18 Burst results for "Tracy Wilson"

"tracy wilson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

06:28 min | 4 months ago

"tracy wilson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Tracy Wilson. I'm Holli crying. It's time for some six impossible episodes. If you are new to the show a couple of times a year, we do an episode that looks at six different stories that for whatever reason we can't really do is a stand alone show a lot of the time. It's because there's not enough information to fill out a whole show or because they're six stories that have some similar themes in common. Back in 2016 We did an episode called Six Impossible Episodes. Deja Vu Edition, and that was on topics that were so similar to things we had already covered, that if we had done a whole episode, it would've sounded almost like a rerun, just with different names and dates just swap those out the exact same story. And today we're doing something a little bit similar to that. Several times over the past few years. We've done an episode about something that happened in the United States, and then afterward we'd gotten lots of notes from listeners about the same thing happening in Canada, although the first story that we're going to get into is actually the reverse of that. Also, I do want to know that these are mostly not happy stories. Apparently mostly people tell us that also happened to Canada about really appalling incidents in history, So we saved the most heroic one for last. So starting out on July 21st 2014 we published a podcast on the squad or the King's daughters. And this was an effort by France's King Louis, the 14th to send eligible young women to New France. In the 16 hundreds. Francis Focus in Northern North America had been on the fur trade not on establishing permanent settlements with families. And as a consequence. By 16 63 there were six French men for every French woman in what is now Canada. So the monarchy recruited French women and paid for their transport to North America in an effort to try to balance things out. Very similar scenario also played out in French, Louisiana. First authorities had expected that French men would go to Louisiana and Mary native women, and then they also expected that these brides would assimilate into French colonial society. That is not how it worked out, though it turned out that the women in question had their own opinions on this subject, which was to do essentially the opposite. By the late 17th century, French officials were actively discouraging colonists for marrying native women to try to preserve the Frenchness and the whiteness of the colony. But then that meant that they needed more French women because there weren't enough to marry these men. The first group to arrive by order of King Louis. The 14th came aboard a ship called the Pelican and are nicknamed the Pelican Girls. As a consequence, the ship arrived a Dolphin island in what's now Mobile county, Alabama. In 17 0 for its passengers included 23 French women and two families sent after repeated requests by Governor Jean Baptiste Limo in the V, A and other colonial officials. The chancellor of France wrote to the governor about these women and this is what the letter said. Quote. Each of these girls was raised in virtue and piety and knows howto work, which will render them useful in the colony by showing the Indian girls what they could do for this there being no point in sending other than a virtue known and without reproach. His Majesty interested the bishop of Quebec to certify them in order that they not be suspected of des Boche. You will take care to establish them the best that you can and to marry them. Two men capable of having them subsist. With some degree of comfort, although most of these women got married very quickly. Beyond that, this first effort did not go well. Recruiters had described Louisiana as an amazing and wealthy paradise, which was Not even remotely true. The women arrived during a persistent and severe food shortage. Diseases were rampant and the terrain if you've ever been to Louisiana, you know this was swampy and the French colonists faced ongoing and justified threats from the region's enslaved and indigenous populations. Conditions were so bad and so different from what they had been promised that in 17 06 a lot of these women launched a protest trying to get passage out of the colony and back to France. This uprising was given the disparaging nickname the Petticoat Insurrection. Today. This protest is folded into the lore about the origins of Creole cuisine. Supposedly everything was resolved when the governor's housekeeper, Madam Lengua taught the women how to cook with local ingredients and spices. Because that would solve all the problems shrug. But it is not clear whether lengua ever existed. And this story really minimizes indigenous and African contributions to Creole cuisine. But it is clear that this protest was about a lot more than cooking ingredients, even in an accounts written by like the male leaders of the time. We're like they're just unhappy because they don't like to eat corn. And that was not. That was like one tiny piece of this whole situation. Regardless, though, word got back to France about what this Louisiana colony was really like, and soon women were no longer willing to go there. Unsurprisingly, so authorities started recruiting women from orphanages, hospitals and prisons, and especially when it came to women who had been convicted of a crime. These migrations were forced. They were not voluntary as that first shipload had been And even for the ones that were technically voluntary. The women in question a lot of the time did not have many other options. Either way. Many of these women died on the way to Louisiana and the ones who survived often. We're not all that eager to marry a colonist and start keeping house for him. France ended the formal migration program in 17 20 but the most famous group of women arrived in New Orleans early the following year. These are the ones most commonly known as the casket girls. These were 88 women recruited from a hospital in Paris that wasn't just a medical facility but was also housing for both orphans and prisoners. Although 19 of these women married quickly and 31 Mary, later on the rest, either refused to marry or returned to France. The name casket was reportedly from the boxes that these women were using to carry their belongings. As they travelled. You'll see articles online that variously.

