19 Burst results for "Tracy Wilson"

"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:16 min | Last month

"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Hello and welcome to the podcast. I'm holly fry band. I'm tracy wilson tracy and listeners. I'm clearly on a roller coaster cycle of like super downer episode light and fun episode super dinner episode light in front episode. Sorry i don't know what's going on. You gotta do what you gotta do. I think i. I b because of where we're all at mentally and like evolution did not prepare us to deal with the ongoing kind of stress of a pandemic by brain is very much gravitating towards a lot of dark things in in and out.

holly fry tracy wilson tracy
"tracy wilson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

08:02 min | Last month

"tracy wilson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"I'm Tracy Wilson and I'm Holly Fry. This episode is the last episode I am writing for the year 2020. Spending a year. Three. Yeah, Array. Also, I've just never had minimal contact with anybody besides my spouse that almost nine months and for some reason, my brain keeps being like scurvy. And That connection doesn't make sense, really? Because if I were to get a vitamin deficiency because of the pandemic, it would probably be about vitamin D. From the not going out into the sun is that what you're saying is that your brain is making a weird jump of concern A vitamin deficiency Maybe not concerned, But maybe more like at least I don't have scurry like Ha, but brain that doesn't make any sense. Anyway. That's what we're gonna talk about. Today is scurvy because just for some weird reason, my brain keeps coming back around to it in these times of winter and pandemic. So scurvy in case you don't know And you probably do is a deficiency in vitamin C or acerbic acid, and its story goes way way back in history all the way to our evolutionary ancestors living more than 60 million years ago. With a few exceptions, including guinea pigs and bats. Most mammals can generate their own acerbic acid, and that included those primate ancestors. But somewhere along the way, a random genetic mutation broke the ability to produce an enzyme known as El Galena, Lac Tone, Oxy days or ghoul. Oh, which is a necessary part of making acerbic acid. Acerbic acid. It is also necessary. The body uses it to synthesize the protein, collagen and collagen is a crucially important part of our connective tissue. We needed to do really important things like hold our skin and blood vessels together, so if the body cannot replace worn out collagen, it causes serious problems. The first symptoms of scurvy involved fatigue, lethargy and aching joints. People start to bruise easily. Wounds won't heal and old wounds. Reopen the gum start to bleed and the T start to loosen and can in fact come out entirely. This is also accompanied by foul odours, including very bad breath without treatment with vitamin C. Scurvy is eventually fatal, often because of acute internal bleeding around the brain or heart. But when our ancestors stopped being able to produce Gullo, this really did not matter. They were living in tropical areas and their diets included lots of fresh fruits and vegetables, so they were getting plenty of vitamin C through their food. If this had not been true, this genetic mutation that shut off the ability to synthesize Gula would have wiped them out. But since their diets were rich with vitamin C, they continued to thrive. As people started living farther from tropical areas, they started eating more foods that did not necessarily contain as much vitamin C. But most of the time this was still not a big problem. Most dietary recommendations call for significantly more vitamin C, but it doesn't actually take that much just to prevent scurvy. Only about 10 mg a day are all you need. And although vitamin C is mostly associated with fruits and vegetables, it is found in other foods as well. Most meat contains a little if it hasn't been cooked too long and liver and kidney meat in particular, contained quite a bit of it. So, as one example the practice of eating raw organ meat in far northern indigenous communities provides protection from scurvy, even when plant based foods are unavailable or out of season. So as communities established themselves around the world, people had to have some kind of vitamin C and their diets. Otherwise, that community just could not survive. But any time that access to food was cut off in some way, say, because of a war or a famine, people could start to develop scurvy. And this was also true for people with diseases and conditions that kept them from eating or kept them from absorbing the nutrients in their food. And the word scurvy comes from older terms that mean lazy scabbed or skirt, which used to be used to describe dandruff. People started using it to describe this disease in about the 16th century. But written descriptions of scurvy that predate that word are much older. The earliest likely description of scurvy is found in the Egyptian document, known as the Ebert's Papyrus, which dates back to about 1500 B. C. E. Past podcast subject shrewd described a condition involving bleeding gums and loosening teeth around 800. B. C. E. Roughly 400 years later, Greek physician Hippocrates described what was probably scurvy. And while he did not go into detail about the cure, he knew for it. He did note that it wasn't effective and that patients usually died. Traditional Chinese medicine texts describe collections of symptoms that very much resemble scurvy as well. So today, scurvy is associated with long sea voyages and his humanity took to the sea. People worked out some ways to prevent it, although really, without necessarily knowing. But that was what they were doing. Many of the earliest seafarers stuck close to the coasts or the island hopped, and that gave them plenty of opportunities to stock up on fresh food. But his voyages got longer. Many also had foods on board that were rich in vitamin C. It's possible that Polynesian way finders introduced sweet potatoes to Central and South America, they would have brought them with them over thousands of miles of ocean. And sweet potatoes contain vitamin C Scandinavian stocked their ships with cloud Berries, which have about four times as much vitamin C as oranges. Do. Unpasteurized milk also contains vitamin C, so seafarers who had dairy animals on board could get it that way. While scurvy was common enough to be documented in ancient medical literature, one of the first specifically documented outbreaks happen in the 13th century. During the eighth Crusade, King Louis the ninth lay siege to Tunis. Although there were plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables available in the area, the king and his fighting force were mostly eating fish, and many were also undertaking religious fasts. The king and about 1/6 of his men died of disease during the siege. For a long time. Their deaths were attributed to plague. But more recent research has found evidence of scurvy in the king's jawbone. Not long after this scurvy started to become a serious problem on European ships during long sea voyages. And most of the literature that's related to scurvy in history today is focused primarily on Europe and its colonies, mostly during the age of exploration, which was from about the 15th through the 17th centuries. But of course Europeans were not the only people taking to the sea. At this point. It's possible that other nations aren't as represented in English language literature because of language barriers or prejudice. But it's also possible that scurvy was just not as much of a problem outside of European fleets most of the time. It takes between two months and 12 weeks without vitamin C for a person to develop scurvy. And while sailors from parts of Africa and Asia were taking voyages that lasted much longer than that, overall, often they were not going that long between stops to resupply. It also seems like they may have been doing a better job at providing their crews with foods rich in vitamin C past podcast subject. Even Battuta, who was from what's now Morocco and traveled extensively during the 14th century described green vegetables and ginger being grown in tanks on Chinese vessels..

