19 Episode results for "Toya Brown"

Full Episode: Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Nightline

00:00 sec | 2 years ago

Full Episode: Wednesday, January 16, 2019

"Are you hiring with indeed you can post a job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started today at indeed dot com slash podcast. That's indeed dot com slash podcast. Good evening. And thank you for joining us. She was sentenced to life in prison for murder she committed as a teenager. But after a headline grabbing fight for clemency sin. Toya Brown will be a free woman in August. And when she walks out of prison, it will change more than just her life. Here's ABC's Adrian banker. I just want to say, thank you. I on a lot of people get to see you. But I have prayed. On top. Two. Sinn Toya Brown is begging for mercy. The thirty year old is a college graduate an advocate against sex trafficking. And a convicted murderer. There's there's nothing to say to justify you can't justify. Can't. Kill donate. Alan. He's gone. I was reading. Brown admits she did it. But maintains her sentence was too harsh for a teenager. It would take nearly fifteen years and attention from a list celebrities to put her case in the national spotlight and highlight juvenile Justice in America. Documentary. Filmmaker Dan Berman has been following Brown's case since the beginning within a day after Toyo was arrested, the juvenile public defender who was defending sin Toya gave me a call and said, we just arrested somebody who we think you ought to meet officials in Tennessee granted Berman access to the then teenager all the way through her criminal trial. The idea of the original film was really to explore how one child's situation could be adot connector for juvenile's across America round was arrested for the murder of forty three year old Johnny Allen. The teen said she was being prostituted by a pimp named cutthroat. Cameras were rolling as she described cutthroats psychiatrist. I. Tell me best out. He was a joke. What else did he do to? People. On this j hockey I in. Have you ever have sex with the guys? Sinn Toya's says cutthroats sent her out to work on that August night in two thousand four he ended up at a sonic where she met Allan he offered to pay her a hundred and fifty dollars and took her home where the two ended up in bed at first disturbed me. But then it's like he just grabbed me like in between my legs. I he just grabbed a real hard. And he just gave me this look if as a fierce, look and just Cindy's chills, mice fine. I'm thinking he's hitting or do something like that. But then he rose over and reaches like, he's reach inside the better something. So I'm thinking he's not gonna hit me. He's gonna get a gun. And once you do that. I just got the gun and shot him. Prosecutors argued Brown's real motive was robbery she ran away with cash guns, and Allen's car, which she abandoned she eventually anonymously called nine one one of the facts of the case didn't look good. What I couldn't see is that Cynthia was at the tail end of three generations of violence against women in Berman's two thousand eleven documentary. Me facing life's in Toya's story. The filmmaker dives deep into Brown's family background. She was given up for adoption, very young firm and met Brown's biological mother. Gina who had sin Toya when she was just sixteen. When I got pregnant, I was I was drinking. And even after my pregnancy. I still drink on a daily basis I could drink a bottle that was this big by myself. Every day. Tests would show Brown was on the fetal alcohol spectrum disorder that impacts the brain and behavior. Brown also says she was sexually abused as a child abuse that continued into her teens both by relatives. And strangers that first Alaba sleep I woke up, and he might him. He choked me into it. He was his best friend, and he got me in Allen's murder Brown was eventually charged. Tried and convicted as an adult. In Tennessee that carries a life sentence, sixty years behind bars. Even with good behavior round would have to serve at least fifty one years before any chance of parole. What now? We are the most Conan in nature when it comes to how we handle juvenile's in this country with sentencing laws a pair of recent supreme court rulings found mandatory life sentences without parole for juveniles were unconstitutional, except in rare circumstances since two thousand fourteen at least twenty four states have enacted new measures like requiring reviews of life sentences given to teenagers. Tennessee isn't one of them. A lot of people not just in Tennessee. But across the country believed that the juvenile Justice system they used to be reformed to recognize that juvenile offenders are different. From a dull defenders attorney Eddie are, bro. Joined Brown's case more than a year ago. The generally juvenile's brains are not fully developed before age eighteen and obviously the younger they are the less development. You have one thing that has changed in Tennessee since Brown's trial sex trafficking laws though longer a child arrested for prostitution is. Considered as a prostitute under Tennessee law. They are now considered victims of sex trafficking of human trafficking. That's new it suggests that his sin Toyo were arrested today. She would have been looked at through a different lens. What has the world outside evolved? Brown grew up behind bars at first struggling. For the past two years working on making a personality. I've ever had before. She went on to earn her GED, then her associate's degree after years of unsuccessful legal. Appeals Brown's case got an unexpected boost from Hollywood in two thousand seventeen riana put round story on Instagram posting under the hash tag free sin. Toya Brown saying something is horribly wrong. When the system enables these rapists, and the victim is thrown away for life. The hashtags spread like wildfire attracting other celebrities like actresses, Ashley Judd, Amy Schumer, Elizabeth banks alyssum Alano and Kim Kardashian saying we'd have to do better and do what's right Kardashian making headlines last year after lobbying President Trump to pardon Alice Johnson, a grandmother who was sentenced to life in prison for a first time, non violent drug charge. She is someone that has completely rehabilitated ourselves. The president granted Johnson's pardon saying those who pay their debt to society and better themselves in prison deserve a second chance instead of waiting out her sentence last year, the now thirty year old Brown and her lawyers petitioned, Tennessee, governor Bill has lem to grant her clemency. Got a lot of publicity. Our job is to look at it on the legal merits in her case and treat it just like every other one at her hearing Brown acknowledged her crying when I was sixteen. I did a thing. I have carried that with me this whole time, but also pointed to her rehabilitation behind bars, I have a college degree hound. I have a family a home family. New community of people who love me who believe in me who support me including the glitter projects a program. She developed to help girls who've been trafficked and exploited like she was I've been able to help people which is amazing. Young people young kids might listen. She was backed up by witnesses, including teachers and advocates even a former prosecutor who was in charge of Brown's two thousand eight appeal argued that she needed to spend the rest of her life in prison soon after he became one of her college teachers, you grant her early release. She is going to invest herself in people who might otherwise come to this institution. She will seek them out. She will find them. She will mentor and minister to them, and she will keep other people from coming here. I do pray that you show me mercy that you get miss James Brown had to wait more than seven months to find out the governor's answer clemency. Granted she was elated, and she started to do a little dance the moment with electric, I do think we made the right decision. But we tried to make it kind of apps and all the noise a spokesperson for. Johnny. Allen's family told the media. They aren't happy with the decision. But hope round has changed. She will be released in August after serving fifteen years in prison instead of fifty one. Dan Berman is now working on a sequel to his documentary out later this year focusing on Brown, and how criminal sentencing, particularly for juvenile's needs to change maybe the blindfold of Justice can be removed just a little bit. So that we can consider a bigger perspective for all children. Brown isn't asking the world to forget what she did. She would readily admit that she committed a crime and that the prison system in effect has saved her life. She says she just wants a chance to help other girls. Not make the same mistake. I'm too I will not let you down. I promise. Our thanks to Adrian and me facing life to sin Toya's fight for freedom. New film by Daniel age Berman productions will launch in two thousand nineteen along with the social Justice campaign by odyssey impact shining. A light on the juvenile Justice system coming up next here on Nightline Gillette's, cutting edge message that is cutting both ways. Is it still a struggle to get that good night's sleep? Then maybe it's time to try the purple mattress. It's made out of a new material that makes it firm and soft. So it keeps everything supported while. Still feeling really comfortable. Try it now with a one hundred night risk-free trial along with free shipping and returns. And if you order one, you'll get a free purple pillow with the purchase of a mattress just text Nightline two four seven four seven four seven the only way to get this free pillow is detects Nightline two four seven four seven four seven. Message and data rates may apply when it comes to hiring. You don't have time to waste you need help getting to your shortlist of qualified candidates fast. That's why you need indeed dot com. Get started today at indeed dot com slash podcast. That's indeed dot com slash podcast. Gillett that king of male grooming products is using Adolf to try to change male behavior. What some call toxic masculinity in this metoo era, but it all could be backfiring. Inspiring some men to boycott the brand. Is this the best a man can get? Is it a brand associated for decades with Matiz mo- masculinity now taking a big and risky? Swing will be boys. Born. Was born Gillette. Updating its classic best man can get slogan for the metoo era in a new commercial with the new call to action is not a be the best amend can be spring going on far too long. All encouraging men to take a stand against so called toxic masculinity. Sweetening come on. We believe in the best in the ad has become the latest spasm in the ongoing national debate about metoo and male behavior. Some prominent people have come out to support the commercial the actress Rosanna Arquette tweeting gratitude to Gillette and Jessica Chastain thanking the company for the reminder of the beauty of men saying I'm so moved by your call to action, but the negative response has also been explosive some critics accusing Gillett of ostentatious woke nece Piers Morgan calling it part of a current pathetic global assault on masculinity and many tweeting the hashtag boycott Gillette while throwing out their razors. I think there's a lot of natural outcry in it's like can. I just shave my face without having politics and political correctness shove down my throat. This commercial is a sharp turn for Gillette. The brand has long celebrated traditional masculinity. The chiseled, man. Can be playing sports or working on Wall Street's best man can get Gillette is just the latest company to tackle social issues in its marketing believe in something. Even if it means sacrificing everything Nike tapped, former pro quarterback, Colin Kaepernick as the face of its icon. Ick. Just do it campaign. To don't ask. If your dreams are crazy. Asking for crazy enough. Roster Ives and the company appearing to be taking sides in the raging debate over NFL players kneeling during the national anthem which capture Nick started that add immediately sparked controversy. Sorry nike. I'm a buying new for past twenty plus years not anymore. But Nike's moved seems to have paid off the company's revenue soared after that ad was released. It was a very calculated risk by Nike because they determined that the audience that would be receptive to that message was more important to them than the audience that would not Proctor and gamble which owns Gillette has not shied away from a dressing sensitive, topics. Giving me a dad deal just two years ago. Pantene also owned by PNG launched its strong is beautiful campaign encouraging fathers to be more present in their daughters lives Strong's booth. It's not enough to run an ad and say our product is the best have to get attention. You have to be talked about in two thousand and four dove broke the mold when it introduced its real beauty campaign ads focused on body positivity and celebrating real people since then companies followed. Doves lead with mixed results. Duos? Budweiser tackled. The hot button issue of immigration during the Super Bowl. With this widely praised ad from two thousand seventeen. Dope is Bush a huge percentage of Budweiser drinkers are immigrants to this country. A very calculated choice. But some commercials have notoriously missed the Mark when Pepsi released this ad featuring KENDALL Jenner appearing to use soda to defuse tensions between police and protesters. Many spoke out Dr Martin Luther King's daughter, tweeting, sarcastically. If only daddy would have known about the power of Pepsi, Pepsi, subsequently apologized and removed the spot Gillette is standing by its ad in a statement on its website writing in part as a company that encourages men to be their best. We have a responsibility to make sure we are promoting positive attainable inclusive and healthy versions of what it means to be a man the big question now will men the side that the best they can get is another brand of razor. The good news for them is getting a lot of free airings of their ad without buying the TV time. But if consequently they lose customers that it probably wasn't a great marketing decision and only time will tell. And finally here tonight are ginger Zee bringing sunshine to the state. With just twenty four hours to learn her routine. Gingered return to dancing with the stars for a one night event, making her Radio City Music hall debut with the cast of dancing with the stars live a night to remember. Oh, amazing. Amazing changer is incredible. We want to thank you for watching tonight for full episodes. You could get on over to Hulu have a great night. Are you hiring with indeed you can post a job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started today at indeed dot com slash podcast. That's indeed dot com slash podcast.

Sinn Toya Brown Sinn Toya Johnny Allen Tennessee Dan Berman murder Gillette Nike ABC Adrian banker Toyo Nightline Gillette Gillette Gillett fetal alcohol spectrum disorde America Dr Martin Luther King Hulu Gillette
Democracy Now! 2019-01-10 Thursday

Democracy Now! Audio

59:02 min | 2 years ago

Democracy Now! 2019-01-10 Thursday

"Yeah. From New York. This is democracy. Now. Yes. Speaker Pelosi will you agree to my walls and said, no, and he just got up and said, then we have nothing to discuss. And he just walked down. Again, we saw a temper tantrum because he couldn't get his way. And he just walked out of the meeting that partial government shutdown enters its twentieth day one day after President Trump storms out of a meeting with democratic leaders. The impact of the shutdown is growing as the FDA hall. True, teen food monitoring, the scales back its monitoring toxic sites, and the TSA faces a possible crisis as a wave of unpaid airport, screeners quit and volunteers are now helping national parks. This trash continues to pile up. We'll get the latest then to the case of sin Toya Brown. The sex trafficking survivor has been granted clemency by the Tennessee. Governor after serving fifteen years in prison for shooting her rapist when she was sixteen years old. What did but they get in chance to do so much more. I've been able to help people which is amazing. Young young kids. Listen, I'm still gonna try to help you finally a group of patients are challenging the Trump administration's plan to deport over fifty thousand patients living in the US who were given temporary protected status after an earthquake devastated Haiti nine years ago this week all that and more coming up. Welcome to democracy now democracy now dot org. The Warren peace report, I'm Amy Goodman with the partial government shutdown now in its twentieth day. President Trump reportedly stormed out of a meeting with house speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer Wednesday after they refused to back a deal to fund a wall on the southern border in a tweet Trump called the meeting total waste of time. Adding, quote, I asked what's going to happen in thirty days. If I quickly opened things up or you're going to prove border security, which includes a wall or steel barrier. Nancy said, no I said bye bye nothing else. Works Senator Schumer accused the president throwing a temper tantrum. Speaker Pelosi will you agree to my walls? She said, no. And he just got up and said, then we have nothing to discuss. And he just walked down. Again, we saw a temper tantrum because he couldn't get his way. And he just walked out of the meeting. This comes as unions representing workers at the federal government will rally at noon today in Washington DC to demand end to the partial shutdown, which has left three hundred eighty thousand workers furloughed, which means they will never be paid and another four hundred twenty thousand forced to work without a paycheck at the White House reporter asked President Trump about the impacts of the shutdown because people have to go without their paychecks. There'd be some are being forced to work without pay. Some have been furloughed. These are they are green money. They're all gonna get the money. And I think they're going to be happy the partial shutdown increasingly threatening safety nets for the poorest Americans while allowing corporations to go unregulated, Robert Weisman price. Of the watchdog group Public Citizen wrote corporate lawbreakers, you're going unpunished safety inspections or being postponed. Discrimination charges are going on investigated. Polluters are not being held in check financial fraudsters are not being policed consumer complaints or not being received an accident investigations have ceased after headlines will go to Washington DC to speak with Robert Weisman. President Trump and his White House counsel plan to visit mcallen Texas today amid speculation he made clear a national emergency and try to use Pentagon funds to pay for part of an expanded border wall. Meanwhile, the president's oldest son Donald Trump junior shared a post on Instagram comparing immigrants to animals Trump junior wrote, quote, do you know, why you can enjoy a day at the zoo because walls work unquote, Donald Trump junior's post echoes President Trump's past comment calling immigrant gang members. Animals and not people. President Trump's nominated former co lobbyist Andrew Wheeler. As Environmental Protection Agency administrator Wheeler is a former co lobbyists and has been the acting head of the Scott Pruitt resigned in July. Amidst to non-slaughter financial ethics scandals Wheeler has regularly engaged with right wing conspiracy. Accounts on social media and liked racist posts, featuring the Obamas in two thousand thirteen in the Democratic Republic of Congo. The opposition leader Felix a- Keti has been declared the provisional winner in December's presidential election. Congo's independent national election commission says just a Kennedy won a plurality of votes with almost thirty nine percent of the total. But election observers, including the influential churches, bishops conference, say another opposition leader Martin fi. You Lou won handily fi. You Lou has denounced the results as an election coup and promised to challenge. The result comes election that observers say was marred by irregularities with position groups alleging fraud. More than a million Congolese voters were unable to cast ballots violence from armed opposition groups as well. As an outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus a candidate groom by longtime thorough -tarian President Joseph Kabila came in third place. Kabila's promised to step down this month after eighteen years in power and more than two years since his presidential mandate expired. Secretary of state Mike Pompeo has arrived in Cairo Egypt where he discussed security and economic cooperation with Egypt's are tearing president dilford El Sisi Pompeo is set to deliver a foreign policy speech today at the American University in Cairo. His visit comes on the heels of a surprise trip to Iraq Wednesday where he discussed President Trump's plans to withdraw US troops from Syria. Secretary Pompeo's trip to Egypt comes on the hundredth day of Saudi dissident Jamaica show, she's death after he entered the Saudi consulate in this dumble Turkey, October second and never reemerged palm peyot. And the Trump administration have defended Saudi Crown prince Mohammad bin someone even though congress voted unanimously to find him responsible for choke. She's murder in another recent development. Turkish officials have released footage purporting to show members of Saudi hit squad carrying kashogi. She's body parts out of the Turkish consulate in. In large black that s- in the Mediterranean. The government of Malta has allowed nearly fifty asylum-seekers who'd been stranded at sea for weeks to come ashore onto rescue vessels, the decision ended in nineteen day standoff that saw other European Union members to ni- port of entry to the migrants and move. That's been blasted by human rights groups this shameful aboard. The C watched three vessel run by German humanitarian group, there were cheers Wednesday as news of an agreement to process the asylum seekers spread. An increasing number of asylum seekers are dying see Italy's right-wing government move last year to deny migrant rescue ships entry at a talion ports in Lebanon blanket of snow has fallen on makeshift camps for Syrian refugees. Compounding, the misery of thousands of people whose tense flooded with rainwater during intense winter storms over the weekend. The UN says flooding effected over ten thousand refugees across Lebanon with a further seventy thousand Syrians at risk. The storms claimed the life of an eight year old Syrian girl who fell into a river and drowned. Amidst heavy wind and rain CNN reports police have issued an arrest warrant for James Mason. The former manager for popstar R Kelly Mason's accused of threatening to kill the father of Joycelyn savage who alleges R Kelly is holding his daughter against her will in an abusive Colt. A police report of tain by CNN quotes, Mason, est, threatening savage and a text message that. Needs. I'm gonna do harm to you and your family when I see you. I'm going to get you. I'm going to f ING kill. You are Kelly has been accused of sexual assault predatory behavior and pedophilia for two decades. But has never been criminally convicted in Chicago, Cook County state's attorney Kim, FOX says offices investigating numerous complaints against R Kelly and is encouraged other victims to step forward. Meanwhile, pop star lady Gaga apologize Wednesday for collaborating with our Kellyanne a two thousand thirteen single do what you want with my body lady Gaga herself a survivor of sexual assault. She says she'll remove the single from streaming services like Spotify in Kentucky. State lawmakers have introduced a Bill that would affectively outlaw abortions even in cases of fetal abnormalities, rape, or incest. Abortions are already highly restricted in Kentucky, which is just one abortion provider for the entire state Bill similar to Kentucky. So. So called heartbeat. Bill have been struck down by federal courts in New York. Three climate activists who took direct action to halt construction of the aim frac gas pipeline have been found guilty of criminal trespass, Rebecca Berlin, David publ. Oh and genital and solace lock themselves inside a three and a half foot wide section of pipeline. In two thousand sixteen stopping construction for eighteen hours on Tuesday. Judge rejected a necessity defense mounted by the activists who argue their action was necessitated by the clear and present tanger- posed by climate change. But the judge did let the three walk free without any additional punishment. In Los Angeles. The union representing tens of thousands of public school. Teachers has delayed plans to begin a strike today. Even teachers remain far from a breakthrough in contract. Talks the union now says it's prepared to strike on Monday. Unless its demands are met the union negotiators want an immediate six and a half percent. Raise along with smaller. Class sizes more librarians fewer standardized tests and more teacher input and local school leadership councils and Louis garden Kosta the founder and president from thirty five years of the nationally known point they youth and community leadership program in Brooklyn, New York, long regarded as one of New York City's foremost human rights and Latino community activists died on Tuesday night following a long illness. He was seventy two years old, the former seminarian who had been active in the Catholic antiwar movement in Brooklyn garden Kosta joined the young lords party in one thousand nine hundred seventy and later founded that groups Massachusetts. It's chapter while he was still a student at Harvard Medical School in two thousand nine garden at cost a total democracy. Now about as participation in the young lords takeover of the first Spanish Methodist church, and he's tore and late nineteen sixty nine which the group used to house free breakfast and clothing programs health services daycare center, a liberation school and community dinners, the occupation ended in January nineteen seventy when police raided the church arresting one hundred five members of the young lords. Very much involved in Catholic social action, a former seminary for the Catholic priesthood a former monk. And so the question of liberal theology was very much part of my life. And my whole struggle was against the war in Vietnam. But at the same time as I said, they would maybe many missing issues that weren't connecting. I thought and then I heard that young people who were trying to feed the hungry clothe. The naked. Deal with the imprisoned who actually trying to perform the Christian mandate of what we call. The corporal works of mercy had been bloodied in his in church by police officers who had come in that have an unprecedented thing. It's chills up my spine in a church a sacred space. So I immediately the next Sunday went investigate and be part of it. Scarred cost to went onto pioneer successful nonviolent direct action campaigns against segregated public schools and against environmental racism in New York City in his later years together with his wife Francis. Lucerne a- garden Kosta created alternative public high school geared toward human rights, activism. The appointee academy for peace and Justice again, Louis garden, Kosta dead at the age of seventy two and those are some of the headlines, this is democracy. Now democracy now dot org. The Warren peace report, I make Goodman, the partial government shutdown has entered its twentieth day on Saturday. It will become the longest shutdown in US. History of a deal is not reached on Wednesday. President Trump reportedly stormed out of a meeting with house speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer after they refused to back a deal to fund a wall on the southern border Schumer accused Trump of throwing temper trench from Trump described the meeting as a total waste of time. This comes as the impact of the shutdown. Is growing across the country. The shutdown has left three hundred eighty thousand workers furloughed, which means they will never be paid for that time lost and another four hundred twenty thousand force to work without pay the food and Drug administration has announced his suspended all routine food inspections at the Environmental Protection Agency. More than thirteen thousand employees have been furloughed forcing the agency to hold work on air quality monitoring enforcement of toxic polluters and cleanups. At Superfund sites. States are scrambling to administer snap food stamp benefits for three point four million Americans after more than four billion dollars in federal payments failed to materialize housing advocates feared the shutdown could lead to the victims of thousands of low income renters who live in government, subsidized apartments over Levin hundred contracts between the government and private landlords have already expired at the TSA. There are reports of a wave of resignations by airports. Screeners because they're not being paid the American federation of government employees sued the government last week over the situation. Heidrick Thomas, president of the unions TSA council said the shutdowns causing a quote massive security risk for American travelers as the TSA is unable to hire or train new workers during the shutdown. We're joined right now by rob Weisman, president of Public Citizen, the group just released a report, titled shutdown drags on agencies devoted to consumer and worker health and safety unfunded and de prioritized, Robert Weisman, welcome to democracy. Now. Can you start off by talking about what will happen to these workers were talking about eight hundred thousand workers for people to understand those that have been furloughed who are not been working for the last week's will never get paid. And those that are working like TSA agents if they have not quit supposedly will be paid. When the government shutdown ends but talk about the significance of this yesterday. The president said they're all happy. Of course, the president is delusional for the for the eight hundred thousand workers, you know, that's most people in America, including most of these workers live paycheck to paycheck. So they're missing paychecks. And they're just going to have to scramble and they're being put in an impossible situations, historically when these shutdowns of occurred when it settled the workers are paid both the ones who were forced to work where legally required to be their jobs, even though they're not being paid and the ones who've been furloughed or not working. There's another category of people who are comparably being affected who will not be paid ever, which is the huge number of government contractors as you've discussed in recent shows, the government contracts because privatize so much of its business to a huge number of agencies and workers those people aren't working now, and they will not be reimbursed. So people are scrambling, and it's huge here in the Washington DC area. But the federal government is spread across the country. It is happening in every state and every community across the country. So talk about what's at risk from agency to agency. Right. Well, there's a couple couple of ways to think about it. One is the things that they are not doing and the agencies are not doing a lot as you were describing earlier. So the EPA has cut back on routine inspections of of plans and toxic facilities the food and drug administration's not doing its regular inspections of of food packaging facilities. The pipeline safety agency has is scaling back. Its inspections the securities and Exchange Commission is more or less shut down. Which means it's not really able to investigate anything efforts at the federal communication commission or the Federal Trade Commission to monitor ongoing consumer fraud shutdown. So all this stuff is happening in the corporations who were normally being inspected or held into account at least a little bit by government enforcement. It's free rein for them right now. And there's really no avenue of redress for for consumers for these various media things that are happening. You know, maybe one of the most worrisome ones in addition to as at the Federal Aviation Administration where inspection of airplanes is routine inspection by the government has been suspended the company's still do their own inspection. But you know, I feel safer knowing that the government is independently doing the inspections, and that's not happening. That's one whole huge category. The other categories things that are still going on by these workers who these were forced to work, even though they're not being paid. That's a huge number of government functions. It's not possible for people who are not being paid to do their job. Well, it just has to be the case. If you're worried about paying your bills your credit card what you're going to do with your kids. You're upset you're not focused on the job. And you're not going to do as good a job. So the air traffic controllers are still at work, but they're not being paid. And you got to worry about how while they're able to do their job you've reported it also, you know, at the border the border agents are not being paid right now. So has to be that they're going to be worse at their job more brutal shorter temper and so on and as this drags on. It's going to get more and more severe. There are also a category of government activities that either have stopped or are going to stop in the future, including you talked about the provision of the deal making for contracts for low income people. We may see a total end to payments for food stamps at the end of the it sometime in in February funding for the federal courts, at least on the civil side funding for the federal courts is going to run out later this month and probably most civil suits in federal courts are going to be suspended. This stuff is going to really stack up as we move forward. FDA Lee all remember what happened on the round the holidays with Romain lettuce recall, which has just been announced be over. What would happen if something like that happened right now at the FDA, rob? Well, the things that are life threatening. Either were regard to food safety other things they say, look, we're we've got that covered. The problem is you don't know that something's life threatening until it emerges as of outbreak. So then they'll be staffed on and they'll find a way to deal with it on on a -mergency recall like that. But they won't do their forward-looking inspections that might have prevented it and the first place, but the exact same thing the highway the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration routine recalls and inspections aren't going on if there's something that's virgin and life threatening. Once they've discovered it to be so they have a capacity to act, but we're gonna gonna know about it until the above problem becomes a crisis. Something that would have been prevented if they were properly staffed, I wanna ask you about the Fox News how how Fox News is covering the shutdown, and this clip here, Steve Doocy, and FOX and friends, but first FOX contributor, Charlie hurt. You can shut down half. Of the government agencies, and literally it would be years if it were not for the media. It would be years before the regular person the normal average working American would even know that the department had been shut down in terms of how much it affects their lives a lot of people across the country. Don't even notice that part of the federal government is shut so sort of suggesting that the government workers are not normal Americans. But rob Weisman FOX using this as an argument to downsize government. Yeah. Absolutely. I think that there's sort of two strains that are coming together in this for sure on FOX. But also the administration one strain is the hardcore dialogues who actually want to shrink government. This is this is a business friend the argument, but its even beyond business because they're actually impacting things that business absolutely needs to go forward. So that's one strain. These hardcore people in the government would be chief-of-staff acting chief of staff, Mick Mulvaney. The other strain is people who are just stupid and ignorant who heard all this stuff. How the governor about how the government doesn't do anything actually have no idea what the government actually does. And we're just repeat dumb things because they've got no idea and are informed by this hardcore ideology, I think that the comment you just played is probably a mix of both those things I think President Trump himself and most of the White House fall and both these categories they actually don't know there've been a lot of reports that when they forced the shutdown. They didn't realize gosh, the government does a lot of stuff. There's going to be a lot of impacts about this. I think one thing that they picked up on was they didn't want pictures of the national parks being shutdown. So they've left the park's open on safely without staffing. But they. Mostly don't know what the government does the government there in charge of running. And we're gonna talk about the parks in a minute. But let me ask you about President Trump declaring a national emergency summer speculating that the fact that the White House counsel is with him as he goes down to the border to mcallen, Texas, suggests he might be talking about declaring this emergency, which he says he is an absolute right to do. What is the significance of this? And then possibly the Pentagon coming up with two and a half billion dollars extra to build the wall. What does it say about budget where an agency confined to and a half billion dollars extra? Well, you know, I we shouldn't ignore that. Last point. You may. I mean, there's so much money being wasted on military spending right now, huge amounts of just money inside the Pentagon sloshing around going to places where they can identify who's being paid. And what it's what it's for that its own legitimate national crisis that needs to be addressed. But to the bigger point about the emergency as a matter of law. It's going to be a complicated thing. The congress has given the president quite a bit of a thority to declare emergencies with terms that are almost unbounded and with powers that have few bounds. Congress has always expected in society is always expected that presidents wouldn't abuse that a thority recklessly declaring emergencies just because they want to we have a president now who has no such constraints. So if he does perceive, which I think is reasonably likely it's going to be a complicated matter of law, but beyond what the law is. Just think about the underlying principles the sort of real constitutional principles the democracy principles. It's a serious matter beyond just the outrage of funding stupid, needless and immoral wall or even part of one which is what he would propose to do. He wants funding for border wall. Congress saying no, the the move to call a national emergency is for the president to say, I will not be constrained by what congress says even though there's not really a national merge salads invoke. These powers. I can do something that otherwise be a legal simply by declaring a national emergency. Now that is if you follow the logic of that that leads to almost unbounded presidential power when you have an authoritarian like Donald Trump in office that is a frightening prospect. It does not have to end just at the reality of billions of dollars from the Pentagon. For whatever it was going to be spent on towards building, a useless and immoral while that of Florida could be invoked for all kinds of quite terrifying purposes. And it's it's something that goes actually way beyond significance of the wallet self and something that we should be very very concerned about if it happens is I think is reasonably likely, and of course, this would all go to court, but before we go there, I wanna go to what's happening in the national park since the shutdown began their around the country have seen overflowing toilets trash piling up park. Experts are warning that the damage may take years to undo on Tuesday afternoon, democratic representatives cheque's speier and Charrette Huffman, California delivered a blue bin full of garbage collected from national parks to the White House. They labeled the Ben Trump trash. This is congress member Huffman. I'm bringing boxes of trash from that rainy Saturday in San Francisco to provide a reality check to the president. So that he understands that his political stunt and shutting down the government over the border wall has real world consequences trash like this diaper burrito. Rappers cups or his building up parks. We represent a national parks all over the country. We're joined right now by Jonathan Asher government relations manager at the wilderness society. What's happening in the country's parks. Amy. Thanks for having me. Appreciate it. The national parks are kind of one of the main ways that the public interacts with their government. It's from the parks to the national forests, and and, you know, local communities and right now, I think we're seeing a lot of resource damage a lot of unsafe conditions, and we're really hoping that the president will move to reopen. The government, you know, quickly and and get our parks back in safe condition and really protecting our resources. So there have been what seven deaths in the national park since the shutdown began this unusual. The parks are always a natural place. There can be risks. But, but you know, I think some of the some of the deaths are likely preventable. But it's hard to know without having the staff there to do the research without having the staff there to file reports. We'll probably learn more exactly about what happened in those instances later, but you know, regardless of actual deaths. I think we're seeing reports out of say Joshua tree national park where folks were making their own roads, cutting down the landmark Joshua trees that are kind of this staple of that park in Yosemite trash along the sides of the roads and people when you have no one to take entrance fees or guide people as they're coming in. You know, folks, well-meaning or or not or just kind of unknowing of how to interact in the parks tend to tend to go kind of run amok. And so I think were hoping that the shutdown in soon, and and that the resource can be protected because it's rough situation. Border wall, a border wall between US and Mexico mean for the fragile ecosystem there. Yeah. A lot of people don't understand that, you know, along our southern border are really wild places, really important. You know, ecosystems that have, you know, hundreds of endangered species thousands of very special types of of animals and wildlife, and you know, a border wall would mean a lack of the ability for these animals too. Move amongst the ecosystem and be able to have genetic diversity within their within their, gene pool. It would mean impacts to the inability for a lot of these animals to find water in kind of a, you know, a very dry environment. So what have really negative impacts on a lot of very important species from endangered pronghorns antelope to Jaguars that are making their way back after after some some challenges in in their their systems. So it's it would be very damaging to the the environment as well as you know. It just being kind of a waste of money. And finally the five point seven billion dollars. Trump is demanding for the border wall. What would it look like if that went to conservation efforts into wilderness to parks in this country, or even fraction of it? Absolutely. One of the great ironies, I think with all of this is that the Trump administration has taken it upon themselves to promote the park maintenance backlog, as one of the one of the conservation ish ideas that they could get behind, and you know, our parks have been loved to death for so long that they they face about a twelve billion dollar backlog in in maintenance fees and maintenance projects that congress hasn't and the administration hasn't funded for for quite a long time. And so five billion dollars would go a long way towards fixing the digging out of the hole that. We're already in with taking care of our national parks. Not to mention the fact that all of this damage being done to our parks and public lands generally national forest. Beal lands at cetera. That's gonna take us a while to to from a budgetary perspective. And so I think for those folks who do care about how government resources are are used. You know, this is not only bad policy, but it's it's a waste of money. President Trump just once again threatened to cut off federal funds to fight California wildfire saying the money's being wasted. Your response yet. Complete ignorance with how force policy works with how forced ecosystems work, you know. You know, the reality is with this shutdown one of the primary times for our forest service and firefighters in and the associated companies that that you know, that work with them right now is the time that they plan for the upcoming fire season. It's when they do their training when they write contracts for for equipment for for for fighting forest. Fires and they're not able to do that. There are examples in California specifically where projects are being put on hold mitigation projects that would help alleviate concerns for the upcoming fire season. In a lot of these entities already are dealing with longer. Firefighting seasons and shorter periods of time to plan. So this is eating into on already very small window that they have to prepare for an upcoming likely, you know, rough fire season again as we've seen increasingly bad over the years with. Climate change Jonathan Asher. Thank you for being with us government relations manager with the wilderness society and Robert Weisman, president of Public Citizen will link to your report at Public Citizen is shutdown drags on agencies devoted to consumer and work our health and safety unfunded and deep prioritized when we come back young woman raped at sixteen who killed her rapist is going to be freed from prison by the Tennessee governor stay with us. You. Lady Gaga singing till it happens to you joined by sexual assault survivors on the stage at the Oscars in two thousand sixteen lady Gaga apologized Wednesday for collaborating with our Kelly on the two thousand thirteen single do what you want with my body. This comes as prosecutors Atlanta and Chicago considering bringing charges against R Kelly after an explosive docu series aired on lifetime TV chronicling years of sexual abuse domestic violence and misconduct allegations lady Gaga herself is a survivor of sexual assault. She says she'll remove her single with our Kelly from streaming services like Spotify. This is democracy. Now, I made me Goodman, as we turn to the story of sin Toya Brown who on Monday was granted full clemency by Republican Tennessee governor Bill Haslam after serving fifteen years in person, the decision follows months of intense public pressure and outrage over her case Brown was sentenced to life in prison after being convicted of first degree murder for shooting her rapist as a teenager. She had been sexually trafficked repeatedly abused drugged the shooting happened when Brown was just sixteen years old. But she was tried nece. Don't this isn't Toya Brown. Speaking at our clemency hearing in may. It's been a very long time. And. When I was sixteen. I didn't. In have carried that with me this whole time. Always hear people say like if I could go back and change things. But when you really realize that you've done something can't undo. Like, it states, and it stayed with me that's whole, Tom. People here today that like are there hurting now fourteen years later, they've been hurting for fourteen years, and I did that. And. Can't picks. It. I can't fix like had to change because I could not live with myself being the site in person that did that I can do that. I face that. I can't make what did that they've chance to so much more. You know, I've been able to help people amazing young people young kids. Listen in. I'm still going to try to help people still him because it's something that people need to understand that something people need to know. There's so many things that I've actually now that I didn't know, and there's so many young people that still don't know. And I called to share that. And. Whatever you decide Everson did. But I do private you show me Marsin that you get music contains that is my prayer, and I can assure each and everyone view that if you do like a walk disappoint you. I'm not gonna let you down sinto Brown. Her attorney Houston, Gordon addressed reporters shortly after Brown was granted clemency Monday. Her story is a story that should be a catalyst for a lot of others. Thousands of other juvenile's we need to see this as an national waken to change the county and laws that allow juvenile's children to be placed in adult prison over the years in Toyo Brown's case to widespread attention on social media under the hash tag free, send Toyo Brown popstar riana wrote something horror. Ably wrong when the system enables these rapists, and the victim is thrown away for life. PBS independent lens featured Brown story and its series sentencing. Children. This is a clip of then sixteen year old son Toyo Brown being interrogated by assistant district attorney Jeff Burks during juvenile court hearing. If you try to leave arm. And you, but you believe in that is based on the fact that he told you get some dons and he's a short. Not only that. But the way we'll only that. We know is that the food took you home you used as bathroom those notable doing that you ate with it you that you settled couch. One teeny would do that you got a bed and at least one time to sleep while he was. He just Grammy. Like and to Molly. He just grabbed there were you just gave me this look like a fierce, look, and I just sent these chills mice fine. I'm thinking me or do something like it. But then he rose over and reaches like, he's reaching to side of the bed or something. So I'm thinking he's not gonna hit me. He's been a gun and want to do that. I just grab begun in our shot that which Sinn Toya Brown at sixteen. She's now thirty years old set to be released an August for more. We're joined by Mariam Kaba, organize your educator who's worked on anti domestic violence programs as well as anti Carson racial Justice program since the late eighties. She's the co founder of survived in punished an organization that supports survivors of violence who've been criminalised for defending themselves aboard member of critical resistance Mariam Kaba. Welcome to buckle. She now. Thanks for having me talk about what has taken place in this case in the significance of the Republican governor of Tennessee granting her clemency. How did this happen while I think it's important to note that since has been surrounded by support team of people for at least the past decade in the beginning. She had a very kind of proactive lawyer who was very supportive of her and has become a lifelong friend and continues to support her her her subsequent lawyers where people also who really fought for her to to try to make sure that she wouldn't end up with a life sentence. She has had community members family people who've kept her story and her name alive for all of these years. So I think I want to you know, kind of make sure people understand that this didn't come out of nowhere. And that people have been fighting on her behalf for almost as long as she's been incarcerated. It was recently with in two thousand seventeen of last year you Mench. Riana and Kim Kardashian posting stuff on Instagram, which got more people to know her case in the modern era. Most people actually still thought she was sixteen and most people also thought hit just happened. Well, let's back for a moment. Yeah. What did happen happen to sin Toya, well, sin Toya in two thousand and four scenario was sixteen years old? She was picked up for sex by a forty three year old man named Johnny Allen who took her to his house and sin Toya says that when she got there first he was haggling her for money about the money. Secondly, he showed her a bunch of guns that he had in his possession Thirdly as you heard in the tape before she was worried because he was acting what she felt was strange and when he leaned over on his bed. She he she he had showed her some guns under his bed. She thought that he was going for a gun and yet he was going to harm her. She had a gun that had been given to her by her pimp a guy named cutthroat. Who she'd been living without a motel from the time. She was about fifteen years old because she'd run away from home at that point. And she used the gun that had been given to her for protection to shoot this, man. And he ended up dying. Let me go to a clip another clip from the film me facing. Life's in Toy Story, which aired on PBS independent lens in this clips and Toya's questioned about her trafficker. Guy. What's his room? So how long were you live in? Thanks. So what was the only? I. These. He was a joke. What else did he do? Boom. Have you ever have sex with the guys? Did he that he have sex with you too? Communicate with him. I'm not having money. He wasn't rights. Only kim. He does. Tones. That's annoying and me facing life's and Toya story which aired on PBS independent lens take it from there. So she ends up going to trial two years after her arrest in two thousand and four and they decide that they're going to try her. She was juvenile at the time that this happened and that they would try her as an adult. I think some things that people probably know intuitively is that black children. Don't get to be children. There's a kind of adult affiliation of children, particularly black children and children of color. So sin Toya at sixteen wasn't seen as a young person. She was seen as an adult already, basically. And they put her on trial as an adult. She ended up getting convicted. And she ended up getting convicted her sentence was life in prison. So you could imagine the shock to the system of somebody who has basically been sexually course, turn tire life who had a run away. So she was already precarious defended herself against somebody. Who basically if nothing else was doing Salvatori rate. He was forty three. She was sixteen years old, and she ends up and in situation where she has got to figure out and she's going to, you know, take potentially put herself at risk of dying or. If she's going to take action she chooses to take action she's punished for it. So she she's punished basically for survival. Yeah. Do you think our case would have ended up differently? If she was white and her us was block. I mean, it's hard to know about these things I will say this black people in this country. Have traditionally historically been punished for any perceived transcript transgression, and so and punish more excessively than white people. But if you wanna make a point that I think is important, which is that we have a mass incarceration problem in this country that whole that basically also sweeps in a bunch of poor white people. So, you know, while while black people are disproportionately targeted by the system. White people are pulled into the system as well. So what we have is a mass criminalization mass incarceration problem. I think we're going to have to do some work to dismantle they'll so sin. Toya Brown was sentenced to life in prison. He was she has served what she will serve fifteen years for her relief in Hong, that's right ex-. And you've talked about the support. She's head the all the time. She's been in prison. But what force the Republican Tennessee governor has lem to grant clemency. And were you surprised when he did? I wasn't surprised that he no because I'm an organizer when people mobilize in put pressure on targets we can win. And I think what happened was that the supreme court in Tennessee in early December came back of helds decision to say that. In fact, he wasn't going to ever be able to be paroled before serving fifty one years in prison. So that she would have gotten out of prison had a chance to get out of prison and going front of parole board at the age of sixty seven and that particular supreme court's decision in Tennessee is what galvanize this latest version of a mobilization on her behalf. So people were like, wait a minute. First of all, this is unjust that she spent one day in prison. Secondly, they're going to have her spend fifty one years in prison before she even gets a chance for. Second chance this is unacceptable. And at that point, a group of different groups all around the country came together with a targeted effort to go. After that that included groups like Nashville color of change, the Highlander center that some of those three two of those three are based in Tennessee. So it made sense that they would kind of push. I want to bring up the fact that, you know, a lot of people on social media got involved and started making phone calls at one point. My understanding was that the governor's office was getting six thousand calls in a day. That's, you know, unprecedented. Unheard of they have to like switch over their lines to another line hold together in order to keep up with amount of people that were pushing for her to get out. So. Reaction. Well, my understanding was that she put out a statement at the end of that she was really thankful for people's support. I think she's I'm sure she's absolutely thrilled to be able to be released from prison you've called her act radical act of self love explained. Well, I think that in this culture where black lives are incredibly devalued where we are in a position of always having to defend our very existence that to insist that you deserve to live by any means necessary is inactive radical self love absolately believe that that's the case. I do want to say something though that I think is very important right now for people who are really in the moment very excited about this. It is very good that she's out of prison. I think people should know that she's being released into supervise parole, which she's going to be on for ten years. That's a decade, which means she's going to have spent twenty five years of her very. A young life in under state supervision for those people who don't know parole is extremely extremely restrictive. They're gonna give a whole set of conditions, which mostly be arbitrary. If she violates any of those conditions. They could violate her right back to prison. She's going to be spending ten years, basically on pins and needles making sure that nothing goes wrong missing missing any sort of parole. You know, meetings ending up going somewhere that she wasn't supposed to go by accident those things violate you. And so she's going to have to be very careful for the next ten years that she doesn't get violated back. So she's not one hundred percent free. And I think that's something people should pay attention to you. You have traced the treatment of black woman who dared to fend themselves back to slavery. Right. Yeah. Up least. Yeah. I mean in this country coming to this country as chattel so property not person we as black women. In particular were continuously subjected to sexual violence with no recourse, absolute impunity. I wrote a piece for the guardian last week that talked about the story of enslave young woman named Celia who fought back against her master who was also her rapist killing him, and she went to trial. She had very vigorous defences eighteen fifty five in Missouri, and the court found that she was property not person therefore could not be raped, and they ended up executing her in in December of eighteen eighteen fifty five, and I think a lot about that. Because it it shows something about black women having no selves worth defending having no selves worth being seen as valuable enough that you can have bodily autonomy really important how many sin Toyota Browns are invalid soms Dr thousands of sin Toyo Browns in prison. I think I wanna also make the point that overwhelmingly. Especially when you look at women's prisons, the overwhelming majority up to ninety percent of the people in there have had histories of sexual and physical violence prior to ending up in prison. What there's a wonderful activists, formerly incarcerated survivor herself named Susan Burton who talks about the fact that what we do is incarcerate trauma when we incarcerate women, and when we incarcerate gender, non conforming people. So there are thousands of civilians, and I think we should really pay attention to the fact that we should be fighting for all of those to be free. And that this example of a governor doing commutations shows how much power the executive has to actually free people, and we are in a state in New York where we have a governor who's probably one of the most merciless governors. We have who almost never commutes anybody sentence, and we have close to fifty thousand people locked up in our state here in New York, supposedly progressive haven, right? And he has commuted nineteen sentences in eight years. Nineteenth. And one of those was a domestic violence criminalized survivor. That's unacceptable. So if people have energy as a result of sin Toya's case, I'm excited about that. But I want people to channel that energy into fighting in your own state and figuring out how we're gonna free all criminalized survivors of Cobb. I want to thank you so much for being with us organizer educator who's worked anti-domestic violence programs as well as anti incarceration, racial Justice program. She's the co founder of survived and punished the ses democracy now when we come back could fifty thousand Haitians who fled the earthquake nine years ago this week be about to be deported. Stay with us. Channel. Them. That's that's shit. So the. And it's. Hey. Dad? That's got Izzo. It's got his. This yet snow? The league wins being empty. Three. Bliss. It's. That's is. So. Not so. God bless the child Billie holiday, and Tony Scott miss orchestra. This is democracy. Now, we end today show with a New York City trial currently underway challenging the Trump administration's attempt to end temporary protected status known as TPS for more than fifty thousand Haitians living in the US. Tens of thousands of patients were granted TPS after an earthquake devastated Haiti nine years ago this week in November two thousand seventeen the Trump administration announced it would revoke TPS for Haitian sparking protests multiple lawsuits around the country. The trial's expected to go into closing arguments today for more we're joined by Marlene bus skin, executive director of the family action network movement or fun one of the plaintiffs in the lawsuit. She testified Wednesday as a witness in the trial. Welcome back to demolish. Now. It's great to have you live in studio here in New York. You're usually in Miami where we talked to you. What's happening right now or fifty thousand Haitians threatened with deportation. The. And that is why we are in court this week to show and demonstrate that the Trump's administration decision to terminate TBS was based on animus and not on conditions in country conditions in Haiti and that when you say, animus humane, hate racism and xenophobia toward immediate of color Brown and Brown reckon Brown immigrants and also the immigrants from Central America and Africa last year. President Trump reportedly told lawmakers that hey deal Salvador and unspecified African nations where s whole countries, but he used the word and in two thousand seventeen he said that recent immigrants from heyday, quote all have aids he did say that he did say that. And that is why we we we are in court to the judge to restore. Wool of law. And so that these fifty thousand Haitians I'm Elise hu deeply rooted in communities. They have twenty seven thousand years children among among them. They are teachers doctors or nurses. They are all or church friends that they are able to stay what do you say to people who say TPS is temporary protective status temporary Maine's temporary talk about what they would face if they were deported to hate employments emperor in as much as the conditions improved. TPS has been terminated before. If the conditions the incomplete conditions warrant, munition it. It's been done before the right now, we know hate it, you still reeling under the worst crisis natural crisis in modern history. An earthquake that killed people even the US, which is the worst powerful nation in the world. It takes years full, Katrina, for example, to recover fee. See my still in interview. Eating and helping families in in in Orleans. So when we talk about Haiti is smallish in and we're talking about such the breath of the destruction. We know that it's still recovering. We'll have the corner outbreak on the a few months after the the. Unit or two dozen sixteenth. You have Ricken Matthew, which cuisine destroyed him dire. South bend Sula, which is considered the breast by scuttle Haiti that's where most of the crops grown. So we also we've also witnessed in the past few weeks, the the instability political instability worsening everyday, including a reset massacre that is still being investigated right now. And then during the hurricane nine years ago three hundred thousand people estimated died and heyday indeed. So what are you calling for right? We all calling for a reinstatement of temporary protected status. Because when we got the the the the earthquake when we look at a cholera outbreak. When we look at hurricane Matthew each could qualify hates for a redesigned vision of tippy s today Haiti qualifies today, so we're going to remove people will gainfully employed. What? Employers important people while homeowners what parents will go to sip Redan from their from their children. So we ask him for reinstatement, and we also asking congress to find a permanent solution. So that this hard working individuals while contributing so much being taxes investing to put that they won't even be able to to use if they're becoming capacity. I know people if we realize that are working Bank axes. Yes, they're not qualified for any benefits any resources, even though they become incapacitated. So we will certainly continue to cover the story Marlene bounced Yan executive director fan the family action network movement. And that does it for our broadcast action produced by Mike birthday. And the governor me shake Carla wills are now sent out John Karen, many mistakes.

President Trump president Sinn Toya Brown government Trump administration US federal government Tennessee Amy Goodman Robert Weisman Public Citizen New York congress New York City Nancy Pelosi White House FDA
Clemency for Cyntoia Brown

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

17:29 min | 1 year ago

Clemency for Cyntoia Brown

"The next week after spending half of her life in prison a woman named Sin Toya Brown is going to walk free choose incarcerated when she was just just sixteen. We told her story back in January and with sin Toyota just days away from release. I thought it was a good time to play the this show for you. One more time back in January lawmakers in Tennessee gathered in downtown Nashville Asheville to make a request and we're here today to appeal to governor has limbs a heart into his sense of justice justice to grant this was a last ditch effort to convince the outgoing Republican governor to grant clemency to thirty year old woman who's been in prison nearly half her life asking this. Her name is Toya Brown. It was a horrible crime but we have to ask ourselves. What was a grown man doing in debate with a sixteen year old girl still chow sin toy ended up in prison because as a teenager she killed a man who paid her a hundred and fifty dollars for sex? The police said this was a robbery a murder Sin Toyah said it was self defense the State representative who held this press conference. He said it almost didn't matter in Satori is case. She was sentenced to a life time in prison. She's already served almost fifteen years in prison and to keep her in prison for fifty one years is doubled travesty to a young victim of sexual exploitation flirtation clemency was the last option the people asking for a shorter sentence didn't seem particularly optimistic this press conference. Let's ended with a prayer. Let us Bauer Hits in prayer and so God we asked right right now for your mercy for your Grays Gosh. She can't speak for herself and so we're speaking we are speaking for justice. God was speaking for that do over. We pray this in your name on and then a week later. Thank you all for being here. I'm Charles Bone and this has been an amazing amazing journey sin. Toya Brown's lawyers held a press conference of their own so we walked in and Mr Bone immediately told her you're getting out in August SD Kathy Sin Bak was sin. Toya's first public defender Cathy was one of the people who told Toya her request for clemency had been granted she at one point right one of the members of the team said. Are you a little disappointed that it's seven months from now and you're not walking out today and she said are you crazy. I was supposed supposed to get out when I was sixty. Seven years old when this press conference was over a juvenile court judge stepped up to the microphone the phone and burst into song show them the beauty they possess in must've seemed like a victory and force in Toy Brown it was but there are thousands of other women just like her people have been exploited the same waste in Toyota's <music> but may not be as sympathetic so in today's show. We're going to give you a new way of looking at this case as a story of not just one woman but many we'll tell you why one advocate calls what's in Toya did an act of radical self love and we'll ask what next for other women who aren't getting out anytime soon. Stay stay with us. This episode of what's next is sponsored by how to raise a parent a new podcast from dairy pure in collaboration with slate studios dairypure believes the world would be a a better place if we reconnected to what pure and innocent and ourselves and each other. That's what how to raise. A parent is all about learn how to shift your perspective as a parent to reconnect with the. Imagination and openness that comes so naturally to kids join host Mallory Kasdan. She talks to parents and experts about what makes kids so fearless creative love and good at making friends and what we as adults can learn from them. The podcast explores the fun messy confusing and delightful aspects of being a parent through personal stories and brought her insights from relevant experts. Make sure listen and subscribe to how to raise a parent wherever you get your podcasts. I wanted to talk to marry him. Kaba about Sin Toy Brown story because Mariam has been an advocate for rethinking our justice system for years I in Chicago and no in New York <hes> my name is Mariam Kaba <hes> I I am the founder and director of an organization called Project Nia which is a grass roots organization dedicated to ending youth incarceration. Mariam is written about how the media talks about Sin Toya Brown the tropes and the stereotypes we lean on. She pushed me to see this narrative differently. She started off by telling me that Sinn Toya's story isn't just one story there really three ways of looking at it I mean I think it depends on what part of the world you're hearing the story from. There's the story told by state prosecutors. The state offered a story in court about how her being someone who intentionally shot a man in his sleep in order to rob him. It's the story that dot told the trial. It's the story that landed her with a life without parole sentence and tried as an adult. There's almost nothing about the actual brutality of the pimp who had coerced her. You know that's the way it got erased completely from the state story then there's the story told by Sin Toya browns defense offense by her family and friends. A young girl who is incredibly afraid ends up because she's being coerced by this older. Tim Getting picked up for sex by a forty three year old man when she was sixteen and she goes to the house. She finds that this person has a gun under the bed. She is scared this. She's afraid that he's going to use a gun on her her. She ends up taking the gun and shooting him because she's saying that she was trying to basically defend herself. He threatened her and she he ends up killing him then. There's this third story the one that's often told on the Internet over the last couple of years tweets and instagram posts from celebrities liberties like Ashley Judd and Riana have pushed the courts and then the governor to reconsider some Toya's case but in doing that many people have framed Hamson Toyota Brown has a girl not woman. <hes> you know sixteen at the time. She is therefore not an adult. She cannot consent to sex works. She's being trafficked by this cutthroat guy who's her pimp and he's basically coercing her in general but also coursing her to go out and get money and their narrative is a rescue narrative. You know this is a child. This should not have happened. She should you know she. She's basically complete and utter victim in the whole entire story. You raise this issue that these well intentioned advocates really do this work that you see is damaging. Can you explain that a little bit. I think the story of rescue often negates people's agency and people's choices that they make under constraints and under horrible circumstances I ah worked many years in support of young people who trade sex for money and survival needs. There is a a issue around no no child can consent to sex that completely negates the fact that there are young people who trade sex for money. The in survival needs rationally in order to live. You know that also links to the larger question of making Sin Choya into do the perfect victim who had no choices whatsoever somebody. who was you know completely devoid of her own agency to see if that's the frame you adopt for her life? Then how do you make sense of choice to defend her life. Yeah I think part of the challenge and part of what you're talking about with Sin Toya is one of the ways people shared her story was with his artwork that showed her in pigtails from when she was on trial these pigtails braids and I guess what you're saying. Is that portraying her in this way as really a girl. It really denies her person. Hood people really wanted you know I think this is important to say when when folks are paying attention to what story a large part of the kind of social media audience for this story thought that this situation had just happened right so they are are consuming this not having known that she'd already spent thirteen years by that point locked up in jail so they are seeing this image inch her circulating with pigtails and they think that this is Jim Toia now. Presently you know she's sixteen years old. She killed her <hes>. You know a John who she was afraid. What's going to harm her and she's at this point. When this thing comes up last year she's twenty nine why freeze her her as a sixteen year old for many people because that's her most sympathetic right. That's her at her most sympathetic. It's something that people than feel that they can relate to is that she's a sixteen year old kid. She doesn't deserve this but what were the point often. You know the point. Ah we're making anarchy from the point lake in our work at surviving punish is that no buddy deserves to be criminalised for survival <music> no matter what your race is and what your gender expression is no one desert <music>. I've covered juvenile justice a little bit as a reporter. I spoke to a lawyer who crafted the case that went to the Supreme Court to make sure that juveniles weren't imprisoned for life and I remember him saying that part of what they did part of the strategy eh which is cynical yes but it was part of their strategy was to put out pictures of these juvenile offenders as children and those were white males so it's not just sin Toya No of course not. Do you think it's a problem across the board. Yeah it is a problem <hes> <hes> if the point that's trying to be made is that only children are deserving of our concern for excessive punishment. I and incarceration you don't use some groups of people in order to make other people's freedom more difficult so yes tell the full story. Let people know that this happened when she was sixteen. Let people know that it's immoral in my opinion to Decay Djing sixteen year Al for Life Without Parole Sale that absolutely the telephone story and also acknowledge the fact that essentially is now a grown woman and she's still and definitely deserves to be free the thing about sin toy around story. Is that no matter which each version you tell it can feel familiar. It has precedence and history parallels. Mariam Kaba Likes to tell this story of an enslaved enslaved woman named Celia a woman who was purchased in Missouri buccaneering fifty. When she was fourteen years old she was raped repeatedly by the man who bought her she bore two of his children and then when she reportedly was trying to reject his advances one night she killed him? We know all this because Celia was put on trial for the man's murder and she had a vigorous defense but the laws of the time didn't recognize enslaved people as people ball there were property incapable of self defense and a jury found Celia guilty of murder. She was executed by hanging less than three months later. When I read her story it really struck me in a very <hes> kind donovan a very visceral way because it encapsulated so much for me the connections between Chattel Slavery and the treatment of black women women in our culture and in our society the fact that we've always been able to be accused of murder and be accountable for that but at the same time we're not actually persons so you can't receive the protections that the state should offer those notions are very they're gonNA baked in to our cultural scripts. The notion is that we don't really have a self defense. You know so sin. Toya is going to be freed in in August fifteen years after she was put I think after she went on trial. Does that make a difference. It's not justice. No it's not not justice is good. You know what I mean like. I think it's good that she's going to be out of prison after serving fifteen years in my opinion when she shouldn't have served one day but it's good that she's GonNa get out but she is one of thousands and I just think I walked people to understand that we've got a whole bunch of people locked up criminalised for defending themselves in criminalised for survival in general you and your ratings you have this really striking way of talking about what Sin Toya did and other women you mentor did that sort of got them to this point you call them acts of radical self love why you know one of the things that I find so oh frustrating in our culture is that you are punished so severely for wanting to live that what the message is is that if he preferable he actually died. Only some people have access to the rights of self defense in our culture and they better be white and they better be men overwhelmingly and so you saying no. I'm refusing. I'm not going to succumb to the violence that is being directed at me is inactive radical self love but I guess I think that Johnny Allen the man that Sinn Toya shot. I think yeah their family would hear that and be outraged. Yes they should be outraged. It's a terrible thing I understand that they lost somebody. They they love. I wish it hadn't happened. I also wish that since I hadn't felt the need to defend herself because she was in danger. Both things can be Gotcha and are thank you so much for talking about this case. I really really appreciate appreciate it no problem no problem think to having <music> <music> all right. That's the show today's episode originally aired back in January Winston instant toyah found out she'd been granted clemency next Wednesday. She will walk free. If you're looking for something else to listen to right now head on over to the gist I with my friend Mike Pesca today he is assessing the legacy of Al Franken but he's doing it. Alongside Christina Cutter Rucci another slate writer a a recent article in the New Yorker asks us to reconsider sexual harassment allegations against the senator but should we what next is hosted by. Mary Harris Rests Pretty by Mary Wilson Jason Leone and Ethan Brooks. I'll talk to you on Monday <music>.

