14 Episode results for "Towson"

EP:050 Guided Accountability w/ Charlena Smith

Finding Her

28:12 min | 4 months ago

EP:050 Guided Accountability w/ Charlena Smith

"Hi, I'm Julia a woman on the rise in the area of personal development are created finding her to teach you skills off the area of self-improvement by focusing on topics that we often find difficult to speak up and speak about in our busy lives each week. I will be giving you tips strategies and introduce you to expert guests off aimed to create and help guide you on redesigning your life just like you I'm a human juggler in this life a wife who despises house Burke and dreams of hiring a personal chef a mother of three young manages a full-time job while podcasting and running her own online business. And by the way, I am a lover of all dogs even ugly ones. I am so grateful you are here. So, let's Dive In Our Youth to learn. Let's do this. This episode of finding her is brought to you by Spotify on Spotify. You can listen to all your favorite artists and podcasts in one place for free. You don't even need a premium account friends. It has a huge catalogue of podcasts on every topic including the best one on planet Earth finding her on Spotify. You can follow your favorite podcast. So you never miss an episode premium users can download episodes to listen to off-line wherever you are easily share what you're listening to you with your friends on the gram if you haven't done so already be sure to download the Spotify app search for your favorite podcast finding her on Spotify or browse podcasts in the your library tab. Also, make sure to follow me. So you never miss an episode of finding her, huh Welcome to the show. Charlena Smith. I'll thank you so much for having me Julia. Yes, and I just ordered your book from Amazon. So I'm really excited to dive into that. Especially after we get to talk about a guided accountability today. And what are you grateful for? Oh my goodness. I live in Eternal State wage. But today I'm particular my kiddos participated in the pinewood derby. It's a popular like you with all these cars out of wood and they've been working on it with their dad and mom they worked so hard and they lost and I am so grateful that they lost with so much grace like I was waiting for it to be in Nightmare and they were totally down with it. They congratulated the other kids. They were swapping tips made my heart sore. Awesome. I love that. I love hearing that story. I'm grateful for continuing to meet lots of dead. Amazing ladies and you are one of them and and it really is an experience and a journey that I've been going through this past year and half. So I'm so grateful you are joining a community today. Yes, me too. All right, so get down to this guided accountability. Sure. Okay. So guided accountability is basically how to increase the success of meeting any goal that you could possibly have by 97% which is a crazy statistic, right? 97% is like you think that's a fake number but it's actually not we've proven it person after person goal after goal health goals, you know, concrete goals business goals family goals all sorts of things and what it is is that no matter what the goal is and no matter what area of your life if possible if you follow these particular strength and align your goals with your values, it's almost impossible to not meet them. It's a different framework. It's a different mindset about how to approach Goldsmith. Oh, that's awesome. And then how did you start working in this? Area or become an expert at it. It's so funny. So I we lovingly refer to me charlena 1.0 inch and a 2.0 Turbo 1.0 was the Super overachiever always had to be doing eight million things, you know, nothing was ever good enough. I needed every degree. I needed another degree. I needed another car I needed. I was just like constantly looking for affirmation and and just like that a girl from outside sources. And at one point in my journey. I was the full-time CEO of the third largest marketing company on the East Coast, which if you've ever worked in marketing and advertising, you know that it's it's the equivalent of like, you know, Cross of War Zone, you know, it's intense deadlines. It is stressed all around at the same time as a full-time professor at Towson University and was also a full-time pH d c e And that would be enough if I also was not recently married to these love of my life above still dearly. This is years ago and just had two babies that were currently under two and had horrific pregnancies with both of them like really really challenging pregnancies with both of them and I was still going I was still doing all the things was like every opportunity that I couldn't say. No, too. I just kept on saying yes, because who says no to these amazing opportunities and it you know it it was raining opportunities and I couldn't see off half the fog of it like I thought if I could just get through today that it would be okay, but it was going to be worth it like and I ended up in the hospital for six months. I ended up on full life-support for three of those months when I say I burned out like I burned the F out I all of my organs shut down one-by-one my lungs completely Club. I must six times. Actually. I was on every machine you can possibly imagine in the only organ that did not stop working with my heart. It just kept feeding. So thank God so thankful for my heart and I am so thankful for my body and especially coming off of your body series listen to it. So deeply appreciating my body for how strong it is. And for all the gifts that gives me a favor. Just so good for me. But also in that time, I mean I was the prediction of me surviving was Zero like there was absolutely no chance of surviving and my husband refused to accept those. He just refused to accept them and he is a brilliant brilliant guy. So he started to filter some of the news the doctors would give me and we realized that a lot of healing has to do with mindset birth. And a lot of healing has to do with accountability. If you don't have anyone that your account accountable to it's easy to get lost and and it's just too hard and you don't want to do it you need to be removed and why you're doing things so that is where guided accountability was born was in that process of healing and learning to walk again and talk again. I actually learned to talk to a past near valve in my throat. I think I would ever be able to speak for my voice box again learning how to do everything all over again and justifying all of the medical advice. I mean taking medical advice, but I'm just ignoring the medical limitations so they would say we're sorry you're never going to walk again and my husband Scott would hear that and say okay you are not allowed to tell her that and I'm I'm going to tell her is that it's going to be challenging to walk again, but see this, you know, and that was the difference and that's when guided accountability was really born that became my accountability partner. Yep. It was within it was a guided framework. He was filtering what was coming in and telling me what I needed to hear to get me to where I needed to be and the concept I was like, oh my gosh, why aren't we doing this like in retrospect when I look back at all of the things that we did that were totally impossible using this framework. I was like everybody has to have that everybody has to know that secret. So that's why the book was born. That's where the whole framework was born. And that's where the movement sort of just took off. I just love that because it like talking about the mindset piece and I teach a growth mindset and fixed mindset to youngsters and now I teach adults but same thing like secret is here's that fixed statement from the medical doctors that are saying you're never going to walk again and then your husband's filtering it and changing it into a growth mindset. So then he's like will just be a little bit harder for you to walk again, right and then really did and it was he also who knows like you would look up the the statistics but if you tell someone that they can't do something especially coming from a place of authority. So like a surgeon the number one surgeon in in this field is telling you that something's impossible. Don't even bother trying you stop trying you believe them you allow them to put that limitation on you and it typically complete bollocks. You can ask you can do whatever you set your mind to the only Limit is how you frame it in your mind. Oh, I love that again. Can't waiting to dive into the bucket just came the other day in the mail. I ordered it from Amazon and it it just really odd helps with you know, people not going through what you went through or maybe not on the grandest on the on the same size scale. But then also yeah when people say, oh they don't usually mean what I went through but in the same capacity, I didn't want other especially women because I think societal pressures on women are just so different with our crazy. Right like we're always trying to catch up with what we're supposed to be doing and it's just it's so hard like what mine said you even take on what mindset is handed to you. What are your actual goals and values and what our goals and values that you think you should have like it's just so complicated. So my heart is with women, but I didn't want someone else to experience what I experienced. And the reason I got to that point is because There was nobody calling me out on my via and telling me that I was doing too many things and going after too many goals at one time and that it was okay to just simmer down for a minute. I could just enjoy my kids can just enjoy my husband can just have one job, you know, like that would have been okay, right because your two kids under two that's like three jobs. Yes. Oh my gosh, it was so intense and both my kiddos have special needs. So it was actually at one point. It's I think you can probably relate more than most but it was off easier to work than it was to be at home and I say that now and it it's like if you don't understand what I'm talking about that you probably think I'm a terrible better off, but if you do understand then you understand and it was like, I just couldn't I couldn't it was exhausting to be here and I just kept filling up my calendar with my dog. More and more things that I felt made me successful but really didn't matter to me and we're not part of my core values or who I am at all. And it's just I mean I talk about to like stress induced illnesses and breakdowns and compassion fatigue and you know often out and all that stuff and and it really is about like feeling like you have enough, you know, like like you said like keep going out reaching reaching. I need more. I need more. I need more to validate ourselves and instead of just looking within and saying we have enough exactly I say everything you need is within you right now and we keep working for external validation and we don't need it. Everything we need is within ourselves right this very minute. Well, my little dogs are trying to talk to you about their accountability issue. What type of have you worked with do you do? Do you coach people in the area of accountability Partners or or ideas? So we have a couple of different ways but that we work I work online with high-impact female career women. So typically like I have a senator as a client Congressman whose clients off the executives as clients that are one-on-one that there and it's very very busy space and basically they are where I was and they don't want to end up where am I ended up so I coached them how to reach their goals without dropping everything else in their life in the process. So that is that is my one-on-one work. We also rolled it out to we have a program that I absolutely love that matches you based on your personality to your ideal accountability partner. And what's really interesting about that if we did tons of em. And then come to work and my so I I have a big sociology psychology background and my husband is he's like, you know, he looks he's the Matrix, you know, he's just number all the rooms all day long. So I started noticing Trends in people's personalities that brought the best out of each other naturally and then he started to see that you could actually put an algorithm to that. So we created an algorithm. I know I know I'm like, of course you