20 Burst results for "Tracy K Smith"

Hunter Biden speaks out on laptop controversy ahead of book release

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:57 sec | 4 months ago

Hunter Biden speaks out on laptop controversy ahead of book release

"The senate president biden speaking about the allegations made against him and his father in november. Fox's aisha ozniel reports from new york city with famously called the laptop from hell by former president trump and now hunter biden is knowledge that that laptop could be his own yes or no if the laptop. I've no idea could have been yours. Of course certainly. That exchange with cbs is tracy smith as part of a rare. Sit down interview with hunter biden about his new book and his answer. Now could cast doubt on president biden's previous claims that the laptop was part of a russian disinformation campaign or a smear campaign allows fall. The new york post published emails from the laptop. That was dropped off at a delaware repair shop among those emails. A thank you. Note from an executive at the ukrainian company burris mma alleged meeting. That was set up with hundred biden's father then vice president biden president biden says he was not involved with his son's business

President Biden Hunter Biden Aisha Ozniel Tracy Smith Senate The New York Post FOX New York City CBS Burris Mma Delaware Biden President Biden Biden
"tracy k smith" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

The New Yorker: Poetry

08:14 min | 4 months ago

"tracy k smith" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

"Then they read a home of their own. That's appeared in the magazine. My guest today is toy derek. Hot the poet memoir s and co-founder with cornell cd of the literary organization kavi conham toys honors include the pen volker award for poetry and the paterson poetry prize for sustaining that literate achievement in twenty twenty two received the poetry society of america's frost medal for distinguished lifetime achievement in poetry. Welcome toy so much being here. Thank you kevin for having me good to talk so much to talk about I want to hear the first poem that you've decided to read. Which is we feel. Now a largeness coming on by tracy k smith. What was it that drew you to this poem. As you're looking through our archives. I was so lucky. Because i had planned to spend the whole weekend going through the archives to find something and i started and this poem having been published recently i came upon very quickly and fell madly in love with it and i needed to go no further well. Why don't we hear the poem. Here's toward eric. Hot reading we feel now. A largeness coming on by tracy k smith. We've feel now largeness coming on being called on manner of things from dictionary of shame not english not words not heard but warn borne carried never spent we feel now a largeness coming on something has saying into us we know not in what source it was begun but we watch it rise through our fallen are slain are millions dragged chained like daylight setting. Leave a light green to go to blinding by like a spirit caught flayed in flesh. I watched a woman tried to shake it once from her shoulders and hips a wild annihilating. Other women formed a wall around her holding back. What clamored to rise. God dowell ancestor. What black bodies. Carry through your school's your cities. Do you see how mighty you've made us all these generations running every day stealing ourselves against it every day coaxing it back into coils and all the while feeding at an all the while loving it. That was we feel now. A largeness coming. On tracy k smith which was published in the november twenty third. Twenty twenty issue of the magazine. I love that you pick that poem. That largeness i think is so powerful but it starts with this dictionary of shame which i think is very important for the moment and i wonder how you thought about that she. She says not english. Not words not heard but warn born carried never spent how. How did you take that opening. Well first of all let it amazing image that she found to summarize whatever this is that we have experienced anyone who's ancestor went through slavery. I mean to get that down in three words addiction and then say that You know it's not words that are usually in a dictionary. All the words have double beatings. Like you could wear warne. Like war down and A word like Borne you know not only carried. I have no but you have to think of being born into this sure and even spent which means both exhausted and then also monetary. You know the cost That i think she she captures. Yes and also i was thinking Depleted but no we're not depleted even under all of this So she just came up with words. That are perfect yes one. It's a kind of conjugation almost here. Warren born carry. Never spend it almost as you know. The words are being found and i love that you pay attention on help us. Pay attention to those double meanings because they feel like they're being enacted and that's always what i love and a poem is when a poem makes me you know i'm going on a journey with the poet with the language with in this case this dictionary. That is wordless but so as you put apt and filled with meaning. Yes yes i think. It's an amazing thing that she's convincing the voice. That's talking about something. So big has the authority to save. This she convinces us that she has the authority and yet even as this authoritative voice she's also intimate now. How does she do that. How does she. How does she at the same time. Be this authority and yet feels so intimate. That's right while side. I think some of it is the we which brings it. Even if you're not perhaps by the end of the poem part of the way you are part of the week. It's generous poem even in. Its pointed nece. And that's something. I think a poet like lucille clifton was able to do Miss lucille as you knew. And we each knew her a newer together. She was able to to point out a big thing and make it feel really small. Make it feel intimate as you put it. That's a very good point intimate but not personal intimate in. Isn't that interesting. How it can rise that level where it speaking of an for a multitude. But you know. I think she is talking about now. That word largeness. It's an abstract and yet it's so appropriate and it's not really abstracted as poem you know when she wants to make the poem tight with those sounds the vowels and the consonants you don't that image like daylight setting leaves a light green to go to blinding white mean she makes it pop and So i just think of this largeness. I had to think of a band of gorman because after that inauguration so many people came up to me and said not did you see joseph biden. But did you see amanda gordon. Yeah the inaugural poet the inaugural poet. And i just thought something. People are syncing about this.

joseph biden kevin lucille clifton amanda gordon november twenty third tracy k smith lucille first poem today Twenty twenty issue each english Warren both three words gorman america first twenty twenty two pen volker
"tracy k smith" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

