19 Burst results for "Tracy b Wilson"

On this day: Karl M. Baer legally recognized as male

This Day in History Class

04:09 min | 9 months ago

On this day: Karl M. Baer legally recognized as male

"Hello and welcome to the podcast. I'm tracy wilson and it's january eighth. Carl m bear was legally recognized as mail on the stay in one thousand nine hundred. Seven bear was born to a german jewish family in eighteen eighty five and after his delivery the midwife said to his mother something along the lines of congratulations on the birth of your lovely daughter but the midwife had a different conversation with carl's father saying that this newborn babies body was ambiguous and that it wasn't clear whether she should call the baby male or female today we might have described him as intersex so the family went to see a doctor and added that when they registered carl's birth they would register him as a girl and give him girls name. But as carl grew up he had a very clear sense of his own self. He later described himself as a boy who was being raised as girl and his own writing he said quote one may raise a healthy boy in a womanish manner as one wishes and a female creature as manish never will. This caused their senses to remain forever reversed and his growing up was not easy at all. He was expected to play with girls but he didn't feel like a girl and the girls also seemed to suspect. Somehow he wasn't one of them not only did he not like most of the pastimes that were considered to be appropriate for girls but the girls in his community excluded him from playing with them his behavior and his interests and as he grew into a teenager his appearance and voice were more in line with what was expected of boys than what was expected of girls in one thousand nine hundred four at the age of nineteen he moved to hamburg. He studied sociology. He started working as a social worker and was also part of feminist organisations including campaigning against the trafficking of women he was also active in the jewish service organization beneath breath that same year. He started introducing himself to people as a man. He changed stress and no longer tried to hide his more masculine physical features and then in the midst of all this. He was injured in a tram accident when he was taken to the hospital. Doctors immediately noticed that his i d did not match the name or the gender that he gave to them. When he was admitted they ultimately contacted magnus hirschfeld of the institute for sexual science which was a research institute medical facility and an advocacy organization for what we would describe. Today as lgbt rights hirschfeld described bear as a case of quote erroneous sexual attribution. He and other doctors at the institute felt that bear would benefit from having surgery. It's what we would today describe as gender affirmation surgery after receiving hormone treatments bear had a series of surgery is starting in one thousand nine hundred six and this made him one of the first people to have surgery for this reason on january eighth of one thousand nine hundred seven. He was legally recognized as mail and was issued a new birth certificate that same year. He published a semi-fictional autobiography called memoirs of a man's maiden years and he published that under the pseudonym nfo body but it was widely known that he was the author of this work on october tenth of that year he got married although his wife died of pneumonia about a year and a half later and he got remarried later on bear continued to work as a social activist in berlin until nineteen thirty seven including becoming the director of the berlin lodges of buzney breath but then in nineteen thirty seven. He was captured by nazis and tortured after settling his affairs as quickly as he could. He fled germany and moved. To what would later become israel. He lived a quiet life there as an insurance agent and he died in nineteen fifty-six

Carl Tracy Wilson Carl M Bear Manish Magnus Hirschfeld Institute For Sexual Science Hamburg Hirschfeld Berlin Pneumonia Germany Israel
"tracy b wilson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

11:16 min | 1 year ago

"tracy b wilson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"And I'm Tracy V. Wilson back when I was doing some research for a project completely unrelated to the podcast just kind of side projects that I was working with friends I came across the story of buddy Bolden and he immediately went on to my list of future topics and then recently as you may recall because we are the episode we went to New Orleans to do a live show at the national World War two museum and while we were there we timed it so that we kind of made a little bit of education out of it and one of my best friends was there with me to my best friends are actually there with me but this one in particular it was her birthday weekend and she absolutely loves music and loves jazz and she wanted to hit all of the jazz spots that she could while we were there and I was reminded of buddy story so it it kind of bubbled back up into my consciousness and it seemed a good time to finally give him a moment and before we start I feel like we need to talk about him as a challenging topic for historians because author Donald M. Markey who wrote really the first and only comprehensive biography of bold and noted early on in his book that when he was researching buddies history and his family history it became really really apparent that there were some problems for example the name Baldwin had been spelled innumerable different ways on various documents so birth certificates death certificates and wedding certificates for any one person might show the last name with completely different spellings on each of for example one of buddy's arts was listed with the last name bolding honor marriage certificate but her signature on that same certificate clearly shows the spelling of Bolden B. O. L. D. E. N. so even on that one documents of the names are inconsistent and this sort of disparity is all over the various records that exist related to buddy Bolden's life even though there aren't really that many records to begin with and may also include things like age discrepancies and address discrepancies it's kind of all over the place and all of this as well as buddies charisma and talent as a performer this contributed to a number of falsehoods and a lot of mythologizing over the years so there will be a couple of things that we point out along the way as unverifiable we do know when he was born Charles Joseph Bolden was born on September six eighteen seventy seven we don't really know when he got the nickname body though his mom referred to him as Charles throughout his life he was west more an Alice Bolden's second child their first child was the daughter who was christened Lada but went by Lottie she was born two years before but he was and Westmoreland as a driver for a businessman named William Walker who is employed bodies grandfather disturbance and grandmother Francis as well and it's been speculated the ghost of us was born into slavery although that isn't one of those places where there is no definitive documentation but ghost of us and Francis and then west more and Alice lived in servants quarters on Walker's property and they were employees there they were not in slave by him Westmore had moved his family a few blocks away before but he was born and then moved back in eighteen seventy eight when west Moore's brother Thomas moved out and then they moved away again in anticipation of their third child Cora who was born in eighteen eighty but his older sister Lottie died she had several ideas since he died in eighteen eighty one at the age of six his father Westmore also died on December twenty third of eighteen eighty three at the age of thirty two he had come down with what was recorded as a cute Poro pneumonia for several years after that it's not totally clear where Alice and the surviving two children lived but in eighteen eighty seven they moved into a home at three eighty five First Street but he was ten at the time and if you're familiar with New Orleans that's on what's the twenty three hundred block of First Street today in the eighteen eighties the neighborhood had a pretty diverse mix of people but the residents mostly were Irish and German and Alice despite being a single mother wanted all of her children in school rather than working so buddy attended school at least into the early eighteen nineties all the records are once again a little unclear their body as Charles Bolden did not appear in a city directory separately from Alice until eighteen ninety seven when he would have been twenty years old and at that point he was listed as a plasterer although in reality he was taking a variety of temp jobs to make ends meet while Bolden grew up in a city that was just full of music he didn't start taking cornet lessons until a little later that was in the mid eighteen nineties from a neighbor named manual hall who worked as a cook in the French Quarter and he was close with buddy's mother Alice yeah it appears it Alice and manual probably were romantically linked at some point and possibly for a long ongoing time sometimes he is kind of referred to almost as a father figure in buddy Bolden's life and it was with this manual hall but but he first played in a band he also joined up with Charlie Galloway and neighbor about eight years older than he was who had a barber shop at this point barber shops were common meeting places for musicians so much so that part of the buddy Bolden methodology that has been repeated over the years spread the false information that he was a barber guests surely you spending all this time and barber shops he was not a barber this is just a location where people Max there was kind of an ongoing shuffling going on at the time in the bands that buddy was part of some of them form really loosely just to play for a particular party or dance and the others went through ongoing reorganization of the members disagreed on the sound of the style we're just moved on to other groups yeah I feel like if anybody ever played in non orchestra type bands in high school they know this dance halls of bands falling apart reforming and other people beating up and playing in a band for a night or two but body and Galloway started playing together not long after body had picked up the cornet it is believed that body made appearances with Galloway's band as early as eighteen ninety four that was the year the first or to taking lessons and his body began performing around the city he got really good really fast and he garnered a following for himself he always had a bevy of young women who were happy to hang around near the bandstand and hold his things and body definitely enjoyed this attention and he was romantically linked to a number of ladies in the second half of the eighteen nineties and one woman had the Oliver who is older than body kept regular company with the musicians in eighteen ninety seven Hattie embody had a child Charles Joseph Bolden junior this wasn't the beginning of a family scenario though buddy and how you weren't married and while he did try to financially support them for a while it didn't really last how do you went by the name had a building for a while in a common law arrangement but by nineteen hundred she was back to going by Hattie all over by nineteen hundred also just six years after he first started taking lessons with manual hall but he had built a a pretty significant name for himself on the New Orleans music scene he was doing things differently than musicians before him had he played differently and hearing songs differently we're gonna talk about that a little bit more towards the end of the episode and while the people that he played with had been a fluid group things started to get some consistency in terms of band members at the turn of the century Willie Cornish you had come and gone through buddy's band before came back in eighteen ninety nine to play the trombone Jimmy Johnson played the bass and was the youngest member of the band he could often be seen bicycling through the town on the way to gigs with is based on his back which delights me there were two clarinet players William Warner and on the C. clarinet and Frank Lewis on the B. flat clarinet Jefferson Mumford played guitar in Cornelius Tolman became the regular drummer after he and Henry Zeno alternated in that position for a while yeah there is I I did not end up including it in this episode just in terms of time it became a whole scope shift if we tried to do it but there is like one photograph of this band although Cornelius Tillman isn't in it and it is one of those sort of history mysteries will include a link to a paper about it in our show notes where no one can decide how this photograph should be flips because initially people saw it and thought that was like two people are playing left handed this must be wrong will flip it and then they realized if they flipped it it looked like two other band members for playing left handed and this is for the source of much discussion and analysis for years and years and years but it's also the possibility that it's just a posed picture where they were holding their instruments naturally the way they would when they were playing so willing to that paper because it's quite delightful but in a moment we're going to talk about the area of New Orleans that is very closely linked to body success but first we're going to pause for words from one of the sponsors that keeps the show going for your next favorite podcast from over two hundred fifty thousand available to you right now all three by downloading the I heart radio here's a preview of a podcast that is sure to leave you wondering what exactly does figuring out if aliens exist have to do with the end of the world well it turns out that the odd emptiness that we find in the universe can give us clues about what may have gone on or didn't go on before we humans came along did something bad happened and if so might it happen to us to looking around for signs of whether we're the only intelligent life to have ever of all can help answer those questions when you look at it the universe does seem amazingly large earth to be the only planet with life on consider it like this let's say that your photons the tiny packet of light and one day you had the where with all the set out to travel across the universe you would find that perhaps your great surprise such a trip would take you around fifty billion years yes you might which can travel at the speed of light would take fifty billion years to cross from one side of the universe to the other at least that's how long it would appear to take you to us humans and this is just the observable universe the amount of the universe that light like you has had time to travel across since the Big Bang within that vast space there anywhere from one hundred billion to two trillion galaxies by our current guesses at least of which our own Milky Way is on the larger side of the spectrum there are larger but they're also a lot of smaller ones too within these billions or trillions of galaxies are billions and billions and billions of stars probably exponentially more planets the total number of planets and stars in our universe the total number of places for life to exist is mind bogglingly large and Sir you packet of light or wavelength depending on your mood might think to yourself as you travel across.