France Louisiana Canada King Louis Tracy Wilson New France Deja Vu French Governor Jean Baptiste Limo Pelican Girls Holli North America Madam Lengua United States Paris Dolphin island New Orleans chancellor Francis Focus Mary
"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

07:53 min | 6 months ago

"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Hobby Saturday. Everyone today is the first day in. May which typically would be Kentucky Derby Day but the Derby has been postponed until September fifth of this year because of the covert nineteen pandemic. But we thought today might be a good day to re release our previous episode on the Kentucky Derby I fifty years. This episode originally came out may third two thousand seventeen so enjoyed welcome to stuff. You missed in History Class. A production of iheartradio loan. Welcome to the PODCAST. I'm Tracy Wilson and I'm calling frying way. We one of the projects I'm working on for our podcast.

Kentucky Derby Tracy Wilson Kentucky History Class
"tracy wilson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"tracy wilson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Hosted by Tracy Wilson and Holly fry as he got to know the market in California, he could ensure that future shipments contain items that would be the most likely to move and to make the most money and for clarity Strauss's were not opening a retail shop in San Francisco, even though they had sort of a similar one in New York. They were basically setting up a wholesale business that would sell stock to other merchants for their shops, so leave I had to invest time in developing. Really good relationships with other businessmen in the area, and he was twenty four at this point he wasn't supporting away for family, so aside from attending synagogue and participating in social events, primarily within San Francisco's Jewish community. All of his efforts could be focused on stashing the family's new west coast firm, and he wasn't only working with retailers in San Francisco, either he also traveled inland to Sacramento and he paid visits to smaller mining. Towns to make deals with the shopkeepers there. And this was an ongoing practice for the business that he pretty much carried out forever. When news broke of new or strikes or a new town popping up Strauss was smart enough to go get into those towns, sprouted up in those places and forge those new business partnerships so Levi quickly established a list of regular clientele, and even as he had received shipment of that first load of freight that his brothers had sent. There were already two other shipments on the way he was doing business density for the company that has brother founded, which was j Strauss and brother. But he was invoicing clients sort.

j Strauss San Francisco Tracy Wilson New York Levi Holly fry California Sacramento
"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"The podcast. I'm Tracy Wilson. Paulie, fry we have kind of an accidental theme in the episode that search lately inspired by things I read on Twitter, which makes it sound. Like, I'm reading Twitter a lot which is the opposite of true. Whenever I opened Witter. I just kind of zoom up to the top three most recent things and then go away from that. So I just coincidentally have caught various interesting tweets lately this time, it was author insci- communicator, Rosemary Moscow who had a Twitter thread about pigeons and how cool they are. And how they are all over cities because humans put them there. So don't be mad at them for it. The pigeons didn't do it themselves, and in this thread, one of the things she said was Paul Julius Reuter of Reuters use them to carry stock prices. And I replied and said well now, I have to podcast on Paul Julius Reuter, which is where we are the man who would later become known as Julius Reuter was born in Israel, beer USA, fat on July twenty first eighteen sixteen. He was born near castle in the electorate of Hess castle, which would later become Prussia. And is now Germany his father was rabbi Samuel Levi. Joseph at and he was the third of four children when the young Israel was about sixteen his father died, and he was sent to live with an uncle in girton, Germany has ran a Bank and the plan was for Israel to train their to enter the finance industry at about the same time, physicist and mathematician, Carl Friedrich Gauss was also in girton experimenting with electrical signals, telegraph technology. It is not entirely clear how these two meant Israel would have been running errands and making deliveries for his uncle. So it's possible that he delivered something to go. And they struck up acquaintance regardless though, Israel was fascinated by these experiments, which started in eighteen thirty in eighteen thirty three Gauss successfully Senta message over wire from his lab to an observatory mile away and eighteen forty one when he was about twenty five Israel started going by new name, which was Julius. It was probably after his birth month of July and in the. Eighteen forty's. He also left the world of banking and started working at a publishing house in Berlin called Reuters publishing company in those same years..

