7 Burst results for "Translational Neuroscience"

"translational neuroscience" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

05:16 min | 3 months ago

"translational neuroscience" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

"It works the plan could help Michigan State and it's sixty seven thousand students stay on campus and have something like a semester. Joining us now is the aforementioned Dr Jack? Lipton. Of Translational Neuroscience at Michigan State University Dr Lipton. Thank you for being with us. We've heard about pool testing I want you to tell us a little more about it and why it it specifically helpful in this instance what what about Michigan State makes it a perfect candidate for the pooling of spit. What would you think about full testing end and Michigan state one of the things that you're that is really important to understand that the resources that we have is that university are fairly limited. Bright. But we're not a multinational corporation. So funds are limited resources are limited and pooling allows us to. have. More. More test being done with the same amount of resources or with less resources. So in this case, if we're dealing with supply chain issues with testing if we can test ten people with reagents that we would need to test one person, then we are were saving a lot in terms of of supplies, and if we don't have to run ten tests and we can run one test, we save a lot of time. So if you can save time and you can save supplies, you're going to Yeah. Ultimately conserve and that's really what our goal is and this. This works 'cause you're not expecting a large proportion of people to have this thing right. So generally speaking a bunch of these pools, we'll come out negative. Right. pools if you if you have about ten people in a pool in your expectation is maybe seeing two or three out of a hundred people. Show up positive than most of your pools are going to be negative. The more the prevalence increases the more the rates of infection increase. Then you're going to have more and more positive bulls. If one out of every ten people are positive than a pool of ten, most likely is going to have a positive individual in it. So you have to really balance pool size and prevalence together in order to come up with the right balance to save resources and save time. So the this actually could have broader implications There's a Wall Street Journal op-ed that you wrote about a previous test not this one that we're talking about, but it was a concept of pulling in you set across the United States tens of thousands of similar academic research labs have the expertise and equipment to help the country test for covid nineteen. If even one tenth of these labs joined the effort we could. Test an additional five, hundred thousand to one million samples a day. Your larger point here is that there are ways to get to more people and and then figure it out early rather than what we're in right now where there are some places where people are waiting in excess of seven days for typical test results in a in a concentrated environment like Michigan state you can. You can see things early and intervene. Absolutely and I think it's really important to note when you're talking about the pet that we put together. The vast amount of resources and know how that existed the academic laboratories universities across the country. Each one of the things that we've proposed was to develop biomedical National Guard and utilize all of these individual laboratories across the country and have them be organized through the federal government in order to be able to respond to pandemics or other natural disasters with biomedical know-how and that if we could get something like that done if the next administration is interested in doing something like that, we can be. Proactive instead of reactive in these kinds of situations. Wow. That's incredible because you just answer the question I was going to ask I was going to say, Hey, what can government do to take advantage of these kinds of resources and you just answer that I just want to say that again, a biomedical National Guard what a great simple idea resources all over the country run by different people but the the government of the United States providing the centralization for the data and the distribution. If you think about all of the laboratories and universities that were shut down as a result of the pandemic so many people were were sitting home like I sitting home on on zoom all day. If we have opportunity to come back into the laboratory and help. We can do so much in terms of trying to not only develop new new treatments and and working on new methods of detection, which is what our laboratory did during during April we can marshal all of these resources all. Know How that exists in order to to. Attack this problem in a concerted and coordinated way. Lifting. There's not a lot of great news about Krono virus, but I have to tell you after this conversation. I'm optimistic that there are people like you around this country who are actually in this moment while everything looks as grim as it is finding solutions that are going to help us see the other side of the coronavirus. Dr. Jack Lift Lipton is the chair and professor of translational neuro size. I don't even know what that is. We'll talk about that another time at Michigan State University. Thank you for all that you are doing and good luck to you at Michigan. State, we'll stay on top of this with you. When we come back civil rights legend John Lewis passes the torch. So the next generation of activists hear him deliver his inspirational words himself next..

Michigan Dr. Jack Lift Lipton Michigan State University biomedical National Guard United States Dr Jack Translational Neuroscience Wall Street Journal John Lewis professor
"translational neuroscience" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

09:27 min | 3 months ago

"translational neuroscience" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