Tracy V. Wilson
"tracy b wilson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"tracy b wilson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Holly and I'm Tracy V. Wilson and we were recently lucky enough to be the guest of the national World War two museum in New Orleans Louisiana excessively would do a show there about the U. S. so and Bob hope's work with the organization to run parallel to an exhibit that they are currently running about Bob Hope called so ready for the laughter the legacy of Bob Hope and that exhibit is gonna run until February tenth of twenty nineteen the museum also has its own podcast about film and World War two history called service on celluloid we'll talk a little bit more about that at the end of the show yeah I I think Tracy and I would both say that it can't be overstated how much we absolutely loved our time in New Orleans absolutely and I I spent the day that we did our show I spent basically all of the time I had available at the museum and it was a great experience yeah that facility is amazing it is huge it is growing so much incredible care and love into every exhibits and they have just some amazing pieces that you will not find anywhere else in the city of course is an utter delight I grew up on the Florida panhandle sorry it's been a lot of time there it was Tracy's first time there it was very fun for you to really see the city for the first time and similarly my husband has been through there with me before but not really for an extended period of time so it was great to to watch him and my other friends really exploring for the first time I said during one of the the brakes during our show that we don't normally put on the projects that I have not felt so relaxed and happy in probably five years the city is just beautiful and it has this great culture and amazing food and a wonderful Arsene and there's just something really really magical about New Orleans so if you've not been there I highly encourage it yeah hopefully you too will feel happy and relaxed in only ways but what we're gonna do now is jump into the live show that we did there at the World War two museum we hope.

Holly Tracy V. Wilson New Orleans Louisiana Bob Hope New Orleans Arsene Florida
"tracy b wilson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

11:20 min | 1 year ago

"tracy b wilson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"And I'm Tracy V. Wilson and today's episode was requested approximately one hundred years ago if you go by way of hyperbole yeah they're not really one hundred years ago but it feels that way it was a very long time and I have had it on my list throughout that time but I am only just now getting to it for a variety of reasons we're talking today about Levi Strauss and his story is really historically interesting because it touches on a lot of important moments in U. S. history so he was an immigrant who ended up in a business that was impacted by and in turn affected the U. S. civil war and American clothing culture she has a story that's tied to the gold rush she also had a vision for his adopted city of San Francisco that he worked really hard to achieve so that future generations would benefit from it in his life in many ways is the story of the United States in the nineteenth century from the perspective of a Jewish immigrant who became a captain of industry before we get into a story I will make a confession which is that until fairly recently probably five years they should go I thought Levi and Strauss for two different people that have been a business together saying so clearly armistice in history class because even though people wear Levi's immune call at Levi Strauss I didn't realize that was one person's proper name so I grew up in North Carolina if not all that far away from cone mills which is if you made the denim for Levi's five a land for two hundred years or something like this is a piece of history that is like I'm a little more speed that I didn't have confusion about whether Levi and Strauss RDP is not my proudest moment but in my defense even though I am a close person I don't think I owned it jeans of any flavor from about nineteen eighty five until like two years ago like that's just never been my thing so that's my excuse poultry though it may be that I just never examined Levi Strauss it makes you feel better I thought Hanna Barbera was one person no that'd be funny but now so Levi was born at Luke Strauss on February twenty sixth at eighteen twenty nine in Britain and Germany his father first Strauss was a salesman who sold household goods door to door his mother's name was Rebecca Strauss and both she and her screw up in Franconia it's an area in the north of modern day Bavaria which was predominantly Jewish Rebecca was first of second wife his first wife metal Ballman Strauss had died at the age of thirty five leaving him with five children then person Rebecca had two more children together a daughter and then lube and first Rebecca and their seven children lived in a three room downstairs floor of a two story house so this was a time when Bavaria's Yudin addict or Jude law was in effect that had started in the eighteen teams and this law seemed as though it offered Jewish citizens the opportunity to pursue a number of jobs that had once been forbidden to them but in return it also created really strict regulations for their lives among them marriage and immigration of new Jews was severely limited all Jews had to be registered they had to take German names they could not own lands and even their language was codified so all public records had to be kept in German we could not use Hebrew for those someone like Herschel Strauss if you travel through the area selling his wares also served as messengers the news community connectors during this time and in this profession first was sort of exempted from a part of the you'd need it working as a peddler which had been a traditional job for Jewish men in the area for a long time was no longer considered an acceptable career but older people Mike Hurst who weren't able to pick up a new profession were allowed to keep doing it yeah it was expected that they would just eventually die off and so with that profession and all of the limitations of the union eight X. eventually inspired emigration one of the marriage laws that really created a problem is it only the eldest son of any Jewish household could get married and so there were some work arounds like is another son that was younger wanted to marry a window that was acceptable or is a couple that had no children wanted to give up the slot their eldest son would have had to another family so they could have two sons merry they could but basically this really limited the entire culture because all of these young women could not get married all of these young men could not get married it was frustrating so eventually they wanted to leave in eighteen thirty seven there was a a group of eighteen people that left eighteen young people into of Loeb's older siblings were part of that they left Germany to make homes in London and New York in nineteen forty and nineteen forty one two more of the strongest children followed suit in eighteen forty six first died of tuberculosis Rebecca remarried soon after a few persons brother he was a widower named look man but Leishman died just a few weeks after the wedding Luke was seventeen at that time and two of his sisters were still living at home an immigration at this point was not easy you couldn't just pick up and leave the Bavarian government had to approve anyone who wish to leave the country and you had to prove that neither you nor anyone in your family have any sort of criminal record and that you could afford to make the trip on March seventeenth eighteen forty seven Rebecca Strauss filed an immigration petition in which he stated that because she was a widow she didn't have the financial support anymore she didn't know how she would provide for her youngest son but she had children in the United States who could help her get settled there live was old enough to work and contribute to the family's finances once they arrived and for his part liberal his own position stating quote no members of my family will stay behind I will share the fate that has been assigned to me with them in foreign lands I just enjoyed my mother and her plea on June twenty sixth eighteen forty seven Rebecca and her children so love and his two sisters were approved for immigration but they didn't leave immediately because Rebecca needed to make sure that the family that had gone on to New York had indeed made preparations for the three of them to arrive and live there they finally made their way in the spring of eighteen forty eight although the specifics of their trans Atlantic passage aren't really documented known Jonas and Louis Strauss lives brothers have both become dry goods merchants in the city they'd open up a shop at three ninety three and a half grand street but by the time the family arrived they had moved to a more lucrative location at two zero three and a half division street they lived above the shop John it's also got married and started his own family and at some point Ludbrook followed the example that the wings had any changed his name to a more Americanized version this was not uncommon in the eighteen fifties senses he is listed as Levi with a why he also started working in the family dry goods business while he was there he learned English really quickly so that he could speak with business partners and customers and he applied for US citizenship just as his brothers had done before him let's also strike its business was doing really well they move to another new location near union market in eighteen fifty one and as their family business was growing a new opportunity was making itself apparent across the country as the California Gold Rush fostered new towns do prosperity and a need for dry goods the Strasbourg there's did not want to miss a chance to capitalize on this new market but they also needed to keep their established New York business going and so the youngest brother of a family was sent west five days after he took his oath of citizenship on January thirty first eighteen fifty three love Strauss who is now going by Levi left New York for San Francisco aboard the U. S. mail ship Georgia which was a steamer and the family had already loaded a shipment of merchandise aboard another ship called the wing to racer for Levi to take possession of once you reach San Francisco the clipper winged racer was failing down around the tip of South America and then north to California leave I would make the trip in less time traveling through Panama this was of course before the Panama canal was built so he took the steamer Georgia to Panama and then traveled across that then stripped of the country to Panama City on the Pacific side we got another steamer there called the isthmus and that was bound for San Francisco he arrived in San Francisco on March thirteenth eighteen fifty three this was considered for a lot of people a safer plan then trying to travel overland from New York to San Francisco because often did not survive that journey or if they did get to California they got there in pretty sorry shape this is a little bit of an easier brooms and the specifics of Levi's first days in San Francisco are also unknown he would have needed to rent warehouse space for the goods that were coming in on the wind researcher in he would have needed to find lodgings for himself he most likely had some letters of introduction to family connections that had already made that journey west so it wasn't as though he just showed up and had to figure everything out by himself he had some security net in place that merchandise that had been shipped showed up two weeks after we buy dead on March thirtieth unlike other merchants you have to bid on merchandise that was shipped on back once I got to the port at San Francisco lead I knew what was coming he just had to inspect it accept it and then move it into the warehouse as I got to know the market in California he could ensure that future shipments contained items that would be the most likely to me even to make the most money and for clarity the stresses were not opening a retail shop in San Francisco even though they had sort of a a similar one in New York they were basically setting up a wholesale business that would sell stock to other merchants for their shops so leave I had to invest time in developing really good relationships with other businessmen in the area it was twenty four at this point he wasn't supporting away for family so aside from attending synagogue and participating in social events primarily within San Francisco's Jewish community all of his efforts can be focused on establishing the family's new west coast firm and it wasn't only working with retailers in San Francisco either he also traveled inland to Sacramento and he paid visits to smaller mining towns to make deals with the shopkeepers there and this was an ongoing practice for the business that he pretty much carried out forever when news broke of new or strikes or a new town popping up Strauss was smart enough to go get into those towns that sprouted up in those places really quickly and forge those new business partnership oops coming up we'll talk more about how Levi Strauss setup the Strauss family business in San Francisco but first we'll take a little break for a word from our sponsor right now there is a lot to consider when selling a home home equity is high housing inventory is down and interest rates are at an all time low but.