saw that of course, you just like I don't even understand how this works. It's amazing. He's it's it's just so different than mine that it's just I just have to let it go and appreciate that there and I'm never going to get it. So yeah, he we together built an algorithm that took you to your ideal accountability partner and what happens when you are in that pairing is that you naturally your natural state of being is going to bring the best out in your partner. So this is not going to be your best friend, you know, your best friend tells you what you want to hear a lot of the time tries to make you feel good and your ideal accountability partner is going to make you be the best version of your life. And when you have that pairing it is so incredibly powerful and what's so great about it is that it kind of freeze up the world of coaching like coaches go through all this training should be able to manipulate who they are and how they are in certain coaching experiences because if people are different right and this algorithm naturally fed up with the person that is your best match so you don't have to learn all that. You just have to be yourself. Oh my God. Like an eHarmony no, just kidding. And you know, it's so funny. I met my husband on eHarmony. So we are we joke that we created the eHarmony for accountability Partners. I'll go to them couple. Yes. We are. I have no I have no idea how I even landed on there, but I'm so glad because he's amazing. But yes, he is the algorithm guy and it and that's exactly what it is. And then we have a whole structure of breaking down your values and getting to your core beliefs and you know, really building your goal out from that and then a weekly accountability page him to touch base and and we have I'd like to joke and say where one will like, you know, you know people and I'm like well one blue like I am all for the affirmations and wage percent in the mindset, but we also back to get with clients. So it is it's one wheel with a lot of algorithm. So if I ever have a podcast it'll be algorithms and Ed. That would be amazing and and doing the work that you do and then getting the word spread out about your company and and what they do has it been easy or has it been pretty well recepted in the communities a little bit of both. So there was a lot of resistance around the word accountability it brings it triggered people the word accountability really triggers way more people than I expected and we've had to do a lot of work in Breaking that down and allowing people to I think that they've just had negative experiences with their version of accountability and what they went through so setting them up with a positive framework and then seeing the 16s. We immediately can change their minds but there is some still some negativity around that word that we're trying to break a stigma that sort of exists it after rolling it out into into publishing. Actually been not as difficult as you would think we started with my first big roll-out was I'm very advocate for a lot of things but one of them is is refugees and we had a huge influx of Syrian refugees into the Baltimore Airport and we needed to acclimate them to us culture as quickly as possible and have them like have our communities embraced them. And the fastest way in my opinion to do that was guided accountability set them up with their ideal partners that were already based in the office and we followed through it that method and it was astounding the results were like if still gives me goosebumps. It's absolutely amazing the mindset changed the the the heart thoughts on molded for that process at that will be enough to light the fire need to continue this movement. And so I'm no longer on this Earth. It was just it was it was remarkable wage. Truly what we had and it showed me that guided accountability is so much more than goal-setting. What it is is we pair people and the common factors are their Humanity a lot different. I mean we're talking sometimes the Republican paired with Democrats Christian standard with Jews or Muslims and we transcend those cultures and and races and different things like that. And what I find is that a lot of times their values at the core are the same and they're all experiencing the same kinds of judgments and they all struggle with the same types of mindset issues that we all have wage and that were not alone in that it's human and it's just amazing to see what happened when you can see into a world that otherwise you would never be able to peer into I am just like in all with all this information that you're sharing like it's just like being able to be paired up with somebody that I mean, this is just a huge experience to be able to navigate your new goals and and reach new levels that you wouldn't otherwise be able to write and even dream of what's possible. There's things that people have been funny. I have some to one of my favorite pairings was an attorney in L A and a stay-at-home mom and this month and the stay-at-home mom at the end of their like six weeks together to stay at home mom was in law school and the attorney was a stay-at-home mom. So it was so funny to me because I was like you guys just took me swap line. So what they realized is that they weren't living out their values and they were so different coming into it and they realized that they weren't different at all. They were just judging one another for the same job. They were judging themselves for the things that we see in other people and we and immediately go there and you start judging them. Those are the things that can judge about yourself. So when they were able to get through that barrier and see what they actually wanted it all became clear and it was just absolutely amazing to watch it unfold. Wow. That's so amazing. It's just really makes you think about what's possible and the investing in yourself and and doing work and home mindset area self-development like how life-changing it can be for you and for other people that you're in the same environment with, you know, absolutely and it you can only work on their office, right like you can convince someone else to do something and what I've seen time and time again is that when you work on your own mindset when you work on your own personal development, it's almost dead. Possible for the people around you not to follow suit because they see the change in you and it's like they they want some of it to like, what is that and that's when the most impactful they the biggest trickle effect for me is every community that got it accountability makes its way into like right now we're in all of the libraries and that has been that was one of my number one goal because it started one of the biggest projects we started with was refugees, right so they would not be able to afford to buy a book. It was really important to me that this book be made available in library, which is a completely different publishing process and but mindset wise now I feel free to talk to other people about it because I know the people that need it everyone that needs it has access to it off. That's so library right now. It should be it's been rolling out to the the way the library works is like you how long the Library of Congress is like, I mean, it's all very technical but seeing rolled out in the top all of the top twenty like the 25% of the largest libraries and then it struck down from there. So it'll be an all of the libraries before the end of this year. Congratulations, and then that gives access cuz it's free to be able to check it out. Exactly exactly and that was my biggest biggest biggest, you know goal going into the fact that there would be no barriers for people to be able to access this framework. I wanted everyone to be able to access it because again, I don't want anyone to go through what I went through right in what like so what with the work that you're doing now and like what would you say for somebody for like first steps of or like learning about accountability? Obviously, we need to purchase your books of or rent it at the library. Yes library near you. If not, it is on Thursday. It's like it's not very expensive. Now. I price it literally as cheap as Amazon would allow me to price it lady. They're like, no you can't go any lower than that. No. You sure like, what is it? Like no, we can't print it for less than this is like, okay, but yeah, so it you can absolutely access that accountability on Amazon. It's also in all dead nearly all places that book stores are that books are sold. So it's very important for me to support local books shops and mobile vendors and that is a big part that I have a big part for that. So I took it there as well. But you can also my site charlena Smith. If you go there you can find a life wheel that will help you align your values and also a personality assessment has just took a free and a paid version but the free version is two questions and I swear it'll freak you out because it's like somebody just read your mind and like go then with the crystal ball because it's still accurate on Thursday thinking question and it's just a lot of fun to take and you can take it yourself. Your friends can take it. You will also tell you who your best personality dead. Accountability Partners would be so you can do that. You can do it all yourself. You can do it, you know get started. We do have a guided accountability course if people are interested in taking that next step and it just teach me how to really be a guide and to be guided because it's something that you know, it's it's natural to guide and be guided but as as a society, it's almost beaten out of it. So it brings that back it brings back that trusting your intuition and listening to your gut and really intentionally setting your mindset should be on certain things and you know taking back control of your mind and your body and you it allows you to Take Back Control, right and then also offer like connecting like a lot of the times when we're like all over the place and we don't have accountability, but we're just on the go on the go on the go and like our body and our minds are not working. In unison together that's exactly what happened to me. So if I had had a guided accountability partner if they would have thought, you know, we do a lot of Zoom meetings and things like that and they would have sat across from me. And then like I said, you need to simmer down like this is crazy here, you know, this is nuts. I didn't have anyone to do that for me. Now my family did they were like, what are you doing? This is crazy but family, so you just took them right? You know? Yeah. Yeah, you're like you be quiet know. Yeah, you can do this that makes you kind of want to do it more with my life to me. Oh my gosh, the rebel mindset. I'm not tell me I can't do it. Let's see you're like dying. You're like I'm still doing it. I'm sure well so our can we find you on Instagram? Other than your your website or where would be the easiest place to get a hold of you would be your probably your website, right? Yes. Yep. For the easiest way to access ma'am on there all the time. We do have a corporate version and then we are also starting the goalkeepers Guild which I'm really excited about. So the goalkeeper field is a community that comes together with all of my passions aligned. It's all about goal-setting. It's all about being, you know, a mom of special-needs kiddos and gender-nonconforming ghettos and you know living that lifestyle and then there's also the work element like how to balance work and family life and health I've gone and my health club has been extreme if you will and just how that can affect you and what you can do to avoid it and protect not just your mind and your soul but your body as well. So the goalkeeper field is is actually a when this errors it'll probably be because I think I just have to approve it this evening. Yes. All right. Well, thank you so much for coming on the show today and I can't wait to dive into the book and then pass it on to someone else that I yes, please do I meet with it or if we don't have another Library, maybe they can go drop it off there. I'm like, yeah, but thank you so much for joining me off. I don't think you Julia. This is an absolutely wonderful and thank you for all that you do with your podcast and in the community. Thank you so much. Have a good day. You too, bye-bye.