Paul Julius Reuter Israel Twitter Rosemary Moscow Tracy Wilson girton Carl Friedrich Gauss Reuters Joseph Germany Hess castle Paulie Witter rabbi Samuel Levi Prussia Berlin physicist USA
Meet Chad Steele, aka the guy behind Tom Brady, Peyton Manning and Ray Lewis at Super Bowl

The Adam Schefter Podcast

03:26 min | 1 year ago

Meet Chad Steele, aka the guy behind Tom Brady, Peyton Manning and Ray Lewis at Super Bowl

"Know, watching the TV Sunday night. And once again, I see the ravens vice president of public relations front and center in the center of the football universe again. And I said we have to get Chad on this week's Adam Schefter podcast. He must be on honored. Well, I mean, it's incredible. What has happened for those of you who are now listening basically CHAD'S job during the year is to work with the Baltimore Ravens? But Super Bowl week. He becomes the media liaison for are you signed to a player or a team. Fair. So during the week there are a number of us that are there to help league out with credentialing radio row know kinda point media in the right direction opening night that Monday night were assigned to a player. I had Tom Brady on Monday night. And then we're time to a player after the which again I had Brady. So it's it's it's flit up between between people. I just so happened to have I think is, sir. Certified time I've had Tom when when they've been in there. So we're we're we're kind of developing a little bond and you had Tom three or four times yet Peyton Manning after the Broncos won the Super Bowl Ray Lewis after the ravens won the Super Bowl. It seems like you always have the star attraction. How does that happen? You know, I don't know where they're like. I said they invite a few of us down kind of some of the heads of department from around the league to help out all week. And then we have some young kids some interns that are looking for jobs, and some some younger systems coordinators that are that are looking to expand the horizons a little bit and down there for the week. And then we just we get the game assignments. And I think the first one that I had when I worked at Super Bowl outside of of the ravens when was was Russell Wilson in in New Jersey a few years ago. And you know, I got a quarterback. I think maybe my side helps you know, that I'm a bigger guy, and I can get out there and kinda kinda move the people through but just ever since. Then I've I've had quarterbacks I think I think six along right now, the only the only loss at what I had I had cast year when the when the eagles beat them, but I pretty decent record. So there you are on Sunday night. The patriots win the Super Bowl. Tom Brady is stormed by the media, Tracy Rolston of CBS is trying to get in to get that interview from your perspective. And you were the only one that appeared in that show with Tracy in Tom, it was Tracy Wilson, Tom Brady, and Chad steal. What was that scrum? Like for you. You know, I it's just it's interesting because Tom pulled in a hundred directions, and you know, we're talk to CBS CBS wanted to try to get the interview pretty quickly. But as soon as you're out there, you're Tom celebrating a little bit than teammates coming up, then have coaches coming up, and he wants to make sure he's very good about making sure he gives respect to the to the opposing team. So they wanna make sure saw Jared golf, and there were a couple of other players that want to see and it's kinda hey, Tom over here can Tom over here. And we're like, hey, Tom, you know, got Tracy right here. Okay. Hold on. I just wanna see this guy. And then as soon as that's done. Somebody else comes up somebody else comes up, but he's he's kinda pulled in a million directions. And we're just saying that hey, trace you just just hang tight hang with us. We'll we'll we'll get them there.