Sin Toya Sin Toya Brown Sinn Toya Mariam Kaba Toyota murder Sin Toyah Kathy Sin Bak Tennessee Celia Nashville point lake Charles Bone Mike Pesca State representative robbery Mallory Kasdan Al Franken instagram Hamson Toyota Brown
GSMC Social Media News Podcast Episode 229: If Its Not One Thing Its Another

GSMC Social Media News Podcast

1:05:56 hr | 7 months ago

GSMC Social Media News Podcast Episode 229: If Its Not One Thing Its Another

"Golden state media concepts social media. Podcast time to Hash Tag. Everything we talk about all the fun crazy stories on social media. Instagram facebook twitter to Tumbler. Probably friendster join us as we explore the Quirky of social meets the Golden State Media Concept Social Media Podcast Gates and book though one so low and thank you for tuning into another episode of the GMC Social Media News podcast brought to you by the MC podcast network. I am your host Chamara Jackson and in today's episode. The quarantine is putting a strain on a lot of people's mental health. And we're going to kind of dive into the actions that some social media handles have decided to do summer. Tours are being halted maybe extended because of the corona virus but ticketmaster has had a different regulation on their refund policy. And we're going to take a look on what that new return policy may be and there were also going to look at the effects that a lot of people may be having to go through because of this new refund policy and then we're going to take a look into all of our celebrity gossip ranging from offset to. Aisha curry coming up. Stay tuned all right. So we're going to dive in to the Los Angeles mayor. Eric Garcetti. And he is saying that it's going to be difficult to see. Large gatherings like concerts are sporting events resuming in the city before twenty. Twenty one and in my personal opinion. I do have to agree with that. The actions of social distancing yourself and being aware of everything around you has become so normal and just a month that people are deciding for themselves to yes become more aware of the people that are surrounding them. I also believe that this is going to after all of this is over. This is going to take a lot of getting used to. It's going to take people getting used to going back to movie theaters. Sitting down at a restaurant are just going to shops. Such is Mac in Sephora retail stores such as forever twenty one places that we know for a fact his constantly in his always filled with different people. Wondering if your friends are your loved ones may have something that could put your life at risk. It's just going to become something that we are going to have to kind of think about and wonder about. And hopefully as the year progresses and this virus becomes something for the history books. As time progresses. I hope that we can get back to where we once were. Which is you know being there for one another having that intimate social talking instead of social distancing and you know being able to go back to where we once were. Is it going to take time? Yes do I feel that will become a hundred percent by the time? Twenty twenty one happens. I mean hopefully so because like I stated again people have. This has become something that is normal social distancing yourself and and a lot of things you know may change even movie theaters. I also have to look at shopping going. There's always been a difference between physically going to the mall and trying on clothes and understanding how each gene can fit a body differently rather than ordering online whereas you get it. You tried on you find out these genes do not fit you even though they even though. It's the same size as you. Some jeans just do not fit the same so now you have to go through the struggle of getting a box finding the to go and send the box to your post office or to ups. And then you're going to have to deal with hoping and praying that this package will reach this company time so that you can get your refunded money or an another choice of gene and finally with all of these return policies A lot of people have been so adamant about telling their customers. Hey We have extended the refund policy This is it in new return policy. Ticketmaster is under fire because they have decided to quietly change their re fund policy. So here is the news on that with all of the tours being canceled especially in the wake of the Corona Virus Pandemic. There is a distinction with ticketmaster. That lies weather. A show has been flat out canceled or postponed for a later. Date canceled concerts are refunded at the point of purchase while a huge portion of concerts postponed. And they are waiting for a later date. So the lake nation president he echoed a recent projection that estimated by the fall of twenty twenty. One that is the earliest that major shows will start hitting the stage again. Okay so if you purchase your ticket for a random concert for for the fall of twenty twenty as we can all see. This pandemic is not easing up anytime soon so you may have to. The DATA MAY BE POSTPONED. So you will not be able to go to your. Did your desired concert time. If you're confused I'm going to read the statement made by Lake Nation and then I'll dive more into my opinion so hold that thought right there. Okay just just hold that thought if you purchased a ticket for any show and it was postponed you may not be able to attend that show until the next year so if you purchased something for. May I twenty twenty nine times? Out of ten or Spurs. Yeah nine times out of ten. These guys have already postponed the date so instead of going to your may concert. You're going to your may concert. The Following Year Aka. May I twenty twenty one? Speaking of May I fans who bought tickets for shows that has been postponed will be receiving ticket masters new concert dates and the options to initiate a refund including the ticket price and all of the fees fans will have thirty days to request a refund. Otherwise tickets will be good for unscheduled shows for cancelled shows they can choose to receive up to one hundred and fifty percent of their ticket value as concert cash. That basically means if you've ever worked in retail when they tell you hey already reached the limit of you not being able to receive your full refund instead. I'm going to give you store credit so in this case concert cash is kind of the same equivalent of Store Credit Aka gift card so what that basically means is if you have decided to get a refund if you have decided hey I do not wanna wait until May I. I paid a certain amount of money for this ticket. And I want my money back instead. What they're offering is a concert cash. If you've decided I don't want to go to show anymore. I just want my money from what I have read. They're able to do it but it's such a big hassle that they would rather just give it to you in concert cash which basically means. Hey I understand you do not want to go to these to your said concert however were unable to do it so instead here is concert cash that you may use to. That may use for another concert going forward in the future. A lot of the money goes to the venue. A lot of money go towards go towards the said artists which again? That's a lot of business going on there. That's a lot of talking that I do not have enough time for in this PODCAST K. Otherwise we would break it down. You know bit by bit but we don't have time for that. Okay so keep that in mind. Do I understand the frustration that a lot of people are going to have? Yes especially in this epidemic. Maybe they were going to work every day and they had that money for that set concert and now that they are not working. That money for that said concert could be used toward a bill or food or anything that can help them through this pandemic after the break all of our social media handles are doing what they can to ensure that everyone is doing everything they can to stay safe in this pandemic and most of it is for our mental health and how they are changing the game to help us stay sane in this situation coming up right after the break you want to be healthier yet. You just don't know what to do all these shows telling you this and that but nothing seems to work. We'll listen close. Golden state media concepts has got something great for you. The health and wellness podcast dedicated to work out healthy eating habits. Diane everything about healthy living. Join us in our banters as we help you not just live life to the fullest but live it to the healthiest whole. Come back so before the break we were talking about the Los Angeles is mayor. Basically saying that it's going to be very difficult to see large gatherings like concerts or sporting events resuming in the city before twenty twenty one and I went on to agree. Basically saying that US as a society social distancing ourselves from near about everything after this pandemic is over. I feel like this has become something that is so subconscious that we don't even make that we don't even mean to do it which is therefore going to see kind of a decline in not only movie theaters but in sit down restaurants. And even how we handle. You know how our kids are going to go on in the future like how a school going to resume. How are we going to not find ourselves becoming hyper aware of everything? That's going on around us. And how are we going to treat you know? Different people going on in the future as well and I guess become anxious about knowing if that person has corona virus or not or something that may have an effect on your immune system but again that is just one other one thing we talked about. We also talked about ticketmaster and how they quietly changed their refund policy to where instead of getting cash. You may get cash. It'll be very difficult instead. They're offering concert cash. Which kind of equivalent to store credit so before I get into this next topic? I saw a whole bunch of things of how people are like. They went into twenty twenty with an open. Mind and now. They're in twenty twenty and they would rather go back to twenty nineteen than deal with this and let me tell you. I have never felt that comment on a deep level. Because let me tell you guys my two thousand in nineteen was something that I would never want to experience ever so for me to say I would rather go back to two thousand nineteen than Dale with the rest of twenty twenty. I feel that I felt that. On a deep deep level but going forward into twenty twenty there cannot be this much chaos without something good that is about to happen and me just trying to be a positive person. A realist positive person. There has to be some kind of good that is going to come out of us being in being in quarantine but again. I'm GonNa talk about that later on what I wanted to talk about right now. Is some social plan social media platforms that has decided to really step up their game and look at their audience. We're going to be talking about snapchat. We're going to be talking. We're going to be talking about net flicks and we're also going to be talking about Instagram but for right now I wanted to talk about facebook and how they are launching quiet mode so with the new normal in place. Which is what I just talked about. Social distancing ourselves and basically becoming hyper aware of our surroundings setting boundaries for how we are spending time online can be helpful. Facebook's new quiet mode might just be what you're looking for to lead a healthy work slash life balance which a lot of us can raise our hands and say that we to have done this when we were going to work and going places. It's so easy to you know. Put yourself in a routine and say oh man I totally forgot. I have to go to work after you have to have to make sure that my days are correlating however with being in quarantine as being on our phones or on social media has become something that is so normal. Because there's really nothing for us to do so I feel like facebook ad again. Quiet mode is setting something in our brains to say. Hey you've been on this for little too long. Get up. Go do something. This is your quiet time. So here is how facebook is explaining it. They stated quote. We've added quiet mode which mutes most push notifications and if you try to open facebook while in quiet mode. You'll be reminded that you set this time aside to limit your time in the APP to press pause on screen you can either switch on quiet mode straight away or schedule it for later. So here is my opinion about quiet mode and you know basically I feel like all APPs need to have a quiet mode and I am the reason I believe. That is because it reminds people to wind down without screens A lot of people don't know that a blue light. Actually it reacts to the Blue Screen The blue light basically like a century to your brain stating this is sunlight or something like that and it just keeps your brain up basically so while people are on the screen subconsciously restraining our eyes and were taking in a lot of this blue light and again when we're trying to go to sleep we are actually straining ourselves to go to sleep because the light becomes a distraction or whatever you're looking at on your social media is becoming a distraction so that is not only messing up and turn your sleep schedule but it's also in some way going to mess up your work schedule because it's kind of like a ripple effect kind of thing so while you're in corn team don't look at don't look at it as you're on lockdown. Look at it look at it as a time to where you can better your routine you can say hey. I'm going to bed at this time. I'm going to bed at ten o'clock So let me put up all my notifications that this is my quiet mode. Okay let me go to all my social media's instead that this is my quiet mode I don't WanNa get notifications any of that so by the time you wake up. Let's say sake seven and you WANNA get on your phone. Your notifications are already there and you can go from there but speaking of you know us wanting our social media pages to do the same thing youtube instead of them having a quiet mode. They're doing something else. Which is lowering your streaming quality. So if you've ever been on Youtube all day and you notice that the quality on your said video is going down. That is because youtube kind of subconsciously. Trying to remind you that. Hey you need to look and see how long you've been on this APP and how long you have been streaming something so users with this being said Wild staying at home has a lot of us streaming videos and Netflix. At all hours of the day after Netflix Youtube following suits to stream videos in standard quality to all regions to lessen network loads so basically what that means is they lower the streaming to help everyone else in the world still get to stream the same video. It's again it's something that I can't really explain in one sitting of this podcast so with that being said I'm not with that being said I'm not going to really dive in deep on that situation but understand that users still have the option to watch videos on high definition if they want to. But we'll have to do so by choosing the HD option as videos will intentionally load in SD only so what that means again is if you've been watching Youtube all day and you suddenly noticed that the quality has just went to trash that is because they are subconsciously telling you hey you've been on youtube watching. Hd Videos all day watching from nine am. It's now eight pm with your life so this is not the end of the world people just a small price. We must pay in order to ease the burden on Internet in fracture again. You can choose to change. Your settings is just going to become a little annoying but that again is the price that we must pay in coming up after the break. We are going to talk about snapchat and how they have added something to help. Ease our mental stress as well as instagram and Net flicks. Also coming in to help younger people understand where they where they are mentally as well. All of that is coming up right after this break. Stay tuned trust me. Do not want to miss a thing. Hey I'm andy if you don't know me it's probably because I'm not famous but I did start a men's grooming company called Harry's the idea for Harry's came out of frustrating experience. I had buying razor blades. Most brands were overpriced over designed and out of touch. At Harry's our approach is simple. Here's our secret. We make sharp durable blades and sell them at honest prices for as low as two dollars. Each we care about quality so much that we do some crazy things like by a world class German blade factory obsessing over every detail means we're confident and offering one hundred percent quality guarantee. Millions of guys have already made the switch to Harry's so thank you if you're one of them and if you're not we hope you give a try with this special offer get a Harry starter. Set with a five Blade Razor waited handle Shave Gel and travel cover all for just three bucks plus free shipping just go to Harrys DOT COM and enter five thousand at checkout. That's Harrys Dot com code. Five thousand enjoy tired of the vast jungle of podcasts. Now listen close and here this out. There's a podcast network that covers just about everything that you've been searching. The golden state media concepts podcast network is here nothing less than our podcast bliss with endless hours of podcast covered from news sports music fashion looking entertainment fantasy football and so much more so stop blurted around and go straight out to the golden state media concepts podcast network guarantee to build that podcast. Whatever it may be visit us at. Www DOT JESUS MC podcast dot COM. Follow us on facebook and twitter and download on. I tunes soundcloud and Google play Welcome back so before the break we were talking about facebook and how they have launched a new quiet mode to ensure that you know everyone is getting the adamant amount of sleep that they can and that they're not straining there is in you know finding a way to balance their work and regular life while we are in quarantine and then we also talked about youtube and how they are lowering their quality if people have been on youtube for a long time to basically they're monitoring your streams and if they've noticed that you've been on your stream for a very long time they're going to lower the settings so that it's not a big strain on your Internet so now I'm going to talk to you guys about snapchat and also instagram's slash net flicks and how. They are doing their part to help us deal with. What's going on mentally so I? I wanted to talk about snapchat and how they are launching a new mental health resource center so with exile city and stress on the rise as the pandemic situation continues to intensify. Snapchat has decided to launch the quote. Here for you. A new mental health resource center to help those experiencing mental health or emotional crisis. So this feature will provide people with relevant updates from the World Health Organization the CBC crisis text line in H S and other partners to help people cope with ICTY and stress. Stress Misfits media wrote on twitter quote at Snapchat has announced that it's bringing Ford. It's new here for you. Mental Health Resources Center in light of these unprecedented times and quote. So here is my opinion on snapchat launching a new. Mental Health Resource Center. I personally really like it as someone who does suffer from exile eighty exiled. He is a real life thing and sometimes people don't understand it but doing something as simple as walking and getting out of the house can help with your anxiety but with everything going on to where people again or just putting an overwhelming amount of stress on cove at Nineteen. And you know doing everything they can to make sure people are being quarantined and doing their part and social. Distancing is just taking a strain on a lot of people mentally especially teens. I remember being a team and trying to figure out life and to be honest with you guys. I'm in my twenties and I'm still trying to figure out life like being in. This situation is not funny. It's not fun. It's not like it has his days of being great and being positive and just finding ways to go from there but sometimes especially if you're anxiety is just acting up it's really hard to bounce back from there especially if you cannot talk to anyone so I find that it's great. That snapchat again has looked at their audience has looked at their demographics and said Hey. Teenagers are the most likely to suffer in this crisis. Te Let me find out. Let me find some ways to not only reach out to teenagers but reach out to a younger adult audience. So I feel like they're using their platform for good and speaking of using their platform for good another very popular. Social Media Handle has offered mental health as well and that is instagram and net flicks. They are both actually instagram and Netflix. Have partnered on one to talk about it. It's a live series. Where every week? One Star talks with a mental health expert about self care during a global pandemic. And what I like about it from what I've read about it. What I like about it is that it has celebrities. Are People around the same age as their demographics. So you have someone who was a teenager you have someone is A woman young lady You have people coming in to ask the questions and give you advice on how to take care of yourself what they consider self care to help you again. Progress during this pandemic and adjusting to like I stated earlier something that is new and restricting on social contact this again like I stated before has taken a toll on the mental health of young people which is not even just teenagers. But it's young adults as well again My opinions about net flakes doing Net flicks and instagram. Doing what they can to help their demographics and to help everyone that they have come in contact with I. I really really really like it. I feel like it's going to help on a lot of solutions. It's going to help people Look up new ways to help themselves so not only are they. Are they getting through the pandemic but they're also going to take something that that is used that is useful for them for the rest of their lives for instance Before even quarantining. I always meditated but having breathing exercise. And I guess finding out if you're having an anxiety attack which I've had before Just if they don't know that they're having anxiety attack and just finding ways to help them understand everything is going to be okay and Kinda taking that mental obstacle down I also believe that during this time. it's not only exactly about being stuck in the house. It's exactly of going out and catching this virus. And it's also not being able to have your support system Sir not being able to be around those that want to see you progress and don't like to see you in your anxious predicted that makes sense but right now. There's some news about Netflix. That may leave some listeners scratching their heads and I understand that they have just done. Some good but Netflix. Right now is currently under fire. And we'RE GONNA find out why that is after this short break. Don't change that doubt coming up. Find out what movies to go. See and check out the GMC movie podcast. It's your ticket to the latest movies whether it's a new blockbuster event romantic comedy or action flick. This show has got it all covered. They talk some what to go. See Now don't bother. What's hot on Netflix? Everything in between that's GMC PODCAST DOT COM BACK SLASH. Movie Dash podcast. When it's all about the movies. It has to be this new show. Don't forget to like them on facebook and follow them on twitter visit GS MC podcast dot com for more INFO. All right welcome back so before the break we were talking about. How netflix an Instagram have? Done something Soho Goodbye. You know reaching out to people who may be experiencing a lot of mental stress that is going on and how they basically looked at their demographics and now they're having people who are the same age as them a celebrity audience who is possibly the same age as them go on live with a mental expert. And just give out ways Give out self-care tips to help those listeners. Progress in to the normal of quarantining and then we've also talked about snapchat and how they have created a mint a mental resource center to help those who suffer from just have a safe place for them to go and talk right now. I wanted to get into net flicks remember before the break. We were already talking about Netflix. And how this subject that I'm about to talk about is going to possibly leave you scratching your head. I know because it had me scratching my head a little bit so here is why net flicks is under fire. It is centered around a documentary about Sin Toya Brown. If you guys have no idea who said Toyo Brown is she is a young lady. She was a young lady who was convicted of the murder and robbery of Johnny Michael Allen. Sin Toy at the time was sixteen years old and she claimed that Johnny who was forty three years old at the time paid her a hundred and fifty dollars to have sex with him and she also stated that she feared for her life during this encounter which led her to shoot him. Okay so who is sin? Toya Brown Sin Toyo Brown is actually know now as son. Toya Brown Mung. She is thirty two years old now but at the time of her conviction she was only sixteen years old. She was convicted of the murder. And robbery of Johnny Michael Allen. So this happened. When she was sixteen years old again she claimed that Johnny who was forty three years old at the time paid her a hundred and fifty dollars to have sex with him and she also stated that she feared for her life during their encounter which again led which led her to shoot him so people. Don't this is where the the mix up convos in some stories that I've read. She shot him in the back of the head. However in other stories that I've read she shot him on the bed. So that's where things are getting kind of mixed up What I don't have mixed up is the fact that she is sixteen years old and that this girl was a she was a victim of teen sex trafficking which is a huge thing. Here's some more back story about her situation. The night that changed her life was when she shot Johnny. Obviously she shot him because again she feared for her life and that was with all of the encounters that they've ever had so essentially this forty three year old man wanted to have sex with a sixteen year old and because she feared for her life. That should go to show you that. He was being physical with her. He was hurting her Aka abusing her so she stated in one article that she thought he was reaching for his gun after she shot him. Sin Toya at just the age of sixteen year old sixteen years old was serving a life sentence so she was sentenced to life in prison. I like this story. Because she ended up getting out and She was granted clemency. Okay which essentially the reason as to why she had the chance to leave. However I don't like this story because it tells you the reality of a lot of teen sex trafficking victims and a lot of inmates in prison right now as we speak and those guys are not the lucky ones so essentially Toya. Her childhood was just never right. I believe her mom was a victim of drugs. Which led to not a lot of neglect? And I believe she was either put up for adoption or she was in this the system of foster care so either way it goes she had bad people around her leading her in bad in a bad direction which again led her into prostitution. Wish let her into sex trafficking okay as a teenager sixteen euro and a lot of us cannot wrap our brains around a situation like this but the sad truth. Is that a lot of victims. A lot of women are victims of her same predicament. They're just not as lucky sin. Toya became someone who the system has kind of failed. They don't really count this man. This forty three year old man who wanted to have sex with this minor and many failed to realize that this man was again in fact abusing her but I personally feel the only reason she was granted. Clemency was because she caught the attention of many celebrities. Such as Kim Kardashian West and Lebron James people who helped put the fire under these people to help them look deeper into her case and understand that. This situation is not just black and white. So how does this tie? In with Net flicks well sin. Toyah said that she had no involvement with the release of the documentary. That is about her. The documentary that Netflix is about to thin out is murder to mercy the sin. Toya Brown story which is an unauthorized documentary. Sin Toya wrote on instagram quote. While I was incarcerated a producer who had old footage of me made a deal with Netflix for an unauthorized documentary. My husband and I were surprised as everyone else when we first heard the news because we did not participate in any way and while I pray that this film highlights wrongs with our justice system. I had nothing to do with this documentary now. Here are my feelings about everything. Do I feel like sin? Toya should have served some type of punishment for shooting this man. I hate to say it but yes I do I feel like this lady. This young lady was okay so it sounds really strange on what I'm about to say. But she served fifteen years in prison before she was ultimately granted clemency in two thousand and nineteen okay so she just got out of prison but during her time in prison she was always active. On how the justice system has let her down about how her surroundings kind of influenced on what she was going through and then her life story I believe all while also in prison she got Not only her high school degree but I believe she got her bachelors as well and also wow in prison. She also learned a bunch of things to help her in society as well and just I. I hate to see something like this. Get blown up but I also have to look at what tyrus wrote on Instagram. As well. He said quote sadly there are a million prison inmate shows on TV. And I'm almost sure that none of them. Inmates whose faces are shown ever financially benefit from being seen or featured nor do they ever sign paperwork. This is sad but this is what happens when you no longer own yourself. While incarcerated you are owned by the state they sign and profit from our backsides and we just have to sit and deal with it. Inmates don't have rights. Those rights belong to the jail and the state sin. Toya's story to me. It tells you the reality of a lot of teen trafficking victims. Another thing is many many have to wonder. Will these inmates ever see this money so we might see them on TV but are they receiving any type of money in any kind of way nine nine times out of ten they are not and again? That is just a sad reality on what we have to deal with. And what people have to go through and coming up after the break. We have some more legal issues. This time it's involving two chains. Y DE AND OFFSET PLUS. Isha curry is reportedly being sued. So last time on my podcast we were talking all about entertainment drama and all of the drama. That's going on but I feel like in today's episode. We're going to be talking about a lot of lawful issues that's going on it's okay. We're all going to be hitting that right after this stay tuned always on the go but the day just won't be one without your Hollywood. Vince lit golden state media concepts. Senator Tim podcast. Take care of that Jordan and Keith is better tonight meets access holly run Jordan Guy Laughing? That's key all inclusive. Look POB kosher. Welcome back in the last segment. We were talking about Sin Toya Brown and how she basically was cut out on this unauthorized documentary on her and her life and how she basically ended up incarcerated. And we've also talked about a lot of victims who face the same reality that's in toy. Brown has went through which is being a part of the system and basically how it has failed them as young ladies and how they've been put on a document on documentary and they have not received any type of notification They just wake up one day and they're on a documentary but now I wanted to change up everything and talk about Aisha Curry. Who IS ISSUE CURRY? If you guys do not know who she is. She is the wife of Steph curry and he is a very much well known basketball player. I has been on the scene before she has been in some TV shows. She is mostly known. Like I said as being Steph Curry's wife but she's also known on the cooking network. She can cook. I am not going to give her that. I'm not gonNA knock her for that. She can cook. She has also helped me get a lot of recipes. Okay but H Hurry is reportedly being sued by a celebrity branding company that states that they have helped launch her cooking career. The company is called flutie entertainment which is operated by Robert flutie. He filed the lawsuit against Eissa Curry. This past Wednesday April fifteenth in this complaint obtained by the obtained by blast flutie entertainment alleges that they assisted in building. Aisha's personal brand into the well known public. Figure she is today. Robert Flutie also reported adding he met. Aisha back in two thousand fourteen when she had a cooking blog called little lights of mine. Which was her only project. At that time. I should assigned to Roberts Company in two thousand and fifteen in hopes of building a separate brand apart from steph curry and his name flutie entertainment reportedly added to the claim that they assisted. I share in her dreams of becoming a celebrity chef in comparison to a current and Modern Day version of Martha Stewart or Rachel. Ray The company added in the claim that they came up with the proposal for. I ISA to release cookbooks. Tv shows and a brand of cooking products Aisha is alleged to have fired flutie entertainment out of the blue in May of two thousand and Nineteen Robert flutie claims. He was not aware of any issues between them. Before the surveillance of ties the company alleged the company alleges that I e Shah attempted to cut them out of prophets and invest in various projects. Flutie entertainment is suing. Aisha curry for ten million in damages. Fifty percent and you already girl. Aisha's production company and a percentage of the money she made from her cooking products and multiple business vineyards. They believe they should be compensated for the deals. They made during her contract between them. I use lawyer. Michael bloster released a statement after the lawsuit was filed okay. So here's my opinion about this whole drama regarding Aisha Curry Do I feel like we? There's a lot of information that we do not know in regards to why Chicory did in fact fire them were they not doing their job right where they beating around the Bush where they stating that they were going to get her to another level when in fact they really didn't it was possibly just Issa's management that got her to where they had to get her. We all know that because we don't have all the details however I felt like a lot of this of her popularity was pushed by her husband. She might have claimed she might have claimed you know that she wanted to have a different face. Aside from her being Steph Curry's wife but at the end of the day people know her solely. Because she steph curry's wife she cannot step away from that. That's just going to be with her. Okay I can understand again. Why flutie entertainment is possibly suing? Why they're suing her For ten million dollars in damages. I think that's very steep As far as fifty percent in yard girl. Fifty percent interest in hardy girl again. I think that's a steep as well for his production company so they're suing her also for her production company and for percentage of the money she made from her cooking products and multiple business ventures. I can understand why they are suing for you know this part in particular however. I felt like suing her for ten million dollars in damaging is steep as well as suing her for fifty percent in yard girl fifty percent interest in yard girl and then her production company. I just feel is very steep. I feel like they're suing her and trying to make her an example. But however however I do have to get on Aisha curry and also have to get on her lawyer at this time because I feel like they read through her contract but I felt like there was no one who really sat down and said Hey. This is not a good idea to quit at this moment. I understand you do not like this company but just try to do everything you can to do with you can with this country. I mean with this With this company until your contract runs out in the you can go there or I feel like they should have had a lawyer come in and change her contract because obviously she wasn't happy with her contract but again that would have to have a very good system and I feel like in this case. A lot of her lawyers dropped the ball no pun and colluded. But that's what I feel happen in this situation. Okay so now I WANNA talk about more legal issues. This time regarding to chains to Weiji and often in their new song proud so it looks like two chains. Weiji offset has claimed a victory after finding themselves at the center of a lawsuit over there. Track proud filed by a New York rapper. Who claimed the rappers stole his lyrics and title in his two thousand fifteen song. The plaintiff Solomon Clanton who goes by slugger in New York. He's widely known in New York He has voluntarily dismissed the case against all defendants doing so without prejudice. Basically what that means is he could refile in the future but for right now he decided to dismiss the claims so basically slug a winning. He claimed that these three men stole his song stole his flow stole everything from him and then later on he came in and said Hey. I would like to dismiss the charges so after reading this on Hollywood unlocked I stepped back in. I thought about a lot of things. And you know usually my conspiracy theories like to like to eat me up but this time I felt like my conspiracy theories were right or I guess. In this fact our guest in this situation this fact that occurred. I believe that why to change in offset paid off this man and I feel like he took the money and just went from there Do I believe they took the song. No but I also said in like another podcast where I feel like a lot of people take stuff they just like write their names change a few and then they say this is mine. So Do I feel like this might have happened? Yes do I feel like they might have paid this man off? Yes so again. I just have to stay. Sometimes they might have changed the lyrics a little bit. They might have changed the beat a little bit but a person knows their songs so in this rappers case his truth is they stole my song in two chains. Weiji in offsets mind. They probably just change a few beats around and this is their song so again they probably just pay this young man off just go on about their business but introduced. I felt like we will never know the true reason. We will never know the true truth because only three people know the truth. Why D two chains and offset the New York Rapper Slava and like the producers and everyone around them and that is the end of today's segment in the next segment. We are going to be talking about the Disney family sing-along and how cute it was all coming up after this short break stay tuned. Hey I'm andy if you don't know me it's probably because I'm not famous but I did start a men's grooming company called Harry's the idea for Harry's came out of a frustrating experience I had buying razor blades. Most brands were overpriced over designed out of touch. At Harry's our approach is simple. Here's our secret. We make sharp durable blades and sell them at honest prices for as low as two dollars. Each we care about quality so much that we do some crazy things like by a world class German blade factory obsessing over every detail means we're confident and offering one hundred percent quality guarantee. Millions of guys have already made the switch to Harry's so thank you if you're one of them and if you're not we hope you give us a try with this special offer get a Harry starter. Set with a five Blade Razor waited handle shave gel and a travel cover offered just three bucks plus free shipping just go to Harrys DOT COM and enter five thousand at checkout. That's Harrys Dot com code five thousand enjoy the GMC live in happiness. Podcast TAKES YOU ON. A Journey of exploration. We'LL DISCUSS TRIED. And true methods alongside the latest trends of how to best live your life to its fullest and happiest from psychology to meditation science to self help books the Genus Mc. Live in happiness podcast. We'll help you to discover what makes you happy and how you can live like being the best possible download the GMC life and happiness. Podcast on Itunes stitcher stunt cloud. Who Play or anywhere. You Find. Podcasts just tie. Gmc in the search bar. Hey is okay so we are at the end of our subject. We have went through so much and just in case. You weren't here to listen to everything that was going on. I'm going to break down everything that we talked about before I began my nice little cute little in segment so I we talked about how Los Angeles is mayor kind of said that it's going to be hard for us to go back in society after this whole pandemic is over and how Us going shopping or going to the movie theater are sitting down in a sit down. Restaurant is just not going to be the same. Especially because we are so used to social distancing ourselves and speaking of social distancing we also talked about snapchat and how they are launching a new mental health resource center to help those who are dealing with exile eighty and stress in the same sentence. We also talked about instagram and net flakes and how they are doing bear part in helping those Experiencing mental health or emotional crisis. We talked about one to talk about it. Which is something that instagram and Net flicks are doing to releasing self-care series for young adults and teenagers again just experiencing so much mental and emotional crisis. That's going on while being in quarantine and then speaking of Netflix. We also talked about how net flicks is under fire for releasing an unauthorized documentary on sin. Toya Brown a young lady who spent half of her life in jail over the killing of a man who she believed was trying to kill her. We talked about how. Facebook is launching a quiet mode and youtube is beginning to lower people's quality they're streaming quality if they notice that they have been streaming for a very long time and finally we talked about. I should curry and Her lawsuits situation in regards to flu entertainment. And we also talked about the lawsuit that Weiji to change and offset had victory over copyright situation in regards to a New York rapper. Name's slug up. So now I wanted to switch up things and talk about a really cute subject and that was the Disney's family sing along. That happened Thursday April sixteenth and it came on ABC. It was so cute. You guys I personally really love Disney. I've always been a fan of Disney and just seeing different celebrities. Go on and just seeing was so cute my favorite person that song for the night and it was all over. Twitter was my girl. Ariana Grande Day. She her she did her thing by seeing. I won't say I'm in love from Hercules one. Because she was singing so beautifully her makeup was bomb and shirt she had on. I really wanted but aside from all of that. Her overall performance was just so good even how she Her monitors were fixed onto the muses. If you know anything about Hercules he already know the muses again. I just I loved it. I loved that whole thing. I think the one reunion that everyone was looking forward to was the high school musical reunion. I forgot one grade. I was in highschool musical first. Came out but always been like a little tradition. My favorite high school musical however was high school musical three. Don't touch me and then it was high school musical in the high school musical two but again. Don't judge me anyway. We saw everyone do reunion and it was so cute and then Zach. Ephron was just kind of sitting there like I'm here I'm here. It was so funny guys. It was very awkward but it was funny at the same time with that being said that is the end of today's podcast. I hope you guys have enjoyed it. And with that being said this is the end of today's show. I would like to thank you for listening to the GS MC Social Media News. Podcast once again brought to you by the GS MC podcast network. I would like to ask that you please remember to subscribe to the show and write a nice review because that really helps us out also be sure to follow us on. All of our social media handles such as facebook twitter and instagram. I would also like to thank you guys and have a good night a good day and everything in between by you've been listening to the golden state media concepts social media podcast part of the Golden state media concepts podcast network. You can find this show and others like it at. Www dot the GS MC podcast dot com download. Our podcast on Itunes Stitcher soundcloud. Google play just type in Jesus Mc to find all the shows from the golden state media concepts podcast network from movies to music from sports entertainment and even three US. You can also follow us on twitter and on facebook. Thank you and we hope you have enjoyed today's program.

instagram Netflix Aisha curry facebook Toya Brown youtube Twitter Snapchat Sin Toya Harry Los Angeles ticketmaster US Twenty twenty Disney New York Weiji snapchat
Cyntoia Brown