"Michigan was one of the State's first at bat against a huge outbreak of corona virus. . Michigan hit its peak in April reporting a high of more than eighteen hundred new cases on April. . The third new cases remained above fifteen hundred for days that month Governor Gretchen whitmer declared a state of emergency by April first she closed all schools throughout the academic year hospitals were overrun even as workers faced layoffs and paycuts thousands. . Of medical workers came down with the virus as they struggled to treat patients, , and by the end of the month, , the state ranked third for the highest number of coronavirus fatalities in the country Michigan struggled to bend the curve, , but Michigan came through the curve bent. . Now, , the question is whether Michigan can stay out of the red zone and the state has seen a few smaller waves since the worst of it this spring, , there was the outbreak last month that. . Harper's bar the popular haunt for Michigan State University which reopened to an unexpectedly large crowd on June. . The eighth local reporters found young patrons lining up less than six feet apart, , and then packing the dance floor like they would on an ordinary non pandemic night. . No masks to see in that picture state health officials later link that bar nearly two hundred new infections and today Michigan posted one of its higher totals of statewide new cases for the past couple of. . Months and that's concerning especially because everywhere in the country right now, , educators are trying to figure out how to get education going again it's basically every state and in some instances, , every school district or even school for themselves at Michigan, State, , , in East Lansing, they're , exploring a combination strategy that's going to be new to them, , and that might be new for anyone else and it starts with a spit test developed at the university by neuroscience professor named Jack Lipton this man. . The kit costs around three dollars a piece, , and as you can see, , it's pretty simple. . You can do this in the privacy of your own apartment or dorm room you put your sample in the vial with the Little Barcode you seal it in the bag and Wallah your part is over the lab at Michigan State will take your sample and combine it with others in what is known as pool testing, , which maybe you've heard about recently, , the idea behind pulled testing is that it can help labs do more way more with weight less instead of having each person take their own. . Separate test you pull the samples from a small number of people about a dozen and you run a single test on that pool of the pool turns up positive only then do you need each person in the pool to take a test but if the pool turns up negative, , you're done the single test covered a dozen people in a place where you expect a lot of negatives. . Pool testing is remarkably efficient at Michigan state. . They're going to step further than that. . Each volunteer who takes a spit test goes into separate pools of about ten or so people so think about it like. . Two teams. . You're Miami Dolphin and a Seattle Seahawk, , or you're Houston rocket and in Minnesota Timber Wolves choose your metaphor. . The point is if two pools come back with positive results, , it can only mean one thing. . The lab just finds the person who belongs to both pools using a handy grid like this one, , and then recommends that that person get a follow up diagnostic test. . It's like playing Bingo be six Bingo you might have corona virus. . That's what Professor Lipton plans to do with samples from MSU volunteers testing two thousand of them every day and referring any apparent positives for an individual diagnostic test. . Now, the , third and most unusual part of this plan has to do with sewage scientists are discovering that they can spot a rising rotavirus cases early on by texting. . Communities, , Wastewater Michigan State, , professor, , Joan Rose and her team have been testing the campus wastewater. . Since April she says, , they noticed a peak in the virus that lined up with the news about an outbreak at a college hang out which demonstrated that there sewage diving expeditions worked I made that up I don't know if they're actually diving. . For the testing this fall, , the idea is to sample the wastewater from different places on campus so that they can get hyper local data if they can get good enough at sampling and turning around their result in a timely fashion, their , work could act as an early alert system for Michigan State perhaps, , even at the level of individual buildings. . So you've got the pool testing with the affordable spit kits you've got expanded. . Diagnostic testing. . But literally just for those people who appear to be positive or just playing turn-up sick and then you've got the wastewater testing which increasingly looks like a functioning means of getting a warning in time to react if the plan works, , it could help the university find and contain outbreaks. . If it works the plan could help Michigan State and it's sixty seven thousand students stay on campus and have something like a semester. . Joining us now is the aforementioned Dr Jack? ? Lipton. . Of Translational Neuroscience at Michigan State University Dr Lipton. . Thank you for being with us. . We've heard about pool testing I want you to tell us a little more about it and why it <hes> it specifically helpful in this instance what what about Michigan State makes it a perfect candidate for the pooling of spit. . What would you think about <hes> full testing end and Michigan state one of the things that you're that <hes> is really important to understand that the resources that we have is that university are fairly limited. . Bright. . But we're not a multinational corporation. . So funds are limited resources are limited and pooling allows us to. . <hes>. . have. . More. . More test being done with the same amount of resources or with less resources. So . in this case, , if we're dealing with supply chain issues with testing <hes>, , if we can test ten people with reagents that we would need to test one person, , then we are were saving a lot in terms of of supplies, , and if we don't have to run ten tests and we can run one test, , we save a lot of time. . So if you can save time and you can save supplies, , you're going to <hes>. . Yeah. . Ultimately conserve and that's really what our goal is and this. . This works 'cause you're not expecting <hes> a large proportion of people to have this thing right. . So generally speaking a bunch of these pools, , we'll come out negative. . Right. . <hes> pools if you if you have about ten people in a pool in your expectation is maybe seeing two or three out of a hundred people. . Show up positive than most of your pools are going to be negative. . The more the prevalence increases the more the rates of infection increase. . Then you're going to have more and more positive bulls. . If one out of every ten people are positive than a pool of ten, , most likely is going to have a positive individual in it. . So you have to really balance pool size and prevalence together in order to come up with the right balance to save resources and save time. . So <hes> the this actually could have broader implications <hes>. . There's a Wall Street Journal op-ed that you wrote about a previous test not this one that we're talking about, , but it was a concept of pulling in you set across the United States tens of thousands of similar academic research labs have the expertise and equipment to help the country test for covid nineteen. . If even one tenth of these labs joined the effort we could. . Test an additional five, , hundred thousand to one million samples a day. . Your larger point here is that there are ways to get to more people and and then figure it out early rather than what we're in right now where there are some places where people are waiting in excess of seven days for typical test results <hes> in a in a concentrated environment like Michigan state you can. You . can see things early and intervene. . Absolutely and I think it's really important to note when you're talking about the pet that we put together. . The vast amount of resources and know how that existed the academic laboratories universities across the country. Each . one of the things that we've proposed was to develop biomedical National Guard and utilize all of these individual laboratories across the country and have them be organized through the federal government in order to be able to respond to pandemics or other natural disasters with biomedical know-how and that if we could get something like that done <hes>, , if the next administration is interested in doing something like that, , we can be. . Proactive instead of reactive in these kinds of situations. . Wow. . That's incredible because you just answer the question I was going to ask I was going to say, , Hey, , what can government do to take advantage of these kinds of resources and you just answer that I just want to say that again, , a biomedical National Guard what a great simple idea <hes> resources all over the country <hes> run by different people but the the government of the United States <hes> providing the centralization for the data and the distribution. . If you think about all of the laboratories and universities that were shut down as a result of the pandemic so many people were were sitting home like I sitting home on on zoom all day. . If we have opportunity to come back into the laboratory and help. . We can do so much in terms of trying to not only develop new <hes> new treatments and and working on new methods of detection, which , is what our laboratory did during during April <hes> we can marshal all of these resources all. . Know How that exists in order to <hes> to. . Attack this problem in a concerted and coordinated way. . Lifting. . There's not a lot of great news about Krono virus, , but I have to tell you after this conversation. . I'm optimistic that there are people like you around this country who are actually in this moment while everything looks as grim as it is <hes> finding solutions that are going to help us see the other side of the coronavirus. . Dr. . Jack Lift Lipton is the chair and professor of translational neuro size. I . don't even know what that is. We'll . talk about that another time at Michigan State University. . Thank you for all that you are doing and good luck to you at Michigan. . State, , we'll stay on top of this with you. .