Tom Brady Baltimore Ravens Chad Steal Broncos Ravens CBS Tracy Adam Schefter Vice President Of Public Relat Tracy Rolston Football Peyton Manning Russell Wilson Patriots Tracy Wilson Ray Lewis New Jersey Eagles Chad
"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Hello and welcome to the podcast, I'm Tracy Wilson. And I'm fry earlier this year we finished up our west coast tour and our last stop. There was in San Francisco whenever we have a break on the tour. We have kind of a choice of where do we want to spend our night off in the place where we just finished a show or the place where we're doing the next show. And I decided since I had never been to San Francisco to choose the one where we were doing the next show. I spent my night off there. And while I was in San Francisco, I stumbled across the San Francisco cable car museum one hundred percent by happenstance and right in the front of the museum. I was immediately captivated by a plaque dedicated to someone who was known as the cable car lady cable cars, of course, are an iconic part of San Francisco, and San Francisco's cable cars are the last working system of their kind in the world. The reason they haven't been completely replaced by more modern modes of transportation is largely because of the. Advocacy of women, and in particular, the advocacy of Fidel Klusman who is the person who became known as the cable car lady Spain established what would become the city of San Francisco in September of seventeen seventy six initially as a military post a mission commonly known as museum DeLores opened that October. It's more. Formal name is missile San Francisco cease and lake the city itself it was named for Saint Francis of Assisi the mission's purpose was to Christian is the native population. And it was built using conscripted. Labour from northern California's native peoples the area became part of Mexico after the Mexican war of independence, which ended in eighteen twenty one. But it was eighteen thirty five before there was an actual European settlement in the area beyond that mission and military post that settlement was the village of yearbook Buena, an eighteen forty six eleven years after your Buena was established Capt. In John Montgomery, captured it for the United States during the Mexican American war on thirtieth eighteen forty seven. It was renamed. San francisco. San Francisco became part of the United States along with the rest of California under the terms of the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, which ended that war. I San Francisco's population was quite small by the end of the Mexican American war. There were about five hundred people including Europeans, Africans native Americans and Pacific islanders. But after the gold rush started in eighteen forty nine the population of San Francisco boomed, we talked about this a little bit in our Levi Strauss episode, and suddenly tens of thousands of people were flocking to the city hoping to strike it rich or to make lots of money off of the people who were hoping to strike, it rich, the city grew incredibly rapidly and by eighteen seventy its population was about a hundred and fifty thousand people and what if it's ongoing challenges was transportation and. Shipping. If you have never been to San Francisco, it is very very hilly. Even if you've seen footage of the city in movies or on TV, the steepness of some of the hills can be really incredibly startling when you experience them for the first time in person, it was a huge huge challenge to safely move people and cargo up and down all these hills. Especially in the winter when the city could be very damp, and all of this was also compounded by the fact that the terrain was very sandy Andrew Smith Haliti gets the credit for coming up with San Francisco's famous solution to this problem Halliday was born Andrew Smith and was named after his father, and he took the name Halliday later on in honor of his uncle and godfather, so Andrew Smith, the father and Andrew Smith Haliti the son had immigrated to the United States from the UK during the goldrush, although Smith returned home in eighteen fifty three holiday had been a tinkerer since he was a boy and Smith. Was an engineer and inventor and some of Smith's patents were wire rope, something that Halliday had worked with him on and which other inventors had been refining and developing as well as the name suggests wire rope was like hemp and rope, but it was made with wire..

San Francisco Andrew Smith Andrew Smith Haliti United States Tracy Wilson California Halliday Buena Fidel Klusman Saint Francis of Assisi Levi Strauss Spain engineer Mexico DeLores Guadalupe Hidalgo John Montgomery UK
"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:36 min | 2 years ago

"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Podcast. I'm Holly fry and I'm Tracy Wilson. And we were recently lucky enough to be the guest of the national World War Two museum in New Orleans, Louisiana and the museum asked us if we would do show there about the USO and Bob hope's work with the organization to run parallel to an exhibit that they are currently running about Bob Hope called so ready for the laughter. The legacy of Bob Hope and that exhibit is gonna run until February tenth of twenty nineteen. The museum also has its own podcast about film and World War Two history called service on celluloid. We'll talk a little bit more about that at the end of the show. Yeah. I I think Tracy, and I would both say that it can't be overstated. How much we absolutely loved our time in New Orleans. Absolutely. And I spent the day that we did our show. I spent basically all of the time I had of illegal at the museum, and it was a great experience that facilities amazing. It is huge. It is. Growing. They put so much incredible care and love into every exhibit. And they have just some amazing pieces that you will not find anywhere else. And the city of courses in utter delight I grew up on the Florida, panhandle. So I spent a lot of time there. It was Tracy's first time there, it was very fun for you to release the the city for the first time. And similarly, my husband has been through there with me before but not really for an extended period of time. So it was great to to watch him, and my other friends really explore it for the first time I said during one of the the breaks during our show that we don't really put on the podcast that I have not felt so relaxed and happy in probably five years. The city is just beautiful, and it has this great culture and amazing food and a wonderful art scene, and there's just something really really magical about New Orleans. So if you've not been there highly encourage it. Yeah. Hopefully, you too will feel happy and relaxed in all new ways. But what we were going to do. Now is jump into the live show that we did. There were two museum. We hope you enjoy. Hello and welcome to the podcast. I'm holly. And I'm Tracy Wilson. And the USO has of course, been a huge part of keeping the military going since its inception and legendary performer Bob Hope is closely tied to USO history. So they very kindly the world. We're t- museum asked us. Come and talk about these things, which we jumped at the chance to do. Absolutely. Because one I we both are into history to leveled Hollywood three it's kind of an important story that doesn't always get talked about..