Women and Crime

55:26 min | 7 months ago

Cyntoia Brown

"Burgum some of the most heinous murders are the ones. You've never even heard from Michael Ojibway and reach weeks. Media comes invisible choir a new form of investigative true crime storytelling that brings the most depraved and under investigated crimes to life. They slammed acute on the ground in the middle of stabbing baby with actual audio from the events including nine one. One Calls Police interogations and concessions act on a wide ample of her as Appraiser founder I. We'll take you on an unforgettable emotional journey to the marginalized communities and crime scenes themselves to bring visibility to the unseen download. Invisible choir today on apple podcast or wherever you listen. This podcast may contain content. That is graphic and disturbing in nature listener discretion is advised at just sixteen years old sin. Toya Brown was arrested for the murder of forty three year. Old Johnny Allen Sin. Toya was sentenced to life in prison after years of advocacy. She was granted clemency and from prison. Why would a young girl commit such an act and what led to in Toya's eventual freedom? This is episode. Sixteen this Toyo Brown Story Hey Amy it's good to see you. Hi Meghan Welcome back everyone to women in crime. I'm looking at amy. I'm looking at her through zoom So forgive us again if the audio is just a tiny bit different? But we're definitely doing our best to Get you good quality here so have make have my kids locked in the basement so we should be. Amy has to record from her closet. Sushi's literally hiding in her bedroom closet from everyone just to get this done Amy You WANNA nounce. Some of our patriots are new veterans. Sure I want to say a big thank you to Angel From Illinois. Thank you angel. Oh thank you and I would also like to give a big shout out to. Jennifer are from Metro Detroit so much for your support. Thank you guys really appreciate it like seriously and again? Thank you for the questions. And e mails we love it and the case suggestions have been awesome. Oh my gosh. The case suggestions are awesome. But I have a list now. That's going to cover US literally through probably next year if I just. Uk suggestions so stop writing us with great cases known All right so we have a couple more patrons. Who else do we have? We have sin from Finland. How cool is that? I love the name and I love where she's from awesome. Thank you so much. I know all the way from Finland. I'm I really like a really really grateful. Really dig that and we have two more patrons who have questions so this one Shout out to Steph from Ontario. Thank Asef thank you staff and her question is how long have you been doing this or something similar? And I'm not sure if she means podcasting or in the criminal justice field so I'll just say that we've been podcasting now for. Oh boy what about a year and a half two years Direct appeal one year anniversary is actually tomorrow. Which is what they are. We recording tomorrow may eight one year anniversary. Thank that's about right may seventh May Seventh or eighth. Yeah okay so what? We actually started working on it A good year year and a half in advance so actually working on all of this together three years as for being in the field of criminology and criminal justice who so let's see for me Probably started with the master's degree and that was that was two thousand two for me right after the masters I went into probation and then back to school for the PhD. And since then so for me. Yep Two thousand. Two Amy I WanNa say for me about a year later. Two thousand three. I did not go back to graduate school till two thousand five but I was working in the field with alcohol and substance abuse which you can't talk about that without talking about the criminal justice system so the world started to intertwine around. Then so yeah. We're looking at what? How many years is that eighteen? Oh my Gosh I just you fast first of all the math scared me though my wow. I never think it's going to be like a long time. I always think it's like still like around seven or eight years and then I'm like no. It's actually closer to twenty okay. So that answers steps question and we have a second question allison from North Carolina. Thank you Alison. Thanks Allison and here's her question. Which I love which case either solved or unsolved sticks with you the most. Do you WanNa take this one first or you want me to cheese This changes for me all the time. My mom I'M GONNA have to go with nor Jackson case right member. We covered nor Jackson That was one of the first cases I covered for women and Crime and she was wrongfully convicted or she was exonerated for the murder of her mother and people believe she's in fact guilty either way the case is unsolved and there's so many questions. Yeah I remember you saying that once before about that case and I totally understand why that sticks with you for me. There's I'm going to go ahead and say to a so if you listened to direct appeal. I'm sorry but I'm just so stuck on Melanie McGuire because we spent so much time and I would just love to know what actually really happened to bill. Mcguire who no matter. Who's guilty or involved My second one though that I just I think about all the time still is Jon Benet. I knew you were going to say that because I literally. It's like Jon Benet. Every day I think about this case all the time and I would absolutely like. I'd probably give something big just to know what happened to her as well. So those are our two cases. Thank you for your questions. We really look forward to your emails and K suggestions and all future contacts so we hope you enjoy today's episode. Totally psyched for this one. And I just want to let everyone know that this was actually in the works before we found out about the Netflix documentary. So believe it or not this. Isn't you know Us going? Oh boy we need to jump on this. Amy's been working on this for some Taito. Just let everyone know that. This is a case that you've been interested in for a really long time so absolutely and we actually had to listeners. Who suggested this case while I was in the process of writing the story? And then like you said the Netflix documentary came out at first. I was annoyed because I didn't people to think I was just jumping on coattails but then I was actually really happy because it helped me see so much footage of the original trial. The appellate Helped me put faces to names so it was actually really good. That's awesome and it was really good to see Sin Toyah herself because obviously we know you can't judge people by their reactions or their affect but it was very powerful. Did you see the documentary? I purposely didn't watch it yet because I wanted to wait for this episode and I don't know everything and I wanted to learn about it here. Good we'll make sure you watch it because I will. I mean I'll give you my opinion on it later but you should watch it. Yep So sin Toya Brown who now goes by Sin Toyah Brown long. She was born on January. Twenty Ninth Nineteen Eighty eight in Fort Campbell Kentucky. And very soon after. She moved with her mother to Tennessee so unfortunately she had a rough life from day. One she never knew. Her father Her Birth Mom Georgina. Mitchell who was actually a teenager. At the time of Sin Toya's birth. She drank throughout the pregnancy and she talked about drinking a fifth of vodka. A day the whole time that she was pregnant with sequoia Some sources say she also used crack cocaine. She lived on the streets at time. She had a pretty long rap she. She has a very strong history of suicidal idealization in fact that whole family the maternal grandmother as well has a similar history so unfortunately she started off having these biological markers for a few these different issues so shortly after birth sin toy spent time in many different households and even on the street before she was finally adopted by L. Net and Thomas Brown so she was just two years old when they officially adopted her but she actually had been saying with the family since she was about eight months old. So what happened was Ellen net new. Georgina and Georgina had asked to watch the baby for her. And it was one of those situations where she just never came back. Gotcha but luckily for Toyah. The Brown household was very stable. One very loving there are some sources that say. She had some issues with her stepfather. Her Stepfather Franco parents would eventually get divorced. But either way you know it was a good family. She got very lucky at the browns had to older children. As well Santo you had a good relationship with them. They both were already at the house. Winston Toya got there. Oh okay in her. Memoirs and Toyah recounts the Closeness. She had with her mother. Her father was a truck driver so he was on the road a lot and her and her mom were very close again. The two older siblings were out of the House and Senate toy did very well in elementary school. She was even placed in a program for gifted children. She was extremely intelligent. So things are going well for her academically but she was often taunted for being quote unquote a white girl. He was biracial. Her mother was Caucasian and her father was African American. And as you'll see if you look at pictures and Toyota is light skinned and her. Two adoptive parents had much darker skin than she did and children. Were not very nice about that okay. She says she never felt like she belonged and while her mother was extremely loving she often felt very alone and isolated. Unfortunately she started getting in trouble at a very young age for example one time she threw a rock at her neighbors granddaughter. And it hit her in the head sin. Toya says it was just part of a game. She did not mean to hurt anyone you know. Their shows poor impulse control. She would vandalize property again not meaning to do harm. She would often feel guilty afterwards. Couldn't understand why she would do these things low level thefts you know. I'm talking under ten years old at this point. Okay to ask eight. Thank you so as you could imagine you know. She was already ostracized because of her skin color but now people started looking at her as a bad kid and she was really quickly labeled as disruptive kid who you know nobody really likes her. Unfortunately and we know the effects labeling. Has You know we talked about this? All the time in our classes wants a kids labeled they begin to fulfil the label. Yeah and as we'll see what's in Toya. She was labeled very early on not only because of the way she was acting. But because of her mother Sin Toya's adopted father would say you know you're just like your mom your nothing you know. So she was she already had this label that you're going to turn out to be just like your mother got in second grade. She was kicked out of that gifted program that I had mentioned before for disrupting class and for disrespecting her teacher of course. Her parents were extremely upset about this. So it seems as though this was really when things are to spiral for her she returned to regular classes and she felt judged and even more removed from everyone she had felt before she started stealing more and one time she brought no does to school. Do you know what no it sounds so from us the sleeping pills or no. It's actually caffeine pills. I meant yeah right. She had stolen them from her brother's truck. I don't even think she meant to do any harm. But of course it's contraband in school right and she got expelled again. She got expelled already. You know the school already wasn't happy with her actions so I think they were happy to get rid of her. Caught it so it was at this time that her parents enrolled her in an alternative school so as it often does this experience of the opposite of what it's intent was instead of turning her life around. She started hanging out with kids who did far worse things than she had ever done. Oh I see okay Gotcha. So now we get into differential association theory. Our students love this one right. Yep Okay a little bit of social learning theory. She's around other people learning certain behaviors and she's very young at this point while she's at this alternative school. She gets arrested for assault after getting to a fight with one of her friends mothers. She was sent to a juvenile facility. She was ordered to undergo a psych evaluation so she was also sent to a psych facility for juveniles and unfortunately she also made some new friends and picked up some new skills at this facility as well. This is why they say that. Prisons and other detention centers are breeding grounds for crime. Yep especially when you're putting kids when they're you know ten eleven twelve years old so when she was released they tried to put her back into middle school but at this point she doesn't belong. She's in a behavior modification program. We know with those can do. She was with children who suffered mental and developmental delays. So go right back to labeling. She didn't she didn't feel like she belonged and now she was in a gifted program. Now she's in behavior modification. We can see what's going on here so not surprisingly. She had an altercation with a teacher and once again she was sent to Juvie and she was officially under the custody of the Department of Children's services. Do you know how old she is at this point? Yes she's only thirteen. Okay so you know. This is not a good start for her so once again. She's in a facility surrounded by people and a lot of the people she surrounded by or much older than her and she's a baby. She's thirteen years old and she is with seventeen. Eighteen year olds much higher security. Lots of fights. She tried to escape several times. Every time she escaped. She got caught sent back all right so after two years in custody she was finally released back to her family except when she gets home she is told that her father left just her and her mother is what you're saying that point actually. I think she would have preferred that. There was a new man in the picture so her mother had a new boyfriend named frank and she did not get along with him. Now we're looking at strain theory right. This actually is a great case. Meghan to teach in our theory classes. Because there's so much going on here right. Amy and for people who don't know string theory is often about the stress and frustration that people face and in lieu of strong coping mechanisms. They will act out in deviant or criminal ways with that they would offend. Oftentimes this relates to people who face blocked opportunities and offend for financial purposes but when talking about sin stepfather here. We're talking about string theory in that people will sometimes react in a in a negative way when they experienced something they really really don't want and so we teach often informs of abuse A stepfather who doesn't treat you. Well that would certainly fit the mold here exactly and you haven't even heard the half of it yet. Sin Toya enrolled back in school. Because she had no choice she was a minor. Her mother. Said you're going back to school right. Did Not Take. Long for her to stop going and she started hanging out with older kids that she had met when she was away and they pretty much spent every day getting high so she would pretend she's going to school and instead of going to school she would just go smoke the whole day and of course her mom eventually found out and she was not very happy. Right of course. Her Mom said you can't do this and she said okay. Well then. I'm going to leave. And she ran away from home. Pay So at this time. She's about fifteen years old and she runs away to stay with some of her friends that she had met who are in their twenties. They started just smoking weed every day. Some petty theft at quickly escalated into selling crack over the course of a year or so she would go home. Run away and start selling drugs and then she would go home again and leave and it would go back and forth and this isn't surprising because she was a child she would get scared when she was living life on the streets. She loved her mother. She would go home to her mom she would feel safe but unfortunately the streets kept calling her back. I have to say now more than ever. I realize it's definitely important to try to eat right. But I don't really WANNA sacrifice tasty foods to have to do so with daily harvest. I don't have to give up either. Daily harvest delivers delicious. Clean food right writer door. They're easy to prepare and until you're ready to eat them you put them in the freezer and then when you're ready you can pop any one of these meals out on their own and prepare them within a couple of minutes. They're really making something for everyone in for all times of the day which is really great and so for like a smoothie. I don't usually make smoothies because I always find. It's pain to chop everything and prepare it. But you know. Daily harvest is giving you a smoothie. That's pre-prepared all you need to do. Is Dump it into the blender put a little bit of milk or other liquid in it blended up and you're good to go within two minutes so I find that the ease is one of the best parts they also have a desert which you know. I'm I have a sweet tooth and they had the did you try the little nips. Yeah so yummy. They were delicious. Didn't you tell me? Also that your kids like those. Yes I told them. It was cookie dough and they believed me but they're delicious and they have all the whole foods. You know the vegetables the fruits and I felt like I was winning when my kids were eating that and they thought it was a desert which it is a desert is just not your typical desert. It was delicious. So that's great. They're making delicious foods that even your kids are excited to eat. I love it good food easy to prepare easy to maintain environmentally responsible. We really hope that you will consider trying daily harvest and that you love it as much as we do go to daily harvest dot com and enter the Promo Code Women to get twenty five dollars off of your first box so again. That's Promo Code Women W. M. E. N. for twenty five dollars off your first box at daily harvests dot com. This crisis has reminded us that we are all vulnerable and that it's okay to reach out for support and I don't know about you but while I'm doing whatever I can't take care of my physical health. I'm realizing that taking care of my mental health is equally important in honor of mental health month. Talk Space Online. Therapy is committed to fostering a global community around the importance of mental health. This mental health awareness month with talks base. You can connect with a licensed therapist to talk it all out off from the safety of your home so you can send your therapist attacks. You could talk on the phone. You could do a picture or video message. And this is twenty four seven as much as you need to talk says matches you with a licensed therapist based on your specific needs and preferences so for example. If you need somebody that specializes anxiety or depression or relationship issues. There over forty specialties. In which you can choose from one. You're matched with a qualified therapist. You can begin therapy the very same day. The bottom line here is that you deserve support. And you don't have to struggle on your your tax base therapists can be your dedicated support system there to help you feel healthier and more empowered even in these uncertain times as a listener of this podcast. You can get one hundred dollars off your first month. Space to match with your perfect therapist. Go to talk space dot com or download the APP make sure to use the code women and Crime. That's one word women crime to get one hundred dollars off your first month and show your support for the show. It's in our show notes that's women and Crime and talk space dot com while she was on the streets and I say on the streets because she was between houses living with people that didn't have her best interest you know. She was brutally raped on a few occasions. And it was around this time that she met a guy named cut throat cutthroat. Okay believe it or not that was not his given birth name sorry cutthroat Good Okay Right. Oh even better okay. His name was actually Gary in mccloughan. Okay so against. What was his name? His name was Garin mccloughan. Okay and she fell for him fast. She said that he was the first person that ever listened to her and she really felt like he was the one she really was into this guy and he was also in his mid twenty s along with the other people she was hanging around with. She very quickly moved in with him. No he did not have a house. They lived in hotels very shortly after the honeymoon stage was over. She looked at him as a boyfriend but he started forcing her to have sex with him. He taught her how to be quote unquote a good slut and he abused her horribly. Both physically and sexually and degraded her. I can't even repeat some of the things I read what he did to her. She says she didn't bother trying to leave. This is not surprising. She felt cared for for the first time in her life because although he was brutalizing her the other side of that was him also loving her or pretending to love her or showing her some sort of love that she had never felt before and because he had started off differently. They don't start off with the brutalization starts off with all the good stuff and then by the time she's hooked into this relationship and in love. That's when you know you would be surprised. It took maybe days weeks. This moved pretty quickly but I think unfortunately in Toyah had such a poor self image already that it didn't take long. He often called her his bitch and she says in her memoir she knows that is degrading term and made her feel like she belonged to somebody and it made her feel really special so very sad. She's a child. Yeah let's tell him a few days. After they were getting settled in their. You know their hotel cut said she needed to start earning her keep so. Unfortunately what do you think this means I when you were saying before describing him? I'm like he's definitely going to try to prostitute her out so I I assume that means he wanted her to prostitute herself. He was grooming her from day. One right right so I she just pretended to be a sex worker and she would basically take money from men and then leave so in other words she would rob men and she felt like this was a way that she didn't have to exploit herself but she can also give cut what he wanted. Unfortunately it wasn't long before she actually started having sex for money. She says in her memoir that she started to accept the reality that she was a slut as co has been telling her all along. So this is really sad so she with labeling right you eventually become it's a self fulfilling prophecy it is. That's exactly what happened here. And she's defeated cut would bring over men and forced her to have sex with him and then he would just take the money so in other words he was her pimp right. Although at the time Sinn Toya did not realize that. She thought she was helping them. Live a life together because of course cut mates until you believe that this was all just temporary and once they got enough money they would move to Vegas and live happily ever after sure so one night. After being almost strangle to death by cut Let me just tell you why she was almost strangle to death. He was pissed because she was not bringing in enough money so he choked her and in fact almost killed her so she went out to find the client the evening of all eighth two thousand and four Sin Toya headed over to the local sonic in Nashville to try to get some business. A gentleman stopped. His car asked her if she was doing okay and she started chatting with this man who turned out to be forty three year. Old Johnny Michael Allen so Johnny. Michael Allen was a local real estate agent. He was also a youth. Pastor and a Sunday schoolteacher. Wow Oh I'm sorry. And he was also an army bet so he sounds like a pretty good guy right. Yeah I mean he's going to be a very sympathetic victim here to yet. We'll get to that okay. So at first he seemed Nice. He asked her questions instead. Of just saying you know how much he asked her. You know how she was if she was hungry he her food. They went back and forth on. How much for Savoie escapes okay? I'm sorry so he's a client. I thought you meant. He was just concerned pastor. Who Stopping to help her. I'm curious to see where you're going to go with this. One Orion hold wetlands so they decided on one hundred fifty dollars for her services. He suggested they go to her house. She didn't feel comfortable with that. She wanted to go to a hotel room ads. She normally did to conduct business but she thought he seemed Nice. Oh she gave in. They ate their sonic. They went to his home. He showed her around the house making short stop to show her his gun collection which included two shotguns and a handgun. She said she started to feel nervous. I think she realized nobody knew where she was. Okay and she was at this random person's house and he has this collection and she thought he was acting strange so she asked if she could watch. Tv and relax a little. She claims it's because she wanted to be closer to the door which was downstairs by the television set okay. She said he talked a lot about his guns and about how important he was in the community. She asked if she could take a shower and when she got out of the shower he was in bed waiting for her naked so obviously she was there for a reason and she knew that but she did not feel comfortable so she said she wanted to take a little nap and she pretended that she was sleeping of course to avoid having sex with him at that moment according to Sin Toya at this point he grabbed her very hard between the legs and kept bothering her and then he turned seemingly reaching for something she assumed. Here's reaching for a gun. So she grabbed the gun out of her purse and shot him in the back of the head. So why does she have a gun? Well could always gave her gun for safety all right because we know that unfortunately sex workers are often assaulted. Yes after shooting him in the back of the head. She stole a hundred seventy two dollars from his wallet. She took two of his firearms and fled the scene in his truck and he questioned. I mean right now this is bad I see how this is gonNA play out really bad for her at this point Yep but I pretty much solve the issue of what What what. What was the purpose of their exchange? That was my initial. Yes exactly but you know I think like you mentioned who the victim was of course is always important. In every case she immediately goes back to the hotel and tells cut what happened. She told cut. I shot this guy and I took his truck cut was of course pissed. Why the hell did you bring the stolen truck here? Go Get rid of it. She drops it off at a local Walmart. Hitches a ride back to the hotel. She claims she had no clue. If this guy was even dead she says the reason she took the guns and the money and the car was because she was afraid he was still alive and she wanted to get out of there fast so she actually found out. He died by watching the news and it was interesting. She said that after this. That cut was so much nicer to her and she felt like she really earned his respect so although he wasn't happy because that might make things more difficult for him. She really felt like she. She was in his good graces. Now maybe he was scared of her. Maybe all right so their plan was move hotels the next morning but unfortunately or fortunately depending how you look at it they got woken up by the police barging in with guns sin. Toya's first response was don't touch cut. He didn't do anything. Let him go. This just shows what we often see by women who are abused. Not even women. She was a child right. She's trying to protect him. Even though he was the one who has been brutalizing her she also says all along that she was never worried about getting in trouble because she believed that she was defending her life so her number one concern was just making sure that did not get in trouble. I'd also shows you her You know enforce the emotional immaturity of someone who so young and who gets arrested exactly. I think that's a very good point. It does show US her frame of mind. At the time she tells police she is nineteen. Although at the time she was just sixteen at first they believed her so they did not call her parents because she was not considered a minor But not surprisingly there the police and it did not take them long to figure out that she was in fact a minor and apparently they were extremely pissed off when they found out that she had lied to them so they take her in for an interrogation and one of my favorite things about this case is there's footage of everything you can see footage of the interrogation. There was actually a documentary. Filmmaker who started following sin. Toyota's case very early on. We'll talk about that later on but I just want to urge everyone to look up some of this stuff amy. Sorry before you go on When she was taken into the Interrogation Room. Do they know her age? She taken in or I guess my question is was she taken in alone and did they question her? Okay Yeah so she waved her Miranda Rights member. She was only sixteen. She was very tired. This was about three. Am and she was high so this is a situation where somebody WHO's underage. Under the influence tired the are no position to be interrogated at that point. Let alone the fact that she had no attorney or parent. This is not surprising because we know that the numbers are in ninety percent of juveniles. End Up speaking to police without an attorney or parrot present right so of course. I was not surprised to hear that. They promised her leniency. If she talked they told her she as upper life go in for ninety nine years. But if you know she talks to them then they could catch her a deal but they're allowed to say these things right right. Well the police are allowed to lie to suspects in an interrogation room in the United States. So the big question in this case from early on was whether she should stay in juvenile court or be transferred up to adult court if she was transferred to adult court she'd be facing mandatory life because in Tennessee with first degree murder charge. That's what the sentence was. So she had to have what is known as a transfer hearing. And that's when the judge would decide whether or not they're going to waive her case up in preparation for the hearing. She actually met her birth mom for the first time while which I thought was pretty interesting. Yeah any idea why she why her birth mom was included here. I would imagine it's because they're trying to make a case to keep her in juvenile court and her situation her background being so bad that It would kind of mitigate her responsibility and keep her there. Yup One hundred percent right so there. They had called on her birth mom to testify as to her own issues to show this biological link and also to testify to the fact that she drank everyday during pregnancy. I think Sin Toya on some level felt that her mom was helping her out so I thought that was the right thing to do really what her legal team had to do. They had to show that. Sin Toyah had issues that could be addressed in a juvenile facility. And that she would be able to be rehabilitated and be a productive member of society. The prosecution of course was arguing that she should be transferred to adult court because from early on the prosecution claimed that she shot him while he was asleep but they never touched on self defense even worse they never touched on the fact that a forty three year old man was picking up teenager for sex. So I WANNA stop and point out the fact that Sinn Toyota was never portrayed as a victim. In this scenario she was described as a teenage prostitute not a victim of sex trafficking although I do want to say later on this would be acknowledged but at the time of the crime. That's to me. That's the biggest problem in this case. Is that nobody looked at her. As the victim that often happens. Unfortunately too with sex workers. you know as their criminalize as as opposed to being seen as one of the most victimized groups not to mention she was under the age of consent it. That's not a defense but I'm sure that the counter argument would have been. She said she was older. It could have been fruitless. Not It doesn't matter it. It actually doesn't gate statutory but I was. Yeah winning it out. Yeah good point two weeks after. The hearing a judge decided that he would in fact transfer her to adult court. So this meant that. She was facing a potential life sentence if she had been tried as a juvenile. The Max would have been about eight years. Wow this is a very important decision. In this case she was immediately transferred to an adult facility to await trial but since she was a juvenile they did keep her separate from adult until she turned eighteen and it is interesting she does say that it was actually nice to be kept in really an isolation because it was quiet and no one bothered her so she says it wasn't that bad. Okay all of that. I until the days turned into weeks turned into months and she started. You know it started affecting her mental capabilities. Right it was also sorry. I just want to point out around this time. She read in the paper that was murdered. He was murdered. Do we know by WHO Sort of drug deal gone bad and she talks about how she was very devastated at the time. Remember she was. She's still young here sh she? This is her first boyfriend her. I love but she does realize later on that. If she never got arrested she probably would have still been with him and she'd probably be dead to all right. Let's move onto the trial now. August Twenty First. Two Thousand and six was the start of the criminal trial. So at this point sin toy was eighteen years old and she had already been incarcerated for two years. As I mentioned. There's a lot of this footage In the netflix documentary. You know you can really see the opening arguments and how historical sin toy is and I WANNA point out. She looks like a baby. It's really heartbreaking. Wow I'M GONNA I mean. I'm definitely going to check this out like right after we get off the SUV call. Yes she's it's just it's really sad. Of course I do not think that she had any right to murder. Someone and I feel for the victim as well but when you do watch as you do get to see just how young. She actually is all right so there are a few issues that I guess. A few of the main issues for the prosecution of course. The detectives took the stand to talked about the interrogation. Something that was I think. Wait a little more. Was the medical examiner who took the stand described the injury as immediate and his hands were clasped so they were saying clearly it was not self defense. He was sleeping when he was shot. Out of four. Hey but his hand being class I mean does does that all right. I don't know why that definitely indicates him being sleeping. But that's fine. I think I think they're trying to say that since he died immediately the placement of his hands indicated how they were placed right before he was shot on it but of course there are experts that would probably argue that as well but the defense. They didn't argue. They didn't you against it. That strongly something else that worked against her is her mom took the stand and like. I said her mom. Was you know a really strong advocate for her sin? Toyah had always said this was self defense. But they had played an audiotape. You know they tape. All conversations wanted individuals incarcerated and it was a conversation between her and her mom and in audio. She says Momma Killed Him. I execute. I that's GonNa work against her for sure. Yeah so the prosecution was saying this confession clearly. She never said Mommy. I did this because I was defending myself. But of course in Toya would say just the words that I use because I was feeling so guilty about what I did because she showed remorse early on and so the story was really that she killed him so she could drop him. She never wanted to have sex. Quit was putting the pressure on. Get me some money. So she knew the only way she was getting money was to. I kill him and take his money so that was their narrative. The defense mostly of people offering some sort of explanation for why she turned out the way she did. So one doctor said that he believes she had borderline personality disorder others talked about her mother and Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Sin. Toya not surprisingly was advised not to take the stand other than the fact that she was very young and also wasn't pulsa and displayed impulsive behavior. At times I think it's also the fact that she initially lied to the police. Okay so it doesn't look good for her that she doesn't have a good track record early. On with being honest I was surprised it was very short. Trial was only five days. Is that it sure it is but you know what we deal with. The atypical trials that go on for like two months. And that's not really as normal either for this type of case now I would say probably. Two weeks is more normal or more typical. Yeah that's what I was thinking too and the jury only rated for six hours also sure they They don't have a lot of. They didn't have a lot of witnesses. So it always depends on the number of witnesses and the jury deliberating for six hours. Seem short to me. I've heard of deliberations a murder trials that lasted for sixty minutes. And I'm shocked when I hear that and I six hours is also short. Yep I agree. So she was found guilty of first degree murder felony murder and aggravated robbery. Oh let's that's harsh. And unfortunately for her. I don't know if you know this but Tennessee had the harshest juvenile sentencing while one of the harshest juvenile sentencing among all the states. But the juvenile sentencing shouldn't apply here right because she's in. She was found guilty in adult court SAR juveniles. Who are tried as adults. Oh Okay Yeah. Sorry about that. So her sentence was fifty one to life. Which would make her almost seventy years old when she was eligible for parole. Wow just in time not to collect social security two weeks after the verdict. She was transferred to the Tennessee. Prison for women where she was to serve out her sentence so she would be transferred to a Memphis facility at some point and then back to Nashville but she was in the general population because was now eighteen all right so in her book she talks a little bit about how when she first got to present. She acted tough right. Because you're what else can you do? She's also still fairly young and she was not necessarily on the right path. She really felt like there was no point because she felt she was going to be there for the rest of her life. I think she was very fortunate that she had a lawyer who was also a friend to her and sat her down one day and said if you ever want a chance at a normal life you need to pretty much. Get Your Shit together. It turned the stuff around. Sin Toya that. That really stuck with her and she only started hanging out with people who were doing the right thing. That's good so any of her friends. Who were you know doing drugs and other illegal activity and presents? She kind of dropped them started hanging around with people who were taking classes. Okay good and she's getting sober now so I mean that's a good thing. Yep She also took every opportunity that was offered to her so let me just tell you what she did while she was incarcerated. I don't WanNa give away when she gets out but obviously we know she gets out. Because I said in the intro but while she's in there she earns her. Ged Sh actually earned her ged in jail. She enrolled in a college program through Lipscomb University. Which is actually a Christian school in Tennessee. She actually took all inside outclasses which is pretty cool inside. Outclasses amy teaches inside out yes I tell people what inside out is real quick. Yeah sure so. I'm a trained inside out instructor. So basically. That's when you take students from campus with you to students who are incarcerated and you have combined classes. They are amazing and actually as sin. Toya talks about it. She said she really felt scene. She didn't feel judge. That's what's so beautiful about these classes is for a moment. I think the incarcerated students feel normal. Yeah because they're with their peers right so she finished two bachelor's degrees she was very focused on her studies. She enrolled in a culinary arts program. She mentored at risk youths. She even took part in a puppy training program. Oh my gosh really did a lot okay. Yeah I don't I don't want to paint it all rosy here because she did have trouble while incarcerated she did have a lot of issues off and on but she always bounce back and she was given second chances by a lot of people who really believed in her people saw her true colors and really helped her out. She's fortunate that way very fortunate so although things seem like they were going okay in prison she was really having no luck on the legal front. She lost her first appeal. So as we know. The first appeal really focuses on errors at trial Right her second appeal focused on new evidence that suggested that she had a cognitive impairment due to the fact that her mother drank while pregnant with her so although she was very smart remember she was in the gifted program as a child right she actually had an Iq of one hundred thirty four which is quite high. Oh yeah so. Nobody could deny that she was brilliant. She had very poor impulse control as we see throughout her life on November thirteenth. Two thousand twelve. She had an appellate hearing asking for a new trial so this hearing focused on fetal alcohol spectrum disorder which you know affects your responses and lowers impulse control and her legal team claimed that she did not act the way someone with such high intelligence would act. They said her functional abilities were equivalent to a person with mild retardation. Wow Not my word. Their word got it on. That is a horrible term. That is no longer used but at the time it was still being used there so they really focused on this discrepancy between her behavior and her. I Q her lawyers also brought up the recent case of Miller versus Alabama. Oh Yeah I know that case. I teach them I. I was GONNA say Megan into you know that case. It's a big one up teaching classes. So Miller versus Alabama in two thousand and twelve. This was a supreme court case. That says you cannot send into juvenile indefinitely to life without parole. In other words there has to be some sort of individualized sentencing hearing which is such a huge case right. But you know what Tennessee prosecutor said. Well they said well. Brown was not technically given a life without parole sentence because she would be eligible for parole after fifty one years so they found that loophole to that was coming. Yep She was really out of options here so her case started very lucky for her her case started sparking public interest so in two thousand eleven there was a documentary called me facing life. Have you seen that one? Ps Okay so this was actually made by the same director as the Netflix Documentary. And it showed her case and it caught people's attention. She started receiving tons of letters offering support and friendship. And actually one of those letters. This is a side note here. One of those letters were was from. Jamie long a local musician who is now her husband. Oh Wow yeah Basically he wrote her and said quote. God Me To tell you that you're getting out of prison. And then eventually. He flew from Texas to Tennessee to visit her. And eventually they fall in love but before we get to the good stuff. Let's go back to you. Know what is going on here? So toyah and her legal team were busy strategizing so her last federal appeal had been denied. She was really out of options. Any idea what her only hope was. Clemency yes okay I was GONNA say Clinton. Pardon I don't know okay. Yeah we're only hope was to be granted clemency by the governor. So her legal team would ask if her sentence could be commuted to second degree murder and with time Sir she would be free so yes. She would be a convicted murderer sale. But at least you would be home. Her chances were not great because they found that less than one percent of clemency. Petitions were granted in Tennessee during the prior decade. Yeah Okay so remember I was saying at the time of her sentencing. Brown was labelled a teenage prostitute. Yes well perception had finally changed in November two thousand seventeen in Tennessee. Anyone who is eighteen or younger cannot be charged with prostitution. There are simply too young to consent agreed yes and said Tennessee law rightfully defines any miner. Who performs a commercial sex act as a victim of sex trafficking absolutely agree I NEU- finally so some say this change was actually partially inspired by sin? Toya's story mean the metoo movement was also gaining momentum around here so I think there was just like a lot of a lot of things going on. That might have helped. Move that forward during this time between the new Tennessee. Law and Sin Toya's documentary. The local news station aired her story and it quickly went viral. I don't know if you recall this. I someone recall yes. Hashtag Free Toya Brown yes Had over like two million shares. Kim Kardashian rhianna Ti. Snoop Dogg. Lebron James. All of these famous people started tweeting for clemency force in Toya. Yeah I remember the okay. Yep as this is really. I think what happened was again. Black lives matter and metoo movement. This was just such a strong example of how the criminal justice system punish people of color who were in fact victims themselves. So I think that's why it stirred up so much support like the perfect storm for exactly I even wrote perfect storm twins okay. Her legal team started heavily pursuing the governor. Bill Haslam at this time and they filed a petition for clemency. Tons of people vouch for her and wrote letters all over the national media. I don't know if you recall Megan but GM today show inside edition. I do remember the media storm here. Just to give some information about clemency. Before the governor will take any action he had asked for the opinion of the Parole Board so her legal team started prepping to go before them and Sin Toy essentially to plea for her life to the Parole Board. The main purpose was really for them to show that she had been rehabilitated. Since her initial arrest and she would no longer be a threat to society and in fact it'd be a productive member of society and again they were asking for sentence to be commuted to second degree. Murder May twenty third. Two Thousand Eighteen was the parole hearing and Sin Toya's last plea for freedom after twelve years incarcerated. The hearing was videotaped again. You can see it if you look it. Up the panel. Interestingly or maybe not interestingly but the panel was mostly white men and two white women many people testified speaking mostly about her transformation over the years she also spoke and showed remorse asked for mercy very heartfelt. The victim's friend and the original detective on the case of course spoke as well as we know at parole hearings. Of course victim has to have a voice right. Sin Toya's birth. Mom was there as well Actually wearing shirt. This had good vibes only which I thought was cute. It's that is really cute Question was her adoptive mother. Also president all these hearings. Yes okay. Yeah her strongest advocate. You know went to visit her every week and yet and her actually her older sister missy as well was a very strong advocate. Okay so what happens. The board ended up divided so to recommended that the request be granted to full out denied it and to recommended that her sentence be lowered to twenty five years. Which would mean that. You still have another eleven years to serve. Ooh What happens when they're divided like that. I should know this off hand but I don't. Yeah well. There are state differences. So don't be so hard on yourself in care So basically in Tennessee. The governor's just asking for their input but he could do whatever he wo right. Okay the they was just just advisory strictly Yep of course so. She waited anxiously again. This was a May two thousand eighteen. It wasn't until his last day in office on June seven. Two Thousand Nineteen that. The governor made his final decision. He called in the legal team for a private meeting and said he will commute her sentence. The fifteen years so this So this would mean that. She had only seven more months to serve and the majority of those seven months would be served in a transitional part of the prison. Wow and I'm sorry. And also she would be on parole for ten years that makes sense. Yep So yeah this was. This was huge huge. Her and Jamie actually got married over the phone shortly after they got the news. Very cute and you want to hear something so romantic. Jimmy had already moved to Nashville member. He lives in Texas. He moved there just in anticipation of this happening. He he had such a strong faith in God and really believe that this was going to work so he offered his life and move there believing that she was going to be coming home. Sounds like true love to me right. I wish I was that optimistic. Sodas Alan Right so on August seven two thousand nineteen after serving fifteen years thirty one year olds into a brown own now sawyer. Brown long walked free and she will be on parole until the year twenty. Twenty-nine so and no. This was a long episode. I am almost done. I just want to give you a quick update. Okay about where is Toya now? Okay okay so sequoia lives in Nashville with her husband. Jaime since her release she has gone on a national speaking tour and she says she's contemplating law school and would like to start a family. She's super young still so she has a whole life ahead of him just thinking about so as I mentioned a couple a lot of times during this episode I mentioned Sequoias Memoir so since being released from prison. She published the book called freeze. Toya my search for redemption in the American prison system so the memoirs mostly features writing that she put together while she was incarcerated and it really shows the experiences of a young person who is essentially being brought up in America's prison system for over a decade. It is brutally honest. She talks about the good the bad the ugly. She does not sugar coat. Things and I found that I really respected that. Because of course she. She wants people to see her in a certain light but she holds nothing back. Does she talk about her crime as well and she still. I just wanted to ask. You still maintain the same story that she felt that he was going to pull a gun on her so she felt endanger. Okay yeah she doesn't she actually. Surprisingly she doesn't. The crime has such a small part of the book. It's very interesting the book I'd say the crime is like five pages of a three hundred page book. I just wondered if she's still sir. Yes domain yet. Her Story Yep she goes he glosses over but yes so she's now really committed to exposing the injustices in the system and she is committed to working to help others. So this Netflix documentary. Well did you know that's in? Toya did not even know about it. Netflix did not work with her on it. How is that possible? Did they want to or I? Don't get it so remember. Mention the gentleman who did that earlier. Documentary the PBS documentary. Yes So he he was a he had old foot inch he sold anti not much made a deal. He made a deal with Netflix. So according to Brown who again brown long. She says that this was an unauthorized documentary and that her husband and her were surprised when they first heard the news because they did not participate in any way. I don't understand the why they wouldn't even ask for the participation. I like why not at least ask and then they turn you down. Then you know. We have this footage. I don't know I really don't know but you know. She says she's currently in the process of sharing her story in the right way in full detail. Okay and you know. She does say quote that she praised at this film. Highlights things wrong in our justice system. But I did have nothing to do with this documentary. Okay well I don't WanNa ruin the documentary for you. But I think she might be disappointed with the documentary. Okay got it. Let's go the documentary. Yeah case P listeners. Haven't yeah I don't WanNa ruin it for anyone. But in my opinion an opinion of others is that the film's really fail to grapple with some of the larger criminal justice issues so it's really focused on her personal path to I guess we could say redemption right and a lot of footage from you know when she was just a child. When this all happened you know but you know the film ignores many of the systemic issues and the racial dynamics and our system. It doesn't even touch on the fact that race might have played in her case and I think that was kind of a huge miss and I'm wondering I haven't heard Sin Toya's statement on the actual documentary if she's going to give one but I'd be curious to see what she says about that. Oh I'd be very curious as soon as I see it so megan thank you for being so patient and such a good listener. But what are your thoughts here? I mean it's such a good story and I was really excited for you to tell it. My thoughts here are that I wouldn't. I wouldn't guess that's in. Toya premeditated the crime and I would guess that after being a sex worker for so long that she probably was fearful In a lot of instances and you know she went back to this guy's house and it probably was a mistake. I I mean my ultimate opinion is that she was. You know a child who was victimized committed a very adult and that's what people look. Well she shot a man in the back of the head. Yeah but you have to look at a sixteen year old. Who Come from you know. Just had a really bad series of events in her life so I think that my opinion was that she definitely should have been tried in the juvenile system. I think that might have been more appropriate. That being said it does seem that I could be wrong because it does seem that her having served fifteen years in prison and under the circumstances she did led to her reform. So perhaps that was the appropriate. I do not believe that a fifty year sentence was appropriate at all but perhaps one she got was just the one she needed. I think that's a great point and similar to Mike conclusion as well. I think that the big misier is that she should have never been transferred to adult court. Very definitely not first degree murder. You Know I. I don't think you could say this was premeditated at all. Maybe a crime of passion. If you're gonNA try her as an adult at the very least it should have been a second degree murder charge but I also believe that. The system failed her from a young age right and it just kept family others. Systemic failure that we see and also. It's a really what one thing I appreciate it. As the changes that happened to treat children who become you know forced sort of sex workers to treat them as victims? I was really glad to hear that. That's a really positive change in the system. Yeah I I wish it was the case you know across the entire system but it feels like we're moving in that direction agree and I think probably sin. Toya would feel that. This wasn't in vain because so much good has come out of this policy level and she. Does you do a lot of work for criminal justice reform. So I think she would feel the same way and I think it's also important to think You know when we talk about juveniles who commit crimes whether or not they should be transferred up. It's really you need to look at the circumstances and no one ever really spent time looking at why she was in this situation. She was in and again the fact that she was also a victim while look forward to seeing what Sin Toyo does with her future hopefully. She's paving the way for some more positive change. Thank you so much for this case today. Thank you again. Thank you guys for listening. Crime is written and hosted by Megan and Amy Schlossberg. Our producer and editor is James Varga. Our music is composed by desert media. If you enjoy the show even get access to advocate episodes exclusive. Ama's and other bonus content for small of the contribution through patriarch to find out more visit patriotic dot com slash women incline sources for today's episodes. Come from the book freese in Toyota by Sin. Toya brand long the netflix documentary murder to mercy. Time magazine and NPR.

Winston Toya Tennessee Sin Toyah Sin Toyah Brown Amy murder Netflix Nashville US Sin Toy Toyota Toyah Finland Toya Brown Uk Melanie McGuire Detroit allison
Clemency for Cyntoia Brown

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

16:32 min | 2 years ago

Clemency for Cyntoia Brown

"The last week lawmakers and Tennessee gathered in downtown Nashville to make a request, and we're here today to appeal to govern a- has limbs a heart into his sense of Justice to grant this was a last ditch effort to convince the outgoing Republican governor to grant clemency to thirty year old woman who's been in prison nearly half her life. Her name is Toya Brown. It was a horrible crime. But we have to ask ourselves. What was grown man doing in debate with a sixteen year old girl still a Chow sin toy ended up in prison because as a teenager she killed a man who paid her a hundred and fifty dollars for sex. The police said this was a robbery a murder sin. Toyah said it was self defense. The state Representative who held his press conference said it almost didn't matter. In in tower is case she was sentenced to a life time in prison. She's already served almost fifteen years in prison and to keep her in prison for fifty one years is double travesty to a young victim of sexual exploitation. Clemency was the last option the people asking for a shorter sentence. Didn't seem particularly domestic this press conference ended with a prayer. Let us our heads in prayer. So God we asked right now for your mercy for your grays, gosh, she can't speak for herself. And so we're speaking we are speaking for Justice gone. We speaking for that do over we pray this in your name on the. Then on Monday. Thank you all for being here. I'm Charles bone. This is been an amazing amazing journey sin. Toya Brown's lawyers held a press conference of their own. So we walked in and Mr. bone immediately told her you're getting out in August, Kathy sin Bak was sin Toya's. First public defender. Cathy was one of the people who told sin Toya her request for clemency had been granted. She at one point one of the members of the team said are you a little disappointed that it's seven months from now? And you're not walking out today. And she said, are you crazy? I was supposed to get out when I was sixty seven years old. When this press conference was over a juvenile court judge stepped up to the microphone and burst into song show them of you. They pull this in. Them must seem like a victory and for sin Toya Brown. It was, but there are thousands of other women just like her people have been exploited the same way in was but may not be as sympathetic. So in today's show, we're going to give you a new way of looking at this case as a story of not just one woman, but many we'll tell you why one advocate calls what's in Toya did an act of radical self love. And we'll ask what next for other women who aren't getting out anytime soon. Stay with us. This episode is brought to you by colour connect you've got a smartphone. Smart watch. What about a smart doffs room colours bringing the modern world and your bathroom, that means voice controlled showers, touch less. Toilets and connected lighted mirrors that enable you to personalize your routine like never before let colour connect help create a bathroom routine. As unique as you are. Visit colour dot com slash smart. Home to get started. That's colour dot com. K O H L E, R dot com slash smart home. I wanted to talk to Mariam Kaba about sin Toy Story because Mariam has been an advocate for rethinking our Justice system for years. I in Chicago, and now in New York, my name is Mariam Habba. I am the founder and director of an organization called project NIA, which is a grassroots organization dedicated to ending youth. Incarceration Mariam is written about how the media talks about sin Toya, Brown, the tropes and the stereotypes. We lean on. She pushed me to see this narrative differently. She started off by telling me that Sinn Toya's story is just one story there really three ways of looking at it. I mean, I think it's pens on what part of the world. You're hearing the story from there's a story told by state. Prosecutors state offered a story in court about her being someone who intentionally shot a man in his sleep in order to rob him. It's the story that dot told that trial. It's the story that landed her with a life without pro sentence and try and adult there's almost nothing about the actual brutality of the pimp who had coerced her, you know, that's the way it got erased completely from the state story. Then there's the story told by sin Toya Browns defense by her family and friends, a young girl who is incredibly a. Prayed and up because she's being coerced by this older. Tim getting picked up for sex. I have forty three year old man when she's sixteen and she goes to the house chief fines that this person has a gun under the bed. She is scared this she's afraid that he's going to use for done on her. She ends up taking the gun and shooting him because she's saying that she was trying to basically defend herself. He threatened her and she ends up killing him. Then there's this third story. The one that's often told on the internet over the last couple of years tweets and Instagram posts from celebrities like Ashley Judd and riana have pushed the courts, and then the governor to reconsider some Toya's case. But in doing that, many people have frame sin Toya Brown as a girl. Not woman, you know, sixteen at the time. She is there for not in the dull she cannot consent to sex. She's being trafficked by this cutthroat guy her pin, and he's basically coercing her in general, but also coursing her to go out and get money. And you know, their narrative is a rescue narrative. You know, this is a child this should not have happened. She should you know, she she's basically complete and utter victim in the whole entire story. He you raise this issue that these well intentioned advocates really do this work that you see his damaging. Can you explain that a little bit? I think the story of rescue often negates people's agency and people's choices that they make under constraints and under horrible circumstances. I have worked many years in support of young people who trade sex for money. Survival needs. There is a issue around. No child can consent to sex that completely negates. The fact that there are young people who trade that's for money and survival needs rationally in order to live, you know, that also links to the larger question of making Cintra into the perfect victim who had no choices whatsoever. Somebody who was you know, completely devoid of her own agency. If that's the frame you adopt for her life. Then how do you make sense of choice to defend her life? I think part of the challenge and part of what you're talking about with sin Toya is one of the ways. People shared her story with his artwork that showed her in pigtails from when she was on trial, these pigtailed braids, and I guess what you're saying. Is that portraying her in this way, as really a girl it really denies her person hood? Yeah. People really wanted. You know, I think this is important to say when when folks are paying attention to a story a large part of the kind of social media audience for this story thought that this situation had just happened. Right. So they are consuming. This not having known that she'd already spent thirteen years by that point locked up in jail. So they are seeing this image of her circulating with pigtails. And they think that this is Jim Toia now presently, you know, she's sixteen years old. She killed her. You know, John who she was afraid what's going to harm her. And she's at this point when this thing comes up last year. She's twenty nine why freeze her as a sixteen year old for many people. It's because that's her most sympathetic. Right. That's her at her most synthetic it's something that people than feel that they can relate to is that she's a sixteen year old kid. She doesn't deserve this. But the point often, you know, the point we're making anarchy in the point we make in our work at survived in punish is that no buddy deserves to be criminalised for survival. No matter what your race is that what your gender expression is. No one desert. I've covered juvenile Justice a little bit as a reporter. I spoke to a lawyer who crafted the case went to the supreme court to make sure that juvenile's weren't in prison for life. And I remember him saying that part of what they did part of the strategy, which is cynical. Yes. But it was part of their strategy was to put out pictures of these juvenile offenders as children and those were white males. So it's not just cinch Hoya. Now, do you think it's a problem across the board? Yeah. It is a problem. If the point that's trying to be made is that only children are deserving of our concern for excessive punishment and incarceration. You don't use some groups of people in order to make other people. Nls freedom more difficult. So yes, tell the full story let people know that this happened when she was sixteen, but people know that it's immoral in my opinion to caging sixteen year old for life without parole sale that absolutely but telephone or story and also acknowledged the fact that Cintra is now a grown woman, and she still and definitely deserves to be free. The thing about sin. Toy story. Is that no matter which version you tell it can feel familiar. It has precedence and history parallels. Mariam Kaba likes to tell this story evidence. Slaved woman named Celia a woman who was purchased in Missouri back in eighteen fifty when she was fourteen years old. She was raped repeatedly by the man who bought her. She wore two of his children. And then when she reportedly was trying to reject his advances one night she killed him. We know all this because Celia was put on trial for the man's murder. And she had a vigorous defense, but the laws at the time didn't recognize enslaved people as people they were property incapable of self defense. And a jury found Celia guilty of murder. She was executed by hanging less than three months later. When I read her story, it really struck me in a very kinda very visceral way because it encapsulated so much for me the connections between shadow flavor and the treatment of black women in our culture in our society. The fact that we've always been able to be accused of murder than the accountable for that. But at the same time, we're not actually persons. So you can't receive the protection of the state should offer. Those notions are very they're gonna baked in to our cultural scripts the notion is that we don't really have felt defend, you know, so sin Toya is going to be freed in August fifteen years after she was put I think after she went on trial. Does that make a difference? It's not Justice. No, it's not. It's good. You know what I mean? Like, I think it's good that she's going to be out of prison after serving fifteen years, in my opinion, when she shouldn't have served one day, but it's good that she's gonna get out, but she is one of thousands. And I just think I want people to understand that that we've got a whole bunch of people lost up criminalised for defending themselves than criminalised for survival in general you in your writings, you have this really striking way of talking about what sin Toyota and other women, you mentor, did that sort of got them to this point, you call them acts of radical self love why you know, one of the things that I find so frustrating in our culture is that you are punished show severely for wanting to live that what? Message is is that if you prefer -able who actually died only some people have access to the rights of self defense in our culture, and they better be white. And they've done it'd be men overwhelmingly. And so you saying no, I'm refusing. I not going to succumb to the violence. That is being directed at me is inactive radical cell phone. But I guess I think that Johnny Allen the man that sin Toya shot. I think. Yeah. There family would hear that. And be outraged. Yes, they should be outraged. It's terrible thing. I understand that they lost somebody. They love. I wish it hadn't happened. I also wish that centrally hadn't felt the need to defend herself. Because she was in danger. Both things can be true and are. Thank you so much for talking to him about this case. I really really appreciate it. No problem. No problem. Thanks for having. For today. That's our show. We're back five days a week coming down your feed bright and early each morning. Tell us what you think by leaving a rating and review and apple podcasts that review is how other people find us. So it really helps a lot on Twitter. You can find us at slate podcast or you can follow me at Mary's desk. What next is hosted by me, Mary Harris and produced by Mary Wilson, and Jason Delio talk to you tomorrow.

Toya Toya Brown sin Toya Sinn Toya murder Mariam Kaba Toya Browns founder and director Kathy sin Bak Mariam Tennessee Celia Nashville state Representative Charles bone Toyah Chow robbery Mariam Habba Twitter
R&B Predator(s?), More like Bohemian Crap-City 1.8.19

