that it's anyone at all that it's another person period and a teammate feels as significant in its own, right? That's a really good point. And yeah, I I completely agree. And speaking of Logan status on a team two weeks later after the plane does finally make down Logan heads back into the danger room, even though Moyer McTaggart protests, which I mean fair enough, and it goes really badly he slow and he scared and eventually that anger builds up inside him that frustration and we. Get so I wanna talk about sound effects. I love sound effects sound effects are. Really cool when they're done right in when they're done, right. They're really evocative, and this is one of those sound effects that sticks with me that that just is. So this early effective the sound effect on is just spelled S C H U K K. And it's I can't I can't make the noise that a devotes the sort of wet tearing of it..

Logan Yana Seoul gene telephonically Ileana Angelica Liana Moyer McTaggart Gina Broza Lee two weeks
"traumas" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"traumas" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Comrade traumas doctors hold and that is a very big if these days, we'll see a higher open later this morning on Wall Street. The market has experienced a sharp decline in recent days. Dialing back his criticism of the fed President Trump maybe trying to come the jittery market after comments Monday. Like, the fed doesn't have a feel for the market. Now, the president's tone is a little less critical raising interest rates too fast. That's my opinion. I shouldn't have confidence. I think it'll straight we've reporters during a Christmas greeting session. Trump also expressed confidence in Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin who had tweeted out that he's checked in with the six largest US banks to ensure they had enough liquidity to operate that raised more concerns which sent investors running for cover Monday, dropping the Dow six hundred fifty three points and knocking the major. The index is down by more than two percent. Jackie quinn. Wasser president says he doesn't know when the partial government shutdown will land he is standing by his insistence on money for a border wall and other security measures federal immigration authorities. Conducting follow up medical exams of all youngsters in their care after an eight year old watermelon child who had fallen ill New Mexico died the second migrant child to die this month while being held for processing one of the local says you couldn't miss this crash of a small plane Sioux Falls, South Dakota. It was just loud. It shook the ground it sounded like something out of World War Two movie. It's a dive bomb to stop. Very fast, very abrupt. Tim Lang talking with KFYI TV one person was killed and the feds are investigating looking at the Wall Street numbers this morning. Dow futures are up one.

president fed Trump Steve Mnuchin KFYI TV Jackie quinn Tim Lang Wasser Sioux Falls US South Dakota New Mexico two percent eight year
"traumas" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"traumas" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Here's Dave county of our sister station, KSL NewsRadio in Salt Lake City with more on the latest episode of cold, Josh Powell asked a physical therapist to treat. What turned out to be a strain and possible partial tear of his rotator cuff just ten days after Susan disappeared. We discovered the injury through an independent medical examination report and insurance document meant to investigate claims the purpose of the report is central with an op the injury. And this isn't a problem the nations having a related just all causation. Dr Peter Chalmers is a shoulder and elbow surgeon at university of Utah health. He didn't treat Josh Powell in two thousand and nine but agreed to look at the report and share his expertise as part of that. I take care of a lot of rotator cuff injuries and don't one hundred zero tentacle. Police never knew about Powell's injury because he build the treatment through an existing personal injury claim related to a car accident. He'd had back in September of two thousand and nine months before his wife. Susan vanished. It was just a Fender bender. No airbags deployed, no police report. So we asked Dr Chalmers could that kind of crash caused such as vir shoulder injury. It's really really really uncommon from that mechanism. Dr Chalmers says the most common cause of a rotator cuff tear is age meaning over the age of fifty at the time Josh Powell was thirty four. But you can also see visuals of major traumas by major traumas. I usually mean. Crashed my helicopter or right? I fell off. Less commonly with minor things because in younger individuals attendance, quite strong, Dave Cali for KTAR news..