05:35 min | 7 months ago

"tracy k smith" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"What would it cost me to say at now to a strangers. Father walking home to our separate lives together. I think it's a good place to end So one i want to say thank you. This is a really lovely conversation to get the have and to to ask you. The question was used to end the show. Which is what a three books that have mattered to you that you would recommend to the audience. I love that question and thanks for having me Well i just mentioned anna deavere. Smith's notes from the field And there's a book form of that this the thing is the scrapped or the script for that play which is so beautiful because it brings you into the voice and mannerism of so many different people and i feel it so instructive. No matter what you're seeking to do to put yourself in that position. I also recently just taught lucille clifton quilting To my students and that's one of her great books of poetry. I think it was published in the early nineties. But she's thinking about black life in this country she's thinking about different contexts in which family and community Exist and how the reality of intimacy is something that we need to acknowledge and celebrate in the face of sometimes those larger starker unfeeling pub forces that also act upon us. It's a book that also makes a really beautiful argument for the black vernacular as a site of extreme nuance and feeling and joy and and complexity and There's a new book that i think is quite beautiful by a poet named sue wong called bodega. And i think it's a beautiful book because it gives voice to experiences you know coming from an immigrant. family It also celebrates the beautiful like pluralism of this country. All the many voices and languages and traditions and Possibilities that that make this country vibrant and beautiful in that we should On her i think she honors those things really beautifully and and her book tracy smith. Thank you very much. Thank you thank you to tracy smith for being here. That was really wonderful. A couple quick things. Before i go here. One is just finished the biggest leg of my book tour. And i want to thank all of you. Who have come out. It was incredibly and continues to be incredibly meaningful to see been meet people. Actually listen to this. Podcast makes the whole thing. Feel much more tangible and real and i've been really moved by what some of you have told me in the role plays in your life. So thank you for that. Thank you for sharing it with me on. There are a couple more tour stops coming to wire polarized dot com to check that out. I'm including stops in chicago nashville nashville in greenville. In austin and so on so good. Wire polarized check that out. Thank you to tracy. K smith being here. That was wonderful. I really do hope you enjoyed it as much as i did. Thank you to tougher. Ruth for engineering to russia karma for researching. Jeffrey gelb producing show is fox. Media podcast production. I'm journalists swisher. I'm non-journalist scott. Galloway your nyu professor. Every week. we dig into the biggest stories in business tech in politics to help you understand what they actually mean for our future. This week we'll be joined by guests. Including baritone day thurston andrew zorkin amina to sow and any slava to break down our biggest bets for the coming year. Twenty twenty one in our prediction special from big tech the healthcare to higher ed and more look at how monumental changes of twenty twenty will shape the news transit and companies of twenty twenty one and then scott i won't hug and weep together a hugger hugger and i will tell him. He is inadequate. That's what happen to get ready for that. You don't think. I know toughen up because twenty twenty was not going to be any easier than twenty twenty. I'm just giving you that news right now. Because i'm a journalist and you are not my life less and less every day bring it on twenty twenty one check out our prediction special on december twenty second and listened to pivot every tuesday and friday on apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcast. Hi i'm neil patel co founder and editor in chief of the verge and host of decoder a new podcast from the verge and the vox media podcast network about big ideas and other problems. I'll be interviewing. Executives policymakers academics and some other assorted troublemakers about what it takes to build the businesses of the future over a decade covering tech. And i am more convinced than ever that every business is a tech business with some familiar problems to solve in some big new opportunities to seize. you'll hear from years like mark cuban on how technology impacts competition the biggest challenge. We have and i say this all the time is we have helped me that our ads in the have nots and founders like sal khan khan academy on how. The pandemic has accelerated trends. We saw our usage through the roof. As soon as the schools closed it was about two hundred and fifty to three hundred percent of normal. we'll talk about how they're navigating and ever changing landscape. What keeps them up at night and what it all means for our shared future. We're asked him tough questions. We're going to break some news. And we're gonna have some fun so look for decoder with neil patel in apple podcasts or your favorite podcast app..

anna deavere tracy smith lucille clifton sue wong Jeffrey gelb nashville thurston andrew zorkin Smith scott swisher slava greenville amina Galloway nyu tracy Ruth austin chicago russia
"tracy k smith" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

