17 Burst results for "Tracy McRae"

"tracy mcrae" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"tracy mcrae" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Something other than their dance of beer well you know I've been those days what do we drag out I always drink or so I asked her core he looked at me like I was crazy but I grew up in the west it's what I like thanks for your time wise take great talking with you Sir any time well Jennifer real clear politics here in W. L. S. Catherine all on one Grande Catherine transaction look at WLS traffic now on the inbound Heaton's twenty four minutes like of the junction no delays outbound Kennedy thirty six in a where the downtown twenty four back out to the airport Eisenhower thirty six and three ninety to the old post office thirty one back out Steve it's unusual delays and on the Dan Ryan no delays inbound twenty four minutes out to ninety fifth next traffic update in about fifteen minutes we also like Catherine sure and rob hello is this a Twilight Zone I might have a stroke in the post production let's just skip ahead to the little Benjamin in your hand he worries at eight eleven two and four and sixty for your chance to win a thousand thousand dollars pay off W. as with your Mayo Clinic radio health minutes I'm Tracy McRae skiing snowmobiling skating the winter months can be full of outdoor fun but without proper precaution there could be danger to like frostbite much like a burn or what we would call a thermal.

Jennifer W. L. S. Catherine Heaton Eisenhower Steve Dan Ryan Benjamin Grande Catherine Kennedy Mayo Clinic Tracy McRae
"tracy mcrae" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"tracy mcrae" Discussed on KGO 810

"Most of the time I'm sure you're buying comedian but you're not really great economic GDP growth two point two percent California over ten percent taxes I can pick five other states other than Texas and tell you federal the federal government stand I understand economics better than you your I'm from Assyrians stay for awhile chip Franklin three to six on KGO eight ten with your Mayo Clinic radio health minutes I'm Tracy McRae muscle injury bone and nerve damage infection even death they're all complications not of some exotic disease but rather frostbite granted that's severe frostbite but it's a stark reminder to treat the cold with respect ears nose toes and fingers are the classic body parts because they kind of stick out of the body but after David Nesler reminds us that frostbite can affect any part of the body the first thing you're gonna feel is it's gonna be exquisitely painful it's actually when you start to lose sensation that you can understand there's no blood flow your body's just essentially cut off blood flow to these affected areas so if you have to be outside dress appropriately cover up exposed skin and pay attention to your body and keep in mind that if you had frostbite in the past or if you have a medical condition that restricts blood flow to your limbs you're at higher risk for more information talk with your doctor or visit Mayo Clinic dot org do you know when I grow up I want to be a new pair of blue jeans when I grow up I want to be kids first computer when I grew up I would be glass counter top in a new home when I go out I want to be a kids dash birthday present I want to be a football stadium when I grow up I'm gonna be warm fleece and a whole day I grow up I want to be a fan I want to be a bike that races around thanks for I'm going to be a rocking chair for the S. ice scraper I want to be.

federal government Franklin David Nesler California Texas Mayo Clinic Tracy McRae Mayo Clinic dot football
"tracy mcrae" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"tracy mcrae" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Is ground with Julie pace Washington bureau chief when I go back to back because it's so you can for listeners who have only ever voted in a primary I think there's a little bit of a fascination and original unbiased news you need as America prepares for the twenty twenty election listen and subscribe to ground game free the Westwood One podcast network where the conversation start with your Mayo Clinic radio health minutes I'm Tracy McRae muscle injury bone and nerve damage infection even death they're all complications not of some exotic disease but rather frostbite granted that's severe frostbite but it's a stark reminder to treat the cold with respect ears nose toes and fingers are the classic body parts because they kind of stick out of the body but after David Nesler reminds us that frostbite can affect any part of the body the first thing you're gonna feel is it's gonna be exquisitely painful it's actually when you start to lose sensation that you can understand there's no blood flow your body's just essentially cut off blood flow to these affected areas so if you have to be outside dress appropriately cover up exposed skin and pay attention to your body and keep in mind that if you had frostbite in the past or if you have a medical condition that restricts blood flow to your limbs you're at higher risk for more information talk with your doctor or visit Mayo Clinic dot org ministrations.

Washington bureau chief America David Nesler Westwood One Mayo Clinic Tracy McRae
"tracy mcrae" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"tracy mcrae" Discussed on KGO 810

"On KGO app Thurston with former P. you see chair Loretta Lynch on what should happen to Fiji any will anybody attempting to make P. Jeannie face the death penalty and I don't mean to individual people I mean the corporation they are now a six time convicted felon for their corporate criminal negligence PGD has responded it'll be prohibitively expensive and it'll take too long and we can't find the workers and the dog ate my homework if their negligence results in the deaths of people they should be held to account Thurston holding corporate feet to the fire noon to three on KGO eight ten with your Mayo Clinic radio health minutes I'm Tracy McRae muscle injury bone and nerve damage infection even death they're all complications not of some exotic disease but rather frostbite granted that's severe frostbite but it's a stark reminder to treat the cold with respect ears nose toes and fingers are the classic body parts because they kind of stick out of the body but after David Nesler reminds us that frostbite can affect any part of the body the first thing you're gonna feel is it's gonna be exquisitely painful it's actually when you start to lose sensation that you can understand there's no blood flow your body's just essentially cut off blood flow to these affected areas so if you have to be outside dress appropriately cover up exposed skin and pay attention to your body and keep in mind that if you had frostbite in the past or if you have a medical condition that restricts blood flow to your limbs you're at higher risk for more information talk with your doctor or visit Mayo Clinic dot org before.

Thurston Loretta Lynch Fiji P. Jeannie David Nesler Mayo Clinic Tracy McRae Mayo Clinic dot
"tracy mcrae" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"tracy mcrae" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"You who waiting for we leave your text rested I cool coast one tax group that's eight eight eight three three seven six nine four nine that's eight eight eight three three seven six nine taking a look a KSFO traffic San Francisco the usual crawl out of the city one on one north bound you backed up after says our shop is street crawls along as you're going by the hospital Kerr if want to connect to eighty eastbound it's also brake lights all the way over to the lower deck of the bay bridge once you're on the bridge that would pretty much moves along just fine pass Treasure Island pain into the Oakland area meanwhile back of bill eighty eastbound at Alamo drive the offramp was shut down because of an overturned car that was blocking but that car has been cleared out of the way so the offramp has re opened eighty moving along just fine now he word with found eight eighty just a little bit sluggish starting a little after tennis in and I'll continue to about Wynton and Encinal succeeding northbound after eighty four two car crashes off to the right shoulder with KSFO traffic mall inject real investing knowledge real trading skills attend a free online trading academy class call eight four four eight two six two eight eight four four eight two six two eight that's eight four four eight two six straight or TA class dot com with your Mayo Clinic radio health minutes I'm Tracy McRae skiing snowmobiling skating the winter months can be full of outdoor fun but without proper precaution there could be danger to like frostbite much like a burn or what we would call a thermal injury.