Tracy Wilson Bob Hope New Orleans USO t- museum Holly fry Louisiana Hollywood Florida five years panhandle
"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Hello and welcome to the podcast, I'm Tracy Wilson. And I'm Holly fry I know I've said this number of times lately it is a byproduct of working on a daily podcast. But today's episode has been on my list of to do's for a really long time. And we're coming up on its eightieth anniversary, which moved it up to the top of the list. Crystal knocks or the night of the broken glass took place on November ninth and tenth of nineteen thirty eight and we've been tuned it in some previous episodes about the holocaust and about World War Two, and it has also come up as a listener request. This was a massive act of antisemitic violence, and it was named for the shards of glass that were left littering the streets and more than a thousand cities and towns and the German Reich, Nazis burned, hundreds of synagogues vandalized and looted thousands of homes and businesses raped and murdered people and made about thirty thousand arrests mostly of Jewish men and those men were then sent to concentration camps. I don't think I've ever. Given a warning the strong on the show before. But this is just not an episode for young children. We're going to be discussing everything that I just said in a lot more detail. And then in a third part of this episode after the second ad break. We are going to be discussing a rape investigation that had horrifying elements on his own. I did want to make one on language before we start over the years, we've gotten a couple of notes from listeners who've told us that they don't prefer the use of the word shoe because of its history as an anti-semitic slur. But then we've also heard from other listeners that avoiding the word has its own baggage because it suggests that there's something wrong with being Jewish or that we're uncomfortable with it. Plus, it means that adherence to all the other religions can be referenced with nouns, like, Christians and Muslims and Sikhs Buddhists and Jews are the only ones that are only allowed the adjective of Jewish. So these listeners have encouraged us to use the word, it is really not possible for us to reconcile these two points of view, but I did want to acknowledge that that's a discussion that happy. Before we get into this episode. And if oaks are wondering about the timing of this episode, given the shooting at the tree of life synagogue on October twenty seventh. We scheduled this episode to come out today back in August. And it was researched and written before the shooting happened, but is being recorded in the shootings immediate aftermath. So to get into the background. We talked a lot about Adolf Hitler's rise to power in our previous episode on the night of the long knives. So we are not going to repeat all of that today..

Tracy Wilson Holly fry Adolf Hitler rape Crystal
"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Hello and welcome to the past i'm tracy wilson i'm ali fry if you if you had a baby in like the last sixty years or been present when somebody else had a baby or maybe even just watched a tv show in which babies were born probably heard people talking about africa scores yeah but i never gave it much thought not being particularly a baby person so yeah i i thought this was an acronym and while somebody did rework the parts of that are score so that it matched up with the letters of her name in about nineteen sixty two the score itself is from earlier than that and it's the work of dr virginia app car who really broke new ground in the fields of obstetrics and anesthesiology as well as other fields in the middle of the twentieth century today the app gar score is really part of the standard of care for new for newborn babies in much of the world and it's totally to the credit of this one particular doctor and this one particular dr virginia up gar was born in westfield new jersey on june seventh of nineteen oh nine her father was an insurance executive who was fond of science and wasn't amateur astronomer and she also had a brother who died of tuberculosis at a very young age so it's possible that both of these things influenced her decision to become a doctor but regardless that decision was made before she even got out of high school to that end she went to mount holyoke college where she studied zoology in addition to being an excellent student in that program she worked several part time jobs to make ends meet then she also played the cello and the violin in the orchestra and acted and wrote for the college newspaper and played on seven different sports teams she sounds like a medical school version of leslie nope yes that's a great description her family she described her family at one point as people who never sat still and that's she seems to have been constantly doing her whole life she graduated in nineteen twenty nine and she started medical school at the columbia university college of physicians insurgents that same year there were ninety people in her class and she was one of only nine women she scraped together enough money to stay in school in spite of the great depression and she graduated near the top of her class in nineteen thirty three so she really wanted to become a surgeon and she was accepted into a surgical internship at presbyterian hospital which is now new york presbyterian hospital columbia university medical center she did really well in her first year of this residency but doctor allen whipple who was the chair of the surgical department encouraged her to change specialties to anesthesiology he was concerned that she would not be able to make a profitable career as a surgeon especially given the economic climate at the time was still in the wake of the great depression he also basically had other plans for her he wanted her to study anesthesiology and then come back to press not in hospital to help start a teaching program for future anesthesiologists there were lots of reasons for dr garcia change specialties it was definitely difficult for women to be respected as surgeons at this point and there were lots of train surgeons so competition for jobs was really stiff and dr apter would have had to stand out even more because of her gender doctor whipple had seen his other female surgical students really have trouble getting hired a surgeons at all and dr app gar had graduated from medical school in debt so taking on a specialty in which she would probably have trouble finding a job was a really risky proposition at the same time by by becoming an anesthesiologist instead of a surgeon she was really setting out to pursue a specialty that did not even really exist yet as recently as nineteen eleven the american medical association had even rejected a request to start an anesthesiologist section for its members so while dr gar essentially had a job waiting for her after she was done with our study of anesthesiology it was going to be a tough one because it was in a specialty that was not regarded as a specialty so let's talk about why that was for a moment for most of.