Tracy Wilson Holly Fry Hippocrates 13th century Central Tunis Today Battuta Asia 14th century 2020 12 weeks Europe Three Morocco today South America Africa 17th centuries Chinese
"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:21 min | Last month

"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Smallpox is a viral disease that has existed for millennia when it was circulating in the wild it spread from person to person through the air usually through face to face contact and it can also be spread through contact with contaminated objects and surfaces people who contracted smallpox typically developed a high fever and body aches and that was followed by a distinctive rash. There are two different strains of the very ola virus that were causing smallpox areola major and burial a minor now that name suggests burial a major caused more serious illnesses as many as a third of people who were infected with very all the major died. As many as ninety percent of babies died it was also particularly lethal anytime. It was introduced somewhere that hadn't existed before such as when european started arriving in the americas and in those cases smallpox usually killed about half the people who contracted it among the people who survived the disease. Smallpox could also be both disabling disfiguring. There was and is no cure for smallpox so even as science and medicine progressed it continued to be deadly but it also had some traits that made it a good candidate for a worldwide ratification campaign. Smallpox was easy to recognize in diagnose unlike say the flu which can resemble a lot of other respiratory infections. Smallpox passed directly from person to person and only infected humans so there were no hidden reservoirs of the virus that could potentially start a new outbreak. That's different from something. Like yellow fever. Which also infects other primates and is transmitted by mosquitoes another plus wants. a person had recovered from smallpox. They were immune for life for a number of reasons. Smallpox outbreaks also tended to develop relatively slowly. Once people were contagious. They were usually also too sick to really leave home. So outbreaks tended to cluster around members of the same household and their immediate neighborhood and then once an outbreak was identified. Swift action could keep it from spreading very far and most importantly there was a way to this. -rupt transmission of the disease in this case a

Smallpox tracy wilson holly fry edward jenner Takeda americas smallpox areola tracy spain us fever flu
"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:30 min | Last month

"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Hello and welcome to the podcast. I'm holly fry. And i'm tracy wilson The top of the sun is silly which is good. Because it's not all silly and we need a little But a few weeks back. My husband and i went to chicago to meet up with some friends. This was kind of in that magical. Calendar window where we were all vaccinated in the delta variant had not had it's big surge yet and we were trying to celebrate some stuff that we didn't get to do during You know the more everybody stay.

holly fry tracy wilson chicago
"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

05:25 min | 2 months ago

"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"It was we talk about. How technology is like blockchain are shaping their world ours in the decade ahead for all of us in the digital economy only nomination. Welcome to stuff. You missed in history class. A production of iheartradio. Hello and welcome to the podcast. I'm tracy wilson and i'm holly friday. Do you remember when we went to paris. Feels like a million years ago. Remember i think about it every day. It was in twenty nineteen I would say the museum. Marmot sam manet and that name suggests they have a lot of monet. That's why we were there. My spouse is a big monet fan. And i've just generally like the impressionists so we decided to go to this museum. That has the largest collection of monet all in one place which is thanks to claude. Monet's son michel who donated a lot of his father's artwork to the museum. Wow we were there though. I really fell in love with the work of baird murray zoo so i had seen a couple of moore's does paintings reproduced in books but as is so often the case that really just didn't compare to being they're looking at it in person also with an audio tour to kind of draw my attention to things that i might not have noticed. Otherwise burton so primarily worked in oils and watercolors and pastels and her favorite subjects. Were really the other women in her. Life often captured in these very like tenderly. Private domestic moments the paintings that were on display. While we were there included several that she had done of her daughter from her childhood into her. Adolescence and i just became really entranced with this idea that a woman whose focus was on painting things that are traditionally considered feminine. Like she was right at the heart of the impressionist movement. It's been almost.

tracy wilson Marmot sam manet baird murray zoo holly Monet paris michel moore burton
"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

04:49 min | 2 months ago

"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Hello and happy. friday. I'm tracy wilson and i'm holly one of our episodes this week was on any jump cannon who i put on the list as i said in the episode when we did the episode on cecilia payne kapatagan. That's not the only episode. She has come up and then she was also specifically mentioned in the episode about a nasa engineer and mathematician..

tracy wilson cecilia payne holly cannon nasa
"tracy wilson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