San Francisco bay bridge tennis Wynton thermal injury Kerr Treasure Island Oakland Encinal TA Mayo Clinic Tracy McRae
"tracy mcrae" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

11:11 min | 1 year ago

"tracy mcrae" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Tracy McRae muscle injury bone and nerve damage infection even death they're all complications not of some exotic disease but rather frostbite granted that severe frostbite but it's a stark reminder to treat the cold with respect ears nose toes and fingers are the classic body parts because they kind of stick out of the body but after David Nesler reminds us that frostbite can affect any part of the body the first thing you're gonna feel is it's gonna be exquisitely painful it's actually when you start to lose sensation that you can understand there's no blood flow your body's just essentially cut off blood flow to these affected areas so if you have to be outside dress appropriately cover up exposed skin and pay attention to your body and keep in mind that if you had frostbite in the past or if you have a medical condition that restricts blood flow to your limbs you're at higher risk for more information talk with your doctor or visit Mayo Clinic dot org I'm Russ Martin and you're listening to think about this your digital life overwhelming you it says and I quote hash tag no phone three year I'd like you and I to be there on that last day she gets the check for a hundred thousand dollars and she tackles of but I think we write your phone so welcome to think about that listen the less you know listen and subscribe to think about this free wherever you get your podcasts from the Westwood One podcast network or the conversation starts good morning Katie green here taking a look at your traffic sponsor this time by ponderosa homes if you are traveling out there this morning please drive carefully we have wet roadways and some gusty winds across the span of the bay bridge at this time I'm looking here at the traffic map we have a problem spot north down eighty seven a gore Kirschner and actually here I things backed up on two eighty five and eighty five back to one oh one at this time westbound five eighty as you approach the top of the Dublin grade an accident here as traffic backed up to the five eighty six eighty split more slowing this morning on this is two forty two south at for the roadway here's been cleared of an accident but you're backed up into Pittsburgh at this time check in with the C. H. P. we have a traffic hazard on westbound eighty at willow Avenue the on ramp here is affected by a stall northbound six eighty admission I see a a barrel Hey it's a barrel into the right lane keep an eye out for that pro can roadies Castro Boulevard we a we have a celebrity so far blocking the right lane that is making getting through the canyon quite difficult at this time apart right is checking in problem free explore ponderosa homes visit rose Avenue St near downtown Pleasanton sycamore off of valley trails in Pleasanton and newly opened ponderosa analyst Gerry ranch make your new on the ponderosa home go to ponderosa homes dot com California D. R. E. number zero one two five seven five six seven okay as a whole morning show continues now with Brian Sussman on talk radio five sixty KSFO six forty seven the time right now Brad Sussman infer brother Brian ladies I either of you ever heard of the crescent dunes solar plants outside of sparks Nevada now you heard about the solar plants you know they put him in the desert to get these giants round rings of solar panels that you know point up to a little tower in the middle read enough heat from these things to spin turbans into you know cook bird sons are you know cook birds as they fly across the across the sky well this million dollar power plants biggest seller plan of its kind twenty eleven city group other financier is put in a finish financiers rather put in a bunch of money into this I hear he read a Senate Majority Leader senior senator different private for Nevada cleared the way for the company to build on public land now this is going to be one of the biggest greatest things ever except now taxpayers on the hook for seven hundred thirty seven million dollars in loan guarantees because the thing was an absolute flop no really it's not even operating anymore it turns out that the steam generators required custom parts and dozens of staff to keep things coming by the time the plant opened in twenty fifteen cheaper solar panels and with increased efficiently had already surpassed the technology it's obsolete all my gosh what would this be something that would come up I don't know maybe in the planning stages you would think originally this thing was designed to power did provide enough power to supply the city of sparks Nevada for about to population hundred thousand people never came close to that it cost the energy company about a hundred thirty five dollars per megawatt hour compared to thirty megawatt hours thirty hours per megawatt hours at a nearby full to another new solar farm nearby with newer panels so it was costing almost three times as much and by the way that's almost five times as much as using natural gas but everybody felt good about it these are the stories of from California the sound like something this stay with Dale cooling yeah didn't Jerry Brown put that into effect right now who is behind this well it sounds like Solyndra right for you actually have that others does solar field that's outside of visited outside of palm springs that's the one that the birds fly through and get cooked okay yeah but but this was everybody says that lives around the areas like it was great when the maintenance workers used to come here because you know they'd say in our hotels and stuff now it's just really pretty that it's it's out there in the in the deaths written into reflects the sunlight looks like a giant some type of art project out there the cost taxpayers a billion dollars this is unbelievable mention cylinder I'll never forget I was going through my my face but the other day and just kind of going through pictures and I'm went cylinder finally shut down one of our listeners went and put an empty chair out in front of Solyndra remember that whole thing what was it what was a chair that was like it was like a bomb is empty chair or something like that to all right wise and then they took the and they took an empty chair they put it out in front of the lender after it shut down and so I have a picture of the empty chair because I want to cylinder to get a photo I had a picture of the empty chair but in the background up on the side of the cylinder building it's just a giant for sale sign off I love it good stuff is now right yeah yeah they're actually doing something useful with that from the building I was just filled with all the equipment that you can see all the chairs and stuff stacked up inside first I'll gosh month wow yeah what's good they're doing some of the building I guess so back here another company getting government funny government money but they are the most valuable car company ever which just scratching my head how many cars do they put out a month compared to like GM or Ford anything like that I could easily find the statistics but you know and they're nothing like the size of a G. M. or a Ford of course the other thing is GM Ford they've got a lot of liabilities like pensions and stuff like that if Ford got out of a lot of them and turned over the union says the U. A. W. that has a lot of email but I think GM still does or is it the other way around but yeah it's a little bit different these these older car companies I I can't really see how Tessler except stock wise the most valuable auto company in the world I think a lot and of course with the guy call yesterday that talked about Dr what it's like driving one of the tests was now I want to test drive one well now yeah sure and I thank goodness we're walking back to our car yesterday saw Tesla drive by and I actually peeked inside to see the lack of dashboard which still bothers me there's no dashboard it's just an iPad but yeah a big old thank it is it actually an iPad I mean it's not actual life but it looks like it looks like one yeah yeah it's it's a tablet of some form man but yeah the guy called a BSA said the V. xcelerated is unbelievable he said he'll take people in the car and it'll go zero to sixty like four seconds that's he said literally did it the G. forces pushing back in the chair that's such a boy things yeah I'd be annoyed by that yeah I can see how guys would be into it I you're right that's a guy thing it is a guy thing all right let's see here Amazon you know they've got the smart doorbell stick ring doorbells at a lot of people like us you know like you get see what's happening on your front porch their motion activated they fired for their employees it turns out they abuse their ability to view customers video feeds and last for years they've been four separate incidences which instances rather which have resulted in termination the story from the Daily Mail each individual had access to user videos part of their job role but it was deemed to have exceeded what was necessary for their job functions it's not known what footage the employees were viewing what they're watching to batting been judged to over reach now if this is just a doorbell thing are they talking about may be they're using the ring video inside the house well I you know there are some videos that have surfaced within the last couple of weeks of these things you know being hacked and what not so obviously you can get into on and discuss your employees I know but I mean you and doesn't mean they're responsible employee is working now yeah they said that a letter was sent to Amazon had Jeff Bezos on November twentieth several senators have now gotten involved in the area in the intervening six weeks rain has been struck was several privacy breaches eight year old girl in Mississippi had obscenities shouted at her the doorbell after hackers seize control of the device all that's in Irving yeah we had the other case what was its that the guy was watching video in their house and was commenting on the presence and stuff like that under the tree yeah he they had a ring camera looks like am I sitting on the counter tops more in their kitchen and he's watching something on TV and commenting on the TV as their families watching it a lovely lovely yeah I don't get it give me a stomach ache stomach ache thank you want to show in all technology that's out there yeah gosh so yeah the senators are gotten involved now so we know nothing's going to happen now because you know governments gotten touch with the people there but that's crazy that they've had a fire for their own employees for that kind of stuff good to know they're watching out for us on talk radio five sixty KSFO Islander often ability mostly to work but not limited to the.