Michigan Michigan State University Florida ABC News Wastewater Michigan State Professor Lipton Arizona professor Governor Gretchen whitmer New York New Jersey DHS Department of Homeland Securit Harper East Lansing MSU Miami Dolphin Mississippi Seattle Minnesota California
Michigan tries new approaches to coronavirus testing

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

09:27 min | 3 months ago

Michigan tries new approaches to coronavirus testing

"Michigan was one of the State's first at bat against a huge outbreak of corona virus. Michigan hit its peak in April reporting a high of more than eighteen hundred new cases on April. The third new cases remained above fifteen hundred for days that month Governor Gretchen whitmer declared a state of emergency by April first she closed all schools throughout the academic year hospitals were overrun even as workers faced layoffs and paycuts thousands. Of medical workers came down with the virus as they struggled to treat patients, and by the end of the month, the state ranked third for the highest number of coronavirus fatalities in the country Michigan struggled to bend the curve, but Michigan came through the curve bent. Now, the question is whether Michigan can stay out of the red zone and the state has seen a few smaller waves since the worst of it this spring, there was the outbreak last month that. Harper's bar the popular haunt for Michigan State University which reopened to an unexpectedly large crowd on June. The eighth local reporters found young patrons lining up less than six feet apart, and then packing the dance floor like they would on an ordinary non pandemic night. No masks to see in that picture state health officials later link that bar nearly two hundred new infections and today Michigan posted one of its higher totals of statewide new cases for the past couple of. Months and that's concerning especially because everywhere in the country right now, educators are trying to figure out how to get education going again it's basically every state and in some instances, every school district or even school for themselves at Michigan, State, in East Lansing, they're exploring a combination strategy that's going to be new to them, and that might be new for anyone else and it starts with a spit test developed at the university by neuroscience professor named Jack Lipton this man. The kit costs around three dollars a piece, and as you can see, it's pretty simple. You can do this in the privacy of your own apartment or dorm room you put your sample in the vial with the Little Barcode you seal it in the bag and Wallah your part is over the lab at Michigan State will take your sample and combine it with others in what is known as pool testing, which maybe you've heard about recently, the idea behind pulled testing is that it can help labs do more way more with weight less instead of having each person take their own. Separate test you pull the samples from a small number of people about a dozen and you run a single test on that pool of the pool turns up positive only then do you need each person in the pool to take a test but if the pool turns up negative, you're done the single test covered a dozen people in a place where you expect a lot of negatives. Pool testing is remarkably efficient at Michigan state. They're going to step further than that. Each volunteer who takes a spit test goes into separate pools of about ten or so people so think about it like. Two teams. You're Miami Dolphin and a Seattle Seahawk, or you're Houston rocket and in Minnesota Timber Wolves choose your metaphor. The point is if two pools come back with positive results, it can only mean one thing. The lab just finds the person who belongs to both pools using a handy grid like this one, and then recommends that that person get a follow up diagnostic test. It's like playing Bingo be six Bingo you might have corona virus. That's what Professor Lipton plans to do with samples from MSU volunteers testing two thousand of them every day and referring any apparent positives for an individual diagnostic test. Now, the third and most unusual part of this plan has to do with sewage scientists are discovering that they can spot a rising rotavirus cases early on by texting. Communities, Wastewater Michigan State, professor, Joan Rose and her team have been testing the campus wastewater. Since April she says, they noticed a peak in the virus that lined up with the news about an outbreak at a college hang out which demonstrated that there sewage diving expeditions worked I made that up I don't know if they're actually diving. For the testing this fall, the idea is to sample the wastewater from different places on campus so that they can get hyper local data if they can get good enough at sampling and turning around their result in a timely fashion, their work could act as an early alert system for Michigan State perhaps, even at the level of individual buildings. So you've got the pool testing with the affordable spit kits you've got expanded. Diagnostic testing. But literally just for those people who appear to be positive or just playing turn-up sick and then you've got the wastewater testing which increasingly looks like a functioning means of getting a warning in time to react if the plan works, it could help the university find and contain outbreaks. If it works the plan could help Michigan State and it's sixty seven thousand students stay on campus and have something like a semester. Joining us now is the aforementioned Dr Jack? Lipton. Of Translational Neuroscience at Michigan State University Dr Lipton. Thank you for being with us. We've heard about pool testing I want you to tell us a little more about it and why it it specifically helpful in this instance what what about Michigan State makes it a perfect candidate for the pooling of spit. What would you think about full testing end and Michigan state one of the things that you're that is really important to understand that the resources that we have is that university are fairly limited. Bright. But we're not a multinational corporation. So funds are limited resources are limited and pooling allows us to. have. More. More test being done with the same amount of resources or with less resources. So in this case, if we're dealing with supply chain issues with testing if we can test ten people with reagents that we would need to test one person, then we are were saving a lot in terms of of supplies, and if we don't have to run ten tests and we can run one test, we save a lot of time. So if you can save time and you can save supplies, you're going to Yeah. Ultimately conserve and that's really what our goal is and this. This works 'cause you're not expecting a large proportion of people to have this thing right. So generally speaking a bunch of these pools, we'll come out negative. Right. pools if you if you have about ten people in a pool in your expectation is maybe seeing two or three out of a hundred people. Show up positive than most of your pools are going to be negative. The more the prevalence increases the more the rates of infection increase. Then you're going to have more and more positive bulls. If one out of every ten people are positive than a pool of ten, most likely is going to have a positive individual in it. So you have to really balance pool size and prevalence together in order to come up with the right balance to save resources and save time. So the this actually could have broader implications There's a Wall Street Journal op-ed that you wrote about a previous test not this one that we're talking about, but it was a concept of pulling in you set across the United States tens of thousands of similar academic research labs have the expertise and equipment to help the country test for covid nineteen. If even one tenth of these labs joined the effort we could. Test an additional five, hundred thousand to one million samples a day. Your larger point here is that there are ways to get to more people and and then figure it out early rather than what we're in right now where there are some places where people are waiting in excess of seven days for typical test results in a in a concentrated environment like Michigan state you can. You can see things early and intervene. Absolutely and I think it's really important to note when you're talking about the pet that we put together. The vast amount of resources and know how that existed the academic laboratories universities across the country. Each one of the things that we've proposed was to develop biomedical National Guard and utilize all of these individual laboratories across the country and have them be organized through the federal government in order to be able to respond to pandemics or other natural disasters with biomedical know-how and that if we could get something like that done if the next administration is interested in doing something like that, we can be. Proactive instead of reactive in these kinds of situations. Wow. That's incredible because you just answer the question I was going to ask I was going to say, Hey, what can government do to take advantage of these kinds of resources and you just answer that I just want to say that again, a biomedical National Guard what a great simple idea resources all over the country run by different people but the the government of the United States providing the centralization for the data and the distribution. If you think about all of the laboratories and universities that were shut down as a result of the pandemic so many people were were sitting home like I sitting home on on zoom all day. If we have opportunity to come back into the laboratory and help. We can do so much in terms of trying to not only develop new new treatments and and working on new methods of detection, which is what our laboratory did during during April we can marshal all of these resources all. Know How that exists in order to to. Attack this problem in a concerted and coordinated way. Lifting. There's not a lot of great news about Krono virus, but I have to tell you after this conversation. I'm optimistic that there are people like you around this country who are actually in this moment while everything looks as grim as it is finding solutions that are going to help us see the other side of the coronavirus. Dr. Jack Lift Lipton is the chair and professor of translational neuro size. I don't even know what that is. We'll talk about that another time at Michigan State University. Thank you for all that you are doing and good luck to you at Michigan. State, we'll stay on top of this with you.