The Daily Zeitgeist

1:06:03 hr | 2 years ago

R&B Predator(s?), More like Bohemian Crap-City 1.8.19

"Miles one of the funniest shows on TV has a new beat. If you will rule nine nine is coming to NBC. There you go there killing it right now. Yeah. I will not be missing the premiere Thursday January tenth. Starring obviously the hilarious. Andy Sandberg hundred per hour. Terry crews that seventy three's an amazing casts. No wonder the show won the Golden Globe for best comedy and best actor Hamburg. Oh, yeah. You were game. Hi fi. It also won two Emmys and critics call Brooklyn nine nine one of TV's best comedies where you there for that. I think so. Well, so many great reason to make sure to catch the premiere of Brooklyn nine nine Thursday January tenth on NBC. Hello, the internet and welcome to seasons. Sixty four episode two of Deir day. These guys the past has retake deep dive into American share consciousness using the headlines box office reports TD rating what's trending on Google and social needs. It Tuesday January eighth two thousand nineteen Jack O'Brien case, Dr Jekyll and Mr Brian. And I'm thrilled to be joined today by my special guest co host lazy mode. Be Lacey Mosley a mile only met is killing me. And. Still. When meadow view lose my mind, give me. Scam me to tame. That was the first AK that was actually a better vocal performance than the original. Very wonderful. Thank you so much. Get your hair. I'm giving what we should do. They. It is working very well. We're thrilled to be joined dinners third seed, by the hilarious comedian Casey lay it's lie. But hey, thank you. I on that. Right. It's all right. That's time. Happy to be here. Yeah. So I deserve credit. I appreciate it. It's Bill and look for the last time I was supposed to be here. I had trouble. So I didn't show up. So I'll you don't pay a bit. Yeah. Lane was broken down. It can only take off in perfect conditions because it's a huge ship. But. Plane. Okay. Great like a corner, cutting jet. Yeah. It's Hammy Hammy Hammy Hemi Hammy down. It's still looking planes. All right, Casey, lie where are you gonna get to know you a little bit better in a moment. But first we're going to tell our listeners a couple of things we're talking about today. We're going to continue to talk about the art Kelly series and also just, you know, sex trafficking since that is a related topic. Unfortunately and can't wait the story of sin sin Toya Brown. And there's also that Drake thing is somewhat related. We're also gonna talk about more shed those right about with the Havana story, we're gonna do a quick look back at the Golden Globes. The Globes you guys the night the stars come out shine. I'm going to correct myself on the Kevin Hart thing, we're going to talk about just all the shit that the president seems confused about these days. But I Casey what is something from your search history. That's revealing about who you are. I think. The most revealing thing that I was just looking at my search history is that I was looking for we ho late night dance parties. So for those of you who don't know we hope is West Hollywood, aka the guys played. And I have been staying on. I've been house sitting on the west side of usually live on the east side. And I never go out, and we home, and I just think it's probably pretty apt definition of Casey as googling like two forty five am on on Friday night late night we ho against parties. And there was only Mickey's and it was terrible. So anyway, just letting you know that if you have questions on late night dance places in a lot of Los Angeles him. Yup. Casey, L E Y live on Twitter had a really strong urge to Dan. I mean, I was hanging out with friends, and it was one of those things where I was like I'm not going to be and we again for a while. I know Hollywood I live in east Harlem. I mean, I hate to say, yes, I've been staying in Westwood and which is further west than West Hollywood. And I haven't seen friends in a month in. Now. 'cause like I always hear how sitting on like I've never had to let anybody say my raggedy ass house. You know, it's just not nice enough to need people to sit in it. Well, this person does better than you. And. Plane. Well, actually, this is for my it's it's my ex's house that he shares with his new boyfriend. Inver punishment. No, no, no. But but there in Europe, and they have my dog that my ex and I used to have so and we ex and I are good. His new boyfriend is twenty one. But that's an issue. And at least one of us is living in Hollywood lifestyle fantasy that we've always wanted. Are you there like moving? That's the biggest thing you can do to fuck with someone. I did that. Yeah. I learned that in a Dane cook comedy special. You wish it around. I put his watch and it sock door and like his remote control between his mattresses. Here's the thing is like, I know it's like a tenuous position. Because the boyfriend is a little wary of how close the still are. You know, well because he's a child and I'm sorry. I don't want to say it sounds like bullying child. But I'm not I'm not as he has apps. He has way more Instagram followers going to be successful. When he goes up one day. And I can't believe I'm saying this is so mean. No, you're wonderful. Okay. Anyway. So I'm there, and I and I don't wanna apart from these means that I'm saying, and actually he is a really nice person. I don't want to not be invited back to hang out with my dog. Right. Trying to obey the rules. The only rule was don't have sex in their house while they were gone. Oh, that's mile. That's like, and that's it was weird enough to be there already. I was like I'm not going to like, you know, bring somebody like cool place. Well, it's actually my act. Score. Yeah. This is my dog. So yeah. What is something? You think is underrated. So I think I'm just going to go with a Golden Globe themes here and this for a show that was nominated for Golden Globes. It's hard to call it. Underrated. But it struggled to get a new season because of of people watching that show is pos- FX series. Pose about trans gay performers in the trans queer performers in New York in the eighties. And it is a fascinating show. And it's underrated because no one's watching it. Not enough. People are watching it. Yeah. We're watching. We're watching somebody. We are somebody for sure, but and they did at its Orion. Murphy joint. And I feel like the wrong. Ryan Murphy joint won awards last night because pose has the actors in it are queer and trans and they portray queer and trans people. Unlike a lot of other shows Darren criss, isn't even gay right? Yeah. And that's what I've heard also remembered transparent came out, and they just let it suck and clean up. I mean, and here, here's he I love transparent transparent, God problematic at the end because of Jeffrey tambor, which like which is which issue, but like, I do feel like it was that point where it was the story was good, and it was acting, and I did kind of have this idea like, you know, people are allowed to act it's acting that being said now knowing how many talented trans gay like everyone out there is capable of doing his roles. You can't like to me if you're not at least really trying to find someone super talented who have who owns the experience it's like on. The crown Peter Morgan who directs the crown which is my favorite show. I'm gay, by the way, and. Like, he's he's like a middle aged woman needs to play a middle aged woman because she can bring the experience of middle aged women. That's why he changes the Queen. He's gonna change the clean every two seasons. And it's the same. Yeah. Yeah. So so Livia Coleman is gonna play the Queen in the coming up seasons shit where clarify played it before. And I'm super psyched about that. Because only person who could play it after clarify is Coleman. I have a lot to say about all of this. Anyway, long story short. It's a great show. It's emotional and it's super entertaining. If you've seen Paris is burning the the documentary about ball drag ball culture in the eighties nineties in New York. This is what that is about data, and it's glittery fantastic and and super enjoyable and Billy porter is a national gem, and he should've own a golden glass, he really should have. He he told me I was at one time. That's all I need. The most nowadays anybody. Performance by somebody who called me cute. What is something big is overrated? I and I'm going to stick with the golden gloves. And I'm sorry to say I think though human rhapsody is overrated. And I didn't think this was going to be an issue because it didn't really get the reviews good positive reviews. And so I wasn't worried and made a lot of money. I'm happy when I think makes money that's great making that money. But the problem was it shouldn't have won the best drama put it in a musical category. First of all, right. Okay. I was confused. I had to like check. I was like, oh, they mistakenly put it in the best drama categories are such trash. Seriously, seriously, especially the comedy music. Just we go anything over here category. There's like one like actual musical produced a year now. And then you have a star is born and. Which is the drama. Sure. But it's also a musical totally. And then and then bohemian rhapsody, which is basically just a concert film, like a CJ concert film. Then that's the musical too. But the issue for me is that as a gay HIV positive man working in this society to have the icon of queer HIV positive representation, whether he was out at the time or not he is like very much associated with it. You know, it's like making a movie about Keith haring without including any of the gay sex or the HIV like they allude to all of it a lot there is they treat freddy's homosexuality is like a curse that brings him down. Right, treat it as like the thing that ruined Queen, you know, and I just didn't like I just couldn't believe that's the direction they went with the movie. A no I can't that. That's the movie. But I can't believe it's being honored. You know, like like this makes us feel better. When literally like all the homosexuality that is portrayed in the in the movie is like passing glances at like dirty cock sucking, you know, you know, the. Dork temptation. Treat it like it's like a heroin addiction or something. So what made his music what it was who made him who he was part of ood. And yeah, I know exactly what you mean by that. And they're like his poor suffering wife, and it's like short, but also like the that's not that's not the reality of their relationship. They also fucked with the timeline hard. So it's not even a true. Like like true story. It's like based on inspired by the life of Queen. And then fuck in the rest of Queen. We'll only two of them. I guess John deacon didn't okay. Any of in didn't like sign off on all of it. But but the but the other two Brian May and drummer. He they were they were it seems like they wanted to save the legacy and not make Freddie out to be the like booking flamboyant like proud motherfucker that he was he was a peacock. He was a peacock and you saw the peacock part. But you didn't see the like the things that made him a peacock. Why he looked peacock so much, you know, so I so overrated bohemian rhapsody. I mean, Golden Globes, whatever. Yeah. And finally, what's a myth. What's something people? Think is true, you know, to be false something that I if people think is true that I noted before us, what did I write down? Oh, this is the thing. I I kind of like this up. But because I I worked on this for something else. But I I would say the thing that I think is true that people don't know is that is related to the Queen thing Princess, Diana. No one realized but she was like a real cool party animal. And yeah. I know this because she went to a gay bar with Freddie, Mercury disguised as a man. And I was reading this whole like story about the entire thing. And like she just was a cool person who wanted to have fun. And so I don't think it's a myth to be like Princess, Diana was like was like. But but, but I just I just kind of thought it was crazy that, Freddie. Mercury. Took Princess Diana in the late eighties to a gay bar in London incognito. And nobody knew who she was lady. I like that. And I love that. It was like it was like all of these like FREDDY went to all like the gay fetish bars like. Like a gay fetish? A while ship even know regular, Shan. Oh, a gay bar everyone thinks booking Meghan Markle. There's no that's the myth debunk. It's Princess, Diana. She's Meghan Markle. Go to a leather bar come down to wreck in the eagle in Silverlake. And then we'll talk about who's a close British Royal hell you alright. All right. Let's get into the stories in the zeitgeist. So the are Kelly series lacy were saying it concluded over we concluded over the weekend. And this is a docu series of six part docu series about the victims of his systematic sexual abuse. It's honestly shocking, obviously are Kelly peeing on people has been in the cultural zeitgeist says they propel Sendai's, but I think that we all kind of because of the media and how it was treated took his behavior lightly. When I watched this six part documentary with countless victims, also no one was paid in this documentary. These people came forward and told their personal business for free, and you could say like some people would want fame or recognition. But if you watch these women talking you're like, no, they this is from a different place. There was just an earnest sincerity from everyone who is speaking this documentary and also from the people who were helping us. Get away with these damn. His assistant speaks in this. And I was like if I was his assistant, I would have been under that little black her ROY. Would have been told me about my whole face. I'll television telling people that aided invented this guy damn child molester sicko, and it was like very systematic. Absolutely. So there were some words that kept reappearing that really kind of solidified for me the truth of this story, which were where it's like training like R Kelly would tell these girls he would target them at concerts. He had a whole first of all this motherfucker ahead whole system. Now, you know, when he first of all before I get to the first of all all you artists need to stop bring your regular people up on stage plants like Donald Trump does at his rallies. Don't be out here. We're real mother fucker people on your stage. Stop doing it. It's whack and then don't pee on them. Exactly. Donald Trump pay for it. Right. And the things that we used to joke about like watching this documentary in watching all of these black women, it was honestly, very cringe for me. Because black women get the brunt. End of the stick so often no one protects us not even our own as I re- I'm still saying because it's true. But y'all can at me on Twitter but blaming load with me on Twitter be where I'm always at all my time lies. They'll come catch me. Catch me all the time line. But to be honest. It was amazing how much he's gotten away with simply because his victims were women of color and also the systems that he created that were functioning than have been functioning for thirty plus years and his concerts. He will bring the girls on stage, and you know, seem to them or whatever the fuck. And then instead of letting them go off stage the way they came. They always had to go backstage through the backstage. So he could get his people on them and get they numbers and target the ones that he felt like we're weak enough to manipulate had a whole fucking system. This motherfucker was always at the high school that thought that was joke here. Was at the high school. It really went to high school hanging out at high schools and also the mall, which I will bring up later, but he would go to the mall, and he would target young women at the mall is what incognito or I haven't watched this. Yeah, he would walk past. And then his henchmen who some of them one of them had the decency to cover his damn facing mumble, his voice and the other one is out here just KiKi in and laughing about Al he fucking forward some documents for lia's marriage. Make it her eighteen when she was really. Yeah. And he reflects on and he was like kiss. She kind of looked at me like she wanted help. And I guess I should've tried to. Yes. Oh, we all thought. And what's so gross? Is we thought because I remember the thing I was quite young. But we were oh, we'll lead a fifteen. That's the best kind of old fifteen minutes. That was a time. It's it's. They put makeup on hundred and seventy five years ago, and like on the wagon trae, you know, that's a different story creepy different story, but the past now, it's not okay. And I feel like that's that's insane to me. And also just the network. This is what terrifies me, and it's no longer surprising is in all of these stories there are it's not just a predator, especially these predators who get away with it for so long who are famous it is a network of their like supporters and their enablers and their money people because they're the Money Train are still has our Kelly sign, and I just signed a petition last night to drop him from the record label because he's still making money, and he's he's still guesting on songs all over the place and writing he wrote basically the whole soundtrack to sparkle we were talking. Yeah. That's the thing is like the last movie I cried to on a plane. Mind you. That's why I couldn't make it though much fallen sparkle. It's crazy. 'cause I think we all thought it was isolated like, oh, Leah's beautiful and mature like that. That's that's why this is just an isolated incident. But it's like he has crafted a system trained kept coming up that word was very operative in the documentary series of like R Kelly would tell the girls that he would train them like on how to have sex, and how to, you know, be whatever kind of woman he wanted and captivity and then eventually his system was so advanced that he had a woman who he had broken down so much that she was the trainer. So she would be in setting these women when they came in and training them on how to behave and how to you know, should were they living with I gotta watch because I had women living with him on several different states. Some would be living in Atlanta. So we'll be living in Chicago some would be holed up in hotels in Los Angeles. So that when he visited Los Angeles, he will go see those women who were in hotels, and they weren't allowed to lead. They weren't allowed to eat without asking him. They're not allowed to. The bathroom without asking him. He was physically abusing all of these women. It's Christmas song monsters in the midst. I'm looking at the cover of her album just this her album age ain't nothing, but a number this my fuck atoll the whole time. That's also she's in the foreground. He is leaning against the wall. Like a pedophile looking at her like blurs, he's like blurry in the background Leary's leering a vest and no shirt under. Yeah. Which I guess is kind of a wave at the time. But but also is very creepy is he's also told I think a huge argument for our Kellyanne reason he's lasted so long as the whole separate the art from the artist, but r Kelly's art is this the the aren't are Kelly stands for right? Rob MC uncle R Kelly himself, the pied piper of this arm. Shied, though pie paper. Yes. Meaning I play my pipe Shlaim children follow told him this whole time age ain't nothing, but a number trapped in the closet. He had women trapped in the cloud guy. No, no. No. No. No. No, no. In the closet. Don't bring us into this. Okay. Right. Yes. No. So he's told us he's been a monster hiding in plain sight all this time, and because of money, and because also I think of society's unwillingness to let go of things that have impacted our lives personally because it feels like if we say mute R Kelly than we have to mute every moment that was involved with R Kelly we all sang at five years old at least at the black schools. We all saying the low I forget what. That's what we saying the positive one. That was like, nah. American believe. Might be. I can believe about Abilene. There's one list song that I can't remember. But as as. Flies is a is a. Yeah. It's a real heartwarming song. Sung by a monster. Song? Yeah. Total mom. There's a lot a lot. Going to say, I mean, that's like it is we have to accept the fact that if we if we start accepting all this, which we should it's that we really have to go back and call it out. And it's not about separate Michael Jackson. I believe was a predator. You know, I mean, I think he's super fucked up, you know, and and I'm not I'm not I'm not dead. Which is the only thing I feel like that makes it more convenient for all of us. Yeah. It helps it helps. And he's any means so much to all of us. And I mean, like, I don't know. It's just it's it's hard to. The question is can you separate the art from the artist? I mean, not in our Kelly's case his his music is literally about attack and children. Do you know the song? You are not alone that he wrote about a young woman that he got pregnant and then had like get an abortion. Yes. That's the woman is in the documentary like she chose to have the abortion. It's not like he forced her. But it's about her in. This is also a woman that he gave a very almost deadly like disease to. Yeah. It's it's crazy. But also now that I think about it. I can do with our Kelly's music, it's going to be you know, what does he feel Amalia Budi? I don't think Bill. No more. I can believe true. Yeah. Yeah. Fresh out the kitchen, the one good one to let go, but I think we have can there's so many other songs about cars. Thanks to heterosexual men. Thinking that is an amazing metaphor. Let's see what you ignition like. So the key goes in the kids that oh, we need a new place to go after the after party because we can't go to the hotel lobby anymore. We're talking about Omar Jaen came out and was saying that he wasn't going to perform any more of the songs that are Kelly had in for B two K because it's the other thing R Kelly wrote for a lot of very. All right. Stelling be to pay honor. Pex, y'all out there? Okay. At bottom jeans boots. Okay. So we can go to the beach UK consular. But our Kelly wrote bump bump bump, I'm half the bump up that off my plumber are actually I'm gonna need to go through. And I just want to find out all songs written by R Kelly. So, but that's the thing. Can you can you? If it wasn't performing, you know, he's railing in and if it's not about peeing on people and locking them in a way. Like like if it's about. No. That's it gets. It's these things about. So crazy that it's taken us thirty years to cancel him with all the information. But car, I mean Cosby, you know, more intertwined live in our in our in our hearts, and in our lives, and in media, and culture and that just happened, but it did happen. And that's another guy who had all these enablers in. And the last thing I have to say about this is directed especially at people who believed that the attack of our Kelly has to do with his race. Is that this is not a race issue. Okay. I'm sorry. Creeps are creeps. And I don't give a fuck if they're black, and I know it's harder for black people. But listen black folks shouldn't be out here. Trying to bolster up creeps simply because they're African American a young need to quit that shit. Kill your point about, you know, the race of his victims having something to do with the fact that the culture was able to look it for so long as probably the more apt average. Just one more call that Bryan singer help direct fucking bohemian rhapsody. So it's a gay problem too. And let's not whitewash that part. And also another reason why we should just cancelled humidity. All right. We're gonna take a quick break. We'll be right back. Mazi wash Brooklyn nine nine. Of course. I watched Brooklyn. Do you watch rookie nine I love Berlin and three episodes. I don't have epic. But it does it's one of those shows not only is it hilarious. But it said diversion, it makes you happy to watch. It is good joke writing. Yes joke writing. And now it's coming to NBC. Thank the Lord yet. They saved this show. Don't miss the premier Thursday January tenth starring the hilarious. Andy Sandberg Andre brower Terry crews and Stephanie bat three oh, an amazing cast. It's no wonder the show won the Golden Globe for best comedy and best actor for Andy Sandberg, also won two Emmys, critics call Brooklyn nine nine the TV's. Yes. We know you're a fool if you don't watch. I'm just insecure about my own pencil gay insecure about that Spanish, pronunciation Altair. Okay. So many great reasons to make sure catch the premiere of Brooklyn nine nine Thursday January tenth. On NBC. And we're back, and unfortunately, this is going to be a bit of a theme across the first half of our episode. So I mean, not unfortunately in the respect that Sinn Toya Brown who was serving a life sentence for murdering a man who was paying to have sex with her when she was sixteen was just granted clemency which a lot of people were pushing for for a long time. She was a victim of human trafficking. And what when she was first convicted they just like didn't take into account that she was underage that she was being sexually abused that. She was a victim of human trafficking and human trafficking is actually, you know, it's between a ten billion thirty two billion dollar worldwide industry, which to put that in perspective. Ten billion is four times the entire Burger King chain and eighty three percent of sex. Trafficking incidents in the US involved victims that were US citizens test mater that right now three hundred thousand kids are in that situation by the FBI, and you know, the FBI freed in June of two thousand fourteen they freed one hundred sixty eight kids who had been sold into sex slavery since two thousand eight at least four thousand kids. So it's it's a problem that I think just in general, we don't we don't like to look at it. Whether it's our Kelly, or, you know, just somebody in our inner city, and I think it's one of those things that we tend to hope that when we see somebody in a really unfortunate circumstance that it's not as bad as we might think or it's you know, that that they did something to deserve that or some shit like that. And it's just you know, there are victims all around us that an and more of them them. We might think. Thanks for bringing me onto a super light show. I think this is something that I'm going to say, and I'm just I whatever people wanna fuck kids. And it's an it's something that that we don't talk. We don't talk about sexist society. And as a result of that we allow these systems of bad unhealthy exploitative sex to exist, and that's a very basic understanding of it. But like, I don't want to defend Roseanne Barr too much. But she used to talk a lot about how Hollywood is full of pedophile, and it becomes clear and clear that that is real, and it becomes clearer that that's real throughout society. And so it's a crazy thing to say, but it's real and we need to talk about weird stuff more openly as a society. I don't they've saying that's going to happen. But like like that's why like this secret industry of ten billion dollars. We could open up the government with half that. Okay. And. It's a lot of money. And I, you know, I don't I don't really have anything intelligence beyond like this like people, humans are crazy. And and and kids are kids are often, you know, the ones who are dealing with things that fucked up adults too. I think you're absolutely right. I mean as also speaking of crazy shadows, come gay. She put a lot of her set celebrity behind some Toyo Brown and behind the publicity behind, you know, what essentially free this black woman. This is the second black woman that Kim Kardashian has helped get out of jail. And I just I can't say nothing better asking them. I might have to go out and get some of this KK WBZ again. Listen, I used to be like, oh, Kim cake by but from us, listen, you earn that Budi child K, thanks so much, and I'm not gonna there's a there's a woman who used sex to her advantage openly and unashamedly and and now as doing good things with the benefits she's reap and anyone wants to call her slut. Yeah. But she's doing social good work. So I'm never called her that people very happy to see a woman get paid from some damn sex shit. Tell pussy for free, and but but sexual coins on the nightstand. And it's a problem, and then the real who hasn't like, I I don't know you guys that well, but I I sure have sent my fair share of like questionable accepted pictures of various states of undress in things and like as someone who wants to become more famous. Thank God for Kim Kardashian impera tilt and putting sex out there in the beginning. So like when I do become famous, and maybe my penis or but ho becomes open onto the public imagination. Who cares? Who cares? Okay. But also Chantal this news that seems to be putting this update of black women in the forefront. It's really important that we talk about it. And that we helped change it and help black women. So yes, there's also the Drake thing check over the weekend where it's old video of him at a concert where he ten from twenty ten where he is kissing. Dancing with a girl who he then finds out a seventeen and then continues kissing and groping her end quotes like oh, you're seventeen. I don't want to go to jail. I really enjoyed this. I hope that's not bad. I really like the way your breasts feel against my chest. This is the audio from direct audio from that video. And this is not what I thought you meant bicycle mode. Right. Come on. Now, Aubrey I can't be listening to you. If you call me at her touch on look, and the thing that I wanted to bring up in comparison with our Kelly is in that documentary. They talk about kind of the system that he had he will go to high schools, we talked about that. He would also go to the mall, and you know, we're drako's to meet lots of his women the stricture should go to the mall. It's in the same fashion of he goes to the mall walks around shops little bit and has his entourage. Give information to specific women that he finds attractive or whatever I've also been to Drake. I love Drake. And I hope that he's not I heard such let children, but I've been to Drake concerts and been asked to go backstage when I was younger and win and nothing bad happened. So I was like, okay. Hopefully, he's not at her creep in. But also that thing with Millie, Bobby Brown. This is the thing with Millie. Bobby Brown is just that he has a very like advisory relationship with her where she's like, he always gives me. Text, and that's grooming. Right. It's just a weird thing that he was also dating a girl who is close to underage if not at the time that news broke. And so on air looking forward to thousand nineteen predictions episode that Lacey co-hosted, we talked about we were like, we hope that this Drake thing doesn't get up into a full-fledged like trend and then this news breaks week later. So and just for like legalistic terms, I in certain places seventeen is age of consent for certain things is this video of non this video of aggressive consensual. What happens at a lot? Of course smooch is like a fan comes up, and I'm sure that the girl looked like she would have it was having a good time. But it's just that. Yes. That is the age of consent. But I guess what nine years ago Drake's thirty two. Now, he would have been he's still was kind of young. He's like would been twenty three in that video and site. And look I I'm so far. I don't want to like just because other things have been so intense. I don't want to like lump that until. I love Drake. And I really hope that he calls his ass down because I don't I don't want. Look, I'll get rid of a Drake catalog would actually be very very hard for the other. If he knows this is out there now, and he can't be like, you know, what maybe I'll leave the seventeen year old nineteen acceptable. You know? You know, like if you can't do that. Then you got have a problem. And also this might have just been a couple of errors in judgment. I think we'd all say do inappropriate things from time to time raising our eyebrows out on the dailies IKEA, and it seemed to enter the generals like this past weekend with this video. So we at least wanted to bring it up. There's also the Havana thing where we were talking about a lot on the daily guys that I thought it was mass hysteria. Then there was a New Yorker article that made me think maybe I was wrong. Well, now, scientists have come out and said that the sound that was recorded that was supposedly the sonic attack was actually the Indies short-tailed cricket. So wait, really. So it wasn't Russia Russian meddling with with American at least the sound that they got on recording. And I went back and read the propublica article that kind of did a beat for beat like breakdown of how the story came together. And like how everybody started reporting this one of the key factors that made people start thinking something was up was the sound. And like so one guy reported that he was like feeling headaches, and nausea, and he did have inner ear damage. And so they were like this guy definitely has something. And then he went over to somebody else's house. And they heard that sound he was like that's the sound. I've been hearing and then they recorded it. And it was a cricket. And it was just a cricket that they weren't used to the rim here. A cricket remain. Right. Well, the guy specifically says in his quote, as he's he's like at first I was just like it's probably we're in a foreign country that I've never been to. It's probably like a type of insect. I've never heard and. Yes, that was what it was. But you just like. Entering into this whole and a lot of it is like the Trump administration getting out in front of the story trying to make it a thing because they wanted to blow up the whole Cuba Obama, and they said, it was a bunch of people to and I imagine that like one person says they have symptoms of something. And then like whatever that affect is. I'm sure that that was part of it. And some people have like they've looked at their brains and say that there was like concussive v- damage of some sort on cricket, right, brain, right, brain stuff is also very fungi. And what we'll see how it develops. Maybe there was an attack that was going on. And then it was like, you know, everybody's attention was thrown off because of this weird. Cricket sound will will see less. Let's move on to the Golden Globes. You guys we've given it the necessary day to decompress from the Globes. The you know, I think the day after the globe should be a national holiday. We're just get to, you know, at least in LA. Right citywide. That's what people say the rest of the country after the Super Bowl. So I thought it would be really out of touch for me to say that after the Golden Globe. Right. But so would you guys think any any takeaways? I it seemed like it was sort of a light on events an uneventful. I guess it. With that. Yeah. Because they're like there was the actress from this is us potentially calling Alison pre. Off Mike or on like on a hot, Mike? And that was like the main story that came away from it. And it turns out she wasn't calling for sure not true. I know the guy who is interviewing so weird. Brag. But I wish it was true. Because then it would have been more also out to Christie, my score you better absorb this minute. 'cause I only knew you from the girl who was making me cry. We got we get out here and get you some coins. Girl, get you a commercial last Neutrogena on your faces the show moment. But it was dry other than that. They even had the fabricate bet drama, I design. I am imagining like they just wanted not to stir any PA. I mean that I feel I feel that way. I mean, like the opening you know, it was good. It was solid and there were some laughs and there were some moments. But it was not like, Sandra Owen. Andy Sandberg did did an expert acceptable job super acceptable shade? Sure. It is it is. It was everything got everything got spread around. I was upset with with some of the awards. But overall, it was like I put it on a little bit of delay. So I could fast forward through the commercials and in the NFL myself fast forwarding through the acceptance speeches too because I was like no, I don't care about anything. I don't care what anyone can say it kind of set that tone and then a shameless. Brag about a connection to my future. Second cousin in law once removed won a Golden Globe last night. So lady Gaga if you are listening. I know we haven't met yet. But I am. Say Regina king. Stephanie Gaga, we're taking her last name all of us. I don't feel like she was robbed in the acting category. Because Libya Coleman was the deserved winner of that she killed as ING. Never. It's good. So sorry. I saw him with John was in it. And I was like, no, thanks, and she in my mind, she's good in this. But she is the weakest link of the three main stars and all of that. And they're all really strong really strong show. Good. And I feel like she didn't win supporting because they split the ticket on it. But so lady Gaga, my family member future family member. She won the best song. And she looked amazing. Like, we do in the family. Really? Your cousins by second. Cousin once removed is engaged Christian Trina. He's like a big super agent at CA. And I couldn't talk about this for forever because it was a kind of a secret family secret. And so we're we're all very excited. My mom was feeling pretty sick yesterday. And then she called me and couldn't stop talking about archives and she calls her Steph, and I'm not just. Yeah. She knows what she asked more questions about lady Gaga. And then she does about like my career. And all that shows. What her priorities are? I didn't God. It was just solid dry. I ever people who aren't from Hollywood. I feel like the the Golden Globes is good for like making. You hate Hollywood like focusing your hatred. I thought the Jeff bridges speech was really a peak moment for that. Where he liked droned on about stuff that occurs to you. When you get really high for the first time, and then like made life into a tag metaphor where being it means. You are like super naturally blessed by God tab, everything go really well in your life. And it's just like a way for him to understand the insanely good fortune. Like, he's talented. This tendency. So beautiful, right? Shepherds has got a did that just his way explaining why the is cosmic -ly conspiring to make everything awesome and revolve around him. And then you behave as though it does. And then I don't know Hollywood believes you because it's a weird town that's controlled by powerbrokers. Yeah. And and in that role in the last two years wasn't it Merrill and Oprah who liked both like boots the house down the entire time. Like, they just brought it up because they just, you know, white, man. Yeah. Resetting was like Trump's golden goal. No, it was all about like diversity in nominations. They drove that that home. But in the end like like, winning wise. It was marvelous mismatch gets it again. Sure. Sure. Yeah. Kaminsky method scheme. Like, the Kim cook. Ain't nobody I have to look it up because I thought I thought it was some kind of scandal or Atlanta win. And then I realized that Lanta wasn't even nominated the good place berry, both probably like we're shows that I know people who watch and like the Comiskey method just seemed like it was one of those things where it was specifically targeted for the elderly people who vote on this word, my parents loved that. And they're in their way. The only thing that I try not to say oh people because I know I'm a beer out as bitch day out here. My jeweled Walker and shape, and I still want to be popping. I still be wanna be one of the girls. You know what? I mean. Like, I I when I saw viola Davis get her box eight in how to get away with my. I don't wanna see mountains you get her back. Then I thought I'm gonna be on she one day and be trying to get my boxing on television. So yeah, I will be oh bugging. So I can't shade too much of the older television in the older actors getting their little do just because I'm like when I'm out of shit. I hope that somebody will still be trying to you know, let me climb on that stage real slow and talk and talk for thirty minutes. That was great. Yes. That retrospective. Was awesome. Book is Sandra. How off Andro also green book. Now, Jack, I was not putting that out there as something else. That was awesome. I was saying that is this year's like white savior. Every year we need one. We need a bang, right? One white save your banger and riskier it was green book that shit. I did not see it. I won't see it. I'm done seeing slave movies. And I'm done seeing nice white people movies where they we drive around in cars shit. We drive Stacy we saw. I nothing about this movie. But not a single one of the previews. Have I been like now that's a groundbreaking movie up something registered to is like musicians in a car driving around together. And it's like, it's so that's a podcast or blog. That's not a award winning movie in my mind. But maybe I'm missing something. This is the movie that makes white people feel good. And I and I get it. Why people now that you have to have some kind of introspection on how horrible waiting the young. Our part in overcoming racism other than being the racist. And this is it. How are we the hero? We were the nice guy in the car. Guys in cars, you know. Getting coffee. I now listen if I offer the role to be in one of those you best believe my blackout. Missile one mega man. And I I was denied this. I will the nine this podcast. I mean, if our Kelly needs a new sing or? I just I my career is not where he wanted to be. The syndrome was great. A lot of people are seeing her in a new light after her hosting gig has been working for our Sandra Alvin out here paying like pounding this damn pavement. Decades, she's been in the game. And I did appreciate that. Shay that she threw it Masan. What was that one? So she talked about how Asian before before crazy, rich, Asians. How many Asian women had been wh what was it? Yes. Leading roles in it. Besides Aloha and goes to the show, and it was like, I'm so sorry. Yeah. And that was yeah. Yeah. It's it's crazy. And then I just wish we and that scholars your Hanson's China is playing another like scotch. Miss raced like character. And it's like, no, no, no, no, also crazy Richardson's with great. And also was going to say on that, Sandra. Did it? They have forgotten. Sorry. Well, parents but that was super durable. So adorable. Yeah. Scott Hanson is about to remake Malcolm X. Shit hobby. I'm gonna go see it because she's good at gonna make some strong tours. All right. We're gonna take another quick break. We'll be right back. Mazi wash Brooklyn nine nine. Of course. I watched Brooklyn. Do you watch ruling? I knew I love Berlin and three episodes. I don't have epic. But it does it's one of those shows not only is it hilarious. But it said diversion, it makes you happy to watch. Like that is good joke writing. Yes joke writing. And now it's coming to NBC. Thank the Lord yet. They saved this show. Don't miss the premier Thursday January tenth starring the hilarious. Andy Sandberg Andre brower Terry crews and Stephanie bat three oh, an amazing cast. It's no wonder the show won the Golden Globe for best comedy and best actor for Andy Sandberg, also won two Emmys, critics call Brooklyn nine nine the TV's. Yes. We know you're a fool if you don't watch. I'm just insecure about my own pencil gay insecure about that Spanish, pronunciation Altair. Okay. So many great reasons to make sure catch the premiere of Brooklyn nine nine Thursday January tenth. On NBC. Indoor back and briefly. I wanted to correct myself which miles did on yesterday's show. But just wanted to acknowledge both the point the miles is making a about. So the Ellen Degeneres Kevin Hart interview that happened at the end of last week. So he did apologize when he was backing out of the Oscar hosting role in a tweet. But during the Ellen interview, he kept referring to the fact that he had already even before the controversy. He had already dealt with the joke, and you know, apologized for that night of took him at his word that he had done that. And in the past prior to the controversy, and that doesn't appear to be the case. And there's a really great segment on the Don lemon show where he address. Messes why he needs to apologize like how he can actually, you know, make amends for his jokes in the past. And again, he continues to you know, Kevin Hart's response to that segment. Even was to say, we all need to learn and acknowledge that we all need to learn. And you know, let's try and remember that in twenty nineteen like so again like people are being mean to him was his takeaway. So. Somebody double down on the problematic as hard as Kevin Hart. He's done it multiple times with the Cowboys and Indians party just really coming out and just doubling down on being ignorance book. And also on this homophobic thing come on. Now, man, we saw your tweets. Yeah. Everybody tweets bash shit deleted tweets, like smart person. But also just oppose also didn't like that. Ellen Degeneres came out here. Trying to be the voice of all gay people just thought that that was annoying girl. Please stop stop that. And also shutouts Don lemon who I now. Call Don lemon pepper, which I've told you that because he's woken fuck out here. We dragged him for a solid ten years on Twitter. He finally got his shit together. And he's right. Kevin hart. Doesn't realize that jokes aren't just jokes because people who laugh at these jokes also think it's okay to assault gay people, which they do every single day, and they continue to do, and we need to take responsibility through that. If he was like gay people are like this walking along. You know, what I said thing he was like I'll hit my kid if he's gay. I mean, it's like real funny joke, and that is that that's the issue for me. It's like if you can't realize that the joke is perpetuating hate against a group of people. And that you can't just apologize for it. Then fucking don't host the Oscars a host anything. I'm not going to go see your movies too. I mean, look I haven't seen the Kevin Hart movie in a long time. I'm not that worried about it. But I do think that we can get over things that you said as long as you show a little bit of fucking. It's not that hard. It's not that hard fake it. You're an actor. That's the thing. That's lex which is going to be harder to take out of the rotation remix to ignition or Central Intelligence. Right. But let's move on. We've talked enough about Kevin Hart over the past two shows. Let's talk about the word motherfucker. Oh, yes. In honor of the continued outrage over the freshman congresswoman's calling the president motherfucker I wanted to look back at something a writer named Ian Cheesman wrote for us when I was back at cracked that reviews, the best idiomatic insults around the globe. Because a lot of attention is being paid to mother fucker as if it's like an incredible insult, and I I've always found it to be a little bit wanting because it's not specific about like whose mother the person is fucking. And like that could be almost like a compliment. Like, I it just means you're having sex with a woman children to mama tambien. My dad, and he's a motherfucker. So right. Yeah. True. That so we actually went through other countries and cultures with better insults. And I just wanted to run through a couple of them for you guys and get your reactions. So a few Spanish speaking cultures have suck butter from my ass shit on your dead and shit in your mother. Oh, yeah. I would feel uncomfortable saying that the sucking butter out of a butthole is that what it is. Yeah. Oh, you shut butter out of my I a woman. The woman I feel like too many men would like that. That's right. Sure. Anytime. Really backfire. But in your mother that's complicating your mother will cause them fiction for sure sure on my dick in your mother's ribcages and air one is very mother sent. Yeah. I leased it specific with regard to who is sticking their dick. And whose mother spe specific yet every like every region, every culture has a fuck your mom. You know, put something in your mom because dads are two way fee like, you know, dads, and every culture fucker down here. Talking with your mother. You have a good relationship with your mom. Yeah. Who Aslan dick culture has grandfather? Fucker uncle fucker sheep Booker. Are they respect women? Right. Cool Iceland clo- while Bulgarian say your mother sucks bears in the forest that sounds about right? Yeah. So. No. So desperate. Bandic the forest havoc. Mom, there's you don't have to go to the forest like bear deck. Eagle. So Romanians were the number one on this dudes list with just more like shampoo, my daycare with your saliva, like gross shit brush your teeth. My dick will soon be inspecting. But Serbians have just like the all right? So they have a particularly brutal. I guess salutation slash the worst wedding toast ever may God give you to search for your children with a guy counter. And then maye your house be alive on CNN. What is a radiation detectors post nuclear? And that's very Yugoslavia now. Yes. And you never want your house to be level. They're like a smash you live in Times Square chew shit. I guess language and translation, it's probably way. More slapping and round the. Round the language now do it in Serbia. My my accent is all fucked up. So that's fair. Yeah. Also, I just the outrage on that is just so hilarious. I love her for not backing down. And I love Pelosi for not backing down on it. I'm sorry. That's not the language I would use. But have you heard the president's dirty and filthy mouth? That motherfuckers move race. So, you know, we we've got some stars in this new group of actors, and it's all lumped in with them being outraged about a oh see day. It's like, yeah. She's a freshman in congress. Like you never see like like robots are hating her haw scared of her. Oh, I'm sorry. This like super smart super brassy super baby leg won't bay like a babe. Her looks matter. But like she is all she's just rack that's makes celebrity for. Sure. Well, yeah. I think it. Yeah. I think that is part of their fear. Right. Like how they're tracked it to her. And they don't know how to deal with George. Obama. She's you know, locus fuck she knows how to use Twitter better than I think like she Chris Eliza like tweeted, some half quote from her, and she was like here doesn't context and just said the rest of the things she said, and it was like took everything that he was trying to do out of is. She's she's good. It's going to be really interesting to see though, I will say she got when she was quoted as or someone was quoted anonymously as saying that she was going to actively try to remove Akeem Jeffries, who's the new one of the new members of leadership she attacked politico for saying that they used anonymous sources as news and everyone on a liberal. I was like you can't do that. And this is the only thing to say about it. That's like whenever there's an anonymous source about Trump are realizing and the entire world. So it just goes to show you the news media is just like super fucked up and everyone and everyone hates it. And I'm just like let's let Mueller dulas job impeach the motherfucker. And then we then. Yeah. And then lastly as we're entering the award season. I talk a lot of shit about the Oscars. I've I've long said that I think they should give the Oscars out five years afterwards and everybody when Seth Rogan, I guess tweeted, the same idea and people always stealing it from you. It's like, no. That's just a good idea that like he's so your. Yeah. But so I do think Austria's get a lotta shit wrong. But there was something that someone tweeted out from metacritic that is the lowest scoring Oscar best picture nominees that I thought is a good illustration of the value of award season in that they kind of give some sort of critical relevance to movies that were otherwise like maybe not appreciated at their time. Like ghost was a poorly reviewed movie a few good men was a poorly reviewed movie or just like not well, reviewed Rainman the six cents. Osmond. Gave Whoopie her backup Oscar for ghosts. 'cause they know they owner that ship or the color. They gave her Leonardo like here you go SIS. Sorry. We missed you last year. Right. Julia Roberts in Erin. Brockovich right now. Yeah. But those are movies that I don't know. I assumed were well reviewed I think because they got Oscar recognition, and they're just widely and generally perceived as classics now Senator woman and field of dreams were both kind of poorly reviewed they're not. They don't really hold up for me. But yeah, a lot of people love them. So those are movies that I feel like I don't know the Oscars did their job by being like these are actually good movies. Even though critics weren't weren't feeling. I've just get upset when literally the movie that I think is like whenever there's a movie that's like clue the best movie in my mind doesn't even get touched or talked about. Then I got upset about that. And that movie this year, it'd be first reformed starring Ethan Hawke. Oh, yeah. And yeah, it's it's it's an environmental movie that also brings religion into into the whole thing. And it is just like he's so good and the fat like what do you have to? To do. Take your shirt off and dance into at a Live Aid concert. And then you can win all the awards, but you can't do like real like deep emotional acting and get an award in this day and age. I mean, you can't if you're Daniel day Lewis, and you're in a movie that nobody ever wants to see again, but you're good. Although black Lancers my favorite movie and got nominated didn't didn't win anything. That's my other favorite movie of the year. Spiner tame in wise. I it was slow for me. Really? But you know, I I love old spikes. I felt like it was like the I Tanya of this year like ton of entertaining, and very like stylized, and I liked it. Didn't you know might not be the best movie? But it was like one that. I really enjoyed right? I like the story a lot. I agree with that. There's no everything's gonna be boring this year because I just aren't anything like cool. Controversial interesting movies like where is the fish fucking. Where's where's the I wanna talk about? Oh, you haven't seen voice? I didn't like. Yeah. And that I mean that again, it was just like the big short would like with with another monster kind of scenario Christian Bill was Dick Cheney in that. I will say right. So oh. Meister cushioned Bill a lot of people were surprised that he is not American. So I I've never heard him speak in his own accent, hopefully, yours before when he accepted some award. I was surprised then and it seemed like he has gotten more cockney since then. Thank you thanking side. Poor aids. What are you talking about? I feel like everyone drinks at the Golden Globes. So maybe at that point he liked what is a little sauce dads. Good my country. I want us are drinking, and I'll start sounding more country down that way. This is normally talk. Oh, that's a really good point. Otherwise cushion Bill has made it his whole career without ever talking to true. I don't remember. I never knew he was British God. He was I mean, I just think of him always the boy from newsies. So I don't know if he's British. But boy, can he sing and dance. Well, guys, this has been so much fun. Having you here Casey where can people find you? You can find me on Twitter, Casey, L, E Y lie and on Instagram, Casey, W L E Y on. I'm sorry. That was backwards Casey lie on Instagram just go there. That's all that matters. And then I'll be in San Francisco coming up this week at the punch on in San Francisco Tuesday through Thursday, and I will be performing SF sketch, which is the big comedy festival. I'm opening for Nico Santos from crazy, rich, Asians and superstore, the marines moral memorial theatre this Friday. The eleventh Casey is an amazing standup. Go check him out. Is there a tweet you've been enjoying? I forgot that. I was and yeah, sure I'll just do one of my own. Oh, yeah. This was funny to me ugly. People hate Nancy Pelosi because she's hot. Just do that one. I love Nancy Pelosi right now. So you Lacey. Ooh. Thank you so much for being a wonderful guest co host so happy to be here. Where can people find you? Okay. Y'all me on the interwebs. Instagram at develops, E, D Ivy L A C. I also Twitter at delay. CDI L A C, I also via mo- pay pale cash ship Yano would find me. And then my favorites we right now. This is actually mine. But it's that if we keep ousting all these male creep musicians Jackie's will be the king. Embi? At this rain is going to be. We should accept it. You find me on Twitter. Check, the squirrel. Brian couple of tweets met binder tweeted, so Kaya Jones tweeted, how would you feel about your child using this bathroom and took a video of gender neutral restroom, like zoom into mount real erratic camera work in that binder tweeted, I'd tell them to watch out for the weirdo, filming the bathroom out. So. Joe randazzo. We did that Americans would set their eleven million dollar earned might be taxed at a higher rate. You just need to get a second job and do a better job. You can find us on Twitter at Daly's ice threat. The daily on Instagram. We have a Facebook fan page and a website Jay lease dot com where we post era episode and our notes where link off to the information that we talked about today's episode as well as song we ride a held on. And we have a who's knee as special coming through producer around a hose NIA? What song are we writing out onto that? By LA priests called. Oh, I know. Oh, I n o. Keep. It's a little poppy song. And I really like it. It's got a great beat. And I'd just like jump around my room to until I'm tired within a second. Are you? Okay. Do you think you're like, maybe suffering? Some physical ailments jump around for one second year physically though original. Eric. All right, guys. We're gonna ride out on that will be back tomorrow because it is daily podcast. Miles one of the funniest shows on TV has a new beat if you will nine nine is coming to NBC. There you go there killing it right now. Yeah. I will not be missing the premiere Thursday January tenth. Starring obviously the hilarious. Andy Sandberg hundred per hour. Terry crews that seventy eights race, an amazing casts. No wonder the show won the Golden Globe for best comedy and best actor Sandberg. Oh, yeah. You were game high fine. It also won two Emmys and critics call Brooklyn nine nine one of TV's best comedies where you there for that. I think so. Well, so many great reason to make sure to catch the premiere of Brooklyn nine nine Thursday January tenth on NBC.

Golden Globes R Kelly Brooklyn Andy Sandberg Kevin Hart NBC Twitter Los Angeles Hollywood NBC Andy Sandberg Andre brower Ter Donald Trump Globes Kelly Lacey Mosley Casey Sinn Toya Brown Stephanie Gaga
Throwback Ep 96: Cyntoia BrownI am Free!

Toure Show

53:35 min | 6 months ago

Throwback Ep 96: Cyntoia BrownI am Free!

"You GotTA think I've been praying like so hard I was like that's not GonNa get me this God's not GonNa let me do the rest of my life in prison and then by you know you go onto the trial and you know it's going bad. I'm thinking the worst that can happen is probably gonNA just be manslaughter. Maybe at the worse secondary martyr which is fifteen years and so I go into it. I'm thinking okay. I'm GONNA get good news. And then they say life and it's like what just happened. Are you serious? I'm just sitting there. You got these cameras catch in your face and you can't even really fully process it. I mean it's hard it's rough especially when you get to the prison and you see what it's like by you see what you're missing out on with family and it's just miserable in there like it's miserable and you're like you mean to tell me like this is going to continue until I die. I really because nobody this doing years in prison. Who's going to last that long sin? Toya Brown long has lived an insane life throughout her early teens. She was repeatedly. Jailed repeatedly raped prostituted. Everything it seems like every man. She came in contact with did her wrong when she was fifteen a pimp. She was in love with center out with his gun and she shot and killed a man she was a teenager who'd been victimized by the world but she was convicted and sentenced to in prison but she never lost hope that God would somehow save her enduring her fifteen years in prison. A groundswell of support and sympathy began to grow until the governor of Tennessee. Commuted her life sentence she was released from prison in August of two thousand nineteen just two months ago. She's now free and starting over and she's the author of an incredible memoir called freese into area. It's the incredible sin Toy Brown long on. Toray show you have been through an unbelievable journey in your life to get to this point how are you? I'm good. I'm blessed. I mean you must feel the most amazing weight off of your shoulders in your heart. And just how is it? I mean it's good and it you know. Of course there is a weight like it's been lifted but to be honest with you until I can see like the other women that I left behind so I could see some change happening for them to. I won't really feel like that. You Know Big Sigh of relief But it was definitely like you know I have my own finally Though I mean just even the pictures in the book the the end photos and the sense of relief that we can see is like wow like. She's so lifted. How did you make it through all of this? This this hell that you've lived through. It was literally nobody but God that got me through. It was rough and you know there was times it should. I shouldn't even have survived and I didn't realize the time just how close I was. But you know he was watching out for me. He definitely had angels around me protecting me. I mean this story. The hell of your life starts from early teenage years. And there's really there's really nobody around who's good to you everybody's trying to take from you and us you and I mean I wonder you know just at a young age when you start seeing that happening all the time you lose faith in humanity. Do you not. Yeah so that started you know. Once I left home the little cocoon and my mother's house it was like that it was always someone that wanted something. Always you know some kind of drama happening and just a lot of trauma that I was taking in and for a while you know I did struggle with you. Know filling certain ways about men in general just about people you kinda come to expect the worst from people But you have to realize that just because you experience that with one person to person a few people that doesn't mean it's reflective of everyone and so that several years for me to to get to that place for understood that but before you even meet cutthroat. Who's this sort of central figure in the story? What did you think of yourself? Because there's just not much no no not much you know. I had come to a place where I really didn't feel like I belonged anywhere. I really didn't feel like I was accepted for who I was didn't really know who I was. You know I was just so desperate to to be accepted like the people around me anything that they said that I needed to be how I needed to be behaving. What was acceptable. I was just taking it all in like a pay this is. This is how I'm supposed to be and you know I was just lost like way before I even met him. I mean your I mean your child you were child but you were being treated like an adult quite often and you're dealing with rape dealing with crack using WANNA All see mean just I. I can't imagine what it needs. You think of yourself nathen. I've been much myself at all and I really didn't think much of the things that I was involved with. Either colleges blindly walking into situations and just figuring out how to survive from there. And when you I mean when you meet a man. They've cut throat. One would think one thing that would mean your Davis Right. Yeah Yeah you'd think so but I guess you just you're not really process and what's going on you put in an adult position but you don't have the capacity of adult you're not really thinking and so yeah that was Read right away your leg. He was cute. I wanted to get his number wanted him to have my number. I mean what was that immediate whole that La- because that's would start to lead you down the real hell you went into. I think like he was just really good about and now I can see it like you know we would have conversations. It was about me like up until that point I had learned how to present myself to men in order to get what I wanted from them. So you know I would usually just listen to them. Listen to certain key words and then just say every now and then something but with him. It was me being able to talk about you. Know my innermost desires my thoughts and and things like that and I was like oh well. He's interested in me and you know that that's all I had been looking for someone who saw me someone who was interested in me. Someone who accepted me and all he really did was just sit there and be quiet and let me talk but get the first man who's listening to me and it's so powerful and you feel like affirmed in seen right for the first time right. Yeah that kind of starts to suck you in. Oh yeah quickly. Like very quickly within his face days like all of a sudden it was like you know. I didn't want to see him for an hour. It was like on the second day. Let's spend the whole day together you now but it quickly becomes very treacherous. Because he's you know his friend is using you and then he doesn't believe you. He believes his friend is almost rapidly. He starts sort of pimping you you sleep with him. You say I mean why did you? I mean I guess you accept that because you don't think anything of yourself and like the crazy thing is like you know he was saying all these things and I'm like well no I'm not I'm not a sled like whatever saw really didn't like constantly like accepted as truth and whenever you know it would be like. I was doing what I was doing. It was like a whore. I'm not I'm not doing this. I'm prostituting like this is not what I'm doing. I'm just you know going out and getting some money from a guy like you just kinda rationalize things in a way were like later. You're looking back and it's like what was what was that. And Yeah like that was definitely the turning point. The I can't remember what I call them in the book but I'll just say with his friend Yeah that was definitely the turning point when things just turned ugly and I almost think like now like you know they plan that or something like was that just the excuse. Randy's openly start acting that way with me But I don't know so. I guess maybe readers they can attempt for themselves. Tell me what they think I mean you. You want one wonders. Why didn't she run away? But where would she have gone? Yeah there's the where would I have gone? You know my mother's home. Of course. Her door was always open but there was a part of me that was like going home. Abi Accepting defeat it would be saying you know failed. I know I told you that I was capable that I was grown and I didn't need all the structure that I wasn't a little girl because I wanted to be an adult but really the truth was wasn't Tino. I just couldn't admit that I was a child and then I didn't need to be at home. I didn't need to be in school. I wasn't ready for that anymore. So there was a question of where would I go? And then there's a part of you that doesn't want to leave you know and people who haven't been in situations like that they don't understand you always hear people when they're looking at domestic violence situations. Will he hits you girl? I just leave? Why would you say that stupid? And unless you're in that situation you can't understand like you don't you always think well it's GonNa get better. Bike will is just a little hiccup or I was tripping and I understand why he did. You make explanation. She make excuses. And you're always just kind of hoping you just have that hope that things are going to change and it keeps you there. I mean just a lot of people. Some people have strife with their mom. And you think about leaving a WANNA leave. What is the difference that that led? You actually leave when so many other people like are hate my mom but I'm not gonNA run away from her. I think it was because I had a taste of something different so actually ran away from a facility. So I wasn't at my mom's house when I ran away the first time and who wants to be locked up you know and so once I ran to the facility and was out and I was able to move around how wanted to. I can make all these decisions. It was just like like every teenagers. James. I didn't have somebody telling me to clean up my room or I needed to go do my homework or I couldn't wear this out of the house like I could do whatever I wanted to do. And so when I got caught on the run and of course went back to my mother's house. Then it was back to okay so you need to get yourself together because you got school in the morning. It's like what sees me. I don't WanNa go to school. And of course I would not ever ever in any circumstance to be allowed to smoke weed. At my Mama's I wouldn't even know where to get it like in my neighborhood from home like in my mom's neighborhood. I didn't know people they were doing that. Were I lived in Clarksville so I wasn't running from her house. Iran toured the things that I was trying to get involved with. And so that's the difference is that I have that taste of something different and it just kept calling me back in the book and you know you remind me of of of Assata Shakur book in that you know. There's so many heavy things happened to her and then in the central moment that sensor to prison. You're like something horrible happened. Let's move on. We're not going to go through the specifics of what happened that night. But then the next night year like we're GonNa get away with this right and then police arrive at your door. And what is that moment like you know? Honestly I didn't even think like okay. I could get in trouble for this. I know what I felt. I felt like I was defending myself. Like I didn't expect for the police to come knocking at my door. I didn't expect that and then like whenever the police came to talk to me. They were all like what happened like what was going on and did he. Are you in Llamas like well? Yeah this is what happened. I'm thinking they understand like this is okay it self-defense. I'm not going to get in trouble but every thought is to protect. Yeah well that was my first thought whenever whenever the answer. The door like how he acted. I'm not gonNA talk too much about but you know that was my first reaction and so my mind like everything was okay. I'm not GonNa say this and that really came up when they were asking me specific. Details that manny your room. What were you doing with the man picked you up anything that could lead back to cut? It was like oh well well. It wasn't that and to the point of just being ridiculous whenever the police arrested me. I even told him I was nineteen. Because you know that's what Gut had taught me if you're arrested in nineteen because obviously he was an adult But they quickly found out I was sixteen. And even after that you know you find out you found me. I was naked in the hotel room. Like that's how you found me. And when they found out I was sixteen he was still there with them because they had arrested as both for questioning taken us. Both in for questioning arrested me to remember questioning any then. You didn't feel the need to follow up at all so there was never like any kind of instinct with them to kind of like figure out what's going on. They never looked at me as someone who is being exploited you know possibly a trafficking victim like none of that to this day the detective. He still doesn't feel that way he feels I was. She was choosing to be out there prostitute and she knows she was doing your thank you old enough to make these decisions right right so. I mean just just in terms of the decision making process the way you describe it. It's almost like a sort of hypnotism where he's like. Hey girl go through this and like okay. Yeah and it's like you know people think. Oh well I've heard like I was in a sex trafficking ring and when you think about things like that it's like you know. These people are taking captive and Steph Mike. When you're dealing with somebody who was as vulnerable just young girls period are so vulnerable but like that I was dealing with internally like you don't have to like all it takes is a little bit of Nessin like that's it and that's all you gotta do and when there's so few people in the world who are showing you attention and showing you. I don't to say love I guess. At that point you received it as love even though it was not that is like. Trish clean water when your thirsty right? Yeah and then I had all these skewed like understandings of relationships. I didn't have like any sort of people showing me attention. They're all kinds of creepy old man. They were showing me attention. You know walking down the street to the store I would get that attention and are never really felt like they wanted me. They're paying attention to me so when I got that with him it was like. Wow this is what I want and I had all these unhealthy ideas of our relationships about you know you're supposed to find this man. Your ultimate goal in life needs to be that this man is GonNa take care of you like. That's that's that's where you're trying to make it to. Of course you see like in the book Raga and but a man also like someone who can bring to the table so I had all these like different things that were going on my mind and was like okay. This is my chance at a real relationship and every time when I would go out and I will come back with this money like I'd be like okay. Let's really going to be impressed. He's really GonNa let this. It's GonNa make him so happy you know that I've got this money number back to them like I can bring some detail. I'm contributing to the relationship like all these sick things that you're telling yourself is just not true but you know at the time like I was a kid and of course like nothing was ever enough. It didn't make them happy. Like love was not on the table period. And you had you described these ideas about sex that you got from watching porn. Yeah when you were much younger than that Talk about that part of it. Yeah so I had found A tape a porn tape and I would watch and it was so fascinated by it and then like on the Internet. I just kept watching. I was like ten years old when I started watching porn. And obviously it's not telling you like yes this needs to happen between two consenting adults and you need to make sure you do this and the other like it doesn't and so just you just kind of think like Oh this is what happens and these are all the moments like that when I close my eyes on H. B. O. shows my mom. Close my eyes. This is what's really happening. This is what they're keeping from me but here I was actually doing and I didn't understand anything that it really was. It was just kind of do something to do and so here I was having sex with people just because just because it was something to do not because I was attracted to them. Not because there was some kind of bond. They're just doing it. And it gives you a currency in the world right you something to allow you to get something from the men around you. Yeah and so and I remember the first time like something like that happened where it had been an exchange. You know the guy that had helped me run away from the facility and he was like come on and I was like okay. Like really didn't even think like Don WanNa do this. Should I do this? It was like okay. I guess this is what we're doing so you feel like you owed him because he helped you escape. I guess like I guess this is what's supposed to happen. I really didn't think anything through it and I didn't have anybody. Obviously at that age bomb wasn't telling me about stuff like that. Why would she think that her twelve year old daughter her thirteen year old daughter was doing things like that? In in retrospect do you think your mom failed you or you failed to hear her. I don't think my mother felt me at all you know. She was constantly trying. You know when she would get called up to the school. She was asking the school what she could do. They gave her no answers. You know when I was locked up in the juvenile court amon. She had to go to court with me. She was asking for help. You know anything that they had said that she needed to do she was doing. She enrolled me in counseling. And things like that so she tried but there was so much going on within me by the time that it really presented itself to that level that it was just I mean everybody like always says like you know parents felt like parents are not the only place that kids get influenced of course not so like there was so going on at school there was stuff going on with my peers like there was all kinds of stuff that was coming in and then there was the trauma of you know. Phil FIT ANYWHERE UP. Feeling that came from this lady. That you know is is some mystery lady who I was adopted from and like what is that about. Who am I so there was all kinds of issues? That were going on that. I really didn't even know how to communicate at the time so I wouldn't say that that she felt me at all because she didn't know what was going on with me. That's all that she used to say what's going on. Why are you doing this when you're going through your trial? You didn't really think that it would not go your way right you kind of you. It seems like you're kind of in a daze of not really understanding like the gravity like you kind of knew on a top level of your mind have been but in a deeper level. It still seems like this is GonNa work out right. They're going to understand right. Yeah because I mean you got gotta think I have been praying like so hard I was like that's not GonNa get me this God's not going to let me the rest of my life in prison and then like you know you go onto the trial and you know it's going bad you kind of see these things but then you cling to every good thing he claimed like Oh this person look this kind of way so that must mean that must this and well. I'm thinking the worst that can happen is probably gonNA just be manslaughter. Maybe at the worst second-degree murder which is fifteen years and so I go into it. I'm thinking okay. I'm GONNA get good news. And then they say life and it's like asking me say what when they did when the jury comes in and says guilty on three counts right feeling like I was just like I'll tell you this so like we were sitting there. You're supposed to rise and everything out of the jury leaves like we were not. Sania so like I was like we were all like really upset because it was like Ma'am like these people didn't hear at all you know like they didn't hear nothing that we had to say. And what do you mean I'm Gonna I'm it's been life in prison and it was so automatic like normally you get convicted and then you have a sentencing hearing but because it automatic life sentence with you know the first degree murder conviction. He said it right into her. Automated Life in prison. I'm like wait. What like what just happened. Are you serious and you know? I'm just sitting there. You got these cameras ch Ch ch in your face and it's like really people really right now so just so much going on. I mean I can't imagine the the heart sink feeling. That would come from wait. They just said guilty and he just said life what the Hell is going on right now and then you don't want to cause. Da that was just pretty much taunting me from the beginning. You don't want him to see me. You know upset and so I'm like I'm not him to cry. He's not he's not going to see it so I just sat there to stone vase because he was not gonNA. I wasn't GonNa let him another. He got to me and I didn't believe it and I was like you know. I'm just justifying. I'm not GONNA do life in prison what they had say. God's GonNa give me out of this and that's when I went back to my cell and you know I prayed I said if you get me out of here I will tell the world about you. Did you have a sense of faith in God at that moment after everybody? I mean you had been at that point in the book you have described being raped more times than one count. You described people doing you wrong more times than I could count. It seems like almost everybody who come into contact with Is doing you wrong? And then you know the. Da You feel like as a personal vendetta against you. The jury doesn't hear you. The Judge Amelie sends you away forever. How do you have any sense of faith in God when it seems like your mother is the only person who's been nice and sweet to your entire life? Yeah well and I think you know guy was acting to her a lot of times but I think we blame God for a lot of things. He has nothing to do with. A lot of things are on decisions there due to you know the enemy. He's busy and that's that's not of God and you know God was voice. That was getting me through. That was telling me you're not going to do that time. That was giving me those. Those kind words from my mother like the small kindnesses from certain people. You know that that that was God. You know go wasn't responsible for everything else. But what he did is what was meant for my bad. He turned around for the good but he did. He did it in his in his. I've I was. I was in wonder you know when you get convicted too. Something massive like that in that first night when you close your way and it's like Oh my God like I'm here rest of my life and like what is that moment that first night like I mean it's hard I just I just made up my bed half. I didn't even make it up the whole way and I just say there and cried and that's all you can do like you know just stuff your face in the pillow and cry because it's like what just and you can't even really fully process it you just can't and just. I mean it's hard it's rough. I especially when you get to the prison and you see what it's like and you see what you're missing out on family and it's just miserable and they're like it's miserable and you're like man you mean to tell me like this is going to continue until. I die like really like who because nobody video in years in prison? Who's GonNa last long so it's just like I? It's horrible it's miserable and you can see. I mean there are older women there. Yeah so you can see like yeah and you know. A lot of the women like who have been there. Of course. There were women who've been there twenty years and the thing you have some hidden in there like thirty years like there. Was this one woman you know. Poor Miss Emma and her mom just gone and I can't remember her from when I started my time house. She was just so full of life and just to see her tier. You're right in that way. And bless her heart you know. She's always saying like going across full. She thinks she's going home. And it just breaks my heart and it's like man she's not like I mean you know. God can intervene. God can but it's like any time she gets backed up to move somewhere. They tell us she's going home so she'll go and it's just so sad like it's so sad and it's like wow this is like really like a helpless flies like this clearly the devil's playground like where we are right now. He's the devil's playground. But the the prison experience you describe does not seem like the hell that some other people have described in their prison time. I mean and it's hell but I've heard about what you make with it and that's the whole thing for me. I decided that I don't care where I'm at. I don't care what the circumstances are. I'm GonNa live a meaningful life and so like what you read. Is You know me navigating trying to find that me searching for the? How do I do that in this place? Like how do that and do you do that? It's hard it's hard you know I started. I didn't even know what to do. I'm attorney hit said you can just completely give up. You can run around and you can be fighting and you can do drugs or you can get in every program that you can and I said well I'm GonNa do that. So of course. I had a setback at first. But you know once. I decided that I was going to get on the right path. I joined every program. I could join the anger. Management Class. Didn't work out for me. Well and then I got into lips. Come and like that really started. Yeah Lipscomb was the prison college program and that really just started turning things around and the reason that was so effective is that you know I was dealing with a lot of issues still coming from the situation with my self worth and the things that I thought to myself and so when it started to show me like what I could do when it started to tell me like you know we believe in you enough that we're going to invest in you. We think you're worth salvaging and it was like. Wow it a minute and I found a community of people and that really helped me like lipscomb was like Ma little psych my little refuge with all the craziness and stuff. There was like drama going on. I just go do homework. I just go steady and you know for a while like that's that's where I found my strength. There's a moment. Where did you talk about having that faith in God that first night but then you need somebody who's truly religious and she tries to speak to you about God and you're basically? Where did you say something like you know? God doesn't care about me so I don't care about right something to that effect anytime seabrook's Yeah and I wouldn't say Mississippi religious. I would say that you know. She is a follower of Jesus. I've come to find that there was a big difference in that order but yeah you know. She told me like when you come to. Jesus that's when you'll be free and I'm like Assad is going to happen like when the court says that you know. My attorneys have argued. Well win this appeal like that's when I'll be free. Obviously that was a lie. 'cause that that's not that happen but Y- I was still thinking in these terms of you know he didn't answer my prayer back then so he must not hurt me. So maybe there's not even one at all. Maybe there's not even a god at all and like I breaks my heart like where I wasn't that point but he still didn't let go of me like he said give up on me even though I started to give up on him and it wasn't until I learned about having a relationship with him until I learned about how he does things. Not How we think of things and how they should be done but how he wants them to be done and at that time you know I wanNA myself to be free. But the way that he did things in the end. It's in a way that other people can be free like there's so many other people that can benefit from from what's happening right now and he set this all up. It's nothing that I've done and got. I didn't put myself here. He did that. You remind me of that. What do you want to call it a parable or when you know when there was only one set of footsteps on the beach where were you? Then Jesus carrying I was carrying. And that's in. You lived there. Oh yeah absolutely and you don't notice that till afterwards because you think like you left me like you didn't do this for me you know. And it's like wow at a blow your mind when you look back and you see just that he was there the whole time and like when I when I felt that conviction in my heart it was like wow man. Mike. I'M LIVING FOR HIM. From this point on and you know nobody is ever. GonNa tell me anything different because I know I've seen it. It's been so real to me and you know I have that encounter like I think everybody who liked comes to know the ruinous God they have that encounter was like Whoa. You just can't deny him then was real. What is that moment for you to tell her? Can they read it? Please tell us okay. So you've heard of Joseph right in the Bible So you know he he dreams and and then it actually comes to pass. Well you think these things that happened in the Bible like Okay Great. That happened like cool cool story. I believe it may have happened but that was back then. I don't see that now. That's not really reality. And then it happens to you so. I happen to have a dream in Memphis and it happened in reality like literally like down to the very last detail. It came true and it was like. Whoa that was creepy. And I'm so glad I had actually one of the other girls with dream was you know and then it was after that that it came true. So she was like. Oh like that's creepy and then it happened again a second time and so when it happened the second time she was like okay now. This is freaky like something's going on here. And it was scaring the crap out of me too and like when that happens like that. It's like okay. There isn't a rational explanation for this because I had come to the point where I try to explain everything away. Try to find a rational explanation for everything and you just can't explain that like that's that's something else like that. Is God like all day long and I was like. Oh crap I this is real. He's real and you know it would still take some time after I met my husband and you know we started talking and I started like discovered that I had actually become angry with God because you know he told me I was like. I'm angry with guide your trip in and he was like issue. I was like I'm not. I just don't believe that and I believe in the universe I don't believe in all this other stuff and just he was like man Mike. Do you know Jesus I was like well. Yeah like I know but I know what I've heard about him and this time the other and some of the lies that you're told and he was like have you read that in the Bible. Did you see that about Jesus? I was like well no and so then I started actually read about him. I started to actually learn from from the Bible and I was like Wow i Jesus is dope. You know Jesus you know. He went through the Justice System. To absolutely like he was he was executed. He was traded so unfairly. And you know just broke my heart because I was like man like he is my brother like and they lie about him all the time like to this day there about him. Like what else have I been learning? What else have I been told that I've just been accepting and this is just like everything else that I had come to accept about myself from what other people were telling me and like. That's not true and so it just changed my whole life. I really it just completely changed the way and everything. So your husband is here review How did y'all meet Jesus? So he wrote me while I was in prison he Saw Documentary about me on you too. And he wrote just to tell me that he was praying for me But also he said you know God wants me to tell you that he is bigger than any sentence. He's bigger than any judge jury and he's GonNa get you out of here and when I read when I read the letter words like when I was packing myself up To send home from prison by just reading. How prophetic it was. It took me back to that place when I had that dream because he had mentioned he said the more people start. Hearing your story the more the world is going to start praying for you and you know this way is support is gonNA come in and at the bottom of the page. He had actually wrote free. Sin Toya Hashtag twenty seventeen. This is January. That didn't happen until November. So it's like Bro. I this is crazy. You know and that's one of the things we had actually like bonded over. And I started like listening to what he had to say about his experiences with God and his understanding of God and I was like wait a minute like I had that experience to. He's had dreams to he's heard the voice of God as well and like stuff that you can't explain it was like wow wait a minute so. I'm not the only one so I'm not crazy. I'm not an job. Not skitso and he was like no. You're not and you know it's just. It's been history since then how did you? How did this relationship develop? And how did you know how to love and how to receive love? Yeah so the relationship developed over the wave. This is January two thousand seventeen. So it'd be about three years in in January. It'll be three years we've been married for almost a year Writing letters talking on the phone. Spinning and gobs of money his money on global tail link very expensive so yeah we just got closer by you. Know he's my best friend. He's been my best friend by the Times imprison like he was there. He was the one that called. He was the one that I cried. Like twenty four seven talked about everything and you know just like we just got close. How did you? How did you have the ability to trust a man after so many men almost every man in the book mistreating you? Yeah and so. That really happened to like when I when I joined lips. Come you know early early. My sentence I think I started like two thousand nine around that time like this was the first time that I had actually been around people who were okay you know. I had always had a negative experience with people who call themselves. Christians always felt judged always felt that I wasn't good enough to be in their company that I wasn't good enough to be. You know a quote on quote Christian and when I came around them and I could just see like wow like. These are genuinely good. People like they don't judge me and they tell me that the reason they don't is because Jesus sent them like well you know this is. That's interesting and then also the men who were in the program like they weren't coming at me like they are attracted to me. That's what I become used to and I was like. Wow they don't want anything from me. These these people like really just want to be a friend like this man. He has a wife and he's actually loyal to her. He's faithful to her. That just wasn't my experience and I had come to have this like negative worldview. And they just turn that upside down. So I'm like wait a minute. This isn't how the world is. This isn't how life works and so I had to come to that process where it was like. I'm not going to allow you know cutthroat. Who's dead in ground to continue having power in my life? I'm not GONNA do that. I'm not going to let all these men who treated me the way they treated me to dictate how I am moving forward. I'm not going to let them rob me of a chance to have healthy relationships And so I had dealt with all that by the time. Jamie had come around now. I didn't think that I would actually be in a relationship while I was still in prison. Because you know women's prisons sny exactly especially as he is so you know it was. It was just by the grace of God the way that it came through. Would you did have a relationship. Not that's too big a word. You did much too big a word you be were. You did sleep with one of the CEO's and it's interesting because in that situation you immediately like this is wrong. Yeah right much faster than in the other situations where when men were stealing sex from US stealing your body in this situation like this is wrong. Yeah because like I knew better like Affeldt Disgusting Mike. After that and it was like brawl like. What are you doing like you just did this to try to make yourself feel better and some like I'm just putting a band aid on something and I was like? Why would I do that? And you know that's when I was like okay obviously. There's something here that I haven't done this. There's something here and I had to think that I can't like allow myself every time like I feel like my self worth is down or it's been attack some kind of way. I can't like put a band aid on it. I need to address. Like whatever is within me. I need to find out like where am I gonNA put? How view myself because apparently like I've been basing it on other things like things that that are GonNa follow away? Everything will come. Everything will go. Everything will change. And you know it wasn't until like. I said I started viewing myself the way Jesus says the way God does that. Things started changing. You know what I mean. I've interviewed a bunch of people who did a lot of time. You did fifteen years and I generally find them to talk about feeling institutionalized that the experience continues to weigh on them after they are free Are there ways that you you find that the long confinement and the prison experience continues to weigh on you Now only in the point that you know I want others freon others to experience it freedom but as far as like being institutionalized no like because I want to be in the first phase like no I. Didn't I think like when people will institutionalize in like when you're in prison you see people that are so institutionalized? They get comfortable where they are. I was never comfortable like from the moment I walked in. I'm like this Mike. I'm not trying to be here like this is where I wanna be. How do I get out of here like okay? I'm ready to go home. You hear a lot of people in prison. You know who are institutionalized. They say well if I get out or if I wanted to always say when I get out when I get out this this is not my life. This is not what it's going to be so in my mind you know. I always think about being free. Avid lay in my bed. And I would envision it constantly on the beginning of my time. That's all I wanted to do was lay down and just daydream. And just think about freedom like it was always in my mind so now being freeze his natural to me like it's natural like no tissue is I don't miss it at all. Not One bit. It was it was in your mind but when when it starts really catching fire out in the world and you become a symbol. What was that like when you start to feel like there's a larger and larger group of people who are saying this was wrong. She needs to be free. What is that like for you? You know saying how like so many people started like voicing. Have they felt about it? You know it was. It was so affirming that there are people in this world who see us here in prison and I didn't see them as speaking out just for me but for all of us and so every person in prison like they're constantly waiting for the loss to change like they're always in the law library looking. They're always watching on the news anytime. There's a whisper of a bill being presented to decreases to change. You know the schools on drug laws. Anything like they're always like clinging onto it and so like whenever this was happening there was other women like Oh my God this is it girl. Things are going to change God's about to open some doors and so it was like yes like pray like pray be God's will But then there's an element like it makes you nervous because you're like it's GONNA turn out bad or you know. There's a lot of people who don't believe in reform. There's a lot of people who don't think the system is broken like. Is this going to bring them out of the woodworks? Are They GonNa Kinda plant their feet in the dirt and be like no? We're not doing this So it was definitely a time where I had to stay focused on God and just pray that his will be done. Whatever it was and just trust that. 'cause you did become this big symbol and you know. I I was talking about you. I was aware of you. A lot of people. Were like aware of you for a while. It seemed like when we were agitating to To get Nelson Mandela Free. And it was like it was an idea. We didn't think that he was actually going to be released. And I felt like you know there was a growing sense of like season Sawyer. Brown is symbol of what is wrong with the system but with this actual person going to be released. Well I I don't know but like this see in this attention around. What's wrong with the system in the world is laid on your name but unlike she actually GonNa get free. I mean you know. I don't know yeah I am. I mean you know when you start to see you know. Actual superstars are spreading the name spreading the word. And Are you like? Oh this could actually happen. This thing. I've been dreaming of could actually happen. I didn't necessarily see the superstars and and think that it could actually happen. I saw you know just everybody what was happening and I thought that it was important. That people were talking about change but for me personally. It scared me because I know we heard from the governor's office that that wasn't helpful. You GotTa think in his position he. He is a public servant. Like he's a government official. He can't be seen as showing people favoritism. Because there's an outcry you can't be seen as like I'm GonNa make decisions based on tweets. Like he can't do that so it's like. Oh crap like what if I didn't know anything about governor has them at the time I didn't know if he was going to be like well. I'm GonNa do this and deny it just so people don't think that I'm making this decision based on this and so like it scared me it really did you know but I just thank God. The governor has them as a man of faith to and the whole process. He was listening to what God was saying. He looked at everything and my file and he didn't base his decision. Off of you know someone's tweets or anything like that. He based it. Off of the steps that I had taken to rehabilitate myself. He base it off of what the Lord told him. This is what he should be doing. He looked God first and then thought of himself as a politician. Second and so. I just thought that was really incredible. Just another example of how you got anybody anybody he can change anybody's heart he contains anybody's life around there. Nothing he can do when they come to you. And tell you okay. He's going to sign the paper. You'RE GONNA get out. You're going to get a date. What is that feeling? It was so I knew it like when I was walking. It was so crazy there was a girl pod and you know. I think the tense but this in the book but all my Thursday. She woke up that morning and I had looked at it and there was something in her that I just saw and she was like. It's a good day today. Was like it is going to be a good day today and the weekend goes by and then Monday morning. I'm call down to meet my attorneys and the same girl is sitting in a chair names. Tiffany and she say go and get your blessing girl and I was like this is it. I'm about to go and saw go down. And you know my attorneys. Tell me that I'm going home while I'm waiting for them to come in you know. I'm just praying thanking God I'm I'm stepping won't fade them like I receive it. I know about to go home. I know that this is they come in and tell me but then later they let me know that the governor had called them to their office on that Thursday to tell them that he was to make the announcement Monday. So you know I thought back to when she said Yeah I was like man that was the Holy Spirit. All Day Long Yeah the day when you get out. It's one thirty in the morning right that they come and say okay. I'm on leave your cell and put on your clothes and walk out. And what was that like? It was good like every asking me the craziest question like the day before and everything are you excited. Are you excited? And I'm like Bro. Like of course. I'm excited like I'm going out. Like Gotcha Miracle Yes. I'm excited but like you couldn't really tell like. I was just so calm and peaceful too excited and I was and they thought like you know you're not gonNA sleep tonight. Of course I did. I was knocked out mouth open and everything I came and got me so I hurried up and I went and got myself together. Had already given everything away like when I tell you I was bare bones. It was bare bones. I pretty much everything away. Even before you know I heard when I was stepping out on faith it's like Lord gave away everything and I gave them a good lip gloss. You gotta come through. You GotTa let me out so I pretty much thing but what I had to take with me which is pretty much. Nothing didn't want anything from that prison. Come with me can have it and you know got ready went over there. It is house free what it's been some of the biggest adjustments of the last couple of months because as you away for a long time the world changed a lot. There was a got expensive. I'll tell you that like can so expensive. It's gotten so crazy and apparently I'm like super cheap like in my mind. I didn't. I didn't really know that I've never really had to spend money for anything. I still don't listen to Tom. My husband's good but still like when you go to the store I have my little shopping lists and everything and it's like yeah give me some Velveeta and some of this and then you get in the store and they'll be like twelve dollars like oh no honey. I'm not getting mad. I'll get this stuff. The Bell Beata or whatever. The knockoff is. I'm not getting that but it's just ridiculous. Like prices are crazy. I've never had to deal with like health insurance like having to get my own health insurance so I was sixteen. I was on my parents. Took care of all that so having to look at my husband about things like this and it's like what like four hundred five hundred dollars for for something I may not even need and I have to have it. Like that's ridiculous. Was the thing you wanted to do like when you woke up and your free. What was something that you're like? I A walk round my hair my head and just be free. Mike really nothing like Oh i. WanNa go ice skate. You know nothing like that. I just I just wanted to like. I wanted to cook them out on kitchen like what I wanted to cook with without having enough pay somebody in the kitchen. Give me onions and garlic. I wanted to have everything that I needed and just make what I wanted. Walk around mcgown. All Day. You Know My little bonnet on and just chill. And that's that's what I do most time. So what do you want to do with the rest of your life to honor the experiences? You've come through what I now I do every day. Like you know. Just telling everybody about it. So many people don't understand like what really goes on like when you're going through that like there's a superficial understanding Some people like pay attention to a little bit and then they just move on to something else you know but you know just like really speaking out like speaking with girls speaking with young people Spending time with him. What is the message that you want them to get? Well with the girls ask with in particular. You know it's that you don't you don't have to work so hard being except it's okay like if you don't then who cares like who cares there's always gonna be somebody that has something negative to say about you. There's always gonNA be somebody that says like you don't belong here. Are Your this summit. Always GonNa try to take you down like if you just try to cater to everybody is. You're always going to be miserable. Like you definitely have to find like who you are for me was finding who I am in Christ to where I'm okay like. I don't care what people have to say about me like I just don't I know that I'm walking in a way that he's called me to walk. I'm trying to live to please him. And that's where it is and you know I tell them time like you are loved and you are okay just the way that you are just the way that you are. We talked about how at the beginning of this experience. Yourself image was zero. There's nothing so what is it. Now what do you think of yourself now? I mean I'm I'm pretty don't just saying let me. I live me. I think I'm pretty awesome. Thanks to Toya for a great interview and thanks to you for listening. Toray show gives you fuel to power your dreams because you can use your dreams like a rocket ship to blast you into a life. You never imagined you can make your dreams of reality and this show can help. I'm on twitter at terrain on instagram. Toray show please leave her view on I tunes. It really helps and tell your friends about the show Tori shows written by me Taurean produced by Jackie. Garofano our editors Ryan Woodhall and our photographer is chuck. Marcus were distributed by entertainment and we will be back next Wednesday. No doubt with another amazing person because the man can't shut us down with candy crush saga the crush. Israel. For the first time ever we're celebrating real crushers and their inside the game. Find out why they love playing complete levels inspired by them and win rewards. They chose for you for a limited time. Only see why the crush is very real with candy crush saga download now from the APP store or Google play for free ends may twenty seventh to selected players level. Twenty five and over.