Tracy V. Wilson
"tracy b wilson" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

09:30 min | 2 years ago

"tracy b wilson" Discussed on 710 WOR

"And I'm Tracy v. Wilson, we're talking today about Levi Strauss, and historians really historically interesting because it touches on a lot of important moments in US history. So he was an immigrant who ended up in a business that was impacted by an intern affected. The US civil war and American clothing culture. He has the story that's tied to the goldrush heels that vision for his adopted city of San Francisco that he worked really hard to achieve. So the future generations would benefit from it, and his life in many ways, is the story of the United States in the nineteenth century from the perspective of Jewish immigrant who became a captain of industry before we get into his story. I will make a confession. Which is that until fairly recently, probably five years ago, I thought Levi, Strauss were two different people that have been business together saying. So clearly I missed this in history class, because even though people wear Levi's and you'd call it Levi, Strauss. I didn't realize that was one person's proper name. So I grew up in North Carolina not all that far away from cone, mills, which is, who made the denim for Levi's five oh, one for. Two hundred years or something like this is a piece of history. That is like, I'm a little more speed it. I didn't have confusion about whether Levi Strauss for two people. It's not my proudest moment. But in my defense even though I am a clothes person. I don't think I owned a pair of jeans of any flavor from about nineteen eighty five until, like two years ago. That's just never been my things. So, that's, that's my excuse paltry. Though it may be that I've just never examined Levi, Strauss fit makes you feel better. I thought Hanna Barbera was one person. Oh now, that'd be funny, but now fellow Levi was born lube, Strauss on February twenty six eighteen twenty nine in Germany, has father her Strauss was a salesman who sold household, goods store, door, this mother's name was Rebecca Haas Strauss, and both she and her screw up in Franconia. It's an area in the north of modern day Bavaria, which was predominantly Jewish. Rebecca with her second wife, his first wife. Male Bowman Strauss had died at the age of thirty five leaving him with five children than her and Rebecca had two more children's gather a daughter, and then lib, and her Rebecca, and their seven children lived in a three room downstairs floor of a two story house. So this was a time when Bavaria's Yudin addict, or July was in effect that had started in eighteen teens in this law seemed as though it offered Jewish citizens the opportunity to pursue. A number of jobs that had once been forbidden to them. But in return, it also created really strict regulations for their lives among them marriage, an immigration of new Jews was severely limited all Jews had to be registered. They had to take German names. They could not own land, and even their language was codified. So all public records had to be kept in German. They cannot use Hebrew for those someone like her Strauss who traveled through the area, selling his wares, also served as messengers his community Connector's during this time. And in this profession, Kirsch was sort of exemptions from part of the you'd need it working as a peddler, which had been a traditional job for Jewish men in the area for a long time was no longer considered an acceptable career, but older, people like her who weren't able to pick up a new profession. We're allowed to keep doing it. Yeah, it was expected that they would just eventually die off. And so would that profession and all of the limitations of the eight eventually, inspired immigration, one of the marriage laws that really created a problem with only the eldest son of any Jewish household could get married. And so there were some work arounds, like, if nother son that was younger wanted to marry a widow that was acceptable, or if a couple had no children, wanted to give up the slot, there, Ellison would have had to another family, so they have two sons Mary, they could. But basically, this really limited the entire societal culture, because all of these young women could not get married. All of these young men could not get married. It was frustrating, so they wanted to leave in eighteen thirty seven there was a group of eighteen people that left eighteen young people in two of loves older siblings were part of that they left Germany to make homes inland in New York. In nineteen forty and nineteen forty one to more of the Strauss children, followed suit. And eighteen forty six Hirsch, died of tuberculosis Rebecca remarried, soon after two curses brother, who was a widower named Lipman, but Lipman died just a few weeks after the wedding was seventeen at that time. And see his sisters were still living at home. An immigration at this point was not easy. You couldn't just pick up and leave. The Bavarian government had to approve anyone who wished to leave the country. And it had to prove that, neither you nor anyone in your family had any sort of criminal record, and that you could afford to make the trip on March seventeenth eighteen forty seven Rebecca Strauss filed an immigration petition in which he stated that because she was a widow, she didn't have the financial support anymore. She didn't know how she would provide for her youngest son. But she had children in the United States who can help her get settled. There live was old enough to work and contribute to the family's finances. Once they are. Arrived, and for his part, live his own petition stating, quote, no members of my family will stay behind. I will share the faith that has been assigned to me with them in foreign lands. I this join my mother and her plea on June twenty six eighteen forty-seven Rebecca and her children, so love and his two sisters were approved for immigration, but they didn't leave immediately because Rebecca needed to make sure that the family that had gone on to New York had indeed made preparations for the three of them to arrive and live there. They finally made their way in the spring of eighteen forty eight although the specifics of their transatlantic passage aren't really documented, or known Jonas and Lewis Strauss. Libs brothers had both come dry goods merchants in the city, they'd open up shop at three ninety three and a half grand street. But by the time the family arrived, they had moved to a more lucrative location at two three and a half division street. They lived about the shop Jonas that also got married and started his own family. And at some point followed the example, that his siblings, had any changed his name to a more, Americanized version. This was not uncommon in the eighteen fifty cents as he is listed as Levi with a why he also started working in the family dry goods business while he was there. He learned English really quickly so that he could speak with business partners and customers. And he applied for us citizenship Justice his brothers had done before him. The Strauss's strike goods business was doing really well, they moved to another new location near union market in eighteen fifty one and their family. Business was growing and you opportunity was making self apparent across the country. As the California gold, rush foster new towns, new prosperity and need for dry goods. The Strauss brothers did not want to miss a chance to capitalize on this new market, but they also needed to keep their established New York business going. And so the youngest brother of the family was sent west five. Days after he took his oath of citizenship on January thirty first eighteen fifty three lip Strauss, who was now, going by Levi left New York for San Francisco aboard the US mail ship, Georgia, which was a steamer and the family had already loaded shipment of merchandise. Aboard another ship called the winged racer for Levi to take possession of once. He reached San Francisco. The clipper, winged racer was sailing down around the tip of South America, and then north to California leave. I would make the trip in less time, traveling through Panama was, of course before the Panama Canal was built. So he took the steamer Georgia to Panama, and then traveled across thin strip of the country to Panama City on the Pacific side got on another steamer. They're called the isthmus, and that was bound for San Francisco. He arrived in San Francisco on March thirteenth eighteen fifty three. This was considered a lot of people safer plan than trying to travel overland from New York to San Francisco because. People often do not survive that journey, or if they did get California. They got there in pretty sorry shape, this was a little bit of an easier. Boom. And the specifics of Levi's first days in San Francisco are also a known he would have needed to rent warehouse space for the goods that were coming in on the winged racer, and he would have needed to find lodgings for himself. He most likely had some letters of introduction to family connections that had already made that journey west. So it wasn't as though he just showed up and had to figure everything out by himself. He had some security net in place that merchandise that had been shipped showed up two weeks after Levi did on March thirtieth, unlike other merchants has a bid on merchandise that was shipped on spec. Once it got to the port at San Francisco Levi knew what was coming. He just had.

