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18 Burst results for "Transfusion Syndrome"

"transfusion syndrome" Discussed on Army Wife Talk Radio

Army Wife Talk Radio

02:03 min | 4 months ago

"transfusion syndrome" Discussed on Army Wife Talk Radio

"Have an unknown period Of of what was going on with him. It was a scary time and we were at high alert because we didn't really know what would trigger a seizure and so as they became more frequent. Our normal lives is halted and we were needing to know how to support him and be patient for commitments to be set up of referrals. Go through the testing results to come back so while we were at a hospital. Stay for an EEG testing per drew. I walked over to one of my ultrasound. Appointments are twins and Jen stayed. Rick drew about appointment. I found out that are twins were diagnosed with twin transfusion syndrome. It's called T. T. And it's a rare disorder that can happen to be that share placenta when they're missed connections of blood vessels that allowed the babies to grow at different rates are twins were at an advanced stage at t t t s and needed medical intervention to keep them alive. I was giving information of what our treatment options were at. Check it all back to Jim. My parents came and stayed with her older kids in gym nine went to Charlotte North Carolina to the closest Fetal Care Monitoring Centre that performed elaborates topic surgery to correct the imbalance in the placenta. And give the baby's an equal share of the on Placenta. And that would give them the best chance for continuing to grow in the home. We had a successful surgery on October. Eight two dozen eighteen for our twins. Benjamin and Ethan and we chose to do a twenty four hour monitoring on them since they were twenty four weeks gestation they had other interventions. They could do they were viable outside of the womb. We were at a facility. That had great medical care and interventions if needed at the end of that monitoring we had never ultrasound and it was clear that the twins heart rate were dangerously low so we went ahead with an emergency. C section..

Fetal Care Monitoring Centre transfusion syndrome Charlotte North Carolina Jen Rick Jim Benjamin Ethan T. T.
Gay Like Me: A Father Writes to His Son

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

11:58 min | 5 months ago

Gay Like Me: A Father Writes to His Son

"And television producer. Richie Jackson is an out loud and proud gay married man and when his teenage son came out to him he was thrilled but when his son said daddy being gay is no big deal. Ritchie knew he had to act his new book. Gay like me. Father Rights to his son is Richie's response. Being gay is a gift he says it also demands knowledge of your history. And how you fit in in America. Our conversation runs the gamut including the historic candidacy of Peop- litigate. Some are actually asking if Mayor Pete is gay enough here what Richie has to say about that right now. Richardson thank you very much. For being on the PODCAST. Thank you so much for having me your book. Gay like me. A father rights to his son. I've read it full disclosure. I wrote a blurb for it because I thought it was beautiful and powerful but for those who haven't read it yet talk about what inspired you to write this book. Well thank you for your beautiful blurb and For having me I wrote the book because my husband and I have two children and when our older son was fifteen he told us he was gay and I was elated. I had wanted him to be gay. Hope to be gay. Why it was being gay is a gift. It is the best part about me. It's the most important part about me. It's been the blessing of my life. I wanted that blessing for him. And also you cam parent. If every day you pray your child is nothing like you. I have no self esteem as a parent if I did that. But when our son told us he was gay he said Daddy being gays not a big deal. My generation doesn't think being gay is a big deal and I said Oh no being gays a really big deal and I started to think of all the things I'd share with him about what it means to be a gay man. I didn't want him to grow up to be one of these people who diminishes it. Demeans it by saying gays? Just a part of me just happen to be gay. If he did that he would break on heart and diminish the gift that it is and then in two thousand sixteen donald trump was elected and brought with him the Washington Mike Pence and they've declared war on the LGBTQ community they are more of an imminent threat to our sun than Isis and North Korea. Now I had to warn him what it takes to be a gay man in America. And that was the impetus for the book you write in the book to your son. You're an American. You do all the things Americans do. You even have the dream but America doesn't want you doesn't accept you a systematically attempting to erase you schools. Don't teach about you laws. Don't fully protect you. The America you think you are part of is a mirage. You must every day. Keep a certain clarity about yourself yet. Remain keenly aware of America's vision of you when you started answering my first question. Being gay is a gift but this gift given what what? I've just read what you've written to your son. It's a gifted heavy baggage. It's harrowing to be gay and it's really hard to be gay but think about it our adversaries are not trying to diminish us because we are worthless because where a defect they know that are being gay makes us powerful think about what. Marvel's lgbtq people are. We disappointed our parents. We are at battle with our government. We are stigmatized by religions. We are bullied in our childhoods. Where raced in our classrooms. We've survived the plague and still we rise. Come out and say this is me. That is the spirit of an extraordinary species of people. You right Also my coming out wasn't only a combination of an exploration in an evolution of identity. It was a political act right that is opposite of what of what your son Jackson was thinking. It's just a part of me. It's not a big deal but for you when you came out it was a political act. And why right so I came out in nineteen ninety-three right at the beginning of the AIDS epidemic and are coming out was political. We had to stand up and show in numbers. How many gay people there they were. So that we would force the government to fight AIDS being game being political has always been intrinsically linked from me because my first political act as a gay person. I act as a gay person was going to rally to demand The government fight AIDS and I. You didn't go where I thought you were going to go because I thought you're already doing my answer. I thought your first political act other than coming out was going to a pride parade and you have very strong opinions about what pride has become exactly. Well you know if you if my first political act was going to pride it would not have been a parade because back in nineteen eighty three. We were marching. We were not having a parade. They were angry marches. They were there. Were more fist than flags. We were activists who were Demanding attention demanding rights that we didn't have demanding representation. There were no out politicians. There were no out movie stars. There were very few laws protecting us so back then. Pride was A A rally a March now all the rainbows and the Hashtag love is love and the parades have all lulled us into this complacency into this false idea that things are better and corporate sponsorship. You Right Pride was a rebellion. Not a logo or handed together not branded. Yes so we didn't have any corporations and I recognized that back then we would have craved the corporate attention. Oh Yeah and Just somebody to say we see you and we support you but right now what these corporations are doing is they're slapping rainbows on their Store windows they're putting floats are parade but they also when we're not watching supporting local politicians with who are anti lgbt because it is in the best interest of their business so they're pink washing us so corporations are a complicated thing for us in our in our pride rallies in our pride rallies. But given what you just said there are corporations that step up and and go to bat for us when more powerful than our government when when state legislatures do so called Bathroom Bills Tim. Cook probably the most powerful. Ceo of a gigantic corporation put his personal cloud on the an he. He is gay right. I'm put his clout on the line. Does that no extraordinarily or you could look recently at Tennessee bills. Where all the company said. This is bad for business. They still got signed into law. The only company that did not sign that letter denouncing these laws is Fedex on. That says a lot yes You what I find fascinating is in. We're of the same the same generation and this son who has didn't really have to be in the closet. You right you were never in a closet. You didn't start. Start your gay life with that prison of secrecy. Aninat weird way was the closet or is the closet A benevolent incubator. Yeah it's interesting To sit there sitting in the closet and be able to discover yourself and and have a sense of what you're facing outside. You know one of the things I think a lot about. Is these young kids. I celebrate them coming out so young but are they ready for. What's going to come at them? Once they are out and You know the the I wouldn't know how to be our son to live in a world where he didn't I didn't start my life Hiding Eileen start my life with secrets and I think so many of us Do that that becomes a modus operandi for the rest of our lives. You can't compartmentalize secrets. So if you start your life in prison and a full of secrets hiding that's GonNa seep out to other parts of your life and my son doesn't have that and I'm grateful for your grateful for it but on the other hand you it makes you super fearful rally him. He has no idea what it takes to be an on alert. Gay Man in America. I one of the things that made me nervous and why I wrote the book is he has no gay guard and Lgbtq people our age. You know that you never let down your guard. You always know who's around you what you're saying. Who can hear you when it's safe to hold your husband's hand when it's not safe to kiss the person you love goodbye. You know What Street to walk down to get to work because it safe. You know what states to live in That are hospitable to starting a family or where you could be fired for being gay there. Were all these things. That take daily vigilance. And if you don't have a gay guard you're at risk and our son didn't didn't have that when he was leaving college looking for college and yet as you write in the book I want you to talk about about this. I'm going to read this one. This one sentence. And then you run with it us. Very Gotcha. Gotcha which you're ready. Fresh said this right now but you right just a few months old and you were already confronted with gay prejudice right so Our Son was three months premature. He was an identical twin and they were They had twin twin transfusion syndrome. They were born three months early in our first born son died and Jackson was In intensive care for three months and when he was eight days old and two pounds he had surgery and over the course of the time that he was in the hospital he needed a blood transfusion. But because we are gay men Both me and my partner at the time B. D. Wong who Who Who I had Jackson with. We were not allowed to donate blood. We were his parents. We had pledged take care of him and to you know protect him and we were being told eight days into parenting that we could not do that. And that law still That regulation from the FDA still stands. Gay Men cannot donate blood unless they're celebrate for twelve months the discriminatory Regulations still in place so when we go to our. Pta says we're doing a blood drive my husband and I have to say we're not allowed to participate

America Richie Jackson Aids Ritchie Peop Mayor Pete Producer Richardson Donald Trump North Korea Transfusion Syndrome Washington Mike Pence Marvel B. D. Wong PTA Fresh Tennessee FDA
"transfusion syndrome" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