07:27 min | 7 months ago

"tracy k smith" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Welcome the show. The box media podcast network so through december. We're gonna be doing a mix of new shows and a couple best of and the best dubs to be either shows that i really really love at wanna be able to put back out into the world and into the feed or going to shows that i think have a particular residents to what is happening right now so this is the best up show. Please enjoy. this is a really beautiful episode. Had the great privilege of talking to tracy. K smith who is a two-time poet laureate of the united states. She's the author of the memoir ordinary light. Which was a finalist for the national book award. And she's the other four books of poetry including life on mars which at one two thousand twelve pulitzer prize and wade in the water more recently which is just a beautiful beautiful book about america. She's a professor of creative writing at princeton and she's just a very wise humane thoughtful person who speaks in a way that is itself calming and is itself deeply poetic. I says a bit in the show. But i'm someone who's always struggled with poetry. I get turned off really easily. Get intimidated by it. I can't figure it out. And i get frustrated and it was reading what smith has said and written about poetry and what our relationship to it is what that struggles about. That has at least helped me understand that. Maybe some of the things i was understanding is negative their understanding as a lack in myself or not. So this is a one i think. A great conversation about poetry but also about america about democracy about love and what it means. and about how to think and read and operate within language in ways to create more space for interpretation and contradiction. And she's just wonderful. I in the feelings. That language defies. some really really enjoyed. This one i hope you do too. As is my email is as recline show at. Vox dot com again as her client. Show vox dot com. Here's tracy k smith. Tracy smith will come the black cast thank you. I like to start with something. You said at a lecture at the library of congress where he said poetry is not the language we live in. It's not the language of our day to day. Aaron running and allegations not the language with which we are asked to justify ourselves to the outside world and it certainly isn't the language which commercial value has been assigned. What language is i feel like. Poetry is the language that sits really close to feelings. That defy language poetry kind of nudges. Some of our feelings of joy or confusion or desire ward feelings that we can recognize them. Describe i of take solace in the fact that it's that we turn to in big moments of change like the loss of someone or or the birth of a child because poems are resourceful and finding terms that remind us of what we live with but don't always bring into speech. I want to say here. That i'm somebody who has had many periods of my life for of said i'm going to learn to read poetry better and have often become frustrated and and it was really reading your work here. That helped me understand that. Maybe some of my frustrations were the point and not a failure like they say in meditation. That when your mind wanders you bring it back up to the point of the meditation failing at it. I love what you said there. That it's feelings defy language. Because i think something i always understood poetry to be was a kind of technical mastery of language and when i read a lot of your work. It seems that you're saying that. Actually poetry is about the shortcomings of language at the ways in which it becomes sometimes difficult to read our signaling. The ways in which language becomes insufficient for what we need to communicate. Yeah i mean. I feel like i wanna say as a poet. There is a certain degree of mastery that is required to even get into the grey zone of feeling and you know what sits beyond the reach of language. I think poets work really hard to create the scaffolding or the formal mechanism for for these big questions to take shape within but the fact of language even the beauty of language is secondary to the larger. Work the poem. Which as you say a thing. It's to enter into that. The uncharted emotional territory or to bring us with a greater sense of courage and resourcefulness toward the things that are just messy overwhelming. Rife with conflict or contradiction and those are the things that that live on. The surface of social life right politics and family and love is kind of tangled up with some of those things as well and so poems tread in that direction and they do something to give us a sense of what we feel what we're apart of and what that means what. What's a poem for you. That gets at that. Feelings defy language i. It feels like such contradictory thing to say that something built of language can help express something that defies language. What's what's an example for people that might make that more legible. If we want. Wanna talk about contradiction. I guess two things come to mind. One is like all of the parables in the new testament. You know where crisis trying to explain to the disciples that there is something that is reeler than real that they can't see that they can feel if they allow themselves to and that they can anticipate their life can be a kind of of communicating with that other space. You know the spirit realm or the afterlife or the realm of god and so all of the language of those stories is metaphor the bread of life or even stories of somebody who is afflicted and somehow healed about affliction. I like to imagine that. That's one of the early instances of poetry or one of the one of the examples of how symbolic evocative metaphor rich. Language can help us come close to imagining something. That's essentially ineffable but then there's another poem that By lucille clifton. That speaks to another kind of contradiction. Many of her homes are untitled. And so this one begins Won't you celebrate with me. What i have made into a kind of life. She's talking about being born. She describes it as non white and woman and having to live without a sense of a model for how to survive how to manifest herself. The end of the poem arrives at. Won't you celebrate with me that every day. Something has tried to kill me and has failed. And there's this wonderful feeling of fear and rapture that that closure kind of insights for me. There is a space that we believe even that we kind of have to operate within. And then there's something else and the something else is important to take stock of you wrote. Or he said in that speech that i'm operating on the notion that poetry can save me from disappearing into the narrow version of myself may be tempted to resort to when i feel lazy or.

america tracy k smith smith national book award Tracy smith pulitzer prize tracy princeton library of congress Aaron confusion reeler lucille clifton
George Clooney says he has cut his own hair 'for 25 years'

CBS Weekend News Roundup

02:22 min | 8 months ago

George Clooney says he has cut his own hair 'for 25 years'

"Display in the movie Ocean's 11. This morning. He's in conversation about his latest film with Tracy Smith. Come in either. This is Barbeau Observatory. Are you receiving this? Yep. That's him. Is anyone out there? Our galaxy alone? There are billions of stars. At least one of them has the potential to support life in the futuristic thriller the Midnight Sky. George Clooney is a lone scientist trying to warn astronauts away from an earth that is no longer habitable. And all while he's caring for a young child, understand for the movie, Clooney grew a beard, drop some weight and put on his director's hat. Take a deep breath You haven't been taking on a lot of acting rules. What was it about this project that was so compelling that you decided to direct and act in it. I saw the part. I thought, Well, there's a really great part. And then I had an idea of how to tell the story. And so I called them Netflix and said, You know, I think I think I have a take on it. As we see early in case what we wanna do is with our graphic is habit just getting developed. Strong T C. You're gonna watch you go from blue to Brown. Let's try that. With the film in theaters and on Netflix December, 23rd is both powerful. And poignant and don't even ask about the ending. Clooney shot it all last year just before the real world. Shut down. Are you enjoying being home all the time now? Well, look, no system, Way met George at his home in L. A, where he spent the past few months with his wife, human rights lawyer Amal Clooney, their two kids. And a whole lot of time on his hands. It's been a while since I did, you know, 15 loads of laundry and a day and mop floors. And you know all these doors over here, I stained and there was, you know, I always say, I felt like my mother in 1964 because she had two kids and no help, and I don't know how she did it. Now I have more sympathy for now than ever. And have you been cutting your own hair? I've been getting my own effort, 25 years, so it has nothing to do with quarantine. Look, I have my hair is like really like straw,