tracy wilson sixty years
"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Podcast i'm tracy wilson and i highly fried we're coming up on the one hundred anniversary of one of the worst trade wrecks in united states history if not the worst train wreck in us history sometimes you will see it listed as the worst train wreck ever that is wrong that is definitely not true it really pales in comparison to some of the world's deadliest rex so for example in one thousand nine seventeen there was a train carrying french soldiers that derailed in france and then caught fire and more than six hundred people died trains are a lot safer now than they were one hundred years ago but we still will have train incidents with huge fatality numbers a lot of times they're things that happen during natural disasters so a train in sri lanka was hit by the two thousand four indian ocean soon nami and that killed more than a thousand people so by comparison the great train wreck of nineteen eighteen was a lot smaller than any of that and more than one hundred people died that was a lot for the time and even though it's usually noted as the worst train wreck in american history it was also kind of a run of the mill accident so the death toll was large but the circumstances that led to the accident were typical so we're going to start out today with a look at why the railroad industry was so dangerous at that time before we get into the actual wreck so as tracy just indicated in the early days of the railroad industry in the united states trains were extremely dangerous there were no standards for reporting injuries and deaths so the numbers about exactly how dangerous are a little bit scattered but in general hundreds of people died and thousands were injured in connection to the railroad every single year between eighteen eighty two and eighteen ninety two the year with the fewest deaths was eighteen eighty five during which three hundred seven people were killed eighteen ninety was the worst eight hundred six deaths happened that year.

tracy wilson us france sri lanka one hundred years mill
"tracy wilson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"tracy wilson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Others even snuck into other movie house party three was also playing day those who stayed in theater was shifted several times by the other patrons and also in ayrshire in chaperone we one of them always told them to be quiet they reportedly bombarded him with popcorn badoer call a scene where the young jewish girl is talking to the german soldiers if any laws one was a senior when you on the field trip now he teaches special education the jewish property in the sienese talking about was the forming on a construction project they were building a concentration camp and the way they were building it was incorrect she was going to cave in the foundation has to be turned down and report if not so she was expressing that to them the general or the guy in charge there that'd be refined in the film you know looked at her looked at his constituents what then he told them the shooter and i remember i heard somebody says oh my god he's not gonna shooter this is tanzania they wanted the kids that are loud and how was thinking the same thing in my head i say he's not gonna shoot this woman she's just trying to try to let them know that they're doing something incorrectly i'm only trying to do by charge he's bombing construction arguments with these people simply pulled out that's when i remember a lot of students are like oh you know oh my god oh charlotte whoa tracy wilson back then where we say you know or man that was crazy or one of the cast of my kids we don't know who actually said five words that would come to define this incident.

ayrshire tanzania tracy wilson
"tracy wilson" Discussed on This American Life

This American Life

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"tracy wilson" Discussed on This American Life