AM 1350 WEZS

11:18 min | 5 months ago

"transfusion syndrome" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

"Is the fact that one in every thirty three babies is born with a birth defect January is birth defects awareness month I think a lot of people aren't maybe perhaps aware of that somebody who definitely is is doctor Scott ads like he's a surgeon in chief at the children's hospital of Philadelphia a quite a resume that doctor ads like has he's he's absolutely dedicated his life to this is an innovator in fetal medicine since the fields inception really so doc thanks so much for coming on with us by pleasure the babies each year are born with birth defects to put it in perspective both of the fax awareness month I'll get give you some key points first of all wanted thirty three babies is born with a birth defects other amazingly calm and Effexor costly billions of dollars required for medical treatment birth defects are merciless no parent should is immune the mysterious most because of birth defects are unknown they're over walked in my view the research is under funded and their birth defects are deadly the leading cause of infant mortality so in terms of stats each year in the US nearly a hundred and fifty thousand babies are born with birth defects anyway the conditions are rare most parents and even some clinicians have never heard of them and so too often these families are made aware of the treatments available in a place like our center pretty diagnosis and treatment of strollers hospital of Philadelphia in the left feeling overwhelmed with few options so it's great that works out talking so that your listeners can hear about this relatively new enterprise of fetal surgery yes so talk about that what could be helped by having the surgery while the baby is still in the womb I'll give you a couple of examples the two most frequent operations we do before birth are describing a laser therapy for twin twin transfusion syndrome and the other is open fetal surgery for the for the so for Clinton transfusions syndrome the set up is identical twins each in their own amniotic sack in as opposed to East when having its own placenta the password this that connects the fetus to the mother they have a shared placenta and their abnormal blood vessels I go from one side to the other says that one of the identical twins gets too much blood and goes in the heart failure develops and in excess of a on the other foot and the other two and doesn't get enough blood goes in the kidney failure and doesn't produce any of the comes a starting point and the way to treat that and to say both twins or otherwise doomed to put a scope inches to the nearest to the mothers of down a wall in your wall Mitchell was the person and use a laser fiber the phone call I get later include those culprit blood vessels with very good outcomes the second example is he'll surgery responded to us but it is the fact in which the coverings of the spinal cord don't form and so the in the higher this is a misspelling core the more nervous or affected and and we learned that there's ongoing damage to those lawyers through the entry actually amniotic fluid exposure because that's mostly is the key how many people everybody don't like journaling but for me it was an opportunity to help hole and I continued that when I came out it didn't become a book until twenty eighteen then hello hello I mean she even had that experience I would not be in a position to help my better assault battery understand in a grip on themselves and even to ship today I you to help hold better is to understand how we can diminish and hopefully some day eliminate bye bye which is at twenty one twenty two per day nationwide now really takes middle and me in the mirror and be fine you couldn't talk or what has been said to you by I'm I'm going to say by the empire whether that empire is political or religious or military it really is our responsibilities are my responsibility to have experienced that to help others not to experience it in other words what I'm saying is I I am a victim of sexual assault or serving in the military all rights to after coming home attempted suicide and all of that though this happens the number one and I didn't have a frame mother I've asked that to get my mother credit god rest her soul for me having some stability mine and I'm doing that work better and as we speak on the first of December for example I bet you will better ends and the topic was I survive through death by suicide a timeless story telling and it was amazing to hear a little better and talk about their experience and how clean by how they survive and how he survived by suicide wow how wonderful it is to have to talk about that who is a professional that is not going to take the critical approach that's the last thing we need is better and if the clinical approach we need will call from a spiritual perspective that will talk to are sold that will that will help are sold in this while we have been able to accomplish many of the things that we have been able to accomplish and can accumulate that being that we've been able to accumulate well one thing that we have left out along the way he is operational loose inspirational that that's the first sold news he's the sole affirmations that feeds the soul and so that that's a long way around answering the questions about health serving in the military what is so important for military people are who are often isolated from their families for over two years of time or are have multiple deployments that this will be at the root of our dance by suicide internally status well I want to call them we have a re entry program that you use a lot of options in the year so that's the next thing that we're going to work on is you know how how do we how do we transition from a very strict Stan Lee very strict and very strong Stan Lee system where I was that your back you've got my back to a billion system where that camaraderie is listing and and very often it's the result the it and we can resolve and two doors it can result in post a message trespass order it can be it can it can result in considering and unfortunately from succeeding in our committee especially all writing to pay it forward so to speak yes I and listening to you thank you for you do for veterans and I hope so many people this is resonating I agree with with Pamela June Anderson and saying that people are disconnected out there and that's and they feel disoriented and and lonely except for and and so much is Welling up inside of them so twenty one to twenty two suicide today that's on believable we we only have a minute or so left and my one and I know it's just lies by what what do you hope what do you hope people take away from reading this that there is hope and that they can do something well they will take away an opportunity to self reflect an opportunity to to kill turnover because that's where the work takes place I can go to all the women are all of the power structures and all of the churches and I can do all of that external were but nothing happened until I stand in the mirror mirror you know that Michael Jackson that the that the made the recording I'm starting with the person in the mirror yeah that used to be in the works is is colonel it's it's really taking time number one to get to know well who am I and and why am I here and do what I believe what I had been taught or or or am I willing to take the risk to the rhythm looking for to take take a critical look at what I've been taught whether it's whether it's religious or political sports store are are these my values are these the values that have been imposed fondly that's where the rubber meets the road and we have to have the courage to say well you know I needed to add a little bit and and maybe if I write about it I think this opportunity to look at these articles that have been written from aimed a reflective perspective for most of the becoming a hold to be made whole their goal and their life and love as a goal to get to know who I am and who was out there so that way Margaret committee to to start and end terminal journey towards wholeness and understand yeah the work will be tedious but on the other side of it like just the glass door is black wonderful and I whoever the IMAP I to reach out to my my my fellow veteran ana for my fellow brother or my soul sister and and and and and and make a friend and and so on down the he's on down the.

doctor Scott
"transfusion syndrome" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

AM 1350 WEZS

11:04 min | 5 months ago

"transfusion syndrome" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

"Is birth defects awareness month I think a lot of people aren't maybe perhaps aware of that somebody who definitely is is doctor Scott ads like he's a surgeon in chief at the children's hospital of Philadelphia quite a resume that doctor ads like has he's he's absolutely dedicated his life to this he's an innovator in fetal medicine since the fields inception release of doc thanks so much for coming on with us leisure the babies each year are born with birth defects to put it in perspective both of the fax awareness month I'll get give you some key points first of all wanted thirty three babies is born with a birth defects other amazingly calm and Effexor costly billions of dollars required for medical treatment effects are merciless no parent should is immune the mysterious most because of birth defects are unknown they're over log in my view the research is under funded and their birth defects are dead later the leading cause of infant mortality so in terms of stats each year in the US nearly a hundred and fifty thousand babies are born with birth defects many what conditions are rare most parents and even some commissions have never heard of them and so too often these families are made aware of the treatments available at a place like our center pretty diagnosis and treatment of strollers hospital of Philadelphia and are left feeling overwhelmed with few options so it's great that works out talking so that your listeners can hear about this relatively new enterprise of fetal surgery yes so talk about that what could be helped by having the surgery while the baby is still in the womb I'll give you a couple of examples the two most frequent operations we do before birth are he discovered a laser therapy for twin twin transfusion syndrome and the other is open fetal surgery for the for the self for Clinton transfusions syndrome the set up is identical twins each in their own amniotic sack in as opposed to East when having its own post the password this that connects the fetus to the mother they have a shared concern in their abnormal blood vessels I go from one side to the other says that one of the identical twins gets too much blood and goes in the heart failure develops and in excess of a on the other hand the other twin doesn't get enough blood goes make the failure and doesn't produce any of the comes a spectacle and the way to treat that and disabled to answer otherwise doomed to put a scope inches to the nearest to the mothers of down a wall in your wall this was the person and use a laser fiber the phone call I get later include those culprit blood vessels with very good outcomes the second example is he'll surgery responded to us but it is the fact in which the coverings of the spinal cord don't form and so the in the higher this is a misspelling core the more nervous or affected and and we learn that there's ongoing damage to those lawyers through the entry or environment particularly amniotic fluid exposure because that's mostly all year so we've developed techniques about twenty years ago back in nineteen ninety eight to do this refuse but about the repair reformers have shown actually do a randomized prospective trial for them of the national institutes of health that fetal surgery respond above the photo has much better outcomes than surgery after birth in terms of better motor function for the babies dollars a walk in terms of decrease incidence of hydrocephalus the rain damage in terms of decreased need for us to to drain fluid from the brain so that's now widely applied actually worldwide stew so saying that is widely applied and wondering how rare still is fetal surgery given some of what you've already told us well graphs old older information is maybe a four thousand people searches done worldwide we we've got about a quarter of them but we also throughs consortia like a north American people therapy network which is a network of now thirty six feet treatment centers in North America that are working together for these rare problem so that we can learn from one another and collaborate for patients data was huge Dr Scott ads like he's the surgeon chief at the children's hospital of Philadelphia since you've been in this in and near the director of the hospital center for feel diagnosis and treatment since you've been then in this up for so long doctor ads like do you feel hopeful that that they're going to be more surgeries you'll be more preventative things that can happen here why it is quite true that we've educated teams not only in North America but also in Europe and in Asia so is spreading worldwide which brings benefit to patients and then there's a lot of things that we're working on now that are very exciting particularly in the area of cellular and gene therapy for example one of my colleagues on your own like a pediatric surgeon here job has worked for thirty years to develop techniques to do in Nero stem cell transplantation early into the station to potentially treat sickle cell anemia use using blood forming stem cells are harvested from the mother and the pre immunity this experimental work shows will not reject those stealthily Grafton takeover the missing function another one of my colleagues here doctor William Pronto is another pediatric surgical scientist is working on in the year gene therapy in in utero gene editing using crisper technology that is shown in animal models feel at home models that this has proof of principle that this works not ready to be applied correctly yet but that could affect thousands and thousands and thousands of babies with free nearly diagnosed genetic disorders say for instance like the cystic fibrosis the desk denture work we're doing orchard now again in animal models with the the artificial world which we we hope we've shown and fetal sheep that we can support he'd all she'd for four to five weeks and then the an artificial womb with their own growth and development so we hope that could eventually be applied to babies who are born prematurely say at twenty three twenty four twenty five weeks gestation because it makes a world of difference whether a baby is at that early just Daschle age or five weeks later when the babies out of commerce so dramatically better while I read tell everyone they go to fetal surgery dot chop dot E. D. U. fetal surgery dot chop dot EDU to find out more information Dr Isaac thank you so much welcome thank you wow interesting what's happening at shop I have a cousin Jen Lorenzo who who works at chop and and has told me some of the things that happen in the neo natal unit and it's some pretty amazing some of the some of the things that happen in that hospital as we continue in this edition of for your health the flu the flu the flu the northeast has really been hit by the flu and me just a crazy record in New York and in other parts of the area the US centers for disease control and prevention listen to this saying twenty seven children in the US have died of the flu that's so hard for me to wrap my head around that it's the highest number of child blue desk at this point in the season since they started keeping these records seventeen years ago right doctors are saying they're seeing huge numbers or unusually large numbers of flu patients at this point and for example as in New York at the land phone health center they've seen two hundred seventy flu patients adults and children in their emergency rooms and clinics in Manhattan and Brooklyn in the last week of December they say it's not usually what they see they don't see that in late December early general usually seat in February or March so there's some huge huge concern about the about the the flu and you know we always talk about the strains of of flu and that's always part of it is what is the strain of flu which you know what's happened here for something else that I think a lot of you can relate to I know myself that I worry about the sometimes with burned out and they say if you're feeling that bone deep mental and physical exhaustion or what is otherwise really called burn out there's new research suggesting you could be at a high risk sadly for a potentially fatal heart flutter and it's called a fib we've talked about that on this show and it's a heart rhythm disorder that leads sometimes the cause of stroke in the United States in Europe they're saying this effects I didn't realize his number was so high it affects thirty three million people and is responsible for a hundred and thirty thousand deaths seven hundred fifty thousand hospitalizations every year to pay attention to these symptoms if you have chest pains palpitations the short of breath fatigue that is certainly one of the one of the symptoms because it's sometimes it's really hard to spot it's potentially silent killer and that's what it's called and chronic stress and exhaustion is a key factor in developing this disease so I guess one way you know to be careful as you can see it when you're walking when you're when you start to feel that shortness of breath except for so I know for me it's been about taking more time in and taking a breath and nothing that you're doing not that I'm lecturing to anyone is worth having a stroke over having something horrible happened get that you know a sieve and high blood pressure's smoking obesity is another factor all of that anything to reduce it because of how incredibly prevalent it's starting to be made according to the American institute of stress eighty percent of American workers say they feel stressed so that's one factor right there and half say they need help with managing stress this is just more than than work we talked about this before sometimes is the constant connection to social media and constantly trying to be on top of everything and burn out of course is a is a major stressors so let's make this new decade one where we thrive and survive he's right but thrive in a good way and of all people to lecture anybody but I'm just saying when I saw the study and I looked at some of the numbers.