08:13 min | 4 months ago

"tracy wilson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Tracy Wilson and I'm Holly Fry. This episode is the last episode I am writing for the year 2020. It's been a a year. Three. Yeah, Array. Also, I've just never had minimal contact with anybody besides my spouse and almost nine months and for some reason, my brain keeps being like scurvy. And then That connection doesn't make sense, really? Because if I were to get a vitamin deficiency because of the pandemic, it would probably be about vitamin D. From the not going out into the sun is that what you're saying is that your brain is making a weird jump of concern and vitamin deficiency Maybe not concerned, But maybe more like at least I don't have scurry like Ha, but brain that doesn't make any sense. Anyway. That's what we're gonna talk about. Today is scurvy because just for some weird reason, my brain keeps coming back around to it in these times of winter and pandemic. So scurvy in case you don't know And you probably do is a deficiency in vitamin C or acerbic acid, and its story goes way way back in history all the way to our evolutionary ancestors living more than 60 million years ago. With a few exceptions, including guinea pigs and bats. Most mammals can generate their own acerbic acid, and that included those primate ancestors. But somewhere along the way, a random genetic mutation broke the ability to produce an enzyme known as El Galena, lactose oxy days or ghoul. Oh, which is a necessary part of making acerbic acid. Ascorbic acid. It is also necessary. The body uses it to synthesised. The protein, collagen and collagen is a crucially important part of our connective tissue. We needed to do really important things like hold our skin and blood vessels together. So if the body cannot replace worn out college and it causes serious problems, the first symptoms of scurvy involved fatigue, lethargy and aching joints. People start to bruise easily. Wounds won't heal and old wounds. Reopen the gum start to bleed and the T start to loosen and can in fact come out entirely. This is also accompanied by foul odours, including very bad breath. Without treatment with vitamin C. Scurvy is eventually fatal, often because of acute internal bleeding around the brain or heart. But when our ancestors stopped being able to produce Gullo, this really did not matter. They were living in tropical areas and their diets included lots of fresh fruits and vegetables, so they were getting plenty of vitamin C through their food. If this had not been true, this genetic mutation that shut off the ability to synthesize Gullo would have wiped them out. But since their diets were rich with vitamin C, they continued to thrive. As people started living farther from tropical areas, they started eating more foods that did not necessarily contain as much vitamin C. But most of the time this was still not a big problem. Most dietary recommendations call for significantly more vitamin C, but it doesn't actually take that much just to prevent scurvy. Only about 10 mg a day are all you need. And although vitamin C is mostly associated with fruits and vegetables, it is found in other foods as well. Most meat contains a little if it hasn't been cooked too long and liver and kidney meat in particular, contained quite a bit of it. So, as one example the practice of eating raw organ meat in far northern indigenous communities provides protection from scurvy, even when plant based foods are unavailable or out of season. So as communities established themselves around the world, people had to have some kind of vitamin C and their diets. Otherwise, that community just could not survive. But any time that access to food was cut off in some way, say, because of a war or a famine, people could start to develop scurvy. And this was also true for people with diseases and conditions that kept them from eating or kept them from absorbing the nutrients in their food. And the word scurvy comes from older terms that mean lazy scabbed or skirt if which used to be used to describe dandruff. People started using it to describe this disease in about the 16th century, but written descriptions of scurvy that predate that word are much older. The earliest likely description of scurvy is found in the Egyptian document, known as the Ebert's Papyrus, which dates back to about 1500 B. C. E. Past podcast subject for shrewd described a condition involving bleeding gums and loosening teeth around 800. BC Roughly 400 years later, Greek physician Hippocrates described what was probably scurvy. And while he did not go into detail about the cure, he knew for it. He did note that it wasn't effective and that patients usually died. Traditional Chinese medicine texts describe collections of symptoms that very much resemble scurvy as well. So today, scurvy is associated with long sea voyages and his humanity took to the sea. People worked out some ways to prevent it, although really, without necessarily knowing. That was what they were doing. Many of the earliest seafarers stuck close to the coasts or the island hopped, and that gave them plenty of opportunities to stock up on fresh food. But his voyages got longer. Many also had foods on board that were rich in vitamin C. It's possible that Polynesian way finders introduced sweet potatoes to Central and South America, they would have brought them with them over thousands of miles of ocean. And sweet potatoes contain vitamin C Scandinavian stocked their ships with cloud Berries, which have about four times as much vitamin C as oranges. Do. Unpasteurized milk also contains vitamin C, so seafarers who had dairy animals on board could get it that way. While scurvy was common enough to be documented in ancient medical literature, one of the first specifically documented outbreaks happen in the 13th century. During the eighth Crusade, King Louis the ninth lay siege to Tunis. Although there were plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables available in the area, the king and his fighting force were mostly eating fish, and many were also undertaking religious fasts. The king and about 1/6 of his men died of disease during the siege. For a long time. Their deaths were attributed to plague but more recent research has found evidence of scurvy in the king's jawbone. Not long after this scurvy started to become a serious problem on European ships during long sea voyages, and most of the literature that's related to scurvy in history today is focused primarily on Europe and its colonies, mostly during the age of exploration, which was from about the 15th through the 17th centuries. But of course Europeans were not the only people taking to the sea. At this point. It's possible that other nations aren't as represented in English language literature because of language barriers or prejudice. But it's also possible that scurvy was just not as much of a problem outside of European fleets most of the time. It takes between two months and 12 weeks without vitamin C for a person to develop scurvy. And while sailors from parts of Africa and Asia were taking voyages that lasted much longer than that overall. Often they were not going that long between stops to resupply. It also seems like they may have been doing a better job at providing their crews with foods rich in vitamin C. Past podcast subject. Even Battuta, who was from what's now Morocco and traveled extensively during the 14th century described green vegetables and ginger being grown in tanks on Chinese vessels. He also wrote about salted ginger, pepper, lemons and mangoes being loaded onto shifts in preparation for long voyages. Another previous podcast subject is Zhang,.

Tracy Wilson Holly Fry Hippocrates Central Battuta 2020 Today 13th century Asia 14th century Tunis Europe 12 weeks Morocco Zhang Three today 17th centuries Chinese Africa
On this day: Karl M. Baer legally recognized as male

This Day in History Class

04:09 min | 10 months ago

On this day: Karl M. Baer legally recognized as male

"Hello and welcome to the podcast. I'm tracy wilson and it's january eighth. Carl m bear was legally recognized as mail on the stay in one thousand nine hundred. Seven bear was born to a german jewish family in eighteen eighty five and after his delivery the midwife said to his mother something along the lines of congratulations on the birth of your lovely daughter but the midwife had a different conversation with carl's father saying that this newborn babies body was ambiguous and that it wasn't clear whether she should call the baby male or female today we might have described him as intersex so the family went to see a doctor and added that when they registered carl's birth they would register him as a girl and give him girls name. But as carl grew up he had a very clear sense of his own self. He later described himself as a boy who was being raised as girl and his own writing he said quote one may raise a healthy boy in a womanish manner as one wishes and a female creature as manish never will. This caused their senses to remain forever reversed and his growing up was not easy at all. He was expected to play with girls but he didn't feel like a girl and the girls also seemed to suspect. Somehow he wasn't one of them not only did he not like most of the pastimes that were considered to be appropriate for girls but the girls in his community excluded him from playing with them his behavior and his interests and as he grew into a teenager his appearance and voice were more in line with what was expected of boys than what was expected of girls in one thousand nine hundred four at the age of nineteen he moved to hamburg. He studied sociology. He started working as a social worker and was also part of feminist organisations including campaigning against the trafficking of women he was also active in the jewish service organization beneath breath that same year. He started introducing himself to people as a man. He changed stress and no longer tried to hide his more masculine physical features and then in the midst of all this. He was injured in a tram accident when he was taken to the hospital. Doctors immediately noticed that his i d did not match the name or the gender that he gave to them. When he was admitted they ultimately contacted magnus hirschfeld of the institute for sexual science which was a research institute medical facility and an advocacy organization for what we would describe. Today as lgbt rights hirschfeld described bear as a case of quote erroneous sexual attribution. He and other doctors at the institute felt that bear would benefit from having surgery. It's what we would today describe as gender affirmation surgery after receiving hormone treatments bear had a series of surgery is starting in one thousand nine hundred six and this made him one of the first people to have surgery for this reason on january eighth of one thousand nine hundred seven. He was legally recognized as mail and was issued a new birth certificate that same year. He published a semi-fictional autobiography called memoirs of a man's maiden years and he published that under the pseudonym nfo body but it was widely known that he was the author of this work on october tenth of that year he got married although his wife died of pneumonia about a year and a half later and he got remarried later on bear continued to work as a social activist in berlin until nineteen thirty seven including becoming the director of the berlin lodges of buzney breath but then in nineteen thirty seven. He was captured by nazis and tortured after settling his affairs as quickly as he could. He fled germany and moved. To what would later become israel. He lived a quiet life there as an insurance agent and he died in nineteen fifty-six