David Nesler Tracy McRae
"tracy mcrae" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"tracy mcrae" Discussed on KGO 810

"From the fast growing world of the sports playstyle almost doesn't have a role in rocket league hello click here it is there are obviously people play roles and stuff like that but a lot of times it seems like it's more dependent on fall position and situation and yeah beginning of rocket league there was you have one please subscribe to sports thirty ever you get your podcasts Westwood One podcast network where the conversation starts with your Mayo Clinic radio health minutes I'm Tracy McRae muscle injury bone and nerve damage infection even death they're all complications not of some exotic disease but rather frostbite granted that's severe frostbite but it's a stark reminder to treat the cold with respect years knows toes and fingers are the classic body parts because they kind of stick out of the body but after David nesta reminds us that frostbite can affect any part of the body the first thing you're gonna feel is it's gonna be exquisitely painful it's actually when you start to lose sensation that you can understand there's no blood flow your body's just essentially cut off blood flow to these affected areas so if you have to be outside dress appropriately cover up exposed skin and pay attention to your body and keep in mind that if you had frostbite in the past or if you have a medical condition that restricts blood flow to your limbs you're at higher risk for more information talk with your doctor or visit Mayo Clinic dot org goes to coast AM on KGO bay ten end of America and the gateway to the west good morning good evening wherever you may be across the nation around the world I'm George nori walking to coast to coast AM later tonight crop formations Lucy Pringle joins us looking forward to.

David nesta KGO bay America George nori Lucy Pringle Mayo Clinic Tracy McRae Mayo Clinic dot
"tracy mcrae" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"tracy mcrae" Discussed on KGO 810

"Hatred for trump John Rothman offers a subtle but powerful distinction he is a very harsh words when people call and criticize George W. bush and they would accuse him of being a fashion war when people called and his Bronco bomb of being a communist you could feel the word hate coming through the lines I said no you don't hate them you ate the stands they take the John Hoffman show six tonight on KGO eight ten with your Mayo Clinic radio health minutes I'm Tracy McRae muscle injury bone and nerve damage infection even death they're all complications not of some exotic disease but rather frostbite granted that's severe frostbite but it's a stark reminder to treat the cold with respect years knows toes and fingers are the classic body parts because they kind of stick out of the body but after David Nesler reminds us that frostbite can affect any part of the body the first thing you're gonna feel is it's gonna be exquisitely painful it's actually when you start to lose sensation that you can understand there's no blood flow your body's just essentially cut off blood flow to these affected areas so if you have to be outside dress appropriately cover up exposed skin and pay attention to your body and keep in mind that if you had frostbite in the past or if you have a medical condition that restricts blood flow to your limbs you're at higher risk for more information talk with your doctor or visit Mayo Clinic dot org let's say you just bought a house bad news is your one step closer to becoming your parents you'll probably most along and see if anybody noticed you mow the lawn tell people to stay off the lawn compare it to your neighbor's lawn.

John Rothman George W. bush John Hoffman David Nesler Mayo Clinic Tracy McRae Mayo Clinic dot
"tracy mcrae" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"tracy mcrae" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"To month in a row leave a message at the hi Jim hit me Jamie I just had a new idea for our song what the name your price tool so when it's like tell us what you want to pay Hey hearing from bone was what wine you say will be found coverage options to fit your budget then we just all the finger snaps will acquire goes he was coming after they've come at jet yes no maybe anyway see a practice tonight I got a new there so the referee to cancel the insurance company affiliates price and coverage match limited by state law with your Mayo Clinic radio health minutes I'm Tracy McRae muscle injury bone and nerve damage infection even death they're all complications not of some exotic disease but rather frostbite granted that severe frostbite but it's a stark reminder to treat the cold with respect ears nose toes and fingers are the classic body parts because they kind of stick out of the body but after David Nesler reminds us that frostbite can affect any part of the body the first thing you're gonna feel is it's gonna be exquisitely painful it's actually when you start to lose sensation that you can understand there's no blood flow your body's just essentially cut off blood flow to these affected areas so if you have to be outside dress appropriately cover up exposed skin and pay attention to your body and keep in mind that if you had frostbite in the past or if you have a medical condition that restricts blood flow to your limbs you're at higher risk for more information talk with your doctor or visit Mayo Clinic dot org bush on talk radio five sixty KSFO welcome back Rush Limbaugh after a two week Christmas break I want to go back to the audio somebody said that just enough time to.