Steph Mike Jesus attorney Toya Brown La freese Tennessee Davis Assata Shakur rape Lipscomb WAN twitter Memphis Bell Beata Randy
Ep 68: Hometown: A conversation about race with LaToyia Brown, Monica Pickens, and Danielle Williams

10 Things To Tell You

1:08:41 hr | 6 months ago

Ep 68: Hometown: A conversation about race with LaToyia Brown, Monica Pickens, and Danielle Williams

"I'm Laura Tremaine and I have ten things to tell you. Any! You have ten things to tell. This show is about connection with each other and with ourselves, and the hope is that the things we talk about here will be fuel for better conversations and a personal awareness. This is an interactive podcast. Each episode has a prompt and a topic that I want you to take to journal text to your best friend or answer on social media using the Hashtag ten things to tell you. This is a show about digging deeper and sharing our stuff I'll go i. Welcome to this episode of the ten things to tell you podcast the conversation today is something that has been in the works for years now and I was so glad to finally record it with a few of my hometown friends last week. If you've been around my blog or podcast very long at all. You know that I grew up in small, town Oklahoma. Technically for most of my childhood I lived in a small small town called MMA, dill population four thousand. But for lengthy reasons that don't have anything to do with what we're talking about today. I went to school and eventually lived in a town called ardmore. which honestly by home standards? It's not really that small the population. There's about twenty five thousand. But comparative to cities and suburbs. Small community. Ardmore is located on interstate thirty five. It's about halfway between Oklahoma, city and Dallas, so I grew up having to drive nearly two hours to get to an airport, but we all get out to the lake and just fifteen minutes. I've lived in Los Angeles for almost nineteen years now, but growing up in Oklahoma. It's just a huge huge part of my identity, and it is something that I talk and write about a lot. And a few years ago in twenty, seventeen I flew back to Oklahoma for my twentieth. High School Reunion. Yes you can do the math I. AM forty years old. I thought that the reunion was going to be fun, but it really ended up. Amazing mainly because I got reacquainted with some of the women that I'd grown up with, but basically hadn't really kept up with besides maybe being facebook friends in decades, and we just had the best time together, laughing and reminiscing immense so so much. About six months after that high school reunion is when I started to create the racial bias series with my friend. Yasmeen on my former podcast called smartest person in the room. Now if you don't already know about it, the bias series on smartest person in the room. It's an eight episode conversation between friends. I am a white woman, my friend, yes, mean is a black woman and we met in our book club. She taught me so much the history behind the racial divide that we were seeing in America. This was after the death of Trayvon Martin and Michael Brown, and then the riots, Ferguson. And I was trying to better understand what was happening. Yes, means suggested that we make some of our private conversations public on my podcast at the time, and so we did. It was a really transformative time for me. Personally I learned a lot. I asked a lot of awkward questions. And as the protests are happening around the country now. I can see you. Guys are still sharing that series and I really hope that it is helpful to people who are listening a few years later. I will link to that by a series from twenty eighteen in the show notes. Now because I started making that series just a few months after our high school reunion at the time I reached out to some of my hometown friends most of them I've known since I was like eleven or twelve years old and I ask if we could get together in person to record a conversation about what their experience was like growing up in our hometown. By, then I was really learning that to stand people's experience. You have to ask them about it. Books are great. Movies are great I love hearing other people's stories in general, but to connect on a relational level to really understand someone or something. Nothing beats actually talking about it with them. And because some of these women were black, I really wanted to understand what their perspective was on our hometown, the Education Sports Church and lots of things. I was trying back then to make that. Conversation happened in person, and we never could find a time that worked while we were all in town, and so it just didn't end up happening and it didn't make it into the original bias series. But that same group of us has been chatting over Messenger during the coronavirus lockdown in the last few months, and so when these current protests started happening around the country in reaction to the murder of George Floyd I asked the ladies if we could have that conversation, and just do it over zoom instead, and three of them were able to join me last week. La. Toya Brown Monica pickens and Danielle Williams were so gracious to talk with me about growing up in small town Oklahoma. When and where they felt discrimination was present. What was taught in their homes in churches how we think about some of these issues now versus when we were children, what we're all teaching our kids when it's appropriate to even have conversations about race and bias. I am so grateful that they were willing to share themselves here with me. This show this podcast is all about connection through conversation, and this particular conversation is vulnerable and imperfect, because we are all humans. You will hear more than one of us have little revelations as we talk through some of the stuff and memories come back and opinions get really honest. At the beginning of the episode I left in a lot of our hometown specific stuff, we talk about our different elementary schools and some neighborhoods in town. These are the kind of details that I would usually cut because they don't make much sense to the general audience, but I left it in because I. Think you can hear us sort of working through some stuff together as we sort out our perspectives, a little bit in the beginning, and that's real conversation. Is You know inside? Left it in so that you can get a feel for the big picture? To quick caveats, this call was recorded over zoom with all four of us different places, so the audio isn't amazing. It kind of drops out a few times. There's sometimes some background noise. I hope that you'll bear with me on the sound quality front and another treat you will hear my Oklahoma accent back in full force, even more than usual when I am talking to other means. No apologies I just don't want you to be surprised. I had no idea what these women were going to say about our hometown. When I pressed record, the entire conversation was a surprise, but I'm so glad that we had it I encourage you to reach out to people in your life, people that you are already in relationship with and genuinely asked them about their life about their childhood and their perspective conversation is the key to connection, and so I present to you this one. Hey, guys, thank you so much for being here with me and having this. This interesting I hope conversation on the show. I've been wanting to do this for a couple years so I super. Appreciate you taking the time to talk to me this week. I Y you guys first to introduce yourself. Let's just start with toy. Add tell us just a little bit about yourself. Kind of like who you are now because we're going to do a whole throwback to our childhood and our hometown, but just talk to us a little bit about who you are these days missile Toya. Okay, so hello, everyone! I'm Toya Brown I of course. Originally from Oklahoma since then I have transitioned to Texas where I currently live. I have four beautiful children, and you know I'm down here. Loving the Texas live, I would call myself in a sparring actress, so you know. I have some plays under my belt I know that, yes, no. Some of the ladies back in March came down to support the play that I was in. It was very awesome. According to them I have one coming up in November so I'll get with you later on that Laura. So I'm just enjoying. The Texas life in and trying to stay on the stage. I love that so much. Okay, Monica Towel ask a little bit about you and who you are these days. Well I'm Monica pickens and I am a proud mother of a freshman in college We live here in Oklahoma City area. I am prior military a on now in oil and gas industry in so I do regulatory compliance for a energy company here and other than spending time with friends and family. Fund raisers and anything dealing with my son. That's pretty much what I do so i. look forward all my friends and family all the time. Okay, and now we had a new friend join Stan Yell. I talk. To. Do you just want to introduce yourself for the listeners and tell us a little bit about who you are these days? I'm Danielle Williams. I'm forty one. I have one child. His name is Mary H.. And I work at a doctor's office right now and I. Really like it. Yeah, I live here in Ardmore Oklahoma steal them pretty much. All I got on. Okay, so I'm so happy to have you three ladies here with me because you know. We got reacquainted at our twenty year high school reunion, which was in running seventeen and ever since then I've wanted to sit down and talk to you because we have. A shared experience in that we grew up in the same town, but the more I learn, the more I understand. I realized that. In fact, we probably had very buried different experiences growing up in ardmore. Oklahoma, which is a really small town in the southern part of Oklahoma and you know I guess I. Just want to be able to ask you some questions about it. Because when I was growing up, I was taught, you know the etiquette was impolite to say anything about race to say anything about color to ever acknowledge that there was a difference or not difference or like. Basically we just tried to not. Acknowledge it at all and. I understand that I think mostly came from a well meaning place of white people trying to pretend that they were. Not Noticing or something by. Now I understand that that is. Very unfair to you to you know kind of whitewash it out. SORTA take this part of your life and your experience out of the conversation so I guess I wanted to ask about some of these things. Let's start in elementary school. Let's just start in child. I went to Lincoln which was all white. I cannot think if I had a black classmate. Where did you guys go to elementary school? I was at Franklin, so I went. I started Franklin finish that Franken elementary I went to. We're Rogers I went to Franklin for two years till my second grade year and then I to row. Rogers were meal toy met. Brett will play going to real rogers like you said you went to Lincoln and Guess Lincoln was known as majority white community. Real, Rogers and Charles Evans Charles Evans was one of those ones back then to me, was my Jr. already the white keys real rogers I felt like it was my Jordi white as well, but you had our speckles of the the different colors, so we was a little bit more versatility, will rogers, but all in all what ruled reuss was the majority of the white he is, you know what I'm saying, so what I mentor you in maybe about three or four other black kids that went to school there. I was excited, but it did it again I didn't really care white or black. I was always like everybody. But I did notice the difference at young ages that. If you went to Lincoln, you must be why if you go to Franklin. That's where all the black kids go. Wall I was GONNA ask about that because. Even at that Young Age, I also knew that Lincoln was all white, and that Franklin was all black and to me. That's these are public. Schools were talking about, said a reflection of the way. The town is split up in two neighborhoods. and. That even think about that. I didn't neither. So it is true. But didn't. Did you have majority? Classmates Monica. I had a lot but I also a lot of white students with me. Because my neighborhood was, there was a lot of whites in my neighborhood, I lived on Gee Street northeast so when I went to Franklin Dowse, the neighborhood I lived in which was predominantly black, but when we moved to will Rogers district. That's win s why so I feel like Franklin was part of that quote, unquote the hood. And I guess I just never even really looked at that like that, but you never thought of the neighborhoods as being divided like split up in no I knew that, but just like not that we had majority of the black kids at Franklin like that I just didn't put that until we just literally said that I mean I, think about it because I felt like it was i. get so mixed right very well for me growing up I. I knew that this from you know just counted behavior. I knew I, didn't WanNa go to Franklin because of the myth of it being. Who could or you know low income or just you know that type of kids? They're bad kids so going to Rogers I. Really Thought I was kind of in a better school. Better School. Yeah, yeah! I feel like I was in a better school and then I always new Lincoln was kind of for me. It was like out of touch. Lincoln was never an option right this because that's where the you know if you will upper echelon. Is. We went to so I never had. I've never knew that was an option. I was actually happy with were Rogers though because it was a lot of diversity in like my childhood of learning and being most. It was it was all pay wasn't. We were outnumbered, but he it where it was so much, so that I couldn't relate to anybody. You know work, so I will. Rogers was a happy medium between Franklin and late. And maybe even Charles Evans so if you don't mind me asking, where do you think you got the idea about like? You knew you didn't WanNa? Go to Franklin and you felt like Lincoln was out of reach. Is that something your parents talked about? People joke about it in the community like where I mean you know our schools didn't. Really intermingle. They didn't have sports that played each other yet. Or whatever so like. Where did you get that idea? Okay, so so you're familiar with the agency Wilson send communities. uh-huh! Okay so at the community center bats place was just everything for me growing up because you know. A lot of black children attended their after school, and we all hung out. No matter what school you went to after school, we would all come there you know. And it was free of charge and free free. After school snacks in a free activities in all of that good stuff so naturally we would all hang out, but then we would have those discussions, or you know just child talk. Go to school. Yeah where you go to school and so when you find out that people that you know go. They go to a different school if Maybe, there's there were shared experiences all. We had a fight over here. They had a fighter. They did this and I was thinking. I. Don't WanNa. Go to that. Let's go into this childhood. Talk. I would say childhood talk to, but you know that will. You would go into a different environment. There is probably an adult at that time. May it said you know that's where all the white kids go? Are This? Is You know you don't want to? You know saying I feel like maybe I did maybe here that at home, but it wasn't enforced or anything like it was just idiots. What it is you know. Maybe it was say, but it wasn't i. was. It said like we are not going to hang out. WE'RE NOT GONNA go to the park in that neighborhood, because that's a white neighborhood like was it explicitly stated like that's a white neighborhood. We're not going. They're not necessarily in a bad way or maybe in a bad way I don't know like. What's the talk around that? I don't feel like I can only say this about my black environment that I lived in as I grew up with a black single mother, and to be honest, which my mom never talked about. Racism are a difference. We all were created same. She didn't say oh. That quote unquote white person. You know what I'm saying. It wasn't really talked about now. Mind you. I'm not GONNA lie now. Maybe there was maybe every blue moon you might hear. The were white shrimp or something like that, but as far as like racism are pointed out. Don't hang around with that girl because she's lying or anything like that. There was never an issue at all because it was never brought up because we're. To me. We're the type of culture that don't see. Nothing different about nobody else to me. In my mom still with me, were I mean I have violation child I mean? Honestly I didn't see color. You know so I feel like my mom never taught me to see different colors. She's always taught me to love everybody. Monica one about you and your home life like did your. Family members. Our community culture sort of talk about like. Racism are more or like. We are black. They are why like what was the what was sort of taught to you in that way? Okay Laura. Out My little bottle, heart feelings from back in when I was young. That I went through a lot of I gas, you can say. family because I always. more with white people than I did with black people. It's just me. This is why it's been so for me. Bomb New and I was always able to go out to a friend's House that live in plain view, staying spend weekends and stuff like that so I used to get teased though from my family for years, and so I had to deal with that for a long time. I mean we're good now that it really bothered me because I would get made fun of for like Avenue. Are. Went. Why people on or that's what my family members with you a you you you know, but at the time back then I. Don't think it was such a big deal. I was Gonna say that because when I blatantly remember my childhood, my best friend, she was white, so I never failed. Even though I knew there was a distinction as far as. The white over there the black over there. There's a mixture of the school that I was at, but it never was in. It wasn't like a Clinton. Play with someone or couldn't interact with someone because of their skin color at that age at that. I knew that we were you know we were different, but. I knew that I felt like you know that they get the white people or Lincoln. Kids got to do more because their parents were. You know wealthier have more money because you know. I grew up in poverty, so I knew from just an economic standpoint that there was a difference as far as color and stuff, but not just, but not that I didn't have access to play in talk and interact and love, and all of that with other white kids and stuff. And it sounds like it kind of sounds like you're saying. It wasn't even necessarily. Overtly tied to race like it was maybe more tied to money absolutely. Yeah Yeah I would say that I would say that to in armour's environment it may be different somewhere else, but our personal experience. I would say was all about the money. Yeah, but actually so encouraged to hear this. Because what it sounds like you're saying is that your family's in your community? Even if they teased you I, know want to consider they teach you, but they were. There was not like an overly. If, feeling that you could be couldn't be friends with rance way. There couldn't be comfortable with with white people. Did you ever get the feeling? 'cause sounds like you all had white friends and staff. Did you ever get the feeling that that that generosity was reciprocated that the white families were also saying I? Don't care who you're friends with to their kids I have one particular friend that will do I will say we're name. They I would not say their name. and. Have had to deal with not. Being is not being okay with being hanging with flatly. For whatever reason it came through like high school this. One her parents were okay with me, but not okay with other people. Other black kids dating mistreat me, but it was never okay for her to discount mingle with other kids, and definitely was not supposed to be a dating situation right right. I was Gonna get to dating in a second I. Feel like I was pretty ignorant to a lot of this stuff until I guess Middle School High School. And, so in our small town there's all these elementary schools, and then they come together or sixth grade in the middle school. Goes through high school, and so as all the schools come together, then that's when I guess I started to be more aware of when it might have been perceived as problematic in the community was the dating thing it wasn't. Other black kids. My parents never said a single racist thing that I can ever imagine in my whole life. But when other kids started dating when? Girls started dating. White Geyser. It seemed more often maybe because I just knew them better. The white girl started dating. Dating a black man, okay Farley! It was. Just, white girls the White House. They a black boys, and asked when I feel like genuinely when I started to to win, parents would have a problem with it, or there would be some drama around it. That's when I realized like Oh. That's mean that's like blatant racism. If you don't want your kid. You know what I mean and said that's and I was pretty old. I mean I would have been a teenager by the time that I was. Aware of that happening, so let's just get to that part. Will maybe back then I mean you gotTa think that was twenty six years ago? Maybe I was a little. Had Been Judgmental about some of that going on because. It's not necessary was taught in the home, but it was just what it was you. I'm date black man in you today, the white man or woman whatever I mean. It was Kinda light. It wasn't discussed, but it was almost like you already know that's supposed today I can have all the different color friends that you. Hang! You know what I'm saying. I knew that I probably need to bring a black man home. You know what I'm saying. Do I. think that my family would have been different now because I have other family members have brought a white girl home. We've always made me feel welcome way. Black communities are as they don't care what. You can come only it, but I did feel that I needed to probably bring a black man hall because I felt like at that time. That was probably the best bet I needed to do now when it started becoming. Obviously that you're noticing a lot more did I become a little relaxed about it. Yes, because I started seeing it more when I started happening. I did feel some kind of way at that time now. If it would have happened today in in time now, I would have been much better understanding. UNCON- with nap was I have no choice but to be Kuwit abroad white boy home and had a child with them. You say it, so I have to stop. My words ally my bills a lot because I do have if I racial child and I have to be. With having a BI racial child, even though I was already, but I got to be more understanding because he straight up says he's both gate, one or the other. He's both if that's what so. But I do believe that like I was just talking to. While ago like she had roping into that society is not gonNA. Look, at my chow, as both race. You'RE GONNA look at him as a black boy man, or whatever so she asked me. Why did you not stay? Which are Y boyfriend? At the time we were boyfriend girlfriend I said. You know why because I feel like. He didn't understand where I was coming from as a black warm. And so that kind of deteriorated our relationship because I felt like he didn't understand. Some of the I was going. You know what I'm saying in which he agreed on, he was like I didn't. I didn't know I didn't know you know what I'm saying so. Dating. I'm okay witty is if you're going to get in a relationship with a black man are white. Want Vice Versa whatever I want you to understand us. You know what I'm saying. Our Understanding Ju where you coming from where I'm coming from and be able to deal with that. As let's say, majority are white with black man. You GotTa understand where this man is going to be treated. How your children's going to be treated in what's Daily struggles? He has to go through going to work vehicle I. Mean just you know being a black mate. So that's the only issue I might have have is that if you're going to be a different race, know where they come from. No their struggles. Toya. Do you have thoughts on when the teenagers started dating? Different races. So let me back to like middle school ish going into high school. Personally I remember when I had my first little crush. On a white boy at the time I was wrong like I couldn't like him. It wasn't necessarily because my home life said no, don't date white. It was because of other people. Seem. To, FROWN UPON IT! You know what I mean I wasn't as comfortable, and that's kind of my first experience, developing the thought that it's not okay to interracial date, and then also another guy that I ended up having a crush on. From the white side of it I don't know if I was necessarily good enough for it was a hair thing I just felt like I didn't have. The white long hair used to put towels on my hair, growing up because I wanted white hair and I started that that was the way that you know that's how you get the white guy hair thing and i. know that sounds so crazy, but. That you will was just a big thing. Here is a big culture thing from a black perspective, and so I just felt like if I had that kind of silky hair, look than the white guy would want me in for whatever reason I just had a crush on him, but it never went any further than just a crush because. It wasn't openly accepted, or if it was accepted, it just felt uncomfortable, so I remember you know getting into high school. And I ended up dating a white guy. In I remember, we went out to eat at a restaurant in the looks that we got, it was so bad just from the tension that I failed in just the looks and stuff, or maybe even whispers that i. no longer was like I'm not. This is not for men, so even with that I kind of developed that even into my adulthood, even though love has no color. Even though I don't consider myself to be a racist, but because the world does not accept a racial so easily, don't want. I don't want my children to date outside of their race, not because I wouldn't accept it, but because of it's going to be so difficult. In this day and time winch, just like Danielle said I I don't have a biracial child, but I'm about to have a biracial grandbaby. In so that is definitely has opened up my eyes like you know what is going to be a whole lot of protection that's going to have to take place, because even though you know where the parents may accept it or whatever, but there's somebody along that best bloodline. Does. I grew up way back when that does not understand you know what I mean so dating to me is like it's like stick to your race. You know what you can't help who you love, right? Oh, I try to encourage that with my kids and my people. That I love you love you love. Don't worry about people, but that's easier said than done. Definitely is, did you? Did any of you ever feel? Unsafe in Ardmore on the east side. You might be new. Into the wrong. We was Kinda note I did see. Unsafe because back in the day whenever I was growing up is so different from today so back in the day we were walking the streets cases as they do not walk. They don't know what that means, but we I mean it was a pleasure to get out and walk to the park. Walk to the store or you know we will be in the. The streets and there never was like well earlier on. It wasn't like a danger thing, but as we got into like Middle School, and then the violence kind of picked up on the east side, there were shootings different drug activity, going on I wasn't necessarily exposed to it because I, had parents who very strict there was curfews. They didn't play them games. Like that but I knew there were other kids who other more scared than I was because I had protection. A sense of my parents were in my life both of them. That for me was Kinda my protection most I wasn't living in fear, even though I knew that there was some bad things happening on the side that I lived on Wine Murray. Were you guys involved in? Church culture growing up. Yeah, a little. Girl. Which Voice Which? Vacation Bible School. That was an usher at the choir. Though yes, I mean church was definitely embedded in from growing up to. A today. Near, very very important in even in that in and I will say this, Laura. Lord knows I love God with all my heart, but in my adult personal opinion Sunday is the most segregated day of the week meaning that we all to our own individual churches people who believe whatever you know, but we all go to our own individual churches in Alabama initial segregated, because heaven is not gonna be separated like that, but we do. congregate with majority, wider, majority, black, or mix churches and stuff like that, but it's just so separated, but yet churches definitely embedded in me. I knew across attracts in Ardmore. That was you know that's what we call this White Church? We don't. We didn't go to the White Church. We went to the. By churches, you know it would just like. We praise and worship different. We kinda believe different I think we love the same guy, but the way that we praise and worship was different growing up. I would go you know the stigma of come into a black church. White people will feel like you're going to be there all day. The White Church. You know it's going to be boring. They're not going to be you know in so bad stigma growing up as far as church you know. Experience OV- experienced, too. So I went to a majority white church in be in which I mean prior to that we majority black charts, but the end when my mom moved to town, and we move schools, and what night we started going to a predominantly white church, which really was just me and my aunt and my cousins, and we would only people there. And I enjoyed air, but I noticed that when I went to my black church tiny. You know totally different I. Feel like were uplifted at our church built at the White Church. You know that I mean. I experienced bowls. Do I feel like they're both different? Yes, but you know at the end of the day. They everybody loved God. You know it's a different experience. Always this experience. Okay, so, but what about in highschool I know? We're jumping around a little bit I'm kind of tracking through time as we're getting older and then in high school. It was still you know a little scandalous. If people dated outside of their race, but I ha- I can remember a couple of pretty prominent couples right now and so I guess. Maybe we started to get used to it, or it just wasn't shocking, or whatever, because there was some longtime couples. If you'll remember like, so, it started to sort of feel. You know not as a thing to think about so much anymore, but what I did notice. And I'm embarrassed to tell this story, but I'm to say. You is that. This cliche thing happened in Highschool in football world basketball world where? The athletes a lot of the best athletes were black. And then a lot of the all period, all of the cheerleaders and drill team and band like all of that was row row eight. and. I just started to notice like. If! You're a really good athlete in Oklahoma that's like celebrity status. And then there it was just a after the dating thing I think that's the next step of being of feeling like maybe people are being treated differently or looked at differently. The and then here's the embarrassing story when I really started like actually talking about, it was because. On the drill team which I had been on which drill team is like pom squad. We got one black person and that poor girl. Of course you guys now are. We. Pepper her with questions on the drill team bus go into some away game for two hours. We would just. Drive, her absolutely nuts I'm sure because we would ask for all kinds of questions, a little bit like I'm asking you now, but it was less appropriate like about her church about. You know decided town she lived on about I mean and they were well meaning. You're the waiter. Is that a perm or is that your real hair? Remember that we were on drill team together. So after that first initial person got there what after that? We gave out two or three, because I remember Maka Gera- she was on drill team senior year there ended up in. A Name Soya Mantra and somebody else was on their sneak, Colbert. Chime say on that I. WanNa you bring that up Laura I. Remember like you said it was. It was like. The black athlete whenever you know you were Kinda, like celebrity like you are very popular, and all of that good stuff, but a lot of their girlfriends tended to be white, and so I was like I'm going out for the drill team you know. I remember are trying out and audition for the drill team in initially I didn't make it and there were several black girls that tried out. Just remember that little era of us was going to make it, and I remember there only be into in to the names. You guys have already mentioned and my mom and another parents mom, one of the ladies who made it her mom and my mom, and a couple of other parents went to the administration building, and you know had a meeting about. Why is the ratio of black girls that tried out for this drill team? It's only two of them versus all of the ones that tried out. I did not know this can't remember what it's called. I had personal experience with dance audit. Make it Toyota. I mean we was I? Bet We was about six or seven deep. Come in to try out for the drill team. What is it called? Laura whenever you you don't you don't quite make it bit your conduct. The runner up like you're the next arsenic alternative. Yeah, so I wasn't alternate, right? When might when our parents went to the administration building and kind of had a meeting about you know. Was it a racial thing? Why some of these girls? There's only two one there and there were several that try out. I ended up getting on I. Don't know if you knew that Laura, but that's how I ended up. Getting on the squad based off of that meeting. I didn't know that because I never knew about that meaning. Yes, and so I ended up getting on drill team, but I remember thinking at that point, not only am I different, but I'm so privileged. You know what I'm saying in. So that was another defining moment of the black and white thing and the power, and the you know what I mean because I felt like white girls. Girls have to try as hard because their parents were were dominated in the community who had money, and that took precedence over some black girl from across the tracks. WHO's GonNa? Be on the team. So, what did you feel like first of all? I had no dance experience and I made it so I'm here to tell you right now that there was something unfair about the situation. Humor so awesome! But. Tell me how you felt once you were on like. Did you feel welcome? Did you feel glad or did you feel like? Oh, no, this sucks. I never feel good enough. It wasn't that the girls on the. Wall I didn't make me feel welcomed in in loving unaccepted, because I was friends with every single last one of them, so it wasn't. It wasn't more so down. It was just the way that it was like when we performed in end I didn't perform alive. It was just the look that you got from other people. She thinks she's white or she's trying to be. You know or like. Daniel said at one point like she's a sell out because. Black people wasn't eating. We weren't signing up for drill team. We were playing basketball and running track. WanNa. Be On drill team was like your sell out. Are you think you're all that or you think you're more than and so? Once I got that buzz I no longer wanted to be on drill team, so it wasn't because of the squad. It was more or less. You know the kids in the in the back talk and all of that. I played sports. I was in several different sports, and I can tell you for sure. There was definitely some discrimination and even so much to wear 'cause back then it was big the booster, so if your parents part of many into our more schools whether you're GonNa, you're good or not. You had a position on that team affairs. It was it just the way it was, and you knew certain parents that have the money their kids play in. That was just dash this way. It was in art more. Yeah I know. I was aware of it without being totally like not the front of my brain, but like some part of me was aware of it. I know, but it wasn't necessarily that I think that our class, our culture, our up bringing more so than like instill that it was like the adults I mean even though the kids talking about it, but of course they're talking about what they hear at home, but I felt like I didn't really I can't say that I solely experienced racism thing like that just because. Like we all say we have tons of white friends, and even all throughout. High School. We knew the differences, but it didn't necessarily affect how we interact with each other. It will just kind of like a common ground, and I'll tell you this. I was looking at our reunion pitcher before we got online. And even though. We all like genuinely I feel love each other respect each other, but we're just been conditioned to be the way that we are because I. looked at that picture, and you will see all the black girls on one side of the pitcher in all the white girls on the other side. Now there is a few this kind of sprinkled here and there, but predominantly the pitcher is like that, and when I looked this several of the pitchers. That's just do like when we get ready to take. A pitcher is not. Right we just? Kind of grab a take, all of us sisters in in all of the other you know. The white girl is just the way that I just think that we're just conditioned over time like if I was gonNA walk in the crown of a whole bunch of people, but I've seen a majority of black people they're. Probably GONNA go back. We could go to the all white side just because our might go in the middle. But I see what you're saying. Yeah, I agree with that so way then tell me honestly as we're having a talk about race. Everything you guys are saying about our hometown even as we're acknowledging some. Obvious discrimination. Is are sort of saying it like I. Don't know I. Guess I'm trying to ask. How do you feel like it's different now in two thousand twenty? Do you feel like racism is more overt? Do you feel like? The protests right now or like a lot, a lot of talk in the nation about. Bias and all of that stuff is. Are you feel like it's? warranted I'm I guess I'm not getting a full vibe on you? Guys on how you feel about talking about race. It needs to be discussed in understood and for someone like you. There needs to be more people like you that are trying to understand things to make the world a little bit better i. think as long as there are people that are closed. Closed in, and they don't see a problem. That's where the problem is. And then there are those that are still just they don't care and they just believe. White is white in black is black, and then that's it so until we have more people that are truly trying to understand different cultures and different prices in what can be done to make things better. In a better place in our, I do want to ask you doubt, but I mean growing up I. Mean just US right here. There's talking I mean when you were growing up. How was your personal experience of even when you growing up in in maybe didn't have a whole bunch of black friends at the time, but you knew you had some friends and are more it should talk to was not like we hung around each other constantly, but we knew each other. You know what I'm saying so when you got off to college and everything started. Get Little Down Earth and whatnot, and you start seeing a little bit more. Did you feel like? You were sheltered here are. Did you feel like you have a lot to learn about different types of races because you know quote, unquote the white privilege. Do you feel like you now that you're grown woman now? Do you feel like he was privileged as a young lady, maybe away with a little bit war. Do you think that you should now natural dote? We'll yeah. I mean absolutely, but not not because anybody was like purposely manipulating it, but because I just. You know benefited from my parents having you know careers that. Paid good money, which meant we lived in a nice neighborhood, which meant I went to Lincoln. You know we talked about. I made the drill team with little to no skills. When other girls did not. I never like I, said that my parents or my church or there was no, there was no one ever saying to me. Anything negative about black people ever so. I never like. I observed that dating was scandalous, but I wasn't really involved, so like I didn't take. It wasn't deep internally to me. Or anything like that I was very curious about so the girl I mentioned that was on the drill team best that we would ask her a bunch of questions that was out of genuine curiosity. It was not rude or or anything I was I. Read a lot of books. I was super curious about Black Church and a lot of France went to the black. We called it the Black First Baptist it was not. Like it said in the negative way it was just like the Black Baptist church in the UAE Baptist Church and so, but once I got older. You know my experience at college I went to was also very very white. I was in a sorority very white. There were black sororities, and so I observed that as well but I genuinely did not start to think about it in a privilege way you know until I moved to Los Angeles and And in La, the things are a lot more overt sides of town. Even though we're talking about, there were Kinda sides of town in Ardmore to but in Los Angeles. It felt to me just a lot more divisive. You know like you. We have learned from movies and rap songs, and whatever about gang, culture, and just things that I had not given much thought to until I moved to California. It is different than in Oklahoma in that way. So I didn't really start. Thinking about like. Why have I, or or like what has happened in my life? That was easier for me. Because white person that's that's still a newish thought to me like in the last. Eight or whatever when I have started seeing people like, let's take police brutality for a moment, which is a very hot topic issue, but when I see women posting about how they have to teach their children how to act if they get pulled over while my parents never taught me how to active I got pulled over like they were like. I mean I have sast a cop with no worry. You know I've never had to think like fat I've never had to think about anything like that, and so you know I've never had to think that. If if I was denied something like if I wasn't lead into the CLOBBER, if I wasn't whatever that it was. Because I of the way I looked because I look I mean I'm. UAE Blonde hair and blue eyes like milk and a lot of doors for me. But. I, wouldn't have put that together until I mean sort of had to be told that right right, I'll just say when when you say that it makes me think of something I'm also being a light skinned black person was definitely a difference, too sure was it definitely was different because it was you know you just was treated a little bit better because you know you're yellow, boned or whatever so when I think back on just general look of things. I can't really say that. I grew up like with racism. That like that in. In the younger years coming up to the middle school, because there was a lot of diversity, you know in all of that Nanu like we already talked about that. It existed, but it wasn't just so predominant that it was just like scary and crazy like today's world, but as I've gotten older and grown, I did have an experience in my adulthood working in Ardmore, where I blatantly know or feel that because of my skin color I was let go from a position in just for a white person to be brought into the position. and. I feel like I lost fight innocence like. To fight it I tried to fight the situation, but there was nothing I could really do because that's just the way it was, and our people wasn't running down to. The city hall meetings and trying to make a difference and stuff like that on my behalf. I didn't know the fall in all the steps take. It's not a fight back in the proper way, and so I of just like I just got fired was what it was, and that's just what it was, but or let go rather I'm so aware today, of course am I. Note of the racism that exists openly than I did growing up. Do y'all think that, maybe because we were a little bit more sheltered here in the small town, because I've noticed it when I wake, social media became popular and all that kind of stuff i. think it made it more. Blatantly noticeable ruled via name because he was everywhere. Now we are back to the whole world now in our little community. Yes, it was there. Yes, there was. You know maybe a little bit racist here there. But you didn't hear about it. What talked about? It wasn't blatant very seldom. It was there when it was seldom. You know like you know you got let go from a position. Next thing you know you already know. Got It in our mind frames. That was our original discussion. Need you know what I'm saying because? If you're dislike, I'm the only person in my workplace. You know what I'm saying and they have questions. They ask me types thing. I'm looking at right now. He still asked this discourse these days pick up pickup something bigger out like. I don't know if y'all know this. Not I don't want to necessarily say names, even though you may you know, edit this part or Laura but there was a lady that's on the north side of town, and I'm sure it'd probably you probably definitely didn't hear about this Laura but there's a lady that lives on the northeast side of town. Who Back in. In the day growing up, she was spray paint on the house about police brutality, because the police killed her son. Okay, and so she was known in the community as a crazy person, so people thought because she was spray painting on her house that Oh that's just such an such. She's crazy, but God restaurants soul because she just asked a but. I now. Thinking back because I was one of those young kids who was not even make. Because our was paint it I. Mean Spray painted with saying things about route police brutality, right? When I go back and think on that. Only thing now. I feel so bad is that she didn't know the proper steps to take. She didn't have help. No one believed in her. There was no cameras. There was no social media. So do I believe that the police probably because it's happening so blatantly open now? That she very well could have been telling hard truths about her child, and because there was no proof. We all thought she was crazy, but that was kind of her cry for help because she was bright paint on her house, you know. And I think about that in today's time like Oh. Yeah I remember. I used to be that the to make. The jalopy out who our children will the economy feel sorry for the? Do. Have you ever heard this store right before that? There was a lady on northeast spray paint on a house because police brutality. You know I never heard that, but I mean I always felt safe in ardmore again. I think part of it was a different time like you know mayberry style like it was just everybody felt safe. You know what I mean like I didn't know to not feel safe, but I also think. General, Ardmore had a from what I understand. A A low crime rate. It went up as we got older because of drugs staff, but like I kind of agree with what Danielle said in that. We're having this conversation, because this is our shared hometown, but if we had grown up in Chicago I, mean what are we talking about? Something different like nuts, an entirely different situation and Kind of this is what I kind of want people. Listeners of the podcast to be doing is having these talks with. Their black friends. The majority of my audience is very white and so I want them to like say to their friends. Like. What was this like for you and honestly I did not know what you guys were going to say today like I didn't know if you were gonNA. Say Ardmore is the most racist evil town of life I have no idea. I. mean. It was rough, but it wasn't that bad unless funds. On the northeast out of the tracks Laura I, don't know how you came over there unless you were going to the Y. Fields for softball, but most it was a distinguished difference, if you didn't grow up or come on the northeast side across the tracks than you were kind of blind in a sense to the things that we struggled are went through. In a sense I mean over time I'm sure you're aware is just that you didn't have to deal with. It is hey, he's over there. You know so. So. Do you guys think that it's? Is it worse or is it just because social media and cameras are bringing things to our attention? And you know the whole nation has gone through a drug epidemic, which is changing small towns, and like whatever like I'm trying to figure out if the stuff that I've been learning, I'm obviously learning that. It's been going on for centuries, so I'm not saying that, but just I don't know there's so many voices. The Internet is so noisy. Sometimes I feel like some people are saying. The world has gone completely evil. then. Some people are saying like this is always been here now. We're just dealing with it or some people are saying it's gotten worse. Some people are saying it's gotten better like I. Don't know what is your. What is your pulse on it? I think it's been brought to more to light because of social media and people being able to find out about more things, but the things have been going on. Life's this already in there were police officers. Beating men or planning evidence, that's been going on for years, but now everybody has a cell phone like you literally never know who knew, and luckily there's people out there video in certain things in that. We're finding out about stuff, but I think that it's been going on. I will say this that I feel these past few years. Since the president we have in office now has given an avenue to people to speak more freely, and so true feelings are coming out whereas it used to be a time where it wasn't okay to say that to someone now it's like you can say whatever you want to do. Someone so in Eilly because I had a moment where these white guys were at Petsmart, and they made me feel like I was crap in caught me bees and black this. It was like all because my dog. I have my dog and he was like breaking seventy pounds I was struggling with him. And I had an English bulldog. He didn't do ride. That was just as life. Everybody knew that, so they just took the moment to do that. And say that to me and I was just like a Paul in just a what the hell is going on his world. Why are they talking to me like like I? Knew then the world has changed. Okay, so we're all matters here, yes. Are you talking to your kids about this staff differently than? You were talked to by your parents about it. This is one of the things I wanted to say to you I'm glad you brought it up because with me having a son who was like almost six five. He's a black man. There's no doubt about it and I've had to talk to him. Literally from being pulled over how to react swiftly saucer, whatnot do in this is what happens when you do that, and this is why they will do it, but you have. My parents never had to have that conversation with me, but started driving I'm like when you get pulled over. You make sure they see your hands. You make sure that your registration everything is where you can get to it, so you're not digging for anything you wait and let them tell you so like you're going in a line and I felt like I had to He Luli just like a couple of weeks ago. Just randomly did something we would have done as children. That would have been a big deal. He went to the high school the go run. Run track light to be on the track after hours now we would have done that growing up in. It would have been no problem. I literally wanted to choke him because I was like. Do you know like what could have happened to you? If the police came, have been having a bad day. Your Trust has like you cannot do certain things. You just can't in so I. Feel Like I've had to do that. Just because of the way things are going because I would feel like I'm not a good mother if I wouldn't talk to him to tell. You gotTA understand. You're different, and that's just the way it is. Yeah. I've had that. Talk I have two boys and I've had that talk with especially my oldest son, because he is currently dating a white girl, and so although her parents or accepting a bit tough hold him tom-tom again. Make sure you know you treat her with utmost respect I, mean you know you have to tread light, and and I hate that because I don't. Of course I want him to treat. Her were regardless of her skin color I want him to treat our whale, but I have to embedded in his head. Because if something happens in, there's an argument. There's disagreement or something more times non Sunday you're going to be in trouble regardless of the situation and I hate that he has to. He can't just openly left who he loved, but that's just what it is, and he understands it. Not, as much as I probably want him to, but he understands it to an extent. You know you still choose today. The white girl with the restrictions of Of Her love for her body is so frustrating for me as a mom because I know that if something ever happens that. Be Good for my son and I and I and I don't even feel like her and him. Their relationship I fear her family members somewhere down the bloodline. That's who I fear for my son, because of the time that they grew up and they just don't accept it. Targets could definitely gotten worse to answer your question. It's definitely gotten worse in are more or just you know of course worldwide right? Because like Monica said at some point in life, we could do simple things that we didn't have the questioner. Think about whereas you can't just. Merely do. Hardly, anything you can even move too much without it being. A jog or you can't even be at home if you really want to be technical. Danielle WanNa speak to the parenting part I haven't really talked to my son about because he's still fairly young. My son has experienced something with his other side of the family Where you know that cultural difference, you know you got a great aunt. Great uncle I'm saying is looking at you. Know this. Brown skin, little boy, and noticing their the difference so I think that when marriage was going over to the other side, you know things were being obviously. Stand in front of my baby made that bill uncomfortable were he had to leave the situation because this is his child to you know what I'm saying. Regardless of you know how you feel about the blacks in this child. Child and I'm not going to see here. Let you just say something about Rotschild, so I mean to this very day. He doesn't talk to that family member for those actions. You know what I'm saying, so. I mean I think it's just an environment that we were on up in, but right now I'm just I'm not currently talk miracle about that kind of stuff now. Okay this is my last question, so you guys are so gracious to give me the benefit of the doubt to even have this kind of conversation, but also we've known each other since we were literally children you. I mean I'm hoping that use trusted where I was coming from with it, but if you had other white friends, well-meaning white people is what I have called them in the past, well-meaning white person also. We want to ask you questions like this. Stu, you find this awkward or weird or inappropriate, or do you welcome it or are you neutral on it? Like where do you? What do you feel on this conversation? Welcome I'm been I with a lot of younger people. Even though we're the corporate office, I have some younger people that I work with so there early early twenties them and you know it's been beneficial to me to be able to have conversation with them whether it's about hair is been about like just growing up because I have one particular guy and he went to a school like five people graduated from it. And it was a private school, so he did not know. I'm probably the blackest he's got. I went to wedding about three hundred plus be was the only black person there so. This is how he's my guinea pig all the time because I try to see where he's GonNa come with something. You know because he just doesn't get it and I have had to explain him. Not Everybody grew up. The way did so live. Like you got into a job because you're on worked for the CEO. You literally came with no experience so position I was like. Do you understand that I? Never would have been able to do that. You GotTa understand you. Download privilege, so he doesn't get it sometimes, and I have to like bringing into light, and then he sees it for what it is, but it's times like this that are really think that more people should be open to talk to people in France in their opinions, and are basically telling them why why we're coming, the place will come in from. People are just tired. People are tired of being mistreating. Just. You. Retired, but for me I have peace in knowing. There's people like you people like my neighbor. There's people my cut. One of my co workers out the blue texts like is this I have peace in knowing that it will hopefully get better than not worse so. Others timing real quick and say ask your question Laura definitely open as well, but it is about approach for me, because if you definitely come with a you know a genuine demeanor, and you hope hardly or showing concern that you really just want to know and we can talk all day, right. More of a you know shade, or you're just kind of being. You know silly with end you know because it's a sensitive subject so naturally you have to make sure your approaches genuine when you're talking about something sensitive, and then we can talk all day about it in the. was charming and say also with everything going so crazy I will say I'm so happy to see so many white people. Protesting along with us because we went through so many of these same situation and a lot hadn't been done for whatever reason Georgia's situation so herbal that white people are even saying this is yes about racism, but is a human life, and so I love the fact that there's more white people kinda waking up in holding a sign that says black lives matter like. That means a lot to me. I'm so glad that we have this shared. You know these shared memories, these these shared experience, but I'm still learning all the different ways that it was also different, but I just cherish you and your friendship and I just am very very grateful that you were coming here and talking to me publicly about this if They use US they're. Talking about, we will be on for hours and hours. Thank you for having us and even wanted. So much. I'm Laura Tremaine and he just listen to the ten things to tell you podcast. You can find the show notes and subscribe to episode emails at ten things to tell you dot com slash podcast. You can follow us on facebook and Instagram at ten things to tell you. Remember. This is an interactive podcast. I have ten things to tell you and do you have ten things to tell? Taking this topic to your journal or a friend or post on social media, using the Hashtag ten things to tell you. These episodes are meant to bring an action with others ourselves an spark better conversations. Thanks for listening. Now go share some.