Michigan Michigan State University Dr. Jack Lift Lipton Wastewater Michigan State Professor Governor Gretchen Whitmer United States Harper Dr Jack MSU Biomedical National Guard East Lansing Translational Neuroscience Miami Dolphin Wall Street Journal Seattle Minnesota Joan Rose
"translational neuroscience" Discussed on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

13:22 min | 6 months ago

"translational neuroscience" Discussed on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

"Into any now. You've been reported to be out there saying that. You know if we got a lot of the academic labs like your own. That aren't doing research because of covert one thousand nine hundred you generate five hundred thousand to a million copies and thank you were quoted as saying a million today. Five hundred thousand to a million tests today. Is that really plausible? I think it's absolutely blow. I think it's basic mass. There's easily ten thousand labs out there in academia that can run this kind of test the real time. Pcr system is is very common in molecular biology laboratories and anyone from a plant biologists to a neuroscientist scientists We all use these tools. And you've seen barrier. You've reported a barrier in getting your type of lab and your type of test approved and a lot have the government sanctioned allow it to be used for clinical determinations. What are those barriers and your experience so the main problem is that in order to run any of these chest you must be clear. Credit the clear accreditation process involves getting a board certified laboratory director. That is something that as an example I can't do but in the middle of a pandemic I think we need to think about liberalising Our criteria while not sacrificing quality for the kind of work that. We're trying to do here. Which is getting everyone to stand up and do what they can for this crisis and I think if we get developed a pandemic national guard of biomedical scientists and pre certify them for this kind of work. We could stand this up whenever we need to without developing huge amount of infrastructure like You know right now. The test costs for reimbursing for for Corona virus. Testing is now at one hundred dollars a sample so cms which is the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services Inc. A one hundred dollars per sample and that's because they need to hire more people and by more women at places like West Diagnostics or labcorp. If we were able to use the existing infrastructure that we had at universities we would be much better equipped and we wouldn't be spending money on equipment in Labor that is going to be. Moss balked at the end of this. We can utilize the people that we have or some of the most highly skilled researchers in the world to be able to do something they do all the time in a relatively standardized and simple way. What's the most interesting thing you found since doing coveted one thousand nine testing? Well thank you. I think both surprising thing to me was the length of time that individuals shed the virus. So when you hear people talk about if you're exposed to someone that has had covered nineteen or stink you have isolates for fourteen days People tend to think that that means that this disease is a fourteen to force. It's not People can be shutting this this virus for four or five five weeks longer so I think that people really need to understand the length of this disease. In how sneaky it is because people can feel better and You know we talked to our subjects and they feel better but they're still shedding virus and so that means that when you're you're like Hey. I'm going to go outside now. You shouldn't do that. Jack Lipton the chair of translational neuroscience and Michigan State and the certification. He's looking for is clear. Not Clear like I said which is why I need too late. Let Zeke handle these things Zeke. That was fascinating. The last thing you know fascinating but the last thing he said it's possible that you could be shedding virus if you have it for four to five weeks well again that we know that some people can shed for a long time. What we don't know are two variables there which is how many people shed for a long time. What's that curve? Look like our most people stopping to shed after a few days. Fourteen days or Do we actually have a sizable number? That go out many days. And if they're shedding are they really infective? How can how contagious are they? And that again is something. We don't know those are two important questions but we have known that some people can shed for a very long time and it stopped looked inside even when they're feeling good and VACs one of the problems of this illness that's why can spread so easily and opening up can be dangerous because people feel good and they're still chatting Thanks for clarifying that while. There's still some issues about accessibility when it comes to getting a test to see whether you have covert nineteen. It's getting much easier to find a different kind of test. The kind that can tell you whether you've had the virus in recovered the second kind of test checks for antibodies in your blood but many of those tests have not been federally approved and could be producing unreliable results. Nbc's Josh Letterman reports quote. As of this week one hundred fifty antibody tests also known as serology tests are on the US market without having faced government review according to data from the Food Administrator Food and Drug Administration. Another twenty four labs are conducting their own antibody testing without having obtained FDA authorization and quote several companies which produce these antibody tests are now the subject of an ongoing congressional in for investigation. Joining me. Now is congressman Roger Christian more. Who's a Democrat from Illinois? He's the Chairman of the House Oversight Subcommittee and Economic and Consumer Policy Congressman. Good to see you. Thank you for being with us. Tell me about this. I mean we have this real excitement about getting these tests out there and I think it may not even occur to people but even the test needs. Fda approval is it because of potential dangers in the tests or is it because they just might not be that accurate. While you're right that these serological tests hold great promise however what we've learned is that the FDA has allowed hundreds of unregulated potentially fraudulent