Levi Levi Strauss Rebecca Haas Strauss San Francisco Rebecca New York US Bowman Strauss Strauss Bavaria Lewis Strauss California Germany Jonas Panama intern North Carolina Wilson
"tracy b wilson" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

09:31 min | 2 years ago

"tracy b wilson" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"And I'm Tracy v. Wilson, we're talking today about Levi Strauss, and historians really historically interesting because it touches on a lot of important moments in US history. So he was an immigrant who ended up in a business that was impacted by and intern affected. The US civil war and American clothing culture. He has a story that's tied to the goldrush. He also had a vision for his adopted city of San Francisco that he worked really hard to achieve the future generations would benefit from it. And his life in many ways, is the story of the United States in the nineteenth century from the perspective of a Jewish immigrant who became a captain of industry before we get into his story. I will make a confession which is that until fairly recently, probably five years ago. Levi Strauss for two different people that have been business together. So clearly, I miss this in history class, because even though people wear Levi's, and you'd call it Levi, Strauss. I didn't realize that was one person's proper name. So I grew up in North Carolina not all that far away from cone, mills, which is, who made the denim for Levi's five ones for. Two hundred years or something? So like this is a piece of history that is like, I'm a little more steeped it, I didn't have confusion about whether Levi, Strauss. It's not my proudest moment. But in my defense even though I am a close person. I don't think I owned a pair of jeans of any flavor from about nineteen eighty five until, like two years ago. That's just never been my things. So, that's, that's my excuse paltry, though. It may be that I just never examined Levi, Strauss fit see feel better. I thought Hanna Barbera was one person. Oh now, that'd be funny. But now so Levi was born lube Strauss on February twenty six eighteen twenty nine in Germany, has father her Strauss was a salesman who sold household goods store at door, this mother's name was Rebecca Strauss, and both she and her screw up in Franconia. It's an area in the north of modern day Bavaria, which was predominantly Jewish Rebecca with her second wife, his first wife male Bouwman Strauss had died at the age of thirty five leaving him with five children. Then Hurson Rebecca had two more children's together a daughter and then lube and her Rebecca and their seven children lived in three room downstairs floor of a two story house. So this was a time when Bavaria's udon addict, or July was in effect that had started in the eighteen teens in this law seemed as though it offered Jewish citizens the opportunity to pursue. A number of jobs that had once been forbidden to them. But in return, it also created really strict regulations for their lives among them marriage. An immigration of new juice was severely limited all Jews had to be registered. They had to take German names. They could not own land, and even their language was codified. So all public records had to be kept in German. They cannot use Hebrew for those someone like her Strauss who traveled through the area, selling his wares, also served as messengers in his community Connector's during this time. And in this profession, Kirsch was sort of exempted from part of the you'd need it working as a peddler, which had been a traditional job for two ish. Men in the area for a long time was no longer considered an acceptable career, but older, people like her who weren't able to pick up a new profession or allowed to keep doing it. Yeah, it was expected that they would just eventually die off. And so would that profession and all of the limitations of the you'd Natick, eventually inspired emigration, one of the marriage laws that really created a problem was it only the eldest son of any Jewish household could get married. And so there were some work arounds. Like, if another son that was younger wanted to marry a widow that was acceptable, or if a couple had no children wanted to give up the slot. Their eldest Ellison would have had to another family so they can have two sons Mary, they could. But basically, this really limited the entire societal culture, because all of these young women could not get married. All of these young men could not get married. It was frustrating, so they wanted to leave in eighteen thirty seven there was a group of eighteen people that left eighteen young people in two of loves older siblings were part of that they left Germany to make homes inland in New York. In nineteen forty and nineteen forty one to more of the Strauss, children, followed suit in eighteen forty six I died of circular SIS Rebecca remarried, soon after two curses brother, who was a widower named Lipman but Libman died just a few weeks after the wedding was seventeen at that time. And see his sisters were still living at home. An immigration at this point was not easy. You couldn't just pick up and leave. The Bavarian government had to approve anyone who wished to leave the country had to prove that, neither you nor anyone in your family had any sort of criminal record, and that you could afford to make the trip on March seventeenth eighteenth, forty-seven, Rebecca Strauss filed an immigration petition in which he stated that because she was a widow, she didn't have the financial support anymore. She didn't know how she would provide for her youngest son. But she had children in the United States who can help her get settled. There live was old enough to work and contribute to the family's finances. Once they arrive. Live and for his part Lou his own position stating, quote, no members of my family will stay behind. I will stare the faith that has been assigned to me with them in foreign lands. I this join my mother and her plea on June twenty six eighteen forty seven Rebecca and her children, so love and his two sisters were approved for immigration, but they didn't leave immediately because Rebecca needed to make sure that the family that had gone on to New York had indeed made preparations for the three of them to arrive and live there. They finally made their way in the spring of eighteen forty eight although the specifics of their transatlantic passage aren't really documented, or known Jonas and Lewis Strauss. Libs brothers had become dry goods merchants in the city. They'd open up shop at three ninety three and a half grand street. But by the time the family arrive, they had moved to a more lucrative location at two three and a half division street. They lived above the shop Jonas, also gotten married and started his own family. And at some point love followed the example, that his siblings had any changed his name to a more, Americanized version. This was not uncommon in the eighteen fifty cents is he is listed as Levi with a why he also started working in the family dry goods business while he was there. He learned English really quickly so that he could speak with business partners and customers, and he applied for U S, citizenship Justice. His brothers had done before him the stresses strike, it's business was doing really well, they move to another new location near union market in eighteen fifty one and as their family business was growing, and new opportunity was making apparent across the country as the California gold, rush foster new towns, new prosperity and a need for dry goods, the Strauss brothers, did not want to miss a chance to capitalize on this new market, but they also needed to keep their established New York business going. And so the youngest brother of the family was sent west five. Days after he took his oath of citizenship on January thirty first eighteen fifty three lip Strauss, who was now, going by Levi left New York for San Francisco aboard the US mail ship, Georgia, which was a steamer and the family had already loaded shipment of merchandise. Aboard another ship called the winged racer for Levi to take possession of once. He reached San Francisco. The clipper, winged racer was sailing down around the tip of South America and the north, California leave. I would make the trip in less time traveling through Panama. This was of course before the Panama Canal was built. So he took the steamer Georgia to Panama, and then traveled across thin strip of the country to Panama City on the Pacific side. He got on another steamer. They're called the isthmus, and that was bound for San Francisco. He arrived in San Francisco on March thirteenth eighteen fifty three. This was considered for a lot of people a safer plan than trying to travel overland from New York to San Francisco because. People often do not survive that journey, or if they did get California. They got there in pretty sorry shape. This is a little bit of an easier booth. And the specifics of Levi's first days in San Francisco are also unknown. He would have needed to rent warehouse space for the goods that were coming in on the winged racer MP would have needed to find lodgings for himself. He most likely had some letters of introduction to family connections that had already made that journey west. So it wasn't as though he just showed up and had to figure everything out by himself. He had some security net in place that merchandise that had been shipped showed up two weeks after Levi did on March thirtieth. Unlike other merchants, you had to bid on merchandise that was shipped on spec. Once it got to the port at San Francisco Levi knew what was coming. He just had to inspect it accept.