doctor Scott hospital of Philadelphia
"transfusion syndrome" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

AM 1350 WEZS

04:18 min | 5 months ago

"transfusion syndrome" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

"In every thirty three babies is born with a birth defect January is birth defects awareness month I think a lot of people aren't maybe perhaps aware of that somebody who definitely is is doctor Scott ads like he's a surgeon in chief at the children's hospital of Philadelphia a quite a resume that doctor ads like has he's he's absolutely dedicated his life to this is an innovator in fetal medicine since the fields inception release of doc thanks so much for coming on with us my pleasure the babies each year are born with birth defects to put it in perspective also this is brick effects awareness month I'll get give you some key points first of all wanted thirty three babies is born with a birth defects other amazingly common the effects are costly billions of dollars required for medical treatment X. are merciless no parent should is immune the mysterious most because the birth defects are unknown they're over logged in my view the research is under funded and their birth defects are deadly the leading cause of infant mortality so in terms of stats each year in the US nearly a hundred and fifty thousand babies are born with birth defects many with conditions so rare most parents and even some clinicians have never heard of them and so too often these families are made aware of the treatments available in a place like our center for Peter diagnosis and treatment to show those hospital of Philadelphia and are left feeling overwhelmed with few options so it's great that works out talking so that your listeners can hear about this relatively new enterprise a fetal surgery yes so talk about that what can be helped by having the surgery while the baby is still in the womb I'll give you a couple of examples the two most frequent operations we do before birth are describing a laser therapy for twin twin transfusion syndrome and the other is open fetal surgery for the for the so Clinton transfusions syndrome the set up is identical twins each in their own amniotic sack and as opposed to east twenty having its own post that the password this that connects the fetus to the mother they have a shared placenta and there are abnormal blood vessels I go from one side to the other side but want to be identical twins gets too much blood and goes in the heart failure and develops and an excess of amniotic fluid and the other twin doesn't get enough blood goes make kidney failure and doesn't produce any I'm not close the comes a stock plan the way to treat that and the state both twins or otherwise doomed is to put a scope into the to the uterus that the mothers of down a wall in your wall Mitchell was the person and use a laser fiber to photo quagga later include those culprit blood vessels with very good outcomes the second example is feel surgery responded Bethlen Ospina method is birth defect in which the coverings of the spinal cord don't form and so the and the higher this is a misspelling core the more nervous are affected and and we learned that there's ongoing damage to those mirrors through the entry or environment particularly amniotic fluid exposure because that's mostly people here so we've developed techniques about twenty years ago back in nineteen ninety eight to do this repeats but about the repair before birth and amp shown actually do a randomized prospective trial for the by the national institutes of health that fetal surgery respond above the photo has much better outcomes than surgery after birth in terms of better motor function for the babies in terms of dollars to walk in terms of decrease incidence of hydrocephalus and brain damage in terms of decreased need for a shunt to drain fluid from the brain so that Snow White they applied actually worldwide stew so saying that is widely applied and wondering how rare still is fetal surgery given some of what you've already told us well cracks old older information is maybe a four thousand people searches done worldwide we we've got about a quarter of them but we've also throughs consortia like a north American people therapy network which is a network of now thirty six feet of treatment centers in North.

"transfusion syndrome" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

AM 1350 WEZS

12:18 min | 5 months ago

"transfusion syndrome" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

"Comes to sex the fact that one in every thirty three babies is born with a birth defect January is birth defects awareness month I think a lot of people aren't maybe perhaps aware of that somebody who definitely is is doctor Scott ads like he's a surgeon in chief at the children's hospital of Philadelphia a quite a resume that doctor ads like has he's he's absolutely dedicated his life to this is an innovator in fetal medicine since the fields inception release of doc thanks so much for coming on with us my pleasure how many babies each year are born with birth defects to put it in perspective also this is brick effects awareness month I'll get give you some key points first of all wanted thirty three babies is born with a birth defects other amazingly calm and birth defects or costly billions of dollars required for medical treatment birth defects are merciless no parent should is immune the mysterious most because the birth defects are unknown they're over locked in my view the research is under funded and their birth defects are deadly the leading cause of infant mortality so in terms of stats each year in the US nearly a hundred and fifty thousand babies are born with birth defects many what condition so rare most parents and even some clinicians have never heard of them and so too often these families are made aware of the treatments available in a place like our center for kilo diagnosis and treatment the struggles hospital of Philadelphia and are left feeling overwhelmed with few options so it's great that works out talking so that your listeners can hear about this relatively new enterprise a fetal surgery yes so talk about that what can be helped by having the surgery while the baby is still in the womb I'll give you a couple of examples the two most frequent operations we do before birth are you describing a laser therapy for twin twin transfusion syndrome and the other is open fetal surgery for the for the so between two in transfusions syndrome the set up is identical twins each in their own amniotic sack and as opposed to east twenty having its own post that the password desk that connects the fetus to the mother they have a shared placenta and their abnormal blood vessels I go from one side to the other says that one of the identical twins gets too much blood and goes in your heart failure and develops and an excess of amniotic fluid and the other twin doesn't get enough blood goes make kidney failure and doesn't produce any I mean I flew the comes a stock plan the way to treat that and to say both twins or otherwise doomed is to put a scope into the to the uterus that the mothers of down a wall and your wall ms was the person and use a laser fiber to photo quagga later include those culprit blood vessels with very good outcomes the second example is feel search your first but I better not spotted method is birth defect in which the coverings of the spinal cord don't form and so the and the higher this is a misspelling court the more nervous are affected and and we learned that there's ongoing damage to those mirrors through the entry your environment particularly amniotic fluid exposure because that's mostly so we've developed techniques about twenty years ago back in nineteen ninety eight to do this repeats but about the repair before birth and amp shown actually through a randomized prospective trial for the by the national institutes of health that fetal surgery respond above the fold up as much better outcomes than surgery after birth in terms of better motor function for the babies in terms of dollars to walk in terms of decrease incidence of hydrocephalus the rain damage in terms of decreased need for a shunt to drain fluid from the brain so that's now widely applied actually worldwide yes so saying that is widely applied I'm wondering how rare still is fetal surgery given some of what you've already told us well graphs old older information is maybe a four thousand people searches done worldwide we we've got about a quarter of them but we also throughs consortia like a north American people therapy network which is a network of now thirty six feet of treatment centers in North America that are working together for these rare problem so that we can learn from one another and collaborate for patients benefit not which he gives Dr Scott ads like he's the surgeon in chief at the children's hospital of Philadelphia since you've been in this and and you're the director of the hospital center for fuel diagnosis and treatment since you've been been in this up for so long doctor adds a do you feel hopeful that that they're going to be more surgeries you'll be more preventative things that can happen here why is quite true that we've educated teams not only in North America but also in Europe and in Asia so it is spreading worldwide which brings benefit to patients and then there's a lot of things that we're working on now that are very exciting particularly in the area of cellular and gene therapy for example one of my colleagues doctor Allen's like a pediatric surgeon here chop has worked for thirty years of all the techniques to do in utero stem cell transplantation early into the station to potentially treat sickle cell anemia use using blood cell forming stem cells are harvested from the mother and the pre immunity this experimental work shows will not reject those cells filling graft and take over the missing function another one of my colleagues here doctor William Pronto is another pediatric surgical scientist is working on in the year gene therapy in in utero gene editing using crisper technology that is shown in animal models feel at home models that this has proof of principle that this works is not ready to be applied correctly yet but that could affect thousands and thousands and thousands of babies with previously diagnosed genetic disorder say for instance like the cystic fibrosis in a in a dispatcher worry we're doing worker now again in animal models with the the artificial womb which we we hope we've shown and fetal sheep that we can support fetal sheep for four to five weeks and then the an artificial womb with durable growth and development so we hope that could eventually be applied to babies who are born to prematurely say at twenty three twenty four twenty five weeks gestation because it makes a world of difference whether a baby baby is at that early just Daschle age or five weeks later when the babies out commerce so dramatically better while I read tell everyone they go to fetal surgery dot chop dot E. D. U. fetal surgery dot top dot EDU to find out more information Dr Isaac thank you so much you're welcome thank you wow interesting what's happening at shop I have a cousin Jen Lorenzo who who works at chop and and has told me some of the things that happen in the neo natal unit and it's it's pretty amazing some of some of the things that happen in that hospital are as we continue in this edition of for your health the flu the flu the flu the northeast has really been hit by the flu and me just a crazy record in New York and and other parts of the area the US centers for disease control and prevention listen to this saying twenty seven children in the US have died of the flu that's so hard for me to wrap my head around that it's the highest number of child flew desk at this point in the season since they started keeping these records seventeen years ago right doctors are saying they're seeing huge numbers are unusually large numbers of flu patients at this point and for example at in New York at the land bone health center they've seen two hundred seventy flu patients adults and children in their emergency rooms and clinics in Manhattan and Brooklyn in the last week of December they I say it's not usually what they see they don't see that in late December early generally usually seat in February or March so there's some huge huge concern about the about the the flu and you know we always talk about the streams of of flu and that's always part of it is what is the strain of flu which you know what's happened here I for something else that I think a lot of you can relate to I know myself that I worry about the sometimes with burn out and they say if you're feeling that bone deep mental and physical exhaustion or what is otherwise really called burn out there's new research suggesting you could be at a high risk sadly for a potentially fatal heart flutter and it's called a sip of we've talked about that on this show and it's a heart rhythm disorder that leads sometimes the cause of stroke in the United States in Europe they're saying this effects I didn't realize his number was so high it affects thirty three million people and is responsible for a hundred and thirty thousand deaths seven hundred fifty thousand hospitalizations every year to pay attention to these symptoms if you have chest pains palpitations the short of breath fatigue that is certainly one of the one of the symptoms because it's sometimes it's really hard to spot it's potentially silent killer and that's what it's it's called and chronic stress and exhaustion is a key factor in developing this disease so I guess one way you you know to be careful as you can see it when you're walking when you're when you start to feel that shortness of breath except for so I know for me it's been about taking more time in and taking a breath and nothing that you're doing not that I'm lecturing to anyone is worth having a stroke over having something horrible happened get that you know a film and the high blood pressure's smoking obesity is another factor all of that anything to reduce it because of how in incredibly prevalent it's starting to be made according to the American institute of stress eighty percent of American workers say they feel stressed so that's one factor right there and half say they need help with managing stress this is just more than than work we talked about this before sometimes is the constant connection to social media and constantly trying to be on top of everything and burn out of course is a is a major stressors so let's make this new decade one where we thrive and survive thank you for right but thrive in a good way and of all people to lecture anybody but I'm just saying when I saw the study and I looked at some of the numbers yanks scary scary stuff alright thanks for listening listening to this edition of for your health stay with us everybody shot at in Mexico one hundred drinks at a well worn bar with some shady looking characters in Vegas riding a bike from Dallas to Seattle on a bent scribbling the words dungeon on a napkin while two passengers next you on a plane wonder what the heck does that mean I'm kids Laney and what does this have to do with my success why do you care part of my journey that I want to share with you in my new book deal your own destiny luckily now I can last and some would seem like other disasters at the time can any of you relate that's exactly what you'll discover by reading my book I picture you want to vote each for relaxing in the backyard.