Jim Jamie David Nesler Mayo Clinic Tracy McRae Mayo Clinic dot Limbaugh
"tracy mcrae" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"tracy mcrae" Discussed on KGO 810

"Tires the team you try it's a clear and cold morning Cupertino forty five this our San Francisco forty five as well Antioch forty one Petaluma thirty seven we won't get out of the fifties most places same for tomorrow in the late tomorrow there's a chance of rain mainly in the North Bay I'm Ripper crimes your last remodeling job your place all Hey were Armstrong get imagine if your last remodeling job was handled by just one company who did everything from design to final installation then you wouldn't have that nightmare story yeah not only would you save yourself a lot of headaches with the time of purchasing materials from different vendors all and stuff re bath makes bathroom remodeling effortless call eight five five re bath for now to schedule your free design session they provide the design materials and installation mention Armstrong you getting you receive a thousand dollars off your complete bathroom remodel call eight five five re bath for twenty nineteen was a landmark year for KGO so glad that we're back to local time and nobody covers bay area issues better than see geo but what about in twenty twenty November we all get to once again ask ourselves are you better off than you were four years ago that's going to be so much to talk about money your left right or center on KGO there was an ability to have a reasonable discourse back and that's what we're gonna have on this program in twenty twenty like all waves the bay area's talk station KGO eight ten Hey five dollars you will that's a day to make I can get a big mac two for five two favorites from the big mac and the two quarter pounder with cheese for just five dollars right with your Mayo Clinic radio health minutes I'm Tracy McRae skiing snowmobiling skating the winter months can be full of outdoor fun but without proper precaution there could be danger to like frostbite much like a burn or what we would call a thermal injury which destroys the tissue cold can do the exact same thing it's just the opposite extreme with the same a fact which is tissue that's not functioning as an emergency room physician in Minnesota frostbite is something the doctor David Nestor sees all too.

San Francisco Petaluma Armstrong KGO thermal injury David Nestor Cupertino Mayo Clinic Tracy McRae Minnesota
"tracy mcrae" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:50 min | 1 year ago

"tracy mcrae" Discussed on KGO 810

"I mix it up some nannies and chopped up pickles yeah that's good the word for it on the three ingredients that I try to avoid on everything man is it improves nothing I look at a pickle all I see is a really cute isn't proves everyday master hard about that all over me saying two nominees and pickles sounds good to you sounds like if my dad said you take some liverwurst some cal tone yes in some war how many you got yourself a good Friday well I remember I used to go on and on about sardines and hard tack yeah that's right now that's a very crisp hard biscuits my dad would pull into Wally's liquor store on a Friday and get some pick knuckles and smoke carbon socialists and he was sent for the fried stuff your dad a did you don't was brought to you by the liverwurst counseling and sardines coalition Armstrong in getting morning sun KGO eight ten with your Mayo Clinic radio health minutes I'm Tracy McRae muscle injury bone and nerve damage infection even death they're all complications not of some exotic disease but rather frostbite granted that's severe frostbite but it's a stark reminder to treat the cold with respect ears nose toes and fingers are the classic body parts because they kind of stick out of the body but after David Nesler reminds us that frostbite can affect any part of the body the first thing you're gonna feel is it's gonna be exquisitely painful it's actually when you start to lose sensation that you can understand there's no blood flow your body's just essentially cut off blood flow to these affected areas so if you have to be outside dress appropriately cover up exposed skin and pay attention to your body and keep in mind that if you had frostbite in the past or if you have a medical condition that restricts blood flow to your limbs you're at higher risk for more information talk with your doctor or visit Mayo Clinic dot org these weekend radio show you know it if they can come in and shows silly we talk about living the best digital lifestyle ever as well as those gadgets and gizmos we talk about your online security and privacy if I doesn't border top stations from coast to coast and around the globe in American forces network radio and it is called the Kim commando show because after all I'm Kim commando I know it's pretty crazy and still after all these years I appreciate your support and all of us do with him commando show because without you you know we wouldn't be able to live our dream you know we're not part of the big I hard companies or CVS or any other networks we are our own small company our own small enterprise and we appreciate each and everyone of you I just want.

Wally Armstrong David Nesler Kim commando Mayo Clinic Tracy McRae Mayo Clinic dot
"tracy mcrae" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"tracy mcrae" Discussed on WJR 760

"Of the kindness revolution this is the season of lighting furnaces starting fires turning up the thermostat quality warm can come in the form of a kind word a small gift a smile seasonal warmth is a real problem too many people in the world here in the United States millions of people will go to bed without this winter some of these families and individuals are closer to you than you might think neighbors friends relatives and in some instances death will occur as a result so be little observer be aware of families and homes and appear to be without electricity contact your local utility and ask about support programs that are consider donating some blankets or coach to your local homeless shelter will make someone warmer for the winter and Mike just warm your heart a little as well to learn more check us out at the kindness revolution dot net equal opportunity is the cornerstone of the American dream being employed gives us the confidence to be financially independent we feel useful and respected but what if you were one of the eighty one percent of adults with developmental differences who do not have a paid job join the centrist foundation and supporting autism speaks best buddies and Special Olympics and creating pathways to one million employment and leadership opportunities for this talented community visit delivering jobs dot org to learn more with your Mayo Clinic radio health minutes I'm Tracy McRae muscle injury bone and nerve damage infection even death they're all complications not of some exotic disease but rather frostbite granted that's severe frostbite but it's a stark reminder to treat the cold with respect years knows toes and fingers are the classic body parts because they kind of stick out of the body but after David Nesler reminds us that frostbite can affect any part of the body the first thing you're gonna feel is.

United States Mike Olympics David Nesler Mayo Clinic Tracy McRae
"tracy mcrae" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:40 min | 1 year ago

"tracy mcrae" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Radio health minutes I'm Tracy McRae muscle injury bone and nerve damage infection even death they're all complications not of some exotic disease but rather frostbite granted that's severe frostbite but it's a stark reminder to treat the cold with respect ears nose toes and fingers are the classic body parts because they kind of stick out of the body but after David Nesler reminds us that frostbite can affect any part of the body the first thing you're gonna feel is it's gonna be exquisitely painful it's actually when you start to lose sensation that you can understand there's no blood flow your body's just essentially cut off blood flow to these affected areas so if you have to be outside dress appropriately cover up exposed skin and pay attention to your body and keep in mind that if you had frostbite in the past or if you have a medical condition that restricts blood flow to your limbs you're at higher risk for more information talk with your doctor or visit Mayo Clinic dot org he nine J. as opposed Ben Shapiro show we deserve to can be brilliant political insider tips for a happy marriage and sometimes in the same fashion the president has been portraying the economy to the public as a phenomenal an incredible by the way this is the office in the traffic Hey good strategies under selling over eleven who said things like we expect the economy to continue to grow at a solid steady rate and then if you over for like all my god we blew it out again this year it's amazing guys this is also how you should operate within the context of America you shouldn't tell your wife the world's best birthday gift you sick you know I'm going to get something for you I really thought too much about it then you get or something that's like mid nice really surpass expectations bill who was an expert at this by the way Bill Clinton used to spend a lot of time under selling what he was going to accomplish and then the accomplish something and people wanted all my he gave us so much more than we ever possibly dream president trump isn't over promising that everything's been nomina it can be the greatest the best most like no surprise the president's on marriage number three he needs to listen to the Ben Shapiro show weekdays into one talk radio five sixty K. SFO why are the bureaucrats at the department of health and Human Services moving for with a Bernie Sanders plan to allow states to start importing some prescription drugs from foreign countries like Canada and why are the Republicans in Congress letting them implement the ideas of a socialist crackpot even Canadian officials say they are concerned about the safety and feasibility of the HHS plan there are zero systems in place to determine if the drugs coming across the border what the label say they are or who made them or if they are from China India or god knows where it's one thing of counterfeit medicines don't work it's another if they make you sick or kill you but Bernie Sanders an out HHS don't seem concerned about that Republicans better start paying attention to what's.

