19 Burst results for "Tracy Mcmillan"

"tracy mcmillan" Discussed on Our Body Politic

Our Body Politic

03:16 min | Last month

"tracy mcmillan" Discussed on Our Body Politic

"And not only that promoted as a symbol of like. She's the first black woman to wear this colonial diamond with mike supposed to be oppressed. He's that like did the ira she. Yep oh my god ruined sunk in place. Yeah so i. I just like we are lost at. This is progress looks like like celebrities in politics and particularly like white celebrities black celebrities at this weird dance between like social justice and like capitalism right like when jaycee partners with the nfl. That still blackballing colin kaepernick. I'm i know for it. Let's critique art but celebrity stand culture. russia is really. I think it's all of our detriments. And i think that coupled with the fact that we do have a lot of non critics problems i want to switch gears a little bit more into that critical lane what it means to critique black artists. Here's author professor and macarthur fellow. Dr tracy mcmillan cottam discussing the topic with the route. I think being a black critic is about in a way that being a white critic is not your invested in the are the art matters to you even if like it. That's what our kinship ties. We want the art that comes from our people right to be at least interesting. I always have to be good but it has to be interesting. And i think has to be Faithful to black people's lives in experiences in a way And i've always thought that. That's what distinguishes black critics From white critics. We care. well you know. I have a lot of different thoughts about this. So for example. I interviewed the artists cara walker for npr many years ago and went to a big exhibit. She had at the closing domino sugar factory in new york. And i gotta poster from that and a black female colleague walked into my office and basically it was like this is. What's wrong with black people. you know. Like the hyper sexualization. Whatever but there's i. I love her art at but i also understand why some people don't but i. I'm curious i'm going to start with you. Karen what do you think of this idea of how to see the role of the critic in a cultural context. Even when you don't like the art. I mean i think very often. Because we're in a white dominated male dominated society there is this instinct to want to promote and protect black expression at all costs is like to critique is seen is. You're airing our dirty laundry or something or or rear. We're playing the white man's game by not standing together in all respects in all aspects. And even when. I wrote the beyond say piece. I got pushback on social media site. Of course they're gonna tear the black woman down and he's black women to do that and i'm like no it's precisely because i want better for our people than's be certain symbols that Wearing a colonial diamond represents love like you deserve better. And i think perhaps you know similar to what's going on with dacia pal. It's like oh you know people are going to him..

Dr tracy mcmillan cottam colin kaepernick cara walker domino sugar factory nfl mike russia npr Karen new york
"tracy mcmillan" Discussed on Relationship Advice

Relationship Advice

06:08 min | 3 months ago

"tracy mcmillan" Discussed on Relationship Advice

"Then you'll catch more. You know learning these things is a big old process and like i said it's life work. It's not like a day or a month or a workshop. Although all those things can add up but It's it's big work. It's really the work we're here to do. Honestly partnership is what we're here for in many respects strum that secure base that you go out and create an world you know exactly in. You're exactly right. it's a process. It's so cliche but it's not the destination it's the journey because there is no jersey nation in your personal experience in in through your work. Are there any particular resources or books on attachment in understanding our attachment style. Area that you can. And here's what. I i love the dianne poole. Heller buck diane buhlheller I forget what it's called just going to give you. I love stand attacking book wired for love. I love dr sue. Johnson's work Hold me tight all those three books. Just those three books are going to be like. Okay got it you know. That's a good beginning. You know and then you can go deep and there's a lot of research being done by on this right now you know This is a whole area relationships sciences. Really a new field. In terms of really quantifying what makes relationships work and what makes relationships fail this. Is you know john gotten john. Goblin workers amazing. Read anybody's written. He's kind of the first and now. There are other people. Dr sue johnson's doing research. There's a lot out there but it's just a pretty new area of study mostly people just you know. Talk to their best friend. Did whatever their best friend said or whatever their mom said you know and it's like it was all anecdotal yay. We love being able to have people like yourself to talk about this relationship science in past episodes because yeah it's really the most important work of our life is is working on ourselves and doing that through the lens of relationships as well in the more tools. We can have the better because we're not born with these tools. Were still learning these tools as an eastern exactly as a species in i was going to layer on top of that not to mention. We're getting things thrown in the gears like social media dating apps that we definitely did not evolve with so yes. We have the better tracy. Thank you so much for sharing some of your personal story in. It's going to be really valuable for our listeners. To apply to their own selves in their own relationships before we wrap up. Can you tell our listeners where they can find you online if you wanna tell them a little bit about the new season of family or fiance and then we'll say goodbye walter interested in this stuff. You can follow me on at tracy mcmillan on instagram and facebook and twitter And of course you can watch family or fiance. Which is we deal with these kinds of issues every single week. Saturday nights on own at ten o'clock eastern and civic and nine o'clock central or you can stream it undiscovered plus much anytime you want to catch up on passed on the past season. Yeah to me this is just. This is the most important thing you can do. The best work you can do and it just it has every single thing to do with the quality of your life your relationships so and it affects every area that work and family all. It's all really the same thing you know and it starts at the relationship. We're having with their south. Thank you so much. Tracy the links to the show in to find you online. We'll be in our show notes in on our website. I do podcast dot com and thanks for taking the time to come on the show. All right thanks a lot take care as always thank you guys so much for tuning into today's episode as always all the links to the guest as well as any of their recommendations will be in the show notes page. You can find the link to that in the episode description or by going to. I do podcasts. Dot com. Click on the podcast tab up at the top and you will have access to all the episodes that we've ever done there are over three hundred of them And while you're on our website if you haven't checked out our free fourteen day happy couple challenge. We really hope you do a free email challenge that we send to you. It's fourteen days of fun. Easy doable challenges to help. Strengthen and improve your relationship and if you're looking for something that provides a little more help with working on your relationship whether it's improving intimacy or communication with their partner or just bringing the spark back we would love for you guys to check out. Our online course spark my relationship. We're offering one hundred dollars off to all of our listeners. If you go to spark my relationship dot com for slash unlock. We worked with over fifteen psychologists and therapists to create the real life tools and strategies that they are teaching their clients. So we wanted to give them to you. It's a self paced online course that can be done in as little as a month or up to three months. You can really decide how much or how little you want to do with your partner or maybe just yourself so we hope you guys check that out. It's spark my relationship dot com forward slash. Unlock have a great day..

dianne poole diane buhlheller dr sue Dr sue johnson tracy mcmillan Heller john jersey Johnson instagram walter Tracy twitter facebook
"tracy mcmillan" Discussed on Relationship Advice