Carl Tracy Wilson Carl M Bear Manish Magnus Hirschfeld Institute For Sexual Science Hamburg Hirschfeld Berlin Pneumonia Germany Israel
"tracy wilson" Discussed on This Day in History Class

This Day in History Class

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"tracy wilson" Discussed on This Day in History Class

"Hello and welcome to the podcast. I'm tracy be wilson an it's november thirteenth. One of history's very many bloody sunday's took place on this day. In eighteen eighty seven. There are a lot of events that have been named bloody sunday and this one place in trafalgar square in london in the late nineteenth century trafalgar square had become a common gathering place for protesters in london in particular. The working poor were protesting against exploitation and financial hardship. These protesters were often supported by middle-class socialists. And then over the summer of eighteen eighty seven the square had also become home to a large number of unemployed people. Many of them with nowhere else to go some slept in the square and wash themselves in. Its fountains and newspapers drawing a lot of attention to the situation. Authorities regarded this sort of encampment in the square as an embarrassment and starting on october seventeenth of that year. Police regularly tried to clear all the people out but little was done to address the circumstances that had led to these people being there in the first place so many of these evictions from the square became violence. The people having nowhere else to go and it having become such a focal point for protests people would gather there again as attention grew to the cycle. The protest grew also and a lot was going on in these protests and demonstrations. There were a lot of different people involved. You had their own goals and objectives. There were socialists and anarchists trade unionists and some of the more specific political ideas that were brought up in these demonstrations included irish rule in england's treatment of ireland in addition to all the other things we've already been talking about so november eighth of eighteen eighty seven. A notice was posted to ban meetings in trafalgar square. It was issued by charles warren. He was the metropolitan police. Commissioner it said in part until further information no public meetings will be allowed to assemble in trafalgar square nor will speeches be allowed to be delivered therein and well disposed persons are hereby cautioned and requested to abstain from joining or attending any meeting or assemblage. This notification also made it clear that precautions we're going to be taken to prevent such assemblies and that disturbances would be suppressed. That was the actual word that was used suppressed so now in addition to the poor people and the socialists and the trade unionist and all of these other people there were now also radicals who thought the key issue at play. Here was the freedom of speech in defiance of this ban. A plan was formed to march on trafalgar square in protest and the plant also included speeches and a demonstration that was planned once they arrived. That was to happen on november thirteenth of eighteen eighty seven. But what happened said was that the police charged the protesters. They were fifteen hundred police including mounted officers and there were hundreds of volunteers there as special constables. The military was there too including infantry and cavalry and most of these people were armed with police truncheons although the military units also had things like bayonets. A few protesters were killed in this most sources. Say either two or three and at least two hundred were injured in violence that went on all day. There were also many arrests of the leaders of the demonstrations. Some of the police in the military were injured as well but there were far. Far more injuries among the protesters. A big part of the response to this event was outrage against police brutality. That had happened. And the people who were killed reviewed as martyrs the authorities though felt that the use of force had been appropriate and some more conservative papers framed. This as a much-needed cleanup of lawless agitators. A week later on november twentieth at a subsequent protest a man named alfred linnell fell and was trampled by a horse and killed. His death was similarly condemned and the same way that the police brutality had been idea. Was that an exploitive and inhumane system had caused the innocent man's death

trafalgar square Cdw oxy dell tracy wilson london Emc england alfred linnell christopher osceola Commissioner charles warren
"tracy wilson" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"tracy wilson" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"But stew when they have trouble finding this booth, and I don't like going to a three man booth. I think it's too many people. And even though I liked Louis, Riddick and I liked Steve Levy And I don't really know much about Brian greasy in the booth. Four NFL. I know he does like what they think this crew did Monday night last year, maybe something like that. If you're ESPN and you knew that you were moving on for Mike Olek. If you even wanted to just make it a quick fix for a year or two, and I think Colin would be great. And he's done a bunch of college football in the booth before and I think they had him on Mike Mike. Really both of them. Greenberg and Gold. Do a few Monday night football games I would imagine. Yeah, they did a few right. That's that Monday. Still right that that second Monday night football game they had him do before. If you're ESPN, why don't you just Why not? Just put Steve Levy and Michael look in the booth for a few seasons? I don't know. And I'm with you. I think that the three man booth is just unnecessary slaughtered. It just It just sounds better with two people. Yeah, Nance and Rome. Oh, perfect. Tracy Wilson on the sideline, and then you bring in whoever your referee analysts is and like for the NFL you got for Fox. You got fuckin Aikman. And sometimes they bring in Pereira, but it's just for the refereeing stuff and have a sideline reporter. So you got Dio NBC perfect. You have Michelle to four on the sidelines and you got Al Michaels and then Cris Collinsworth with smooth sliding. And ESPN shortly, learn from experiences they brought in wooden booger McFarland and Joe Tessitore. And it was a disaster. It was an absolute disaster. So you move on from booger and tests. And you bring in Levi, Riddick and Brian greasy. Does that move the needle for anyone? It may be a better booth. But you could also argue and trust me. I thought and I usually don't find announces, be insufferable for run your calling football games. I don't think it's that big of a deal. But really tests and booger were insufferable like test for boxing. I like test for college football, the NFL. He was horrible. And Booger was just a disaster in the booth. Every single player. This person is the best player in our league. He's one of the best players are like not the Holy could be the best player or one of the best players. So it became so bad You could almost argue, though. What did you just rather kept testing booger? Instead of Levi, Riddick and Greece. Even though it could be a better booth. They can't get any worse. You would think At least you still get some good publicity. Is there any gonna really be that much national flavor and national field was Steve Levy, Louis, Riddick and Brian Greasy? It's probably a boot that you looked to replace in 23 years. Of Sean McVeigh was talked to by ESPN. I saw the other thing. Prime time let the NFL network because they don't want to give him the Sally that he's been making and asked to take too much of a cut, and Deon Sanders is joining bar stool. And I listened to the Deon Sanders introduction on why he's joining barstool and he said before that he wants to coach college football and you heard that he was interviewed and he was linked to his alma mater at the Florida State job. Mike nor Bell did end up getting that job when you hear the reason why he's joining barstool The entire thing..