Josh Powell Dr Peter Chalmers rotator cuff rotator cuff tear Susan Dave county Salt Lake City KSL Dave Cali KTAR university of Utah health nine months ten days
"traumas" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"traumas" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"A powerful typhoon traumas better the west near the Tokyo where East Japan Railway has suspended all train services in the Tokyo area did last night and educa- says it hopes to have them back up this morning, Kansai international airport. Meanwhile, which services greater Asaka closed operations on two of its runways preparation. Meanwhile, frantic efforts to find survivors in the wake of the seven point five magnitude quake and soon NAMI that unleashed an eighteen foot wave on Paulo and surrounding strip of coastline at least eight hundred thirty two people have been confirmed killed one girl who is an Indonesian disaster agency spokesman says they expect it to go out as well as victims buried under ruins. There are also remote areas yet to be reached by joint essay RT, and there are questions about the early warning systems. Yes, President Donald Trump has just started tweeting about the FBI prob-. That's on this week further in the background of judge Brad Kavanagh with regard to sexual assault allegations. He tweets. Wow. Just starting to hear the Democrats who are thinking only obstruct and delay or starting to put out the word. In time and scope of FBI and the partisan feelings continue Republican Senator Lindsey Graham on NBC defending Kavanagh's reaction in front of the Senate Judiciary committee. I'm offended by the fact that anybody would hold it against Brett cavenaugh to be upset by the way, he was treated, but democratic Senator Amy klobuchar says if the scope of the investigation is limited it would be a I the White House should not be allowed to like ground manage an FBI investigation club HR on CNN. Meanwhile, the White House is saying the meeting between the president and deputy attorney general rod Rosenstein may again be postponed this week and at a Trump rally over the weekend. The president says things regarding him and Kim Jong UN are much better. He says they were tough back and.

Brad Kavanagh FBI President Donald Trump Kim Jong UN Tokyo Brett cavenaugh president Senator Lindsey Graham Kansai international airport Senator Amy klobuchar White House Asaka East Japan Railway rod Rosenstein Senate Judiciary committee educa assault deputy attorney general CNN NBC
"traumas" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"traumas" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Traumas parks Hawaii's big island of seeing two feet of rain is hurricane lane continues it slow track north toward the Hawaiian islands or casters expect. The storm center to. Move close to or over. Parts of Hawaii's main islands late tonight into tomorrow. Norris Michelle Bigler. Says bomb this kind of, weather is nothing new for her we'll be good you get back home Needs to be Staring home Other that flight will take off remains to. Be seen the US Geological Survey says a. Seven point one magnitude earthquake has struck in eastern Peru close to its border with Brazil. And, Bolivia Charney general Jeff Sessions insisting the Justice department will not be improperly influenced by. Political considerations the attorney general's written statement appears to push back against the latest round of criticism by President Trump who told Fox News that sessions never took control of the Justice department and has repeatedly criticized. The department and the FBI sessions writes that the Justice department won't be improperly influenced by political considerations, and says there's no other nation with more talented and dedicated law enforcement investigators and prosecutors that's White. House correspondent Greg Clugston looks like more Sears and. KMart stores we'll be closing from California to. New Hampshire with many states in between Sears holdings, corporation says it will soon be, suffering forty six additional Stores that are unprofitable we'd liquidation sales starting next. Week and the lights turning on for good November just a few years back Sears had four thousand, retail locations now it's down to about eight hundred correspondent Jackie Quinn a funeral for twenty year old. Molly Tibbets to be held on Sunday hometown of. Brooklyn island Wall Street Dow futures up fifty. Four points s and p futures up five points, more on these stories at townhall dot com Are you. Drowning in IRS tax debt.