test to flood the market and. Here's the problem alley. And that is a large proportion of them have high false positives. Meaning that if you were to take this antibody test and it yielded a false positive result. You could be fooled into thinking that you have antibodies to cove in nineteen and potentially immunity. When you actually do not and so you could relax your social distancing go out and interact with a bunch of people catch cove in nineteen and then get other people sick as well so you could make some really dangerous life. Decisions based on these unregulated potentially very fraudulent tests the other issue we have. I want to just show you a New York Times report. That one. In Four New Yorkers had contracted Covert nineteen the preliminary data suggests that many more New Yorkers may have been infected than was previously believed in their reports like this from all around the country. What does that tell us? Because there are a lot of people who are anxious to know if they were exposed to it because it might allow them to either make decisions or know who to support in what sometimes feels like a very political fight about whether we should be going back to work or continuing stayed home. The short answer is that scientists still unsettled. Exactly what the presence of these Kobe. Antibodies means in terms of how much immunity they confer if any on people for what length of time and what that really means in terms of what you can and can't do and your daily activities. This is were the. Fda has to step into the void and give us precise standards so that even if you get the results back from these covert ninety tests you know what to do with them besides that we think that the FDA should clear the market of all those tests and only allow authorized tests to be on the market. Today there are only eight authorized tests according to the FDA's website whereas there's more than one hundred and fifty unauthorized tests. Which as I said could could be very faulty in terms of their results congressman given all this uncertainty. Do you think it's safe to open up a US? Based upon whether people have antibodies or not or is that just way too premature Given what we know about the Faulting serology tests doctor. I think it's It's it's too premature. We just don't know yet It's true that it holds great potential. But if you're rushing to reopen your economy based on these serological tests that are on the marketplace. I think you'd better think twice because Right now in the absence of precise standards and science telling us what it means to have these antibodies in terms of what you can and can't do an engaging with other people. I don't think you could just reopened the economy and say hey you have covert nineteen. Antibodies you can go out and relax social distancing and do whatever you want. We're not there yet. Talk of course are mortally. Thanks for joining US coming up the extended unemployment crisis what it means for Americans in Georgia Today. Most kinds of businesses were open again after the governor decided not to extend his order for staying at home already. Georgia had begun allowing restaurants to serve a limited number of dining customers which led scenes of waiters in masks reading customers over customer. Mortar waffles and cups of coffee in states that have begun reopening. People who cannot work from home are being given what feels like an impossible choice. Go back to work and risk their health or stay at home and continue to miss wages. The most pressing example or workers in meat plants the Centers for Disease Control said today that one hundred fifteen meat and poultry plants in nineteen states have reported outbreaks involving thousands of workers. At least twenty meatpacking workers have died of corona virus. This week the president signed an order designed to keep the plant open at a poultry plant in Pennsylvania. Today workers protested for more protective equipment. They also want the plant closed for cleaning after they say more than twenty workers tested positive at a beef plant in Colorado which reopened a week ago. Several workers have died of corona virus a worker they're told NBC News. He's happy to work but he's pleading for every worker to get tested. We're practicing social dish. Since and some of the areas you can't have Soho distance of the fix me. And so like today I was working and next to a guy and we kept bumping into each other and like my I worry was what if he has the virus and he keeps bumping agent me. And like you know come to me and then I'm going to bring it home and then like all my roommates. My son like everybody. You're GONNA get it. Stay at home and lose pay or go to work and risk spreading the virus as more states reopen. That's becoming the inescapable dilemma. For millions of Americans joining me now is Sylvia allographs. She's a Labor economist. And Co Chair of the center. Wage and Employment Dynamics at the University of California Berkeley Sylvia. Thank you for joining us. Look this is a tough one and it is tougher yet for those people who have no choice in the matter often wage. Earning workers have less choice than most people do. But in this case the president has invoked the defense production act to keep some of these folks at work and even though many of them are unionized. The Union can override that. So what do you make of this situation? This is this is people who they want to work. But they don't WanNa die. Well I think the the first half of your show released sums it up without adequate testing tracing isolating P p. e. Were just sending a lot of these workers their families and spreading this community to their deaths. We know that they're correlations between all of this and you know even though You know a trump signed the executive order to send them to work. He did so without any guidance. I mean there's some guidance from Osha but there's no real hard and fast regulation with any To it it's. It's clear that it's much too soon to be doing this. And as you said it we have hot spots all over the country where these meat packing plants exist are complicated problem and it would seem like the communities in which the meat packing plants are located would actually be against opening them prematurely without testing. Because we saw in South Dakota you can spread it not just within a plant but outside the plant want someone gets infected or is that worker said..