Levi Levi Strauss Rebecca Strauss Hurson Rebecca San Francisco New York US California Bavaria Lewis Strauss Germany Strauss Jonas intern Panama Canal North Carolina Wilson Natick Hanna Barbera
"tracy b wilson" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

09:34 min | 2 years ago

"tracy b wilson" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"And I'm Tracy v. Wilson, we're talking today about Levi Strauss, and historians really historically interesting because it touches on a lot of important moments in US history. So he was an immigrant who ended up in a business that was impacted by an intern affected. The US civil war and American clothing culture. He has a story that's tied to the goldrush. He had a vision for his dotted city of San Francisco that he worked really hard to achieve the future. Generations would benefit from it, and his life in many ways is the story of United States in the nineteenth century from the perspective of Jewish immigrant who became a captain of industry before we get into his story. I will make a confession which is that until fairly recently, probably five years ago, I thought Levi, Strauss were two different people that have been business together. Saying. So clearly I missed this in history class, because even though people wear Levi's and you'd call it Levi, Strauss. I didn't realize that was one person's proper name. So I grew up in North Carolina not all that far away from cone, mills, which is, who made the denim for Levi's five ones for two hundred years or something. So like this is a piece of history. That is like, I'm a little more speed it. I didn't have confusion about whether Levi, Strauss two. It's not my proudest moment. But in my defense even though I am a close person. I don't think I owned a pair of jeans of any flavor from about nineteen eighty five until, like two years ago. That's just never been my things. So, that's, that's my excuse. Poultry though, it may be that I just never examined Levi, Strauss fit makes you feel better. I thought Hanna Barbera was one person with a woman. Oh, no. That'd be funny. But no fellow Levi was born lube, Strauss on February twenty six eighteen twenty nine in Germany, has father her Strauss was a salesman who sold household goods store to door mother's name was Rebecca Haas Strauss, and both she and her screw up in Franconia. It's an area in the north of modern day Bavaria, which was predominantly Jewish. Rebecca with her second wife, his first wife male, Bowman Strauss had died at the age of thirty five leaving him with five children than Hurson, Rebecca had two more children together, a daughter and then lib and Hirsch, Rebecca and their seven children lived in a three room downstairs floor of a two story house. So this was a time when Bavaria's you'd an addict, or July was in effect that had started in eighteen teens in this law seemed as though it offered Jewish citizens, the opportunity to pursue a number of jobs. That had once been forbidden to them. But in return, it also created really strict regulations for their lives among them, marriage and immigration of new juice was severely limited all Jews had to be registered. They had to take German names. They could not own land, and even their language was codified. So all public records had to be kept in German. They cannot use Hebrew for those someone like her Strauss who traveled through the area, selling his wares, also served as messengers as community Connector's during this time. And in this profession, Kirsch was sort of exempted from part of the unique working as a peddler, which had been a traditional job for Jewish men in the area for a long time was no longer considered an acceptable career, but older people like Hirsch who weren't able to pick up a new profession. We're allowed to keep doing it. Yeah, it was expected that they would just eventually die off. And so would that profession and all of the limitations of the eight eventually, inspired immigration, one of the marriage laws that really created a problem with only the eldest son of any Jewish household could get married. And so there were some work arounds, like if another son that was younger wanted to marry a widow that was acceptable, or if a couple had no children wanted to give up the slot. Their Ellison would have had to another family, so they have two sons marry they could. But basically, this really limited the entire societal culture, because all of these young women could not get married. All of these young men could not get married. It was frustrating, so eventually they wanted to leave in eighteen thirty seven there was a group of eighteen people that left eighteen young people in two of loves older siblings were part of that they left Germany to make homes inland in New York. In nineteen forty and nineteen forty one to more of the Strauss, children, followed suit in eighteen forty six I died of circulates this Rebecca remarried soon after two curses brother, who was a widower named Lipman but Libman died just a few weeks after the wedding was seventeen at that time. And his sisters were still living at home and immigration at this point was not easy. You couldn't just pick up and leave. The verion government had to approve anyone who wished to leave the country. And you had to prove that, neither you nor anyone in your family at any sort of criminal record, and that you could afford to make the trip on March seventeenth eighteen forty seven Rebecca Strauss filed an immigration petition in which he stated that because she was a widow, she didn't have the financial support anymore. She didn't know how she would provide for her youngest son, but she had children in the United States, you could help her get settled there. Live with old enough to work and contribute to the family's finances. Once they are. Arrived, and for his part, live his own petition stating, quote, no members of my family will stay behind. I will share the faith that has been assigned to me with them and foreign lands. I this join my mother and her plea on June twenty six eighteen forty seven Rebecca and her children. So love and his two sisters were approved for immigration, but they didn't leave immediately because Rebecca needed to make sure that the family that had gone onto New York had indeed made preparations for this of them to arrive and live there. They finally made their way in the spring of eighteen forty eight although the specifics of their transatlantic passage aren't really documented, or known Jonas and Lewis Strauss. Libs brothers had become dry goods merchants in the city, they'd open up shop at three ninety three and a half grand street. But by the time the family arrived, they had moved to a more lucrative location at two three and a half division street. They lived above the shop Jonas, also gotten married and started his own family. And at some point live, followed the example, that his siblings had any changed his name to a more, Americanized version. This was not uncommon in the eighteen fifty cents is he is listed as Levi with a why he also started working in the family dry goods business while he was there. He learned English really quickly so that he could speak with business partners and customers. And he applied for us citizenship Justice his brothers had done before him. The Strauss's strike. It's business was doing really, well, they moved to another new location near union market in eighteen fifty one and as their family business was growing, and you opportunity was making self apparent across the country. As the California gold, rush foster new towns, new prosperity and need for dry goods, the Strauss brothers, did not want to miss a chance to capitalize on this new market, but they also needed to keep their established New York business going. And so the youngest brother of the family was sent west five. Days after he took his oath of citizenship on January thirty first eighteen fifty three lip Strauss, who was now, going by Levi left New York for San Francisco aboard the US mail ship, Georgia, which was a steamer and the family had already loaded shipment of merchandise board, another ship called the winged racer for Levi to take possession of once. He reached San Francisco. The clipper, winged racer was sailing down around the tip of South America, and then north to California leave. I would make the trip in less time traveling through Panama. This was of course before the Panama Canal was built. So he took the steamer Georgia to Panama, and then traveled across that thin strip of the country. Panama City on the Pacific side got on another steamer. They're called the isthmus, and that was bound for San Francisco. He arrived in San Francisco on March thirteenth eighteen fifty three. This was considered for a lot of people, safer plan, then trying to travel overland from New York to San Francisco because. People often do not survive that journey, or if they did get California. They got there in pretty sorry shape. This was a little bit of an easier booth. And the specifics of Levi's first days in San Francisco are also unknown. He would have needed to rent. We're house space for the goods that were coming in on the winged racer, and he would have needed to find lodgings for himself. He most likely had some letters of introduction to family connections that had already made that journey west. So it wasn't as though he just showed up and had to figure everything out by himself. He had some security net in place that merchandise that had been shipped showed up two weeks after Levi did on March thirtieth, unlike other merchants had to bid on merchandise that was shipped on spec. Once it got to the port at San Francisco Levi knew what was coming. He just had to inspect it accept it. And then move it into the warehouse..

Levi Rebecca Haas Strauss Levi Strauss Bowman Strauss San Francisco New York US Lewis Strauss Strauss Germany California Panama Bavaria Jonas Hirsch intern Panama Canal North Carolina Wilson
Meet Chad Steele, aka the guy behind Tom Brady, Peyton Manning and Ray Lewis at Super Bowl

The Adam Schefter Podcast

03:26 min | 2 years ago

Meet Chad Steele, aka the guy behind Tom Brady, Peyton Manning and Ray Lewis at Super Bowl

"Know, watching the TV Sunday night. And once again, I see the ravens vice president of public relations front and center in the center of the football universe again. And I said we have to get Chad on this week's Adam Schefter podcast. He must be on honored. Well, I mean, it's incredible. What has happened for those of you who are now listening basically CHAD'S job during the year is to work with the Baltimore Ravens? But Super Bowl week. He becomes the media liaison for are you signed to a player or a team. Fair. So during the week there are a number of us that are there to help league out with credentialing radio row know kinda point media in the right direction opening night that Monday night were assigned to a player. I had Tom Brady on Monday night. And then we're time to a player after the which again I had Brady. So it's it's it's flit up between between people. I just so happened to have I think is, sir. Certified time I've had Tom when when they've been in there. So we're we're we're kind of developing a little bond and you had Tom three or four times yet Peyton Manning after the Broncos won the Super Bowl Ray Lewis after the ravens won the Super Bowl. It seems like you always have the star attraction. How does that happen? You know, I don't know where they're like. I said they invite a few of us down kind of some of the heads of department from around the league to help out all week. And then we have some young kids some interns that are looking for jobs, and some some younger systems coordinators that are that are looking to expand the horizons a little bit and down there for the week. And then we just we get the game assignments. And I think the first one that I had when I worked at Super Bowl outside of of the ravens when was was Russell Wilson in in New Jersey a few years ago. And you know, I got a quarterback. I think maybe my side helps you know, that I'm a bigger guy, and I can get out there and kinda kinda move the people through but just ever since. Then I've I've had quarterbacks I think I think six along right now, the only the only loss at what I had I had cast year when the when the eagles beat them, but I pretty decent record. So there you are on Sunday night. The patriots win the Super Bowl. Tom Brady is stormed by the media, Tracy Rolston of CBS is trying to get in to get that interview from your perspective. And you were the only one that appeared in that show with Tracy in Tom, it was Tracy Wilson, Tom Brady, and Chad steal. What was that scrum? Like for you. You know, I it's just it's interesting because Tom pulled in a hundred directions, and you know, we're talk to CBS CBS wanted to try to get the interview pretty quickly. But as soon as you're out there, you're Tom celebrating a little bit than teammates coming up, then have coaches coming up, and he wants to make sure he's very good about making sure he gives respect to the to the opposing team. So they wanna make sure saw Jared golf, and there were a couple of other players that want to see and it's kinda hey, Tom over here can Tom over here. And we're like, hey, Tom, you know, got Tracy right here. Okay. Hold on. I just wanna see this guy. And then as soon as that's done. Somebody else comes up somebody else comes up, but he's he's kinda pulled in a million directions. And we're just saying that hey, trace you just just hang tight hang with us. We'll we'll we'll get them there.