accountability Partners Amazon Spotify Julia Charlena Smith eHarmony Burke Towson University pinewood derby Library of Congress Goldsmith CEO East Coast professor Scott Ed Baltimore Airport attorney partner
Verbose title of the episode

Verbose title of the podcast

12:38 min | 2 years ago

Verbose title of the episode

"Families who you're listening to Ted Talks daily. Our environments are changing rapidly largely because of us humans. What do today's cities full of noise and pollution and light due to wild animals and plants evolutionary biologist meno. She'll Towson is the voice behind today's talk from tedx Roma 2019. He covers the amazing adaptability of animal and plant species. They were forced into what he calls a pressure cooker of evolution, but they've found fascinating ways to survive and even Thrive I loved the geeky anecdotes in this one. Hope you do too. A small Village near the city of Rotterdam in the Netherlands. This is where I grew up in the 1970s and 1980s. When I was a teenager. This area was a quiet place. It was full of farms and Fields and swampland and I spent my my free time they're collecting wildflowers bird watching and also offer collecting insects. And this was one of my prized finds. This is a very special Beetle an amazing Beetle called and and Beetle and this is kind of beetle that lives its entire life inside an ants nest. It has evolved to speak and it's using the same chemical signals the same smells as the ends do for communicating and right now this girl is telling this worker and hey, I'm also worker and I'm hungry PLS feed me and the and complies because the Beatles using the same chemicals over these millions of years. This Beetle has evolved a way to live inside and and Society over the years when I was living in that Village. I collected twenty thousand different thoughts and I built a collection of pins Beatles and this got me interested at a very early age in Evolution. How do all those different forms? How does all this diversity come about? So I became an evolutionary biologist like Charles Darwin and like Charles Darwin. I also soon became frustrated by the fact that option is something that happened mostly in the past. We study the patterns that we see today trying to understand the evolution that took place in the past, but we can never actually see it's taking place in real time. We cannot observe it as Darwin himself already said we see nothing of these slow changes in progress until the hand of time has Mark wage. the lapse of Ages or do we Over the past few decades evolutionary biologists have come to realize that sometimes Evolution proceeds much faster and it can actually be observed especially when the environment changes drastically and the need to adapt is great. And of course these days great environmental changes are usually caused by us WeMo. We irrigate we plow we built we pump greenhouse gases into the atmosphere to change the climate. We release exotic plants and animals in places where they didn't live before and we Harvest fish and trees and game for our food and other basic needs. And all these environmental changes reached their epicenter in cities cities form a completely new habitat that we have created and we close. It's in Brick and concrete and glass and steel which are impervious surfaces that plants can only route in with the greatest difficulties. Also in cities we find the greatest concentrations of chemical pollution of artificial lights and noise and we find wild mixtures of plants and animals from all over the world that live in the city because they've escaped from the gardening and Aquarium & Pet trade and what does the species do when it lives in a completely changed environments? Well, many, of course you go sadly extinct, but the ones that don't go extinct they adapt in spectacular ways. Biologists these days are beginning to realize that cities are today's fresh air cookers of evolution. These are places where wild animals and plants are evolving under our our life is very rapidly to suit these new Urban conditions exactly like the end Beatles it millions of years ago when it moved inside an ant colony we find now fine with animals and plants that have moved inside the human colony and are adapting to our cities and in doing so we're also beginning to realize that Evolution can actually produce it very fast. It does not always take the long lapse of Ages. It can happen under our very eyes. For example, the white-footed mouse, this is a native Memo from the area around New York and more than four hundred years ago before the city was built this mouse lived everywhere else, but these days they are stuck in little islands of green the city's Park surrounded by a sea of tarmac and traffic. A bit like a modern-day version of Darwin's finches in the Galapagos. And like Darwin's finches the mice in each separate part have started evolving has have started to become different from each other. My colleague Jason Munchies south from from University who is studying this process. He is studying the DNA of the mice the white-footed mice in New York City's parks and trying to understand how there are beginning to evolve in that archipelago of islands and he's using a kind of DNA fingerprinting and he says if somebody gives me a mouse doesn't tell me where it's from just by looking at its DNA I can tell you exactly from which park it comes. That's how different they have become and Jason is also discovered that those changes these evolutionary changes are not random. That means something for example in Central Park. We find that the mice have evolved genes that allow them to deal with very fatty food. Human food twenty-five million people visit Central Park each years. They have most heavily visited Park in North America and those people leave behind snack foods and and peanuts junk food and the mice have started feeding on that and it's completely different diet than what they're used to and over the years. They have evolved to suit this very fatty very human diet. And this is another city slicker animal. This is European garden snail very common snail it comes in all kinds of color variations ranging from from failure how to dark brown and those colors are completely determined by the snails DNA and those colors also determine the heat management of the snail that lives inside that shell for example a snail that sits in the sunlight in the bright Sun if it has a pale yellow shell it doesn't eat up as much as a snail that sits inside a dark brown Shield just like when you're sitting in a in a white car, you stay cooler than when you're sitting inside a black car. Now, there is a phenomenon called the urban heat island, which means that in the center of a big city. The temperature can be several degrees higher than outside of the big city that has to do with the fact that you have these concentrations of millions of people and dog. Activities in their Machinery steak generate heat. Also the wind is blocked by the tall buildings and all the the the steel and brick and concrete absorbs solar heat and they radiated out of nights you get this bubble of hot air in the center of a big city and my students and I figured that maybe those garden snails with their variable shells are adapting to the urban heat island maybe in the center of a city. We find that the shell color is evolving in a direction to reduce overheating of the snails and to stop this we started a citizen science project. We built a free smartphone app, which allowed people all over the Netherlands to take pictures of snails in their Garden in their street also in the country outside and upload them to a citizen-science web platform and over a year. We got ten thousand pictures of snails that have been photographed in the Netherlands and when we started analyzing the results off We found that indeed our suspicions were confirmed in the center of the urban heat island. We find that the snails have evolved more yellow more lighter colored shells office. Now the city smell and the Manhattan Mouse are just two examples of a growing list of animals and plants that have evolved to suit this new habitat this Citi habitats that we have created and in a book that I've written about this subject the subject of Urban Evolution. I give many more examples for example weeds that have evolved seeds that are better at germinating on the pavement grasshoppers that have evolved a song that has a higher pitch when they live close to noisy traffic Muskegon that have evolved to feed on the blood of human commuters inside Metro stations. And even the common city pigeon that has evolved ways to sneak attacks themselves from heavy metal pollution by putting it in their feathers. Biologists like myself all over the world are becoming interested in this fascinating process of Urban Evolution. We are realizing that we're really at a unique event in the history of life on Earth completely new ecosystem that is evolving and adapting to a habitat that we have created. And not just academics. We're also beginning to end list the millions of pairs of hands and ears and eyes that are present in the city citizen scientists school children together with them. We're building a Global observation Network, which allows us to watch this process of Urban Evolution taking place in real time. And at the same time there's also makes it clear to people that evolution is not just some abstract thing that you need to travel to the Galapagos to to study or that you need to be a paleontologist for to understand what it is. It's a very ordinary biological process that's taking place all the time everywhere in your backyard in the street where you live right outside of this theater, but there is of course a flip side to my enthusiasm when I go back to the village where I grew up. I no longer find those fields and swamps life that I knew from my use. The village has now been absorbed by the growing conglomeration of Rotterdam and instead I find shopping malls and I find suburbs and Muslims and many of the animals and plants that have our so accustomed to have disappeared including perhaps that and beetle. But I take comfort in the fact that the children growing up in that Village today May no longer be experiencing that traditional nature that I grew up with, but they're surrounded by a new type of nature a new type of ecosystem that to them might be just as exciting as the old type was to me. They're living in a new modern-day Galapagos and by teaming up with citizen scientists and with evolutionary biologists like myself, they might become the darwins of the 21st century studying Urban Evolution off. Thank you. TRX

Urban Evolution Netherlands Central Park Galapagos Charles Darwin New York City Jason Munchies Beatles Rotterdam Towson Ted Galapagos Rotterdam Citi New York North America
Inside Digital China With Jeffrey Towson