Relationship Advice

02:21 min | 3 months ago

"tracy mcmillan" Discussed on Relationship Advice

"Today. We're going to talk about the impact of family dynamics on our relationships and obviously this is a big one and one that we all bring with us. We come from families. We get into relationships in that plays a huge role in how we relate. So let's start by having you tell our listeners. One of the bigger things you see in people's relationships as it relates to their childhood and their origin family in how that can impact their present. Day romantic relationships. Well the very first thing. I think that happens. Is that our issues. In our present day relationships usually originate in our families. So one of the things that tell mazing about family or fiance is that we bring the cause and the fact into the same house and any time you get multigenerational like it's like multigenerational therapy. Essentially where both sides benefit from bringing those two things into the same place for three days because invariably whatever's going on with the parent. Okay so the thing about family or say there's really two different ways things happen sometimes. There's a problem in the cup holder. The family sees the couples not dealing with. And sometimes there's a problem in the family or with one of the parents and one of the partners that needs to get resolved right so it can either be the problems in the family. The problems in the couple either way this process of bringing families and couples together invariably surfaces. Whatever is going on so on a lotta times of people like to do is way they get along in their families or in their partnerships is to just keep the beach ball underwater. Put it. they just don't say what they really think whatever's the scariest thing they can say they're not going to say it. They're not going to go to the heart of the matter. They're just gonna pretend it's not happening. And that's how they're going to keep the peace and instead that doesn't really keep the peace keeps the

tracy mcmillan tracy huffington post Sarah tara marvel united states
The Impact of Family Dynamics on Relationships With Tracy McMillan

Relationship Advice

02:21 min | 3 months ago

The Impact of Family Dynamics on Relationships With Tracy McMillan

"Today. We're going to talk about the impact of family dynamics on our relationships and obviously this is a big one and one that we all bring with us. We come from families. We get into relationships in that plays a huge role in how we relate. So let's start by having you tell our listeners. One of the bigger things you see in people's relationships as it relates to their childhood and their origin family in how that can impact their present. Day romantic relationships. Well the very first thing. I think that happens. Is that our issues. In our present day relationships usually originate in our families. So one of the things that tell mazing about family or fiance is that we bring the cause and the fact into the same house and any time you get multigenerational like it's like multigenerational therapy. Essentially where both sides benefit from bringing those two things into the same place for three days because invariably whatever's going on with the parent. Okay so the thing about family or say there's really two different ways things happen sometimes. There's a problem in the cup holder. The family sees the couples not dealing with. And sometimes there's a problem in the family or with one of the parents and one of the partners that needs to get resolved right so it can either be the problems in the family. The problems in the couple either way this process of bringing families and couples together invariably surfaces. Whatever is going on so on a lotta times of people like to do is way they get along in their families or in their partnerships is to just keep the beach ball underwater. Put it. they just don't say what they really think whatever's the scariest thing they can say they're not going to say it. They're not going to go to the heart of the matter. They're just gonna pretend it's not happening. And that's how they're going to keep the peace and instead that doesn't really keep the peace keeps the

"tracy mcmillan" Discussed on Relationship Advice

Relationship Advice

01:58 min | 3 months ago

"tracy mcmillan" Discussed on Relationship Advice

"Guys thanks for tuning in hope. You're having a great day. Sarah is here but if you have not heard from past episodes she is fighting a terrible sore throat code something and she basically can't talk so she's here producing and that's why you'll be hearing only from me in today's show with tracy mcmillan and tracy is television writer. Relationship expert in author who's writing credits include madman good. Girls revolt marvel's runaways. In united states of tara she's written three books in a memoir and she really rose to fame. I guess you could call it in the relationship space when she had a viral blog uae. You're not married and for more than two years. Had article on the huffington post under the same title while you're not married. That was the most viewed article in the history of huffington post. She's also the host of a show on the network own family or fiance. You'll hear her reference that and we talk a little bit about that in today's show in dive into the impact of family dynamics on relationships and we talk a lot about attachment theory and tracy shares her personal journey of dealing with her attachment history and a lot of value. There and we really think tracy for getting personal because thing. It's always great to hear people's personal stories and no you're not alone in struggling in your relationship struggling in with yourself where all dealing with different things so thank you tracy for that and as always we appreciate you guys tuning in leaving us those five star reviews on itunes to help us to grow the podcast telling your friends and family. We really appreciate.

tracy mcmillan tracy huffington post Sarah tara marvel united states
"For Your Reconsideration" Week

Feedback with EarBuds

02:40 min | 1 year ago

"For Your Reconsideration" Week

"This week's theme is for your reconsideration. The curator is Donde from luminary. Here are the podcasts and episodes chosen by Yolanda. Monday's episode comes from metaphysical milkshake and is called. Can you honor indigenous faiths without being a jerk. It's thirty four minutes long in this episode. rainn Wilson Resin Ostlund have one question. How do we honor and embrace embrace indigenous faiths without becoming like Kevin Costner? How can we become more than dilettantes? With dream catchers Kevin Locke is an artist Hoop dancer musician musician. Educator and cultural ambassador for his Lakota an Amish on Beirut's he joined the pod to share what we can do to better understand our indigenous faith traditions and how out to see our spiritual heritage in all the land around us. Join the conversation using Hashtag. Metaphysical an email your thoughts to metaphysical milkshake at soul pancake. GEICO DOT COM. Tuesday's episode comes from on second thought with Trevor Noah and is called prison break. It's forty four minutes long in this episode. Trevor and David David discussed their ideas for improving. Prison then talk about alternatives to incarceration Danielle Sarid founder of common justice. Wednesday's episode comes from from under the skin with Russell brand and his called science capitalism. And God with Neil degrasse Tyson. It's one hundred twenty one minutes long. Here's the description. This week's guest on under the skin is the infamous astrophysicist Neil degrasse Tyson. He's pretty amazing. He was promoting his book letters from an astrophysicist but he was much more than and being a focused and dedicated educator I enjoyed talking to him. Thursday's episode comes from here to slay with Roxane gay and Tracy McMillan Cottam him and his called all. Your faves are problematic. It's fifty three minutes long this week on the show Tracy and Roxanne take on the Popeye's chicken sandwich and all of its glory as well as the problematic takes that have come along with it. Friday's episode comes from the seaward with Lena Dunham and Alison Bennett and is called Lady Rosemary. Aber door it's fifty three minutes long in this episode Rosemary. Obrador seemed to most like a shy awkward wallflower but underneath drab exterior lurked an appetite for Jules parties parties and larceny born into an unassuming middle-class English home rosemary secretly stole thousands of pounds to fund her glamorous identity as titled Aristocracy. That's Lady Lady Aberdeen to you. Lena analyst Cover Rosemary's wild parties outrageous schemes her ultimate downfall and discuss what it's like to feel unseen and unappreciated those are the podcast recommendations chosen by Yolanda for this week's theme for your reconsideration

Neil Degrasse Tyson Lady Rosemary Trevor Noah Yolanda Lady Lady Aberdeen Kevin Costner Cover Rosemary Lena Dunham Rainn Wilson Resin Kevin Locke Geico Beirut Tracy Mcmillan Danielle Sarid Obrador Russell Analyst Jules Roxane Gay David David
"tracy mcmillan" Discussed on Help! I Suck At Dating with Dean, Vanessa and Jared