doctor Scott hospital of Philadelphia
"transfusion syndrome" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

AM 1350 WEZS

12:18 min | 5 months ago

"transfusion syndrome" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

"Every thirty three babies is born with a birth defect January is birth defects awareness month I think a lot of people aren't maybe perhaps aware of that somebody who definitely is is doctor Scott ads like he's a surgeon in chief at the children's hospital of Philadelphia a quite a resume that doctor ads like has he's he's absolutely dedicated his life to this is an innovator in fetal medicine since the fields inception release of doc thanks so much for coming on with us my pleasure the babies each year are born with birth defects to put it in perspective both of the says Burke effects awareness month I'll get give you some key points first of all wanted thirty three babies is born with a birth defects other amazingly common Effexor costly billions of dollars required for medical treatment X. are merciless no parent is immune the mysterious most because the birth defects are unknown they're over locked in my view the research is under funded in their birth defects or deadly than the leading cause of infant mortality so in terms of stats each year in the US nearly a hundred and fifty thousand babies are born with birth defects many with conditions so rare most parents and even some clinicians have never heard of them and so too often these valleys are made aware of the treatments available at a place like our center pretty diagnosis and treatment to show those hospital of Philadelphia and are left feeling overwhelmed with few options so it's great that works out talking so that your listeners can hear about this relatively new enterprise of fetal surgery yes so talk about that what can be helped by having this surgery while the baby is still in the womb I'll give you a couple of examples the two most frequent operations we do before birth are describing a laser therapy for twin twin transfusion syndrome and the other is open fetal surgery for the for the self proclaimed transfusions syndrome the set up is identical twins each in their own amniotic sack in as opposed to east twenty having its own post that the password this that connects the fetus to the mother they have a shared placenta and their abnormal blood vessels I go from one side to the other says that one of the identical twins gets too much blood and goes to the heart failure and develops and an excess of amniotic fluid and the other twin doesn't get enough blood goes make could be failure and doesn't produce any amniotic fluid becomes a stock plan the way to treat that and to say both twins or otherwise doomed is to put a scope into the to the uterus that the mothers of dollar a wall and your wall Mitchell was the person and use a laser fiber the photo quagga later include those culprit blood vessels with very good outcomes the second example is feel surgery responded up enough money for the is birth defect in which the coverings of the spinal cord don't form and so the and the higher this is a misspelling core the more nervous are affected and and we learned that there's ongoing damage to those mirrors through the entry yearn environment particularly amniotic fluid exposure because that's mostly people here so we've developed techniques about twenty years ago back in nineteen ninety eight to do this repeats but about the repair before birth and after own actually do a randomized prospective trial for the by the national institutes of health that fetal surgery respond above the photo has much better outcomes than surgery after birth in terms of better motor function for the babies the bill is a walk in terms of decrease incidence of hydrocephalus and brain damage in terms of decreased need for a shot to drain fluid from the brain so that's now why they applied actually worldwide yes No saying that is widely applied I'm wondering how rare still is fetal surgery given some of what you've already told us well graphs old older information is maybe a four thousand people searches done worldwide we we've got about a quarter of them but we also throughs consortia like a north American people therapy network which is a network of now thirty six feet treatment centers in North America that are working together for these rare problem so that we can learn from one another and collaborate for patients benefit I was speaking to doctor Scott ads like he's the surgeon in chief at the children's hospital of Philadelphia since you've been in this and and you're the director of the hospital center for feel diagnosis and treatment since you've been been in this for so long doctor adds a do you feel hopeful that that they're going to be more surgeries you'll be more prevented if things that can happen here why is quite true that we've educated teams not only in North America but also in Europe and in Asia so is spreading worldwide which brings benefit to patients and then there's a lot of things that we're working on now that are very exciting particularly in the area of cellular and gene therapy for example one of my colleagues doctor Allen's like a pediatric surgeon here chop has worked for thirty years of all techniques to do in Nero stem cell transplantation early into the station to potentially treat sickle cell anemia use using blood cell forming stem cells are harvested from the mother and the pre immunity this experimental work shows will not reject those cells filling graft and take over the missing function another one of my colleagues here doctor William Pronto's on other pediatric surgical scientist is working on in the year gene therapy in in utero gene editing using crisper technology that is shown in animal models feel at home models that this has proof of principle that this works not ready to be applied for likely yet but that could affect thousands and thousands and thousands of babies with previously diagnosed genetic disorders say for instance like the cystic fibrosis in a in a dispatcher worry we're doing worker now again in animal models with the the artificial womb which we we hope we've shown and fetal sheep that we can support fetal sheep for four to five weeks and then the in an artificial womb with durable growth and development so we hope that could eventually be applied to babies who are born to prematurely say at twenty three twenty four twenty five weeks gestation because it makes a world of difference whether a baby baby is at that early just based on age or five weeks later when the babies out commerce so dramatically better while I read tell everyone they go to fetal surgery dot shop dot E. D. U. fetal surgery dot top dot EDU to find out more information Dr Isaac thank you so much you're welcome thank you wow interesting what's happening at shop I have a cousin Jen Lorenzo who who works at chop and and has told me some of the things that happen in the neo natal unit and it's some pretty amazing some of some of the things that happen in that hospital as we continue in this edition of for your health the flu the flu the flu the northeast has really been hit by the flu let me just a crazy record in New York and and other parts of the area the US centers for disease control and prevention listen to this thing twenty seven children in the US have died of the flu that's so hard for me to wrap my head around that it's the highest number of child flew desk at this point in the season since they started keeping these records seventeen years ago right doctors are saying they're seeing huge numbers are unusually large numbers of flu patients at this point and for example it in New York at the lan cone health Saturday fifteen two hundred seventy flu patients adults and children in their emergency rooms and clinics in Manhattan and Brooklyn in the last week of December they say it's not usually what they see we don't see that in late December early generally usually seat in February or March so there's some huge huge concern about the about the the flu and you know we always talk about the streams of of flu and that's always part of it is what is the strain of flu which you know what's happened here I for something else that I think a lot of you can relate to I know myself that I worry about the sometimes with burn out and they say if you're feeling that the bone the mental and physical exhaustion or what is otherwise really called burn out there's new research suggesting you could be at a high risk sadly for a potentially fatal heart flutter and it's called a said we've talked about that on this show and it's a heart rhythm disorder that leads sometimes the cause of stroke in the United States and Europe they're saying this to the fax I didn't realize this number was so high and effects thirty three million people and is responsible for a hundred and thirty thousand deaths seven hundred fifty thousand hospitalizations every year to pay attention to these symptoms if you have chest pains palpitations you short of breath fatigue that is certainly one of the one of the symptoms because it's sometimes it's really hard to spot it's potentially silent killer and that's what it's called and chronic stress and exhaustion is a key factor in developing this disease so I guess one way you here to be careful as you can see it when you're walking when you're when you start to feel that shortness of breath except for so I know for me it's been about taking more time in and taking a breath and nothing that you're doing not that I'm lecturing to anyone is worth having a stroke over having something horrible happened get that you know a sieve and the high blood pressure's smoking obesity is another factor all of that anything to reduce it because of how in incredibly prevalent it's starting to be made according to the American institute of stress eighty percent of American workers say they feel stress that's one factor right there and half say they need help with managing stress this is just more than than work we talked about this before sometimes is the constant connection to social media and constantly trying to be on top of everything and burn out of course is a is a major stressors so let's make this new decade one where we thrive and survive he he's right but thrive in a good way and of all people to lecture anybody but I'm just saying when I saw the study and I looked at some of the numbers yeah like scary scary stuff alright thanks for listening listening to this edition of for your health stay with us everybody shot at in Mexico one hundred drinks at a well worn bar with some shady looking characters in Vegas riding a bike from Dallas to Seattle on a bet scribbling the words dungeon on a napkin while two passengers next year on a plane wonder what the heck does that mean I'm kids Laney and what does this have to do with my success why do you care part of my journey that I want to share with you in my new book deal your own destiny luckily now I can last and some would seem like other disasters at the time can any of you relate that's exactly what you'll discover by reading my book I picture you want to vote each for relaxing in the backyard laughing out loud.

doctor Scott hospital of Philadelphia
"transfusion syndrome" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