Barbeau Observatory The Midnight Sky Tracy Smith Clooney Netflix George Clooney Amal Clooney Brown George
"tracy k smith" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

The New Yorker: Poetry

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"tracy k smith" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

"Bear. Was Declaration by Tracy K Smith originally published the November six twenty seventeen issue of the New Yorker I wonder if there's any initial thoughts we have about hearing that poem again I was really struck by the line the form of our just because with poetry we're also talking about form and a form of redress as it were, and I think it takes such different stance than a declaration, though it of course is a different kind. It isn't a speech, but it uses speech, too. I think think about what speech does. What speech doesn't do? and I wonder if we have any initial thoughts about that. Just about erasure in general. When you say, form right now when I'm kind of in the wake of that poem thinking about. All of the actions, all of the efforts, all of the movements and attempts to be heard that we as black citizens of this nation have taken and they happen through. You know physical presence through taking a knee through language through our I feel in reading that Pohan I am not the speaker of this poem I feel like the Doggie minutes trying to tell us something and even the resignation and simmering rage and are repeated. Petitions have been answered only by repeated injury I feel. My hackles raised thinking about even in the last month. How the repeated injury seems to be presenting so so much. It's uncanny the way that you know the language can be another metaphor for the real, young. said. You know we're in this moment right now. Where all of these patriotic efforts at civil disobedience at peaceful manifestation are being called out now as anti American by route, you know reactionary opposition. And what I think is so. True for those of us who are trying to bring the question of black life into the national conversation something that we should value and protect. Is that. This is coming out of a love for America Even the fact that we're looking at one of America's foundational documents for guidance and helping us through this crisis in America. I think it also be speaks to sense of belief and hope. For the country that we do belong to do claim will also points out that unrest is the start of the nation but also that paradox is there that there is this. Paradox of freedom and land that has enslavement built into it, and all sorts of tensions that are in that document and I think what a poem does. all poems do this, but I think this kind of erasure pointed out even more, is it? It's a dance between silence and speech. You know in the sort of unspoken. COMES UP A lot in in that poem. Maryland in your poem pigeon on Hawkers a lot of what isn't said, or what the kind of poor tent of the whole poem. Is there anything else you'd like to say about the polar for we hear it. A little bit I suppose Great debt to Maryland. Hacker sure suggesting I write the story. I told her that this anecdote. Could it happen to me? And she said you should make a com out of it can be a companion piece to another poem written cub minor miracle. She said that way you'd have to similar hopeful story so. That's. Most useful thing I think I can see. That's great, so let's have a listen. This is Marilyn Nelson reading pigeon and.

America Maryland Bear. Marilyn Nelson Tracy K Smith young.
Alicia Keys reflects on the journey to know herself

CBS Weekend News Roundup

00:59 sec | 1 year ago

Alicia Keys reflects on the journey to know herself

"Our Tracy Smith sat down with Alicia keys to chat about her new book as well as other matters here's their conversation for the record Alicia keys might be the reigning queen of cool with her megawatt smile and her fifteen Grammy awards she's a one woman musical empire with more sold out concerts than she can name and more fans than she can count but even as she was rocketing to new heights of fame the private Alicia keys was struggling with some lingering doubts about what she was doing why she was doing it and even who she was it's a big deal

Tracy Smith Alicia Keys Grammy
"tracy k smith" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"tracy k smith" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Called Bodega. And I think it's a beautiful book because it gives voice to experiences you know coming from an immigrant family It also celebrates the beautiful like pluralism of this country. All the many voices and languages and traditions and Possibilities that that make this country vibrant and beautiful in that. We should Honor I think she honors those things early beautifully and her book Tracy Smith. Thank you very much. Thank you thank you to Tracy Smith for being here. That was really wonderful A couple of things before I go here. One is just finished the biggest leg of my book tour and I want to thank all of you. Who HAVE COME OUT? It was incredibly and continues to be incredibly meaningful to see. Been meet people. Actually listen to this podcast. It makes the whole thing feel much more tangible and real and I've been really moved by what some of you have told me in the role plays in your life. So thank you for that and thank you for sharing it with on. There are a couple more tour stops coming you can go to wire polarize dot com to check that out on including stops in. Chicago IN NASHVILLE IN. Greenville in Austin and so on so good wire polarize. Check that out. Thank you to Tracy K Smith for being here. That was wonderful. I really do hope you enjoyed it as much as I did. Thank you to toe for Ruth for engineering. Terrific Karma for researching. Jeffrey Geld producing Conn. Show is Fox media podcasts production. This episode is brought to you by Flan school. The New Year brings a new decade future. Proof your career for decades to come with a career intact with the number one rated coding bootcamp. I course report that are in. School is committed to student success and sets the bar for the industry with a soaring ninety. Three percent employment rate for job seeking on campus and online grabs included in just released independently. Verified jobs report learn in demand skills like software engineering data science. You EX design and Cybersecurity to launch your career and tech with one to one support from dedicated career coaches get the full twenty nineteen jobs report at flat. I in school dot com slash. Vox this episode is brought to you by bullet Bourbon. Bullets subtle complex flavor comes from a unique blend of Rye corn barley. Malt bullet changed the game with High Ri- Mash Bill that brings forward boulders spicier flavours. But it's one thing to talk about bullet Bourbon. It's another thing to taste them. So that's what we're GonNa do some urban. I'm ready this is Leeann Love I. I'm going to take it out of this paper bag because we keep it classy. Well the draft all right. Let's go yeah. Tell me about what you're tasting. Well it's super smooth. It sort of his little bit witty little bit sweet. Not too sweet. How do you feel about the finish after SIP? It again to no future. Will you take us out? Will you read the end? Yeah sure I'd love to learn more. Go to bullet DOT com today or just ask bartender for bullet. That's B. U. L. L. E. I. T. dot com please drink responsibly. The Bullet Distilling Company Louisville Kentucky..