"The foundation has to be toned down and report if not so she was expressing that to them the general or the guy in charge there that'd be refines in the film you know looked at her looked at his constituents until chef in then he told them the shooter and i remember i heard somebody says oh my god he's not gonna shoot her this is tanzania that one of the kids that are loud and i was thinking the same thing in my head i say he's not gonna shoot this woman she's just trying to try to let them know that they're doing something incorrectly only by charge construction let's go into heaven with these people in garson p pulled out his gun in charlotte that's when i remember a lot of students rely oh you know oh my shroud her whoa tracy wilson back then what we say that you know or man that was crazy or one of the casselman kids we don't know who actually said five words that would come to define this incident oh man that was cold but he probably said it is oh man that was cold he said it really loud i believe he's like oh man i was cold and just quickly there was something else about the scene the way the actress fell after she was shot she bounces abruptly up and down again into the snow wickson natural her body was very involved by okay that's the bit but as we would say nowadays extra and that's when i recall the giggle shallow say some kids in the theater laughing while.

tanzania charlotte tracy wilson garson
"tracy wilson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"tracy wilson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To go told them to be quiet reportedly bombarded with popcorn i do recall a scene where the young jewish girl is talking to the german soldiers if annualize one was a senior when you on the field trip now he teaches special education the jewish woman in the sienese talking about was the forming on a construction project they were building a concentration camp and the way they were building it was incorrect she said no one's going to cave in the entire foundation has to be torn down and report if not so she was expressing that to them the general or the guy charge there abby refines in the film you know looked at her looked his constituents what then he told them the shooter and i remember i heard somebody says oh my god he's not gonna shooter this is tanzania in one of the kids that are loud and i was thinking the same thing in my head i he's not gonna shoot this woman she's just trying to try to let them know that they're doing something incorrectly i'm only trying to do of construction arguments that these people he pulled out that's when i remember a lot of students rely oh you know oh my god oh shouted whoa tracy wilson back then when we say dame you know or man that was crazy or one of the castle kids we don't know who actually said five words that would come to define this incident.

tanzania tracy wilson
"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Hello and welcome to the podcast i'm totally and i'm tracy wilson and tracy are you watching or did you watch true detective i did not you still can but thanks to its popularity as you heard it actually crashed hbo go on its finale night i did hear that so many people were trying to watch it many people have found a renewed or perhaps a new interest in the writing of robert w chambers because of a book of short stories that he wrote in the late eighteen hundreds which was called the king in yellow in this book is referenced throughout the season one story arc of true detective with references to the yellow king and the wearing masks in the city of karkoszka an intern chambers influenced a whole subgenre of writers of socalled weird fiction including people like hp lovecraft definitely weird well it's actually called weird fiction i know just me going that's weird i'm just saying and i love weird fiction so but influencing chambers so going back before the work of chambers was actually a man who has been on my list for a long time so now seems like the perfect point to focus on him since true detective pointed at all of this work so much recently and all of those mentions of karkoszka intrude detective that come up that name actually shows up in chambers work but it was borrowed from the man we're gonna talk about today who is amber beers who i mentioned it in a short story which was called an inhabitant of karkoszka and that was first published in eighteen ninety one and beer is a really fascinating character he was a soldier he was a journalist he was an editor he was sending of a philosopher he was a cynic he was a very complicated man with an unwavering moral code in his life experiences he touched so many things that are historically significant in his time and much of it was fantastic much of it was horrific and it all sort of informed his writing.

tracy wilson robert w chambers karkoszka editor intern
"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Go to brooklyn i don't think so is it the l train i don't remember more than i d man i miss the old i guess they still have some but the old red like the seven train remember those old red trains that look like trains they didn't look like subways they look like regular locomotives to me i like my subways to look like subways trains should look like trains smell like poop gum apparently in new york the gum is so bad and some that you can lose your shoe i can see that he actually get mired in the gum yeah you feels no give up your seat for the ladies that's what i got a big yeah for sure yeah could go and chuck that's fine ending learn more about subway etiquette and tunnel boring machine and the covenant that you can type in subways as you beat a y s into the search bar house dot com and it'll bring this fine article by tracy wilson and i said search far it's time for listening this is an anniversary of to to young people in love okay we had something to do with that okay guys have never been before i just thought it would be appropriate seeing as my boyfriend and i are celebrating our three year anniversary is partly due to you guys a few years back nathan was trying and failing to win over my heart and then he began striking up conversations about the weirdest things like abandoned cities what pressure and robots.