AM 1350 WEZS

12:19 min | 5 months ago

"transfusion syndrome" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

"Birth defects the fact that one in every thirty three babies is born with a birth defect January is birth defects awareness month I think a lot of people aren't maybe perhaps aware of that somebody who definitely is is doctor Scott ads like he's a surgeon in chief at the children's hospital of Philadelphia a quite a resume that doctor ads like has he's he's absolutely dedicated his life to this he's an innovator in fetal medicine since the fields inception really so doc thanks so much for coming on with us my pleasure how many babies each year are born with birth defects to put it in perspective also this is brick effects awareness month I'll get give you some key points first of all wanted thirty three babies is born with a birth defects other amazingly common the effects are costly billions of dollars required for medical treatment birth defects are merciless no character is immune the mysterious most because the birth defects are unknown they're over locked in my view the research is under funded and their birth defects are deadly the leading cause of infant mortality so in terms of stats each year in the US nearly a hundred and fifty thousand babies are born with birth defects many with conditions so rare most parents and even some clinicians have never heard of them and so too often these valleys are made aware of the treatments available at a place like our center for kilo diagnosis and treatment to show those hospital of Philadelphia and are left feeling overwhelmed with few options so it's great that works out talking so that your listeners can hear about this relatively new enterprise a fetal surgery yes so talk about that what can be helped by having the surgery while the baby is still in the womb I'll give you a couple of examples the two most frequent operations we do before birth are describing a laser therapy for twin twin transfusion syndrome and the other is open fetal surgery for the for the so between two in transfusions syndrome the set up is identical twins each in their own amniotic sack and as opposed to east twenty having its own post that the password desk that connects the fetus to the mother they have a shared placenta and their abnormal blood vessels I go from one side to the other side but want to be identical twins gets too much blood and goes in the heart failure and develops and an excess of amniotic fluid and the other twin doesn't get enough blood goes make kidney failure and doesn't produce any amniotic fluid becomes a stock plan the way to treat that and to say both twins or otherwise doomed is to put a scope into the to the uterus that the mothers of down a wall and your wall ms was the person and use a laser fiber to photo quagga later include those culprit blood vessels with very good outcomes the second example is feel search your purse but a better than us but it is birth defect in which the coverings of the spinal cord don't form and so the and the higher this is a misspelling core the more nervous are affected and and we learned that there's ongoing damage to those mirrors through the entry your environment particularly amniotic fluid exposure because that's mostly so we've developed techniques about twenty years ago back in nineteen ninety eight to do this repeats but about the repair before birth and amp shown actually do a randomized prospective trial for the by the national institutes of health that fetal surgery respond above the fold up as much better outcomes than surgery after birth in terms of better motor function for the baby's enters a dollars a walk in terms of decrease incidence of hydrocephalus the brain damage in terms of decreased need for a shunt to drain fluid from the brain so that's now widely applied actually worldwide yes so saying that is widely applied and wondering how rare still is fetal surgery given some of what you've already told us well cracks old older information is maybe a four thousand people searches done worldwide we we've got about a quarter of them but we also throughs consortia like a north American people therapy network which is a network of now thirty six feet treatment centers in North America that are working together for these rare problem so that we can learn from one another and collaborate for patients benefit was he gives Dr Scott ads like he's the surgeon chief at the children's hospital of Philadelphia since you've been in this and and you're the director of the hospital center for feel diagnosis and treatment since you've been been in this up for so long doctor adds a do you feel hopeful that that they're going to be more surgeries you'll be more preventative things that can happen here but it's quite true that we've educated team is not only in North America but also in Europe and in Asia so it is spreading worldwide which brings benefit to patients and then there's a lot of things that we're working on now that are very exciting particularly in the area of cellular and gene therapy for example one of my colleagues doctor Allen's like a pediatric surgeon here job has worked for thirty years of all techniques to do in utero stem cell transplantation early into the station to potentially treat sickle cell anemia use using blood cell forming stem cells are harvested from the mother and the free immunity this experimental work shows will not reject those cells filling graft and take over the missing function another one of my colleagues here doctor William Pronto is on in other pediatric surgical scientist is working on in the year gene therapy in in utero gene editing using crisper technology that is shown in animal models feel at home models that this has proof of principle that this works is not ready to be applied for likely yet but that could affect thousands and thousands and thousands of babies with previously diagnosed genetic disorders say for instance like the cystic fibrosis in a in a dispatcher worry we're going to work here now again in animal models with the the artificial womb which we we hope we've shown and feel sheep that we can support fetal she'd for four to five weeks and then the an artificial womb with durable growth and development so we hope that could eventually be applied to babies who are born to prematurely say at twenty three twenty four twenty five weeks gestation because it makes a world of difference whether it be a baby is at that early just Daschle age or five weeks later when the babies out commerce so dramatically better wow alright we tell everyone they go to fetal surgery dot chop dot E. D. U. fetal surgery dot top dot EDU to find out more information Dr Isaac thank you so much you're welcome thank you wow interesting what's happening at shop I have a cousin Jen Lorenzo who who works at chop and and has told me some of the things that happen in the neo natal unit and it's it's pretty amazing some of some of the things that happen in that hospital ours we continue in this edition of for your health the flu the flu the flu the northeast has really been hit by the flu and me just a crazy record in New York and and other parts of the area the US centers for disease control and prevention listen to this saying twenty seven children in the US have died of the flu that's so hard for me to wrap my head around that it's the highest number of child flew desk at this point in the season since they started keeping these records seventeen years ago right doctors are saying they're seeing huge numbers are unusually large numbers of flu patients at this point and for example at in New York at the land grown health center they've seen two hundred seventy flu patients adults and children in their emergency rooms and clinics in Manhattan and Brooklyn in the last week of December they I say it's not usually what they see they don't see that in late December early generally usually seat in February or March so there's some huge huge concern about the about the the flu and you know we always talk about the strains of of flu and that's always part of it is what is the strain of flu which you know what's happened here I for something else that I think a lot of you can relate to I know myself that I worry about the sometimes with burn out and they say if you're feeling that bone deep mental and physical exhaustion or what is otherwise really called burn out there's new research suggesting you could be at a high risk sadly for a potentially fatal heart flutter and it's called a fib of we've talked about that on this show and it's a heart rhythm disorder that leads sometimes the cause of stroke in the United States in Europe they're saying this effects I didn't realize his number was so high it affects thirty three million people and is responsible for a hundred and thirty thousand deaths seven hundred fifty thousand hospitalizations every year to pay attention to these symptoms if you have chest pains palpitations the short of breath fatigue that is certainly one of the one of the symptoms because it's sometimes really hard to spot it's potentially silent killer and that's what it's it's called and chronic stress and exhaustion is a key factor in developing this disease so I guess one way you you know to be careful as you can see it when you're walking when you're when you start to feel that shortness of breath except for so I know for me it's been about taking more time in and taking a breath and nothing that you're doing not that I'm lecturing to anyone is worth having a stroke over having something horrible happened get that you know a film and the high blood pressure's smoking obesity is another factor all of that anything to reduce it because of how in incredibly prevalent it's starting to be made according to the American institute of stress eighty percent of American workers say they feel stressed so that's one factor right there and half say they need help with managing stress this is just more than than work we talked about this before sometimes is the constant connection to social media and constantly trying to be on top of everything and burn out of course is a is a major stressors so let's make this new decade one where we thrive and survive thank you for right but thrive in a good way and of all people to lecture anybody but I'm just saying when I saw the study and I looked at some of the numbers yet scary scary stuff alright thanks for listening listening to this edition of for your health stay with us everybody the shot at in Mexico one hundred drinks at a well worn bar with some shady looking characters in Vegas riding a bike from Dallas to Seattle on a bet scribbling the words dungeon on a napkin while two passengers next you on a plane wonder what the heck does that mean I'm kids Laney and what does this have to do with my success why do you care part of my journey that I want to share with you in my new book deal your own destiny luckily now I can last and some would seem like other disasters at the time can any of you relate that's exactly what you'll discover by reading my book I picture you want to vote each for relaxing in the backyard.

doctor Scott hospital of Philadelphia
"transfusion syndrome" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

AM 1350 WEZS

11:09 min | 6 months ago

"transfusion syndrome" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

"When it comes to sex the fact that one in every thirty three babies is born with a birth defect January is birth defects awareness month I think a lot of people aren't maybe perhaps aware of that somebody who definitely is is doctor Scott ads like he's a surgeon in chief at the children's hospital of Philadelphia quite a resume that doctor ads like has he's he's absolutely dedicated his life to this he's an innovator in fetal medicine since the fields inception release of doc thanks so much for coming on with us my pleasure the babies each year are born with birth defects to put it in perspective also this is brick effects awareness month I'll get give you some key points first of all wanted thirty three babies is born with a birth defects other amazingly calm and the effects are costly billions of dollars required for medical treatment X. are merciless no parent should is immune the mysterious most because the birth defects are unknown they're over locked in my view the research is under funded and their birth defects are deadly the leading cause of infant mortality so in terms of stats each year in the US nearly a hundred and fifty thousand babies are born with birth defects many with conditions so rare most parents and even some clinicians have never heard of them and so too often these families are made aware of the treatments available at a place like our center pretty diagnosis and treatment the shoulders hospital of Philadelphia and are left feeling overwhelmed with few options so it's great that works out talking so that your listeners can hear about this relatively new enterprise of fetal surgery yes so talk about that what can be helped by having the surgery while the baby is still in the womb I'll give you a couple of examples the two most frequent operations we do before birth are describing a laser therapy for twin twin transfusion syndrome and the other is open fetal surgery for the for the so the Clinton transfusions syndrome the set up is identical twins each in their own amniotic sack and as opposed to east twenty having its own post that the password this that connects the fetus to the mother they have a shared placenta and their abnormal blood vessels I go from one side to the other says but one of the identical twins gets too much blood and goes and heart failure and develops and an excess of amniotic fluid and the other twin doesn't get enough blood goes make kidney failure and doesn't produce any under the comes a stock plan the way to treat that and to say both twins or otherwise doomed to put a scope into the to the uterus that the mothers of down a wall in your wall Mitchell was the person and use a laser fiber to photo quagga later include those culprit blood vessels with very good outcomes the second example is feel surgery responded after announced by the government is birth defect in which the coverings of the spinal cord don't form and so the and the higher this is on the smaller court the more nervous are affected and and we learned that there's ongoing damage to those mirrors through the entry your environment particularly amniotic fluid exposure because that's mostly people here so we've developed techniques about twenty years ago back in nineteen ninety eight to do this repeats but about the repair before birth and amp shown actually do a randomized prospective trial for the by the national institutes of health that fetal surgery respond about the photo has much better outcomes than surgery after birth in terms of better motor function for the babies the bill is a walk in terms of decreased incidence of hydrocephalus and brain damage in terms of decreased need for a shunt to drain fluid from the brain so that Snow White they applied actually worldwide yes saying that is widely applied I'm wondering how rare still is fetal surgery given some of what you've already told us well graphs old older information is maybe a four thousand people searches done worldwide we we've got about a quarter of them but we also throughs consortia like a north American people therapy network which is a network of now thirty six feet of treatment centers in North America that are working together for these rare problems so that we can learn from one another and collaborate for patients benefit not which he gives Dr Scott ads like these the surgeon chief at the children's hospital of Philadelphia since you've been in this and and you're the director of the hospital center for feel diagnosis and treatment since you've been been in this up for so long doctor adds a do you feel hopeful that that they're going to be more surgeries you'll be more prevented if things that can happen here why it's quite true that we've educated teams not only in North America but also in Europe and in Asia so is spreading worldwide which brings benefit to patients and then there's a lot of things that we're working on now that are very exciting particularly in the area of cellular and gene therapy for example one of my colleagues doctor Allen's like a pediatric surgeon here chop has worked for thirty years of all the techniques to do in utero stem cell transplantation early into the station to potentially treat sickle cell anemia use using blood cell forming stem cells are harvested from the mother and the free immunity this experimental work shows will not reject those cells filling graft and take over the missing function another one of my colleagues here doctor William Pronto is another pediatric surgical scientist is working on in the year gene therapy in in utero gene editing using crisper technology that is shown in animal models people and warm models that this has proof of principle that this works is not ready to be applied for likely yet but that could affect thousands and thousands and thousands of babies with pre nearly diagnosed genetic disorder say for instance like the cystic fibrosis and a the dispatcher worry we're doing worker now again in animal models with the the artificial womb which we we hope we've shown and feel she'd that we can support fetal sheep for four to five weeks and then the in an artificial womb with durable growth and development so we hope that could eventually be applied to babies who are born prematurely say at twenty three twenty four twenty five weeks gestation because it makes a world of difference whether it be a baby is at that early just Daschle age or five weeks later when the babies out commerce so dramatically better well all right we tell everyone they go to fetal surgery dot shop dot E. D. U. fetal surgery dot chop dot EDU to find out more information Dr Isaac thank you so much you're welcome thank you wow interesting what's happening at shop I have a cousin Jen Lorenzo who who works at chop and and has told me some of the things that happen in the neo natal unit and it's it's pretty amazing some of some of the things that happen in that hospital right as we continue in this edition of for your health the flu the flu the flu the northeast has really been hit by the flu and me just a crazy record in New York and and other parts of the area the US centers for disease control and prevention listen to this saying twenty seven children in the US have died of the flu that's so hard for me to wrap my head around that it's the highest number of child flew desk at this point in the season since they started keeping these records seventeen years ago right doctors are saying they're seeing huge numbers are unusually large numbers of flu patients at this point and for example it in New York at the land grown health center they've seen two hundred seventy flu patients adults and children in their emergency rooms and clinics in Manhattan and Brooklyn in the last week of December they I say it's not usually what they see they don't see that in late December early generally usually seat in February or March so there's some huge huge concern about the about the the flu and you know we always talk about the strains of of flu and that's always part of it is what is the strain of flu what you know what's happened here I for something else that I think a lot of you can relate to I know myself that I worry about the sometimes with burn out and they say if you're feeling that bone deep mental and physical exhaustion or what is otherwise really called burn out there's new research suggesting you could be at a high risk sadly for a potentially fatal heart flutter and it's called a fib we've talked about that on this show and it's a heart rhythm disorder that leads sometimes the cause of stroke in the United States and Europe they're saying this effects I didn't realize his number was so high it affects thirty three million people and is responsible for a hundred and thirty thousand deaths seven hundred fifty thousand hospitalizations every year to pay attention to these symptoms if you have chest pains palpitations you short of breath fatigue that is certainly one of the one of the symptoms because it's sometimes really hard to spot it's potentially silent killer and that's what it's it's called and chronic stress and exhaustion is a key factor in developing this disease so I guess one way you you know to be careful as you can see it when you're walking when you're when you start to feel that shortness of breath except for so I know for me it's been about taking more time in and taking a breath and nothing that you're doing not that I'm lecturing to anyone is worth having a stroke over having something horrible happened get that you know a film and the high blood pressure's us smoking obesity is another factor all of that anything to reduce it because of how in incredibly prevalent it's starting to be made according to the American institute of stress eighty percent of American workers say they feel stress that's one factor right there and half say they need help with managing stress this is just more than than work we talked about this before sometimes is the constant connection to social media and constantly trying to be on top of everything and burn out of course is a is a major stressors so let's make this new decade one where we thrive and survive even for height but thrive in a good way and of all people to lecture anybody but I'm just saying when I saw the study and I looked at some of the numbers you like.