Better School Ardmore Oklahoma Laura High School Danielle Williams White Church Lincoln Rogers Black Church Franklin Lincoln Jordi white Los Angeles Franklin Toya Brown Monica facebook middle school
What sex trafficking in the U.S. actually looks like

Post Reports

27:17 min | 1 year ago

What sex trafficking in the U.S. actually looks like

"This post reports podcast is brought to you by net suite by Oracle the cloud based business management software. That gives you the visibility and control. You need to grow. Net suite is offering their free guide. Seven seven key strategies to grow your profits at net sweet dot com slash. Go from the newsroom. The Washington under the Washington Post Washington Ellen Nakashima with Washington. This is post reports points. I'm Martine powers. It's Friday December twentieth. Today how we judge the crimes crimes of victims in the wake of Metoo and highschoolers learning about impeachable. So is it a story about her story. About how the world sees prosecution of sex trafficking victims or story about at like. Who is the victim here? Just contraire is an enterprise reporter at the Washington Post this year. She's been writing a lot about teenagers and most recently about teenagers and children who are victims of sex trafficking. There's this phrase as that's been used forever and ever child prostitute which under federal law. There's no such thing as a child prostitute. A child build a minor cannot consent to being bought or sold for sex and even though I think people know that they still have this image in their mind of of a teen girl putting herself out there and we know from studies that black girls especially are perceived incorrectly to be older than they really are to be more sexually mature than they really are and if you look at what child sex trafficking is in America. Cut those girls are. That's what's happening. There are girls who are desperate who are vulnerable who are being manipulated violated by someone they trust and because they hear the narrative that they're a bad kid that what they're doing is wrong that they could get arrested for what they're doing doing they don't come forward and say I'm being abused sin. Toya Brown was one of those kids when she was a young teenager. She became victims of sex trafficking when she was sixteen she shot and killed a forty three year old man who is paying to have sex with her. She maintained that it was in self defense but she. He was sentenced to life in prison. Sin Toya says Allen was behaving erratically and owned a number of guns and that she feared for her life when she shot him in the head and made her escape scape. She didn't even know when she was a kid that she had been sex trafficked. CITOYEN Brown's case went viral. She became a cause for celebrities like Kim Kardashian. Dan Riano Lebron James Eventually. She was granted clemency and released from prison. Let me too movement really brought to light talking about what it means to be the victim of sexual violence and so there is this sort of reckoning happening across the country where people who who are victims of sexual violence people who are victims of sex trafficking. Those people sometimes ended up committing other crimes and and the country is in the midst of sort of rethinking. What does that mean? And how much does it matter that they were victim of sex trafficking in how they should be treated for committing that crime so I started looking for stories and then I came across crystals so who is crystal Kaiser and why why is she in jail right now. Crystal Geyser is now a nineteen year old girl and she's in jail because of something that happened when she was sixteen. She met this man named Randy. Villar Randy is a white man who was in his early thirties. He was living by himself in Kenosha. Wisconsin she needed money and and a girl showed her how to post on backpage DOT com. which was a website for prostitution? She posted herself there randy. He was the first person to respond. She says and she started spending time with him on a regular basis and he was paying her for sex and not just paying her with money but with cars phones jewelry and something that she needed even more which was love love and attention. He had bought me this Heart lucky that may be feel special. When did he do that much? Evidence Birthday so one night in June of twenty eighteen crystal went over to Randi Lars House. She had a gun in her purse that her boyfriend had bought her and by the time she he left the next morning. Police say she had shot him in the head lit his house on fire and fled in his car. While you're the corner seventy eighth street and fourteen avenues on fire. Do you see flames is the best name. Oh my gosh. So she says she was arrested and charged with arson among other things and first degree intentional murder off and so right now she is awaiting trial so right now she is in jail in Wisconsin and she's awaiting jury trial and if she he is convicted she will spend the rest of her life in prison. I learned how to cope with something. Mike what like just being away from law that I really don't like to be away from her Like I get I get sick filling lenience to like learn. Todd like cope with being without her How does her story embody you? This question about how we think about victims of sex trafficking. I think so often we think about sex trafficking as something that happens around the world that people are smuggled over borders or that the victims of sex trafficking are people who are chained up in a basement somewhere but the vast asked majority of child sex trafficking. That happens in America. Looks like crystal a vulnerable kid. who gets too trusting trusting somebody who then takes advantage of them and carefully and calculatedly manipulates them to believe that they are the one and doing something wrong? gave me this new drug that I never heard of alcohol ECIT. What was that like? That was the case with crystal and it seems like that was the case with all of the other girls that we know. This man was abusing so this wasn't just an isolated case crystal was just one of multiple victims of this person. Randy Lar- locker. She didn't know it at the time but Villar was abusing multiple underage black girls. The reason that police found that out was because one of those girls girls called nine one one from his house saying he'd given her drugs and wanted to kill her and then that girl hung up the phone and ran away. They found her wandering the streets and she just had a BRA under hers up and her eyes were all dilated. She'd taken LSD. And when they started talking to her are more. They realized that she'd been living with this guy for weeks. and He'd been sexually abusing her for even longer than that and she told the police he he is sexually abusing other girls too and he's filming it and so then. What did police do when they found out that this man it appears was breath targeting many different girls so ten days after this girl ran from his house? Police searched Randy Velarde House and they arrested him. They arrested him on charges that included child sexual assault. which is a huge charge? It's punishable and Wisconsin forty years in prison prison in usually from the sex crimes. Prosecutors that I've talked to what would happen is that there would be a very high bail set for charge like that right especially if someone was wealthy which we know that Randy Villar had hundreds of thousands of dollars in bank accounts. And what actually happened was that at. The police released him on the very same day that they had arrested him and three months went by before they even handed did the case over to the district attorney and even the district attorney had the case and had these documents that showed that he had hundreds words of child porn files and was making home videos of of girls. They still take him back into custody. They were still working on the case case. And that's when he died. So did you. Did you ask prosecutors. Why they didn't charge him for some of these crimes if they were aware that this was going on the I spoke with the Kenosha County district attorney? His name is Michael Gravely and what he said at first was that they didn't know how how old the girls were. Well it changes. What changed what? The crime is based on their age and their consent. And I mean so so you're you're under current statute required but I guess if they're underaged they're not able to consent right. But in many in most of the cases we didn't know it. Okay okay so so we literally did not know whether we had misdemeanors selling later that day. Though we went to crystal's MOM's house and and in her house was envelope that crystals lawyers had mailed to her and then the envelope had gotten mailed to her mom and inside the envelope. elope was the police records that the police had been refusing to give us on their sex crimes. Investigation into Randy Villar and on the documents. It says right there how old the detectives thought that those girls were. It says thirteen fourteen it says mid teens it says early teens. It says some of them might be as young as twelve and so were there and crystals mom is of reading mass. And she's reading it for the first time and understandably she starts to freak out big little kids in any twelve years old he was charged with all of the child. Child enticement person to truth and sex crime challenged me a a general lesson of child. So why are we ear so I went back to the DA. And said I now have these documents and they show that the detectives did believe at these girls were underage. And he basically stated that that still wasn't sufficient evidence to charge randy villar with all the things is that they could have potentially charged him with but in the time that they were spending getting more information. Villar was free to who continue abusing these girls and so in this time frame when prosecutors are looking into this case it sounds like according into them that they were trying to find evidence that is when for crystal. She felt like she needed to take some kind of action. What did she say about what what led up to her deciding to kill this person so she knew ranyal Villar for almost two years and about a year after they met something happened crystal was arrested? The Milwaukee Police say she was driving a car stolen by her brother when she she fled and ran from an officer she was arrested and she spent fifty five days in jail and then Randy Velarde paid her fail while she says that after he paid her bail. He made very clear to her that he wanted to do a specific sex. Act that I would rather not say. And she didn't want to do it and she said that's when he started to turn violent. I was GONNA stop talking to him and he said if I did that. He's he's GonNa kill me so for the next year. I think she was in this place between being afraid and being desperate I mean and she was from this very poor family that just moved out of a shelter and he was giving her tons of money he also seemed to Have this kind of control over her that at first I didn't fully understand Because it took a while for crystal. I still tell me this but eventually she told me that it wasn't just that Randy Velarde was paying her for sex. She says as he began to sell her to other people. She says that he posted advertisements on back page. He would drive her there. These guys would. It spent thirty minutes with her pay her and she would give the money to villar so when I asked her. Did you call anyone. Did you call the police. She said no because she had experiences as a child on when her mom was being abused by boyfriend of her feeling like the police didn't really help so she never called the police when this was going on and I asked her why did you keep doing this grown up. I wasn't oh I listened so when things started to get violent I think that lasted for a while. And she says what happened. was that on June fourth. Two thousand eighteen eighteen. She went to court for The fleeing charge that she'd picked up and afterwards her boyfriend were fighting and sh- Her boyfriend had a history of hitting her. She was afraid he was going to do that again. So she texted Villar and asked him if she could come over he. He sent an Uber to pick her up and that night at his house. She says that he came over to her or sat next to her. Put his hand on her indicating that he wanted to have sex and that she told him she didn't WanNa do it and he started talking about what what she owed him. She says that she tried to get up. And she tripped in foul and he got on top of her and and then she says she wiggled loose winter purse in grabbed again. So if this was a person who is a victim of sex trafficking and she was a minor and and she says that that she was it sounds like afraid for her safety in end for her life. In this moment why are prosecutors. Still Oh trying to convict her of Mir- The prosecutors in this case say that the evidence shows that crystal wasn't defending offending herself that she planned to murder rainy villar. There are messages. She's sent to a friend on facebook where she was telling a friend that she was going to get a new new car and the car was going to be BMW. They think that she intentionally killed him to steal his BMW. But does she say about them. She says that's definitely not true. Chichi gets upset and says that she took the car because He he was going to give her a car and a laptop for her birthday And when when she talks about it she basically basically She says she she didn't intend to do this. She didn't go over there with that plan. and she even now says that he didn't served di she's still in a way is protective of him even though he was abusing her for months and years She's still says he was the only friend I had. So it seems like there are two pretty radically different ways of looking. At this case rate you have one way of looking at it where this man has been killed and that prosecutor that it was premeditated and that they they are trying to convict this person of homicide. The person who killed him. And then you have this other way of looking at the case that is completely different that is basically typically. The person who killed him was victim and that prosecutors had opportunities to stop this man from hurting her Riggan hurting other girls and they feel to do that and it's hard to know how to square those two ideas. Yeah you're getting to the heart of the thing thing which is how much does it matter that she was a victim and she's not the first victim of sex trafficking to try and defend herself and ended up murdering someone. I found a bunch of cases like this through the years and back in the eighties nineties when these things happen the fact that all of them were kids when it happened but the fact that they were victimized victimize or the fact that they're person that they killed was a known pedophile known abuser. Those things were thought you would never bring that up in court. Because you're disparaging the victim today after me to there are. Those cases are being reexamined. Ultimately think that the way that we view victims of of sex trafficking has actually changed. WHO's the we because I think in the media it may be? I mean if you compare the difference in in the way that crystal has been written about and the local news. 'cause they're using terms like sex trafficking Winston Toya Brown with convicted. She was teenage killer child prostitute. I think the world is coming to an understanding that children cannot consent to being sold for sex no matter what the circumstances are and that's what the federal law says but states haven't necessarily caught up and prosecutors police officers people who are in positions of power if they haven't been educated on and what sex trafficking really looks like and maybe even if they have it doesn't mean that they're going to have a full understanding of what it means to be victimized in that way they just Carreira is an enterprise reporter at the Washington Post in December a a judge in Crystal Kaiser's case rejected her lawyer's request to use what's called an affirmative defense. That defense would have enabled crystal to argue that because her crime was that's a direct result of her being trafficked. She should be acquitted of the charges against her. Her lawyers are appealing. This decision. Crystals case will go before a full jury sometime mm time next year. This reports podcast is brought to you by net suite by Oracle the world's number one cloud business system and now one more thing. Well it's sort of a long story and it starts with myself. I was in middle school when President Clinton in gotten and I was living in Sacramento California and despite being all the way across the country I remember being kind of obsessed with the news and and I started reading Newsweek. All the time and reading commentary on this and it's part of the reason. I decided to become a journalist very weird. My name is Mariah delinquent and I cover national education issues for the Washington Post so I was really curious to know how students were processing this impeachment because the students of today are the members of Congress tomorrow and so the way that they process this. It's going to shape their view but it could also shape our lives lives. I went to two different high schools. One Wilson High School in the District of Columbia in northwest. Obviously the district is a very liberal place where the vast vast majority of the voters supported Hillary Clinton plus reminders homerun in. What were they breaking into the water? Tolerant Wilson I observed an advanced placement government class US which was one of my favorite classes in high school and the teacher had them do some really interesting things. She had them analyze political cartoons. She had them compare hair past and present impeachments and then she basically deputized them and said you're going to be a members of the judiciary committee the jury for lives pieces. You remember. Did the committee themselves actually breaking office breath who allegedly hired right. And you're going to decide whether we should impeach the president so she looked at Johnson's at Nixon at Clinton and a at trump so breaking out once an impeachment inquiry. I'm not sure that is. Why was it lost for president? Trump is really of partisanship. Johnson was impeached Nixon. Nixon obviously was not. He resigned before he could be impeached. Clinton we know is impeach trump. We know today and so she wanted to know what articles articles of impeachment. which you bring against these presidents and then she had them vote vote to to saying not abacus this trial so she was empowering them she was making them the lawmakers to make these decisions? How can start impeachment? I process but I also went to poets and county outside of Richmond. Virginia which is a county that went seventy percent for trump. I went to another government class. Las where I found a broader mix of views and opinions on. This does in a way to be a very political thing that they're doing is only your left in. His turns was the point of the teaching. If there's only a you're GONNA do a lot as your doggy because I really was interested in getting the lens from two different parts of the country. Even though these places are just a couple of hours ars apart politically. They are diametric opposites inevitably all of the discussions devolved into the president. The thing is the EH could it. It'd be consider them spending all this money on these investigations. It away as a political bill. Could that be considered using taxpayer money. Sure absolutely right. We actually saw some somewhat tense but lively debates over the meanings of some of these terms. What is an impeachable offense? Whether impeachment is inherently political article or not the students were really getting to the deep philosophical questions around impeachment. I mean in my opinion it should be able to us because we're affected by letter in the House and Senate are still getting. Hey this I they say you know. These high school classrooms are one of the remaining places where people with completely differing differing viewpoints who have sort of a baseline respect for one another are engaging in a way that we just don't really see in many other places so you know these are students that don't know each other as Democrats or Republicans liberal and conservative. They know each other as like oh she's does. ROTC or we. We played football together. So the faultlines. Don't follow along political lines. I think we're more prone particularly in the capital to see people as Republicans publicans and Democrats before we see them in other terms mariah bowling rolling. It covers education for the post. That's it for today's show. Thanks for listening. Our executive producer is madly Koska our producers. Our Alexis de out. Rena Flora's Lena Muhammad Maggie Penman Rennie's for for non-squeaky Jordan Marie Smith and Ted Muldoon who also wrote our theme music. The Post Director of audio is just all I'm Martine powers will be back on Monday with more stories from the Washington Post contributions to post helping hands go directly likely to services run by beneficiaries bright beginnings and St village and so others might eat that provides shelter food. Education and other services is to those less fortunate in The Washington D._C.. Region learn more at post helping hand dot com.

ranyal Villar prosecutor Washington Post Villar Randy Wisconsin Randy Velarde Winston Toya Brown America Crystal Kaiser President Clinton Washington Crystal Geyser Randy Velarde House reporter Metoo murder Kim Kardashian crystal
The Power of La La Anthony

The Nod

08:16 min | 2 months ago

The Power of La La Anthony

"Hey all it's Britney and Eric. We are back again with a very special episode of our Qube show the not with Britney Eric this week I'm talking about sloppy toppy sandwiches that is with Pinky Co founder of the popular sledding Vegan brand of restaurants music journalist Eva Johnny Joins Britney and I to look at how some of the most popular women in rap are using their voice for Change and. Brittany and I ranked the best films and TV shows. They depict Black College Life College Hero Beatles School Days I don't know you got to watch and see. But today we're talking to actress VJ author producer, the one, and only la La Anthony. She joined us to take a look back at her career and discussed her most recent stint as dumb on showtime's shy and how she's moving into producing. For Six seasons Lala Anthony's fans knew her as Kisha on the hit series power anti I did that girl so Jerry. But there is life after power and is here to talk to us about her role on the shy and the big move. She's making as a producer plus we're going to challenge her with some power trivia not style stay right there. This is the. PLA Anthony Welcome to the show so. How are you guys doing? Don't? Talk to you. So, people. Know, you got your start in radio at the age of just sixteen t talked to us about your journey I like to go to eleventh grade and I was just so until with this radio station and then went to an event they were having enormous like saw some interns like hanging posters with something that the Wu Tang clan was doing and I was like this could be really cool. So I applied for the program NASA I got him but I didn't really have a plan I just knew I. Love Music and my love for music has taken me where to where I'm at now I got somebody who has dj big. Fan You want not held it down. But it's been incredible to see your acting career just flourish and you play the character of dom on most recent season of the shy conduit for the money I, do it for the culture talk to us about what it was like to play. And get into that character shirish doubt I love lean away. She's amazing for our culture and she was like I might have something for you on which to come in addition and I was like I can't mess this up like I wanna be on the shy and I got the role of dom which I love because she's so different from leaky show empowered dom as a chef that's an entrepreneur and trying to get their business off of. The ground and really focused into keeping 'em it on point so they can build this amazing business together. So I think it was a great transition into go from working with great creators like Courtney Kemp and fifty to now be on the Lena and her crew has been just an incredible transition and so there and you've been acting in so many different types of roles for over ten years I'm curious like what type of role do you hope comes next I'm always looking for relieve rooted and grounded stories just stories that matter to us. Our culture stories that we can relate to stories that people aren't telling I'm attracted to that kind of material, which is why I'm also producing house well, because the great thing about producing, find your own material and bring it to life you're working on a new project that gives a behind the scenes. Look at the NFL. Tell us a bit about this new series and why you wanted to be involved. So fifty were executive producing together the book that we read that we love and it's more about like what goes on behind The scenes with sports, but it's mostly about the women. So many women just give up their own lives just to be there for their partner, who's an athlete losing sports, and what happens when you like I have my own life and I want to do my own thing and what effect does that have, but it gets really grimy and gritty in real and obviously you know sports and athletics or something you know I know a lot about so I was able to really give some of my stories and really gives some real. Really exciting content to the show. So we're excited we're excited to hopefully be in production really soon and get that oven going you're also working on. Producing Story About Sin Toya Brown long you know young woman who killed a man in self defense sixteen was tried as an adult given a life sentence was then finally offered clemency last year. Why was it so important to you to make sure that this story was told that just such a powerful story and I had been tracking it for a while and watching toys interviews and just what happened to her from young growth? Donau. Moe's fascinated at like what? Was Your Life like that. took you down these paths and then her completely changing her life and finding God and becoming the spokesperson for young girls and sex trafficking. I thought it was amazing. So that's something we're so excited about and wanted to be so careful with because now we're telling someone's life story. You don't WanNa, take it lightly or take that for granted art. So power was truly one of my favorite shows I've talked to breathe way too much. I still found myself wondering what carers from the show would do if they existed in the real world. So We'd love it if you could just indulge us in a little bit of a game. Okay. We're GONNA throw out a scenario and you tell us which character from power best fits the situation. All right. Okay. So we all know that Joe Biden made good on his promise to choose a woman to be his running mate. On the democratic. Ticket but we want to know which female character on power would have made a better choice as a running mate. Okay. So You already know off the top of the dump quick witted she's smart. She knows the system how to get through the system I. think he'd be a great running Angelo for sure I mean she kinda got caught up by the system that numerous through it and she knows the law whether she was part of breaking the law or not. She knows the law. So I think she would have been great. All, right. Second Question. So none of the men on power were necessarily winning awards in the a good boyfriend healthy relationships department lynch two men from power. Do you think could go head to head in a horrible boyfriends verses? Who would you like to see? I think draze caring. There was a horrible boyfriend who said the daughter the always mentioned that he didn't care what happened. Durham mom probably ghost I don't love how he handled the situation between you know Tasha Angela and how he did that I wouldn't say Tommy 'cause. You did kill Holly. You're right. Maybe that's what I was gonNA. Relationship you've really love Kisha and things that he would have never heard. Anything to protector. So he might not have been the ideal boyfriend, but I think he was getting to a place where he was really trying to eat. Better. But he did last gopher. No So it's no secret that the that the male characters on power had a ton of admiring fans. I'm curious who do you think would make the most money if they had an only fans page those hardwick, he's a fine specimen of a man that's my brother, but he's A. Man and women loved him and we would you don't WANNA walk around New York City with him old dipper ballgame. So yeah I think there's only be popping and he would be extremely paid from that. You could probably supplement that their politician come at least until lasts up so he probably has a Right. Well thank you so much for joining us. Today has been a pleasure talking to. Doing. So thank you for having me on I. Really enjoyed it, but she does keep kicking, ass. Thing here. Thank you so much. Needs. So a broadcaster just means so much. JUMP WANNA I wanted to be part of so keep rocking and hopefully when this is all over, they can all link-up in person in December fun. So if you want to stay up on all things happening with La Anthony, you could follow her on twitter and Instagram at Lala. Thank you so much washing today's show. We'll see next time for a brand new episode of Benach.

Britney Eric Lala Anthony producer Kisha Black College Life College Her La Anthony Brittany NASA Qube Joe Biden Wu Tang Pinky Co Jerry Angelo founder Courtney Kemp Eva Johnny Toya Brown NFL
Ep. 82 - You Asked, Shaun Answers - August Edition

The Breakdown with Shaun King

50:18 min | 1 year ago

Ep. 82 - You Asked, Shaun Answers - August Edition

"I'm the host of this podcast but i never really wanted to be a podcast about me. It's why it's not called the shaun king show but the breakdown with shaun king today is one of those days where have to answer some questions and talk to you all about several things that people are saying about me in a week that i thought was going to be pretty amazing has turned out to be pretty tough and so the bam going to unpack and explain many different questions that people have about all of the fundraising. I've done over all the years actually proud of it like without hesitation reservation completely proud of all the things things have done over the past five years and this movement. There's probably nothing that i'm more proud of than all the fundraising that i've done but you all ask some tough questions and i'm going to give you honest clear thorough answers and this podcast will just exist in perpetuity and we'll be able to point people back to all right. This is shaun king. You're you're listening to the the the breakdown breakdown the breakdown <music> all the things that i've done in my life as an activist activist and organizer. I think the fundraising that i've done for families in causes and charities and people affected by not just police brutality black natural disasters or racism or white supremacy or people had their homes burned down lost their loved ones. I think of all the the things that i've done over these past few years few have given me a the satisfaction of knowing that i've been able to raise money for people aw who are often at the lowest point of their lives and every time i've done it. I've always been asked to do it. I'm i'm not volunteering on tearing to go out. There and help people raise money people come to me and ask me if i can do it and over the years i've i've been raising money for charities in causes and people for almost twenty years. I think when people ask. I'm glad to do it because i know how to do. It and fundraising requires a certain persistence like when i believe in something i will ask everybody. I know out email everybody. I know. I have an email list that i've literally been working on since nineteen ninety nine. No i don't mean that as an exaggeration literally i've been building my email list since nineteen ninety nine fine and so many people have literally given to projects that i've worked on behalf of for two decades and so i have a dedicated base of very very generous donors and when people come to me and need i know that if i go to these donors and supporters people who may admire me or respect me see for different reasons i know that people are going to give and and when i look at everything that i have done just over these past five years of the black last batter movement. It's sometimes hard to point to clear victories now. I've pivoted in change somewhere now. Now we lead our organization real justice and we've helped let new district attorney's all over the country but i know for many families that i fought for across across the years. I know that when we raise this money it will give them relief. It'll give them the support. They need often to be able to take the time off of work. They need to pay off bills that they otherwise wouldn't be able to pay and i'm able to look back at this and just know ya'll help do this and so so these next questions i answer all of them and i'll i'll be thorough and specific <hes> these next questions. I do <hes> really with very little regret. I mean i think i don't. I don't think there's anybody that i as i think back. I don't think there's any cause that i've raised. I funds for that. I regret it. There have been some that have been really difficult but i have no regrets on on doing this and so let's let's dive in. They are probably about seven questions that people have asked me over and over again and i'm just going to break down the answers and get real specific all right. The first question is how much money have i raised and it would seem like that is an easy question to answer but we have to give an estimate in in some ways because over the years when people ask me to raise money they are literally just sending me a link and saying. Can you share this link over and over again and when you see me raising money for causes is never something that i have access to or that i am. I am guiding family on. Here's here's how you should spend your money like all they do is send me a link and i get to work and i have found it difficult to track down over the years i've literally written hundreds of thousands of tweets and a hundred thousand facebook post and i've sent out e mails on different email systems that i now no longer use and so it's difficult to track down but me and a small team of people that i work with. We think we have an estimate for how much money i have raised raised at least since two thousand fourteen and this is this is just money for families charities and causes. This doesn't count any of the money that i've raised for political campaigns which may be even more than i've raised <hes> for these charities and causes so i know since two thousand fourteen eighteen that i have raised over ten million dollars for families charities and causes and of that ten million dollars i literally received nothing never not a penny. Not a nickel dime not a favor not a t. shirt literally not not a not a hookup not job not <hes> not any credit. Sometimes families have even asked to to give me some type of public credit or public award and i have shied away from that and all of the ten million dollars that i've raised that's for nearly a hundred different families charities and causes where i was asked to come in and help and support those families and <hes> several other questions that i'll that i'll answer and then i'm am itching to answer so i'll get to those other questions but the first question in is how much money have i raised and it's right around ten million dollars. If i scroll down and look at the spreadsheet that we've created aided <hes> the last figure that we had was was literally ten million and thousanddollars in dollars in eighty three cents and so <hes> i'm proud of it. I i look at each. One of those and i really forgot got most of these. Each one came to me at a different season of my own life during these five years where i've raised all this money i've always worked literally two or three other jobs and and i'm always doing this fundraising not as a job whereas career with just literally in my spare time. I'm on my on my breaks. Sometimes i'm stealing time away from one job to be able to advocate for these families but it's over ten million dollars and and my guess is they're probably fifteen or twenty fundraisers that people have sent me links to the support that we just haven't been able to track down but over ten million that we could track down all right. Let me get to the next question. The next question is this and i understand this question says. Why didn't i issue the report on my fundraising that i said i was going to issue a few months ago. Gosh it's actually i think all the way back in january. Now people are saying the same things. They always say that. I'm stealing money from families that i'm holding onto money from families families and again. That's literally never happened. When i raise money for families it has never gone into any account that touch or manage or have access to. I don't even they have the user names and passwords for these gofundme me's or any other platforms at the us. They're not tied to any bank accounts of mine of charities that i manage their normally managed managed by the attorneys for these families or sometimes by the families themselves but i found something really horrible that happens and there are two reasons. One is personal and one is for for the families. I'll get to the personal and i because i don't want to think i don't want you to think that it's just for the other reason but we hired a crisis communications since firm. This was back in january. When people are saying the question back in january is why did sean raise money for this young black woman who was in jail at the time in tennessee for she was convicted of murder. Why did sean raise this money for sin toya brown in keep it and it went viral. I mean he was shared. Tens of thousands of times all over the internet on twitter on facebook on instagram journalists were writing about it and media people were speaking out about it like why did shaun king raise as this money for this family and refused to give it to them and i literally never even knew this and toyo brown had a fundraiser. It never happened. I didn't share the link. I didn't know there was a link had nothing to do with it. I had spoke out a few times like saying yes. We need justice for sin toyo browns. He needs to be released. She needs clemency. Clemency like a million people did that and that was really what i did and i still to this day have no idea where that lie it came from originally who made it up. Originally a young activists in atlanta was the first person that i saw tweeting it but from there it went viral role and to this day people still ask me about it and i'm a have multiple stores. I've had a a young black woman here in new york who came up to to me on the street and it was furious wanting to know why in the world i would ever keep money for some toya brown. I had a <hes> two different front incidents at speaking engagements in january and february of this past year where people were legitimately boiling what anger wanting to know why raise money toya brown it wouldn't give it to their family and even when i told them when i told the young woman here in new york when i told will the young man at a at a an engagement i think was in january and a young woman in february. Hey i actually didn't even raise that money. They refused to. I believe it because people that said i did raise it. They thought they were credible. And it was so many people saying that raised it that they couldn't believe that dozens dozens and dozens and dozens of people were wrong in the thousands of people who shared it were wrong. They just refuse to accept it and they just thought i was lying and we hired this crisis communications this firm and they told me something that was true that anytime i mentioned this stuff mentioned hey people are lying about fundraising. I'm doing that. It doesn't make it better for me but that it actually in may sound complicated. It makes it worse i because the truth is that even though thousands and thousands of people are saying this about me and that's awful that when i say it now millions of people see see it and they then get to choose whether or not they believe me or not and i introduced this issue to millions of people and i'd already said hey we're gonna issue this report on the fundraising because i'm i'm proud of the fundraising that we've done and really the crisis communications firm just said we believe that if we just let this die down in pass away that that's the best thing for you on this and for several months it really was until until we started flipped the senate and that was two mondays ago and until riana announced that she was going to give me an award at her diamond ball and in both instances when we announced this campaign to flip the senate people were saying that's a fraud. That's that's sean scamming. You sean is stealing that money and what people didn't know and what they won. There is not a person on earth who could actually say are campaign to flip the senate and it is a fraud or scam or gripped which is a word that i never even use before. No one actually knew that because it's not true and what no one knew was that months ago when we were even considering this campaign and consulted our attorneys and all of that that we had made the decision decision months ago that i would never be paid from any of the work for for flipping the senate that flipped the senate campaign. We have nearly fifteen different employees <music>. I'm not one of them. I have literally never received a nickel dime or any benefit all of that work that i do on that flip. The senate campaign is for the love because i want to flip the senate. We need to flip the senate and everybody else was working around the clock on our staff one of the most gifted staffs that i i have ever been a part part of they are all paid. I am not and that wasn't in response to this. It was because when we looked at the legality of it we said hey as is a paid journalist. Let's not be paid for this work that i will advocate in my journalism not paid. I'm not paid to do that work. Other people people are but i'm not and so people started saying two mondays ago shona stealing this money sean keeping this money for himself. This is a way for sean to get rich which i literally have other means of employment. My my wife is employed. I'm employed. We both have bachelors and masters degrees and have worked hard for where we are in life and i'm not paid for this work and yet people said it as if it was fact and then when riana <hes> in and said that she was giving me this award at the diamond ball not just for the work that i've done in in electing district attorney's or advocating on behalf of families but also so working behind the scenes with her foundation again people said this guy scammer. He's a fraud. He's a phony. He steals from families. He raises money for causes that he keeps for himself and and so you know that original idea of never releasing the report it actually worked worked for about eight months so from january all the way to august not releasing the report seemed to help the issue of love me stealing money from families or causes or charities or businesses or anything else it seemed to help the matter until he came right back up and then the second reason we never released that report was something weird happens and again this is you've probably heard me show this lesson now a few times times. We're not just responsible for what we intend to do. Our intentions were also responsible for our impact and when people say sean has stolen money from the family of mike brown or the family of tamir rice family of eric garner or fill in the blank what they don't know is that every time people take those lies people contact those families over and over and over again and i mean white supremacists i mean ultra conservatives. I mean conservative media outlets. I now mean <hes> activists and organizers who think they are helping these families is to say hey let me help you get to the bottom of shaun king taking this money from your family and the families are grieved by not only does it waste their time time which have been a standard takes them back to a painful place and to waste any of their time on this is an abomination like i i never asked these families for anything and so that people are in the name of getting justice are going to any of these families families in bothering them over and over and over again when they have all already made statements saying no that never happened. I know this we now have this internal report that we've built out and i have a spreadsheet in front of me all the funds that we've raised and for all the causes i i know that when we released this report with statements from the families and all of their attorneys people are going to start bugging these families and harassing them saying. Are you sure that shaun king did not take money from you and here's the thing what people fail to understand is that if i kept a dime from any family from any business from any charity any of them from any political campaign anything that was meant for them. If i kept a penny it's not just shady. It's not just foul. It's criminal. I would be committing a crime over and according to people over and over and over again again like it's never happened and if it did happen once i would be in jail like that's that is the bottom line here in new york where <music> i'm not friends with the governor in the united states of america where i'm not friends with the president or the attorney general like that's that's the truth of the matter. I don't get a special hookup for scams and frauds where i do them in just never pay the price and so we are going going to release a report. We're building it now like putting it in a slick format that people can read. We're building a website forward as well and i hate that i hate to have to do it because most of these families literally spoke out in two thousand fourteen in two thousand fifteen twenty sixteen twenty seventeen twenty eighteen the twenty nineteen and it's going to subject them to further scrutiny and here's what i know even after we issue this report in and a website what i know is that people still won't be happy that they will still say but i don't know if we believe it. I don't know if this is everything. I i don't know if every dollar is on here because their problem really isn't actually with my fundraising because nobody whoever's funds for ever is saying anything about this. The problem is with me and so the problem they have with me. Bell still have after we released the report and just had to come to grips with that so that's why hi we never issued the report originally but we are going to issue it anyway christian. The next question is not funny but in some ways it does make me snicker a little bit. The next question is where did all that damn money go where did all that damn money go that i raised and aspen a few minutes <hes> trying to answer that i again when i raise money for families i don't raise it with stipulations when i raise money even for cause or charity political campaign or anything when i raise money. I don't then indictate but you better do such and such with it. Hey send me those receipts like that's not my business if we raise money for a family to be able to to bury their loved ones i don't. I don't follow up with it like what they do. If that is up to them i don't have the time the energy or really the desire to police what families do with the money we raised for them. When families have been impacted by police violence of white supremacy or bigotry or their houses burned down or they lost everything in a flood or a natural natural disaster. We raise the money for them. People send us links. We raise the money and and let them do with it what they need to do with it. I trust their decisions asians and if a family happens i i don't i don't have a story in mind we raise money for family and they spend it on something frivolous frivolous or weird or whatever that's on them like that's their decision everybody something different with their money. You've misspent your money. I've misspent money in in my business is not to train them financially. I i normally when i work with families. 'em normally contacted by their attorneys in it's normally attorneys that i trust and believe in and those attorneys often guide the families to on how how to spend the money in ways that will help them and give them the support that they need but when you ask where did all the damn money go i think again that there is some suggestion there that i had had the ten million dollars that raised over the past five years that i've ever had it and i never have ever period there is and there's is nobody's saying so there is not a family saying sean raise money for my family and never gave it to me. There is not a dollar in my possession an and never and there never has been and there never will be like. I am smart enough to know that that's not the best way to do it. <hes> i'm gonna no pull up and tell you just some of the people that we've helped across the years. I mean pull up an example. <hes> we raised two hundred eighty thousand dollars for the family of mike brown. After mike brown was murdered. We raised money for trayvon. Martin at galaxy goes all the way back to twenty thirteen when and trayvon was murdered. We raised money for the family of tamir rice three different times. We raise money for the family of tamir rice. There was a young brother and oklahoma who was murdered by a security guard named monroe bird. We raise thirty five thousand dollars for his family. Those a young brother in florida who was murdered by police raised ten thousand five hundred twenty dollars for his family was the umbrella that thinking in ohio. I believe that was shot by police. Ah child name rodez earns. We raised eleven thousand eight hundred and fifty three dollars. Do remember that young sister who was in class in south south carolina and a police officer assaulted her in the classroom and literally grabbed her while she was in the desk and threw her across the room. We raised forty ninety five thousand seven hundred and ninety two dollars for that young woman a girl when bree newsome climbed the flagpole and took down the confederate flag flag. We raised one hundred twenty five thousand seven hundred and five dollars for her <hes>. There were multiple charities in ferguson that we raise money for there was a sister named melissa alexander who you may recall was incarcerated after she shot what an abusive family member her husband or estranged husband. I believe we raise sixty one thousand seven hundred thirty three dollars and eighty three cents for her to help her get back on her feet when she was finally released on sterling who was <hes> murdered in baton rouge. I worked with <hes> each array and <hes> for the family of alton sterling in we raised for his children in a trust fund and for all of them raise seven hundred fourteen fourteen thousand six hundred and nine dollars. There was some people <hes> whose home burned down in right now. I'm looking at it. Says has the crosby fire victims. We raise six thousand three hundred ninety five dollars. We raised for activists and organizers and indigenous digits people in standing rock three hundred seventy eight thousand four hundred and two dollars for martial arts program for black boys in in detroit. We raise seventy nine thousand nine hundred and thirty six dollars. I could go on and on and on. That's where the money went. That's where all the money i went. I mean that i am maybe fifteen percent through the list. I see on here terrence crutcher who was murdered by police again in oklahoma mo- which is now currently the worst place for police violence in the united states for the family of terrence crutcher his twin sister tiffany is my friend. We raised one hundred sixty nine thousand two hundred and twenty dollars <hes> ac- philander castille here in four filanto's family. We raised one hundred eighty eight thousand three hundred forty one dollars. There was a young child who was incarcerated on rikers island named pedro hernandez and we raised one hundred and twenty five thousand dollars to pay his bail. <hes> there was a young brother in <hes> virginia who who was assaulted by white supremacist and we raised. I'm talking about the andre harris. We raised one hundred sixty six thousand and forty five dollars for the andre harris. I see stefan clark c. Antoine rose. I see neha wilson. All families impacted by police violence. I know these families. I see you both from john who was murdered when a police officer literally just walked right into his home and shot and killed them in his own home. We race race forty six thousand six hundred sixty five dollars. I'm speaking in september at the first foundation gala for the family of both john aw i care about these families and and still continue to care about them in never i have never talked about raising this money for any of these families. It's it's. I didn't raise it to get credit for raising it but that's where all the money went and when we add all of this up it's over ten million dollars owners. We raised <hes> over seven hundred and fifty thousand dollars in partnership with the artist vic mensa for young people in chicago. <hes> we raise money for young young brother who was a student at morehouse for his scholarship. There was a sister sister who was murdered by police in seattle named charleena lyles. We raised one hundred seventeen thousand five hundred twenty five dollars in each time we did this and that i mean there are things that we raise money so somebody could buy back some <hes> newspapers from the black panthers. We raise four thousand seventy dollars for for that. I didn't buy them. It was for someone else's project over and over and over again. We raise these months this money to to help people who who were in need <hes> there was a veteran who needed help upgrading something in his home. We raised three thousand six hundred seventy one dollars over and over again. We did this out of love for love. There was a sister who you may you may recall. Her name is crystal mason and and crystal. All she did was vote. She was a a someone who served her time on a previous conviction and after she was released her voting rights were not restored and she went to vote not with someone else's name not with someone else's identity a your driver's license her name in her precinct as she was told by the people there that she could vote that she was <hes> she was able to vote and she voted and got sent to prison ford. We raise forty six thousand six hundred thirty four dollars for crystal mason. There was a teenage girl named hannah williams just this summer who was shot and killed by police in california and to help her family. We raised thirteen thousand eight hundred twenty five dollars over and over and over and over and over again. This is what i do. I love doing doing it. I'm proud of it. I don't have any hesitation or shame in doing it and in each one of those instances i never received a dime nine never was told by anybody. Hey we'll support. If you do this we'll do that and whenever any back door deals just did it for the love and then i moved on don't and whatever families did with this money is up to them. I hope it gave them some relief hell. I hope it gave them if it could. I hope something joyful happened but i don't. I truly don't care because it's not my business. These families all suffered something grievous that interrupted their lives and i'm proud to have supported all of them but will release all of these numbers and all the links and statements statements from families and their attorneys. It's ridiculous to have to do it but we'll do it anyway. Question in the next question is has there ever been a fundraiser that i completely dropped the ball on. That's hard to say <hes>. I do what i can for each of these fundraisers and sometimes it depends on so many random variable sometimes a fund razer takes off and in that moment it could it literally could come down to the time of year could come down to to wear air. It happened who the some incident happened to what the tragedy was and there's so many different random variables that come down to it but in. I don't have it down to a science. I do it all the time but sometimes things take often sometimes they don't <hes> there've been times that i've worked with families and when i tell them that i will help them raise money that i think they think that means they'll be able to get all of the support they need and i wish that was always true. Sometimes i raise money for families and <hes> we raise a few thousand dollars and they may have needed ten thousand but we raised three sorry <hes> sometimes a family that that is befalling by tragedy. They may hope that they can raise money for <hes> a college fund on for their children because their father was killed or there have been times where we raised funds for disaster victims and they hope to raise enough money to buy new howson elson we we hardly raise enough money for a down payment or and and so sometimes it is disappointing other been plenty of times uh-huh where i knew that if i had more time if i had it that that if this was my job will to raise money for families and charities and causes i knew do that. I could do a whole lot better. There've been times where i needed to raise money for political campaigns particular like the district attorney campaigns that we fight for and for various reasons. I just couldn't get momentum going with it. I tried and <hes> and sometimes it works. Sometimes it doesn't <hes> i'd there have been multiple times that i've raised money and i didn't didn't really know the family well but raise the money money for them and then after the money is raised. There are disputes among the family on who the money goes to and that's complicated and i have nothing to do with that. I generally don't even mediated because there's i'm not a mediator and i'm not an attorney and i generally leave leave that work to the attorneys and families for them to figure out but it happens and and so yeah i mean many times i've raised money and after the fact it's like like <hes> this is this is difficult for the family automatically. They'll have the support but <hes> sometimes families do have difficulties figuring it out because many times when their loved one particular their loved one is killed or murdered happened so suddenly sometimes like imagine if it's if it's a young man or woman who scaled that pete families have it worked this out like they they never thought this was going to happen and so <hes> i want to say you know there's a fundraiser that just dropped the ball on but many times it got complicated for families and always hate to see that this next one is complicated and i see people saying this literally this morning on my instagram instagram page. Why don't i su- or file lawsuits defamation lawsuits against the people who say this and here's why it's complicated that is what i decided to do this past january there were multiple people who had posted complete fabrication nations about me and i formed a team of nearly twenty five different people activists organizers <hes> <hes> <hes> friends family attorneys and we looked at the things that were complete fabric saying you hate me. That's that's your opinion saying. You don't like the way i did something. That's not that that's your opinion. I'm talking about someone saying shaun. King stole money from the family of toy brown or shaun. King is keeping money from families. Shaun king is keeping money from pauses any of those types of things or complete fabrications shaun king plagiarize. This article from this person never happened ever period not once ever and so when i see these things things and then i just say on social media. No that's not true. Well people expect me to say that. I mean what would i say yes. I i did take money from this family and so if i did of course i wouldn't say that and so we got a team of people together and it was universal where we said yes. Let's let's file lawsuits and i would say of the twenty five people in the group twenty different people chimed in and i'm talking about primarily black men and women organizers from the movement and others said it's crossed a point where we should consult attorneys and move forward so i assembled a team of four black attorney's respected in different fields and we talked about how we should do it and one by one we just had a list of all of the complete fleet fabrications that had been issued in just said yeah. Let's go down the list one by one and not file lawsuits less. Just i ask them to please retract your false statement. It is damaging. It is a lie. It is a fabrication. Please retract it an issue some type of statement. We didn't say it had to be beautiful a friendly or anything like that just issue a statement saying i want to say hey that this thing that i previously said turned out to not be true. We need to say you need to apologize. Just issue a public statement on the retraction that deleting deleting it is not enough because at this point screen shots of it exists and it just keeps getting shared and shared and shared well people refused and not only do they refuse news. They then said that this was my attempt to silence and target black people black women this is me <hes> <hes> being problematic and it blew up and most people on twitter responded negatively to me threatening to potentially file a lawsuit whenever filed lawsuits we just said please retract it and please issue a statement on the attraction and it said if you don't we will proceed legally and people you know took screen shots of of those things and said hey i was just asking questions will when you say hey. When are you gonna give that money back to send toyo brown you were saying i have money from sin toya brown. It's not a friendly question and most of the things weren't questions anyway. They were statements and and end it got so messy so quick it became a national trending topic that it made all of us say hell there has to be some method of recourse but this is clearly not not a method that's working and and so now aw still as someone posted fabrication saying this is a scam <hes> this is a fraud. This is some shaadi thing to get sean rich any of these types of things that people say complete fabrications that no one has any evidence or proof of because because it doesn't exist and that's why the civil court system exists you file lawsuits not to send n. People to jail. I have no interest in that my only interest to get somebody to issue a public retraction. I'm not i'm not seeking monetary damage. Although it has done done significant monetary damage not just to my life but to the causes and other people that i fight for and fundraise for now when i fundraise for family people literally saying don't give to this sean going to steal the money which was the original intent of this lie when it was i said led by white supremacist but now it is hop the fence and become popular and other circles to say i'm doing this and so it's difficult difficult i mean i feel in some ways like i am in a corner. Where if i file a lawsuit people say that i am problematic and even if i i have just attorneys involved but when i contact people directly they don't want to deal with it and so it's a tricky position to the show so now the question that nobody is normally normally asked but i am asked it regularly and i think there's some assumption there. That's just completely inaccurate. Am i rich of their mini versions of it. Sean is getting rich off of these families. Sean is getting rich off of all of these fundraisers. We've already said it over and over and over again. I've received nothing. Nothing not not a fund raisers fee which is a thing when you raise money for charities when you're hired people sometimes get fifteen twenty percent would never do that like i literally. I fund raise for families as a hobby like in my spare time. It's what i love to they. Do the payoff for me is the reward of knowing that the family got some relief some support. 'em i rich hell l. No like literally. I would be happy. I'm embarrassed even say this but like i would be shamed for you to even look in my bank account and i have five kids. I live in new york city which may be the most expensive place not just to live but to have a family with five kids. We didn't have these kids in new york. When we had our kids we lived in the south and at the time never imagined that we would live in new york when my family and i just three years ago when we moved to new york city i'd i'd. I been working for the new york daily news for a year. I was the senior justice writer there and i agree that after the first year of working remotely for the daily news. I agreed that i would come. I'm in work in new york and work in the office. My editor in chief was a guy love and instill note to this day. Jim rich was really a mentor me and brought me to the daily news. <hes> we moved into a one bedroom apartment and i'm talking seven of us like i know we violated in new york housing using policies i know we violated the all we could afford and at the time my wife didn't yet have a teaching job she eventually she's been a schoolteacher her entire life if and she eventually got a teaching job even with her job and my job at the daily news we were struggling it was i mean that's how will hard it is to get by in this city. Taxes are higher here and at that time i think it was that one one bedroom apartment may have been the most expensive home whatever had like that's how bad it is and between what i was making what she was making and are five kids. It was tough and it's still tough. Our oldest daughter is now in college and we're doing rolling financial aid and student loans and things just like everybody else you know. It's we have another daughter who is now applying the collagen getting ready and i'm like i'm like every other family. How the hell are we going to make it and it's difficult and i mean we are literally. I confess like we are paycheck. Paycheck to paycheck. I said publicly recently that <hes> i didn't have health insurance. I i literally just now my wife guy health insurance at her job but we went this period of time where we didn't have it and couldn't afford it. I'd left my full time job at the intercept and the health insurance insurance that they were covering. I no longer had and for me to pay it on. My own was twenty three hundred dollars a month and i i paid for two months and by the third month i couldn't afford it and so we just didn't have health insurance and i literally went to the doctor. I have several across multiple spinal surgeries across the years. I have several chronic injuries that continue to plague me and cause pain and i went to the doctor for an an outpatient procedure and i had to pay for out of pocket on a credit card and when families say like he's getting rich. Oh he's taking an extravagant again vacation on money meant for families complete li- like we will sometimes save up month after month after month after month to be able to sometimes just take two of us on a vacation not all seven of us and in that rare time that the seven of us i can go. We literally are often sometimes putting it on a credit card just so we can have a beautiful experience together and then pay it off for months. What's on in the work that i do is hard and it has strained in and put a lot of pressure on my family and so when we can get away we try to do it right but no. I can't afford to buy a home in new york city. The a remotely decent house is outrageously expensive here i i. I couldn't even begin to communicate for you. How outrageously expensive it is today to try to buy a home in new york and most of the people who buy homes now here are either rich or they bought it twenty five years ago and so we are literally working people and not only does my wife worked fulltime but i work full time. I work multiple jobs now just to be able to make skins meat and because i have always worked multiple jobs <hes> i can. I'm always able to raise money for families without ever ever thinking <hes> i wish they would. I wish they'd pay me. I mean sounds ignorant even saying it but because i've always been employed not just these past five years but my whole adult life when i do the work that i do. I never expect anything in return and i you know i do the work that i do the work that i'm paid for in the work not paid for i do because i love it but no we're not rich and at least in new york terms probably never will being it is hard to get ahead in the city for sure and the final question russian is this and this is a question that i get a lot in that. My team gets a lot about me. <hes> the question says sean you have so much going on on that. I can't keep track. How do you do the action pack the northstar the breakdown and flip the senate and are those things all connected. How do i do all the work that i do and fight for families and fight against police brutality and <hes> service serve as this social justice voice on the tom joyner morning show <hes> and still right for the intercept and <hes> it'd be a surrogate arrogant for political campaigns and and work with real justice. I do all of those things one. I have several answers for that. My schedule is planned down to the minute every single day all a plan down to the minute in currently. I have to wake up at about five a._m. Every day just to do everything i do and i work now most days from five a._m. To seven p._m. That's what is that that is fourteen hours a day every day and it requires me to work that much every every day to do all of that and if anything gets thrown off it throws my whole schedule off and so i work a lot and i work hard hard at work efficiently. That's one thing <hes> also have amazing staff in teams that i work with in every one of those was places on the tom joyner morning. Show i'm on there every tuesday and thursday and i literally just have to show up the producers. The co host allston every they do the hard work. I just show up. I have to prepare but i i am prepared and show up and do what i do and the same thing is true you know right now. I'm recording the breakdown podcast. I'm in the studio for the breakdown and after i record all of this i'll send out audio to our producer willis us and an entire team willis will do all of the production of the episode but the sandra who is the associate producer on the podcast helped me get to this point helped. Make sure i had the time for it helped. Make sure i knew the material that i was going to cover and then there's an entire team of people that upload it do transcripts transcripts for i don't do any of that and i just come in and record it the best i can and and this the same is true for all of the work that i do do we have an amazing staff at the action pack an amazing staff for flip the senate and i you know as i say hey this about real justice and the action pack and all of those things if certain people in all of those places left it will fall apart. If i left the work could still continue. I bring a lot of energy. I bring up you know. I bring my personality. I bring my following my expertise and in things to the table but so much of the hard day to day work <hes> to make these things happen in real <hes> so many people that you never see in no are doing that and so <hes> it's all social good and so in that thing i'm in the same spirit every day but <hes> it's hard work and i'm and then lastly. I said this is a second ago. I love what i do and that makes it not draining in that sense all right so you know i've tried to answer a lot of questions about my work about fundraising where where all the damn money he goes and you're going to be hearing some more about it. We're going to kind of come at it from a more offensive <hes> perspective year in the weeks and months ahead all right. I gotta run but i appreciate you. Love you and thank you for your support. Take care of by the bring the bring the the the break it down for the break up of the the franklin.

shaun king attorney sean new york senate toya brown fraud new york city twitter united states oklahoma officer andre harris tom joyner rikers island new york daily news black panthers
Hard Factor 1/8: Cyntoia Brown Granted Clemency, Idaho Teacher Gets Off Animal Cruelty Charges, and Elon's World: Exploding Spaceship Edition

Hard Factor

20:20 min | 2 years ago

Hard Factor 1/8: Cyntoia Brown Granted Clemency, Idaho Teacher Gets Off Animal Cruelty Charges, and Elon's World: Exploding Spaceship Edition