Help! I Suck At Dating with Dean, Vanessa and Jared

06:44 min | 2 years ago

"tracy mcmillan" Discussed on Help! I Suck At Dating with Dean, Vanessa and Jared

"Help dating. We have a very special guest who is in studio with us right now. She is a television writer relationship. Expert and author of three books including including why. You're not married yet in her Ted. Talk the person you really need to marry has more than twelve million of us is Dr Tracy McMillan. We're GONNA call you doctor. anyways people do people in twitter says right there on the doctor. Jerry Tracy McMillan people into decided I was a back door Dublin weekend accept it. Somebody called me Doctor. I am Dr Dr Jared Haven Md.. On whatever you think. I practiced all right. We'll tracy thank you so much for coming in having me. I love being here of of course so Actually mark was expressing. Some of your views. before you came in which I think the audience would love to know more about one example. Apple is men are way more committed to relationships. Okay well okay. That's probably a little bit simplified oversimplified. So here's the thing what we do here help us. That's okay that's okay. So one of the things about for example women file for divorce seventy percent of the time Women are the people who file for divorce so you gotta wonder why is that I think part of the reason is that when women are unhappy marriage or relationship relationship because it kind of goes related their way more unhappy than when a man is unhappy in a marriage. 'cause like dudes can compartmentalize in ways that that women either cannot won't will not and also there's a lot of research about how when men are committed into the relationship and open to being what's called influenced by their wives. This would go for the girlfriends to the relationship is much happier beer now. It doesn't work. The other way will explanation that I think my my idea would be. That guys are speaking as a guy. So yeah this might be a little stubborn maybe a little down and so I think guys are just. I think also a lot of relationships that I've seen women are the ones who are not afraid to speak about their and where guy will. Just if something's wrong he'll just I handle it mentally compartmentalize in and not want to deal with women Well this is all research Women are the people who bring up problems in a relationship like much more than men do. So I think the thing about being influenced what it means to explain Dean please So basically to be influenced means you listen to your partner you taken what they say and you allow yourself to be changed by it as opposed to just just. Oh there's words raining down on my ears and nothing is going to change in my heart or in my behavior so when a man is open to being influenced by his wife or girlfriend they. Those couples report a much higher satisfaction in their relationships. Now when women are open to being influenced by man. It doesn't didn't change the outcome of the happiness quotient. It's really a guy thing because I think it's it works the other way when a guy is not open to being influenced influenced in his relationship. It makes a lot of unhappiness very unhappy partners influence. What do you mean influence on what like taking in what? They're hearing to be moved by what they're hearing to be willing to change. Learn but cover the Gambit Jackley Ackley all kinds of so few say okay for for example in one of my marriages because guys you know I've been married a lot right okay. How many times three times? Okay okay. So judging by your math I'm just going to numbers real quick. You filed for divorce twice out of those three times all three hours. Just I look on your hand. I didn't ring and so I think it's three times. The thing about it is is that even the third time he was like if he in but he would've stayed married the he was okay to have. Do we swear on this show okay. It's okay to have bus going on and be married. He was just like. Why do you have to believe it? And I'm like no because I don't do it's because maybe men sometimes are better at like distracting themselves too. Yeah that's to me the compartmentalizing thing he didn't it wasn't it's like it didn't mean he didn't want me it just meant he was very confused and wanted to be able to go to dinner with other women and maybe date them white. Hey guys like eating. I caught cheating. That's what I said to him but why he he more wanted to probably have something very nontraditional. Was this your third marriage Okay so was my husband or super super solid and I was the one who wasn't ready. So can I ask you why. Why keep getting married again? Well it's wasn't exactly exactly like that so the first time it was the eighties so I was nineteen. I love how people use that as an explanation bring so much joy to my heart. It was the the eighties. It's what happened it's true and I'm from Minnesota so it's absolutely what people were going to do right then it'd be like we're we've been together two and and a half years. We're getting married the next obvious. Step here Never mind I'm a teenager but whatever a lot of my high school friends are still married to their high school sweetheart so it can. I think they're miserable. Actually I think most of them are not miserable. It's good and sometimes this other friend of mine and we'll be really happy and like I think they are her is. Do you think there was a time when they were miserable. No I think we're about to step into another whole topic around attachment and secure attachment and I think securely attached people apple enjoy being in relationship. It's no big deal. And but they pair up very young and then they're out of the dating pool while so so your first marriage in the eighties. He had with the second the second second time I was pregnant and that was in the nineties so either thirteen years between my first and my second marriage so when you say why keep getting married. I'm like well. That was a long time in between and and then there was. My next marriage was in two thousand five so that was ninety. Six to two thousand five suck at math nine in years and then. How long were you in ten years ago since I was married? Wow you look great. Oh you missed the two thousand teens. You ought to hit every decade hit the twenty teens. I know well we're not done yet..

Dr Tracy McMillan Dr Dr Jared Haven Md twitter Dublin writer Apple mark Dean Minnesota partner
"tracy mcmillan" Discussed on Help! I Suck At Dating with Dean, Vanessa and Jared

Help! I Suck At Dating with Dean, Vanessa and Jared

06:44 min | 2 years ago

"tracy mcmillan" Discussed on Help! I Suck At Dating with Dean, Vanessa and Jared