Brian greasy ESPN NFL Steve Levy Riddick football Mike Mike Deon Sanders Mike Olek Levi Greenberg sideline reporter Colin Tracy Wilson Sean McVeigh NBC Louis Aikman Michelle Cris Collinsworth
"tracy wilson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

06:28 min | 1 year ago

"tracy wilson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Tracy Wilson. I'm Holli crying. It's time for some six impossible episodes. If you are new to the show a couple of times a year, we do an episode that looks at six different stories that for whatever reason we can't really do is a stand alone show a lot of the time. It's because there's not enough information to fill out a whole show or because they're six stories that have some similar themes in common. Back in 2016 We did an episode called Six Impossible Episodes. Deja Vu Edition, and that was on topics that were so similar to things we had already covered, that if we had done a whole episode, it would've sounded almost like a rerun, just with different names and dates just swap those out the exact same story. And today we're doing something a little bit similar to that. Several times over the past few years. We've done an episode about something that happened in the United States, and then afterward we'd gotten lots of notes from listeners about the same thing happening in Canada, although the first story that we're going to get into is actually the reverse of that. Also, I do want to know that these are mostly not happy stories. Apparently mostly people tell us that also happened to Canada about really appalling incidents in history, So we saved the most heroic one for last. So starting out on July 21st 2014 we published a podcast on the squad or the King's daughters. And this was an effort by France's King Louis, the 14th to send eligible young women to New France. In the 16 hundreds. Francis Focus in Northern North America had been on the fur trade not on establishing permanent settlements with families. And as a consequence. By 16 63 there were six French men for every French woman in what is now Canada. So the monarchy recruited French women and paid for their transport to North America in an effort to try to balance things out. Very similar scenario also played out in French, Louisiana. First authorities had expected that French men would go to Louisiana and Mary native women, and then they also expected that these brides would assimilate into French colonial society. That is not how it worked out, though it turned out that the women in question had their own opinions on this subject, which was to do essentially the opposite. By the late 17th century, French officials were actively discouraging colonists for marrying native women to try to preserve the Frenchness and the whiteness of the colony. But then that meant that they needed more French women because there weren't enough to marry these men. The first group to arrive by order of King Louis. The 14th came aboard a ship called the Pelican and are nicknamed the Pelican Girls. As a consequence, the ship arrived a Dolphin island in what's now Mobile county, Alabama. In 17 0 for its passengers included 23 French women and two families sent after repeated requests by Governor Jean Baptiste Limo in the V, A and other colonial officials. The chancellor of France wrote to the governor about these women and this is what the letter said. Quote. Each of these girls was raised in virtue and piety and knows howto work, which will render them useful in the colony by showing the Indian girls what they could do for this there being no point in sending other than a virtue known and without reproach. His Majesty interested the bishop of Quebec to certify them in order that they not be suspected of des Boche. You will take care to establish them the best that you can and to marry them. Two men capable of having them subsist. With some degree of comfort, although most of these women got married very quickly. Beyond that, this first effort did not go well. Recruiters had described Louisiana as an amazing and wealthy paradise, which was Not even remotely true. The women arrived during a persistent and severe food shortage. Diseases were rampant and the terrain if you've ever been to Louisiana, you know this was swampy and the French colonists faced ongoing and justified threats from the region's enslaved and indigenous populations. Conditions were so bad and so different from what they had been promised that in 17 06 a lot of these women launched a protest trying to get passage out of the colony and back to France. This uprising was given the disparaging nickname the Petticoat Insurrection. Today. This protest is folded into the lore about the origins of Creole cuisine. Supposedly everything was resolved when the governor's housekeeper, Madam Lengua taught the women how to cook with local ingredients and spices. Because that would solve all the problems shrug. But it is not clear whether lengua ever existed. And this story really minimizes indigenous and African contributions to Creole cuisine. But it is clear that this protest was about a lot more than cooking ingredients, even in an accounts written by like the male leaders of the time. We're like they're just unhappy because they don't like to eat corn. And that was not. That was like one tiny piece of this whole situation. Regardless, though, word got back to France about what this Louisiana colony was really like, and soon women were no longer willing to go there. Unsurprisingly, so authorities started recruiting women from orphanages, hospitals and prisons, and especially when it came to women who had been convicted of a crime. These migrations were forced. They were not voluntary as that first shipload had been And even for the ones that were technically voluntary. The women in question a lot of the time did not have many other options. Either way. Many of these women died on the way to Louisiana and the ones who survived often. We're not all that eager to marry a colonist and start keeping house for him. France ended the formal migration program in 17 20 but the most famous group of women arrived in New Orleans early the following year. These are the ones most commonly known as the casket girls. These were 88 women recruited from a hospital in Paris that wasn't just a medical facility but was also housing for both orphans and prisoners. Although 19 of these women married quickly and 31 Mary, later on the rest, either refused to marry or returned to France. The name casket was reportedly from the boxes that these women were using to carry their belongings. As they travelled. You'll see articles online that variously.