FDA US congressman president congressman Roger Christian laboratory director Food Administrator Food and Dr Zeke New York Times Nbc Illinois South Dakota Centers for Disease Control Georgia Center for Medicare Moss Michigan
"translational neuroscience" Discussed on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

03:19 min | 6 months ago

"translational neuroscience" Discussed on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

"Since the corona virus pandemic began there has been one constant among all experts the need for more testing on March sixth when the United States had only two hundred seventeen confirmed cases of corona virus. This is what president trump said while visiting the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta. Anybody that wants to test can get a test. That's what I would say that we started tonight. The United States has one million one hundred and two thousand nine hundred thirty seven confirmed cases of Corona virus. Now the actual number of cases is likely much higher. But we don't really know because we still do not have enough tests. There have been shortages at times of everything necessary to conduct those tests including personal protective equipment. Specialized swabs the reagents chemicals needed by labs and machines to run those samples across the country. There are thousands of academic labs that could test for the virus that are being unused. That's according to an OP. Ed In the Wall Street Journal written by two neuroscientists from Michigan State University. They write our team. Our research team US Food and Drug Administration guidelines at a scientific report from China to develop a Cova one thousand nine hundred tests in early March. It took one week. Our test doesn't use. The reagents other labs are desperately seeking and it could identify levels of virus so low but a typical test could miss them entirely yet. Our lab sits idle the sticking. Point is something called Clinical Laboratory. Improvement Amendments Certification also known as Cle- most academic labs currently do not have this certification. But with it these labs could help drastically increase testing in the United States. Jack Lipton is chair of transnational neuroscience at Michigan State Chart Translational Neuroscience at Michigan State University College of Human Medicine and he co-authored that op-ed. He talked to Zeke about his labs diagnostic test also known as PC OUR TEST. And what a prompt accreditation from federal government could mean for. America's fight against rotavirus. Wanted to talk to you I to explain to people. What a P. C. R. Test is and what the steps. We have to go through our so. I you get a nasal swab or you get a saliva swab And then you in the lab isolate the Arunee the genetic code in the virus. Then what do you do to get the tasks and determine if the person's been infected or not so we take that and we turned it into something stable which is DNA than we take that bit and we amplify it and we take it in and we run it through several cycles with some some enzymes and those allow it to reach cycle the larger that we amplify the more we start to develop a a lengthy signal and through that signal. We end up. Seeing weather we've amplified the genetic code virus and if we did we will get frank signal and that produces reading tells us if we are indeed the presence of the virus.

United States Jack Lipton US Food and Drug Administratio Michigan State Chart Translati Centers for Disease Control Michigan State University Michigan State University Coll Atlanta Wall Street Journal trump president rotavirus frank America Point Clinical Laboratory China Zeke
"translational neuroscience" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