Digital Business Models

38:30 min | 1 year ago

Inside Digital China With Jeffrey Towson

"The digital business models podcast will give you the top business education. You need to understand the digital business world whether you're an entrepreneur and executive or wanting to be an entrepreneur. The digital business models podcast is your go to place for Your Business Education High at one for police station. We We'd ask Jeff we had a speaker on China and Asia that grants visas professor at Beijing University and older older of a great book which is really a quick greeting driven understanding about China which is called the one hour channel Hannibal so thank you Jimmy disquisition Jeffrey now pleasure to be here. Thank you so let's start from urology actually actually get you know to study the Chinese Market Economy Ellison your story I just a sort of international international business guy doing a lot of deal stuff's out of the Middle East and slowly started doing more with Asia this is good fifteen eighteen years ago and I was sort of half in the developing world in half in the US and it was pretty clear that Asia was the place to be early early on and China and Asia was just going to be a huge story so I was kind of on the ground is pretty obvious what's going to happen so I started focusing more and more on China Asia and I've been doing that ever since I still keep about half my time in China half my time in the US which is just an endless opportunity 'cause there's always new stuff to do and it's also pretty enjoyable lights so that's kind of where I settled days one foot in China one foot in the US which is gets more and more more interesting every single year absolutely of course suitable also to see all the things and the differences and similarities between Howelsen Woodson the the landscaper right now that the most interesting backup tech companies probably messy before for for a few years and I guess your good spectator and also protagonist of these which is interesting so and then in the book you actually mentioned seeks Mega trends that shape than actually are s shaping China in the Chinese economy. I am looked at those make sense. Can you give us just a short as an option about Those ones will be this is a CO author author. Jonathan Mackenzie we know China's confusing and there's a lot going on. It's a big place very complicated and what we did is we sorta pointed. Look at least major economic trends happening that our long-term these. Are you know thirty forty year trends if you if you I can understand those a lot of the chaos becomes a lot more understandable and so the trends. We started to look at where things that were driving. The revenue are the cost structures of companies and out of that we we identified sort of six number one. We is urban as ation just the fact that in China reopened to the world nineteen eighty about eighty percent of the population west farms and twenty percent in this city which is usually pretty much the inverse of most developed countries I so there's just been a steady movement of people into cities which is still happening today. That creates a lot of economic drives. We also like to things like manufacturing manufacturing scale just a lot of money capital rising Chinese consumers which is something that's really become important in the last five to ten years. I digital China and then what we call brainpower behemoths which is just there's there's more and more people with advanced degrees. China's not liking us to be in nineteen ninety minutes engineers and PhD's and artists and a lot of advanced skills now so we kind of looked at those six EXC trends and that that's held up pretty well over time. This little model used a lot of most of the major companies. You see are writing one or two of those trends so so far it's held up. Its minimum four to five years so we'll see but I think it's pretty solid most of those. Things are going on for at least another decade gate if not longer and then we'll say interesting. What time do you think it will be really going on a steeler in the in in the next I mean of course the Sikhs Mega as you said that we would be going on or thirty four thirty forty years but some of them really started the banking the against inspecting the eighties so those spence that you see losing momentum and which ones are the ones that I really any moment I can get. You know it'd be nice to from your side perspective random in the ones that were easier to predict where urbanization manufacturing shrink capital just a lot of money because it's just been steadily narrowing. I mean it's literally a linear line. Just dry nineteen eighty two today and it's just a stray raid law. The ones were little more unpredictable. Were rising Chinese consumers which you know they were not really an economic factor ten years years ago. People didn't talk about Chinese consumers ten years ago. They weren't buying much even know they had income and savings well. That's changed dramatically in the last five to ten years now. It's the world's largest market for audio for gaming offline gaming cinema movies and one industry after the next day become the largest argest marketplace or in the top two so that one's sort of a late bloomer and then digital China which is one of our six is the most unpredictable acas crazy stuff happens all the time most of the China. The digital consumer stories really about consumers. I'm sure most of the digital China's story is mostly about consumers honors. that's where things are really happening. Fast Alibaba ten send social media all that that's a lot of China who turn out are almost almost entirely digital creatures. You know you can't talk about Chinese consumers without talking digital anymore. Everything happens on a smartphone. That's probably the most awesome predictable one but it's moving quick now each missing and you said at the beginning knitting these bedding posted to stress out because a steeler for many people. China is blocked by the very complex set county which is a male of many classes as you. I liking the in the book but did the digital megatrend like Internet Essa changed in China lagged in terms of society consumers would seeing now consumers is his main. Everyone knows a lot of them. That's not a big surprise. Everybody knows that they're rising in their wells. I think the part that gets under appreciated is how complicated they are. China's is arguably the world's most complicated consumer market now it is just you can look at thirty million. Chinese consumers live in caves. You can find Chinese consumers in the far west. Were you got several hundred million of them. That looked like a different country. You go to downtown Beijing. You get more billionaires in Beijing in New York City so there's a huge fragmentation and complexity to them. and it's just getting more so because you know there's a lot of them so we get a lot of anything you're. GonNa they get a lot of complexity and to you still get this big spread between very very developed market behavior like Beijing and Shanghai and you know okay that's out in the field and in the mountains and so you know it's just this hugely complicated subject in the only way you can really understand and Chinese consumers at this point. Is You have to go small. You have to study micro populations Chinese moms sports enthusiasts inland consumers DADS. You have to break it up that way and you find out people are very different YEP. He in Buca Luke Action Yields Twilight one point which I found very interesting in Sao actually people consume the consumption of the Internet sites okay to be more intense or for for Chinese especially young people compared to two west Westerners and is it something that it's still valid today. I mean they still like more time spent on the Internet on digital devices compared to the West Yeah basically I mean everyone knew that was going to be a lot of people with smartphones mark bones in China. That was pretty predictable. Seeing the same thing in India Indonesia places like that. I think what surprised people was how enthusiastic they are they just doc things faster than other countries APP mobile apps off like crazy and they they spend more time online than other consumers in other countries. They contribute more they post more. They add content more so just turns out they. Are you know some of the world's most enthusiastic netizens are Chinese. You know that wasn't necessarily predictable but it's true the other thing to keep even mind. Is You know there's a difference between regular consumers who go down to the supermarket by apples and online consumers because the online consumers effectively operate like network you know it's not just one person that person's sharing with another person sharing their interconnected and if you have three hundred million Americans or three hundred fifty million Americans. There's a certain number of connections. You'll get between them. When you have a billion Chinese consumers. It's actually exponentially financially larger so digital. China effectively operates like a network and it's very rapid very vibrant so so that part is sort of showing itself when you see a new aspect off in China. It goes for nothing to a hundred million users in two months three months now. We don't see that anywhere else that I've seen right and I thought it was interesting to see. Nowadays is a bit of a bads in the marketing world because they said these schools that the talk which they claim to be combated in like in social media space by finding because they sort of in some cases compare the metrics the users acquisition of blood from Lake that we the we we waste about a dozen the make in some ways. It's much sense because as you said I mean it's very eat steady easy to the up went up Atlanta actually they they might get Eddie began than median us so I think it very important to the seldom understanding of China and when he just something he's also that in China that he said that the phenomenon of a super APPs which is something that we didn't yet I guess seeing though in the in the West which makes me think that of course intend as technology China's evolved by looking at you know how Western companies any state companies work actual of the since it was more a I think a couple of years ago looking more in depth at the by do business business model but what I found interest with that right now recently they company like by do is not just a coping a something like a company that Google but actually innovating each way so it's waiting its own innovations as many things actually will will doesn't ever as well as always interesting to see these scandal. I mean what we'll do. They will you see on that standpoint. How does that look like right now. In China China obviously from the West and use any of combining the yeah I mean it's most people in I'd say the United States they got on the Internet by PC. You sit at home. You have your laptop your desktop. They discovered g mail than a couple years. Slater discovered youtube and they slowly adapted various tools over time that didn't happen in China. People basically joined around two thousand nine in two thousand ten only on their smartphones mostly. There were some users before that was very small and they got all these tools at once you know they went from nothing thing to. I've got a smartphone. I can do messaging. I do online video like drawing gaming so they kind of jumped in the deep end of the pool and they've only know the Internet on smartphones and the difference between a smartphone in a P. C. Is One you you work at home your office and then you leave the other one you carry with you all day long so they carry these around all day they message they take photos they watch videos all of that and one of the things that it was different early on people don't use email you send an email to someone in China. You better wait a week. 'cause permanent going to check their email. It was all about messaging so it started out with messaging with Q in that led to we chat and then from there they added payment which Allie pay in and we chat wallet and once you had messaging in and we chat take mobile payments set up that enabled you know e commerce to happen on your your phone anywhere you happen to be during your day that was the basis of the Super App and it turns out people just live on their smartphones. It becomes sort of the operating operating system for your life but we didn't see any of those three steps in the US you know people weren't living on WHATSAPP as much. Although they kind of are now they were using email they didn't adopt mobile payments because they were using credit cards which worked fine not awesome but they were functional and then e commerce. Was something something you did on your. Pc not necessarily on Amazon on your smartphone so we didn't really see the super emerge in the US at all. Although the facebook is trying it right now we saw it in China and then we started to see in Southeast Asia grab and go jacker working on this people are trying to build it in India and Latin right now but it kind of you know emerged out of China I and it's not clear to me. It's GONNA emerge out of the US at all. FACEBOOK is basically copying. We chat right now. They're they're consolidating their messengers which is WHATSAPP instagram and Facebook Messenger first and then they're gonNA try and add mobile payment which is CA libra and then they're gonNa try and at ECOMMERCE. They're basically trying to copy. We chat but I doubt I doubt it will work but right yeah we. GonNa work actually. FM funding away it is that if you think the the would've Lebed consuming also content right now I think we we see also sort of a comeback of the of the male way or communicating even even if he made you means that are in clattered. MVP editor of these medium of course it's one of those were either never as much noise from me as another chance you've been consuming your base so it's it's interesting to see also this is different behavior of consumers in the US and also oh suggesting that in Europe compare the most China work they got really sadly on the Internet and they hold the new as you said where the mobile devices worked probably made sense Nikitin's which was more integrated so where you had more does and I would like to a go beco- on which you mentioned before because I think it's important for new standard at the Chinese consumers the Chinese market and in the you said the how you know the the inquiry has become a Assadi adopted in in your also mentioned that a lot of these option maybe you the fact that many people are in the rural areas which make them more prone to spend probably more time on on the Internet and you'll also mention the importance of one word of mouth as as a way of consuming things so Chinese any says at Betty generally skeptical so this is interesting because a deck suspended understand. How are you know Chinese people think so. I'll see what can do. You have any thoughts of dinking around these like How wise would amount you know implants that we are evolving Chinese economy. I mean word of mouth has sort of been the way China has operated for a long time. You know up up until recently. The news was mostly government created. Noah state on broadcasters stayed on media so people didn't necessarily I believe that at face value and similarly a lot of the information comes from corporations while they don't necessarily believe that either so people you know in China wait. These works the fifty years since you asked France. WHO's a good doctor. What's a good product. How good is that washing machine. Whole countries worked on word of mouth for a long time when Kyu and we chat came along that just basically moved it all online and even today when social social in Chad is a big part of e commerce and other things China you you chat