"Help dating. We have a very special guest who is in studio with us right now. She is a television writer relationship. Expert and author of three books including including why. You're not married yet in her Ted. Talk the person you really need to marry has more than twelve million of us is Dr Tracy McMillan. We're GONNA call you doctor. anyways people do people in twitter says right there on the doctor. Jerry Tracy McMillan people into decided I was a back door Dublin weekend accept it. Somebody called me Doctor. I am Dr Dr Jared Haven Md.. On whatever you think. I practiced all right. We'll tracy thank you so much for coming in having me. I love being here of of course so Actually mark was expressing. Some of your views. before you came in which I think the audience would love to know more about one example. Apple is men are way more committed to relationships. Okay well okay. That's probably a little bit simplified oversimplified. So here's the thing what we do here help us. That's okay that's okay. So one of the things about for example women file for divorce seventy percent of the time Women are the people who file for divorce so you gotta wonder why is that I think part of the reason is that when women are unhappy marriage or relationship relationship because it kind of goes related their way more unhappy than when a man is unhappy in a marriage. 'cause like dudes can compartmentalize in ways that that women either cannot won't will not and also there's a lot of research about how when men are committed into the relationship and open to being what's called influenced by their wives. This would go for the girlfriends to the relationship is much happier beer now. It doesn't work. The other way will explanation that I think my my idea would be. That guys are speaking as a guy. So yeah this might be a little stubborn maybe a little down and so I think guys are just. I think also a lot of relationships that I've seen women are the ones who are not afraid to speak about their and where guy will. Just if something's wrong he'll just I handle it mentally compartmentalize in and not want to deal with women Well this is all research Women are the people who bring up problems in a relationship like much more than men do. So I think the thing about being influenced what it means to explain Dean please So basically to be influenced means you listen to your partner you taken what they say and you allow yourself to be changed by it as opposed to just just. Oh there's words raining down on my ears and nothing is going to change in my heart or in my behavior so when a man is open to being influenced by his wife or girlfriend they. Those couples report a much higher satisfaction in their relationships. Now when women are open to being influenced by man. It doesn't didn't change the outcome of the happiness quotient. It's really a guy thing because I think it's it works the other way when a guy is not open to being influenced influenced in his relationship. It makes a lot of unhappiness very unhappy partners influence. What do you mean influence on what like taking in what? They're hearing to be moved by what they're hearing to be willing to change. Learn but cover the Gambit Jackley Ackley all kinds of so few say okay for for example in one of my marriages because guys you know I've been married a lot right okay. How many times three times? Okay okay. So judging by your math I'm just going to numbers real quick. You filed for divorce twice out of those three times all three hours. Just I look on your hand. I didn't ring and so I think it's three times. The thing about it is is that even the third time he was like if he in but he would've stayed married the he was okay to have. Do we swear on this show okay. It's okay to have bus going on and be married. He was just like. Why do you have to believe it? And I'm like no because I don't do it's because maybe men sometimes are better at like distracting themselves too. Yeah that's to me the compartmentalizing thing he didn't it wasn't it's like it didn't mean he didn't want me it just meant he was very confused and wanted to be able to go to dinner with other women and maybe date them white. Hey guys like eating. I caught cheating. That's what I said to him but why he he more wanted to probably have something very nontraditional. Was this your third marriage Okay so was my husband or super super solid and I was the one who wasn't ready. So can I ask you why. Why keep getting married again? Well it's wasn't exactly exactly like that so the first time it was the eighties so I was nineteen. I love how people use that as an explanation bring so much joy to my heart. It was the the eighties. It's what happened it's true and I'm from Minnesota so it's absolutely what people were going to do right then it'd be like we're we've been together two and and a half years. We're getting married the next obvious. Step here Never mind I'm a teenager but whatever a lot of my high school friends are still married to their high school sweetheart so it can. I think they're miserable. Actually I think most of them are not miserable. It's good and sometimes this other friend of mine and we'll be really happy and like I think they are her is. Do you think there was a time when they were miserable. No I think we're about to step into another whole topic around attachment and secure attachment and I think securely attached people apple enjoy being in relationship. It's no big deal. And but they pair up very young and then they're out of the dating pool while so so your first marriage in the eighties. He had with the second the second second time I was pregnant and that was in the nineties so either thirteen years between my first and my second marriage so when you say why keep getting married. I'm like well. That was a long time in between and and then there was. My next marriage was in two thousand five so that was ninety. Six to two thousand five suck at math nine in years and then. How long were you in ten years ago since I was married? Wow you look great. Oh you missed the two thousand teens. You ought to hit every decade hit the twenty teens. I know well we're not done yet..

Dr Tracy McMillan Dr Dr Jared Haven Md twitter Dublin writer Apple mark Dean Minnesota partner
"tracy mcmillan" Discussed on Help! I Suck At Dating with Dean, Vanessa and Jared

Help! I Suck At Dating with Dean, Vanessa and Jared

03:18 min | 2 years ago

"tracy mcmillan" Discussed on Help! I Suck At Dating with Dean, Vanessa and Jared

"Until that story. If they didn't pay. The success is Louie newer. This story was going. I was going to end that story. Be Like yes and they gave him the probably dead now. But now they have a healthy little Bijon Named Rascal no but yeah. That would have been dark. Turn to to say the least by the way before we move on. I want to show Kendall this real quick so Kendall reach out to me after my surgery and gave me a bit of advice and I went out and my gosh eating it. Well you know the original plan was to read about one hundred pages of this book in the recommended to get the book. What's the name of this book will blow your mind? Journeys at the extremes extremes of science. It's an amazing amazing book. It definitely does blow your mind. Why did you recommend it? Because it's one of those things that kind of takes you away from your current situation. Shen what is it about about mind-blowing things right. Yeah okay well. Yeah which Bowie. It's basically about things happen in the real world that you can't. I can't believe happen. It's just so mind blowing so a lot about like Space Salat about just like how we see color just in general like things. We take for granted every day. Caller is that the kind of thing like what my blue is could be. Your red no heard this before. I don't necessarily believe in that. I feel feel like okay so our eyes are so limited in the sense that we can only see a certain amount of colors because of the Monaco that we have so. If you look at like shrimp they have twenty three cones so so they can see like two million thousand billion colors. Compared to how many years we can see So that kind of stuff was your mind so if somebody's colorblind do they only have two cones also the so. There's two different kinds of color blind. So there's one color become like a science podcast and scree knowledgeable those one kind of colorblind where you have a lack of cones and usually usually men are the ones that have that kind of colorblind symptom because they have like one less chromosome and women but then there's another one where your retina actually crosses Ossis who blends colors so those are the ones where you see people putting on those glasses and like. Oh Wow I can see colors so there's depends interest but there's been studies where they've injected like red cones into chimpanzees is and people people and the chimpanzee can actually start seeing like red so it's pretty fascinating to think about that and so I we'll villainous here. She's ready to go. We're GONNA bring her before we do that though. I do want to say the crazy thing to think about to your point you said Mantis. Shrimp have ten x Morricone's cones in their eyes than we do. It's like it's it's colors that we can't even fathom what they are looking at their rainbow is like a extra thick it's usually like variants of the same colors. I guess it's like the best. We can do like variant of the same color as we can see different kinds of Magenta different. So we'll talk about more of that. Maybe off air anyways next up we have Dr Tracy McMillan coming in and we are going to dive into a little bit about her and and what she has to offer for our suck army a lot of thoughts. Actually she has. She says that men are way more into relationships and women as of commitment. That's false. She says that you should have the baby before you get married. She's she's a pro arranged marriages. Oh interesting yes. She has a lot of interesting thought we needed to get into what she was on. Oprah I that's impressive as well super impressive point point is you're not gonNA WANNA miss.