Tracy K Smith Flan school Jeffrey Geld Louisville Fox media Kentucky Ruth Greenville NASHVILLE B. U. L. L. E. Chicago Austin
"tracy k smith" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:56 min | 1 year ago

"tracy k smith" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Meeting many many Americans do our voices sound more similar than we I think when we dip below that decibel level I really wanted the answer to be yes and I said okay. I'm going to do this project and see what the answer actually is and I do believe that the answer is yes. I wasn't arguing policy with people I was talking about how the aspects of individual lived life that come up and poem. Some of those things speak to policy. You know immigration. What does it feel like to be a stranger in a place where you may not be welcome or thinking about language and community and home We weren't categorising or defending or justifying practices. We were saying this person seems to be feeling this thing and you know what the last time I felt this thing. It was like this. We all We all do sound very similar when we're speaking at that level I'm not as an authority not as a The representative of perspective. But as somebody who's alive on this earth I was in a a lot of places where I know the values that people hold are different from mine and yet I feel like we were able to enter into the nuances. That let's it beneath the ways that sometimes difference can feel threatening. We were able to say oh. You see that that way. That's interesting I hadn't thought about it like that. I actually see it like this to me. That seems like where we we ought to spend most of our time But of course we're encouraged edged to do otherwise because we're we're encouraged to have a brand were encouraged to Sort of talk back to or shout down people who don't Celebrate our ideas and were encouraged to you. Know kind of like judge wjr but if those temptations were kind of like sidelined a little bit I think we actually feel so much better. Even in our difference friends I keep thinking what you said at the top of the show achieving an impossible kind of listening. It's not as impossible as we think right. Let me just like the last caller said we just have to make space for it. We have to say okay the mode that I find myself in when I'm on social media media is one mode but there's another that I want to practice with others and it feels like this. Well well we've got about two minutes. I was going to darn it. I think I've run out of time because I was going to ask you to read another poem but I don't want you to have to rush through it here So I I will tell folks they should pick up Wade in the water. Your your one of your more recent anthologies because we were going to. Have you read an old story right. which is a fabulous poem? How long do you think it takes you to read it? I'll I I don't know I could probably read it in one minute or I could talk to you about it. What do you read it? Oh you do okay okay. An old story we were made to understand. It would be terrible every small. Want every niggling blink urge every hate swollen to a kind of epic wind livid the land and ravaged like a rage full dream the worst in US having taken over and broken the rest utterly down along age past when at last we knew how little would survive us. How little we had mended or built? That was not now lost something and large and old awoke and then are singing brought on a different manner of weather. Then animals as long believed gone crept down from trees. We took newstalk of one another. We wept to be reminded head of such Color Tracy K Smith reading an old story from her anthology. Wade in the water water. And Tracy'd thank you so much for helping US take new stock banks magnets been a real pleasure. It has been such an honor to speak with you. Done it a couple of times and hope you come back again. Sometimes that we'll tracy. K Smith served two terms as poet laureate from two thousand seventeen to two thousand nineteen. She's also professor of the humanities and chair of the Lewis Center for the arts at Princeton University Magna Cromartie. This is on point..

US Wade Tracy K Smith professor Princeton University Magna Cro representative Lewis Center
"tracy k smith" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"tracy k smith" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Country and what she learned what we can all learn. Let's go to Katie. WHO's calling from from Detroit Michigan Katie? You're on the air. It's a great pleasure to speak to Tracy and I'd like to know that I spend Fiber Kenyan. It's with her every morning on her Newsletter to slow down and I'd like to give a big shout out for that that and this morning at was snowflakes and here in Michigan. I'm well acquainted with snowflakes and it was by longfellow pillow. But every morning I usually forward one of her poems to friends of mine and I'm I'm delighted to have that connection and to give high praise to Tracy and know now that she's being heard all over the world will Katie. Thank you And Tracy before I let you responded let me just turn to Arthur. WHO's calling from Riverton in West? Virginia are Sir. Are you a fan of the slowdown as well. I am definitely a fan of the slowdown. And I'd be came name enamored with poetry because of it and West Virginia Public Broadcasting Broadcast the slow down two times a day. It's wonderful wonderful and Tracy worked so well and explains it's just a wonderful setup and I really really appreciate it. She has a beautiful voice. She gives her impression or understanding of what the poem means and then and she reads it. It's fantastic thanks for listening to that. Arthur what difference has it made to you in in a hearing Tracy K Smith do all that in. It's a tricky. It's a podcast right. Is this little yeah. It's a podcast that also airs on certain You know affiliated stations And it's it's short. It's five minutes so spend the first three minutes In some sort of a reflection about some aspect of life for maybe even history that connects in some way with the poem. And what I imagined that I might be doing is opening up a space for a listener To receive the poem. You know on the go per helped me immensely to understand how poetry works and I I just I'm I'm so happy to be able to say this and tell Tracy how much I I appreciate it. What she had been doing with the slowdown? Thank you that means so much to hear from you. Arthur thank you so much for that call. Let's sneak in another one. He'll go to. James is calling from Hattiesburg Mississippi James. You're on the air. Hello and May I say it's an Alderman James Nice to hear you can you I would like to say that or Ask your opinion on the idea. Third Tree is prayer or mantra in in particular. I'm thinking about a poem by Nixon Waterman. That's very close to my heart. Call if I knew you and I try to use this poem It's if I knew you when you knew me if both of us could clearly see in with an inner site divine the meaning of your heart and mind. I think that we differ. Lesson class for hands friendliness. Our thoughts flexibly agree. If I knew you and you knew me and that poem is something. I tried to keep in mind In Gra site Upon meeting a new person or dealing dealing with the person who I am having a difficult time with if we're at odds that's beautiful and yeah imagine if all of us lived and with that poem and our hearts just at the tip of her tongue I do think that poems urge us to Do the difficult work of of listening and also empathizing Whatever that means for for for you in in whatever the situation is to say what does this other perspective stem from.