"Today's episode of heart factor is brought to you by Tommy John. Hey, guys, it's the beginning of a new year. And I'm going to tell you about a resolution you can make today that you can accomplish in a matter of minutes and enjoy all year, go online to Tommy John dot com and choose to make two thousand nineteen you're most comfortable year yet. Listen, Tommy, John's sent me two pairs of briefs and a t shirt, and that was a smart move on Tommy John's part because I just bought seven extra pairs of boxer briefs from these fucking guys today without a doubt. Tommy, John underwear is the greatest pair of underwear I've ever owned Tommy John underwear as lake how ultra thin condoms wished they felt the fly on these things is unreal. The quick-draw fly. Let me tell you. It's a God damn joy to and these things not to mention it's literally impossible to get a wedgie and a pair of Tommy John's, you cannot fucking do it. I want to be buried in my time. John underwear that is a must now. And I've said it out loud. So it's verbally binding. A has to happen. I was leaning towards cremation until I got my cock. And balls and a pair of Tommy John briefs and now cremations out. Hurry time John dot com slash hard right now. For twenty percent off your first order. That's Tommy John dot com slash hard. For twenty percent off only at Tommy John dot com. Tommy, John dot com. This is Joe man. Randy savage in this factor in the risk. No one that does better like now. Yeah. But he does a better repeat myself going told me something right down. Moderate. Oh. What do episode of heart factor? It is Tuesday January eighth. That's the time of this. Recording clips in is kicking the shit out of Alabama in the national title game. That. Yeah. So congrats Portnoy nice win one. A lot of money top source of the day. West is going to do one about a long overdue pardon. That has been granted. Yeah. Seems like a no brainer to me. Pats going to take one about an Idaho teacher who has been forgiven for hating puppies. No. It's not true. Not my world, everybody the state only by the courts, I'm gonna do I'm gonna do eons world, the exploding spaceship addition. And then Markle take us through a lightning round of other headlines takeaway west all right, sin Toya Brown. A woman who has been serving a life sentence for the killing of a man who hired her as a prostitute. When she was sixteen will be granted clemency in August of this year and will be under ten years parole supervision as granted by Tennessee. Governor Bill Haslam as the two dozen four case ghost and toyah who was the underage sex slave of a pimp named cutthroat. Yeah. Shot the John coincidentally named Johnny Allen. And army veteran who brought the then sixteen year old back to his house for some hundred and fifty dollar sex fair price. She's what what a terrible prostitute prostitution's. The oldest profession have some fucking respect for the game. You're gonna. Kill someone. Well, the thing is though what wait, wait. You're mad at her a mad at her. She she killed the guy that's paying for says. She was sixteen. Choose force. Fuck the guy dude named cutthroat. Well, cutthroats, the blame you know, his worn cutthroat. If you're born cutthroat, you only got two choices jobs. One of them's pip names only giving dot cutthroat. Yeah. Here in person here. And he's the army vets that got shot in the head. He probably thought she was seventeen ish. All right. Some states. So joking. So so Johnny was sleeping peacefully since has shot him in the head stole some guns money and took off with his F one fifty. So I can hear all the rednecks out. Oh, God, not the guns and the F one fifty maybe a little upset. So she was tried and convicted as an adult and the prosecution claimed the killing was not in self defense. But a simple case of greed and robbery those sin Toya claims the robbery was out of fear to not return to cutthroat empty-handed, which was probably something that really chapped cutthroats ass. Not something you do know. That's the first thing he teaches you don't come back up to hand. Cutthroat has one rule. Yeah. He cuts your throat if you come home empty-handed. Could be coincidence. So this case gained national attention. The documentary was made about it as the poor girl was clearly the victim of underage sex trafficking and back in two thousand seventeen Kim Kardashian and Kanye west came forward to again voice their opinions on the case, which which through the case and do in the media spotlight or because you know, that's their job. Yeah. I mean, they got some clout one up since the killing Tennessee has changed their laws, and how they view sex slaves. Basically in today's court. She would have been seen as a victim and not a criminal in the original court transcription toy it was described as a teen prostitute. When in fact, she was just the poor child being forced to be raped over and over sex slave jelly. Yeah. That sucks. Yeah. That's not good. So since she wasn't has been incarcerated she's worked hard to turn her life around. She's gotten her associate's degree. She was mentoring troubled youth in prison. She's going to set up a nonprofit to help, you know, other at risk youth in Tennessee. And so she's. Wow. Thirty and and sounds like she might might actually do some good when she's released from from prison. Do we know about that? We don't do much good. No come on. That's a shitty. Shitty. Take just hunt. She's gonna be getting in trouble with the law again. Nothing. If not a realist, Mark, I I'm not buying the whole story to be honest with you, I think that she was more of a prostitute than a sex slave. But it's okay, she's six thirty and shoes she knew Jews doing she's potentially. Obviously not there's a lot of sexy regarding on. It's not good. And also, the probably go after cutthroat in the story, but I'm not buying that she's gonna be fucking model citizen. Maybe we should move on. Let's move on. Yeah. I mean, I don't even know we're gonna comments for this. It's basically she shouldn't be released verse. She should be released. Those comments is. Yeah. Like if she got jail like at the right time for her situation. Right. Like, she obviously has had some time to think about everything that's happened since he's been here yet. I mean, you guys remember when you were sixteen the choices you made it wasn't. I remember how I still tricks shooting people that had thing. Sucks thing saying, you might not everything was in your control. I guess everyone's at fault in this story. Okay. Agreed. Yeah. Moving on. All right. Okay. So here's a fun one for you. A grueling today trial in Franklin county, Idaho, ended yesterday with a verdict of not guilty. The accused a middle school teacher named Robert Crossland the crime feeding a puppy to a snapping turtle after school in front of a group of children, not guilty. Not guilty. Yeah. This all happened back in March when the science teacher from Preston highschool did what he was trained to do. Teach kids about the circle of life by murdering man's best friend the disturbing. Feeding took place after school hours, which is even creeper. If you ask me because it was like an extra credit assignment. It wasn't long before word got around town into a local rights and animal rights, activist and busybody Jill perish who filed a an animal. Cruelty lawsuit against the teacher was he a high school teacher middle middle school junior. Cross cross. Defense attorney did not dispute the accuracy of the story whatsoever. But did add that the puppy was sick. And likely to die soon that poppy was annoying the pub- the puppy had it coming. So this all started when Crossland son Mario had been given the puppy by farmer who informed him that. It was sick and dying. And it was like we'd what what the fuck like does this kid live in a sop fables? Did this happen when he made a wrong turn on a country road? Like a kid you want this sick puppy? Anyway, it is worth farmer would only give him a dying runt. Yeah. We'll also who the fuck did you ever get a puppy from when you were a teenager? The country. They give away like on the side of the road. Yeah. I'm curious about the farmers former Mario relationship, if he asked me farm farmer went by nickname of cutthroat anymore when his sister, they got the puppy. They tried to nurse it back to health. But look after a day. It was clear that this puppy was going to die. So they did the natural thing and gave it to their dad to feed it to his snake. They gave the puppy of fucking day, and they gave it to their creepy, dad. Like if it was that sick. They probably shouldn't have except. Hey, hey, you guys gonna use that sick puppy? That's what makes us really weird. Like, you can tell pretty quickly when puppies are young runs that probably aren't going to make it. So it's so weird that the farmer would give this kid a run that was. Yeah. So in the morning on the day of the feeding Crossland had brought the puppy to work, and he tried to feed it to a snake in the classroom before the students got there in the snake? Look up at cross on fended is blatant stereotyping. It's come on, bro. Really? So cross took the puppy back to his vehicle which happens to be a van, and he left it there for the rest of the day. So he's got a snake in the classroom. He's got multiple reptiles in the classroom. They're they're like pretty obvious you walk into class. Knicks just got a puppy inside. It's. Crowns was in the court. He like took the stand was like my pappy used to make me watch Curtis kill puppies off the time. There was there was quite a bit of that night. A so cross state after school that day to help some students with the project when he remembered. Oh, yeah. I left a sick puppy in my van all day. And he got an idea you said some of the to the effect of hey, you guys want help. Feed. My snake with a puppy from my van. Does anyone kid gave me? Yeah. Exactly. Then the members of his after school psycho club said no teach. We don't mind things like that. That's why joined this club yet to make the puppies, impending death more satisfying to the group of developing serial killers Crossland, let the group handle the puppy. And then he was like, hey, does anyone wanna take this puppy home? But that was the question yard already knew the answer to again because it's a psychopath club. And then it was feeding time. So we thought let's give the snake another stab. But the snake was like brought is this a trick? I'm still not eating this fucking puppy. But someone at the puppy. So we put it in a three hundred fifty gallon tank that belong to the class snapping turtle Monte who dragged alive, puppy underwater, drowning it and then eating it which is just like another day in science class. She's Shane Shane right shirt that teachers defense attorney said, quote, Mr. Crossland has several reptiles that need to feed regularly on live animals like his snake and people think he somehow created some suffering for this animal, but if he failed to feed is turtle that would have been suffering dangerous reptiles this guy have in the class release too. And this is a divided issue in Preston, Idaho. Because one parent said, quote, if you're not fine with it, you leave the room, and then he took a long pull of his cores yellow billion spit a dip on the floor. This snapping turtle, by the way was legal. And they put it down. That was actually the only charge. He got he got hung up got illegal to kill snapping turtle too. So the great move guy. Yeah. That's a fun. Idaho's definitely gonna Netflix special about a group of serial killers twenty or no, I I think that I've cracked the case actually while we've been talking I'm pretty sure that this was all Mario Mario orchestrated. This whole thing on you. He was given a run puppy. He was given a healthy puppy that turned into a runt to killed by his teacher. Yeah. If you live near this guy's son. Mario you're going to get killed soon. Are you did take the ten crying saying he thought he was doing the right thing? Given the puppy was dad who knew how to snake, but that's another issue. Tickets the internet Brannagh Welty brianna wealthy says. Wow. So one cannot feed a dead puppy to turtle without being the end of the world, but a woman can murder their babies in the womb everyday. What a crazy world this. Yeah. Yeah. Well, kids don't have to watch that shit every day. You fucking psycho. Hot antiabortion take. That's awesome. Anti-washington? Mill school kids. All right. Let's take it over to Ilan's world the exploding spaceship edition so NASA and SpaceX are scheduled to wash their first test flight of the falcon nine rocket and the dragon spacecraft together on January seventeenth those cool. Cool fucking names, really cool names. This is the first time that this quit the falcon nine and the dragon has been used in combination. And it's a test flight for the first commercially crude mission that should take place about a month after the test. And so we need to get invited to like a nerdy. Like viewing party of this of this launch saw like Oscars party. We should definitely try to attend one. If they have those. I'm sure they do, but we spend our whole lives trying to not associate with nerds. We don't know any. Well, we got. So the tests may be delayed because ninety percent of Nassau's furloughed. So the government shutdowns affecting whether they can have it. That's not really the story today. What we're talking about? Now is how lon- musk has finally agreed with hard factor that the odds are very high that this puppy explodes on its inaugural launch. While the test flight is not man this first one, isn't man. The next one will be Alon had this to save regarding the risk, quote will be extremely intense early flights are especially dangerous, and there's a lot of new hardware on quote. So basically like don't be surprised if this thing just fucking explodes. It's going to explode. So one test flight where it might explode and they go right into human testing. Right. The one just just one just the one guaranteed failure. Who's next you know, that you're pissed if you're next up. Some people thought that NASA might be upset by Musk's warnings about a possible test failure because they they paid for, you know, low low likelihood of failure. But apparently, they probably agree with him. Nasa consultant, Wayne HALE said, I think it's impossible to fly new space vehicle without learning. Something significant that you did not expect second flights are only slightly less risky. Mr. musk is definitely well advised to lower expectations. A second flight. Definite, desks. Third flight. Maybe like like who's wife's going to be a widow at the end of the second flight things. Like that. Would you learn right as Alon musk and this NASA guy, just two megahertz telling you that like, oh, we'll definitely kill you without thinking twice about it in the name of space progress. So it might never be my never be safe. But we're gonna get some up there. Eventually eventually, we'll have to kill about fifty may maybe a hundred who knows I lying if I said that the pictures of the spaceship on launchpad, aren't really awesome. So he's dragon and falcon how could it not look fucking bad ass looks pretty cool looks pretty cool, but taking it to the internet. Tina right is not happy. She says go home, we need a wall. And that was oh, yeah. That's basically that I tried to look at comments for this one. It's like a bunch of people who are like scientists who are like actually discussing like what the whole of the space cares spacecraft is made out of. And then there's like random people who just pop in saying, you need more liberals to shoot up to Mars. I think they're taking it all wrong here. I think that they're too focused on the wall between US Mexico. It's already it's already too late to many Mexicans of gotten. Let's get up to Mars early build the wall before we colonize Mars fresh start. There you go. It's like, hey is it time to go to Mars yet? What was the wall Bill? All the shame of America on Mars. Yeah. We'll wait till the walls done. Yeah. I'm not going up until that Walston. So let's get to some things. We didn't some stories win and get to good news for snowbirds looking for cheap vacations. Seven men have been killed in a shooting attack at a bar and Mexico's Caribbean. Coastal city of Playa del Carmen authority said Monday, so tickets the plateau Carmen, they're gonna plunge. That's what you don't leave the resort. No, you do not leave the resort in other news related to Mexico. President Donald J Trump tweeted, I am pleased to inform you that I will address the nation on the humanitarian and national security crisis on our southern border Tuesday night at nine PM eastern time. So tune into that tonight, there won't be any football with this probably going to be alive wall building over under whether he declares a national emergency. I say abs- fucking Lutely. So that's like a yes, or no, yes or no. But there's no football tomorrow and trying to make a little football. I think he's gonna shoot on over to the border and how someone working on the wall over one hundred one point five. National emergencies declared what's the spread on that? We'll see we'll see some glorious plans. I think. Yeah. I just got it a gamble. You know, not a sports guy. But I gotta give this week. So I'm about a great time. Right. Like a month after Pete Davidson had a meltdown and told the world he was going to kill himself. He got to go home with Kate Beckham sale after the Golden Globes and allegedly dipped in it or so the moral here is whine and cry like a little bitch. And then you get to fuck another ten, you know, Mark I've been I've been trying my life. It doesn't work. Well, it's working for him. It'll make get over some heartbreak Becca Pete. I'm so suicidal. I'm not gonna wanna sleep alone night. And it doesn't I mean, I do dude. In college that Slade with the depressed act. Like, I mean, just murdered just cleaned up. Like any bar? You know, he was like Gould. I don't work on them. What's the point? Anyway. Oh, yeah. So to depress to put to impress just hurt. Too much. Kevin Spacey was in court on Monday where he pled guilty to groping an eighteen year old busboy back in two thousand sixteen tip better. Yeah, he won't be back in court again until March fourth. Why were a fifteenth nineteen year old boy, I would probably steer. Well, clear Spacey's house the next few months because everyone knows the few months before you get locked up you jittery and you go him. You know, it's very true. Gotta get it. In might not have it for a while. Exactly. In a story that Florida tips can store that Florida can only tip their cap to a man in Memphis. Tennessee was arrested for allegedly yelling racial slurs at a group of thirteen year old kids and then chasing them down in his car while Brandis brandishing a gun after both of the groups left, the Family Dollar store. Matt each other, okay? Family Dollar classic Family Dollar parking lot scenario. And WikiLeaks on Sunday advise journalists not to report one hundred and forty different false and defamatory statements about its founder, Julian Assange, so clearly Sandra one of his buddies at WikiLeaks got drunk and angry about some article someone wrote about Assange and went way overboard here. But hey in the spirit of not liking to be told what to do by nerds. I'm gonna go ahead and spread three false statements about Julian Assange right now, Julian Assange is normal looking join us on just great at keeping secrets really and Julian Assange never sexually assaults women. Al- falsehoods? And that's going to do it for hard factor. Now that the holidays are over. We're back on the grind we had the number one episode in our category for yesterday's show. So thanks so much to all the listeners, we really need your support to keep this thing. Growing spread the word. Subscribe to heart factor on every platform under the sun and leave us flattering reviews. If you haven't already and make sure to do the same on, your friends, family, and enemies phones. Hell if you live near Verizon store pop on in that motherfucker and subscribe to heart factor on all those sample phones too. Big things coming in two thousand nineteen please. Remember to have a great day. And we'll talk to you tomorrow.

Robert Crossland John underwear Tennessee Idaho Tommy John Mario Mario Julian Assange Tommy Tommy John dot Mexico Tommy John John dot Toya Brown Randy savage NASA attorney Joe man Kevin Spacey Johnny Allen football
Cyntoia Brown- Free at Last

expediTIously with Tip "T.I." Harris

39:01 min | 1 year ago

Cyntoia Brown- Free at Last

"Thank you for listening to this. podcast one production available on Apple podcasts. And podcast one allowed. You don't even know I chewed dron coming up. Miss most domestic minor sex trafficking. You know it doesn't happen like that you run into what you call these Romeo pimps a lot like my situation where you can be dead in the center of it and not even know. There's a lot of people in society who reinforced that belief. Who Will it's eighty that there are just some young girls fast? Some young girls who were just promiscuous and doing that that's misidentification of people who are actually victim and there's no such thing as a teenage prostitute. There's no such thing as a minor who was consenting to her own exploitation. So I mean that's that's a big star. We need to really understand what it means to be a trafficking victim in this country with diverse individuals. What is does your family marriage? Is he a travel is elated and they were all loving. All the kiss showgirl in go took my Kinsey. Andy and Ashley lead a march on is all real real expeditiously. I am too now. The following experience is not a test. The compensation stores expressed on this podcast meant to be an expression of purpose. In truth this show probably title. Expeditiously is a free exchange of ideas and opinions no judgment preconceived beliefs no fear you're encouraged rich to share your thoughts and as any question as long as it's done spit nast through true love and respect for others that we change the world and speak truth to power one show at a time eh further. Do this is expeditiously. I'm Ti Harris. Today's specialist expeditiously. Today's gases a person who's real life story story I I learned about it a few years ago and just like everybody else. I was outraged after her case went viral me and other celebrities and other people who won't to maintain fair and decent treatment of women and children man. We stood up at the cow. How after being convicted and sentenced to life in prison and a two thousand? Four murder of Gianni Allen afforded three-year-old Nashville real estate agent. I guess today said Allen picked offer sex in East Nashville She shot him as he lay in bed next to her to defend her own life and escape the terror that she was being subjected objected to. She told police that he was reaching for good rightfully so she did what was necessary. In those circumstances she was sixteen at the time. Her story galvanized the celebrity community and the community at large who began championing her release and now her new memoir recent recent toy you my search for redemption in the American Prison System Center. You chronicles our journey leading up to and during her time at the Tennessee. Prison for women in Nashville. Please welcome finally after all this time to expeditiously the Queen's Sin Toya Brown long was going Oh and on a man that is just truly feels like a blessing to see you Hear enjoying the the liberties of life is you should be after so long I can't start this conversation without saying how proud I am. And many others are of you your story worry. It angered and inspired and motivated people around the world. And I'd be remiss not to make that statement my first cost of business. Do you ever get tired. Tilling store or hearing about it. You know. Sometimes it's not always comfortable and sometimes it can be like odd rather talk about other things but I just keep reminding myself that God gave me the testimony for reason and so many other people can be helped by it and I mean who cares if it's a little repetitive additive. Who cares if it's a little uncomfortable? You know there's a lot at stake so I get it I mean So how how many years did you actually sir. I actually serve fifteen years to the to the T.. Sheesh man I mean like so. What was your mindset light? flightless say before your case went viral were you already candlelight digging into the library and what was your mindset at that moment before all of this came to a head so from the time that I was arrested. I was told that I'd be tried as an adult. You know. I started learning everything that I could about about. The law asked my lawyers you know. Bring me and whatever you can The black's law dictionary. But she brought me I still have it. It's tattered sauce started digging in. Oh really China understand everything that could and continued. That always made sure that I research. I didn't really rely on just leaving it in the hands of lawyers although I had capable lawyers uh so I had always love you like you. Okay you're always your own best advocate and so I was in that place yes and I was getting lawyers. who were extremely experienced? Who knew judge is an appellate courts? And I'm thinking each time. Okay this is going to be it because this guy knows this this guy. Yeah but appeal after appeal. It just kept getting denied and I kept holding onto the help that I would get out someday but in November two thousand sixteen. My last appeal was denied. My Federal Habeas Corpus and clemency. There's literally a slim to none chance that anybody. He ever even received a recognition of their petition by the Parole Board less than a one percent chance and that was my only chance at that time and I remember it was like March march. Two thousand seventeen. I was talking to my husband and I just really just broke down because I was like I may actually do life in prison and you know. And when he first wrote me he said you know God is bigger than any sentence. He's bigger than any judge. Any jury he can turn it around and he will. He's already said he's going to do it for you. And so he asked me point Blake. Are you gonNA believe man's report or you can believe God said I said I'm just going to have faith in God and when I started getting closer and developing a relationship with them I started to see how things started turning around without me doing anything the appeal that you know a federal federal appeal federal. Habeas until you have to get permission to appeal that they told me was dismissed and I couldn't appeal it. It was dead it was dead and got reopened and and it was like wow and fast forward four or five months out of nowhere out of nowhere all of a sudden. I'm going into the school and the teacher says girl. Have your people been on instagram. I'm like I don't know why she said Tia tweeted about you I was I. It's it's probably not real. It's probably a fake account. Fake accounts and it just kept coming so rapidly and I started to see. Hey how God had such people all across the world and I was coming from a place where you know. We're not seeing. We're not heard from and to see so many people just just stand up like it really did give me hope man. I think you know it infuriated me that a judge couldn't see that a a sixteen year old foul reasoning to take such necessary action due to the what she would she. He was being subjected to and said that no reason for her to take white man's life. That's what I saw when I a net made me upset And that's why you know. I began to make phone calls and post off and just figure out what's the play and everybody said the only way to do to get to the governor. Let me ask you this. When has them? The former governor of Tennessee took the rare step of granting tinge clemency commuting mandatory fifty one years behind bars fifteen years time served what do you think. Inclined Him Promoted him or motivated him to do it all of a sudden because this wasn't the first he heard of cases. Yeah well this actually was. was you know in the beginning we had already before the the things started to go borrow. We had already been in contact with his chief of Staff Gadget. The attorney the Council for the governor and so we were really just getting advice on how to move forward strategically with filing the clemency petition. And when you first reached out to him about it he was receptive. Well we hadn't talked to him. We had talked to his people giving me some pointers legal team. Some pointers and everything was done very quietly and so whenever this happened I was like really nervous because in a state like Tennessee like attention no and that makes them. I'm even more critical. That makes them even more skeptical. And you have to think we're dealing with a man who this may not be the end of his political career. He may decide to run again. And he's a Republican governor so we were really worried But he made it very clear that he was going to focus on the petition. He wasn't going to allow the sheer amount of attention to make him pay any more or less attention because he didn't want to come across as him being unfair to others or to me so I was really grateful for that is noble. Yeah and so you know. He decided that you know fifty one years is too long for someone at it especially when you see that. They've made such strides to change their alive. I mean especially when the acts were were taken in self defense I mean of course I'm biased. So you know this is not going to be the A neutral interview have a I have a a a a point and position and maintaining it. So if you don't like it you can stop listening now You said in interview that you spent time with the former governor and his wife and I think this is a true example because I say people all the time. It's not about black or white. It's not about Republican Democrat. It's about a fair and decent people who feel like you know people should be treated the way they like to be treated. They behave survey the other people who think that they should be treated differently from everybody else because of the color of their skin they behave a certain way. And whichever side. Agile whatever color you are. That's just what it is But you should you. You spent time with the governor and his wife the former governor and his wife and he shared which you wish he'd Ridge a book before leaving office. Why why do you think he said that you know one of the things that I've learned about being in prison? The people that can really change things have the power to change things. They don't always know what's really going on drugs and always know the truth. A lot of things get covered up by the captains by the warden Gordon Missionaries and a lot of times. They're really going information that people feeding them and they're being they're being given and it's it's not always advertisers. It is and it's definitely in advisors have agendas you know more so than anybody else I think for him it was. It was just sobering seeing how many times that I had interaction with the state. How many times there were points of intervention? How many times? They could have got it right but they didn't and you know for him to for that to come to his awareness. It was like there was things that is the governor could have done. I wish I knew these things. Then that's amazing. So would you think back to sixteen-year-olds until you Like what was missing going on in your life that you feel that you had to resort to such such a thing as such So young and your life and that's another reason why I wanted to really just dive into everything that happened leading up because there was a pattern. Okay you know there was a pattern of me wanting to feel like I was accepted me feeling that I had been outcast and I wanted to find somewhere where I belong and it had got to the point where I was just desperate desperate to be accepted desperate to be wanted and you know there was someone who picked up on that exploited that right I mean I I think a lot of girls and I have daughters. You know so. It's incredibly important in in a priority for me to to make sure the options are always listed in abundance But two young ladies who made made may be in in homes folks did you know aren't as stable or whole as they should be for their proper upbringing. What advice can you give someone you know? One of the things things I had to learn especially being in prison is you don't have to be a product of your environment. You don't have your actions don't have to be defined by the circumstances you're in or the things things that you're taught There's always people who are willing to be positive influences. There are so many groups out here in the community who are working with young girls working to temporary young girls and you know my thing is I spent so much time trying to appease other people. I didn't. I didn't have to do that all along like like I'll have to do anything to deserve. God's Love I don't and there's always gonna be somebody who has something negative to say there's always going to be somebody who feels that you know autumn belong. They're going to try to count me. OUTKAST's me out. Cancel me out. So I mean it's it's it's pointless to try to live my life please other people and I wish I knew that when I was sixteen right I mean I think a lot of people you know go through that that face some some phases a longer than others others were you know they just they just search for acceptance. They searched for validation everywhere. But within you know what I mean and I think that that's a that's an excellent message during your sentence because time is hard to do. You know what I'm saying like it's like nobody will know anyone the one who's been in these situations or circumstances that ever was like. Oh Yeah. This shit was a breeze. You know what I mean. Time is like time is hard to do to be away from your family. It's the little things waking up in opening the frigerator seeing the light. Come on you know what I'm saying like the little things that you miss that that make it more mental into the physical. A lot of people think always dangerous. And you know you get stabbed and beat up. But that's you know that's trivial compared to the mental anguish that the end the psych and the psychiatric Issues that you face going through lengthy period of time especially if there's any solitary confinement involve We the C O B Surreal digs too. You know what I'm saying I'll tell my life for real you ain't never ran in your life. Have you magic digger saying you have absolutely no authority nowhere else. This is the only place where you come in. Assert some artificial authority on people. Why would you do that like why would they do it? So during your time to take your mind off the bushy tailed people. Like what are some books that you that you read. They really we can to help. You grow and helps you evolution so one of the first books that I read that I really loved was caught. I am now by Martin. Buber you and I am Dow I now okay and it's It talks a lot. Philosophical book is a hard read like you have to read it like five times and I was seventeen so social the dictionary right and taking notes right then it's about relations it's about like honest relation. Not The the superficial the you know the the meaningless or really just trying to use people but like really getting to know like people for people relation and the second book was Jesus and the disinherited by Howard Thurman and I would start to read that book years later and it's actually a book that Martin Luther King Junior would carry around Adam. Okay Yeah and so. That was a really good book. Rules for radicals a Saul Alinsky. Was this holiday. I think it was solvency. Rules for radicals So that just really taught me like you know how to be your own advocate basic. This Reu So those three books where some of the closest to me but the most important the most meaningful okay was absolutely the Bible. I always heard a lot about it and assumed that when I actually sat down to read it It it really changed me now. The thing about the Bible and always give the Bible. I I will admit I get a Bible tough time. You know what I'm saying. Because of how many timed and man has gone in rewritten to suit his own needs But I I can say that it still holds true to this verde. No matter what you're going through. You could just pick up a bible. Open it up start reading and right there where you start reading will will be an answer to something that you're going through your life at the time What was like a groundbreaking Tim? Eli Some groundbreaking lessons early owning your sentence that you Kinda head to learn to allow you to mature can adapt somewhere to your environment. Really just start paying more attention and observant to the people around me You know I was used. It's always just walking in a situation. Just Kinda blindly and I was on solitary confinement for two years before I was ever allowed to be out with other people. People kind of just jumped in the mix not really knowing what was going on. Found myself back on Max on saw Palmer for another year while started in solid jake mom at sixteen eighteen sixteen and eighteen and then when I came to prison I got in a fight and went back for year when I was eighteen had just turned nineteen so oh you spent your eighteenth birthday in solitary confinement too. I think a lot of kids who run around and really light you know just carryong Areo Actions in engaging at activities with no consideration of the consequences where it could land him how it could affect their futures. They don't think about those things you know no possible. I know that like they never. They never think about those things and I think thanks important for all of us who have who have experienced endure those types of those types of horrible conditions to let kids know the bike. I don't over spoke yourself. Find out what you can handle some. We are gaining. Take being on punishment. Can't use. Your phones came so let alone being tossed Five seven. You know what I'm saying and and and can't see the light of day and have all of your freedoms and liberties snatched away from you force. It do nothing but read and speak to yourself like if that's it's not really where you want to be in any way you want to take your life. You should be considerate of eggs. You choose to engage Sir activities I think that's a- and like you said kid a usually used to just walk into situations no strategy no evaluation of it. Just Kinda die He first sensitive frozen late hoping they nick Straw. You know saying I think these cazar testimony is incredibly important. You listen to expeditiously Apo- cares what your net rating for this expedition chef continue. When did you start writing so I had tried to write for several years? I was always told that I should. I should the book you know. I should tell the story and I don't know if it was because I didn't feel that it was finished. I didn't know struggled with how how how to put it and it just I would start stop at one point. My manuscript even came up missing shakedown and it just was never coming together and and so I wanna say December either late November December twenty eighteen church service where I worked in the chapel and one of the volunteers volunteers it said God said. Write the book. Are you serious yes just at the Blue God see right. The book right book and I was like well. I've been trying S. I go back and I call my husband and I'm like what do you think about this. And we pray about it and he was site the book and so start to ride it and it just starts flowing out of me. I was cranking out like two chapters in a week and within three months. It's I had my main street finished. That's amazing started working with the Ryder. That's at three more months. So now freese into a search for redemption in the American prison system is available edible wherever people go and buy blocks near the audio books as well for those of you lazy motherfuckers still. Don't I want to read okay. So you know we we've made mention of your husband and and you recently got married to a young man that many of us may have came. Aim to know as part of an RB group that you know had quite a few hits in the early two thousand but I wanNA offer him opportunity. You know to to speak you can share. His perspective is where could we. Could we get another mic. Setup is where so. Tell me how how did how did you guys meet. What would what was the beginning beginning of this romance so the beginning of this and he may want to tell you but the beginning of this was actually a there we go? We want to hear him but we would like for you. Eddie began it began. I was sitting on my bed after mail call and I opened up a letter from someone in Texas edges were burned. Sometimes like that's interesting. See deliver like that before and I started reading sauce pictures and wrote him back. I didn't really know of anything transpired from there but you know we started riding back and forth talking on the phone as you know expensive phone call hours a day and you know I'm at my best friend. And he was there for me on those moments that you talked about when it's hard when you feel like you're trapped and like you just feel feel helpless and you always WanNa talk to your mom. You Always WanNa talk to your family and living what you're really going through. You know personal stuff. Yeah and he was that. Here's that person for me Bro. Been Awhile Man So so for those. That don't know you were you a member of the you know the A Super Group Pretty Ricky Bakti by twelve years ago after After pleasure love our came in there for a while right right Oh it was a job. It was a job when I was trying to. You know okay so you were not part of the original get you so I came handed job. No I wouldn't look for fame and unlike that you see like a pretty reserve kid. I mean according to the Internet I'm not Macleod Chase. I mean I'm pretty sure you know things get mixed in screw Atlanta Internet can how I I will I know but you know I will lean on the benefit of the forgive the blood of Jesus Mac giving us when I I say fuck them people. You know what I'm saying I really don't care. Then the baton on it has S. Shit is for the birds because as long as you can't you must live your life you you must I mean but at the same time and you know we we is so many is on us man you know and we want to be the perfect examples tempelsman Because my wife situation it wouldn't just for her. It affects a lot of other people if we could control the narrative and keep the narrative true because we live. We're not true short saying that's what we want to do. You know what I'm saying now. Okay so let's let's go back to before. The edges of the letters will burns burns. Let's go before okay. We want to get into what major. Burn the edges of the letter but even prior to that. What made you write sin until you? How did you find out about her? Honestly man like I say I was. I was sitting in my room. I have writer's block one day. I was doing still doing things. Two thousand in seventeen January two thousand seventeen OKRA and I've seen a on on youtube him room now. It had been posted on there for a few days and our click. I seen. It was like an hour long and our lane away often watch this whole thing on. TV right just same thing hour later. I'm looking at the TV. While I was crazy. This ain't right. I walked back out the room before I can get back to Other part of the crew was going to felt. It must be the writer. I didn't know what to say. You know I put the pants at paypal. It was just like hey how you doing. My name is Jay my name is Jamie people call me J. Yeah you getting out of prison prepare yourself you get out of prison uh-huh and I put the paper in. I'll put the HASHTAG. The freezing toy has to get the bottom or put it in an envelope and this was actually Eh like before. It was a Hashtag right. Anybody News for you. You know what I'm saying. So it's like Put it invalid. Vote in some told me pull it back out and burn edges. And that's what I did. You notice what caught our attention. You know what I'm saying so I didn't expect no reply back I was doing. What House doing I mean? I don't think at that time of my life. I was like yeah. I'm about to marry somebody in prison. You would have told me that. Dan like crazy. I mean I'm living pretty comfortable life. business running successful can do what I wanted to go out. WanNa do your money straight. I'm okay so were there any fears or concerns. There is a lie apprehensions going into like with a person who is not only like serving a life sentence but who become the face of a very taboo taffy happy. You know what I mean like. That seemed like by that taboo topic. I mean sexual abuse sex trafficking. You know what I mean like. was there any apprehension. There man I know fears and faith man I story is faith story that Israel fears faith. Brother you got to pursue it be obedience and what the Lord is telling you go sit down somewhere and let somebody else do as real. He gave me an assignment. I did it and you looking at so I must not have been lying. Ever really say pitchers thousand words in presences were for me. You know what I'm saying As you begin your advocacy efforts like what are the greatest challenges that you're facing right now at this stage in life for you you know honestly I feel I don't really feel I have any real challenges. I think that I've I've overcome the greatest challenge also is just I mean that's that's small Marr. Once we get out of and I say that like I said I know compared to you but a ghetto me man who had been serving like you know about twelve years when I got you know what I'm saying like cats asked me. You know what I'm saying about my my time in my aspin's I'm leaving. I don't want to talk about I. I'd be damned if I talk about my pain and you know me not wanting to be here for my Gat Damn Year in the day. And Hey y'all Elliot's been in here year old mess. Look this is. I've been here thirteen years and I know more ready. Did it go. Today was the first guy I mean but one thing I can say that once we get out of there though nothing else seems like a big deal anymore anymore now and that's what I keep reminding myself what you said like the challenges that I'm facing a blessing that I can be dealing with these things and I always carry them with with me. The people that are left behind always think that they would love this opportunity so for me if I did have to say something that you know that I carry that I feel like this is this. This is a challenge that I'm facing. You know getting people to understand like to look at me and say okay. Well maybe there are other people who deserve second chances. Maybe you know I was wrong. Maybe we do need to change things. Form is necessary because I know they're counting on it. I can remember when I was sitting there and anytime I would hear someone speak about prison. Reform about changing laws. We get so. Hopefully we will get so happy you know because I mean. They depend on that. They're trapped in there a lot of them. Don't have a bills left. And they're they're I just hope for change. I mean man you have an amazing spirit Both of you I support you. You know what I'm saying. I I look forward to what you guys will be able to do in the future. Speaking of what you'd be able to do in the future Tell me what's Knicks wasn't an explicit toy so oh we're actually working With our attorneys on starting a nonprofit the J. Fan Foundation or also knows that foundation for justice freedom of mercy Um we're hoping to be operational by next year and one of our first campaigns is actually going to be the glitter project which was something that I had started when I was in college there at the prison and it's the grassroots learning initiative on Teen Trafficking Exploitation and rape and that was actually the interview that the just started everything going gone. Viral was actually supposed to be me talking about the project. And I'd only mentioned clemency. Just just just enough for people for the Noah wounded and you know that became the story but it really started with me feeling that it was necessary for us to begin talking about you know all the different factors that come into play with making girls more vulnerable to being exploited the messaging that we take in around us the the things that you know adults adults are teaching children consciously and subconsciously and. I really think that it's time for you. Know a shift in cultural norms when it comes to that And so that's that's all you're going on. I think this this phenomenon in you know efforts are aligned because after finding out the Atlanta was the number one like the Capitol for sex trafficking In life for the sake of my daughters I feel yeah I feel the need to get involved you know so now. I've spoken to my governor who reached out to me after he saw video. The Taylor did I've seen now see and we we working with his wife To do due PSA's and just kinda go about Putin some kind of programs together That they can offer alternatives and you know an candidate just prevent preventative maintenance for girls. Who feel like they don't have? Yeah I mean And a lot of people don't even know I are coming up missing. You know what I mean. Let children are coming up missing. It's a real six slave trade that is you know the dog web is real. They're they're Real like secret societies and super rich people who think that they could actually by human beings and use them for whatever. Do they want to and if you have runaway girls if you have People who feel like you know both parents Kinda uninvolved. They don't have no real guardians so well nobody missing if they come up missing I dash. It is real even down to the Uber drivers in you know what I'm saying like they. It's Uber Draft. Some people who have scanners who tried to take figure out. What Uber driver for Uber? Drivers say he's GonNa come pick you up here. It's people out there who are trying to beat the Uber driver. But they're impersonate the UBER driver. Get you in the car. It take you to a a a a a known location. Do whatever the kidnap you no you can cook. Thank you turn the truth. Most domestic monitor sex trafficking happen like that. You run into what you call these Romeo pimps you know a lot like my situation where you can be dead in the center of it and not even know when I was doing what I was doing. You can tell me that that was what was happening with me. I was in in a relationship. What do you mean like for this is my man? I'm just doing what I'm supposed to do to bring stuff to the table and you know there's a lot of people in society who reinforce that I believe who will say that there are just some young girls who are fast some young girls who were just promiscuous. And you know doing that. That's misidentification of people who are actually actually victims and there's no such thing as a teenage prostitute. There's no such thing as a minor who was consenting to her own exploitation and and you know we as a society don't really understand that there's people in law enforcement who don't understand that so I mean that's that's a big start. We need to really understand what it means and to be a trafficking victim in this country absolutely not in for that reason. I'm glad that we're having this discussion I think it's so much that we can do together. And I will enforce your efforts to bring awareness and prevention and I would ask if you are okay okay with that we do A. PSA together left him. Okay Koo Koo adulated date. I'm sure you know you guys get up there and and and j what what what you say you have a company like. What is it that you would like to share about your company? Always good is running man. I just on home health and I gotTA DNB company okay. Okay don't company Sodas back in Texas and it's all machine is Ryan Yourself Lemay will. Congratulations rose congratulations goofy yellow. Happy that you gas found love and that you will finally united in you know your unionists complete. I really do appreciate the opportunity to sit down which you can thank you guys for making yourself available recent. Thank you for everything that you're doing not just help give a voice to people who can't use their own man man. You know where you know what happened man. My kids started getting old enough to have to actually go out and live in the world when my daughter you you know my oldest daughter. She started driving. She got on Creole. Dan I got nineteen year old son. He got his own car he gone. You know you're going to get his own career not going back and forth to school. I got another center right now. His eighteen out on tour You know what I'm saying. All so as all of these things began Bantu happen to young teenage boys and girls. I was at a physician who I was having to let go Kinda of my children and send them off to create their own lives for themselves so I feel the defiant then gained notoriety always influence and did absolutely nothing with that would help make the environment or the the make the world a better place for them to live in. Then I I feel like I would have squandered. It affects us all even the justice system like people who don't think that it affects you because you've never done anything in your life that doesn't mean it. Can't we just one decision away. This this is true especially the way you know. Policemen deal with our young black and women you know males and females men and women girls and boys Being shut down and merged with no accountability in their atrocities that are happening in our communities. Every day I'm familiar me with police. Brutality I was on the end of it. Just thousandfold may stay right right okay so here expeditiously right right. We have a thing we do. It's called word of the week. All right all right. So word of the week is a word that we select from the dictionary of my vocabulary. Oh Cavalier and it's a word that I think that that is indicative of the discussion and represents the guest for the day. So this were are for the week is clemency now. Clemency is a word that we here but I wanNA make sure that we understand what it means in both regular sense of the word and end legal. Says I ain't so the definition of clemency. Is Mercy lenience kind gentle or compassionate Shen treatment You know I think that we can all agree. That clemency was definitely Louis Warranty in your case. But I'M GONNA use it in a sentence jeff for those of Y'all you know saying who too lazy to do it yourself and when I use it in the same as usual Countess lantis clues. You can take it to work tomorrow. Take school usually like you've been knowing that all your life sin toy you brown was rightfully granted clemency. After fifteen years years in prison. That was a short sentence. You can go and make another fancy when for yourself if you like but that was mass. So thank you missing Toy Brown loan

Tennessee Nashville Bible Toya Brown Dan I Texas attorney Gianni Allen American Prison System Center Martin Luther King Kinsey Apple nast Ti Harris Tilling Parole Board China writer Saul Alinsky
1-8-19 What's News

The Nicole Sandler Show

06:00 min | 2 years ago

1-8-19 What's News

"It's time for new coal Sandler's. What's news from the coal Sandler dot com, and the progressive voices network two thousand fourteen all of the major networks refused a request from then President Barack Obama when he wanted to address the nation to present his plan for immigration reform to the American people for some reason, all of the major TV networks will air Donald Trump's eight minute address Tuesday night on his promise border wall. Live after the White House requested they make space in their prime time lineups ABC CBS FOX and NBC all confirmed Monday that they would carry Trump's address to the nation on what he calls, quote, the humanitarian national security crisis at our southern border democratic leaders, Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer have asked the networks for equal time to respond to Trump's address. Meanwhile, if the networks, insist on carrying the speech live, many are suggesting life fact, checking even running the speech on a short delay allowing the networks. To respond to Trump's lies as they happen. For example, a few days ago. Trump said that past presidents agreed with him on a wall. This is national security. We're talking about we're not talking about games talking about national security to should have been done by all of the presidents that preceded me, and they all know it. Some of them have told me that we should have done it. Not so fast, captain bone Spurs, all four living former presidents have now denied telling Trump that they support his long promised border wall during his Oval Office address. Trump just might announce he'll declare a national emergency in order to get his stupid wall. Have you considered using emergency powers to grant yourself thirties to build this wall without congressional approval and second ago, you have yes, I have. And I could do it if I want so you don't need congressional approval to build we can use. Absolutely. We can call national emergency because of the security of our country. Absolutely. Now, we can do it. I haven't done it. I may do it. I may do it too bad for him that the resident legal expert at Trump TV judge Andrew Napolitano, FOX said no can-do, the president has valid emergency of thirties in time of a true emergency. But he can't spend money, and he can't take property unless the congress has authorized that that's directly from the. Constitution Trump shutdown is now in its third week. And if no agreement is reached by Saturday will become the longest shutdown in US history. And if no agreement is reached soon, hundreds of thousands of federal workers will miss their first paycheck this Friday, astonishingly. Trump says he can relate. That are on the receiving end will make Justice. They always do. And they'll make adjustment people understand exactly what's going on. But many of those people that were be receiving paycheck. Many of those people agree one hundred percents with what I'm Bill. No idea what it's like to live paycheck to paycheck. One of Trump's latest lies got a big pushback this weekend. Surprisingly from Chris Wallace at FOX who didn't let Sarah Sanders get away with the Walker. He began with a clip of Kirsten Nielsen head of department of homeland security CPS stopped over three thousand what we call special interest 'Lions trying to come into the country in the southern border. Into the Intel community has a dentist fide are of concern. But special interest aliens are just people who come from countries that have ever produced a terrorist, not terrorists themselves and the State Department says that there is quote their words, no credible. Evidence of any terrorists coming across the border from Mexico. We know that roughly nearly four thousand known or suspected terrorists come into our country illegally. And we know that are most vulnerable point of entry is. This detest. I didn't know if you're gonna use it. But I studied up on this, do you know, where those four thousand people come where they're captured airports, not always airport. Certainly department says there hasn't been any terrorists coming across the land. And it's by see it's all of the above. But one thing that you're forgetting that the most vulnerable point of entry that we have into this country is our southern border, and we have to protect it and the more in. Coming across the southern border, Sarah they're coming and they're being stopped at sea. News broke a story. Monday night that says CB p encountered only six immigrants at the southern border whose names were on a federal government list of known suspected terrorists during the first half of fiscal year. Two thousand eighteen starting Tuesday one point four million Floridians with completed sentences will be able to register to vote the single biggest in franchise -ment of voting rights since passage of the twenty sixth amendment to the constitution and finally sin Toya Denise Brown. Tennessee woman serving a life sentence for killing a man who bought her for sex when she was sixteen years old has been granted clemency after fifteen years in prison. Brown was sixteen when she killed a forty three year old stranger who picked her up and brought her to his home sentenced to life in prison for the two thousand four murder. Her case gained national attention last year. After a began circulating under the hashtag freese in Toya Brown lifted further by. Celebrity supporters. Her defenders said the team was forced into prostitution by violent boyfriend on Monday. Tennessee governor Bill Hasler granted her clemency. Adding that she will be released on August seventh and on parole for ten years. And that's a bit of what's news for now. I'm Nicole Sandler of you. Appreciate these reports and the Nicole Sandler show, I he'll consider making a contribution. My work is one hundred percent listener supported and I can't do it without your help. Find out more in col-, Sandler dot com slash donate.

Donald Trump Trump Nicole Sandler Tennessee President Barack Obama president Toya Denise Brown Sarah Sanders NBC Nancy Pelosi Andrew Napolitano Chuck Schumer FOX ABC White House US State Department Intel governor Bill Hasler Mexico
Democracy Now! 2019-10-18 Friday