Morricone Kendall Louie Dr Tracy McMillan Bowie Ossis Oprah
"tracy mcmillan" Discussed on Help! I Suck At Dating with Dean, Vanessa and Jared

Help! I Suck At Dating with Dean, Vanessa and Jared

03:18 min | 2 years ago

"tracy mcmillan" Discussed on Help! I Suck At Dating with Dean, Vanessa and Jared

"Until that story. If they didn't pay. The success is Louie newer. This story was going. I was going to end that story. Be Like yes and they gave him the probably dead now. But now they have a healthy little Bijon Named Rascal no but yeah. That would have been dark. Turn to to say the least by the way before we move on. I want to show Kendall this real quick so Kendall reach out to me after my surgery and gave me a bit of advice and I went out and my gosh eating it. Well you know the original plan was to read about one hundred pages of this book in the recommended to get the book. What's the name of this book will blow your mind? Journeys at the extremes extremes of science. It's an amazing amazing book. It definitely does blow your mind. Why did you recommend it? Because it's one of those things that kind of takes you away from your current situation. Shen what is it about about mind-blowing things right. Yeah okay well. Yeah which Bowie. It's basically about things happen in the real world that you can't. I can't believe happen. It's just so mind blowing so a lot about like Space Salat about just like how we see color just in general like things. We take for granted every day. Caller is that the kind of thing like what my blue is could be. Your red no heard this before. I don't necessarily believe in that. I feel feel like okay so our eyes are so limited in the sense that we can only see a certain amount of colors because of the Monaco that we have so. If you look at like shrimp they have twenty three cones so so they can see like two million thousand billion colors. Compared to how many years we can see So that kind of stuff was your mind so if somebody's colorblind do they only have two cones also the so. There's two different kinds of color blind. So there's one color become like a science podcast and scree knowledgeable those one kind of colorblind where you have a lack of cones and usually usually men are the ones that have that kind of colorblind symptom because they have like one less chromosome and women but then there's another one where your retina actually crosses Ossis who blends colors so those are the ones where you see people putting on those glasses and like. Oh Wow I can see colors so there's depends interest but there's been studies where they've injected like red cones into chimpanzees is and people people and the chimpanzee can actually start seeing like red so it's pretty fascinating to think about that and so I we'll villainous here. She's ready to go. We're GONNA bring her before we do that though. I do want to say the crazy thing to think about to your point you said Mantis. Shrimp have ten x Morricone's cones in their eyes than we do. It's like it's it's colors that we can't even fathom what they are looking at their rainbow is like a extra thick it's usually like variants of the same colors. I guess it's like the best. We can do like variant of the same color as we can see different kinds of Magenta different. So we'll talk about more of that. Maybe off air anyways next up we have Dr Tracy McMillan coming in and we are going to dive into a little bit about her and and what she has to offer for our suck army a lot of thoughts. Actually she has. She says that men are way more into relationships and women as of commitment. That's false. She says that you should have the baby before you get married. She's she's a pro arranged marriages. Oh interesting yes. She has a lot of interesting thought we needed to get into what she was on. Oprah I that's impressive as well super impressive point point is you're not gonNA WANNA miss.

Morricone Kendall Louie Dr Tracy McMillan Bowie Ossis Oprah
"tracy mcmillan" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

05:04 min | 3 years ago

"tracy mcmillan" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"You get your podcasts. This is on point a mega truck bardy. We're talking this hour with Tracy McMillan Cottam. She is a professor of sociology of Virginia Commonwealth university widely published writer columnist as well and many essays now appear in the debut essay collection, titled Fiqh and other essays and professor Cottam is with us today from Richmond Virginia with go and take another call here. Let's go to Jude who's calling from New Orleans. Judy you're on the air. Percents econom-. Are you today? I'm wonderful Jude. How are you? I'm good. I'm good. So my question is how have you been received given the topic that you are bringing up in Richmond, Virginia the? Capital of though, isn't it though? Yes, it is. I am an ex residence of them city, and I will say being a I guess nearly a lifelong southerner it is a different type of house, and I would say that the way that I was raised in Louisiana is a lot different then health as worthier due for a second for for those of us who aren't lifelong southerners when you say a play in the rule for all listeners here when you say, it's a different kind of type of stuff. What did you mean? Well, I felt very restricted. I felt like there were like I said rules that I was not privy to. You know, I I think, you know, New Orleans. Sort of is a place where it's very hospitable to all. And and you know, people, you know, you walk down the street. You can ask just about any stranger for directions, and you and you don't get strange looks. You don't, you know, there just isn't a sort of know, your place of you know, attitude, and, you know, I it was very strange, and and you know, it was weird to see a place that sort of clung to that southern Ness, but had this very boundary. You know, these these boundaries on and so here, you're sort of almost blowing open these like, okay? We talk about. Is worried about my health and wellbeing and I really receive. No. I know exactly what you mean. Like, jude. You know, I'm a southerner. Although in the book, I do admit my lifelong shame. I finally had to out myself. I was actually born in New York forgivable. I know listen, I had letters angry letters from people. Go in your whole thing has been a lot. I was like I get it. I do so sorry, but I was raised in the south by deep southerners, and I very much a child of the south, and I've lived all over the country actually enjoyed in deliberately lived in California. Did Boston for awhile in New York, Chicago, and I come back to the south. And I think Jude would probably understand this. There's nothing quite like being black and being embedded in the south and understanding this place, whether whether it is always good for us. There is some value in understanding the US south, and I'm not one who wants to write that off. But to Jude's point. I think that Virginia and Richmond is interest. It is it is the still sort of proud home of the former confederacy in the south the civil wars alive here in a way that has never been true for me anywhere else that I have lived in the south, and is still very tangible here, but you know, the sort of movement of the New South city that has been happening. There's been happening for the last thirty years or so it Lanta Charlotte North Carolina places that sort of want to embrace its history while critically while at the same time moving forward. I think there's some momentum of for that here in Richmond. It just happened here. I think later than it has a other large urban areas. But you know, there's a reason why ground myself and my work in the south, even when it's complicated as it is here in Richmond Virginia, I do think that's still a story about the black American experience that matters. I'm even as we turn our eye to how how diverse the black black culture is. And I talk in the book about a never want people to confuse my story of blackness in the US. As the story of blackness in the US. And so I'm always very clear to sort of ground..

Jude Richmond Virginia Richmond US Tracy McMillan Cottam New Orleans Virginia Commonwealth universi New York Virginia Judy professor of sociology professor Lanta Charlotte North Carolina writer Louisiana California Boston Chicago thirty years
"tracy mcmillan" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:56 min | 3 years ago