with people about what you're going to buy and online influencers. You know these people that talk about products on Yokoun such that's the same phenomenon it's okay. I don't understand what this product is is. I don't trust anyone. I don't trust the commercial but I trust this one person. I listened to on my channel because she seems like a pretty okay person. That's kind of a version version of word of mouth. It's well. It's kind of cloudy. A trust on people trust today no that's. That's been a long running thing within China. The Internet just made it a lot. What's faster you get these these online influencers just millions of followers as they talk about what handbags in lipstick to buy discussion forms and things like that really are pretty pfeiffer chime so I mean that's part of it and the other is you just research save so many people chatting about everything all day long that the there's a very energetic online conversation happening in China now that didn't exist thirty years ago thirty years ago if you lived in Beijing you didn't know Equate Joe or Kunming. There wasn't communication. There wasn't phones. The country was very very fragmented with the vast majority of people living in villages and farms up until nineteen eighty nine hundred ninety so you know the Internet Kinda stitched everyone together for the first time and you know China has sort of this ongoing going on ongoing discussions online. That's a new thing for the country. That's never existed before right and so it's interesting to watch watch him yeah. It's it's it's very interesting to watch absolutely end the east he said beeping in conflict with the with the fact that in any case at ah China's a government tries to control sort of the communication flow especially as related in the book where were Chinese banks. Ah Losing the south of they're they're controlling the economy they're not as our for us to be does he change at the salt the Internet communication the change in effect the we and the government as our on undecided. There's a couple levels to this. Definitely there is a system of controls in the media and in some conversation that definitely exists and you know part of that is because of politically sensitive topics which is what people tend to report on but there's another level. I love it. Where the government does you it as its role to have healthy conversations things that aren't considered bad for society so if you watch TV people don't have tattoos they don't smoke on TV because those things are not considered terribly terribly good for society so it's not just about you know controlling. It's also about encouraging other types of topics encouraging sort of respect for your family. Respect back to your your elders. You know there's a lot of this that is not as controlling as people like that think. It's more about just stay. It believes that there should be a healthy level of conversation. That should be positive and you know I. I think there's a lot of value in some of that. I think that's a lot of bad behavior like if people playing Internet games too much it's ads. Are you know too much about just showing naked. Women Women are almost naked women that does get stopped because it's not considered terribly good for the country which is it's. It's not a bad argument yeah so it. It seems to me. It's a bit like the Internet in some ways. It's like. TV used to be rubbing the US many many years ago where you still have some sort of epic or like you surround what kind of things you do. Would you not do which ran now recently on the Internet. It's it's a way more difficult to control. I mean we see especially. I guess on social media another China's which are very hard to condense stems no yeah. That's probably changed a lot live. This is just been the evolving nature of the Chinese Internet and definitely in the last couple of years. The level of sort of let's say transparency in control role of online world with China has dramatically increased so things that you know existed in two thousand and nine winnings so yeah but the tech has advance sounds pretty rapidly on all of these sort of government tools and a lot of them aren't run by the government a lot of them. Are you know run and by tech companies are run by media houses who are run by people who make movies and they sort of know what they can include them what they can so it's it's pretty complicated system but it's definitely getting more sophisticated textwise. We'll look company so you following right now. Now in terms of you know as you fooling the trend the Internet companies you following you more interesting in terms of technology and mutation. I mean obviously the big ones you know the big five or six Kalibbala ten cent by Dan's by do. Dd May Thuan flon now. Those are kind of the big giants by market cap. I also look at the telco players a bid so walkway. Gt China China Mobile China Unicom because the the hardware world is I focused mostly on software on digital side right I mean software software and data but the hardware world is becoming more software. networks becomes smart as drones but come smart is refrigerators refrigerators become smart that really means adding software so more and more I'm looking at those sort of more equipment type companies as they moved towards Ford software walkways in the news a lot this year and then the AI companies that are just sort of roaring up right now. Most of them aren't public yet but there's a good number of these almost surely. Ai Companies like may be sense time equation things like that. They're pretty interesting what they're going so it's sandwiches see in the paper more or less. Yup So one particular field is It's interesting to me which is a voice search and breezy surprise. Ah You can confirm these not the as you are in China quite quite most of the time so I was a inches it actually it was glad to see that change anything boysearch she'd sound in that up in radio appropriate Alex musical. I mean mistaken like by the West Radio Voice assistant like rummy before and then Google them if I'm staying so I'll always voice trend now on others. He looked like in China while having the the the big question is sort of natural language processing on your computer here you and understand it and it turns out. That's actually pretty difficult. computer vision is much more advanced commercialize. Talbott Chinese companies especially like by which is the big surge since they've been on this for a long time has a lot to do with the fact that is actually pretty hard hard to type in Chinese on a cellphone that you know you you can sort of type on a smartphone or a PC in English quite easily but drawing young Chinese characters is actually kind of pain so people switched over to voice or started thinking about it much earlier so the accuracy levels the numbers who read about it's usually by do that. They have a high accuracy level for Chinese inputted voice. You know higher than English and that that's because has is Kinda hard to type in draw the characters that's where it's going. I'm not totally sure alibaba's all over that situation thirteen not Maldini Xiaomi has an assistant. That's moving pretty quick sodas by do so minutes kind of the equivalent of Alexa Alexa and Google for the West but you know we're seeing three or four different companies in China doing this yeah. I think it's GonNa move pretty. Quick but yeah the the recognition aspect is problematic. It actually turns out. It's pretty difficult. Civil see you know. Can it get passed basic understanding or is it. GonNa be stuck at this sort of rudimentary understanding for a long time which could be the case. I I don't know we'll see how it plays out but it's pretty tough I assistant or a big deal right now. In June yet no ancient and as you said the interesting analysis well that the extender as as a practical issue so is not like they were citing Franklin due to innovate the course said it's difficult to type in Chinese on will buy are the most news uh by by Chinese people came out as they came up as a practical need support for anyone we strang to expand and Ebi recent digital business and expand in China suggestions. Do Most of the cool cool digital stuff in China's is consumer focused the B. Two B. side. The Enterprise side is actually pretty slow and it's not as advanced as the US or the West ask so consumer side is where China's really the frontier of a lot of things within that probably the most important thing is to understand digital marketing and and social media 'cause it's very aggressive in China. If you're not doing that you can't sell anything to anyone and so what you see is a lot of big fortune five hundred companies studying thirteen in China in terms of digital marketing and then taking those lessons and applying the rest of the world. That's kind of the area. I'd start focusing on things are moving really fast and probably more advanced in just about anywhere. You'll find mostly woods it young digital marketing social media stuff like that. What did you not solve our our in depth of digital marketing team set recently seen in China that we didn't see yet thing that in the Western world because as the expedition and I guess going on probably the coolest thing I think is how content is driving e commerce that you know we had these. Kol's he's online influencers come up there basically content creators they create videos you know traveling through. Paris looking for handbags and then they use that to sell their own stuff by my handbag but they you know they're also contracting with major brands to promote their stuff and and brands are doing this in large part as a replacement for hiring celebrities or spokespeople because Kol's can move more items so oh. It's you know it's turning out. The content is a very powerful authentic way to drive ECOMMERCE. you know it's it's got depth of content in thinking often intensity that is really quite powerful and that's something that we see in China more than it anywhere else. I think that's pretty interesting and then the other stuff is short form video which is tick tock doc doe in that was China thing but that's taking off in a lot of countries right now live streaming micro gifting. There's a lot of it should China stuff. That's different than the West. podcasting is actually very popular in China and it's easier to monetize in China than it is in the US uh-huh not really any AD markets podcast a couple of things for China's related. Usually all of these things tied consumer behavior is that's where things are really innovative so in China that he's a nut market already and now people use subscription gift in free me on but they're using mytalk and micro gifting very popular online influencers or lightning east sports huge in China and people play online people legit shower them little gifts of money things yes oh yeah there's a lot of interesting models bubbling around and it's not just China. It's really Asia a lot of interesting stuff happening. Yep renell a wingback will before the Internet is began abducted by Chinese especially when they were using mostly mobile devices. I guess that the that the most the most a mental the most used on sanctions Leo it was known for instance in the US with google seeing that Google is pushing more and more windex other and a convent like we see Kolio Albouy via which is becoming a goodbye Most of it is that we get on Google search in China August is really the the primary consumption of content. Yes especially short video. One of the reasons tick tock took off so so quickly. Was You know these are fifteen second videos one. It turns out. There are a lot more addictive. When you're you're hitting new video. Every fifteen seconds the other thing is it engaged more of the China network that Let's say there's five hundred million people who have smartphones could data plans in can watch. Yoku whatever but short video anyone could do so all one billion people who have which had can watch short video radio even if you just a farmer in his field and you have a very basic cell phone with a very basic data plan because you have a lot of money you can watch short video because they don't take much memory and you can also film your own short videos just with your phone so it engaged the much bigger percentage of the network of consumers not just consume but also to produce content. That's one of the reasons that is doing so well. Oh and lots of like poor countries because anyone can do short video no matter how skimpy your data plan is our basic yourself on his you can do we chat you can do short video a couple other things even if you have a little bitty data plan so that's one of the reasons. I think that's powerful also turns out. It's super addictive yeah yeah. I mean you you. Have you have the great which wishes you to go on. DVD platform is not nine tweet so it's really like sarcomas talk about a lot of luck machine mechanism whites and that issue because in China you have potentially over a billion people which which work as a as a which could work from the bathroom because the disease mostly user generated content then potentially have a lot of people that can work for you for free which is the whole logic of of us generated that back from an and of course you have the student do to prevent a bad bet content. They NS gala weakening so interesting phenomenon polluted. It also turns out like it's really good for digital advertising because every let's say fourth or fifth video is a full screen fifteen second video advertisement which is a heck of a lot better than a banner ad after a search engine inquiry right right it it turns out. It's really good for video advertisements when you get in the covers your whole screen you know that's a lot better than a banner headline so it's it really works on a lot of dimensions. Let's you know pretty clever as business yet. Yeah let me let me let's close. The conversation was was great conversation I and really enjoyed it where where people what is set would resources which is air? Mass Street. Do you have others others who since they use adjusts that that wonderful low what's going on each now yeah. I'm literally launching this week on align sort of when I'm calling it sort of Jeff's Asia Tech Class where basically I'm going to start teaching online on my website which is Jeff Thomson Dot Com and it'll be a freeman model so people can basically log in every week and get ninety minutes worth of teaching on all of this and we're gonNA lay out a good year or two of courses wound up. People can learn as much as little as they want the. I'M GONNA I'M GONNA start systematically teaching about all of this the yet so that's launching this week really I make sure make sure to to look at it and also we're going to everything that in that the after year so so that people can can can go on the platform and where people can find you. I guess on the same they joined join the blood from an Bobi degen suit. I guess contact you in in the easiest for contact me probably Lincoln yet. I'm on there a lot and then it's either linked in which is easy to connect on than I do my Asia Tech Class and my little newsletter on my website so those are my two main little channels yet sensitive. Thanks said thanks a lot for Jeffrey was really Bashar and the Ella really or anyone that we'd be sitting at the one Howard China book is great reading of course they have the chance to jump on your about from a great way to stay up to date with what's going on in China and especially from the digital standpoint team. It's it's Betty Betty Eddie useful so thanks again. Okay thank you. You've been listening to the digital business. Models podcast created it by four week. Mba Dot com the leading source of business insights for those wanting to become digital entrepreneurs Goto four-week Mba dot com for more top tier business education.