doctor Scott hospital of Philadelphia
"transfusion syndrome" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

AM 1350 WEZS

11:09 min | 6 months ago

"transfusion syndrome" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

"The fact that one in every thirty three babies is born with a birth defect January is birth defects awareness month I think a lot of people aren't maybe perhaps aware of that somebody who definitely is is doctor Scott ads like he's a surgeon in chief at the children's hospital of Philadelphia a quite a resume that doctor ads like has he's he's absolutely dedicated his life to this he's an innovator in fetal medicine since the fields inception release of doc thanks so much for coming on with us my pleasure the babies each year are born with birth defects to put it in perspective also this is brick effects awareness month I'll get give you some key points first of all wanted thirty three babies is born with a birth defects other amazingly calm and the effects are costly billions of dollars required for medical treatment effects are merciless no parent should is immune the mysterious most because the birth defects are unknown they're over logged in my view the research is under funded and their birth defects are deadly the leading cause of infant mortality so in terms of stats each year in the US nearly a hundred and fifty thousand babies are born with birth defects many with conditions so rare most parents and even some clinicians have never heard of them and so too often these families are made aware of the treatments available at a place like our center pretty diagnosis and treatment the shoulders hospital of Philadelphia and are left feeling overwhelmed with few options so it's great that works out talking so that your listeners can hear about this relatively new enterprise a fetal surgery yes so talk about that what can be helped by having the surgery while the baby is still in the womb I'll give you a couple of examples the two most frequent operations we do before birth are describing a laser therapy for twin twin transfusion syndrome and the other is open fetal surgery for the for the so between two and transfusions syndrome the set up is identical twins each in their own amniotic sack and as opposed to east twenty having its own post that the password this that connects the fetus to the mother they have a shared placenta in their abnormal blood vessels I go from one side to the other sister wanted the identical twins gets too much blood and goes and heart failure and develops and an excess of amniotic fluid and the other twin doesn't get enough blood goes make kidney failure and doesn't produce any I'm actually comes a stock plan the way to treat that and to say both twins or otherwise doomed to put a scope inches to the nearest to the mothers of down a wall in your wall ms allies to listen and use a laser fiber to photo quagga later include those culprit blood vessels with very good outcomes the second example is feel surges responded better and Ospina Milton is birth defect in which the coverings of the spinal cord don't form and so the and the higher this is a misspelling court the more nervous are affected and and we learned that there's ongoing damage to those mirrors through the entry here in Parma particularly amniotic fluid exposure because that's mostly people here so we've developed techniques about twenty years ago back in nineteen ninety eight to do this repeats but about the repair before birth and amp shown actually do a randomized prospective trial for the by the national institutes of health that fetal surgery respond about the photo as much better outcomes than surgery after birth in terms of better motor function for the babies in terms of dollars to walk in terms of decrease incidence of hydrocephalus and brain damage in terms of decreased need for a shunt to drain fluid from the brain so that Snow White they applied actually worldwide you so saying that is widely applied and wondering how rare still is fetal surgery given some of what you've already told us well graphs old older information is maybe a four thousand people sure she's done worldwide we we've got about a quarter of them but we also throughs consortia like a north American people therapy network which is a network of now thirty six feet of treatment centers in North America that are working together for these rare problem so that we can learn from one another and collaborate for patients benefit that was huge Dr Scott ads like he's the surgeon chief at the children's hospital of Philadelphia since you've been in this and and you're the director of the hospital center for feel diagnosis and treatment and you've been been in this up for so long doctor adds a do you feel hopeful that that they're going to be more surgeries you'll be more preventative things that can happen here why is quite true that we've educated teams not only in North America but also in Europe and in Asia so is spreading worldwide which brings benefit to patients and then there's a lot of things that we're working on now that are very exciting particularly in the area of cellular and gene therapy for example one of my colleagues doctor Allen's like a pediatric surgeon here job has worked for thirty years of all techniques to do in utero stem cell transplantation early into the station to potentially treat sickle cell anemia use using blood cell forming stem cells are harvested from the mother and the free immunity this experimental work shows will not reject those cells filling graft and take over the missing function another one of my colleagues here doctor William Pronto is on in other pediatric surgical scientist is working on in the year gene therapy in in utero gene editing using crisper technology that is shown in animal models feel at home models that this has proof of principle that this works is not ready to be applied correctly yet but that could affect thousands and thousands and thousands of babies with previously diagnosed genetic disorders say for instance like the cystic fibrosis in a in a dispatcher worry we're going to work here now again in animal models with the the artificial womb which we we hope we've shown and fetal sheep that we can support fetal sheet for four to five weeks and then the in an artificial womb with durable growth and development so we hope that could eventually be applied to babies who are born to prematurely say at twenty three twenty four twenty five weeks gestation because it makes a world of difference whether it be a baby is at that early just Daschle age or five weeks later when the babies out commerce so dramatically better wow alright we tell everyone they go to fetal surgery dot chop dot EDU fetal surgery dot chop dot EDU to find out more information Dr Isaac thank you so much you're welcome thank you wow interesting what's happening at chop I have a cousin Jen Lorenzo who who works at chop and and has told me some of the things that happen in the neo natal unit and it's it's pretty amazing some of some of the things that happen in that hospital ours we continue in this edition of for your health the flu the flu the flu the northeast has really been hit by the flu and me just a crazy record in New York and and other parts of the area the US centers for disease control and prevention listen to this saying twenty seven children in the US have died of the flu that's so hard for me to wrap my head around that it's the highest number of child flu deaths at this point in the season since they started keeping these records seventeen years ago right doctors are saying they're seeing huge numbers are unusually large numbers of flu patients at this point and for example it in New York at the land grown health center they've seen in two hundred seventy flu patients adults and children in their emergency rooms and clinics in Manhattan and Brooklyn in the last week of December they say it's not usually what they see they don't see that in late December early generally usually seat in February or March so there's some huge huge concern about the about the the flu and you know we always talk about the strains of of flu and that's always part of it is what is the strain of flu what you know what's happened here I for something else that I think a lot of you can relate to I know myself that I worry about the sometimes with burn out and they say if you're feeling that bone deep mental and physical exhaustion or what is otherwise really called burn out there's new research suggesting you could be at a high risk sadly for a potentially fatal heart flutter and it's called a fib of we've talked about that on this show and it's a heart rhythm disorder that leads sometimes the cause of stroke in the United States and Europe they're saying this effects I didn't realize his number was so high it affects thirty three million people and it's responsible for hiring thirty thousand deaths seven hundred fifty thousand hospitalizations every year to pay attention to these symptoms if you have chest pains palpitations the short of breath fatigue that is certainly one of the one of the symptoms because it's sometimes really hard to spot it's potentially silent killer and that's what it's called and chronic stress and exhaustion is a key factor in developing this disease so I guess one way you you know to be careful as you can see it when you're walking when you're when you start to feel that shortness of breath except for so I know for me it's been about taking more time in and taking a breath and nothing that you're doing not that I'm lecturing to anyone is worth having a stroke over having something horrible happened get that you know a film and the high blood pressure's us smoking obesity is another factor all of that anything to reduce it because of how incredibly prevalent it's starting to be made according to the American institute of stress eighty percent of American workers say they feel stressed so that's one factor right there and half say they need help with managing stress this is just more than than work we talked about this before sometimes is the constant connection to social media and constantly trying to be on top of everything and burn out of course is a is a major stressors so let's make this new decade one where we thrive and survive thank you for right but thrive in a good way and of all people to lecture anybody but I'm just saying when I saw the study and I looked at some of the numbers yet scary.