"tracy mcmillan" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"That's what I is for. It's the morning news podcasts from NPR the news. You need to take on the day in just about ten minutes. Listen to up first on the NPR one apple or wherever you get your podcasts. This is on point a mega truck bardy. We're talking this hour with Tracy McMillan Cottam. She is a professor of sociology of Virginia Commonwealth university widely published writer columnist as well and many essays now appear in the debut essay collection, titled Fiqh and other essays and professor Cottam is with us today from Richmond Virginia with go and take another call here. Let's go to Jude who's calling from New Orleans. Judy you're on the air. Percents econom-. Are you today? I'm wonderful Jude. How are you? I'm good. I'm good. So my question is how have you been received given the topic that you are bringing up in Richmond, Virginia the? Capital of though, isn't it though? Yes. It is. I am an ex residence of them city, and I will say being a I guess nearly a lifelong southerner it is a different type of house, and I would say that the way that I was raised in Louisiana is a lot different then health as worthier due for a second for for those of us who aren't lifelong southerners when you say a play in the rule for all listeners here when you say, it's a different kind of type of stuff. What did you mean? Well, I felt very restricted. I felt like there were like I said rules that I was not privy to. You know, I I think you know, New Orleans sort of is. Place where it's very hospitable to all. And and you know, people, you know, you walk down the street. You can ask just about any stranger for directions. And and you don't get strange looks. You don't, you know, there just isn't a sort of know, your place of you know, attitude, and, you know, I it was very strange, and and you know, it was weird to see a place that sort of clung to that southern Ness, but had this very boundary. You know, these these boundaries on and so here, you're sort of almost blowing open these like okay about. Is worried about my health and wellbeing and I really receive. No. I know exactly what you mean. Like, jude. You know, I'm a southerner. Although in the book, I do admit my lifelong shame. I finally had to out myself. I was actually born in New York forgivable. I know listen, I had letters angry letters from people. Go in your whole thing has been a lot. I was like I get it. I do so sorry, but I was raised in the south by deep southerners, and I very much a child of the south, and I've lived all over the country actually enjoyed in deliberately lived in California. Did Boston for awhile in New York, Chicago, and I come back to the south. And I think Judy would probably understand this. There's nothing quite like being black and being embedded in the south and understanding this place, whether whether it is always good for us. There is some value in understanding the US south, and I'm not one who wants to write that off. But to Jude's point. I think that Virginia and Richmond is interest. It is it is the still sort of proud home of the former confederacy in the south the civil wars alive here in a way that has never been true for me anywhere else that I have lived in the south, and is still very tangible here, but you know, the sort of movement of the New South city that has been happening. It's been happening for the last thirty years or so it Lanta Charlotte North Carolina places that sort of want to embrace its history while critically while at the same time moving forward. I think there's some momentum of for that here in Richmond. It just happened here. I think later than it has other large urban areas. But you know, there's a reason why ground myself and my work in the south, even when it's complicated as it is here in Richmond Virginia, I do think that's still a story about the black American experience that matters..

Jude Richmond Virginia Richmond Tracy McMillan Cottam New Orleans NPR Judy Virginia New York Virginia Commonwealth universi Lanta Charlotte North Carolina US professor of sociology Louisiana California apple professor Boston writer Chicago
"tracy mcmillan" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"tracy mcmillan" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Like to think that we have developed one of the more robust cultures of code switching that exists. And listen, I love that. We have this sort of cultural fluency, but I also wanted to push back. I think in this text on the tax that has on people as Angela really describes their of this constant navigating of making people comfortable because Angela points out in as many people a black women have experienced there really is not enough coach switching that we can do to demonstrate to people who fundamentally do not believe that we have agency or a value or intelligences. There's really not enough coats, which we can do to make those people. Okay. Right. So when the person turns to look returns to in that exchange for validation of whether or not the word is a word. Right. You don't you don't even discuss it with the person who said it, right? So what do you mean by there's no follow up about? Oh, is that what that were me? Oh is that what that is? Oh, I've never called it that you know, what we call it where I'm from. That would be a normal sort of exchange. But when you are looking to the others around you who are not the black women sort of validate the person as they sit there. There was no code switching that was going to fix that. And that's why I talk about as much as I enjoy the cultural tradition. One of the things privileges. I'm exercising lately. In my life is not coats witching, not because I cannot or should not. But because I want people to feel more uncomfortable in those moments is when people are in that moment suspended in half to reflect on why they're uncomfortable that maybe they'll see their actions. Right. Maybe it'll prompt them to be more reflexive about why they return to someone else to figure out whether or not the black woman knows the word that she was using. Well, we're speaking with Tracy McMillan Cottam caught him. She is a writer columnist professor of sociology at Virginia Commonwealth university. A lot of haranguing has been now put into the new collection. It's called thick and other essays. She explores beauty. Money identity experiences that define black womanhood in America. Professor Cottam is also author of the book lower Ed the troubling rise of for profit colleges in the new economy, professor Carter when we come back on ask you about beauty and black women. Okay. So stick with us. We'll be right back. This is on point..

Tracy McMillan Cottam Angela professor Virginia Commonwealth universi professor of sociology America Carter Ed writer
"tracy mcmillan" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:54 min | 3 years ago

"tracy mcmillan" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"But because everyone else seems to have a question Mark over there. Right. Yeah. Yeah. Thank you so much for that. Angela. I talk about my experience of coats, which ING is Angela describes it's you know, constant navigation one way to think about coast which switching is any minority group in a majority society is usually tasked with managing the emotions of the majority members of the group and one of the ways we do that is to be able to switch efficiently fluently between cultural languages and discourses. Right. So and black people tend to be particularly good at this an island. Like to think that we have developed one of the more robust cultures of code switching that exists. And listen, I love that. We have this sort of cultural fluency, but I also wanted to push back. I think in this text on the tax that has on people as Angela really describes their of this constant navigating of making people comfortable because his Angela points out in as many people a black women have experienced there really is not enough coach switching that we can do to demonstrate to people who fundamentally do not believe that we have agency or a value or intelligences. There's really not enough coats, which we can do to make those people. Okay. Right. So when the person turns to look who's deterrence to in that exchange for validation of whether or not the word is a word. Right. You don't you don't even discuss it with the person who said it, right? So what do you mean by there's no follow up about? Oh, is that what that were me? Oh is that what that is? Oh, I've never called it that you know, what we call it where I'm from. That would be a normal sort of exchange. But when you are looking to the others around you who are not the black women sort of validate the person as they sit there. There was no code switching that was going to fix that. And that's why I talk about as much as I enjoy the cultural tradition. One of the things privileges. I'm exercising lately. In my life is not coats witching, not because I cannot or should not because I want people to feel more uncomfortable in those moments is when people are in that moment suspended in half to reflect on why they're uncomfortable that maybe they'll see their actions. Right. Maybe it'll prompt them to be more reflexive about why they return to someone else to figure out whether or not the black woman knows the word that she was using. Well, we're speaking with Tracy McMillan Cottam caught him. She is a writer columnist professor of sociology at Virginia Commonwealth university. A lot of haranguing has been now put into the new collection. It's called thick and other essays. She explores beauty. Money identity experiences that define black womanhood in America. Professor Cottam is also author of the book lower Ed the troubling rise of four profit colleges in the new economy, professor caught up when we come back on ask you about beauty and black women. Okay. So stick with us. We'll be right back. This is on point..