08:12 min | 6 months ago

"translational neuroscience" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Welcome back to the improv show and we go from Jack lived in a translational neuroscience professor at Michigan state to James Logan who is the head of the department of disease control director of the arthropod control product to test center arthropod to be distinguished from the Cillian Murphy anthropoid movie and also Britain's leading expert on insect repellents and methods of personal protection against an arthropod vectors so we go from neuroscience in humans two of the study of insects and it's it's fascinating talk about all hands on deck for combating cove it nineteen a James Logan is the principal investigator of a large research portfolio investigating novel ways to control arthropod vectors that transmit pathogens of medical importance including seca malaria and dengue fever and he's making at least the prospect of combating covered nineteen fun if you thought the Abbott labs test was cool you haven't heard anything yet James Logan thanks so much for joining us Preciado hi there so I read the this piece the New York Post and in the headline I thought this was gonna be sort of one of the sensational a tabloid pieces but this is some Syrians serious science business and the just of it is the prospect that dogs properly trained could actually detect somebody infected with covert nineteen please explain so what we know guards looks to be the the fact that when you have to be quite often change your body would actually change the way you smile we know that for a number of the previous work on malaria has demonstrated that when you have the infection when you're checking the area your body odor changes and what that does is it actually makes it more attractive to mosquitoes will let you keep that combines to to achieve competency and but what we have also done age trained dogs to detect people who have malaria infections of dogs have an incredibly good sense of smell and they can learn smells as well so we know that don't have the ability to do that you can clear scientifically robust experiments it has been demonstrated that dogs can detect odors associated with medical conditions and we know that most because he does have an older below that other restrictions didn't have an order I'm so tired like clear that cupboard nineteen has a specific order that's that's the first thing that we have to demonstrate but if we do demonstrate and then I am confident that told you will be able to detect and any you you mentioned you you mention malaria for example but also it's been reported diabetes Parkinson's even for different types of cancer dogs could actually detect with a high degree of accuracy yeah that's that's right so that that there's a whole range of medical conditions but it often older dogs can detect and offered them although there are some reports of people being able to detect looters well usually our sense of smell is not very good but adult is now so much technology and and other great reader learning where you expose into your smile and get my rewards from the pack that's not correct and if you can to associate now we're awards on the line but not not on speaking openly Connecticut and and we at the London school of hygiene and tropical medicine where you're the head of the department disease control you you all have trained Labradors and Cocker spaniel to detect malaria as you were just describing how do you how do you identify the breed of dog or dog the or the breeds of dog that could be used for this disease detection so I'm so we don't have the dogs are not in the mood to Los Alamos I'm unfortunately that would be quite nice yeah and but we do work with a charity your record is currently culture art medical detection dogs who are our partners and they specialize in choosing the right hi could tell for deterrence is thirty nine and actually the corn dog so they they have managed to get several hundred calls I couldn't believe he didn't carry them to help with the detection all the creation what people in the community so we work with but he died protecting dogs that were looking at using our and he can he can but Labradors because laughter towards war and spaniels which would be very very good records but also I'm very good at learning the template of the dog and the ability to learn and enjoy reading portion but we're alive although the exploits of dog expert you do like talking at the moment we have six dogs some of those folks where are malaria talks land but we have six dogs that are ready to be trained as fascinating and and so that the training and then the testing is so give us the the sense of how that proceeds in terms of the did the training and then the the trials if you will the clinical trials if you will get the first stages see you and the the critical part of this is we will be collecting samples from people who have an infection in people who don't have an infection transaction costs to confront what's really important is that the some of the collection from people who have an infection we don't have any symptoms so he might be a symptomatic proportion of the population what it might be people here are if you are infected but before they develop symptoms not should be deported once we got those samples with and tested with the dogs and train the dogs to detect the smell now within a couple of weeks we know whether there is this now the by that they can protect you or not then within about four to six weeks you will train them sufficiently that we will know how accurately they can detect so it's important that we know how well they can detect somebody infected collected on somebody on the track and correctly and at the same time will also be doing analytical chemistry on the orders to identify biomarkers within with associated with the infection and Anna and again per your previous experience training dogs with respect identifying malaria infection if you suggest that your accuracy is above World Health Organization standards for diagnostic yes that's right SO four four R. malaria I'm for other diseases the accuracy is is very very high for the area and you know I thought the the level to be able to help both health organizations expect for a diagnostic so it does look very very good accuracy and one of the other keys today since it's not just the potential of getting through the trials and the corn dogs but also the number of people that the talks will be able to screen so each individual dog could scream scream up to two hundred and fifty people our file and so on but looking at filling that out but other organizations who have working dogs already in place for different purposes you know think about airports with dogs that are drug dealers and I'm I'm not sort of thing so there's already a model to your socks and I could not reach a meeting airports are going to be very important venue for and for this type of tool that's fascinating and making cove it nineteen testing fun and to to the consort of kind explain it as fun as you can make it he's James Logan he's the head of the department of disease control director of the arthropod control products test center and Britain's leading expert on insect repellents and methods of personal protection against arthropod vectors as he was describing James Logan thanks so much for joining us will be watching with the bated breath.

Jack professor James Logan director Michigan
"translational neuroscience" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