new york tracy wilson nathan three year
"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Hello and welcome to the podcast i'm tracy wilson and i'm holly fry so back in two thousand sixteen and also as our most recent saturday classic we did an episode on the easter rising that was an armed rebellion that struck ireland in nineteen sixteen and in that episode we made a couple of brief mentions of constants marquette which and i made an aside that she was one of the most fascinating characters that i learned about while researching that episode and that if i had found out about her earlier the episode might have been all about her about the easter rising in general so she's been on my shortlist ever since then which probably gives you a sense of how long my shortlist is since that was two years ago and we are just now getting around to it we've also gotten a few requests for show on her recently so i thought it was finally time for her to make it up to the top of that list there was a lot of conflict in ireland during this period of history and constants markovits was involved in a lot of it so we're not going to get back into the details of the easter rising again that is why we had it as our most recent saturday classic for maybe folks who are newer to the show or don't really remember so that is easy to find in the archive for that part of the story but there's a lot more to talk about so we're not going to get into the easter rising so much today constants markevic was born constance georgina gorebooth on february fourth eighteen.

tracy wilson holly fry ireland georgina gorebooth markevic two years
"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"tracy wilson" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Between two winch half an inch and two inches long they're browner black usually yet and that link is minus their antenna this just their bodies coming in to end their heads point downward like as tracy wilson who wrote the article points out almost as if they're built for ramming yeah or two searching for stuff units another way to look at it the males are the ones that have wings females may have wings but they're vestige you'll wings can't fly with them uh males can fly not very well though which makes them even more horrific when nepal medal buga big one's flying at your face because he no he has no control right exactly yeah oh man is sort of like the sucato like there i don't think they're win wings were made for flying but if they jump off of something high they can help him a little bit uh glide perhaps in not like hit the ground is hard um short distances basically and there are there insects which means that they have three main body regions the head the thorax in the abdomen they haven't access skeleton that they moult as they grow and they mole a number of times depending on the cockroach species yes over the course of a couple of weeks or over the course of a couple of years in their life spans also are um uh in step with that moulting schedule yes um but the iccat gradual multiple times over its life before becomes an adult yes and when they moult um it's the same thing is when they're born they're gonna look white men and um that's probably cannot repeal can of never seen a malta cockroach like a skinless cockroaches leica the lady in hell raiser before a fully gets oliver skin right uh and uh they're they're pretty susceptible to injury and death obviously when the when the after they melted before bursa con which is a hormone makes their exo skeleton harden dark once again than they have their little armor um which is no match for flip flop by.

tracy wilson bursa con nepal malta oliver two inches
"tracy wilson" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"tracy wilson" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"That defense holy crap i you know i i would like to think that i can say that i could do it i could hand the ball off as yet had enough to get hit right i got to tell you right now know there were guys there were guys run on what openness you go i know it was it was overthrown guys under they lose me was discussed at when when you watch you know went on the other side when jackson those blitzing tara tell her this is you know he he can't see worries thrown it and what does he do he such a good advocate that he starts run on whether it as well there was also he saw two quarterbacks playing in tough conditions discounting the conditions because the win the call you was a little bit cooler than was fifty seven degrees of at the wind it was like twenty seven mile 2030 mile an hour winds so i i i understand part of that you know i played the the gas why now but boy i'll tell you what would you get the iaps in your throwing like he was throwing of like bordeaux's you like oh my god now it's hard do you think that cbs or anybody over there was produced in that game was afraid to talk to jaylen ramsey at the end of the game because he's a little bit of a loose cannon because after that game the one guy i want to hear from was ramsey after that pick up whiteboards and you ended up the book whose tracy wilson of blake sucked and i was thinking maybe thick someone's like you know what jaylen ramsey little bit on the crazy side let's go with the safe route employee bortles because we know he's not going to say anything it's going to goes on trial so i know there's a discussion with the pr people teams that win so you get the guys that you want to get in usually it is the quarterback because the quarterback drew brees matt ryan there are the guys at you know kinda there that they're the face of the franchise they're the ones that you.

jackson cbs tracy wilson blake brees jaylen ramsey fifty seven degrees