Tracy McRae
"tracy mcrae" Discussed on KARN 102.9

KARN 102.9

01:52 min | 4 years ago

"tracy mcrae" Discussed on KARN 102.9

"With your mayo clinic radio health minute i'm tracy mcrae and in printable device that tends electrical current to the brain it sounds scary but for thousands of people they could be the answer to controlling apple uptick seizures it is very stated the art divisive pass to functions one of those functions is to basically to tacked have normal after collectively in a brain such as a seizure and wanted to tax that after maladies it actually can be program to send out an electrical signal to stop that seizure of from a cronie you knowledge is doctor joseph surgeon explains that the devices not a frontline treatment option candidates for the device need to meet several cry tear these are the folks that are responding to medications they may not be candidates for surgery for surgery has a work for them it's estimated that there are four hundred thousand people just in the united states that meet the criteria to be candidates for the device for more information talk with your doctor or visit mayo clinic dot org we got forty nine minutes after the hour welcome back to arkansas fair ways you green's bob steal land charlie clausen i'm with you fox was with us for half of the show he's over at the arkansas state goff association man's four ball championship at the hot springs country club and very howard the head gaa professional that way runs great tournaments and i can tell you that from my experiences with very he's a hall of fame member of the arc so goff hall of fame in runs a great operation and we are awaiting the phone call from alex meyers of goff digest dot com man i see that the phone.

tracy mcrae united states arkansas charlie clausen alex meyers goff mayo clinic radio mayo clinic dot fox goff association howard goff hall of fame forty nine minutes
"tracy mcrae" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio on Neurosciences

Mayo Clinic Radio on Neurosciences

10:18 min | 4 years ago

"tracy mcrae" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio on Neurosciences

"Shives and Tracy McRae. This podcast was recorded on February fifteenth. Twenty seventeen as we age in. Both of us are doing that. Me probably a little faster than you are. But as we age our brains lose volume that our brains get smaller and that makes us more susceptible to dementia and of course that's a decline in memory and other thinking skills and of course. Alzheimer's is the most common form of dimension and nobody wants that. No recent study published in the Journal. Neurology followed four hundred patients. In Scotland from age seventy two seventy six and found that choosing the right foods helped prevent preserve their brain mass. Now Diet may have something to do with this of course but are there other things that you can do to help preserve brain health as we get older here to discuss brain health as we age is Mayo Clinic. Neurologist actor David Knapman welcome to the program Dr Nominee. It's nice to meet you. Thank you for asking you good to have you here. And this whole question of dementia and Alzheimer's and so many people that that seemed to have at these days is this mainly the result of the people living longer. Yes I think that it is the dramatic change in life expectancy over the last hundred years Accounts for a lot of this difference at the beginning of the twentieth century. Only four percent of the population lived over age. Sixty five. Now we're at fourteen or fifteen percent and when you have a disease that increases with advancing age and you have more people living longer that multiplicative effect is what's created of the health crisis that we have with this disorder so just like everything else. Our brain wears out. I'm afraid so. Are there things that we can do to help? Preserve the brain health or the volume of the brain will brain. Volume is definitely an important parameter for brain health. That's probably not the only thing but it's a good measure and we use that in in research but things like staying mentally active staying mentally engaged socially engaged physically active yes diet probably plays some role. are all important things but the emphasis really needs to be on lifelong engagement in these activities. Not Starting at age. Seventy after doing none of them before that yeah it's a little late And it is The lifetime engagement in mentally stimulating activities like occupation physical activity That that does make a difference but that isn't to say that continuing to do them in older age or Increasing those activities and older age might not have some value. So the other thing We want to talk about his his medications. Because I know there are a lot of drug companies out there that are trying to come up with the medication that will prevent dementia Alzheimer's disease or reverse Dementia Alzheimer's disease but so far there isn't anything any good out there. Is there really well? There are no that is the short answer. The longer answer is that there are some drugs that delay the progression of symptoms and people who have symptomatic Alzheimer Dementia Colon inhibitors but in terms of drugs. That are more potent and those called necessary. Inhibitors aren't all that potent terms of something more potent or in terms of something that can prevent Alzheimer's disease. We're not there yet. Actually last night there was just a press release from a drug company of a promising drug that failed in symptomatic Alzheimer's dementia which is unfortunately a longer line of failures that we've had in this field This is a really tough nut to crack and We just have to keep working at it. I think we're we have some new strategies that the field is applying. But it's a very slow process. I I really do believe that. The as the biology as our knowledge of the biology increases. We will find effective therapies. But I don't know how long it's going to take brain. Volume is one of the things that you're talking about as we got going here is the size of your brain good determine whether you're going to get dementia or not. It's actually probably not the size of your brain itself. Because I know many four foot eleven women who are much smarter than I am. So it's not just brain size it's actually the thickness of your cerebral cortex. The surface covering of the brain. That probably does make a difference and actually in our research here at Mayo. as as seen by many others the thickness of the cerebral cortex does bear a pretty close relationship with cognitive functioning and It also is something that is susceptible to Alzheimer's disease and to cerebrovascular disease that when people have have have stroke did also affects other blood vessel changes in the brain so that cerebral cortex that the outer layer of the of the brain. That's exactly on Tracy alloway. Well we can sign you up for research and put you in our research. Mr Scanner and and we can. We can do that. Yeah well if I can't do that. What to have good cerebral CORTEX health? What is it that people should be doing well? there's no question that the more educated you are the more brain reserve you Acquire and the more a brain reserve that you acquire. If it's more synapses are more cells that makes that CORTEX THICK. That is going to protect you. Even in the face of emerging disease the more disease you have the higher the education you have you are able to tolerate. More pathology never heard that before really important to keep your brain active your entire life and then if you do that you're less likely to get dementia. You'll still get the dimension but it won't be quite as severe. No it'll be delayed the compared to win you would otherwise have gotten it. Had you had a lower level of education. Tell me more about what The studies that you're doing on the cerebral CORTEX. We have a population based study here in Olmsted. County that My partner Ron Peterson. The principal investigator on and we are recruiting and have recruited probably close to five thousand people initially over the age of seventy. Now we've gone back to thirty and we're doing scans on them on the people every other year and the older people every year at looking at the Mr Scans and measuring Thickness of this rebel cerebral cortex were also doing. Scans that can actually measure the bad proteins in the brains of people who are destined to get Alzheimer's disease with the Mr Scans. We can also find evidence of stroke cerebrovascular disease and what we're focusing on our people who are cognitively normal in order to study what happens as people decline and develop cognitive impairment. We're looking for risk factors. Were trying to really quantify the biology in living people which is something. We'd never been able to do until a few years ago. So what do you know about a risk factors? We know the number one risk factors for the number one risk factor for dementia or Alzheimer's age. What else well. Age is the big one genetics. Our family history is the second. But that's really important to clarify. Just saw a woman today who was very worried about it as many people but what family. History of dementia does is to drop the age of onset or lower the age of onset If you have a mother who's age eighty five when she became impaired. That probably doesn't convey much risk to you when I talk about genetics or we talk about genetic says risk. It's when people have family members who were underage seventy you're under age sixty the only other key Risk factor that we know about his Ford Dementia in general and it's probably related to cerebrovascular disease. And that's avoidance of diabetes avoidance of hypertension avoidance of obesity. A good exercise. Good Diet an avoiding smoking all right so the things that you've talked about our staying mentally active staying physically active and you said that Diet might play a role but every once in a while you see article that talks about a brain food. Is there such a thing as a brain food? Well any story in the medical literature about diet invokes. Sorry a feeding frenzy in the media and People are so anxious to find the magic bullet especially if it's in grandma's Swedish Rye bread. But I'm afraid that is overly simplistic that there. There are diets that are better than others and The Mediterranean Diet as the one. That's holding sway now that that seems to be associated with lesser cardiovascular disease and in and if it's good for the heart it should be good for the brain but. I'm not necessarily endorsing one diet over the other just using that as an example. Finally if people want to learn more about the research that's happening at Mayo Clinic Rochester. Minnesota THE CEREBRAL CORTEX. Which how can they get in touch with you to find out more about that? While I think they could contact our Alzheimer's Disease Research Center through the Mayo Clinic Operator. Seven to eight four to five one one and then ask for the Alzheimer's Research Center correct. Sign you up for find out about your CORETEC. I'm in brain aging with neurologist. Dr David not been thanks so much for being with us. Thank you for having me for the latest in health and medical news go to news network DOT Mayoclinic Dot Org..