09:55 min | 6 months ago

"translational neuroscience" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Mention the Santa Clara county testing that was done by our friend Dr J. but sharia from Stanford there was another study out yesterday from a USC of LA county the outbreak in LA county could be up to fifty five times bigger than the number of confirmed cases according to USC researchers at the research study conducted with the LA department public health they're a a preliminary results found that an estimated four point one percent of the county's adult population has antibodies to the corner virus so that's between their estimate is between two and twenty one thousand four hundred forty two thousand adults in LA county that's twenty eight to fifty five times higher than the eight thousand confirmed cases reported in the county through early April same sort of thing in Santa Clara county the cabbie ought to that well there's a couple one is there are and I and we when we get to doctor J. not the Virginia squires Philadelphia Sixers Dr K. but the doctor K. from Stanford on back on the show to address the criticisms of the methodology of his study got addressed criticisms you know this is this is a preliminary has been peer reviewed the other can't yet I would add is you're still talking about and and again the numbers for the similar in Santa Clara two to four percent two to four percent in LA county so that's not the twenty five to fifty percent that some more projecting was the percentage of the population that was and had been infected but asymptomatic into developed antibodies and so the rest of the population the percentage the population that is truly was still vulnerable to the virus is much smaller than imagine you're still only talking about four percent that still leaves a huge percentage obviously the overwhelming majority of the population that still has threat of exposure so it's good to get this information and hopefully we'll be getting more of it to do a better job modeling and understanding what the potential downside is if you will but it's not as encouraging as finding out that twenty five fifty percent of the population has that we've developed herd immunity and it's a very small percentage of the population that still has a real threat that some faces a real threat from the virus those numbers don't tell us that I don't believe for more on the whole topic of a testing what we know what we don't know we're pleased to be joined by Jack Lifton is a PhD chair and professor of translational neuroscience at Michigan State University Jack Lifton thanks so much for joining us say hi this party for us I'll do that yes thank you for having me on so you and your colleague professor sort well had this op ed in the Wall Street journal about a task that has been developed there at Michigan state and you want to use it a covert nineteen tests and you want to use it but your not able to use it and you want to be able to use it so tell us the story of you got this test and why can't you use it so we read a report that came out of the university and Wuhan China on on an acid that they had developed there and I worked with Carol sort well and one of our other assistant professors Jill Patterson we look at it and said to we adopt this and and check it out because we're neuroscientists we usually work in Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease services in our area but we do molecular biology and we work with viruses all the time for therapeutic so we thought we could take this test and adapted the test was reported to be about five hundred times more sensitive than the standard test that's used to detect the virus may reduces the number of false positives are some false negatives of people that that get missed by the standard test since it's more sensitive we can detect more poor people so we decided to develop this this test make sure that this report out of China was valid so we took it we adopted it kind of made our own and we have it working so we're using it for research purposes right now so we can test humans through human subject studies but we can't use the test clinically and the reason that we can't is because research laboratories are not licensed to offer clinical diagnostic testing services related to some legislation that was passed in nineteen eighty eight which is in effect for good reason right the idea of having some regulations to make sure that laboratory they give you your tests for cholesterol or vitamin deficiencies or viral tests are consistently giving reliable and robust inference information back to patients and a lab in New York if you the same information that eleven Nebraska does but right now those regulations prevent us from using that test or even the regular standard CDC approved test because they won't allow university led to do this work this seems to me this is like that this is a Scott Hahn issue this is the FDA doing a waiver of this law or obviously with the assent of the president but that that's really what we're talking about here is whether through a state agency or contract or your your members of Congress or directly the FDA they should just be waving this this restriction yeah and they have they have a lack a lot of rules so some of the rules that that are are in place you know you have to use very specific chemicals to do the work and they have used some of those they allow research use only materials to be used but and they're they're making it available they have these xcelerated process these calls E. ways or emergency use authorizations where individuals laboratories can put in for they have a new test they don't have any test I want you to validate it here's the data I have on it and they'll say sure use it even though we have an approved it you can see you're still authorized to use it so there are ways that they've been relaxing things in the pandemic to try and make things easier but this one saying basically accreditation which laboratories like quest diagnostics Oakley accreditation other hospital laboratories to but we can't if they could eat that one piece we can still do everything with the same amount of rigor and follow the FDA protocols to demonstrate we have a working test so have you got it we just can't have you gotten feedback in terms of why you haven't received that waiver I think it requires some political well right people have to be willing to to say we're going to do this and exactly whether it comes from the state where the state's gonna say this seems sufficient for us because there seems to be a lot of back and forth between what the federal government says its responsibility is in the state of the mandate from the federal government the states have to regulate it based upon the federal government guidelines there's a lot of finger pointing there and also whether this can be taken care of by decorative order or whether it has to involve legislation I'm not an attorney so when I read the statute I'm like now I don't know yeah that sounds like it sounds like something the FDA could work around if they were somehow it made it yeah it is so there has been reports about the neurological impact of cove in nineteen and I wonder if you or your colleagues have actually studied the virus at all and those reported neurological impacts no I've I've been reading some of those reports as well and everything so new right now exactly what what those are and what the you know the penetrance of that what Chris and to people have neurological complications there's so many different things that we don't know about this yet and trying to understand cofactors that may just be aggravating existing conditions and people to get them the virus versus actual changes in and neurological function as a result of the virus isn't that right now we really can't figure that out you know the virus does produce a lot of information so that's one of the big things right your lungs get inflamed you can't you know fluid builds up you can't breathe and so once you have large amounts of information that are floating around through the body and that's it this occurs because your body's immune reaction releases a bunch of chemicals that cause inflammation that's used to help clear an infection but at the same time that information hurts you it's not something that we're very is very commonly known in neurological disorders so if you have a stroke to the information associated with that injury and produces additional brain damage so understanding whether it's viruses affect on inflammation which is producing a logical problems or if the virus is actually producing direct changes in the brain is really a question that needs to be answered what what's your a perspective on the antibody testing that is slowly getting rolled out finally here but that that's been another search search source of frustration leads for me I think some others too in terms of why that could have been on two tracks earlier parallel tracks earlier but it's starting now we've got a few case studies that we were talking about before we brought you on what's your perspective so in some ways when we talk about the viral tests right there's all of these regulations that prevent us from doing testing with a proven test all of these antibodies antibody tests are starting to come out and it's clear that a lot of the antibody tests which are then manufactured in in China and are based upon materials that are produced there and the government is allowed all of these tests to come without really doing appropriate validation so I'm actually very concerned that a lot of these antibody tests are giving false positive results because the the test itself can cross react with other viral particles and so if you've had exposure to other coronaviruses like some colds can be produced by a corona virus there's cross reactivity there too you may show up and and think Hey I'm safe I got to run a virus I'm good to go when it's actually registering some other infection that you had previously so I'm actually concerned that those tests are gonna be a little bit too permissive in allowing people to to go back to work and I think it's really important to get those anybody just working up right now there seems to be a lot of concern and a large proportion of those tests were coming from multiple any factors may not be as rigorous as we helped Jack Lifton chair and professor of translational neuroscience at Michigan State University Jacqueline.

Dr J. Stanford LA county Santa Clara USC LA