France Louisiana Canada King Louis Tracy Wilson New France Deja Vu French Governor Jean Baptiste Limo Pelican Girls Holli North America Madam Lengua United States Paris Dolphin island New Orleans chancellor Francis Focus Mary
"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

07:53 min | 1 year ago

"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Hobby Saturday. Everyone today is the first day in. May which typically would be Kentucky Derby Day but the Derby has been postponed until September fifth of this year because of the covert nineteen pandemic. But we thought today might be a good day to re release our previous episode on the Kentucky Derby I fifty years. This episode originally came out may third two thousand seventeen so enjoyed welcome to stuff. You missed in History Class. A production of iheartradio loan. Welcome to the PODCAST. I'm Tracy Wilson and I'm calling frying way. We one of the projects I'm working on for our podcast.

Kentucky Derby Tracy Wilson Kentucky History Class
"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

09:09 min | 1 year ago

"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Playlist. That were calling offbeat history. Yeah we're adding this to our our regular publishing schedule as one kind of big drop all at the same time on March nineteenth and that is so that you maybe have a little bit of extra entertainment options available to you particularly if you are self quarantined or shelter. You welcome to stuff. You MISSED IN HISTORY. Class Production iheartradio Hello and welcome to the PODCAST. I'm holly and I'm Tracy Wilson and this is the continuing story of the attempt to bring hippos to the US as a livestock.

Tracy Wilson US
"tracy wilson" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

10:35 min | 1 year ago

"tracy wilson" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"This business rockstars I am Britney Whitney and my guest today is Tracy Wilson Ross man founder of tech girls Tracy thanks for joining us today thanks for having me so for those who are not familiar with you give us some background and your entrepreneurial journey that led you to tech girls well it is definitely not a straight line so I started off in retail management and in a department store that unfortunately is no longer around in Philadelphia went over to QVC which at that time was very very early on in the you know TV selling and then from there we decided that I should go into sales I'm sorry did advertising sales and I had my own territory and that was really the beginning of being a little bit of an entrepreneur but opportunity came on board when I was seven months pregnant with our second child the most convenient time exactly I kept telling my mother opportunity knocks and sometimes it's not always the exact best time right and we bought an existing business call king cab which was child transportation well before uber last was even you know clean in the founders I so that was really our first stab into owning a business and I worked with my husband on that but I ran it for the most part and we did that for about three plus years old that business in selling was a success but it wasn't exactly a success so we can talk about that another point if we like yeah and then from there joined into the tech industry I work for a company that became more students you what is cherry solutions today which I was one of the early founders on and that is a software development company and from there are because I I do have some latitude and seeing what was happening with in that the tech industry with the lack of women coming on board decided that I should take a shot and try and figure out how to solve the problem and that's how tackles was founded I love your journey and for those not familiar what is tech girls so tech curls our mission is to help middle school girls embrace the power of technology for their future careers and what we do is we create the short interactive workshops that anybody can teach any time any place anywhere at this point we've just crossed the threshold of working with twenty thousand girls over the last ten years and we're ahead of schedule and we have almost sixty workshops in our free library wow that's so amazing and you're also doing another business while you are writing girls girls I'm so take a is my extra job and I should say that we were just acquired by a larger non profit in April so yeah thank you so my responsibilities have less and as my team is going over to the to the larger nonprofit which is great is going to help us with expansion but it might my day job which I always say pays the bills is cherries collisions which is the company which is now seventeen years that's amazing and we also because you know I don't have enough to do my co founder and I glory about how we started women in tech conference which also went over to the the nonprofit and all those profits from the women in tax on it which is in five different regions goes to tech girls that's amazing you have so much going on I don't know how you're doing so I want to talk a little bit about the challenges you faced early on with tech girls and why you also call it a non traditional non profit sure I'm so tackles what is an idea that I had in my head probably for about five years before I actually did anything with it and I kept talking to people and eventually I like to say that I this is the way that I hold myself accountable when I say ideas and I start telling people it allows them to call me out on it so finally I said okay we're going to go and try this out this problem is not going away so we took a year I was able to put together an advisory group and we spent fifth time figuring out what was in the ecosystem what was missing and also to talk to the people who were going to be our customers at the end of the day our customers were the girl's but also the people who would be delivering courses and what's great is that we found that from the first event that we did that it really hasn't changed much it's a little bit more of the delivery system that we've changed but it's pretty much what we had set out to do from the beginning the challenge is always been fundraising we can't scale without having dollars and even though I like to call this a nontraditional nonprofit there are parts of the nonprofit world that we do have to understand and fund raising is one of them when I say nontraditional nonprofit one of the things that we have done is applied on the lean startup methodology as we started again and we went out we talk to people who would be using our product so that we had a better understanding of what we would that be delivering what people actually use it right we continue to use plain startup methodologies specially around fell fast so we do small task based on what I term hypotheses and then if things are successful were able to bring them out further and if they're not successful we haven't spent a lot of time or precious dollars some resources on that particular idea and we've had some things that have not gone exactly the way that we thought that they were going to write and explain why the need for qualified tech talent has never been greater so I mean this actually feeds in from my regular job cherry installations we've seen this trend probably for the last eight years companies need more tech talent and what I like to say is right now every company is a tech company so when you think about it you know fifty years ago technology was mainframes and punch cards and now we're looking at you know servers and mainframes there have the power they're put into and I fall more so it's crazy but we're also dealing with technology that didn't exist even ten years ago eleven years ago our smartphones are only eleven years old crazy right so we have all of the new technology that's coming out and companies who you wouldn't consider technology companies like hospitals or financial institutions or even utilities that needs technology talent whether it's a website whether it's not working whether it's cyber security so that the brass of technology jobs has changed and grown absolutely and the numbers right now the labor department is predicting there will be three point one openings in the technology industry by twenty twenty six wow yes that's another important reason why women and girls need to get into tacky exactly exactly and just expand on that point why women and girls there's there's multiple reasons but from one of the things that we really need to understand is that that's where the jobs are so it is not only just about becoming a computer programmer there's so many of these other opportunities and there's a prediction that seventy seven percent of all jobs will be tech enabled by twenty twenty three non farm is not that far away and we need our our girls and the women entering the workforce right now to understand that this is where the opportunities are absolutely did you ever have a fear of failure with tech girls with cherries solutions any business that almost made you stop and pause and think I don't know if I want to do this today is Monday yes every day overcome that you know the first thing that happened with came a cab when we sold the business and I really felt that I failed because you know we didn't become rich and successful under the terms that I think people assume that's what happens when you when you own a business right I really thought about what what was success took me a little bit of time to understand what that meant to me and when I realize this one especially now with wings start up methodologies failure is not a bad thing failure is a learning experience as one of the things that I talk about is D. risking some of the failure and understanding what the risks are and what you were willing to rest on and when you start breaking down when I started tech girls I understood that if it did not work life would go on my life would go on and that it was better for me to try and to say that I tried and have an understanding of why it didn't work and to not have tried it all and what it's done for me personally in terms of how it's allowed me to grow professionally and what I've been able to do with other people and for other people has just been tremendous AZ and if people want to learn more about tech girls were Kaneko easy it's tech girls within the Acer T. E. C. H. G. I R. L. C. dot org you'll learn about how you can participate whether you're a parent whether your business he wants to get back either donation or volunteer time and also we just announced the first ever girls in tax summit all girls on stage all girls in the audience so we're gonna you know disrupting and I love it thank you so much for joining us there's a pleasure speaking thank you so much.