Alzheimer Alzheimer's disease cerebrovascular disease Mayo Clinic Scotland Shives Disease Research Center Mayo Clinic Rochester Minnesota Mayo Clinic Operator David Knapman Tracy McRae Tracy alloway Mr Scanner Olmsted Dr David Research Center Ron Peterson
"tracy mcrae" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio on Transplant

Mayo Clinic Radio on Transplant

08:25 min | 4 years ago

"tracy mcrae" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio on Transplant

"Twenty fourth twenty seventeen to Mayo Clinic. Radio I'm Dr. Tom Shives and I'm Tracy McRae Tracy. The Mayo Clinic Liver Transplant Program There's three different sites. All three sides do liver transplant Arizona. Florida and of course the mothership Minnesota and the three of them combined perform over three hundred liver transplants. Every year now unfortunately like other Oregon's the number of people who are waiting for liver transplant far exceeds the number of available donors because the human liver regenerates and returns to its normal size. Shortly after part of it is removed living donor liver. Transplant is an alternative to waiting for a deceased donor liver to become available. Isn't that interesting the liver can actually regenerate itself? Make more of its up. The only organ in the body can do it. Here to discuss liver transplant. Is the division chair of transplant surgery at Mayo Clinic? Dr Charles Rosen. Welcome back to the program. Dr Rosen thank you the pleasure to be here. So Dr Rosen. Nice to see you Mayo Clinic Rochester. One of the sites that does liver transplants. So tell us why someone would need a liver transplant a liver transplants done for anybody that develops liver failure. It can happen rather suddenly and we call it acute liver failure and that can be from Drugs such as tylenol overdose can be from a an acute hepatitis caused by a virus or a couple of real rare conditions. And sometimes it's just a drug interaction that we don't totally understand Also people can have what's longstanding liver disease or chronic liver disease that over a period of yours develops into cirrhosis and that can be caused by alcohol a lot of viruses that can cause psoriasis as well as some diseases that we have fancy names for. What really don't understand all that well. So psoriasis basically means that the liver scarring of the liver. That's right and the liver Delivers an organ. As you mentioned it can regenerate and grow back but for some reason when it gets diseased. It grows back and develop sees fibrous scar tissue. That keeps it from regenerating to its full capacity and Results in problems did did I hear you say that? If you take too much tylenol you can get acute liver. Failure is that over a long period of time. No It's if you take too much once. Unfortunately in some countries like the United Kingdom. It's a a form of suicide occasionally. It can be that done here or can be inadvertent and if you also drink alcohol with tylenol. The two of them together is not a very good combination. Really quite a lot if there is a lack of liver livers available for donation. Why aren't more living donor? Why isn't that happening? More often Well first of all A. It's kind of exciting. Two Thousand Sixteen was a wonderful year for transplantation it was the highest number of donors ever in the United States There were over almost sixteen thousand donors and thirty three thousand six hundred people got transplants last year. Both those numbers are up about ten percent or nine percent from the year before an organ donation is actually up about twenty percent over the last five years so we're fortunate in the United States that the deceased donation has gone up and we would much rather do that rather than a living donor transplant When you get the whole organ with the larger vessels in the bile ducts Things go well. A living donor. Transplantation is a way around it for people that can't get a deceased donor because their position on the waiting list there are more problems in the recipient with the bile duct. 'cause it's shorter and smaller in the same with the blood vessels going to and from the liver And of course. The donor has to undergo pretty major operation in involves taking out up to almost seventy percent of the liver in some situations. The liver grows back find. But just the course of the operation dividing the blood vessels and dividing the liver. is composed some risk to the and the risk to the donors. Life is actually about somewhere between one and two hundred one and three hundred. So it's it's not insignificant to one to two percent chance that you'll die being a living liver donor of one in two hundred one and three hundred so about point five. Yeah well but still. It's a big risk. What's the average? Wait how long do people typically wait for a donation ever? Since the early two thousands they changed the allocation for liver based on the The government's Kinda directive to the transplant community to transplant the sickest patients first so it isn't How long that someone would wait for transplant? But how sick that. They have to get so waiting. Time doesn't really matter unless you have a condition where the scores adjusted because of a tumor something but unfortunately now many of our patients are getting far more sick than they were years ago. Oftentimes they're in the intensive care unit or even on dialysis for Kidney Failure. That results from the liver failure. So I heard you say I think that you would prefer to do a deceased person's US that Their liver as opposed to a living donor correct. We would always prefer to do a deceased donor liver transplant over a living donor transplant. If we can get the liver and the only reason that you would do a living donor. Transplant is if the person On the waiting list Couldn't you couldn't find a deceased liver donor for that person? That's right and the reason we wouldn't be able to find it as that. They're not quite as sick as the other people that are on the deceased donor waiting list. So their score which we call a MELD score model for end stage liver disease and that scores lower because they're not as much risk of dying although they're still pretty sick so in those situations where we can't get a liver until they get more sick we consider living donation. I think the last time that you were on the show with us you had just on your one liver surgery. That might be true so that was one thousand ago so tells about the day you did five in one day. Well it wasn't just me. It was our entire team and There was a day About a year and a half ago and we did do five transplants in one day in Rochester living and deceased donors. They were all deceased donors except for one was a heart liver transplant. And the liver. That patient had Disease called Familial amyloidosis where the liver is normal but it just makes too much of a protein in order to get rid of it you have to get rid of the liver and so you replace the liver with the transplant. And they also needed a heart transplant but deliver that we took out of that patient can be used for another patient and we pick patients that are a little bit older in their upper fifties to sixties or older and they get that disease when they get that new liver but it might take twenty thirty or forty years before it causes trouble. So that day we did do five transplants. One was what we call a domino transplant. The other were four deceased donors. That must be unusual to have that many deceased donor organs become available on one day. And we've actually done the math and for a program that does about one hundred transplants per year over three hundred sixty five days the chance of when we do one transplant chance of doing two or more is about forty three percent. Tell us about pig liver and other organ donation. Are we close to the point in time where we can take up a pig liver and transplanted into a human? We're not very close. But working out with pig cells. Dr Scott Nyberg has a lab and is developing techniques to use pig cells to support human particularly the kind of patients that might be an acute liver failure and just need temporary support with an artificial device Intel. Oliver becomes available or even if their own livermore recover but to actually use a whole organ from a from a non human Is Still on our future more fiction than fact? Yeah so far so you do one hundred a year at Mayo Clinic in Rochester. Three hundred a year system-wide terrific. We actually did a hundred and thirty one in two thousand and sixteen with about twenty one living donors and the rest were deceased donor. So it was an all time high for us as well. That's a Lotta lives saved isn't it? It is liberal. Let you live. That's correct Mayo. Clinic transplant surgeon. Dr Charles Rosen time for short break when we come back..