doctor Scott hospital of Philadelphia
"transfusion syndrome" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

01:48 min | 9 months ago

"transfusion syndrome" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Get left behind and that's exactly why we created the great American well project to help those who aren't ready for retirement and deserve the chance to retire rich at the event I'm giving away details on my number one million you're making stock Alex and I reveal exactly what it takes to supercharger well plus I'll show you how to get my brand new book the United States of trump absolutely free so please make sure you join us at the great American wealth pride just go to Riley wealth project dot com to get started again it's a Riley world project dot com presented by the Oxford club if you're drowning in iris debt and can't afford to pay then you need to take advantage of special iris tax programs that are available and free yourself from iris collection efforts once and for all due to the financial hardship consumers are facing throughout the country the Internal Revenue Service has made it easier to settle delinquent tax problems an open phone line has been established by community tax for consumers to call and see if they qualify take down this number or stored in your cell phone but call the community tax help line at eight hundred five hundred fifty five eighty eight if you owe back taxes to the IRS and cannot afford to pay them back or even if you have years of on file tax returns there's no need to fear anymore but you have to call the community tax helpline today at eight hundred five hundred fifty five eighty eight for the help that you need don't take on the IRS alone they can attack your wages savings pension home and even your social security check call eight hundred five hundred fifty five eighty eight for your free consultation and to see if you qualify that's eight hundred five hundred fifty five eighty eight this is a life issues with Brad matters president of life issues institute twin to twin transfusion syndrome is a life threatening condition for both unborn babies results one faulty connections and blood flow developing.

"transfusion syndrome" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

10:15 min | 1 year ago

"transfusion syndrome" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Welcome back. I'm Jim Rome. All right. So again, it felt wrapped up coming. We're trying to get as many top prospects on this program prior to the draft as we possibly can. I've got another one for you right here. A former safety at Mississippi State and all American first team all SEC player one hundred and seventy tackles fourteen tackles for loss. Five sacks and three fumbles forced plus two interceptions in the last two seasons. The twenty nine thousand nine NFL draft is April twenty fifth through April twenty-seventh. It's in Nashville, Tennessee, Jonathan Abram is my guest Jonathan really good to have you on you. I'm pretty good. How 'bout you miss? I'm great, man. I'm great good. Here. You listen. You got a couple of more months away from the start of the draft and only two days from the start of the combine. So bring us up to date. How has your life right now? Right now, we're pretty much kinda D load and going into the Combi. So I mean, we've been taking your county wasting thing. As far as like, I say drought Predrag. I mean, pre combine workouts and things of that nature. So it's pretty much slowing down getting ready for the come on. All right, then in addition to that, you're getting a lot of attention. You're getting a lot of run as potentially the best safety in the draft. How do you go about dealing with that do you like that attention or maybe you try to block it all out? I mean, I do like their attention because I mean, it's true. But I mean, you can't let it get to you. So I mean what I've been doing is just been staying humble just working more. There you go. I can go out improved it on the grounds. Because I mean, no matter what anybody says you have to prove it you got to prove it. And you gotta believe it Jonathan Abrams guest. Now, one of the things that's really obvious from watching you on film is that you're not at all fair contact at all. In fact, it looks like you really like to hit where does the approach come from. I really don't know growing up. You know, I was always I wasn't aggressive care. But I mean, always like contact, and you know, just playing football the right way to be play more than. Data at the same time. The NFL is a game of football. It is changing. So how do you balance that aggressive approach on the field without drawing penalties? Me, and my coaches previously. We worked all lorrimore strike you guys. Be hit in the lower lower grisly areas. The go-to by the way as far as keeping my head of seeing what I hit target. 'cause like you said, you know, the game is changing, but his ways around, and if you talk to the correct way injuries, you prevent the person getting hurt, and you you don't create Jonathan Abram. Joining us getting ready for the combine and the NFL draft plays college. Mississippi state. Listen, look at your background and you played your high school ball at east Marion in Mississippi. What are those routes mean to you, and what it means to be representing that area and following in the footsteps of the guys who came before you only means a lot to me now with one of the reason why upside and stay home even junior college because I had the chance to go pretty much anywhere searching for me. I wanted to be one of those guys that represented my state from Mississippi State. It means a lot of my family back home. All my friends. Nobody reaches out to me. Tell me how proud of him proud of me that they are. And you know, a lotta guys that came before me like Bobby Helms say he played in the NFL four year. Our guys that go overlooking like career breath. He's from. He's really from Columbia Mississippi. The great wall to pay. So it means a lot to media represent my area. And you know, trying to build up my resume to be one of the great day. You know, the kids look up to and want to be like one day. We're talking to you Abram. You have no idea how happy that made me that you mentioned Terrell Buckley like when you were being recruited Louisville was very interested. The story goes to Todd Grantham antibody were all over you. And then you were recruited junior college. As you mentioned I mentioned teapot because he was at Mississippi State. He's one of my favorite guys ever literally ever. What was it like being recruited by Terrell Buckley and playing defense with him on the staff? It was really funny because he was first actually my off outta high school to Liu. So he was seventy because that's what plenty of with my Smith. I ended up deciding to go to Georgia. So he me. I mean, you know, we still talk because I like I said we were pretty close coming out of high school. We haven't being from Columbia. And so we just couldn't take. And it was a, you know, he he was always upset me that decided to go to George pretty at the same time. So we had the time. I was gonna transfer. He was all over the he would not let me get away. So and that's where we end up. We always laugh and joke. He never let me get away to do. If you've done that to him twice if you had done that team twice that would not have gone. He would've been. Oh, you're too young. To know what he was great. I mean, he he used to catch. He was you know, just talking to some of the guys that play with him. You know, like, they say, you know, he was they talked a lot. He would overshadow by prime time. When he was there for the guys who say, we know he forgot the Green Bay. A lot of fans, but the first time you got in on the proletarian took it like seventy yards at out job. I'm so glad that you know, that that's his deal, man. He made plays. Now, he gave up some plays. But he plays. He was electric. I'm kind of curious I t buck in middle age. What's he like now? Well, he's still talks trash. Mary listening, you still try you? He was trying to go out there and race you feel for three years. Over. So go out there. You know, can your spring take it gives them every time because he always makes them go. He's movement. And by the time, they go. That is incredible. That is such a good story Jonathan Abrams joining us. I'm glad to hear mom antibody has not changed that much now after your time at Georgia. You went to junior college. And then in Mississippi State every time I have somebody on from Mississippi State. We talk about life in starkville. What was stark Vegas like for you? For me. I mean, I love Vegas because. You know, it's a it's an agricultural school. So it's pretty country. You know, coming Columbia. I'm a country, boy, I like hunting fishing and things of that nature. So for me, it was relaxed. It's a quiet place. But at times, you know, you can go out and have fun for me. That's one thing. I didn't really focus on, you know, going for me was like strictly a business trip. Now got my degree. I the whole situation, and I ended up having great years there. So that was my main motto just going in here. Just working going to accomplish what I need to come. Jonathan Abram is my guest may ask about your teammate Jeffrey Simmons he was expected to be an early pick. And then he'd last week in training. What was your reaction when you heard that? Economy me, you know, like once it happened. You know, we just saw. I told him he got a free situation. He's been doing much worse. Change his life. You know, what you know ahead. Just merely a bump in a row. And you know, we talked about it. You know, you're still going to Jesse because feel speaks for sale high character guy, he's got you won't have on your team. And so, you know, he realized that he he's gonna lose somebody, you know, with all injury. But I told me happen. There's nothing he can do about it. You just gotta make the best out of the situation. And as is merely what life is you can't control everything, but things do happen to you gotta make the best out of them. And so we stand positive. Yes. Surgery yesterday. So everything went well. You know, he he was the best of luck at the combine, you know, everybody working your body. You know, I'm gonna tell the same thing. You know, he's the guy you want your team your team. And that's not because I'm he's my teammates as because of the type of person, you're great guy. I love playing. I definitely would help whoever draft. Now, take him whatever rounded they decide to take. Sean when he does come back. He's gonna come back a hundred times better. Johnson Abram is my guest. Listen before you go. There's another level to what you're doing right now. And if you're okay with this. I wanna ask you about something that you're involved with the T t s foundation even raising money for each bench press reps that you get at the combine for the twin to twin transfusion syndrome foundation when you and your wife were expecting twins. There was a diagnosis of stage three t t s what is your know about that at that time in what was it like to hear that news at the moment? I mean when it first happened. I was just really confused because I mean, I really know about it. We're coming into. Now. I was still cover. You know, having a kid. So you know, I knew about people having all the time for twins was kind of new to me. So I was kind of wrapping my head around the whole situation and then. It was even scarier because you know, my wife, she was really sad. You know, we really didn't know what to do when the foundation reached out and. The wind up having natty or a couple of cathedrals and things of that nature. They just were big help and my wife, actually, she ended up meeting. One of the women who were in the foundation with her at the hospital, and it was like they just were major helped cook. And so I just want to do anything. I can't possible to help them in any way. So now, I'm going out to my real thin. Foundation hoping to you know, create more awareness for better treatment. Anything that I can possibly go. What I get her money of my own I plan to donate again Johnson Abram. I guess I gotta ask you. I mean, this is something that is so painful, and because of that you and your family very easily could have kept his private, which you've taken on a role you want to help others. Why was that something that was so important to you? 'cause I mean every day I just wake up, and I looked at my daughter, and she was born three months premature. So he was always. Ma..

Jonathan Abram NFL Mississippi State Johnson Abram Jonathan Abrams Terrell Buckley Georgia Mississippi state Jim Rome Vegas football SEC Nashville Columbia Mississippi Tennessee Todd Grantham Bobby Helms Mississippi Jonathan
"transfusion syndrome" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"transfusion syndrome" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Born with birth defects, so common most importantly, birth defects are deadly the leading cause of infant mortality why not wait until the baby is born to operate there. Certain birth defects that cause progressive organ damage such that when the baby is born here too late or that are particularly devastating spina bifida that can lead to paralysis and hydrocephalus and brain damage dot also says fetal surgery is essential for identical twins who have twin twin transfusion syndrome. Twin gets too much blood and goes to the heart failure and the other twin doesn't get enough blood goes into kidney failure dodger Adzic says fetal surgery can be a lifesaver health update. Sara Lee Kessler NBC News Radio. I'm Ashley working with the FOX celebrity profile on filmmaker m night. Shyamalan who follows up his two thousand film, unbreakable and twenty seventeen split with a third part of the comic book inspired story glass. You knew this was going to be a trilogy from the start right from unbreakable. But did you have the full picture in mind back? Then roughly roughly there was nuances to the ending that you saw that I didn't know at that time, but I had questions and in my file of notes from nine hundred ninety nine had the Ray questions last even includes unseen footage from unbreakable. And we spoke about what it was like to revisit that first film in this series. I mean, so amazing to look at that footage. And I knew I had that. So I wanted to incorporate that and because it's been nineteen years to acknowledge that in. And when you're watching glass and say wanna be amazing to see a son grow out from a boy to a man Bruce Willis Samuel L Jackson and James McEvoy overturn to round out the trilogy with glass. Ashley.