Tracy K Smith Arthur Katie Nixon Waterman Alderman James Nice Michigan Detroit West Virginia Riverton Virginia Hattiesburg Mississippi West
"tracy k smith" Discussed on The Slowdown

The Slowdown

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"tracy k smith" Discussed on The Slowdown

"I'm Tracy K Smith and this is a slow the slowdown is a production of American public media in partnership with the Poetry Foundation

Tracy K Smith Poetry Foundation
"tracy k smith" Discussed on The Slowdown

The Slowdown

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"tracy k smith" Discussed on The Slowdown

"I'm Tracy K Smith and this is the

Tracy K Smith
"tracy k smith" Discussed on The Slowdown

The Slowdown

05:01 min | 2 years ago

"tracy k smith" Discussed on The Slowdown

"<music> i'm tracy k smith and this is a slow oh down every year.

tracy k smith
"tracy k smith" Discussed on The Slowdown

The Slowdown

05:28 min | 2 years ago

"tracy k smith" Discussed on The Slowdown

"<music> i'm tracy k smith and this is the slow oh down.

tracy k smith
"tracy k smith" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"tracy k smith" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"So much for talking with us thank you tracy k smith who recently finished her term is poet laureate of the united states she talked with kevin you're on the new yorkers poetry editor and he's also the director of the schaumburg center for research in black culture this new yorker radio hour tracy k smith read one more palm for us from her latest collection wade in the water let's end on that the problem is set in texas and it's called hill country he comes down from the hills from the craggy rock the shrubs the scrawny live oaks and dried up junipers down from the cloud bellies and the bally's of hawks from the cara cara stocking carcasses from the clear son smacked soundless miss that shrouds him from the weather's bad of planks outside the cabin where he goes to be alone with his questions god comes down along the road with his windows unrolled so the twigs and hanging vines can slap and scrape against him in his jeep down past the book caught in the hog trap that kicks and heats bloodied blinded by the whiff of its own death which god thank god staved off he downshifts crosses the shallow trickle of river that only just last may scour the side of the canyon to rock gets out walks along the limestone bank castor beans cactus scat of last night's coyotes down below the hilltops he's wins out at chateau tree backing tree dark debt be i glides across not bothering to decipher what it hides a pair of dragon flies mate in flight tiny flowers through frantic color at his feet if he tries if he holds his mind in place and wills it he could almost be leaving something larger larger than himself rearranging the air you glance at the jeep glaring in bright sun stairs awhile at patterns the tall branches cast onto the underside of leave then god climbs back into the cat returning.

united states director schaumburg center tracy k smith texas bally chateau tree poetry editor
"tracy k smith" Discussed on The Slowdown

The Slowdown

05:01 min | 2 years ago

"tracy k smith" Discussed on The Slowdown

"I'm US poet laureate. Tracy k Smith, and this is the slowdown. Is complicated because people are complicated. There are things we must have and things we absolutely will not tolerate and in between there is the messy gray area where we spend much of our lives. I think that gray area is like life laboratory. It's where we learn to adapt to admit to our own need to change to ask for what we need and to help the people we care about to evolve. It's where we learn the patients of sticking things out and other times, the tact of leaving with kindness rather than acrimony. It's not easy. Sometimes the grays owned can feel like a circle of hell, but I suspect the emotional work we undertake while there is as important as anything else, we might endeavor to do. And today's poem purple bathing suit by former US poet laureate. Louise, Glick one person comes clean about what it feels like to be married to someone who isn't perfect like life. The poem is by turns funny and biting it looks closely at the small things that create the fabric of shared life. I envision the speaker as she though, perhaps you'll envision a he or they gender aside. What I see is a person able to find evidence of every relationship flaw in the way, a significant other tends to the garden. I'm reminded of the ways that married couples bicker through years and years of cohabitation, and yes love I think there are many things that make this poem remarkable chief among them. It's final stanza and the way that the poem speaker allows her or him or their self to be implicated in the relationships deepest problems. I can't tell what the future of this relationship will be the poem sets in a book that chronicles a divorce. So I suspect this poem tracks the kind of realization that sometimes allows people to set themselves free, whether or not this is the case the poem invites me into the Gray's own as an empathetic. Observer it offers me a new vocabulary for leveraging and accepting blame. And it reminds me that these moments of gravely serious realization are also sometimes undeniably funny. Purple bathing suit by Louise Glick. I like watching you garden with your back to me in your purple bathing suit. Your back is my favourite part of you the part furthest away from your mouth, you might give some thought to that mouth. Also to the way, you we'd breaking the grass off at ground level when you should pull it by the roots. How many times do I have to tell you how the grass spreads your little pile notwithstanding in a dark mass which by smoothing over the surface. You have finally fully obscured. Watching you stare into space in the tidy rows of the vegetable garden ostensibly working hard while actually doing the worst job possible. I think you are. A small irritating purple thing. And I would like to see you walk off the face of the earth because you are all that's wrong with my life. And I need you. And I claim you. The slowdown is a production of American public media in partnership with the library of congress and the poetry foundation to get a poem delivered to you daily. Go to slow down show dot org and sign up for our newsletter.