acute liver failure liver disease chronic liver disease Mayo Clinic Dr Charles Rosen United States Dr Rosen Rochester Mayo Clinic Rochester Arizona Oregon acute hepatitis Minnesota United Kingdom Dr. Tom Shives Tracy McRae Tracy Florida psoriasis
"tracy mcrae" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio on Cancer

Mayo Clinic Radio on Cancer

13:58 min | 4 years ago

"tracy mcrae" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio on Cancer

"Mayo Clinic Radio. Presents conversation about gynecologic cancers with gynecologist Doctor Jaime Gomez the show hosts? Are Dr Tom Shives? And Tracy McRae. This podcast was recorded on September thirteenth. Twenty sixteen. Welcome back to Mayo Clinic. Radio. I'm Dr Tom Shy. And I'm Tracy mccray Tracy the PAP test you've heard of that. Probably had fewer near day should have and that was developed by a Greek physician by the name of George Patton Nicolau. My wife is Greek. And she's going to really like me for this. So it came into use around the nineteen forties. But actually he had discovered that you could find malignant cells under the microscope. Actually in the twenties or early thirties but nobody never got credit for it. Nobody believed him. Dull around the nineteen forties when it finally came into use. And of course that test is called the PAP test or the PAP smear and is now used worldwide for the detection and the prevention of cancer of the cervix and other diseases of the female reproductive tract. What he did what he showed. Was that by gathering just a few cells from the vagina inside the vagina vaginal tract and looking at them under the microscope. You could actually tell whether or not a woman had cancer of the cervix pretty amazing breakthrough. Absolutely the PAP test changed the lives of millions of women and now researchers are working on a screening test for endometrial cancer. Also known as uterine cancer research funded by the National Cancer Institute and Mayo Clinic is developing a screening method using DNA from a Tampon for early detection and screening of endometrial cancers now unique is that DNA from Tampa. How so and and we're talking about uterine cancer as opposed to cervical cancer and the two are connected but the cervix is just the opening of the of the uterus with baby-boomer is now in the age risk category for endometrial cancer. The number of women diagnosed each year is increasing here to discuss this new minimally invasive screening method for endometrial. Cancer is the woman leading the research. Director Jamie baucom Gomez. Welcome back to the program. Dr Beckham Gomez thank you. Dr baucom Gomez Pretty Exciting stuff and truly unique tell us about this using a Tampon to diagnose endometrial uterine cancer absolutely. We're very excited about this. We've known for decades that abnormal cells from inside the uterus can be picked on picked up on PAP smears but it's not very commonly picked up that way there are other markers that are not naked That are not necessarily visible under the microscope. Such as molecular markers that we can actually now test for these are changes in DNA so DNA mutations DNA methylation which is where the gene is actually turned off because of a change to. What's kind of hanging onto the DNA called methyl groups And we can pick those Those changes up not only in the actual cells that are the cancer cells but when those cancer cells shed and flow down through the cervix into the vagina they can be picked up Those those signals can be picked up on PAP smear and we're actually taking it to the next level of Trying to pick them up on the fluid in the vaginal canal because it's in that fluid it's in that fluid and And the reason that we're focusing on detecting this using a Tampon is data. Tampon is a common hygiene product that most women use in fact The tampon business in the United States in two thousand fifteen one point five billion dollars so we know using using that as a surrogate that this is a very common while accepted collection prod collection device. It's not a special Tampon by any means the kind you just buy it the convenience store. Well we're doing from from the research standpoint we're just using the common over the counter regular about Tampon As we develop this test further a likely be something a little bit more specialized so tell us how this works a you you tell the woman To use a Tampon put a Tampon in and then take it out when and then bring it to you is that how does it work so right now. We have clinical trial open In which we are collecting Tampon samples from women who are coming in with abnormal uterine bleeding That are paramount of puzzle or postmenopausal. So it's still in the research phases And before they have a biopsy to determine whether or not there is what the cause of that admirable pleading is on. We're asking them to collect a Tampon They're doing that in the clinic. We time how long it's been in the vagina because that's also part of the test need to figure out exactly how long it It needs to be in the. What's the minimum amount of time? And then the then the Woman goes on to have her clinically indicated biopsy in. How's it doing so far Well so far we've enrolled almost a thousand patients to that to this clinical trial And we're working on the combination of markers DNA methylation mutation Markers a table a test in prospectively in those in those samples with this sounds were some somewhat similar to Coa guard where you take a stool specimen and look for abnormal DNA DNA. That will tell you whether or not the patient has colon cancer. Same principle absolutely. So guard is a combination of mutations. One mutation and Three methylated genes. And they're all they also look for fecal called Hemoglobin so much a colt hemoglobin doctor. Yep exactly so fecal a call him Gordon. They're looking for blood as well. So but it's a multi target DNA test that is self collected and exactly. That's exactly what we're trying to To do with this type of a test. is develop something that is highly patient accepted something that provides women with high access meaning. They could collect the sample at home and potentially mail it in. That's our ultimate view or ultimate vision. I should say that would make I would imagine. Make a big difference for anybody could take part in that. I mean it could be that someone notices that they're not feeling writer. They've got some symptoms but they don't end up going to see a physician. This would be a good step to get that ball rolling absolutely. We know that decreased access to healthcare Does worsen survival in certain cancers. So that's that is something that we are hoping that ultimately we impact so uterine cancer itself. What are the symptoms? Who's WHO's at risk for this particular problem? Yes so there are very well known. Risk factors for uterine cancer. Obesity is probably one of the largest risk factors for wearing fur and mutual cancer Also having diabetes hypertension Those are also hyperloop. -demia those are risk factors having a family history of Uterine Cancer Colon. Cancer Stomach