Tom Brady Baltimore Ravens Chad Steal Broncos Ravens CBS Tracy Adam Schefter Vice President Of Public Relat Tracy Rolston Football Peyton Manning Russell Wilson Patriots Tracy Wilson Ray Lewis New Jersey Eagles Chad
"tracy b wilson" Discussed on This Day in History Class

This Day in History Class

06:25 min | 3 years ago

"tracy b wilson" Discussed on This Day in History Class

"Hi, I'm Ariel Casten Jonathan Strickland and together, we're going to tell you the stories behind some of the biggest triumphs and failures and business. That's right. We're going to explore situations that tested the medal of entrepreneurs pivotal moments required making decisions we'll be talking about some big companies that everybody knows like Disney LEGO and Harley Davidson and together we try to answer the question. What do you do when you find yourself at the brink? Listen and subscribe at apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to your podcasts. Welcome to this day in history class from how stuff works dot com. And from the desk of stuff you missed in history class. It's the show where we explore the past one day at a time with a quick look at what happened today in history. Hello and welcome to the podcast. I'm Tracy b Wilson in its December sixth the Halifax disaster took place honesty in nineteen seventeen with the exception of nuclear explosions. This is one of the biggest man-made explosions in history and it happened. When two ships collided in the harbor at Halifax. There was a French freighter called the Mont blog and a Norwegian freighter called the Eam. Oh, the mom Blunk was carrying explosives for the war effort. This was during World War One. The EMA was headed to New York to pick up food to take to Belgium as part of a relief effort because there were people in Europe were frankly, starving in the wake of World War One. Neither of these ships plans to be in the harbor at this particular time, there was an anti-submarine boom that was being used at night to try to protect the harbor. Over from German U-boat's and the ego had wanted to leave the day before, but they needed to pick up an order of coal in that cold. Didn't get there until it was too late. The boom had already been put in place that can get out the mom Blunk was supposed to have arrived on the six but had gotten there a little bit ahead of schedule the night before but also too late to get into the harbor so that on the morning of the sixth. Both ships are trying to navigate a very busy very crowded narrow waterway, and they started approaching each other on a collision course after a series of twists and turns and attempts to get around other maritime traffic, the IMO hit the monk Blunk a little after eight thirty AM when this happened. Some of the containers aboard the mom block broke and sparks from the collision started a fire. So the mom blocks, captain knowing what was aboard. Ordered everybody to abandon ship. But no one else really knew what the mumble was carrying. Normally it would have been flying a flag marking that it carried munitions. So people would have known there was explosive material aboard the ship, but that wasn't being flown because of the war effort, there were fears that doing that would just make the ship a target for a German torpedo attack. So in this collision happened on shore a lot of people stopped what they were doing to go watch, which is a pretty normal human behavior. They didn't know that. There was such dangerous material on one of the ships. They didn't know they needed to take cover people gathered at windows and all of the buildings around the water. They gathered on rooftops and the few people who did for whatever reason. No, what was happening or into it. What was happening? They tried to clear the docs and get people out of the way. But there were just too many people. Not enough for knowledge of what was about to happen and at nine oh, six AM the month. Block exploded debris was thrown for miles away from the ship. The ship's gun landed five and a half kilometer away. And it said the shock wave from the explosion was felt three hundred kilometers away, hundreds of people instantly died and altogether. More than two thousand people were killed and nine thousand more were injured and needed medical treatment. A lot of the injuries were eye injuries and blindness thousands of buildings were also damaged in the explosion. A rescue effort started almost immediately. But was soon hampered by a blizzard naturally. An inquiry followed this it had been a major disaster with a huge loss of life. But ultimately, it was found that the mom blank and the EMA were both at fault. The city of Boston sent aid to the city of Halifax and in return Halifax since a Christmas tree to Boston every year with a lot of pomp and fanfare on both ends of the journey. You can learn more about this on the December nineteenth twenty eleven episode of stuffy missed in history class. Thanks to Casey p grim and Chandler maze. For their audio work on the show. You can subscribe to the stay in history class on apple podcast, Google podcast iheartradio app and wherever else. Yeah. Your podcasts, and you can tune in tomorrow for a date that still does live in infamy. I'm Katie golden. I studied psychology and biology at Harvard, and I pretend to be a bird on Twitter and my new podcast creature feature. We've you nature in men from a new perspective each episode Eskin comedian to get inside the minds of animals, so we can explore the startling connections to human psychology. You'll find blood bents and treachery that make game of thrones seemed like a dumb show for babies. Join this every Wednesday and subscribe on apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Blunk Halifax apple iheartradio Disney Ariel Casten Harley Davidson Boston Harvard U-boat Jonathan Strickland Tracy b Wilson Europe Twitter Katie golden New York Belgium
"tracy b wilson" Discussed on This Day in History Class

This Day in History Class

03:37 min | 3 years ago

"tracy b wilson" Discussed on This Day in History Class

"Hello and welcome to the podcast, I'm Tracy v Wilson. And it's November twentieth of wail sank the whaling ship Essex on this day in eighteen twenty. The story starts on the island of Nantucket off of Cape Cod, Massachusetts, which was the heart of the whaling industry in the early nineteenth century this industry had started out with people butchering dead whales that head washed up on shore. And then that progressed people hunting whales relatively close to the shore from boats, and then to hunting whales farther and farther out to sea and much larger and more sophisticated ships as people were wailing farther and farther out from the shore. These ships started have onboard to process, what was harvested from the whales because that was a lot easier than trying to haul an entire wail back to the shore, sometimes from thousands of miles away a lot of what they were really after was the sperm CD. Also, people call that per sperm city from the heads of sperm whales. They were also harvesting blubber. It wasn't as much about the meat. It was about the blubber and the oil and also amber GRIs, which you had to be really lucky to get that was a lot more rare. So wailing ships had the series of pots and fires on board called a try works. That was used to render the blubber while they were still at sea and the whale ship. Also carried a few smaller whaling boats because the main ship itself was not all that maneuverable you needed something much smaller and faster to be able to actually hunt away. All voyages were also meant to last a really long time. It was not uncommon for a ship to set out with three or four years of supplies and two and a half year. Voyages were really typical also incredibly dangerous work. A lot of people died in August. Eighteen nineteen the Essex set sail from Nantucket and nearly sank in a squall just two days later. They eventually made their way to the Galapagos islands though. And they resupplied with turtle meat while they were there. But while they were there. They also set a fire on Charles island that was massively destructive and probably lead to the extinction of at least two animal species more than a year after they had left Nantucket, they spotted a pod of whales, and they deployed to boats to go hunt them, but then the people that were still on the main whaling ship noticed another way all that was behaving oddly. It seems to be watching them. They estimated that this WALE was about eighty five feet or twenty six meters long, which was extremely large for a sperm whale. And then it headed straight for them. It struck the ship turned around came back and struck them again. So with the ship seriously damage started to sink fortunately for the crew those boats that were used to hunt the whales. We're still in order and the men all of them survive thinking divided up and got into them. They were also able to salvage about sixty days worth of supplies, including one hundred ninety five gallons of water at first they talked about heading for the marquess or the science islands. Both of those were more than a thousand miles away and the prevailing current would help get them there. But they were afraid of cannibals on these islands, which is going to turn out to be ironic instead of going that way they headed for Peru or Chile both of which required them to go against the current and against the wind..