Louise Glick US Tracy k Smith congress
"tracy k smith" Discussed on The Slowdown

The Slowdown

05:01 min | 2 years ago

"tracy k smith" Discussed on The Slowdown

"US poet laureate, Tracy k Smith, and this is the slowdown. Before I became apparent it used to be that traveling alone was a blissful enterprise. A chance to lift off from my known life and touchdown in a brand new adventure, and that initial feeling of lift-off when the plane I let go of the ground and rose as if weightless into the air that was the moment, my heart leapt in my chest, telling me, I was on my way now when I travel the feeling is different even when I'm excited by my destination and happy about what I'll be doing there that initial leap into the air feel so much more abrupt, it seems to be yanking me away from where I most want to be which is at home with my family. Up at night in hotels. Sometimes I worry will the kids wake up happy. Will they eat enough and brush their teeth and make it to the bus on time. Bill tomorrow be a good day. And those are just the small fears. There's a whole concert of larger worries that I as a parent carry like can I trust where they're going and that they'll be safe, and how will the people they come into contact with respond to the fact of their race. I guess the other question in my heart is something like will the world hold. Will there be enough? Trees and clean water. Will we hear in our pocket of space? Still no peace in a decade or two or three. I find today's poem on days when we both travel by bay area poet, Brenda Hillman to be incredibly useful in both my worry. And my hope and though the speaker may not be contemplating her children. There is a strong bond that of a life partner. She is mindful of we are so vulnerable. She seems to be realising. But there are small things that keep us anchored birdsong the birth of new baby words that prove others are struggling searching attempting to hang onto the large and small emblems of what matters. What does a poem any poem solve no matter the poem? The answer's always not enough life is rife with uncertainty. But I believe there is something real in the constellation of another human voice reporting back from its leg of the journey. On days when we both travel by Brenda Hillman. Everything is so stressful wasn't always like this air full of bitter flex from the fires, friends and despair over violence and money for many of feeling of being unhinged or if not unhinged. One screw taken out of the door. You got up and left before dawn taking afraid black bag. I left soon after that afraid going the opposite way daily this curtain between death and life than ks. Baby is born just north of here. Now, the four part call of the crow snags gravity from stars that crashed millions of years back the four floats and my blood like a broken chair in a flood on the play. Plane. I read the work of friends on earth abstract intimate grounded or rough difficult delved simple or winged. Sometimes poetry can't do enough or sometimes poetry can do enough. The slowdown is a production of American public media in partnership with the library of congress and the poetry foundation.

Brenda Hillman US Tracy k Smith congress Bill partner ks
"tracy k smith" Discussed on The Slowdown

The Slowdown

05:01 min | 2 years ago

"tracy k smith" Discussed on The Slowdown

"Yeah. I'm u s poet laureate. Tracy k Smith, and this is the slowdown. If I had to I'd say that the questions driving me as a poet, then possibly even as a person are these who. And what are we what fast mysterious system? Do we belong to? And why do we do the things we do to one another? I don't imagine. My questions are in any way unique. I suspect people have been asking some version of them since well since people began. It's not that. I'm so eager to know. What I am. And why I'm here though, that does intrigue me what fascinates me more has to do with the people. I love the ones who were once here and now are gone. Where have they gone? My mind persists in asking. As for the ones, I love who are here living breathing growing and even fighting their way through day after day. I struggled to imagine what brought them here. And why and how it is that our lives have managed to intersect one another one slight change of direction even just a dozen years ago, and whose husband or partner would my husband now be and what our children have found their way to earth through some other human mother, or would they have taken on an altogether different form. It's a puzzle that won't consent to being solved. Even when I land on something that seems to make sense. The matter won't stay resolved for long as if understanding is itself a barrier to the kind of certainty. I'm after. Of course, whatever we think we know about ourselves may have no bearing upon what the universe knows about itself. And who knows maybe the universe or whatever might exist beyond it understands as little of us as we do of it. Today's poem is walking home by poet, j Udal of tiptoe, Louisiana. I respond to the ease. Even the pleasure. The poem speaker takes with these great mysteries. The poem even seems to find satisfaction in the broad spectrum of possibilities that our lives on earth represent be they bright or Blake. Walking home by j Udal. I walked as if I went alone a world unto myself, a globe balanced onto strange sticks. But with each step the steady seeming earth held my dreaming weight and carried me along. With each unmindful breath air came to greet, my grateful lungs, and fed the blood that fed my brain without a plan without a thought. The sun escorted me as if he'd summoned these is into site lighting and warming the way waiting patiently whenever the breathing trees bathed me in their shade. And while I slept gravity. Kept me safe in my place among the other animals, eating one another. I knew the earthquake would come along with the flood hurricane drought tornado soon. Nami wayward meteor and then the hot finale with that waiting star still I loved the uncertain floor this house whose walls we've never found. The slowdown is a production of American public media in partnership with the library of congress and the poetry foundation to get a poem delivered to you daily. Go to slowdown show dot org and sign up for our newsletter.