Cancer Those symptoms those cancers tend to If there are families where you can actually see high numbers of those cancers and that's consider Lynch Syndrome are some families are diagnosed with Lynch Syndrome? Which is a genetic condition that puts women at higher risk for uterine cancer? You don't hear about very many women. Dying of uterine cancer. I know it happens but it must is not all that common so it must be very treatable if you can. Just make the diagnosis right. It is It is fairly treatable especially in early stages early stages typically the treatment surgery alone Even in advanced stages There are potential cures but usually it requires extensive surgery radiation and chemotherapy and the side effects of those are oftentimes long lasting. And what are some of the symptoms of endometrial cancer? Yes so symptoms. Ninety percent of women with endometrial cancer will present with some sort of abnormal bleeding or abnormal vaginal bleeding Postmenopausal women I About Even though ninety percent of women with cancer will present with abnormal vaginal bleeding. Only ten percent of women who come in with postmenopausal bleeding will actually have a cancer. Well that's a good thing. It is a good thing it is but also all of those women undergo an Mitchell biopsy which is an invasive procedure and. We're looking to try to help void that as well. It's it just as interesting just as an exciting just as incredible caller of art so We wish you all the success in the world. But now we'll expand our discussion to other reproductive system cancers because September is gynecologic cancer awareness month so Dr Gomez why Why is Ovarian Cancer? The the worst of all of these so ovarian cancer has kind of a long standing nickname. And that is that. It's the silent killer The signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer can be very vague. Despite the fact that it's already in its advanced stages the signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer typically fall into four categories or for For symptoms and that as abdominal bloating distension Change in appetite or society basically getting full fast when you eat Bowel changes Whether it's swinging constipation or diarrhea And then bladder changes Frequency a frequency of urination or urgency. So let's go over those. What's more loading Just WanNa make sure that that all of our listeners have. These bloating is one but that everybody has that at one time or another and you sort of write it off yet. We're talking about something that's constant that's persistent for. You know. Probably more like two weeks or so rather than an intermittent type of process But you're right. That's why these scientists. These symptoms are quite vague. All right and then you had bowel changes Bladder problems and a number two and I had to do with eating society full fast. So is ovarian cancer in a sense somewhat. Like cancer of the pancreas in that because the the ovaries are so deep-seated that tumor has to get fairly large before it does cause any symptoms and by that time it has often metastasized or spread elsewhere. Yeah there are different patterns As far as the spread of ovarian cancer but most often the GI type of symptoms the bowel changes and even the early Feeling full early in a meal. are probably related to the Matassa metastatic deposits that are on the surface of the small intestine large intestine and sometimes even the stomach. So what's this a five year survival rate now for women with ovarian cancer and compare that to? Let's say a decade ago. Are we better? We're better yeah. We've definitely made a lot of progress. I think it's it's hard sometimes to go through to actually dissect what the Five Year. Survival is for ovarian cancer in general because most ovarian cancers are diagnosed at an advanced stage One of the most important prognostic aspects is thorough surgery In the beginning of the diagnosis out. Good you can get it all out. That actually improves five year survival And some studies have actually shown that at five years More than fifty percent of women are still alive who were diagnosed with advanced stage disease. Where is it usually go to from the ovary it starts there? Then where does it spread? it likes to go to an organ that's inside. The abdomen called the mental It is an organ that hangs down off of the stomach and large intestine. So it surgery if you can if it's a metal to the surgery hasn't spread to too many places or too far away from the ovaries chemotherapy. And what about radiation is it? Ever part of the regimen radiation used to be part of the regimen for ovarian cancer but it has It has fallen out of favor. Because we've shown that chemotherapy is actually more effective so treatment for ovarian cancer is a combination of surgery and chemotherapy. Sometimes we give chemotherapy first and then surgery in between two courses of chemotherapy. And what's the average age of the woman diagnosed with ovarian cancer most often? The woman that segments with cancer is going to be in her early sixties so it is yes. September being gynecologic cancer awareness month. We've talked about endometrial cancer and ovarian cancer What's up next cervical while cervical cancer? Also one of our specialties. How deadly cervical cancer so cervical cancer actually the mortality in the United States as well as in other developed nations has dramatically decreased with the introduction of the PAP smear Back in the nineteen forties We also now have the vaccine against the Human Papilloma virus which causes most of most cervical cancers That vaccine or those vaccines. I should say because there's actually a series of them that are that are available those vaccines. We don't think we've seen the impact of them yet. because those are vaccines that are currently indicated for For Young Women Ages Eleven and twelve and men too and Manitou. Yup exactly if enough people love of young people get vaccinated weekend pretty much. Wipe out cervical. What percentage of cervical cancers are caused by this virus ATV? Almost all of them are caused by high risk type of virus. Seventy percent are caused by two specific viruses. Hp Sixteen at HP eighteen in the vaccine. Good against both of those. It is all three. Vaccines that are available are include. Hp Sixteen Eighteen. What's hard to believe but women can also get cancer the vagina often. Do you see that so vaginal cancer is much more rare than than cervical cancer but it is also most often caused by those same viruses the HP viruses the key of that HP. It's it really is a cancer vaccine. I think people tried to diminish it a little bit saying Oh it's a sexually transmitted disease thing but it's it really is a cancer vaccine. Yes it is all three of the vaccines that are available are against The include HP sixteen eighteen As.

Cancer Ovarian Cancer uterine cancer endometrial cancer colon cancer National Cancer Institute Dr Beckham Gomez PAP Doctor Jaime Gomez Mayo Clinic United States HP Tracy mccray Tracy Mayo Clinic Radio Dr Tom Shives Dr Tom Shy Tracy McRae Dr baucom Gomez