Ashley Sara Lee Kessler transfusion syndrome Bruce Willis Samuel L Jackson Shyamalan James McEvoy NBC Adzic Ray FOX nineteen years
"transfusion syndrome" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"transfusion syndrome" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"Unfortunately, most causes birth defects are unknown in my view, Michelle. They're overlooked research is underfunded and birth defects are deadly the leading cause of infant mortality so in the US each year. Nearly a hundred fifty thousand babies are born with birth defects, many weather conditions, so rare most parents even some clinicians have never heard of them. So I'm glad to be on your show to maybe educate some families. Yeah. Because I know obviously when we're pregnant we go for ultrasounds at what point would a mother know that she has a child who may have birth defects. So it's. Important thing maybe in terms of two categories, Anna pretty effect structure ones in genetic defect. So for an Italian birth defects most pregnant mothers in the US at least have an ultrasound down at eighteen to twenty weeks gestation and most in having birth defects should be detectable at that time. And then there there can be risk referral to a central like ours or more sophisticated radiological testing can be done, for instance, with fetal MRI, it's true. You can do an MRI on feed us to give more information. And that's a technique that we invented here at the house Bill Philadelphia about twenty years ago as far as the network effects, go the the standard way in the past for those who say were at higher risk would be to do an amniocentesis or choreography villa sampling. But now there's a new test that requires only a maternal blood sample is called noninvasive prenatal testing or in a PT for short. The way this works is that from the maternal blood. There's a leakage of fetal DNA fetal cells from the fetus across the southern end of the maternal bloodstream, and we have techniques now to find a needle in the haystack. The fetal cells to retrieve the genetic testing with only maternal blood sample, and that's amazing. And I've had that done now. Correct me if I'm wrong does that test for three major birth defects. Correct. Or does it test? A wide array managed genetic abnormalities, the trisomy banks are getting sophisticated hit it to other genetic analysis. And I think what time this may largely replace amniocentesis. That would be amazing because I know I had an amnio it's on and it was such a debate. It was such a debate within my mind, whether or not to do it because they do warn you that it could lead to a miscarriage wanted two hundred right? So yeah, that would be absolutely amazing to have that which could test the. A whole array of of defects. Okay. So parents who know that they have a child who is going to be born with a birth defect. What are some things that they can do prior to the baby being born? I think they need to meet with a team like ours to get get make sure the appropriate. To get information. And really so we've had twenty three thousand referrals to our center since nineteen ninety five this year. We'll buy what about two thousand women carrying babies with birth defects mo- most of which are quite serious only ten percent of those women require any sort of fetal therapy. And you only do fetal therapy if there's progressive damage by the birth defect to Oregon's before birth social when the baby's born you're too late. So it's rare, but we we, of course, have done more fetal surgery operations than any center in the world, but like twin twin transfusion syndrome spina bifida lung tumors things of that sort. Incredible. And what is the expected long term outcome for babies do undergo this feels surgery? Well, let let's let's take one example, so twin twin transfusion syndrome is where there are identical twins in the same year, of course, separate amniotic socks, but as opposed to to settle discs to percenters into which the umbilical cord inserts is only one so they have to share it. And for some reason in some some of these instances, there's a unburied, abnormal blood vessels that go from one side of the Pacific to the other such that one of the twins gets too much blood. It goes to heart failure and develops excess amniotic fluid and the other twin doesn't get enough blood and goes in kidney failure does not produce fetal urine. Which is what most of them yet clue it is and becomes shrink wrapped in the membranes. And both twins will go onto to die at a certain stage. They're doomed but with pitas gothic laser therapy. Putting fetus cope into the uterus? Visualizing episode in the normal blood vessels. And.

US Bill Philadelphia Michelle Anna Oregon Pacific twenty weeks twenty years ten percent
"transfusion syndrome" Discussed on The Morning Breath

The Morning Breath

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"transfusion syndrome" Discussed on The Morning Breath

"I forget what the name of the medical tornado term is but then she donated her babies to science to that like they can figure out why not nazis yet the whole story was so sad i never watched her seat in the badger but i'm automatically in love with her now me to think that is the most difficult thing i think nobody i have to i think so to be let us but we wish you the best thank you for speaking out yeah 'cause like she could have just moved on with left noone would have ever known well no because if you announce your pregnancy and railroad you don't give birth i guess it's implied but i think a lot like i was watching nashville and character unnatural goes to a similar thing and she speaks out about it because she feels like such shame in the fact that she miscarried and wants other women like to know that it's not your fault revolves no i know but it's so sad it so sad well we wish you all the best twenty twin transfusion syndrome that's what djibouti on last story interesting for people who are interested by this i'm interested by this chandler i'm making new shows for netflix china rhymes the creator popular television shows such as greece anatomy and skin dow and also how to get away with murder which is the only one i've watched of all the goes as much any of the shows burgum denver shunned arrives netflix show yet we'll also because i started watching how to get away with murder anything i much for two seasons like every thursday and was so fucking scary that i always had was meals we early yes i could not take it was so like irri anyways i enjoyed it but then i couldn't keep up with the weektoweek other normal unlike for scripted tv like i don't watch that much just nashville even phones sometimes neat but that's also something i acknowledge and we so for someone like me binge watching how to get away with murder would have been really great for me could have gotten like all the scary and is in one sitting and it wouldn't have to like scare myself once a week.

chandler murder denver nashville djibouti netflix greece
"transfusion syndrome" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"transfusion syndrome" Discussed on KPCC

"Or nutrient it may be better her boat the baby and the mother to be delivered early right but you're caught we trying to weigh the risk of a of an unexpected premature delivery for medical indicate versus the rip staying in the womb when if not a good idea really go to the phones eight four four seven two four two five five if you have questions about placenta and fetal development and please keep your suggestions for placenta recipes to yourself i couldn't believe it let's go to that's coach to who question let's go to the phones that's going to jesse in rochester higher jesse welcome designs friday all thank you ira um so it sounds like you've you've discovered that the placenta among identical twins would favour one over the other my twin identical fund ted when did quinn trend here and syndrome which sounds like kind of an hyperactive tendency of their codefendants who wanna he'd won and deplete the other i wonder if you could speaker how your new findings might be related to the twin quinn grant federal okay it could you let us here what that is yet twin transfusions syndrome is when the vessels in the placenta from one twin and the other half abnormal connection so one typically one twin steals blood from the other twin directly um in our particular study we excluded as twins with those abnormalities but we are hoping that with in ford we can also look at how that transport of nutrients his altered with an abnormal connections and probably like anything that percenta issue i suspect dram in one spectrum there is his feeling of blood from went went to the other and in another and respect and there's one placenta that isn't functioning and as well as it should be so there's trying to understand where the boundaries are between normal and avner some of the things we hope to do better as we move forward can better understand the scent of function and just to clarify nar study weep specifically chose on purpose twins that were different in size the vast majority of identical twins have very similar in size and you don't and you don't see this phenomenon now i know you i noticed that you use something called bold mri for this most recent study had does that were boulder mara below them rise blood.

ford jesse rochester ted quinn avner boulder
"transfusion syndrome" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"transfusion syndrome" Discussed on Science Friday

"But if the baby is suffering due to lack of oxygen or nutrients it may be better for both the baby and the mother to be delivered early but you're constantly trying to weigh the risk of a of an unexpected premature delivery for medical indications versus the risk of staying in the womb when it's not a good idea rideau to the phones e 447 two for each 255 if you have questions about placenta and feudal development and please keep your suggestions for placenta recipes to yourself grower couldn't believe it let's go to cut to who question that's got to the phones going to jesse in rochester higher jesse welcome to signs friday all thank you ira um so with sounds like you've you've discovered that the placenta among identical twins would favour one over the other my twin identical son ted twin to twin transfusion syndrome which sounds like uh kind of an hyperactive uh tendency of their placenta to want to feed one and deplete the other i wonder if you could speak to how your new findings might be related to the twenty twin transfusion central okay you could you lends a little more what that is yet twin twin transfusions m syndrome is when the vessels in the placenta from one twin in the other um has abnormal connection so one typically one twin steals blood from the other twin directly in our particular study we excluded i twins with those abnormalities but we we're hoping that moving forward we can also look at how that transport of nutrients his altered with abnormal connections.

jesse rochester ted twin
"transfusion syndrome" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"transfusion syndrome" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"School blows it was problems and while sweet it's kind of weekend also perform in the fetal fucking that to risk on a seam aging and more right to triple a decides up to learn and then walsh we have all these accomplished official we've discussed without a change in we've we can offer but if intervention they said of the when you fix there are four surgeries but you perform explain explain each of them to us what do you do okay so the first procedure at that time perform is to for the score pick who leads her ability shown fourth twinkling tweet plus you just seen them so you know his stop of a common situation that we have fall plus st the fuck shoe babys so we have if they didn't you quote going so and then the fourth i went loss we have all plus st the sometimes but usually the share quinn action also blow the connection is a sometimes us connections are not balanced so one features receive too much blood flow another one best not pursue enough but and previously them other than one of last probably lost that are down when martin eighty percent of the time they would lost they would lose the debate we've so what he vote baby's both initiatives so you have one person to to baby yes adding fix that so we put me too does a very tying score that is corporate cam ranks study you to send then i'm he hughes rethink she fired those connection so on the plus st kosar for sir face and then the using quote leisurely weekend global labels last was in it can stop to that problem so that's so when we get to what will in charlie male used to do they did not have the telescopic they did not have the lazar these are tools that are relatively new that a surgeon such as yourself now can use that previously were not available yes so hundred technique to so he proved a lot of technique before we used to doing all selective bullish on now we've been to fight is pacific of the week two best those are cause into problem so so this for five for a tough there's procedure increased improved a lot alright in that that operations called the twin twin like so the pressure call for to scoff because he's operation did diseases plane to clean transfusion seemed on twitter winter twin transfusion syndrome alright it's going.

official lazar transfusion syndrome walsh quinn hughes twitter eighty percent