Britney Whitney founder Tracy Wilson Ross
"tracy wilson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"tracy wilson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Hosted by Tracy Wilson and Holly fry as he got to know the market in California, he could ensure that future shipments contain items that would be the most likely to move and to make the most money and for clarity Strauss's were not opening a retail shop in San Francisco, even though they had sort of a similar one in New York. They were basically setting up a wholesale business that would sell stock to other merchants for their shops, so leave I had to invest time in developing. Really good relationships with other businessmen in the area, and he was twenty four at this point he wasn't supporting away for family, so aside from attending synagogue and participating in social events, primarily within San Francisco's Jewish community. All of his efforts could be focused on stashing the family's new west coast firm, and he wasn't only working with retailers in San Francisco, either he also traveled inland to Sacramento and he paid visits to smaller mining. Towns to make deals with the shopkeepers there. And this was an ongoing practice for the business that he pretty much carried out forever. When news broke of new or strikes or a new town popping up Strauss was smart enough to go get into those towns, sprouted up in those places and forge those new business partnerships so Levi quickly established a list of regular clientele, and even as he had received shipment of that first load of freight that his brothers had sent. There were already two other shipments on the way he was doing business density for the company that has brother founded, which was j Strauss and brother. But he was invoicing clients sort.

j Strauss San Francisco Tracy Wilson New York Levi Holly fry California Sacramento
Meet Chad Steele, aka the guy behind Tom Brady, Peyton Manning and Ray Lewis at Super Bowl

The Adam Schefter Podcast

03:26 min | 2 years ago

Meet Chad Steele, aka the guy behind Tom Brady, Peyton Manning and Ray Lewis at Super Bowl

"Know, watching the TV Sunday night. And once again, I see the ravens vice president of public relations front and center in the center of the football universe again. And I said we have to get Chad on this week's Adam Schefter podcast. He must be on honored. Well, I mean, it's incredible. What has happened for those of you who are now listening basically CHAD'S job during the year is to work with the Baltimore Ravens? But Super Bowl week. He becomes the media liaison for are you signed to a player or a team. Fair. So during the week there are a number of us that are there to help league out with credentialing radio row know kinda point media in the right direction opening night that Monday night were assigned to a player. I had Tom Brady on Monday night. And then we're time to a player after the which again I had Brady. So it's it's it's flit up between between people. I just so happened to have I think is, sir. Certified time I've had Tom when when they've been in there. So we're we're we're kind of developing a little bond and you had Tom three or four times yet Peyton Manning after the Broncos won the Super Bowl Ray Lewis after the ravens won the Super Bowl. It seems like you always have the star attraction. How does that happen? You know, I don't know where they're like. I said they invite a few of us down kind of some of the heads of department from around the league to help out all week. And then we have some young kids some interns that are looking for jobs, and some some younger systems coordinators that are that are looking to expand the horizons a little bit and down there for the week. And then we just we get the game assignments. And I think the first one that I had when I worked at Super Bowl outside of of the ravens when was was Russell Wilson in in New Jersey a few years ago. And you know, I got a quarterback. I think maybe my side helps you know, that I'm a bigger guy, and I can get out there and kinda kinda move the people through but just ever since. Then I've I've had quarterbacks I think I think six along right now, the only the only loss at what I had I had cast year when the when the eagles beat them, but I pretty decent record. So there you are on Sunday night. The patriots win the Super Bowl. Tom Brady is stormed by the media, Tracy Rolston of CBS is trying to get in to get that interview from your perspective. And you were the only one that appeared in that show with Tracy in Tom, it was Tracy Wilson, Tom Brady, and Chad steal. What was that scrum? Like for you. You know, I it's just it's interesting because Tom pulled in a hundred directions, and you know, we're talk to CBS CBS wanted to try to get the interview pretty quickly. But as soon as you're out there, you're Tom celebrating a little bit than teammates coming up, then have coaches coming up, and he wants to make sure he's very good about making sure he gives respect to the to the opposing team. So they wanna make sure saw Jared golf, and there were a couple of other players that want to see and it's kinda hey, Tom over here can Tom over here. And we're like, hey, Tom, you know, got Tracy right here. Okay. Hold on. I just wanna see this guy. And then as soon as that's done. Somebody else comes up somebody else comes up, but he's he's kinda pulled in a million directions. And we're just saying that hey, trace you just just hang tight hang with us. We'll we'll we'll get them there.