Justice department Jeff Sessions Sears holdings US Sears Norris Michelle Bigler Hawaii Molly Tibbets Greg Clugston New Hampshire Brooklyn KMart IRS President Trump Fox News Peru Jackie Quinn Bolivia Charney
"traumas" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"traumas" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Traumas and how to survive them and, you know how to, have, them in in a healthy way it's normal tabby. They've profound biological reaction to, trauma Absolutely, and. Physical and I think that I think a lot of. People don't recognize it it's something that. We don't have control over I think, that a, lot of people think. That we should just, kind of get, over, it, and, once time heals. All wounds and we get past it but there's so many things nowadays that can really triggered these kind of feelings and and physical. And, emotional reactions mainly and in the case of these shootings are media exposure and, and seeing those, things, over, and, over, again, which is causing a lot of trouble pretty young kids why it's so interesting because we're not that far removed for it, from it and I know we you know on, the outside, it's you. Know it seems like it's been a long time ago but for these kids it's kind of still feel fresh and I would think just going back to. School would be. Just just sad yeah triggered yeah Absolutely and I in in your scene you know you're going into a classroom and some of these kids have, been in school. With each other since kindergarten and there's a large segment of the missing. Now and so that you know again that. Goes back to you just as adults in the situation you understand it's like why don't understand. Why you're having trouble coming back school we have cameras and, we have twenty th wall offensive now you're safe that's not what this is about right it's about you know, just recognizing traumatic stress at these kids have input under and and how do we really respond to them and, as support each other and the other thing about that. Age group the Thais school ages they don't they don't manifest their psychological and. Psychiatric symptoms the way, adults do, they aren't often, aware, that something's, happening to them they don't necessarily complain about it, or ask for help, they may just have a drop in their grades or change in their behavior in the their frontal lobes aren't. Functioning, that, well Jack Taylor stressors Head, Lisa go ahead Yeah I mean, dealing, with these kids I I think both, you? And lecture both right like these kids are already struggling just to be teenagers. Body, changes and The digital world they live in and stuff all the nonsense yes yes Posted do have enough likes. On, it Good enough has you know all of the things that they're dealing with and then. Out in any, sort of extra stress and and again I and a lot of this is and I and I know I talked. About this a lot. About empowering them these kids are amazing I think that you, know if I look back at my, how I was in high school You know they're a decade ahead, of me in terms of their maturity and the things. That they have to. Deal with on a day-to-day basis and they impressed me every day when, I sit down and have conversations. With them on like what, they really actually already get which is pretty. Amazing and. I think it's because of the of the social media and because of the things that they see online but it also buries, them in a lot of ways it's unfair to them and that's the part that that we're trying to help with. Basically said we're.

Traumas Jack Taylor Lisa
"traumas" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"traumas" Discussed on Latino USA

"Now a few days lonard generations of haitians and black dominicans and those those are traumas that you have to face at the end of the day there is this racism this anti blackness that exists throughout latin america and the united states i mean in a lot of ways we've been through this for years now like in the case of orlando casteel who was shot and killed by geronimo again is who was mexicanamerican and this notion of like you you body in two of the entire narrative of anti blackness as a latino and you acted on it i mean i would i would even i would even took it may be a step further and say like is it that they bought into anything new or is this something that has always existed so you're here how are you treating your people back home are you looking at are you clutching a purse are you talking about somebody's here are you telling somebody that you don't want to live in a certain neighborhood that's a question that needs to be asked in an and i like to ask that question and i like to watch the reaction that people have so if there are non latinos who want to be better allies what to do one of the thing that really frustrates me is that every hispanic heritage month it's the same recycled story about the are for latino whose discovered their blackness and come into it and i'm like that is not all of our stories like i have met very proud black rusians black people from honduras cuba i mean my goodness.

latin america united states geronimo honduras cuba
"traumas" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

Gettin' Grown

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"traumas" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

"Tin tin 12 15 years later after the fact like you only have a work on a radio no more things like though you don't have to come out and mr me to this this is nobody cares about anything you know what i'm saying like young you'll have to make this about you is not about you and we don't get enough would look at you all his time um we'll go was god sunny and turn the volume down moving right along speed some black france kazue um you can always so with somebody don't have black friends when they got a really bad we all week but anyway spear that is true because there is just you know friendship is friendship this requires truth the worst the leave out i'd be like you ain't got no black runs in the worst lee randomly one black for an um terrible terrible terrible but the speaking of people who have not healed and moved on from that from the traumas of their lives i her so this week i watched mary mary on we um and i had unfortunate i even know an unfortunate opportunity of watching um tina campbell and her husband teddy council and these were like just me given like 45 air quotes like that's all the quotes that council house way busy no we know his busy now a his missing there in his baby maga the humid chicken necking at like accidentally like mickey mouse he don't have not head shipbuilders knees and toes even so reasons health visit where your neck abbey where your neck though where your leg.

mary mary tina campbell mickey mouse 12 15 years