Nantucket Essex Massachusetts amber GRIs Tracy Charles island Galapagos Cape Cod Peru Wilson Chile one hundred ninety five gallon twenty six meters eighty five feet four years sixty days two days
"tracy b wilson" Discussed on This Day in History Class

This Day in History Class

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"tracy b wilson" Discussed on This Day in History Class

"And welcome to the podcast. I'm Tracy b Wilson in its November seventeenth h h Holmes was arrested on this day in eighteen ninety four. He probably have heard of h h Holmes? He was the one with the murder castle. Sometimes he's described as being the first serial killer in the United States, but really the same could be said of other killers as well. He was born Herman w Mudge it in New Hampshire on may sixteenth of eighteen sixty one his parents were very strict and in many ways abusive and his only childhood friend a boy named Tom died in a fall while they were playing in an abandoned house at the time. This was determined to be an accident. But there are people who think this might have been his first victim. He got married in eighteen seventy eight although he eventually left his wife but say legally married and he started studying medicine at the university of Vermont when he was nineteen. He was not a great student and medical school, but he did start up some crime while he was there. He started using the school's cadavers to commit insurance fraud. He would take out insurance policies on them. As though they were his family members, and then stage fake accidents with their bodies to collect on it. It's not totally clear whether he graduated from medical school or not but a child died after getting medicine from the drugstore where he worked so he left and went to Kogyo, and that is where he started going by the name h h Holmes? He took over a drugstore in Chicago that was owned by a MRs Holton he bought it from her after her husband died, except he got the money to buy the drugstore by mortgaging. What was in the drug? Store before he actually.

h Holmes Tracy b Wilson Herman w Mudge MRs Holton university of Vermont New Hampshire United States murder Kogyo Tom Chicago
"tracy b wilson" Discussed on This Day in History Class

This Day in History Class

04:54 min | 3 years ago

"tracy b wilson" Discussed on This Day in History Class

"Hello and welcome to the podcast, I'm Tracy v Wilson. And it's November sixteenth, but battle of Kabul Markelle took place on this day in fifteen thirty two and it's also described as a massacre. This was committed by Francisco Pizarro and his men against the Inca people of what's now, Peru when this happened the Inca empire had just been through an enormous epidemic and a civil war and the epidemic could actually sparked the civil war emperor. Wanna Capac both of his governors and multiple other important leaders had died in this epidemic. And then why not Capac named one of his sons as his successor? But that's son died in epidemic himself before you could even be notified of the decision. And then his father died also before news got back to him about the death of his son. This interrupted the imperial line of succession, and nineteen year old husker went to war against his half-brother out a wealth of both of them being sons of the previous emperor, the resulting civil war went on for four years without a wellpoint ultimately winning this war had just ended. When Francisco Pizarro arrived on the coast of what's now, Peru. He was following the example of her non Cortez's conquest of the Aztec empire. He was planning to take a small force inland and capture outta Wolpe. Hugh Inc of you'd as a divine ruler. That was actually what Cortez had done with the Aztec emperor Moctezuma the second Moctezuma was killed when this happened. Although it's not clear exactly how or by whom Perot and his force of just one hundred sixty eight men took a treacherous mountain road from the coast inland to Markelle, which is where auto Alpa was in camped. The city itself was almost empty with Ottawa's force of between forty thousand and eighty thousand men not far away. Once they got into the city Perot concealed his men in buildings that were arranged around Marcus central square, and then they invited out while but to have a meeting with them the night before this meeting Ottawa Alpa had held a ceremonial dinner. To celebrate his victory over his half. Brother, and this dinner went on late into the night in involved, lots of intoxicating beverages. So when he entered marker the next day he was carried on a litter with about seven thousand retainers, and they weren't necessarily at their best. Most of them were also unarmed because they were not coming there with a fighting force or with any idea of having any kind of battle at Wolpe was a divine emperor. He expected to be treated that way. By this visitor to his empire inside the city out of wealth. But was greeted. By a fryer. You talked to him about Christianity and also delivered a Spanish document that was called the requirement. The requirement was meant to inform indigenous peoples that Spain had given its representatives the moral religious and legal rights conquest. Of course, the requirement was often delivered in Spanish, and that was often the language that the people they were talking to did not speak. There was though an interpreter in Markelle that day. During this exchange with the friar the friar had a bible and sources really differ about what happened, but they all end up with the bible on the ground either having been knocked down or thrown or dropped. And when that happened Pizarro's men burst out from hiding, and they massacred nearly all Abbas retinue and they took him prisoner because ours foresaw almost no casualties in this. Well, Ottawa Alba's force being mostly unarmed were just massacred outta Wolpe was designed as prisoner until July twenty six fifteen fifty three when he was put on trial after there were allegations that he was mounting an attack force. He was executed. Pizarro attempted to use the emperor's that followed a Welte as Pepe DHS, although one of them named Manco Inca ultimately rebelled against Spain and established a completely separate Inca capital two. Buck Amari is considered to be the last Inca emperor. And he was executed on September twenty four th fifteen seventy two less than twenty years after out of wealth is executing. You can learn more about this in the April fourth twenty eighteen episode of Steffi missed in history class called hallmark and the end of the Inca empire. Thanks to Casey, Peter. I'm in Chandler maze. For their audio work on his show. You can subscribe to this day in history class on apple podcasts, Google podcasts. And wherever else you get your podcast, and you can tune in tomorrow for a murderous castle. I'm Katie golden. I studied psychology

Francisco Pizarro Wolpe Cortez Peru Wanna Capac Kabul Markelle Markelle Spain Capac Perot Buck Amari Ottawa Alpa Moctezuma Tracy Ottawa auto Alpa Chandler maze husker Hugh Inc
"tracy b wilson" Discussed on This Day in History Class

This Day in History Class

05:00 min | 3 years ago

"tracy b wilson" Discussed on This Day in History Class

"History. Hello and welcome to the podcast. I'm Tracy b Wilson. And it's November fifteenth Major General William to come sherman's March to the sea began on the stay in eighteen sixty four this happened during the US civil war, and it's more formerly known as the Georgia and Carolinas campaign the union army had captured Atlanta in September and had removed at civilian population. With the intent of keeping Atlanta is a strictly military base. It had also destroyed factories and railroads and buildings basically anything that might be useful to the confederacy many homes in Atlanta were also burned. Although it wasn't the wholesale destruction of the entire city as it's often popularly imagined the March from Atlanta started on November fifteenth and sermons force was divided into two approximately equal wing. Things they continued southeast toward Savannah Georgia where they would arrive on December twenty second. This was not a straight unbroken line. The two wings progressed in four columns with the right wing shifting south toward make in Georgia and the left wing shifting north toward Augusta Georgia. This was to make it seem as though maybe those cities were the real objective, but both columns shifted once again and bypassed both cities this March was incredibly destructive. The intent was to rob the confederacy of anything that could possibly make use of and to terrify the civilian population and try to encourage a faster southern surrender. So the union army took anything that was edible or valuable from plantations and from farms that they passed Sherman had promised to make Georgia howl. So they burned out buildings and farms and sometimes homes. They kept destroying railroads and cutting telegraph lines and birding stores and supplies. They were as they went also emancipating people who were enslaved on these properties. So in theory, this destruction. And it was definitely destructive was supposed to have some limits. Sherman gave orders not to enter people's homes and win seizing livestock. They were supposed to focus on things that were owned by rich people rather than what was owned by the poor people who weren't resisting supposed to be left alone as much as possible. The intent after all was to deprive the confederacy of anything that could be useful and terrify people into surrendering. It wasn't to punish the poorest civilians and the freed people who really had nothing else. But in practice, these orders that were supposed to sort of temper this whole process were often not followed at all soldiers carried away as much as they could and destroyed what they couldn't. And a lot of people who were left in the path of all of this destruction were women and children because a lot of the men were away fighting this also meant that the people they were liberating from enslavement were liberated now, but they were left with nothing to support themselves. No way even necessarily to have shelter or food and Sherman and his army. We're taking no responsibility for them or for making sure that they were going to be able to survive once they had moved on the two wings of sherman's March reconnected in December. They took fort McAllister. For bombarding city of savannah. And then after capturing savannah Sherman sent this telegram, his excellency, president Lincoln. I beg to present you as a Christmas gift the city of savannah with a hundred and fifty heavy guns and plenty of ammunition. And also about twenty five thousand bales of cotton w t Sherman Major General. The destruction in all of this was massive the union. Army lost fewer than two thousand of the sixty thousand men that it left Atlanta with over this more than a month of the campaign. And it was also disastrous for southern morale as it was intended to be especially for the civilians who had thought that the confederate army would protect them. And instead had no protection Sherman estimated that the March through Georgia caused about one hundred million dollars worth of destruction. And then the following year they turned north toward the Carolinas. And that March probably also did an equal amount of damage through the Carolinas after the war sherman's March became part of the lost cause propaganda that reframed the confederacies role in the war as a noble and heroic, but doomed struggle to preserve it genteel way of life and even appeared in the nineteen fifteen birth of a nation, and then was later part of Nazi propaganda. Thanks to Chris..

savannah Sherman Atlanta Savannah Georgia union army Carolinas Army Georgia savannah confederate army US Tracy b Wilson Augusta Georgia fort McAllister president Lincoln Chris one hundred million dollars twenty second
"tracy b wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