Tom Brady Baltimore Ravens Chad Steal Broncos Ravens CBS Tracy Adam Schefter Vice President Of Public Relat Tracy Rolston Football Peyton Manning Russell Wilson Patriots Tracy Wilson Ray Lewis New Jersey Eagles Chad
"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

04:15 min | 3 years ago

"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Hello and welcome to the past i'm tracy wilson i'm ali fry if you if you had a baby in like the last sixty years or been present when somebody else had a baby or maybe even just watched a tv show in which babies were born probably heard people talking about africa scores yeah but i never gave it much thought not being particularly a baby person so yeah i i thought this was an acronym and while somebody did rework the parts of that are score so that it matched up with the letters of her name in about nineteen sixty two the score itself is from earlier than that and it's the work of dr virginia app car who really broke new ground in the fields of obstetrics and anesthesiology as well as other fields in the middle of the twentieth century today the app gar score is really part of the standard of care for new for newborn babies in much of the world and it's totally to the credit of this one particular doctor and this one particular dr virginia up gar was born in westfield new jersey on june seventh of nineteen oh nine her father was an insurance executive who was fond of science and wasn't amateur astronomer and she also had a brother who died of tuberculosis at a very young age so it's possible that both of these things influenced her decision to become a doctor but regardless that decision was made before she even got out of high school to that end she went to mount holyoke college where she studied zoology in addition to being an excellent student in that program she worked several part time jobs to make ends meet then she also played the cello and the violin in the orchestra and acted and wrote for the college newspaper and played on seven different sports teams she sounds like a medical school version of leslie nope yes that's a great description her family she described her family at one point as people who never sat still and that's she seems to have been constantly doing her whole life she graduated in nineteen twenty nine and she started medical school at the columbia university college of physicians insurgents that same year there were ninety people in her class and she was one of only nine women she scraped together enough money to stay in school in spite of the great depression and she graduated near the top of her class in nineteen thirty three so she really wanted to become a surgeon and she was accepted into a surgical internship at presbyterian hospital which is now new york presbyterian hospital columbia university medical center she did really well in her first year of this residency but doctor allen whipple who was the chair of the surgical department encouraged her to change specialties to anesthesiology he was concerned that she would not be able to make a profitable career as a surgeon especially given the economic climate at the time was still in the wake of the great depression he also basically had other plans for her he wanted her to study anesthesiology and then come back to press not in hospital to help start a teaching program for future anesthesiologists there were lots of reasons for dr garcia change specialties it was definitely difficult for women to be respected as surgeons at this point and there were lots of train surgeons so competition for jobs was really stiff and dr apter would have had to stand out even more because of her gender doctor whipple had seen his other female surgical students really have trouble getting hired a surgeons at all and dr app gar had graduated from medical school in debt so taking on a specialty in which she would probably have trouble finding a job was a really risky proposition at the same time by by becoming an anesthesiologist instead of a surgeon she was really setting out to pursue a specialty that did not even really exist yet as recently as nineteen eleven the american medical association had even rejected a request to start an anesthesiologist section for its members so while dr gar essentially had a job waiting for her after she was done with our study of anesthesiology it was going to be a tough one because it was in a specialty that was not regarded as a specialty so let's talk about why that was for a moment for most of.

tracy wilson sixty years
"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Hello and welcome to the podcast i'm holly fried and i'm tracy wilson tracy you wanna talk about food a little bit i love to talk about food this isn't so much about food as it is about the people that make food we will talk about some food along the way today no secret there's a whole entire industry around celebrity shifts and often they'll start on tv but then they tend to branch out so today there are so many chefs with branded cookware lines and food lines and endorsement deals and you know their restaurants are well known throughout the world and people go to see them and their faces on the outside sometimes yeah being a celebrity chef is a thing now but the first celebrity chef it might surprise you to learn was around long before farnsworth ever conceived of the television which launches liberty shifts today and to find said chef we actually have to take a be a peak all the way back at late eighteenth century france and the life of marie antawn chem eighteenth century france is the source of so many trends it is and i will confess it's one of the areas of history that i love that's why you're getting it today yeah well and it's it's incredibly incredibly possible that there are also famous shifts and other parts of the world but this was the one that liked to get to a whole other level yes certainly in the western world this is definitely the first celebrity chef so we are talking about marie antoine karam who was born in a slum in paris on june eighth seventeen eighty three his family was massive and it was also destitute he was the sixteenth child in the family and was named after marie antoinette a little bit of a weird choice for a baby name at this point marie antoinette was not beloved by this time but the reasoning for why his parents decided to name him after her is not clear what is clear is that soon after he was born he was being called by antonin instead of marie antoine and then throughout his life he would shift among various.

farnsworth france marie antoine karam paris marie antoinette marie antoine holly fried tracy wilson marie antawn antonin
"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Between two winch half an inch and two inches long they're browner black usually yet and that link is minus their antenna this just their bodies coming in to end their heads point downward like as tracy wilson who wrote the article points out almost as if they're built for ramming yeah or two searching for stuff units another way to look at it the males are the ones that have wings females may have wings but they're vestige you'll wings can't fly with them uh males can fly not very well though which makes them even more horrific when nepal medal buga big one's flying at your face because he no he has no control right exactly yeah oh man is sort of like the sucato like there i don't think they're win wings were made for flying but if they jump off of something high they can help him a little bit uh glide perhaps in not like hit the ground is hard um short distances basically and there are there insects which means that they have three main body regions the head the thorax in the abdomen they haven't access skeleton that they moult as they grow and they mole a number of times depending on the cockroach species yes over the course of a couple of weeks or over the course of a couple of years in their life spans also are um uh in step with that moulting schedule yes um but the iccat gradual multiple times over its life before becomes an adult yes and when they moult um it's the same thing is when they're born they're gonna look white men and um that's probably cannot repeal can of never seen a malta cockroach like a skinless cockroaches leica the lady in hell raiser before a fully gets oliver skin right uh and uh they're they're pretty susceptible to injury and death obviously when the when the after they melted before bursa con which is a hormone makes their exo skeleton harden dark once again than they have their little armor um which is no match for flip flop by.

tracy wilson bursa con nepal malta oliver two inches