China United States Gt China China Mobile China Un Asia China Asia Google Betty Betty Eddie Beijing alibaba facebook Jeff Thomson Your Business Education High Howard China Middle East Beijing University executive spence
Barstool Rundown - February 12, 2019

Barstool Rundown

15:20 min | 1 year ago

Barstool Rundown - February 12, 2019

"The. The rundown. It is Tuesday. It is February twelfth. Back. I thought it was Wednesday at least Wednesday. I counted back from Valentine's it, that's why I did that in today's my last to end the rundown this week because. I. Unnecessary. All yeah. I'm heading to NASCAR Barzel NASCAR team. I'm actually now legitimately excited to see with about. We're teaming up in two thousand nineteen kicking off February seventeenth from Daytona five hundred sold out of the packages. So if you slept on those VIP package is tickets are selling gone, Dave. That's me. All going down for Barzel tailgate live show coming out with us at our spot. The midway Daytona can't make it be sure to tune into the sixty running the date. I guess it was like the hundredth running the sixty first running of the Daytona five hundred this Sunday, two thirty eastern on FOX. So I knew that was a problem. Bob, FOX put his jacket on the Moore. I was like how you gonna get down, bro. These domains as disrespectful to you minority to I knew that was going to be a thing. All right. And Tony Brown in the news. He has said he is done with Steeler nation. He's out you still in the contract. But he's done. They're fucked. A nightmare. It's the place. Every week could be the worst human alive right now. Well, what about LeBron these third? No, LeBron is threatening the American way of life and Tony Brown third Goodell Goodell LeBron and Tony's. Would you want him on them right now? You would well you are gonna get the jets argument. They're gonna get. Yeah. I mean, I'm I'm so devoid of like talent at the skill position that I don't think I can be beggars can't be choosers fully admit this. Can you get almost no that he'll be a headache? But if he can actually catch the football league, let's go. He deserves for somebody teammates this break his nose. It's crazy. How does he do you see a picture took with Ed OMON? Trolling. I didn't even know Ataman was holding up six and he was standing there. Don't even when I I love the picture. I didn't know who was because guide his mustache. I thought it was like a rapper something. He he's everything that's wrong with the steal. Okay. Go ahead. Say I'll counterpoint that. I actually love in Tony Brown because like diva wide receivers are hilarious. And they make football fund the league always needs one at. Yeah. Right. It's just like oh del Tonio Brown and Odell does nothing compared to. With. Right. I think he's an asshole. But the world like the NFL needs the animals more exciting when we have this one might have gotten a little like he's a little bit too much now but him getting upset about not winning team MVP and the mink coat, and it's just the show. Fox between both of those guys. And I'm the capture those reading it's like if you train them. Now, you lose twenty one million dollars betrayed them in a few weeks. He was twenty four million dollars. Tomlin. So he's let this. I mean, the second the second. He started making Facebook videos of like the post game. Yeah. Like speeches? That's probably like at the raw take him to. All the Steelers. We mean give him that is him. I'm saying I would take him as my head coach, Tom. I would take them all. Breaking Chris Bosh who hasn't played MBA game in four years announced his retirement to move. I did like a triple take when I read. But I thought what was the biggest price? Bryce Muhammad Ali being alive or caught me off guard. Yeah. Yeah. I'm a what I what I don't know. How I missed. Remember the big fan. I don't remember. Oh. Guy from committing suicide. Now, I literally shut down Louisville. If somebody hit me at the right time in my brain. When I was like, no he's alive and like, no, he's dead. I'll bet you your net worth on him. I would have done it. That's how I around someone else. That's the David Bowie here that I have twenty around someone else would he would Trump, but I'm saying? I'm saying, well, what if it was prince prince prince was dominated every John June third twenty six now Princeton. Muhammad Ali I it would be almost impossible to be Muhammad Ali. I have the curse rich. The only reason I brought him up because I'm April twenty first twenty six not too far off the brought him, mama. Was that very this the picture from the Carolina game of that old bag just like losing her shitting, Michael Jordan, which I love I thought was hilarious is like who can what living legend can create that reaction. I said Mohammed Ali people like well. He's dead. Actually, then your point is even more, correct? If you saw some Hamadeh you'll be like what that's like seeing. So you point you Devia. Do you have anybody? I was trying to think. Michael Jordan's just about. I I don't know. In the world. What athlete like soccer players Beckham? But even that, I don't think Palay back, although. I still think Beckham would be I'm trying to think I don't think anyone anyone gets to that maybe Kareem just because he's so all no. But Kareem wouldn't I don't think that's legitimate watch. No. I know I know I'm just thinking of people who are combination of famous, but also like how the hell like when green walked in here, we overly what the hell. It's crazy. How tall is? Yeah. I think it's just MJ francesa category zone. We're just talking about with francesa. No before the MJ thing. Bosh retired Bosh. By the way. But I'm actually calling bull bullshit because I feel like if he spent this long not saying that he retired. If someone call them tomorrow, it was like, hey, we want to sign you he'd be like done. Well, that is a theoretical western because in the article it's like, no one will give me a chance. So right. He's so he retired. Nobody will sign. That's correct. I guess the radically like we could retire. Right. I'm retired from the NBA right signs. The posh. Also, it's gotta suck for guys. I always think about guys like that. Who like he his game is perfect for today's. What he was saying that arrive. Yeah. Pretty good run. All did. You have good run to always like the punching bag LeBron. Well, the brunt always need the thing. He was always lying. More numbers for good. This video is very funny. So New York subway video ladies and a fight with somebody and her she just threatens she's gonna suck his dick off. She's like you won't do it. Let me I'll suck your dick off right now bitch. He can't. Years. Just stupak game. Dementia like gets up way that you went down ready sucks. Pretty intimidating. Very aggressive. Yeah. I would scare me way more than someone being like fight you. She's like take you dick out. Right. So emasculating, then if you're going to come over the top on are you have to take Dicky? I think she would have bitten his. Yeah. I wouldn't I wouldn't have. She said she went interest won't fight. I think she's I believe her Agean if they got into that. And just continued and like, well, it'd be like the hottest sexy never told you stick. You're going to suck it. Crazy still things going on the subway that make me be like well never seen that one this many years in. Yeah. So we're still surprising this I don't get the so it looks real to me towels and college old blackouts numbing grounds. So there's basically a woman a mother like fifth year old Asian lady walking around showing pictures of her son to girls do on date my son. And now the police are looking for this me like stereotypical. But I like, I can see my mother doing this like Asian women's Jusin, Asians. Yes. So right. I don't see. I mean, who cares? Yeah. This is why they're looking to like arrester. It's a bit weird. But I don't think it's like it's also like I know this is going to sound stupid. But it's kind of an end being like, my crazy mom. Yeah. Spreaker? Yeah. Got to work with it. You got your starting well would spot, but I feel like now if you're working with it. I don't think it's a positive. No, it's nice breaker. You have something to talk about your mom goes around asking bunch of women out on a D for you. Yes. You lease have the first thing to say. And that is like the most difficult thing close, but get in the living suing your mom is not coming back into play until like an relationship. Right. So if you can get over this first hurdle crazy. Mom disappears for the next. Right. No it where the police are like launching a manhunt for this one. That's you know, what that is. That's that's college cops. Yeah. Need something to do. This is the biggest thing, you know, could be week subjects I guess today. But that's all we got. Saw got. There was a couple of decent video of a fight where lady puked in the middle of it. I put that on there. Two. Oh. Lady going. The supermarket like just throwing everything ground as you try to pay for bag of Pringles. Don't don't don't. He. E. No, he's Pringles. Always discuss me. Yes. Loves print. Oh, of course, he has is very Pringles the white trash gas station food. I lo- Pringles. But like eating all the time. It is one of those foods that it'd be like go to like it. But when you eat it feel kind of dirty. Yeah. Yeah. You got like your hands are all gas eats like a fucking ten year old. So oh, he's a bird one. She chicken fingers things. He learned. I forget what trip it was. But he like picked a restaurant, and it was like it was so bad. It was like a fish place. What it was like a dive bar in line. Montreal like, you're never doing that again. Yeah. I guess that's about about it themselves. Tell me what are you doing sneaky little rivalry building? Marina versus Frankie each. I love Rena with a grace the Berge on shirts. Since is in game. She just. Do you see what she did? She she ordered that shirt for self and had it sent to Frankie's. Oh, he opened it thinking it was a gift in the thousand goals thing thousand games is that a big deal. A lot of games league. I wanna thank you games. Shitload of games. So yeah, that's that nothing else. And we just run the we have already. Tomorrow, two more minutes. Let it run for two more minutes that way when people see it, they're not like, oh, it's only a twelve minute rundown. Chucky cheese that that they are interested. Okay. That the waiters take let the leftover slices and then just create a new slice and give the people leftover mega slice to even like you order, and they're not creating fresh. They're just taking leftover slices and putting them back. You kind of deserve it. If you Jimmy. Would not be able to tell the difference. Right. Fresh and old Chucky cheese certain level of Chucky cheeses, categorically denied the charges. Okay. Well, I actually categorically say they're true. Okay. Fine. No, it's gas you chugging pizza checking cheese pizza now. But I would you would that I experience Portland. Maine. All right rolling rock, ugly sweater party fouls nine. Yeah. That's right. And I stopped picking restaurants after. I would never pick that. But I don't ever pick restaurants either. Because he's. Portland. Maine actually has a lot of nice restaurants. And he picked the worst. Did we go recently where I told the person was perfectly fine. Like nice upscale steakhouse, and I feel like it's something goes wrong Rury, he's the worst. He if it's up to him, eat McDonald's and Pringles every day, we were somewhere in all I think it was Tyler in Atlanta. And I was like yo you better picked a good restaurant. Because if you didn't Dave will kill you. I can't remember where we went. I don't let him pick those in in Atlanta. She she got the Chinese food. And she was like, it's not very good. And I was like don't see that around that hotel. Right. You just don't own you. Because I remember we just kept going into San Francisco bowl just to prime. Yeah. Puts unbelievable whenever I love that. Rid for you. Our a deal. But then you guys just kept going. No it was expensive. Just so good. We went every so often I thought it was. It was the name of the house. And it was only five with time. So it's like well the budget would load on. Just keep going. All right. There's your extra two minutes. People say, we never gave you.

LeBron Pringles Tony Brown Bryce Muhammad Ali Daytona Chris Bosh Dave Maine Portland Frankie NASCAR FOX Michael Jordan football Kareem Barzel Beckham Valentine Bob Facebook
Big Ten w/ Christy Winters-Scott