Angela Tracy McMillan Cottam Mark professor America Virginia Commonwealth universi professor of sociology Ed writer
"tracy mcmillan" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:11 min | 3 years ago

"tracy mcmillan" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"We assume everyone has and then it becomes invisible. Just as you were saying MAC Magnay becomes part of the background noise of everybody else's experience. And part of what I'd hoped to do as a turn the volume up on the background noise. But you know, I think one of the great moments of generosity, and your writing is that you you write about how okay beginning with this experience of black women in, you know. V. The medical establishment every day. You also write about how you see that more and more of us are, you know, there's one Rivero quote her saying that more and more of us are caught in the trap of chasing competence yet. Right. So you're you're sort of generously. Offering the experience of black women as a hey, look, it's not just one group of people. That's right. That in fact, if you do not see that the way that black women are made incompetent does not speak to the ways that you will probably be incompetent in the near future that you're probably missing the whole point of our shared humanity. The reality is whatever the healthcare system did to me the education system is doing all of us, and the economic system seems to becoming for all the rest of the people who left on the table that sort of you can never be competent enough to overcome the realities of politics and economics wants it has been decided that this process needs to be set in motion that individuals can't do that that this. We need something bigger and deeper and broader than that. But it cannot happen. If you don't start with the people who have experienced at the most and for the longest, well, let's go to some callers here because they've been waiting very patiently to speak with you. I'm speaking with Tracy McMillan Cottam. She's a professor of sociology Virginia Commonwealth university widely published a writer as well and many of her essays appear in the marvelous new collection. It's titled thick and other essays. And let's go to the phones. Angela is calling from Baltimore Maryland. Angela you're on the air. Hello. And thank you so much for taking my call. Thank you, professor card, and I wanted to discuss the code switching that a lot of especially African American female professional have to undergo I live in Baltimore City. I live in the harder city. So I, and I'm also a licensed social worker, so I encounter, and I would say even the my professional studies before I was licensed, I encountered amongst my peers this, I guess this dissonance. You know, just not understanding that I'm hearing professional school because I qualified just as you. I had a discussion with my classmates when we're talking about what was going on in Baltimore. And I used the word blight be boy L, and he said to me this is a Caucasian young girl, and I have to say, I'm non-judicial student. I was at the time almost forty and she looked at me and said you mean plates, right? No, I I mean, the lights, and she then looked at the the Japanese American woman who was the next to me and said is that a word? And my mother looked at her as if she had six is said Dell. Yeah. And again, you know, we I find myself on a regular basis having to prove my the literature haven't you prove myself worthy of where I am not because I question myself. But because everyone else seems to have a question Mark over their head, right? Yeah. Yeah. Thank you so much for that. Angela. I talk about my experience of coats, which ING is Angela describes it's you know, constant navigation one way to think about coast which switching his any minority group in a majority society is usually tasked with managing the emotions of the majority members of the group and one of the ways we do that is to be able to switch efficiently fluently between cultural languages and discourses. Right. So and black people tend to be particularly good at this an island..

Angela Baltimore City Tracy McMillan Cottam Rivero sociology Virginia Commonwealt Maryland professor Dell Mark writer
"tracy mcmillan" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:30 min | 3 years ago

"tracy mcmillan" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"It's not just you. That's right. This is a defacto experience of zome any black women in this country. And I think what you know, what's really important to me in that story. I mean, lots is important, obviously. But if I if I had my choice. Of what I hope people took from that. It was that. You can do everything right in our society. But based on who you are you can never do everything right enough. Well, we know impurity from research is that education an income do not protect black women from these experiences like they protect every other group of people. So in our society, if you go to school and get a good job where you're born to wealthy. Do all of those things you get better health care better outcomes. That is not true for black woman is not true for our children. And that says something not about black women. But about the way that we refuse to allow black women access to the same type of mobility that we assume everyone has and then it becomes invisible. Just as you were saying MAC magnate becomes part of the background noise of everybody else's experience. And part of what I'd hoped to do as the volume up on the background noise. But you know, I think one of the great moments of generosity, and your writing is that you you write about how okay beginning with this experience of black women in, you know. V the medical establishment everyday. You also write about how you see that more and more of us are, you know, there's one Rivero quote her saying that more and more of us are caught in the trap of chasing competence yet. Right. So you're you're sort of generously. Offering the experience of black women as a hey, look, it's not just one group of people. That's right. That in fact, if you do not see that the way that black women are made incompetent does not speak to the ways that you will probably be incompetent in the near future that you're probably missing the whole point of our shared humanity. The reality is whatever the healthcare system did to me the education system is doing to all of us, and the economic system seems to becoming for all the rest of the people who left on the table that sort of you can never be competent enough to overcome the realities of politics and economics wants it has been decided that this process needs to be set in motion that individuals can't do that that this. We need something bigger and deeper and broader than that. But it cannot happen. If you don't start with the people who have experienced at the most and for the longest, well, let's go to some callers here because they've been saying waiting very patiently to speak with you. I'm speaking with Tracy McMillan Khadem. She's a professor of sociology Virginia Commonwealth university widely published a writer as well and many of her essays appear in the marvelous new collection. It's titled thick and other essays. And let's go to the phones. Angela is calling from Baltimore Maryland. Angela you're on the air. Hello. And thank you so much for taking my call. Thank you, professor Khartum. I wanted this Gus the code switching that a lot of especially African American female professional have to undergo I live in Baltimore City. I live in the harder city. So I, and I'm also a licensed social worker, so I encounter, and I would say even the my professional studies before I was licensed, I encountered amongst my peers this, I guess this dissonance. You know, just not understanding that I'm hearing professional school because I qualified just as you. I had a discussion with my classmates when we're talking about what was going on in Baltimore. And I used the word blight be boy L, and he said to me this is a Caucasian young girl, and I have to say, I'm non-judicial student. I was at the time almost forty and she looked at me and said you mean plates, right? No, I I mean, the lights, and she then looked at the the Japanese American woman who was the next to me and said is that a word? And my mother looked at her as if she had six is said Dell. Yeah. And again, you know, we I find myself on a regular basis having to prove my the literature haven't you prove myself worthy of where I am not because I question myself..

Baltimore City Tracy McMillan Khadem Angela professor Khartum Rivero Dell Maryland sociology Virginia Commonwealt writer
"tracy mcmillan" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:46 min | 3 years ago