Democracy Now! Audio

59:02 min | 1 year ago

Democracy Now! 2019-10-18 Friday

"From New York this is democracy now I do private she showed me mercy that you give me a sick the yeah welcome to democracy now democracy now dot Org the Warren Peace report in addition the US with lifted sanctions on Turkey. It remains unclear what will happen to Kurds who live near the Turkish border former Obama official carrying out summary killings and unlawful attacks that have killed and injured civilians in northern Syria Kurdish authorities report at least two hundred eighteen civilians Turkey has refused to call the deal a cease fire on Thursday a Kurdish commander said they would accept the deal but only along part of the border and transfer it would involve massive ethnic cleansing essentially he said meanwhile Amnesty International's accusing Turkey of committing war crimes under Operation Peace Spring will be paused and operation peace spring we'll be halted entirely on completion of the withdrawal five days Turkey invaded the region after president trump withdrew. US support for the Kurds Vice President Mike Pence announced the deal after meeting with the keep fighting we'll speak with Sin Taya Brown long and one of her first interviews after prison all that and more coming the New York Times reports the do quote amounts to a near total victory for Turkish precedent because it would allow Turkey to keep occupying parts of northern Syria been killed and the Turkish offensive including eighteen children acting White House chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney publicly confirmed Thursday so at the age of thirty one and has now published her memoir Free Centra Might Search for redemption in the American prison system here you there people who understand what you're going through I understand I've been through it myself and they were Thomson Turkish President wretched tape aired one and Ankara Turkish side will pause Operation Peace Spring in order to Oh for the withdrawal of forces from the safe zone for one hundred twenty hours all military operations I'm Amy Goodman shelling is continuing in northern Syria one day after Turkey agreed to a US plan to halt its assault on Kurdish controlled areas for Colin Powell told The Guardian quote if they really think they're going to push the Kurds all the way back to behind the m four highway that's a huge population after years of protests Sin Toyo Brown was granted clemency by former Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam she was released just two months first degree murder for shooting her rapist as a teenager the shooting happened Winston Toyota was just sixteen years old but she was tried as an adult they need admission could mark a turning point in the impeachment probe Mulvaney made the comments while being questioned during televised press briefing at the White House redant trump blocked nearly four hundred million dollars in military. At Crane attempt to pressure Kiev to investigate the Democrats House Democrats say you meet Cintra Brown long she was forced into sexual slavery as a child and sentenced to life in prison after being convicted social demand for an investigation into the Democrats was part of the reason that he was on the to withhold funding crazy the look back to what happened in to that did he also mentioned to me in past the corruption related to the DNC server absolutely no question about that but that's it and that's why we held up the money now there was a report oh I didn't think that I was GonNa make it but the Lord brought me to it and can bring you to it as well so just just keep faith and to any young women and girls who find themselves and the situation that I was in I would say that there are people that funding will not flow in west the investigation into the democratic server happened as well we do we do that all the time with policy Mo Mick Mulvaney went on to continue to defend the administration's actions I have news for everybody get over it there's going to be political influence in Foreign Policy Mick Mulvaney comments shocked many in Washington for directly undercutting president trump's claim that there was no thousands sixteen certainly was part of the things that he was worried about in corruption with that nation then that is absolutely clear this is a quick profile it is oh quid pro quo with Ukraine hours after the news conference ended Mulvaney accused the media of misconstruing his comments issuing a statement country addicting his previous remarks the statement read in part quote let me be clear there was absolutely no quid pro quo between Ukrainian military three eight in any investigation into the two thousand sixteen election he said the US ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sandline confirmed the house impeachment investigators that president trump had delegated Rudy Giuliani his personal attorney to be in charge of foreign policy around Ukraine sides wrapping the State Department Sunlen said quote I did not understand until much later that Mister Giuliani's agenda might have also included an effort to prompt Ukraine in Related News Energy Secretary Rick Perry has announced he's resigning by the end of the year he was recently subpoenaed as part of the house impeachment and ends to investigate Vice President Biden or his son or to involve Ukrainians directly or indirectly in the precedence twenty twenty reelection campaign he said Miami Golf Resort in Florida the announcement was widely criticized Robert Weisman president of public citizen said quote it's hard quarry over his role in Ukraine the White House says announced the next g seven summit will be held at the trump national to imagine a more blatant violation of the constitutions anti-corruption provisions then the president steering foreign governments to stay at his luxury property unquote on Thursday acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney dismissed the criticism claiming the White House had determined the trump congress sort was the best possible site in the entire country to host the summit we'd all the environment we live and Y'all know the environment that we live in he knows play trump bedminster he got over that a long time ago he we absolutely believe this is the best place to have it we're going to have it there and there's going to be folks who will never get over the fact that it's a trump property we get that but we're still going to go there acting chief of staff Mulvaney also revealed one of the world's most pressing issues the climate crisis will ackley that he's going to get these questions and exactly that reaction from a lot of people and he's simply saying okay that's fine I'm willing to take that the same way he takes it when he goes to trump mar-a-lago the same place when he goes the United Nations reports a record forty three hundred civilians were injured or killed and Afghanistan between July and September these are the highest figures since the UN began counting in two thousand nine this comes as the US is intensifying its air war last month US Air Force aircraft dropped nine hundred forty eight missiles and bombs more than in any month in five years British lawmakers are scheduled to vote Saturday on a new brexit deal re not be on the agenda at the g seven as you're looking at the content of what you want to do next year I'll be hot Florida in June vo climate change climate change will not be on the agenda and news from Afghanistan civilian casualties have reached a new high between British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and the European Union opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn said the Labor party cannot support the brexit deal this is flourishing of the nation's third largest school system died when the prime minister seems to have made a deal with the European Union which doesn't give us the complete freedom of movement between Britain and Holland Co Teacher's Union as well as seventy five hundred support staff represented by ESA you launched their strike on Thursday the New York City Council has twenty five thousand teachers represented by the Chicago island because it creates a customs union board down the Irish Sea and secondly it does nothing to deal with all the concerns that we've raised during are disgusting these jails should have been closed years ago we are doing it today I will probably vote yes thank you all very very much a prison reform New York City Council Speaker Cory Johnson back the closing of rikers conditions matter these jails decades human rights activists have protested the violence abuse mismanagement inside rikers island and cold for its closure yet many activists over one hundred million dollars to hire thirteen hundred cuts now they want to spend ten eleven who knows how many billions of dollars building what would be the tallest skyscraper jails in the World Ziana a Cuban asylum seeker has died of apparent suicide while being held in solitary confinement at an ice detention center the ACLU of resources on instead of investing billions of dollars in locking up our children our children's children we're talking about multi generational jails here for decades and we're here to stop them inland eighteen years in prison over their role and Catalonia's two thousand seventeen bid for independence from Spain Lebanon's witnessing its largest protests in the oppose the plan to replace rikers with four new jails the group known new jails NYC staged protest outside City Hall on Thursday proved an eight billion dollar plan to close rikers island by twenty twenty six and build four new jails across New York City and what many are calling a national model years earlier today demonstrators blocked roads with burning tires and marched in Beirut on Thursday the Lebanese government dropped the plan to institute new tax in the United States meanwhile the Group Freedom for immigrants is reporting to Cuban asylum seekers detained in New Mexico recently slit their wrists missile from nationalist says two American corporations in Chicago a city wide strike by teachers and school support staff has entered its second day forcing the Aijun of Spain this comes after days of street protests by Catalan separatists on Monday the Spanish Supreme Court sentenced nine Catalan separatists layers up to thirty easy ANA condemned the death of Roland Anandas Diaz saying quote we will not stand by while ice tortures people who are exercising their right to seek asylum the so-called progressive needs to take that money and spend it on what would actually keep New Yorker safe and keeping Yorkers out of jail things like housing education healthcare including mental health care these are the things that the city should be spending a of Korea con during a routine police check but then members of his cartel responded by laying siege to the city overwhelming the police and Mexican National National Ballet of Cuba despite being partially blind Alonso became one of the most celebrated dancers in the world and those are some of the headlines at least nineteen others are planning on doing so in an act of mass resistance a general strike shut down much of Barcelona and Catalonia then released him after authorities came under attack by heavily armed drug cartels the the Auguste Mon Lopez a leader of the powerful Sinaloa cartel was detained in the city this is not a member of the group that you haven't fifteen the same mayor and city council members but it's increased the NYPD budget hard fighting raged for hours at least two people died the Mexican police eventually withdrew and released Bushman at least twenty prisoners also escape during the chaos assist democracy now democracy now dot Org the Warren Peace report I'm Amy Goodman at the age of sixteen shoe was arrested for killing a man who'd aww one is begging to teach his son we want to live in dignity Mexican security forces briefly captured one of the sons of El Chapo on Thursday for murdering forty-three-year-old Jani Allan Estate Agent who took her to his home for sex in two thousand four Sin Toya says Allen Miami private ship on his IPAD rice bottom in rights protections and we believe the deal he's proposed he's heading Britain in the direction of the deregulated society juveniles in Tennessee who are sentenced to life in prison must spend at least fifty one years behind bars sin Toya's case drew widespread addict day and the legendary Cuban Ballerina at least Alonso has died at the age of ninety eight she was the founder of the internationally renowned I today's Sin Toya Brown long joins us to share her experience what's happened in the fifteen years since she was incarcerated and how she won her interrupt for sex after she'd been forced into sexual slavery as a child she was sentenced to life in prison after being convicted of first degree murder for shooting her rapist but she was tried as an adult and convicted of first degree murder and aggravated robbery in two thousand six without the possibility for parole until twenty fifty five in January. I can't make for what I did but they get a chance to do so much more I've been able to help people X.'s on calls made through what's that protesters have condemned the Lebanese government for failing to tackle the country's economic crisis in what is amazing young people young kids they listen and I'm still going to try to help people I still am was behaving erratically and owned a number of guns and that she feared for her life when she shot him in the head and made her escape at the time she was being sexually trafficked guest she is now thirty one years old this week she published a book about her experience she's doing her first interviews her memoir is titled so you are sentenced to life in prison at the age of sixteen years old if you would go back and time and tell us what happened on the night of August seventh two thousand and four what led to well everything that has happened now although there were so much before rapists and the victim is thrown away for life after her repeated appeals in the case were denied Sin Toya's spoke at her clemency hearing ace in an incredible development Sin Toya was granted clemency in January after former Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam commuted her sentence real estate agent any back to his home to start acting really strange I started and repeatedly abused and drugged and forced into prostitution by a pimp nicknamed cutthroat she was just sixteen years old at the time of the shooting office guns things like that things just really escalated and it came to a point where I shot him I felt that something was about pension and social media under the Hashtag freese and Toya Brown pop superstar Riano wrote some things horribly wrong when the system enables these and I was going out meeting with men having sex for money and one of them that had picked me up was forty three year old man as you said with criminal homicide so how much can you understand a at the time you were sixteen right at the time I was sixteen free Centra my search for redemption in the American Prison System Syn Toya Brown long welcome democracy now it's great to have you with us and I feel called to share that and whatever you decide I respect it but I do pray that you showed me mercy a spoke with them freely I felt that you know I have defended myself so I didn't have anything had next thing I know I'm being charged go back and went back to the hotel room that I had shared with cutthroat about within twenty four hours the police had come and arrested me says the charging process I didn't letting get it I know whenever the detective had spoken with me before I went into the confession room you know he kinda just said find out after the fact that I was sixteen years old still didn't attempt to try to call my parents try to call so on the night of August seventh I was involved with a man by the name of Cutthroat as you mentioned and yeah I really didn't understand the gravity of the situation that I was in the situation that led to me being arrested and then of course the entire arrests price even though what happened that night leads to your sentence of life in prison I want you to go so I was born Fort Campbell it's a military base race in a military community Very supportive community my family was very like I was in a situation that I just couldn't get out of although I just want to just leave felt very uncomfortable with showing I'm not GonNa let you down that was sin Toya Brown long speaking in January she was ultimately granted clemency and released from prison and odd talking to me is going to be the difference between nine years and nine years so choice was obvious right no lawyer no parent did you give me a second chance that is my prayer and I can assure each and every one of you that if you do like a walk disappoint you lawyer anything like that take us back because you're referring to cutthroat a man you've come to see a very different way than you did as a child back in your own life now and tell us about where you were born and what led you to the point you were on that fateful night at the time I did tell them that I was nineteen because that's what cut had told me to save the police ever caught me you know couldn't tell them I was sixteen however they did from state custody from the facilities that they had placed me in and I started staying on the streets in Nashville and I was on the streets in Nashville with the and then I entered into the juvenile justice system so pretty much downhill from the time that I entered alternative school from juvenile justice system I started running Mckenna John you're poor and we are asking for jobs spelled for her rights Christen water we are demanding education going on and I had always wanted acceptance from other people had always wanted to be seen as though I belong natural for certain kids found myself an alternative school round the wrong crowd alternative schools are pretty much like schools version of is it something that people need to understand something people need to know there's so many things I've you're saying now that I didn't know there's so many young people that still don't know it was kind of treated as an outcast and started to develop behavioral problems attitude problems the school labor me as the it would go to school and other kids started pointing out that I was different from my parents I was different from other people didn't really feel like I fit in anywhere I had known him just for a few weeks just for a few weeks and I had met him right after I've been for the first time lot was somewhere and so it was rather quickly that I found myself just drawn to him I felt that he listened to me in ways that no one else listened to me what happened to me I left went back to the room pickup truck right God in his pickup truck I was the only way I could take my mother's a teacher my father he's retired military Had Pretty much everything that I needed as a child but the hotel and this is what you can do it was like okay I want to do this because I love this person and I'm just contributing to the relationship I really felt in my head that I was in a relationship with this man and so when it came time for him to say we need money for this we need money for guns with lectures and when I say lectures I mean like hours on end Smith telling me you know you're nothing but a slut no one will ever completely unhealthy thought patterns that I had developed from actually being on the run learning unhealthy behaviors and healthy understanding that I need to get by so with all those seeds they're already planted it was his work was you know was already done so that I had met from running away whenever I was introduced to cut and explained who cut through was so cutthroat he Mr Allen the man that I had ended up shooting I had really come to expect violence from men and I really think that that played a with different things started skipping school actually wound up catching my first charge with some of the other kids that I have met at Alternative School I was actually adopted directly from biological mother so she had actually asked the family that I was with you know there was times that one time he actually had choked me until I pass out like the man could have really killed me that was actually on the night right before I had met jake role and what happened that night and it would take years for me to really just unpack everything to just really process all the trauma that add kid started finding out that teachers wanted to just get rid of me they would put me in iss for the little things little smart remarks that just course they always start out nice very charming and you know then it would lead to snatch me up a little just shake me up when did they explain that your parents explained that to you so I found that out I guess I was like five whenever I had started school of sexual relationships I really had come to see my body as you know a good to be traded for shelter for food for money for the things and you know I was in the classroom your parents bring you to school because it's the first state class an ESA T- teachers talking with my my mom and Dad I'm then you know it's just somewhere to just toss kids in sixth grade you were tossed out of school right right sixth grade so started getting in deeper or maybe I was thirteen somewhere in there I think I was thirteen actually something that happened in March so thirteen years old and Tia call this friend to begin this friend ever good enough so I remember getting in the car with my mother after class and you know I asked her and she explained to me Oh I was actually I had come back from court from the facility the court didn't tell my parents that I was having court that day they just brought me up I really built up when did you come to understand you had been placed in the foster care system is an infant so I was never placed in the foster care system a family friend who had been sexually abusing well he hadn't been sexually abusing me he'd made an inappropriate comment so he drew Gyna- new wrangled you so it didn't start out that way naturally I don't know many people that would stay in a situation where it starts out that way I was previously on a trip with them whenever my parents had gone out of town for their anniversary and the people that we were with had sent me out to go tell him to setup this lens for me where I just started feeling like oh I really don't fit here do I don't fit here either and so it was just just a season you know that was mixed and that I was adopted and there was introduced this idea of this mystery woman that I came from and that colleges we know that was different and one question lead to other questions to a full blown interrogation from kids that's just what they do you know one answers and and whenever I said hey it's time to eat he had spoken to the personal phone who was like yeah small boys daughter She's one of those due to take care of me she was incarcerated she was in and out of jail and they adopted me directly from her so I was never placed in foster care they have implanted explain the moment when you are in one facility or school and your parents couldn't come to pick you up so they sent playing with the other kids and I can remember one other little boys he'd asked me you know why don't collect my parents my mother's dark skin my father as well and girls it's developed and all the right places and you know I have been raised on lifetime movies so I knew like there are certain trigger words that were just not okay apart from the detention center and they were going to release me well my mother she was at work and she couldn't just leave she didn't have a substitute she called my father my father had already come inside to come into the cabin because dinner was ready and whenever I went out he was sitting in his truck with his leg hanging out door open he was on the phone with someone in my mother made sure that I understood that and so you know I slammed the door on his leg Iran inside and told the group that I was with you know what had happened I want you with me and you know my mind I was like this is not true but you gotta think like have that's really just thinking to me I was already in place and like I'm being punished now like I was going to get to go home but because I don't feel comfortable around this man I spoke up about it now I can't go home so d left he was driving trucks at the time and he called his friend to come pick me up and this I was twelve twelve thirteen I can give you for me being thirteen years old that meant that they can hold me up until I was nineteen years old because it's an indeterminate sentence and so it's like wait I'm expecting like go in on this man like this is not okay but the reaction that I got was he walks in and they just had You know I had never really thought about it I didn't feel any different mommy and poppy they had never treated me any difference so there was no reason for me to like really Allman at court the clerk I'm not going with him I don't feel comfortable leaving with him being alone with this man she tells the judge and the judge says fine L. Someone I need to speak up about things and I do it and nothing happens so fast forward all these months later and he comes the court to pick me up well when I tell the and tim apply the steak and everybody just sits and talks normally and so it was like wait a minute you know I'm always told that we'll put you in state custody and stay custody is the worst fear of every kid who's been involved in the juvenile justice system because it's the most severe punishment take that is my prayer and I can assure each and everyone of you been if you do like a walk disappoint you I'm not GonNa let taught me the exact opposite we're gonNA break and then come back to our discussion we're talking to Sinn Toya Brown long she's a sex trafficking cer- fully definitely wasn't healthy definitely didn't teach me that you know it was a good thing to speak up for myself it was a good thing to advocate for myself stronger happened at her first trial and then beyond and how a child gets sentenced as an adult stay with us has the goal of the juvenile justice system is supposed to be to remove the tena criminality their focus his post to be rehabilitating any individual that comes into the court transfer hearing because the district attorney had actually asked the court to try me as an adult and so what they do is they actually number one they find if there's probable cause to believe that you actually we've been close piles doc so at the transfer hearing testified I was still transferred I was tried as an adult they figured that there was just not enough time Eliot Brown long who is a sex trafficking survivor sentenced to life in prison after being convicted of first degree murder for shooting her rapist as a teenager she committed the offense and then the second part of the hearing is determining whether they're actually resources within the juvenile justice system that they can use to treat you owner granted clemency and she's just gotten out of prison this is wonderful I post prison interviews we'll continue with her learn what it was granted clemency by former Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam in January she was released from prison this past August she is now thirty one years old out with her memoir free teenager he's showing his guns you shoot him you leave the police get you you have no lawyer and talk about what happened in your hearing your explain what a transfer hearing is and then ultimately what happened in your trial how you ended up with life and person descend Toya my search for redemption and the American prison system so let's take it to your arrest within twenty four hours after left within the juvenile court jurisdiction which was three years two and a half years for them to to help me so I go uh-huh who is your cell who were you allowed to see yeah it I mean it was horrible it was it was horrible you know the cell is about the size so shortly after my rest I was assigned a public defender and that public defender was part of the juvenile court so it was her job to prepare my case for you murdered the man who took you home you were terrified by him a you he was going to give you money for sex you're and sexually trafficked and repeatedly abused drugged the shooting happened Winston Toya was sixteen years old but she was tried as an adult since will to the adult jail to the county jail house in up I myself solitary confinement to be kept away from the adults how long are you in salt or can find two years and you know it was really hard especially with everything that I was dealing with because you had nothing to distract you had nothing but everything that you were by Mary j live this is democracy now democracy now dot Org the Warren Peace report I mean the goodman were talking to Sinn Toya Brown well now some Sir of probably your bathroom at your house and you don't get out much you get out for an hour a day if they remember you this is before the trial this is solitary confinement you're a teenager for two years for two years yes for two years because every I did not I had wanted to testify but my attorneys advise me against it because they felt that my earlier statement in juvenile court could been US acing all the anxiety all of the thoughts all the trauma everything that you're trying to deal with is just there in that room with you and this is before the trial aww time mental health constantly just feeding you different medications because when you're telling them you know I'm feeling this I'm experiencing this they just find another pill so finally make it to trial and I was convicted I was convicted on all counts did you testify in your trial I to impeach me because it was different from when I was telling the police that cut had nothing to do with anything I didn't even know him I had just met him so they said that now at that time had to be in solitary confinement dishes how they did I mean they didn't have to be there was you know juvenile facilities that could have house them until they were eighteen but Where you can go outside to be locked in a Kennel which pretty much a dog Kennel it's a cage offense to engage and then they'll take you to the shower one of the women who actually worked in the juvenile court office the Defenders Office head told me you know you're facing life and I'm like wait what do you mean I'm facing made and also talk about how your view of cut cut throat changed how you came to understand what sex trafficking was right right so actually getting to see like that forced me to really rethink things and it's like you know they just kind of use you as going to be drug through this time in a different way than when you were on the streets absolutely absolutely the entirety so my view of himself like that that took time to change because whenever I was first incarcerated I was still thinking like this is my boyfriend I know what happened and when you were sentenced to life in prison so the day that I was convicted this was believe it was the fifth other people to speak up for you but there's never going to be anyone that advocates for you the way that you can and so it's really difficult and at the conclusion this isn't what I thought it was and they let me know like it's important for you to tell the court everything like you're facing serious charges here you're facing life in prison interesting so I didn't they never got to hear my side of the talk about the day you were convicted describe where you were in court my attorney is telling me that he's making statements against me to the police I don't believe him because he told me not to believe it he told me a head of time that they would tell me these things and judge you know my attorneys had brought up the fact that I was with this man that was abusing me they had brought up the fact that you know day of child and you'd never spoken I had never spoken to sat there in the courtroom showing up everyday just listening and you know you're listening to everybody us from the time I was sixteen until turned eighteen I was in solitaire confinement what was that experience like what does it mean to be in solitary confinement how large yeah I was just so loyal but I mean he didn't deserve it at all but averages so loyal to him and it took for them to actually sit down with me fly I didn't even know that was a possibility for me at age of sixteen and some other attorney had sat down with me and she took a piece of paper and she divided into four sections one big assault on on on everything that that I felt about myself like it just made me feel they said you could not speak right when it came to the trial they advised me not to testify I wanted to testify my family wanted to testify but they said that it wouldn't be my best ah me having testified the way I did and the juvenile court they could use that to impeach me come to find out later that they never could have used that to impeach me anyway because comma indication of what happened and I remember there was one man and was a black man and during jury questioning they had asked him if he had any and so you know when I went to the Juvenile Court of a psych I'm going to have to tell them everything and I did have the transfer hearing at the transfer hearing but when it came to your that's just what they felt was more convenient for them so house and Juvenile House and solitary confinement as a juvenile anything said at the juvenile transfer hearing can't be used again shown later proceedings some attorneys who are mistaken you know that rather major mistake to have there was actual photo evidence where this man was taking pictures of me and I can remember you know my attorney had taken the picture it was folded up and I was like that's not good and it's like I knew then you know and I looked at every single one of their faces mother had left because you know they told her they won't come back with a verdict today and so my mother had left in there by myself with my attorneys experience with the justice system and he kind of thing you know that would make him you know biased and he had said that he had nephew there was actually involved in this system a deliberate the better it is like this is good like Shirley I'll I'll get fifteen years for second degree murder worst-case scenario like she'll be awesome I guilty the automatic life sentence and she's stuck there like what just happened you know so it's automatic life sentence horrible horrible human being made me feel you know this is my fault like what happened with me with cut like I didn't I didn't ask for him to do those things to me but I was made life sentence it doesn't matter if you're juvenile no consideration is given to any mitigating factors there's absolutely and so I'm thinking okay he's GonNa fight for me because he understands but whenever he came in he looked at me and he just hung his head and shook his head things about cut and you know I got to see putting it on that paper that you know the bad far outweigh the good this is the man who held guns to you who strangled you no way around that it's automatic life sentence mandatory so let's talk about what happened to you then in prison you're an adult person fill that that I did ask for it so you're in a holding area and then you're brought in for the verdict some in the holding area and they tell me actually that you're sixteen years old you face life in prison if to serve over half a century of that talk about and of the trial the jury deliberation I sat in the holding cell for a while had they brought up your age and trial they did they brought up my it's here program from a local university lipscomb university in Nashville that had come and they offered college courses free of charge For I agree like is just it's not what happened you know you keep thinking like I know what happened like that's not what happened surely they won't find that and so I talk about the worst thing that you've ever done and paint you in the worst possible light it's it's brutal brutal and you can't even speak up for yourself like you're having to depend on it Erkin prison system talk about the educational system and the prison and who you came to meet so my entire life I could if you were sentenced that day to life in prison life in prison in the state of Tennessee anytime you're convicted of first degree murder it's automatic number always feeling like I was thrown away like I wasn't worth salvaging he know and of course the entire process it just reinforced that belief about you know these people are actually listening to what I'm saying and they think I'm smart and they don't think that you know I'm some dumb girl who made all these dumb choices all right my attorney didn't show the nude part he blocked it off it was folded in half however the DA actually came in unfold it and it was like well this is the rest of the picture because it was taking so long it was getting so late they actually thought that deliberations would pick up that Monday so I'm thinking okay this is good because they say the longer they call they say oh they came up with the verdict was like they did and we go up there they bring the jury and and I'm just looking at them just desperate to get any US and she was like let's really think this through and she taught all the sections things cut doesn't make me feel good things cut doesn't make me feel bad good things about cutbacks didn't show me new but he just showed the look on my face just how miserable I was just how Blanco was to the jury and the district attorney comes back they show a nude picture of you so naturally like the way I felt about myself it was just had an all time low and there was a program of a potential and even though I was on close security which was a higher security designation because I had gotten in trouble she worked with me in and once I get into this program you know I start thinking like wow like I can actually do these things actually smart like you start to think what happened to cut in person what happened to so I actually learned that prior to my trial eight months she gave me the chance to interview to take the test and then the day I got off of close security she allowed me to enter the program and when you learn full House the Tennessee prison for women and took some time took some work and finally got into the program they see me as so much more than that they don't even look at the worst thing that I've done like they don't they don't even acknowledge that they worry about who I am now and they see me and I was like like what was that about my attorneys Donald like we were all shocked you know so it was just that is just one moment that just indicates how it was just like they wouldn't look at me look at me I was like this is not good and so whenever they read the verdict it was like give me all the way there you know I wouldn't come all the way to filling that you know fully walking and my redemption until I developed a relationship with Jesus and change your view of having to defend him now like I had already before that before he died I had already come forward with everything with appealed entered an appeal in your case talk about when it was denied where you were and why it is you never gave a pope After I was incarcerated at the end of March two thousand five he was actually killed by another man in a parking lot did that your feelings of I guess you could say redemption I mean the subtitle of Freecell Toya Your Memoir is my search for redemption in the program she's actually well she was she's retired now which is unfortunate because she was awesome she was the principal of Education Department when you were when you went to school and you started to really talk and think through things you started to then I followed a post conviction appeal that was denied as well and my final appeal that was due to the Federal Habeas Corpus and that was me and I can't tell you just how redeeming that is and it just made me it made me want to do better maybe we want to live so actually loss not just one appeal but three appeals my first my direct appeal was denied around two thousand nine come to understand the situation you were in the whole idea of sex trafficking you'd appealed your sentence and denied and it was said that I couldn't even appeal that and so you keep trying and you keep hoping that some court is going to give me some amy want to strive and it was just an incredible experience and just like really just set me on a path didn't like when I found out he died I brought up those old feelings I was devastated I remember just screaming when I found out and she had given me a chance and she really worked with me because there were so many people trying to get into the program but she had seen from placement testing that aw long to know you had when you were in person how did you meet her are you talking about Mrs Seabrook's yeah so I'm Mrs Seabrook's when I was trying to get into the Lipscomb uh-huh doll life in prison at sixteen stay with US found that information that they still didn't follow up on anything but I thought that I had come to a point where I was over it I understood things but I remember king survivor who just got out of prison her sentence she was granted clemency by the former Tennessee governor she had been sentenced to ooh up their fee it starts with a day who had denied your appeal and the conversation that you had we'll be back in a minute with Sin Toya Brown long a sex traffic if you could just fill it so I could just stabbed heart like each word and I mean it was rough then right after that to jury said I mean the judge says life in prison at the age of sixteen it would be should be granted clemency last January by the former Tennessee governor stop slowdown read it and figure out where we go from here and the first few lines they actually list the parties involved in the appeal list me couple story aveer professor at Lipscomb who was the assistant attorney general you did not realize that the time this is democracy now democracy now dot org the weren't piece report I mean a good motor spending the hour with some Toya Brown long a sex trafficking survivors sentenced to your life when is when do you realize that Preston ship your professor recognize it either it's very hard you know to remember a name and case and I think that's a big problem with the system now we're just reduced the case numbers and allience either GonNa show me some kind of compassion they're gonna see all these things but it never happened so we have to break but when we come back I wanna ask you about the remark and you tried hall to be more every woman by Vagabond Toya Urine prison your appeal is denied but you're going to school lipscomb university within the prison a program that absolutely see youth you know I had told him the transfer hearing which was in November of two thousand four didn't change anything even though the detectives had talk about that in the book and like what important important part that played in my life and in my freedom so you won't you talk about a mentor office you never see them because you don't actually go to the appellate courts to attend those hearings so I'd I wouldn't have recognized him because I've never seen him

Turkey US Obama New York Sin Toyo Brown Mick Mulvaney President Syria trump Amnesty International official commander Crane Lebanese government Mike Pence New York Times Bill Haslam Amy Goodman Sin Taya Brown
AP Headline News Jan 07 2019 14:00 (EST)

AP Radio News

04:30 min | 2 years ago

AP Headline News Jan 07 2019 14:00 (EST)

"I'm Jay Farner, CEO of Quicken Loans, America's premier home purchase lender. Today's fluctuating interest rates can leave you with unexpected higher mortgage payments at Quicken Loans. We've created a new way to protect you from unpredictable interest rates. So you can buy a home with certainty. It's called rate shield, and here's how it works with rate shield. You can lock your interest rate while you shop for a new home. So if rates go up, you don't have to worry. And here's the best part. If rates go down you get the lower rate with rate shield, we really have you covered. Here are more reasons why you wanna work with America's largest mortgage lender for nine years in a row now Jd power has ranked Quicken Loans highest in the nation in customer satisfaction for primary mortgage origination. And for the fifth year in a row, they've also ranked us highest in the nation for mortgage servicing rate shield, another way, we can save you money on your mortgage. Call us today at eight hundred quicken or go to rocketmortgage dot com. Basin. Rocket mortgage data in comparison to public data records, Rachel approval only valid answering thirty or purchase transactions. Call for cost information and conditions. Equal housing lender. License in all fifty states MLS number thirty thirty additional conditions or exclusions may apply. Why? AP radio news. I'm Tim McGuire. White House press secretary Sarah Sanders, says President Trump will travel to the border with Mexico on Thursday as the partial government shutdown continue comes as the president shows no signs of budging from his demand for more than five billion dollars for a wall along the border. A partial government shutdown continues to resolve this issue with congress. That's a priority. We feel that the Democrats are delaying this process. White House director of strategic communications Mercedes slap says the goal is to find the resources to secure the border. This is not only a humanitarian crisis that we're seeing in the southern border, but we're also seeing a national security crisis. House speaker Nancy Pelosi intends to begin passing individual bills to reopen agencies in the coming days. Ed Donahue, Washington. Some eight hundred thousand federal workers are directly impacted by the partial shutdown Terry Donaldson in Dallas as a union rep for the air traffic controllers association. He tells K D F W or your friends and neighbors were being told to come to work. We don't know when we're going to be paid. Actor Kevin Spacey has been arraigned in Massachusetts court on charges he groped in eighteen year old busboy in two thousand sixteen. The judge ordering Spacey to stay away from his accuser and his family history. Crispy on the Bill beyond the bail money are the com office requesting that Mr. Spacey ordered to stay away and have no contact with the name victim and his family. Surely, the court will impose those conditions Spacey's lawyers entered a not guilty plea. A winter storm brings heavy snow to northern California and heavy rain areas hit earlier by massive wildfires. As men tells K NBC that cars or stuck in the mud on the Pacific Coast Highway. Running. Park land flights avalanche warnings are up for higher elevations in parts of California, Nevada and Utah. This is a P radio news for the first time in twenty five years supreme court Justice, Ruth, Bader Ginsburg was not on the bench is the supreme court met today to hear arguments, my Kempin with more court spokeswoman says the eighty five year old Ginsburg is working from home while she recuperates after doctors removed to cancerous growths from her left lung on December twenty first the court said the doctors found the growth when Ginzburg was being treated for fractured ribs, she suffered in a fall at her office in early November Ginsburg, head cancer surgeries in nineteen ninety nine in two thousand nine but she did not miss any court sessions. She also had broken ribs on at least two occasions. Mike Kemp in Washington, Tennessee, governor Bill Hasler has granted clemency to a woman serving a life sentence for murder who says she was a victim of sex traffic. Taking hassle mortaring now thirty year olds at Toya Brown to be released August seventh. She will remain on parole for ten years. I'm Tim Maguire AP radio news. This is firefighter Raphael. Forget for firehouse subs. Introducing the new spicy Cajun chicken sub Cajun seasons grilled chicken, breast zesty, cherry peppers and housemaid Cajun male just five fifty five for immediate. Remember a portion of every sub you buy cups. Provide lifesaving equipment for personal sponsors firehouse subs. Enjoy more subs saved. More lives. Limited time only. Plus tax participating locations by ourselves. With only the minimum one million dollars in two thousand nineteen thousand firehouse subs public safety foundation by donating quite one one percent of every purchase. I'm Jay Farner, CEO of Quicken Loans, America's premier home purchase lender. Today's fluctuating interest rates can leave you with unexpected higher mortgage payments at Quicken Loans. We've created a new way to protect you from unpredictable interest rates. So you can buy a home with certainty. It's called rate shield, and here's how it works with rate. She. Healed. You can lock your interest rate while you shop for a new home. So if rates go up, you don't have to worry. And here's the best part. If rates go down you get the lower rate with rate shield, we really have you covered. Here are more reasons why you wanna work with America's largest mortgage lender for nine years in a row now Jd power has ranked Quicken Loans highest in the nation in customer satisfaction for primary mortgage origination. And for the fifth year in a row, they've also ranked us highest in the nation for mortgage servicing rate shield, another way, we can save you money on your mortgage. Call us today at eight hundred quicken or go to rocketmortgage dot com. Basin rocket mortgage dated in comparison to public data records, Rachel approval only valid on certain thirty or purchase transactions. Call for cost information and conditions. Equal housing lender. Licensed in all fifty states MLS number thirty thirty additional conditions or exclusions may apply.

Quicken Loans firehouse subs Kevin Spacey Jay Farner America America Rachel CEO Bader Ginsburg Tim McGuire California AP Nancy Pelosi White House Mercedes White House Ed Donahue
Hunter Biden, Trump's Kids and Cashing In on Family Connections | Cyntoia Brown-Long & Ali Wong

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

33:13 min | 1 year ago

Hunter Biden, Trump's Kids and Cashing In on Family Connections | Cyntoia Brown-Long & Ali Wong

"You're listening to comedy Central Kober Sixty two thousand nine hundred comedy central's World News Headquarters in New York. This is the daily show with Trevor Noah years let's kick it off with some sports news the conflict between the NBA and China over the Hong Kong protests continued this week but now King James has stepped into the fray we'll have to touch your phone again and the trumps and Biden's play family feud so let's catch up on today's headlines more but I believe he wasn't educated on on the situation at hand those comments setting awful political brushfire here at home Republican senators quick to pounce got a Florida writing clearly King James is the one who is an educated on the situation Nebraska's Ben Sasse your parroting communist propaganda China is running let's move on to a more American scandal involving Gina Rodriguez some people have said that the Latina actor has a history of making insensitive or condescending remarks about black people and Razzie Cleveland burned his Jersey Miami burned his Jersey like forget Nike Lebron's against sponsored by Kingsford lighter fluid that's what they should be think Lebron's comments were insensitive misguided but at the same time I get where he's coming from because the Houston Rockets GM slammed China on twitter when Lebron was on in Hong Kong tonight basketball superstar Lebron James under fire his famed Jersey up in smoke fuhrer growing over his response to this tweet his Jersey in Hong Kong which by the way if the NBA kept statistics of most jerseys burned I think Lebron would dominate that too yeah yeah Hong Kong Burns or camps and you know it yes Lebron James is getting a lot of heat for not taking a stand against China and the repression with people even superstock comedian and an actor who's out with her first book Alley Wong is going to be on the show China is joining the Lakers policies I'd be like oh I think China has policies the policies that allow me to fly home city. She did not do herself any favors careful what you post on Instagram cirrus her fair warning because actress Gina Rodriguez learned that the hard way we've got to be killing it in every field normally I would agree. NBA players shouldn't have to know the intricacies of by Houston Rockets General Manager Darryl Maury earlier this month in a parent support of anti government protesters on again to feud with Daryl Daryl is wanted to reach out and apologize I'm sorry I'm sorry if I offended anyone by singing along to the Fujii's to a Song I love that I grew up on her new memoir is about search redemption in America's prison system some Toya Brown long will be joining us everybody and then after that we're gonNA chat with the awesome thank you so much thank you for coming out we have to get to joining us tonight could do what you believe me necas give me he'd be gene B.'s now apologizing for using the n word in post hey what's up everybody the Asia policy but at the same time Dennis Rodman is basically the years from Bassett or North Korea so I don't know what the rules are anymore I'm works also understand why people his way to China in the Bronx probably like Amen Start this beef after I leave what's wrong with you man going there because I would do the same thing like if you ask me in China what I thought about China I love Lauryn Hill and I really am sorry if I send it to you okay here's trump is tip of the day if you insist on saying the n word rapping along with the song don't do on Instagram do it on the mosque singer okay yeah because then people have to wait three weeks to see if they get to be mad at you they'll be like I think that was cheap paint who said it but if it was Donny Osmond his ashes in big trouble also being rapid should help yeah because like they make the songs I think reps could help prevent these incidents from happening in the first place because think about it rap songs that are safe for radio I think now they need to make versions of their songs that are safe for non black people they can just replace the N. word with something safe like like my friends you know what I mean in every single song also WanNa find me I my friends gotta find me and finally some that'll change the way you make obscene gestures at your phone Google's newest phone works without even touching it that pixel four was unveiled at an event in yeah just changes and if you don't know now you know my friend for everyone New York City like apple's iphone users can unlock the pixel with their face but the feature getting the most buzz gesture control for let's say you're driving phone market wow the first phone that will turn everyone into a magician's assistant call mom voice now practically everyone has weighed in on the Ukraine scandal from trump to Pelosi to acute rattlesnake everyone except the man this really is amazing technology you can open your phone just by waving at it no one's ever had this technology except the front door of a walgreens never have we it's me you know also feel bad for Bernie Sanders he's going to be setting that thing all the time without meaning gesture acknowledging to ABC News what he calls poor judgment did I make a mistake well maybe in the grand scheme of things yeah but did I make a mistake based upon the center of it all onto Biden he sits on the board of a Ukrainian Energy Company while his dad served as vice presence and now the trump is using it have been a lot different for one thing definitely wouldn't have gotten into the Harvard School of surprise massages yeah but you know I do appreciate got his dad hunter is finally speaking out Hunter Biden speaking out for the first time defending his business dealings in Ukraine saying he did quote nothing wrong at all and if Donald trump junior went to China and came back with one point five dollars seen it before you know what's weird is how the way we unlock our phones is evolving where because I we have to type in the code and then we just had on ethical lapse absolutely not if your last name wasn't Biden do think he would've been asked to be on the board a Barista I duNno I dunno probably to notice that shit I'm just saying man the truth is your name could be a big reason that you get a leg up in life like I know hunters honesty there because he admits that he was probably hired by the Ukrainian company because of his last name that's how the world works a lot of people get opportunity invoice famous was the parents get me wrong I'm not saying that he wasn't a good wizard but he was the only student whose name Dumbledore new personal restrictions point men on Ukraine because it looks very much like he got this business because of his father's position and understand why a lot of people would complain about that perfect I know the only reason I got to where I am today is probably because my great great grandfather built the Ark like I I accept that a little cool Ronan who might he's like freckles and girl Harry and by the way family names work the other way too that's why Ginny Weasley was getting eaten by snakes in the basement it took him on four hundred pages can I say Ma'am a great great grandpa loved boats watching animals now with that said that's what he was doing on the boat normal control's going to be like and that's why we need to take on the one percent calling the what no no no I'm not calling are not calling the headlines what I don't understand is why these people are complaining about that let's talk about the double standard what do you guys think would happen why else would they be asking him to speak to share his expertise on bad beards or would it be more like ladies and gentlemen a man who wants sat on a tree stump don someone please explain to me why they've been doing this trump promised no new foreign deals but that hasn't stopped his family from continuing business overseas the countries on trump company business since January first in early January it was a trip to Uruguay for a glitzy party to promote a new property this morning Donald Trump when you're in India to promote trump branded condos in two cities there as a business we're GONNA continue to run we have incredible assets all over the world that will continue to operate and pick it up and look at it now we can just wave at it without touching it feels like we're like slowly breaking up with our phone like we're just moving away the next one will let you on your phone but it's not the opportunities because of their names it's these two I mean donald trump junior up just got paid fifty thousand dollars to give a speech at a college if he wasn't Donald Trump's son media so what happened was my bunions were acting up and there was no chair insight but then I remembered someone once told me stumps Roquetas sit on thank you good I don't think that there's a lot of things happened in my life that that if my last name was in fine you know what he's right if hunters last name wasn't biden his life would we gave up we didn't have to do you see me on any boards you see on any boards you see Vonk on any boards okay first of all I'm not surprised nobody has put Beavis and four the U. conn tonight it's not a good look Ukrainian company hired hunted by just months off the Joe Biden became the Obama admits he's because of who their parents are Cindy Crawford's daughter is now a model Andrew Cuomo his father was the governor of New York before him and you think Harry Potter would have gotten all that attention canoes and you want to advance extract you don't like that one or you want to go back to it again Google is hoping the new tackle lead to more sales in the highly competitive diving boards Eric you're jumping off the wrong end jumping to the wet part dude and secondly and secondly if there was ever an example of people uh not one point five billion Ed just one point five dollars can you imagine if I took three cents nights also also if trump's sums are actually concerned truly concerned about children of politicians doing business overseas fluence officials in at least four countries talked about ways they could manipulate Kushner in part by taking advantage of his complicated business entanglements vulgar Tropez Jared Kushner trademarks that would that's what you have to understand for instance Michael Jordan had to fight for four years to trademark himself yeah the Chinese quotes argued that this I know this is crazy to say I know this is crazy to see but at least Donald and Eric a one step removed from the presidency to grow yeah that's right even with Edad in office the trumps are still growing their business in places like India Philippines Indonesia Uruguay they're all over the world was not Michael Jordan yeah they were like no that could be anyone some of our jumping the other day who knows that means that could be me that's how crazy they are about trade box zip plowed ahead with deals in India Indonesia Uruguay and the Philippines that were already in the works before trump took office by Wednesday eric trump will have gone to four the US and China we're trying to restart trade talks raised eyebrows okay come on China approved a dozen trademarks of uncle right as her dad wasn't negotiating trade because there are other trump children who are in business and governments jared Kushner and a bunker trump's rules in the White House opened up another potential avenue for foreign in head on any corporate boards that's not like scandal if not a thing I don't even think they're allowed right back the Ukraine or four cents from China I mean it's unbelievable we gave up our entire business on my father could run for president we don't do anything overseas anymore the there are few stories you will read a book fiction or fact that have as many twists and turns as life that you have lived I knew a few details of your story but reading through the book is a really powerful and painful and then redemptive experience at the same time near the White House where diplomats and foreign dignitaries spend big money last year China approved more than a dozen trademark for vodka trump branded products the timing just as when you wrote the story again was it hard for you to relive some of the decisions and some of the things that happened to you in your life that got you to where you ended up comedy central is bringing back the iconic print coal show crank yankers and now it's also a podcast every weekday you'll get to listen to a classic print her for sex and sentenced to life in prison after serving fifteen years she was granted full clemency and tells her story in the new book freese and Toya my search for listen to new episodes of crank yankers every weekday wherever you listen to your podcasts took in as much as one hundred and thirty five million dollars in revenue last year that includes almost four million dollars Ivanka trump pulled in from her stake in the Family Hotel here redemption in the American prison system she's welcome Sin Toya Brown Law Bikes listen to the beloved characters from the TV show calling unsuspecting civilians and start your day with a wakeup call you'll actually enjoy subscriber talk impeachments it's democracies Mulligan it's like the amazing race with no running and no Chins Donna and Eric doing so much international business it almost feels like donald is just trying to not spend was with China you can't tell me that's not suspicious timing I mean it's like how right before Christmas my mom said that a horrible accident happened at Census Factory Cole never before heard in podcasting space and featuring a list talent such as Jimmy Kimmel Tracy Morgan Stephen Colbert Sarah Silverman and wonder how does this how does this happen every mom they need to look into safety regulations at the factory I'll never get my toys and China does not mess around with this thing is that the last people who should be talking about the blurred lines of family names and political influence of the people currently running their Home Office from the White House the man let's be let's be I'm not defending hunted by I don't know him I don't know about his business all I'm saying with his sons you know it's almost like he's like boys I've got a new business for you to take care of its on Mars there's no way to get back from Mars and I appreciate your sacrifice it didn't show I guess was just sixteen years old when she was convicted of killing a man who solicited wild this would be like saying that this isn't done junior I mean no one else has ever set on a stump like that says you know when I started writing the book I had thought that I had dealt with everything that had happened to me and when you're actually riding those things it brings up that time that moment you have to step back in there especially when I started working with the rider is amazing writer Bethany Mauger s really great questions we'll get out one day so I really feel like I'm I'm living my dream right now yes so I always kept always kept well I don't know but I know that every since I was in prison I'd always dreamed of living a real life I never let go of hoping imprison was meant to be over fifty years you served fifteen which is essentially a life sentence because you were sixteen years old at the time particularly powerful and complicated is when you talk about your relationship with the idea that you were involved in sex trafficking agency but at the same time you have to admit that something was done to you you faced the ultimate punishment for what happened to you in your life and thanks for for shelter for food because they did it they consented and that's just not the case that is abuse that is exploitation and these individual in that time in prison what did you think your world was going to be you know because you went in as a sixteen year old aw I just consented I was just promiscuous because that's what I was being told by society and so it took for a campaign from a group in Tennessee was after this man solicitor you took you back to his place abused you and essentially held you captive in his world you killed him and he was sentenced to life he call in slavery that you know they stress that there's no such thing as teenage prostitution I didn't know anything about the federal statute that said anyone who's a minor taking advantage of no I wasn't I knew what I was doing and that's just not the case it's really hard to be in that situation where you still want to maintain really good to be able to just really process that and to to just really step back in those moments even though it was hard what one part of your story that is rules aren't reporting it and if you have them saying you're not a victim you're actually willingly doing this hour and I believe it and so for so long it was actually a trafficking victim there's no such thing as consent and you know that was hard to kind of face I used to argue with people when they said you know you were people who are in suitcases or stuff to contain as unchained and yet I thought I had a boyfriend when in fact this was your pimp who was making you do what you would you would youth they're supposed to report every instance of child abuse him fifty seven percent of them thought that some teenagers willingly prostituted themselves thought that some teenagers traded you will get out and yet here you are studying furthering your education trying to make the best of the time that you have why do that when you don't think you're gonNA get out because I didn't and it's really really gripping in the book because you say you didn't consider yourself to be part of sex trafficking in any way you know there's a passageway you say I thought of sex traffic victims I can't identify victims when it comes to some of the people who are supposed to be saying you know this is child abuse our camera when I get out and it was like that for the entire fifteen years when we look at the criminal justice system today in America it is an unfortunate fact that there were doing in the world is that part of the problem that we face in dealing with sex trafficking is that some of the people who are involved in it don't think of themselves as being victims in the in the situation absolutely the One I would say things you'd hear a lot of people say you know if I get out or if Markham fishing is overturned I would always say when I get out and I know my husband the study where I think it was fifty seven percent of mandatory reporters where these are counselors teachers these are people who are constant contact with the in our talk to him all the time well when I get out I wanna do this and he would always be like well let's cross that bridge when we get there but it's just something that came so natural when I get out when I get it many some Toyota browns who are experiencing its adverse effects if there was one thing you wish would have been different when it came even like at Emily them when they tell me I would make a point you how your case was handled what would you wish the thing would be that would be applied to every case going forward my case specifically have pain you can't that hope is that is that what you studied in prison it is because that that was that was fascinating to me and the story is here's somebody who's going to spend the rest of their life in jail there is no promise that locality there has to be consequences however a juvenile is not the same as an adult even the supreme court has number one I I do think that there are things that I needed to be held accountable for and I think there are a lot of cases with juveniles who commit certain crimes there has to be he ruled that several times and a string of cases so it just doesn't seem like it makes sense to me for the Supreme Court think that's one of the things that needs to change and to be honest with you I think a lot of senses are just excessive in general of that fifty one years is is like who's GonNa make fifty one years in prison nobody you have lived a story many wouldn't dream of living all have nightmares of living man this is apart from being free this is what life is about honestly like when I'm just at home sitting on I think it needs to change it's still the case now you still have juveniles who are tried as adults

China Nike Lebron Lebron James Hong Kong NBA New York Trevor Noah Gina Rodriguez Instagram Biden Nebraska Miami twitter Houston Lakers King James Hong Kong Burns Ben Sasse Houston Rockets Razzie Cleveland
Tuesday, January 8: Shout Down

Start Here

00:00 sec | 2 years ago

Tuesday, January 8: Shout Down

"It's Tuesday January eighth and no one shut down the microphones in Washington. We start here. The White House revs up its PR machine. Presidents got his Oval Office primetime address the visit to the border have both sides maneuvering loudly to end the shutdown if we've defeated ISIS and Syria, and who are the terrorists Americans were allegedly helping us is in the eyes of many people has not been defeated. There is still a battle with the controversial troop pullback stance and a life sentence lifted. I will do everything I can to justify your faith in me. She went into prison, a sixteen year old murderer the critics have been saying all along. She's the victim from ABC news. This is start here. I'm Brad milkey. Are you hiring with indeed you can post a job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started today at indeed dot com slash podcast. That's indeed dot com slash podcast. As the government shutdown drags on into its eighteen th day. Each side is walking around saying we've got the advantage. And when you think you've got an advantage you keep the pressure on in Washington. You create pressure by turning on your PR machine. We really cannot resolve this until we open up government. And we made that very clear to the president on Capitol Hill House Democrats announce they passed bills to restore funding for most of the government Senate Democrats took it a step further yesterday saying we're going to block every other Bill in the Senate until we get a vote on these ones a senior democratic aide said that Republicans should instead lead with funding bills passed by the newly democratic controlled house. But the White House has even more direct tools at its disposal to alleviate some pain of the shutdown for Americans tax payers had worried the refunds Mike get delayed. We'll President Trump demanded a short staffed IRS get them out on time trash piled up at national parks. The budget office now says resources are on the way to get them clean. And no one's got a megaphone quite like the. President late today the president revealing he now wants to deliver a prime time address from the Oval Office. Tomorrow night, calling it a national security crisis. The White House's announced tonight, the president will make a national address and then on Thursday he will head to the border to get a look at what he calls a crisis. This is not sound like the agenda of someone who expects big conclusive deal to be reached today. And if there's no deal tonight officials say it's likely federal workers will forgo another payday this week. So let's bring in ABC's chief White House. Correspondent the host of our power house politics podcast, Jonathan Karl along with our coordinating producer for all things. Capitol Hill, Trish Turner, and Jonathan can you look inside your crystal ball. I mean, how does each side think this ends? Well, look, there's absolutely no sign of any progress whatsoever. But both sides have calculated that the other side will suffer Moore's result for a what unfolds. So what you're going to see on? The president's got his Oval Office primetime address the visit to the border the Democrats below. Believed that the president has painted himself into a corner here. There is no strategy to get out what the White House believes or the president believes is that by highlighting the situation at the border. And and Democrats you can point to Democrats is not wanting to do anything to protect the border and over all of it Brad is the threat that the president could in his mind, and I'm sure it'd be challenged immediately but could declare national emergency and basically do this by himself. Let's get right to it. Just President Trump had the ability have the authority to declare a national -mergency have the military build his wall. Fortunately, the short answer is. Yes there. She was a democrat Adam Smith who's going to be leading the House Armed Services committee. He's the one who grudgingly kind of admitted. Yes, the president can declare this national emergency. So I mean are Democrats kind of just along for the ride here? How do they feel? We're glad we don't sense that. The Democrats feel boxed in in any way. In fact, they are charging forward. Senate Democrats have decided they're going. Block or they're going to effort to block anything that comes up in the Senate until vote to reopen. The government happens that's one sign that they feel. We'd by this argument and House Democrats are charging for this week with bills one by one to reopen parts of the government that currently or shut down these are difficult political votes. They plan to box Republicans as best they can we would certainly oppose any attempt by the president to make himself a king, and it's higher and one thing that really struck me yesterday chairman Nadler, the incoming judiciary committee, chairman immigration as his is his thing he was asked in a border. Visit in a what do you think the president's going to say in his Oval Office address without missing a beat chairman Adler said he's gonna lie has been lying to the American people and his spokespeople continue like the American people. You know, Democrats are really going to hammer President Trump on this. They do not see a crisis. They've said it repeatedly we really don't see any cracks in this. Dacian at all as far as Democrats were concerned one. So Jonathan you've spoken a vice President Mike Pence. He's been doing a lot of negotiating on behalf of the White House. Only to be told some of the terms he's floating aren't necessarily what the president wants. So is that because this national emergency idea is still an option. So I was at a briefing at the White House yesterday on the record off camera with the vice president, and he said about this whole issue, and he said over and over and over and over again, national emergency. This is a national security emergency and humanitarian emergency at the border under that is the threat will could the president do something about it. Those words national emergency can have a very specific meeting. If it is the president to clearing a national emergency any chance that is what the president's declaring tonight. It's a it's a it's a big question. I, you know, no indication, but he has made this big point of calling for a primetime address. It seemed a little bit backwards that were the case because he is going to the border on Thursday. And you know, but but who knows I'm not convinced he's going to pull the trigger on this because it would be a very messy process. It would be another court challenge. And and a very real possibility that that he would be denied in the courts. Senate will not waste. It's time considering a democratic Bill which cannot pass this chamber in which the president will not one group. He barely talked about since this began Trish is congressional Republicans. Right. I mean, Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell goes to the White House. But then bales before the photo op can even go down. He's refusing to pass these bills from Democrats not because he says, they're bad bills. But because the president is the one who will veto them. So I mean when Republicans look at all this one are they seeing we'll tell you what it's really unusual to have Mitch McConnell just absent from negotiations because this is his thing. But he is not going to get burned again quietly. He's been you know, he was fuming over the fact that last week he had the Senate vote to reopen the government and a short term solution. He was told that was what the White House, the president would accept and boom, the president changed his mind and president, you know, Mitch McConnell was left holding the bag. We should say McConnell in all honesty. He is up for reelection in two thousand. And we've seen a number of the Republicans in his caucus a couple specifically who are up in two thousand twenty. They've also said it's time to reopen. The government we can negotiate this wall, you know, outside of that. But let's fund the government and reopen the government rule number one in Washington, right? You don't wanna get blamed for a shutdown when you're up for reelection. We're still seeing more ways in which are getting affected to the department of housing and urban development confirms. Now, there are more than a thousand landlords who will not get the money. They were expecting to help out there. Low income tenants. John, trish. Thanks a lot guys. Always a pleasure. Thanks. I'm just going to get you ready for this ten days from now, you're going to hear lots of clips from this video I've been president for almost two years, and we've really stepped it up, and we have one against ISIS by then it'll be thirty days since President Trump declared victory over ISIS in Syria and announce troops could be withdrawn from the country. They're all coming back and they coming back. Now, we one administration officials insisted ABC news. They would all be out within thirty days. Like, I said that is coming up ten days from now. And there was nothing to suggest that's actually happening. Instead we've seen murkiness on when or if troops are returning fast or slow. Timetable when you know, somebody said four months, but I I didn't I didn't say that either. And if ISIS has truly been decimated in Syria than why we're to Americans arrested in Syria for helping terrorists, they're ABC senior foreign correspondent and panels been in out of the region for years now. And so I mean. I mean, our American troops leaving or what what are what are you hearing with us any what the president said like let you reports almost a month ago. But now over the last few days with seeing pretty much an about face, the national security adviser John Bolton first of all on a tour of the region saying that actually would be conditions based discussing the presence decision to withdraw. But to do so from northeast Syria in a way that makes sure that ISIS is defeated. Let's rewind back to that statement in the nineteenth of December. The president was emphatic we've beaten them and we've beaten a badly we've taken back the land. And now it's time for our troops to come back home. The Pentagon within hours was saying that will be thirty day deadline soon as General Mattis signs that older, and as we know within again, a very short period secretary of defense Mattis handed in his resignation, partly in protest that very decision. Well, now Bolton saying, we're. Not leaving until the Kurds. There have a level of safety in the Kurds of the ones coming forward saying they've caught some Americans who were aiding ISIS. I mean, what happened there? That's right. So then active on the frontline the moments against ISIS, and they taking territory and every time they territory the take catches. Well, it turns out they mashed to pick up they claim and this is yet to be a hundred percent verified a two American captives. One of them. Warren Christopher clock. Now, according to papers that are being released and planes from different parts that clock was originally from Houston, Texas. They served as a substitute teacher in en- Sugarland, Texas, then going to teach in Saudi Arabia, then Turkey, and then had written a letter get this had written a letter like an application that you apply for any routine job to ISIS saying he'd like job as as a teacher, even sending in his resume sharing everything that he done. No like an actual resume and actual resume, and you can see it online. I mean, ABC's good it up as well. We've been shed this from the George Washington University. They have department there that looks into counter-terrorism, and they obtain these when a whole bunch of ISIS documents were found emotional in Iraq. But it has identified this man as well as someone else would who has been claimed is American possibly from Trinidad. Again, people trying to work out the full details of that. You never know where Ian panel is going to turn up this morning. He's in London in glad we could snag you. The hang spread. Next up on start here. She was a victim of sex trafficking until she pulled the trigger. Then suddenly she was facing life in prison. When it comes to hiring. You don't have time to waste you need help getting to your shortlist of qualified candidates fast. That's why you need indeed dot com. Get started today at indeed dot com slash podcast. That's indeed dot com slash podcast. No one disputes that some Toya Brown killed a man. No one disputes. She shot him in the back of the head as he was lying in bed. But no one disputes. She was also just sixteen at the time. And as she sat in prison serving a life sentence people have argued over whether she was the perpetrator, or in fact, a victim. I am honored and privileged today. To speak the words of sin Toya Brown directly yesterday. The governor of Tennessee said fifteen years was enough. He granted her clemency. Thank you governor has lem for your act of mercy. And giving me a second chance. I will do everything I can to justify your faith in me. Ron's lawyers saluted the Republican governor one of his final acts before leaving office ABC Steve ocean Samis been watching this unfold. And so Steve what did governor Bill has lem see now that people didn't see fifteen years ago? Well, one of the things he probably saw was this documentary from two thousand eleven that paints an entirely different picture. Of her story. Domi away for the rest miss Brown was sixteen years old when this happened and she was a prostitute. At the time who had been sucked into sex trafficking who'd been sex traffic and the person who she killed was a real estate agent who had hired her to have sex with him. And she was afraid that she needed to come back to her pimp with enough money to make her pimp happy, and that's why she says she killed the man. So the the governor no doubt has heard this story. The story was championed by celebrities, including riana, Kim, Kardashian, LeBron James or all airing clips of this documentary. And that's what sort of got the ball rolling. The the sympathy ball so to speak to educating people about her background what led to this? And that it probably wasn't just to send her to jail for life, which was her. The sentence and that phrase prostitute, that's also sort of at the center of this controversy, right? 'cause even in court documents at the time you've see prosecutors calling Brown a teenage prostitute over and over. I'm sure advocates would say now there is no such thing as a sixteen year old prostitute. She's a victim of sex trafficking by definition. Absolutely. Absolutely. They the her advocates and her supporters say that if you look at her case through today's laws, but also if you look at her story through the lens that we're using today that you would absolutely say that she was a rape victim being sixteen years old. And that changes the narrative a bit we need to see this as a national awakening to change the Coenen laws that allow juvenile children to be placed in adult prison when they're just children. They're not little adults. The governor of Tennessee, no doubt saw this. As did many of her supporters. The other thing is she's going to be released in August. She will have served fifteen years for this crime. If her sentence was wasn't commuted by the governor of Tennessee. She would have had to serve another thirty six thirty seven years before she would have been up for parole and the governor yesterday, basically said that that was just not just it was too much just eye opening to see how the conversation has changed. But like, you said Sinn toy Brown was kind of this model test case, right? She earned her degree behind bars. She had the Kardashians and the Ranas and the Amy Schumer of the world behind her. So the test might be and how the system deals with less notable. Maybe more gray area cases, Steve Olson Saami. Thanks for checking in. You're welcome. No one is seen this site in twenty five years. But yesterday, if you were in the supreme court, you would have seen an empty chair were Ruth Bader Ginsburg, normally sits the Justice had never missed an oral argument due to illness knock during two other bouts with cancer nattering other health scares, not even after the death of her husband yesterday, though Ginsburg remained at her house recovering from surgery to remove to cancerous lesions from her left lung, and she missed arguments in a fascinating case that could rewrite the rules for companies that make your prescription drugs. Wanna bring on ABC's Devon Dwyer. He covers the supreme court force. Hey, Devon, pay bread. So I mean, tell me about this case. Yeah. This is a case about the drug Phosa max eight percent of women in their fifties have thinning bones and risk increases with age, but was released in the late nineteen ninety s to help people who suffer from osteoporosis, strengthen their bones. It's proven to help reverse bone loss for -duced by the former giant Merck and what began. To happen in the late nineties as a number of women who started to take the drug started to actually experience broken bones, severely, broken bones. One woman Luiz Cortez. A seventy year old woman began taking the drug. She was actually was taking it for ten years and one day she got up to go and lock the door. And she turned like anyone would do to simply turn the bolt. And she heard her left leg snap, the femur bone the strongest bone in the body of big bone that goes down to your knee snapped broke through her skin, crumbled, literally beneath her turns out, Brad that she was one of at least more than five hundred women at the time who had similar breaks, they're called atypical femoral, fractures, and these are very serious deals and these women alleged that it was a side effect of the drug something that began to filter its way down to Merck. They knew about the warnings. They they they knew about this. This was a known side effect a company had like how how is the company not responsible? If that happened. And that's exactly the heart of this case over five hundred women in different jurisdictions around the country, Brad one assumer. But the problem is Merck said when they heard about these warnings. They went to the FDA back in two thousand eight they proposed revising the label on the drug and Merck alleges that the FDA told them no you can't change the label the science isn't there yet? And by the way, the FDA is the ultimate arbiter and what goes on a drug label. So did the FDA does get this wrong. Then because obviously there was there's some sort of a problem. Well, that's the issue in this case is that the FDA typically Brad doesn't want to over warn. They don't want to they see a downside in putting too many frivolous warnings than people wouldn't pay attention to them. So at issue in this case is when what information did the FDA have when they made their decision in two thousand nine Merck said they have plenty of information. They decided not to put the warning on end of story. But these plaintiffs say that Merck's suggested warning was actually, MS. Leading and that they didn't help the FDA come to the proper conclusion, which by the way, they now warn all drugs in this class, including in acts have explicit warnings about these breaks wherever ex but serious breaks. So there's a discrepancy over how that decision was made at the FDA at the warning the FDA turned down was about stress fractures in the plaintiffs are saying, well, these weren't stress fractures, these were femur spontaneously breaking so that should be a different warning to different things. And Devon it's unclear where the justices will be on this. But I mean does Ruth Bader Ginsburg figure into all this does she get to vote on a case that she did not here. So she wasn't in the courtroom yesterday for the oral arguments, but the court assures us, she's actually participating in the case in all cases this week from home. She's doing it by reading the transcripts. She's reading the briefs she's looking at other court filings. Brad, there is precedent for that. You don't have to be there to participate, but everyone's going to be watching closely to see if she comes back later this week if this drags on. What will that mean for some of these? Cases longer term can adjust as fully participate. If she's not there, certainly not a big deal today. She can still weighing in vote. But depending on how long this goes it could raise some serious question. And how long President Trump is an office since we know some of our feelings about him can she effectively surfer to or even six more years devonte wire. Thanks a lot. Thanks. And one last thing it's the data fest in the desert. The software show on the strip today marked the opening of CAS twenty nineteen not just one convention center. Three conventions enters as ABC's Alec stone somewhere in one of those buildings during a preview. So I asked him what this year's Consumer Electronics Show will be remembered for this year is a couple of things one being five G enabling faster speeds in the lowest leads you anyone ever experienced on a more or less. No one, you know, right now your device runs on four G or LT. So this is the next generation of data networks with a big part of five G is not so much your phone, and what this promises is way way faster internet, which to unimagined if people like me means oh, great my Email load quicker to actual tech moguls that is the sound of a paradigm shift. You might not need to have internet installed any longer. You would have a hub that would just suck five G out of the sky complete. We envisioning here. Similarly, when you hear about new TV's q. Eight K a lot of eight KTV's K. What does that even mean? Eight K. We're talking eight times the resolution of high definition, you might think cool. I guess I can see everyone's pores on their face better. I don't know. But the more advanced screens become l g got one as well that it actually rolls up the more. You can make radical changes you press a button and it rolls up into a box at the bottom. It's not like you can just roll it up like a poster, but it does it for you. And once you roll it up, you can still play music from it think about it. The last time TV's, we're not the focal point of your interior design. We're putting shares in front of the family radio. And this happens every year, we will see it again next year. Similarly, random products, you're going to be able to send in your cans, DNA and know, everything about your cat. But it is worth looking up every now and then to see how the world around us has changed in some ways. This is almost become a at least in one wing of this an auto show, and where we're going in the future. You got someone in your life that you think could use a good morning podcast in their ears. Duma solid. Get him up to speed tell them about start here. Start starting morning smarter. For more on any of these stories had ABC, news dot com or the news app. I'm Brad milkey. See tomorrow. Are you hiring with indeed you can post a job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started today at indeed dot com slash podcast. That's indeed dot com slash podcast.

president President Trump White House Brad milkey ABC Senate ISIS Democrats ABC Syria White House Washington Trish Turner Mitch McConnell FDA Oval Merck government