Around the Rim

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

Big Ten w/ Christy Winters-Scott

"We have my life. Analysts and mom wife goals now on the show, ladies and gentlemen. Please. Join me in welcoming Christie winner Scott the amazing basketball analyst who around the rim. Welcome christie. Hey, let's Jain. Thank you so much for having me. Well, you know that I wanna be you like an every aspect of my life from how you break down the game to how you dress to your fabulous kids in your career, south lakes, Maryland and all that stuff. So I've always wanted to be we're both DNV girl. So that's right. That's right. This is always a fan girl moment for me. But Christie used spent time in the big ten a lot of time. And we've enjoyed wow, you you smothered and cover that league. So well for all of us this year, but we know about making us in an Iowa they're going to be in Greensboro is the number two seed, I know you are moving onto. I was sitting the first. A second round where drink as all also there. So you have some good matchups. Looks like Missouri Mercer, but I want to focus a little bit on some under the radar big ten teams or some teams. I'd like to see if you wanna make a case for okay, if they could advance out of the first second round with Indiana that will be an Eugene, I'll actually be an Eugene, but they're taking on Texas in the first round. And then either Oregon or Portland state tell me about why Terry mourns team maybe able to pull some upsets in advance Sweet Sixteen. Well, number one, I think that Terry Moore and end her squad. I think they are carrying with them. The confidence of winning w an IT tournament last year in Indianapolis. And I think when you have a team that has a winning culture and winning expectations and a player like alley. Pat Berg, I don't know if you have really touch the surface on what she brings to the table. Let's when she missed those three games with her shoulder separation. You could definitely see the energy level was different. Although she was there on the sidelines and being energetic as the leader. But when she is on the floor for Indiana. She is a force and it's not just her scoring ability. But she distributes the ball. Well, she is passionate player plays a lot of fire and competitiveness. And when she is out there. They're just a different team when it comes to just bearing down and and competing every single possession and playing the fifty fifty basketball's really. Hard. And I think the defense that Terry Moran has played this season. I think has really been impressive to watch. And they're non conference portion of the season as well. Coming into big ten season competition, I think was really strong for them. They were undefeated on at one point. They had carried in fourteen consecutive wins going back to the WNYC championship. And a couple of games prior to that. So I mean, this is the team that knows how to win especially in crunch time. And they had a lot of close games this year. They were bumped by in a nine point game and the tournament. So I mean, this is a team I feel that could be a surprise for some people like you said, and you know, yes, we're talking I want Maryland and workers coming out of the big ten this year. But you know, you don't hear about Indiana as much, but they have had a fantastic season Terry Moore, and it's going to have those kids prepared and ready to go. And I think it's gonna be fun to watch alley pepper. I think you know, marches where you discover all the. Players to continue to follow throughout their careers. And I think you have to put alley peppered right at the top of the list on that. Yeah. Couple of transfers for Terry Moore in that have made a huge impact in Pat Burg and also Brenna wise and Indiana was one of those last teams in right? They were into the debatable eight, and so then you get this energy. Once you say, okay now, we're in and you have nothing to lose, right? Those teams are always the most interesting to watch you mentioned you mentioned Rutgers. And obviously know sad news coming out that that coach Vivian stringer will not be doing her team for the NCAA tournament as she continued to wrestle our prayers to her. But ruckers doesn't look like they're really messing around despite not having your head coach and possibly being inspired. I love stace Kerry. Does Rutgers really have what it takes without Seve on the sideline to pull them up sets. Well, I think what they have. They have CVS stringers spirit within them. She has taught them well and not just the players, the coaches, and the coaches have held their team accountable to the expectations of of CVS stringer and what she expects from them. So with that being said, Tim eat men implemented there fifty five defense about two weeks prior to the big ten turnament initially. They had said that Vivian stringer would return for the TA tournament. But like you said the news came out last week that she would not be returning. But I think they implemented that fifty five to assure that they would get into the NCAA tournament. And it's time for her to come back. But I think with that fifty five defense if you haven't seen it you guys. I mean, it is swarming. I know in their last five games, they had one hundred six steals because if you five and I mean when you're steals not just the flex. We're talking about feels and going. The other way. So this is a record team when you're in March madness, your defense has to come through for you and for Rutgers whenever you say the word Rutgers. That's just it personify defense. I mean, you think Rutgers you think defense you think that fifty five they had done it. They were intermittent with it at the beginning of the year kind of went away from it mid season. And then got it back right in time for the strong momentum push to secure three seed in the big ten tournament. So when you have records now at a seventy and they're gonna take on buffalo, which is going to be a great match up and they've had a fantastic season. And of police ya like a Jack shoe back difference in job with an emotional pride moment after winning that MAC championship. But I just think when you have a team like Rutgers who will present some strong defensive energy and pride you can never count that out. I don't care how your shooting the ball. I know against Maryland during. The regular. I mean during the big ten portion of the season they upset Maryland at Maryland hitting nine threes. Your shots not always gonna fall. But what you can bring all the time is that lockdown defense that trapping swarming. Run jump situation full court that you have to contend with. And you have to break it every single time or you're going to be in big trouble. So you have to be on your Ps and qs when you're playing against Rutgers, especially in that full court presentation, it can be exhausting, absolutely exhausting, which arrived. Buffalo will be fun watching Dillard. And then if records gets out of that, they'll have Yukon probably we will take on tasks, and and I know we haven't gotten this the ton of Taus in this year. But one what a great story as they get to their first NCA tournament. And I know, you know, something about the background of head coach, Diane Richardson, can you tell us a little bit about her. First of all, I just love her love her. She was the head coach at Riverdale Baptist the highschool out inaugural, Maryland and. Did a fantastic job with them. They were ring top of the countries that were several years over, but she's had since with the university of Maryland GW, West Virginia and now house and she's taking the helmet and just two years gotten them to the NCAA tournament for the first time in program history. So I think when you have leadership like that. And it's the belief that she has in the players, but it's the belief that she creates within those players that has really been special to see and I'm just really happy for her. And I know that the sky's the limit for the potential of that program moving forward just because of what she's planted and then in terms of the beliefs and the competitive trust that she's created with the culture there in talented. Yes. Congratulations to house. And if you haven't seen Diane Richardson's dancing skills. You can check out my Twitter can definitely get town. Last question before to Rica kick me off here Kristie, I think the most intriguing team for me. Now, you again, you've got the Maryland's you've got the Iowa's. But I also were wondering about Michigan. I just feel like personnel wise. They have so many great pieces came up just short in a big tin turnament. And is it just mayor those Kim Barnes Areco tnd have have a chance and have what it takes to make a run. Well, I definitely co-signed that China just because can burn Rico said this has been her most deep team that she's had in the seven years. She's been on the sidelines at Michigan. No Caitlin flare. The all time score and leader for them, not just for women's basketball. But for men's basketball as well. So it was a different style of play that they utilize this past season. And when you have a player like Nicole Munger who is a gritty hard nose hard hat kind of player's gonna take charges for you. But can also knock down the three and stretch the floor around players like Holly them and this dynamic freshmen who I am absolutely. In love with non Hillman who was big ten freshman of the year as voted by the media. And when you have this kind of balance when you have the the older players utilizing the the issue of these young players and not and said over and over again, hey, I'm. Just I'm learning and I'm in it to win it. I'm listening to all the coaches they trust me. They put me in the starting lineup. So if they're trusting me I have to trust myself. This is a kid who just gets it and she gets out there, and she just goes hard. And she is a motor inside on the glass like she stays possessions for them. So I think with Michigan when you have the leadership like I said at an eighty you're gonna take on Kansas state of the big twelve and I just think they have a great chance because of their balance and their depth. So obviously dome has a foul trouble. She's a key piece for them on both sides. But the same goes for Munger, you know, she was in and out of the lineup a little bit this year with some injuries. So it makes a difference with her on the floor, but Kim Barnes Rico. I know she's excited to be in the turnament this year after winning the w I t two seasons ago. So she knows what it takes to win. And she really has these kids believing and what she wants. Well, I. I wholeheartedly agree with that. I love Hailey Brown as well. And let me tell you should makes it pass Kansas state and Louisville pass Robert Morris. What a game that would be an old began natch up from Kim Barnes Rico, Saint John's days, and Jeff wall days that would be a dog fight. So yeah, we'll definitely be watching. We'll be watching you Kristie. We know you will be in Iowa. So we'll watch you on the two, but we're else can we catch you on social media where can fans follow you? At Christie, w Scott fifty one on Instagram and Twitter, and I will be heavily utilizing my social media during the Iowa City bracket. So actually one of our kids from southlake coach, she's a freshman at Mercer to you been the nudie. So it's like this crazy connection of going there to see her play as well. So it's going to be a lot of fun for me personally. But I love the game. So it's going to be awesome. Getting to see one of your former players and south lakes in the NCAA tournament. Wow. How awesome would that be? Yeah. I forgot to add to your resume. Coach is well, congratulations on your run and the Virginia state tournament as well. Thank you so much Kristie. We appreciate your time. And they just being amazing be life going into Riga. We need we need role models. That's you. I appreciate you guys doing for the game. And and just keep pushing pushing and letting people know what a great game women's basketball is we love you guys. We love you too. Thanks christie. These days.

Rutgers NCAA Iowa christie Indiana Terry Moore Maryland Michigan Kristie Maryland Vivian stringer Kim Barnes Rico basketball Diane Richardson Nicole Munger Buffalo Twitter Terry Moran w Scott
Jan Freund on Improving Your Game