"tracy mcmillan" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"If you've got a question for Tracy McMillan caught him up, professor Cottam. Oh, just want to I want to engage with a bunch of your other essays through the rest of this hour, but I do want to just get to a simple question about g the tensions that that black public intellectuals may feel in terms of and especially black women because a lot of what you write about is is talking about how how the bla- the experience of black women. Ought to be honored and recognized and learn from every day in America in and of itself, just by fact, but you also write about your own personal story as well. So I'm just wondering is there is there a tension there between saying like, look, listen because we are experts. But will also do feel obligated to weave your own personal narrative into it. And did you sit I'm getting out. I do I do. Yeah. I think about that tension in many ways this book is my one of the ways that I am practicing or trying to come to live with that tension and trying to figure out quite frankly, if it can be navigated, I'm not arrogant enough to think that I would be the first person to figure out on the crack that very complicated issue to fix it in my own life. Anyway, this has been of issue for black women who have been doing intellectual work for the whole recorded history of our time, I in western society, which is that what people tend to want from us what an audience wants when. They want to consume what black women produce as our intellectual work say often want to produce they want to consume our emotions and our experiences, which is not always the same as respecting our expertise, and our intellectual contribution. Now. That's a problem for women intellectuals were large I would like to say, but as I will say to people it can be a problem for everybody. I just happened to be talking about black women. At because I do think it is particularly acute for black women because what you're butting up against their stereotypes about who is allowed to be expert. Right. And the farther away you move from our dominant assumptions about who should have expertise, generally speaking, the more, you have to prove that you have a legitimate claim to whatever you're speaking on for black women that means we're dealing with idea racist ideas and stereotypes about whose knowledge is valuable, but we're also dealing with gender stereotypes about who should be allowed to speak into lead. We're also dealing with class issues about because African American women for all the reasons I would hope many of us know are less likely to be represented in high income status groups, we are also dealing with the issues of class when more likely to be poor or working class, and our society also doesn't value expertise from those groups of people and so just layer and layer upon sort of inequalities manifest in this way. This is for black women. To be respected as experts on whatever it is. We've been trained in whatever, you know, experiences. We bring to a conversation. We almost always I have to present a palatable form of our, you know, our sob story. I, you know, I talk about in the book is, you know, how angry sometimes my senior black women colleagues will get when they say, you're bleeding instead of thinking, you're bleeding on the page, and the problem there, of course, is that sometimes oftentimes too often dominant publications and outlets won't let us think until we have I bled. Jimmy pause here because because of what I wanna do is actually go back to a personal example, and you write about in the book. And of course, I'm feeling awkward about that. Because talking about this. Reading the book feeling uncomfortable..

Tracy McMillan America professor Cottam Jimmy
"tracy mcmillan" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:58 min | 3 years ago

"tracy mcmillan" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"If you've got a question for Tracy McMillan caught him up, professor Cottam. Oh, just want to I want to engage with a bunch of your other essays through the rest of this hour. But but I do want to just get to a simple question about g the tensions that that black public intellectuals may feel in terms of and especially black women because a lot of what you write about is is talking about how how the bla- the experience of black women. Ought to be honored and recognized and learn from every day in America in and of itself, just by fact, but you also write about your personal story as well. So I'm just wondering is there is there a tension there between saying like, look, listen because we are experts. But will also do feel obligated to weave your own personal narrative into it. And did you sit I'm getting out. I do I do. Yeah. I think about that tension in many ways this book is my one of the ways that I am practicing or trying to come to live with that tension and trying to figure out quite frankly, if it can be navigated, I'm not arrogant enough to think that I would be the first person to figure out on the crack that very complicated issue to fix it in my own life. Anyway, this has been of issue for black women who have been doing intellectual work for the whole recorded history of our time in western society. Which is that what people tend to want from us what an audience wants when? They want to consume what black women produce as our intellectual work as they often want to do they want to consume our emotions and our experiences, which is not always the same as respecting our expertise, and our intellectual contribution. Now. That's a problem for women intellectuals were large I would like to say, but as I will say to people it can be a problem for everybody. I just happened to be talking about black women. At because I do think it is particularly acute for black women because what you're butting up against their stereotypes about who is allowed to be expert. Right. And the farther away you move from our dominant assumptions about who should have expertise, generally speaking, the more, you have to prove that you have a legitimate claim to whatever you're speaking on for black women that means we're dealing with idea racist ideas and stereotypes about whose knowledge is valuable, but we're also dealing with gender stereotypes about who should be allowed to speak into lead. We're also dealing with class issues about because African American women for all the reasons I would hope many of us know are less likely to be represented in high income status groups, we are also dealing with the issues of class when more likely to be poor or working class, and our society also doesn't value expertise from those groups of people and so just layer and layer upon sort of inequalities manifest in this way. This is for black women. To be respected as experts on whatever it is. We've been trained in whatever, you know, experiences..

Tracy McMillan America professor Cottam
"tracy mcmillan" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

Slate's Political Gabfest

04:21 min | 3 years ago

"tracy mcmillan" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

"And she finished her remarks by saying you just got there. And I know you've got lots of good ideas. But I would encourage you to sit still for a minute and learn the job. So what be Goldberg is not exactly a raging conservative. And so I think that reaction is coming towards her as well. I think that's such a misguided reaction the job. These days is actually the job of a house member. These days is not to legislate. There's no legislation that passes the house. It's not serious of chamber. The job is to be a kind of public figure around ideas, and to create a sort of drama, and buzz and the national identity. That's. The evidence of the last twenty five years is that and she has she shouldn't sit still and wait. She should teach other people in the democratic caucus. Here's how us Instagram here here ways to put ideas out in the public. She has a a gift and a steel inability to reach an audience that ninety nine out of one hundred new members or any members of congress do not have. And that's her job is her job is is not to wait. It's to push. Thing about her that I find compelling is that she doesn't seem to limit herself to talking points when she's giving interviews she seems to just talk and like when she's on Instagram cooking, some, you know, recipe involving beans from grandmother, it's an extension of that. And to the degree that that's spilling over more. Broadly into politics to me that just is. So welcome so tired of the retreat into talking points. It's so boring. I was watching this like one minute video the other night of a newly elected. State Representative and Connecticut whose name is an Hughes, and she just had this power on her as she was entering the Connecticut state capital. I don't know if she was going there for the first time or what? But he was like kind of you know, clumsily shot she had some bag of stuff from her local constituents. She was just like excited to be there. And it was just sort of charming in a kind of wacky way. And I feel like the more we have that in American politics like good Amal for that. Let's go to cocktail chatter when you're making your Cortes cocktails. Emily. What are you going to be chattering? I'm sorry because this is sort of a sober topic. But I read an amazing piece this week by ironically for kale, I read an amazing piece this week by Tracy McMillan Cottam who is an American writer. She's also a sociologist at Virginia Commonwealth university. And she wrote a piece in time about. Her own pregnancy. And and it was a loss pregnancy. She had a stillbirth, and what she was really writing about was the way she was viewed as a black woman and the problem of competence in health care where she was reporting symptoms that should have been taken in by her doctor is truly alarming, and instead we're kind of brushed off or Nord, and this is a larger problem or having right now where maternal mortality rates are higher for black women in America in a way that is about race as well as class and is deeply troubling. And. Was just such an powerful use of one's own story to to make a point with other evidence behind it. And to you know, really like interrogate this problem of how we see different people when they present as patients, so I really recommended and in particular thinking about how despite the fact that she's well educated that, you know, she speaks in a way you would expect of an educated person. She still felt like she was viewed as an incompetent purveyor of her own symptoms in a way that led to this tragic outcome, it really made me think. To read. Yeah. JJ? What is your core? Well, mine is a one of you know, I feel like I could do every cocktail chatter about something. I find on brain pickings. But this one in particular, I liked I can't remember why what wandered me they're into this thicket. But anyway, it's when Walt women I self published leaves of grass GRA leaves of grass, I should say not leaps of graphs that was another book..

Tracy McMillan Cottam Hughes Goldberg Instagram Connecticut Amal congress Walt Emily State Representative Virginia Commonwealth universi writer America twenty five years one minute