Tracy k Smith j Udal congress partner Louisiana Blake
"tracy k smith" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:10 min | 2 years ago

"tracy k smith" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"My poem is going to be attract. But if I can say, what are the the sort of weird spaces that are under imagined? What are the areas where I m already perpetuating something that is part of what I envisioned as the problem, or what are the imagined spaces? I can enter into where I have to get uncomfortably close to that problem. That's where something really I think interesting starts to happen. I might finish a poem and see something differently. It doesn't necessarily change the sense of outrage that might also feel but it's eliminated something. That that feels productive. I think that discipline that you describe doesn't just apply to the writing of the poem like somehow. Outrage is justified can be justified at can be important. It can be a moral response. But finding how we let it drive us. And when we know in fact being motivated by it won't affect. Yeah. We actually need to affect. I mean, even those two words they feel so. It's a forceful, but it doesn't feel creative generative and changing things is it's a generative act. I think can I read a poem. Yes. Okay. There's a. A photo that everybody's probably seen that came out of the black lives matter movement a couple years ago. It's called unrest in Baton Rouge. And it depicts a woman. Her name is Asia Evans, she's wearing this Ghazi sundress blowing in the wind. And then on the other side of the frame. There are a row of police officers in combat gear, and I was invited to write a poem about that image, which I saw and I felt something like certain and powerful when I saw it. But the poem had me think differently had to come up with different terms for what I saw and those terms pushed me to think about what we do or what we might do differently. Push me to think about fear, which is also I think part of that image differently. Unrest in Baton Rouge. Our bodies run with ink dark blood blood pools in the pavements scenes. Is it strange to say love is a language few practice, but all or near all speak. Even the men in black armor, the ones jangling, handcuffs and keys. What else are they so buffered against if not loves blade? Sizing up the hearts from millier meat. We watch and grieve we sleep stir eat. Love the heart sliced open, gut it clean. Love naked almost in the everlasting street, skirt lifted by a different kind of breeze. It felt almost frightening to put love in the center of that image and to imagine that the officers which to me seem like the threat were susceptible to something that's stronger than they are which is love it made me also say, right? I mean, if I am going to love a stranger or even my neighbor, I'm vulnerable to them. And I've got to say, okay. I know this is important to me. But I think about being faithful to what's important to you and so- framing it like that. I mean, the terms in the poem change my sense of what's at stake, not just in the photograph. But in in our interactions with each other, and that felt sort of scary and productive. I'm Krista Tippett. And this is on being today. A public conversation with the US poet laureate. Tracy k Smith..

Baton Rouge Asia Evans Krista Tippett US Tracy k Smith
"tracy k smith" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:27 min | 2 years ago

"tracy k smith" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Oh, it's such a joy to be here. I just I said to somebody backstage I've wanted to come to gesture in forever. This is such a legendary sacred place and such a creative religious place. Into Bahir with Tracy k Smith. I I've been. We have known. So when did we start? Oh, you you turned up on the stage of this selected shorts. And that was the first time we met and I knew and so I've known I wanted to speak with her for a long time. But now when we've been together, I have been purposely, not speaking about anything full. It's all here with you tonight. And I even avoided or backstage, so. Okay. And you are the fifty second US put laureate. I think all the time about this moment, we inhabit and. You know, the day after the election of two thousand sixteen it feels so clear to me that. Whoever had one well actually moving through that lawyer who ever had won the work head, and I always found myself coming up with these images of like sewing or knitting, which I don't do. But like stitching weaving mending, whatever come in life. Can be for the twenty-first century must be for the twenty first century. And I think we would have had to reinvent that. Anyway, because it was never going to be what it was in nine hundred fifty six or two thousand six but then there's this ad there. Are these chasms were suddenly revealed many of which already been there we haven't seen them? So you here in this community have been doing this work of I think at re imagining matters of common life at the intersection of religion, and politics, and Tracy has spent the last year using her stature in the ceremony of her role as poet laureate being out there in the country and being in parts of the country that she didn't know before. And there's one place you said I'd love this. You said. Of because the poet laureate can kind of do what they want with the role. But you said I I wanted to see if it's true that the feelings poems alert us to equip us to transcendent cross divides, and you've specifically focused on the geographic divide. But but naming the fact that those geographic divides contain so many other points of identity separation. So here we are. So we are going to have a conversation up here for half an hour, forty minutes. And then we're going to open it up for some questions that might be on your mind. I will I think somebody will wave at me in a little while until you believe you may have did everybody have a card on their seat. So at some point we'll collect those cards will speak for ten more minutes. And then we'll open it up, and we'll close the our back up here together. And I brought Wade in the water and you brought everything. So I want you to feel free. Like, I may ask you to read some poems. I want us want you to feel free. If you feel called just pull out a book any book. So you were born in Massachusetts in race in northern California. I wonder how you would how you would begin to describe the religious and spiritual background your childhood. Well. I was born into a household work. God lived that's what it feels like my parents were both. Faithful people problem the south. I think they had different different relationships to that faith, but they both came from the black church and my parents were born in the mid thirties. And I understand that the community that the church fostered was spiritual and social, you know, there's the sense of you know, God can make your life better. And if we can look out for each other, and if we can hold ourselves to a standard of discipline. It's going to be a lot easier to live in the segregated plays. So I think I got both strains of that growing up. I mean generation leader the political climate was different. But. I think the sense of discipline and the sense that we oh something larger than ourselves. Our best was a big part of what I was raised just knowing. But faith was also. Something that my mother cleaved to toward the end of her life. She was diagnosed with cancer when I was leaving home for college. And..

Tracy k Smith US black church Bahir Massachusetts Wade California forty minutes fifty second