03:30 min | 3 years ago

"tracy b wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Frying and I'm Tracy view Wilson. And today we are serving up part two of my interview with Mindy Johnson, the author of ink and paint the women of Walt Disney's animation, and she is so full of information that we very easily filled to episodes with it. And I think there are two episodes of the both run a little longer than our normal average back in part one, Mindy, busted some myths, and there's more of that on the way today. And that includes the idea that women in the early days of animation were just tracers and not accomplished artists in their own rights. So we will jump right in. Will you talk a little bit about what the hiring process was like for the women that ended up in the Incan paint department and then what their day to day jobs were like? Yeah, and it's important to know that there's a lot of material Elta that states that was the only place women could work. There's a crazy letter from this Snow White days that circulates on the internet and there are a couple of things that need to be well, first of all placed in context about that, it was the nineteen thirties that was the prevailing attitude. But the other thing that's important to understand is this was a form letter that was actually created in the late twenties because by that time, the Mickey and Minnie cartoons had become worldwide phenomenon. And the little tiny studio in the Hyperion avenue in must feel as California was getting inundated with fan mail and people wanting to, oh, I wanna work. There. I've gotta do this plus it was the depression, so it's democratic. You know any kind of job anywhere was you know, vital critical. But if you were working at Disney studios, you were certainly they didn't feel the immediate effects of the depression as other places did in the country, and it was a BoomTown, and so they were getting inundated people would literally show up at the front door. I got a letter from you. You know, I'm ready to work, but yet there was no job because they just said, thank you for sending it, but we're not hiring at the time. So they changed their generic form letters to stay. You know, please, it's a polite. Thank you, but these go away. They weren't paying to have people come out and certainly there were very talented people. But again, it was the nineteen thirties and the men were doing the animation boys club at that point and women's roles were seen in secondary. And as women, we tend to not talk about our work. It was a man's world at that time. And so women really were either a poor secretary somewhere, typed it out saying, women didn't do any of the creative work. But yet this is the secretary who had no understanding of what was going on over in that department, nor was it in the general mind that to speak about that. But it's also important to note that these were not. There was a myth going around those. Oh, they've picked women up off the street. My sister's cousin got in there. Anybody could train. No, you had to come in and pays the tool establishing Tuesday mornings. You had to bring in your portfolio and they were always on scrambled trying to find qualified talented personnel artists. They sent out at various times postcards and did radio announcements. We found the..

secretary Mindy Johnson Walt Disney Disney studios Wilson Mickey California
"tracy b wilson" Discussed on Behind the Bastards

Behind the Bastards

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"tracy b wilson" Discussed on Behind the Bastards

"Friends. Adman. Yeah, man. Thank you for being on. And I'm of course, Robert Evans, you can find me on Twitter at I right. Okay. Just two letters. Get a book on Amazon, a brief history vice. So check that out to you can find this podcast on the internet at behind the bastards dot com. You can find us on social media at master pod for. We'll have all of this mini sources for this article and pictures like Paul manafort's glorious mugshots. So yeah, check us out next week. And you know, I love statistically about forty percent. Hello. I'm Tracy b. Wilson. I host the podcast stuff you missed in history class with my friend and colleague Holly fry over the past few years every day on our social media, we've been talking about what happened on this day in history. So buyer dressed in a pacifist and activist who helped plan the March on Washington for jobs, and freedom was born on this day in nineteen twelve or honesty and seventeen Eighty-nine. Women marched on for side to demand a solution to an enormous food shortage. Those things did not happen on the same day, but you get the picture. So for years we've been doing that and it suddenly dawned on us what if this was its own podcast? So that's what we're doing starting July. First, we're launching kind of a little sister podcast to stuff you missed in history class. It's called this day in history class. It's about five minutes a day every day, and it gives you the highlights of something notable that happened on that day in history. So come and listen, you'll be able to find this day in history class on. Apple podcasts, Google play, and wherever else you find podcast.

Robert Evans Paul manafort Holly fry Tracy b. Wilson Amazon Washington Apple Google forty percent five minutes
"tracy b wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"tracy b wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"To the podcast i'm holly fry and i'm tracy v wilson and if you listen to the twenty eleven tulip mania episode that sarah and dobalina did you know already that sometimes people go a little mad in their obsessions when it comes to plants and today we're going to talk about another episode in history in which plants became a status symbol and the cornerstone of a high dollar industry and while we're not really going to talk about him later on in this episode i did want to mention that this also brushes up against our episode on joseph paxton and the crystal palace because paxton also cultivated gardens and built a conservatory for william kaman dish the six duke of devonshire also known as the bachelor duke and in that job he gathered the largest collection in england for his royal employer the bachelor duke had also fallen victim to orchid delirium which was an intensive session with the plants that was sweeping through victorian england at the time and that is what we're talking about today so orchids date back at least twenty million years in two thousand seven of b was discovered it was preserved in amber and it dated back that far and also still had orchid pollen stuck to its wings a fossilized orchid from new zealand is dated back twenty one million years that's possible that orchids existed as far back as the late cretaceous period around eighty million years ago or maybe even longer yes so they survived when the dinosaurs did not orchids grow all over the world the only inhospitable areas are open water true deserts and glaciers and there are species of orchids that grow from the ground but a lot of varieties are epo fights meaning that they grow on other plants or rocks some even grow on fungus they are sometimes mentioned as being parasitic that's not actually the case they're getting their nutrients from the air around them they just kind of need a place to per church and unsurprisingly for a plant family that can thrive in so many different places there is a vast range of species of orchid there are more than twenty seven thousand species of orchid some sources will list that number is even higher more are being discovered.

holly fry wilson dobalina joseph paxton devonshire england new zealand tracy sarah william kaman cretaceous twenty one million years eighty million years twenty million years
"tracy b wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"tracy b wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Hello and welcome to the podcast i'm tracy view wilson and i'm holly fry today we have a podcast but i have started on and the stops maybe five times in the last five years but we're coming up on the four hundred anniversary so it kind of feels like i need to do it now or never you could do this in another hundred years yeah we would be so old we would be robot we would be able to really tell history from a alive perspective yeah so this is the much requested defenestration of prague and just to set a little expectation the the actual defenestrate ing does not take that much time pretty simple story defenestrate just means to throw out of a window and it's from the latin word finistere four window apart from sounding like it's the punch line to a joke about dialects there's been a surprising amount of throwing people out of windows and check history and almost all of it has been connected to religious wars so we're gonna talk through all that today her aa the first defenestration of prague took place almost one hundred years before the start of the protestant reformation but it stemmed from the same kinds of reforms and conflicts that were part of the reformation yon whose was a bohemian religious reformer who was born around thirteen seventy and his religious work overlapped the western schism which was a huge dispute within the roman catholic church here's how this dispute started bartolomeo pregnant oh was elected pope in thirteen seventy eight he became pope urban the sixth and he had been elected in part because for about seventy years all of the popes had been french and the papacy had been headquartered in avenue all romans started calling for a roman pope or at least an italian one they were tired of all these french popes and before his election pregnant had been serving as the archbishop of the italian city of bari so he's satisfied the romans demands for at least an italian pope but urban the sixth was hard to get along with he constantly but it heads with the cardinals who had become very powerful during all those decades of french popes so the cardinals elected one of their own as pope robert of geneva.

wilson holly fry prague roman catholic church pope bari cardinals pope robert geneva bartolomeo one hundred years hundred years seventy years five years
"tracy b wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"tracy b wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Hello and welcome to the podcast i'm tracy v wilson i'm holly fry back when we did our podcast on executive order ninety sixty six and the incarceration of japanese americans during world war two we bury very briefly mentioned the segregated units for soldiers of japanese descent that were created during the war and those were the one hundred infantry battalion and the four forty second regimental combat team whose name we mangled as four twenty second thanks to a typo on my part so i had been planning to do an episode on the four forty seconds since then we've gotten a lot of requests for it we had gotten requests were before that when i finally got into the research i realized you've really cannot cover the four forty second without also talking about the one hundred and then i realized that their story is also connected into the story of the military intelligence service all of those things have multiple common elements and their background and like multiple connecting points between them so today we're gonna talk about all three of those and how they played a critical role in american involvement in the war also i just wanted to note that today's show is really about men but there were also japanese american women who served in world war two including in the army nurse corps in the women's army corps those began accepting japanese women in february in november of nineteen forty three respectively so we're going to start with the military intelligence service although the united states.

tracy hundred infantry battalion united states executive four forty second four forty seconds four twenty second
"tracy b wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"tracy b wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Hello and welcome to the podcast i'm tracy b wilson and i'm holly fry i really like the tv show timeless it is favorite of mine i was really sad when it got cancelled and then really happy when it got uncanceled and in the first season of this show it seemed like every time i turned around i would think hey we have an episode of our podcast about this it was like there was a hindenburg and there was jim buoy and there was no phen baker and there was davy crockett and it went on and on and on there were so many that before the second season started up i actually made a board on our pinterest called as seen on timeless where i pinned all the episodes that relate to past episodes of that show so early on in season two i was watching timeless and a historical figure showed up on the screen that made me go okay stop everything this has to be a podcast and it's it was very similar reaction to the one that several of the people on the screen in the show had because this is about wendall scott who was a black driver from the early days of nascar all almost his entire racing career took place in the segregated south i didn't go into this intending to write a two part podcast on on nascar but once again we have a surprise to part sports podcast also i wanted to note that there are people who knew him who pronounced his name more like windowsill but the vast majority seemed to say wendell including some interview with his tilts interviews with his children's so if some point you're watching old tv footage about wendall scott and you're like why did they say wendell wendell seems to be the more common some of that is probably an accent thing right.

davy crockett pinterest scott nascar wendell wendell