The No Limits Selling Podcast

22:57 min | 2 weeks ago

Jan Freund on Improving Your Game

"You are you ready to become awesome. Hello everyone this is you mar immed- your host and welcome to the no limit selling podcast. Where industry leaders shared their tips strategies and advice on how to make you better stronger faster. Get ready for another episode. Hello everyone today. Have got the privilege of sitting down with jan find. She's a branch manager for berkshire hathaway blah boy and all that and the but the main thing is you. Have you run. Three branches with one hundred agents nasqad a fulltime job. Welcome to the program. Thanks for having me. I appreciate it. Yes i am the branch manager for berkshire hathaway on services ten federally. That's a mouthful movie. As long from the people in his. We leave home services out most of the diet. Brilliant jan one of the reasons. I wanted to sit down with you. Is people become good at their craft and management. Goes you know what will make you a leader. And that's a different skill. set right. tell me about when you went from just running your own business to. What was the next to the team or was it right into branch manager. It was actually straight end to Be interbranch branch manager at was pretty much always my end goal From when i started into real estate and a tragic event took me on the turn of real estate. I needed to do something else so Someone helped me start from nothing. And i mean nothing and gave me an opportunity. Who was at was the owner broker associates twenty in reality and in york pennsylvania and so i always wanted to be that kind of manager and help people the way she helped me grow my business and i had one lead in my pocket new one in pennsylvania so five point six million dollars in four months and then became talk one hundred fifty to one hundred agents and its entry twenty one brilliant and she helped me get there so that's who i am today. That kind of manager. And i wanna get back. Brilliant a gentleman kitchen a little bit closer. Ari go jimmy about this far away. And all this out but mike james manager century twenty one. That helps you what. We're smokey pieces of advice that you gave me still hold on today. And maybe you channel to your agents that her worst mattia mouth was absolutely. There's one woman stands out. Emma and mind you know i'm cranking on thirty homes a year. I loved the selling part but a hit the back end paperwork and all that minutia staf so she pretty strict ship and until she said you either get paperwork together or you can leave so here. I am a top producing agent. And she was okay with that. She's like has your liability for me at this point sound. She said a good agent. Does it all so tell me about. What did she said that. What was your reaction like. Was there was like anger wasn't oh my god moment because i loved what i did i want to. I worked for and with so it's time to get my act together and i learned how to do it all so that was a huge moment and i think the biggest thing you know in the real estate world Up in pa. You go for listings. Of course i was listening in a buyer's agent so if you're going in less than it's ever present listening to get permission. She's always said. Don't sell yourself short so today in this world we live in. i tell my agents. Don't sell yourself short cylinder value sell. Who are you know. And that's what i said people don't know you don't like you and they don't trust you so that's what you have to do when you go in to win. That listing brilliant. Told me about people that you tell that to them and say okay have difficulty executing how to get them over that s- barriers. They actually believed the value. Because i bet you people discount the value you might see value. Oh bobby so amazing jan tastic me and so. How do you get to believe in themselves. So they actually charge on value. And it's not just Each electrode as she believed in heart well over the last eighteen months. That i've been here. I have probably brought on about ten new agents about that. And i have to. That have done nothing but all other eight of them have at least three to five or more transactions underneath their belt. So i think what i've done is to help them to believe in themselves and you know it just takes time and it's showing up for trainings. You know giving big as when they do something great and Just reminding them that they're not in this alone that they have me a whole team in my office behind that and it's just constantly coaching reminding scene helping them believe in yourself. Potest positive motivation. All of those things. It's a it has to be a day to day ongoing and letting them know how important they are to me in our company Just reaching out. How are things going you know. I saw you posted. You were out this weekend. Where your husband and you're having dinner is always not all about real estate. It's it's you know to keep good agents here with you is just helping them believing selves and how important they are to the company and to myself so tony bone someone that you really were someone who worked with a while ago that went from the need to having a constant encouragement to where they internalize it and it was just like a salon ego but just stepping into the. I am pretty amazing. And that way the al-said motivation is nice. That they don't need it. It's just an intrinsic thing. They know the value. So tell me about someone who saw that transmission. They went from needing it to the right direction to knowing it. Funny i do have an as and that's happened Fortunately and her. Corporate world downsized in whilst job. It's like wow already state. So lovely woman she about four months and she's like i just don't have anything yet. Oh my gosh. She went and got a part time. Job i'm like joan do it. I am telling you so she evolved now. She's been with me a year. she has evolved. She got it finally one day it just clicked and she now has six transactions underneath her belts and a six month period so tried to ran roundabout where she got it to once. You got in. What did you notice in her demeanor that you would just gotta well few talks where you're right you're right. I just need to do this. And i need to do that so it was. It was several meetings and then there was just one aha moment. She had a transaction. It was a difficult transaction. She made it through. But i didn't at that point. I didn't i don't hold hands. I give you're not supposed to cover the campus but i said i'm not going to do it for you. I'm going to coach you but you need to fly right pushing yoenis exactly. It's kind of like when your kids. You're pushing them out the door. I do the same thing with agents and it was an a ha moment. And she's like a guy force me. I'm glad you made me do because now you know she's writing contracts are on. She doesn't call me yet out. It's like it was amazing that transformation was helping a lot and then i just kind of cut the tie but coached yes and then she sword. What's what's really interesting is. I don't know this person. But i would be surprised during that. Time is like can't believe that stupid jan. She's supposed to help me. Sean helping me and thank you for doing that. Because through is we'll become up against our comfort zone and that's a scary place for everybody. Correct one of the things that kind of frustrating as leader is when you have a a wrap that has so much potential. They just can't see. Can you tell me about one of those experiences. Pick a random name so we don't know who this person is. We talked about him a little. You're on it tells the story about him but you seeing the potential and him not him in himself right so about five years ago. Someone came across the my life named chris or use. The name. chris Lots of potential saw the potential Given tons of support by multiple people and struggles in life seeing what we see and we did tons of coaching Telling her value and how she could succeed and gave her some coaching because she had some little rough points that we needed to correct. Sometimes people when they start in the most are very eager and they become very. They come overpowering to people. And you don't have to do that old wise manager of mind someone else. That's very important in my career. He told me. God gave you two ears and one mouth. You will more than you speak. And once i got that let me tell you. It's amazing. it changed everything in my life. Because i am southern girl born and raised to end a lot of people think. Southern women are weak. But we're not. We're very strong. Women were very boisterous women. And so i had to learn that skill and so you know with some coaching and she just couldn't couldn't get it she just still with tons of christiania and value. She just couldn't get. There's no joke in these idea. Trich world how many shrinks does it take to change a lightbulb. Only one but the ball passed a wanna change. That's one of the things is you know how do how do you recruit people because when you look at me on my resume much prettier than i am in person me delegate. So how do you go from the initial meetings where everyone's on their best behavior to really kind of getting getting sense data me rockstar of this person. Says all the right things but maybe not right. How do you master that like. What are you thinking. How do you detect the real coy from poster. Well as to experience over the years. Have i made a mistake. Absolutely i think when i'm recruiting people We just don't recruit everybody here We're looking for really the right fit and our office were very family. Oriented office Care about our agents. I want to know about their kids are doing. I want to be able to converse with them. So when i'm sitting in an interview on a little bit of. I don't want to know all about you. Know people can go sell twenty million dollars a real estate but i wanna know really who lakers who that person is so we spend a lotta time figuring out you know. What are you doing for fun. You know what's important to you. What are you know what a values this and that and and that's really important. And i think that's what in this real estate world because Like you say you people. Can you know buffalo. you in an interview. They look great but we just really spend time diving. And and i think it's become an art for me so much of personality toss or is that. So that's a fringe keller williams. They do a lot of testing. And if the boxers i b went there and scouted that out once and it's different young people love it there and people love it here so you have three branches that you run. It's the same old you in all three branches. But there's different agents in those ranches. So i suspect there's a different vibe. Each one of the branches backups out so walk me through. What's the difference in culture between the branch sitting in and lose the bill. And the other two that you run culture's pretty much the same across the board. How would you describe the culture. The culture here is oriented care about our agents. So let me stop you there for a minute because any Brokerage so they go to we care about our agents but some people actually do it versus not. So what do you do. How do you make that real. And not just a something written on the wall. How i make that real. I answer my phone limit. Call i pick up the phone. It's not five to eight hours later. It might be an hour later But i answer my phone seven days a week taxed. You know they know that if they need me and it's a fire i might be in a meeting. You one may an immediate. And i'm gonna be frail and i think from an agent from when i was an agent. I think that was what was important to me because if on calling manager i needed my manager you know i needed to balance something. And i'm thinking me just being there in case is huge for them because there are not any nine doubting brokers or managers but artist managers that you hear from eight hours later while the fires gone sisters for high in a plant store in canada and their manager sits in his office with all along and the floor going nuts he could come out and alpinist like nope just hiding my all and being totally off hand so you have a one hundred agents this call the of agents that could take over your job. Maybe maybe if you were thinking about those two people don't name names people in mind so person a what's missing out of this skill set or attitude. You need to help them gain that so they could step in and then the same question for being a coward you help to learn that scale or that knowledge for personnel so they can actually be ready to take your sock person a would have to learn to step back not be 'cause sometimes in our l. state route. It can be pretty emotional. Things are going wrong. Emotions are running high and with my experience. I've learned to step back because the want an answer right then but i'm not. They know what i came here. You're not going to get an answer from me. Instant so they would have to learn to take a step back. Pull all your information together and learn to say you know what. Let me go. I've got information. Let me go put all this together. Give me a half an hour. And i will call you back because the judge that they don't messaging is okay so that person have to learn to do that. So how because that's easy to say. Okay that makes sense but incredibly difficult for them to do. How would you go about building that skill set up in them holding back not wanting to just jump right into such difficult to do and not get tied up emotion at the moment. So it's a skill set that is learned over time and patience is the biggest thing so and coach them to you at one. Don't get tied up in the emotion. That's hard not to do and you're gonna have to. I'm a big person of Learn the art of mindfulness and been taught that that. So i think stayed in the moment i tell my ages all the time. Stay in the moment. Don't get out and don't get in the past. Don't work stay right here. And i think coach met person to stay in the moment brave. Step back learn the patients. And then but i mean that's the biggest thing that has helped me as same the moment personally with cisco leg each learn and how would you go about instilling it in that person just would wanna love on the body so again is sometimes you have to be a little hard knows where things and like make it. Just she would have to tell people that have a little bit harder under skin and that's hard sometimes for someone to do so. I do a lot of work with a lot of people. And you'd be surprised. How many liters. Ceo's have this issue that they know exactly what to do but they have a need to be liked and the need to be like get them to let projects that should be killed immediately round or another six months or not fire someone that needs firing so yeah. That's a challenging thing to do chan. What's your growth. What are you looking to because you could just coast here for a long time. You're phenomenal job. But what's next growth thing for you. What are you learning. What are you looking to do next. World domination with melts hardwood. Because i've been here eighteen months as i have a. I have managed several offices before we are growing these offices. These a couple of offices needed a lot of help so we have had a lot of growth. So i'm still in the process of growing offices but my in game if growth wise i would want to do something more I don't like the way corporate because we're not corporate will use home offense Doing something more on higher manager level. Pardon me yes gets like. I am just becoming the pennsylvania broker of record. The over company is getting ready to hand that down to me. So that's a very important job. I've never been a broker records so that was always a goal. You have so But he's ready to hand over the reins as i've encouraged more my agents to become pennsylvania. Licensed across the company So that was a goal that i'm getting ready to fulfil that something more on the home office level Would be nice. Let me nice somewhere to end my career there jan. You're obviously very accomplished person. But we still have those barriers. Those fears that we need to overcome. So what does someone like you. It's the you want to overcome so you could be awesome. Well for seri the biggest thing it for me as you know i struggle. He said something new decide. Vegas want to be like if you would have said that to me a four years ago. That was a struggle of mine. I want an hour and everybody like me but through a lot of I have a life coach Through therapy life. Coaching handle back. And you know it's okay if you don't like me a huge thing to overcome so i would suggest anybody. That's struggling area. But i think that's something i work on every day especially When i first came here. I did have to let someone go. That's never has ties especially when you're the new kid on the block. So i was a brand new manager. Three months in and i'm having to What's go so. I think from What i struggle a little bit is still and that i'm still reading an attraction of it's okay for people like and i think that has made me grow in my position but every day i educate myself mars strive to be a better person and i think if i can do that i am more of an asset to my agents and the end brilliant just before report compli remind hack or productivity to or leadership you love to share with others I well. I sent out a positive message every morning to my agents and i search i. Do you know the biggest thing that i can say is Thing my biggest thing. I tell asians if yesterday you had a bad day or you know something didn't go right like as a realistic age of you got to get up the next morning. You gotta look at yourself in the mirror and say you like who you are and you're going to go out and you're going to be the best person you can be today. And that's the best advice. I can give anybody on because our world is up and down. We don't we lose deals. We're hot on herself. We went big deals and our our profession is very high and low. Sometimes so. I think you just have to put your blood bootstraps the next morning. You know best thing you can do is talk to yourself and just be the best person you can be day and go out and get it. Gosh darn i love myself. The exactly. there's so much nella me thank you. This is a great opportunity. If you enjoyed this episode please go to itunes neva five star rating. And if you're looking more tools go to my website at no limit selling dot com got a free online training course there s going to teach you some insights from the world of neuro linguistic programming. And that is the fastest way to get better results wrong.

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Ep. 404  Brian Stelter

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

1:03:47 hr | 2 months ago

Ep. 404 Brian Stelter

"These days we all have financial questions northwestern mutual advisors have the answers and can design the right financial plan to not only guide you through this. But help you come out stronger get matched with an adviser who gets you go to northwestern mutual dot com slash plan. And now from University of Chicago Institute of Politics and CNN audio, the axe files with your host David Axelrod. You may know Brian Stelter, tireless chief media correspondent for CNN where he anchors the reliable sources show on Sundays. He's also the author of a New Book Hoax Donald Trump Fox News in dangerous distortion of truth which is already a bestseller. I sat down with Brian this week to talk about the book the turbulent relationship between trump and the media, and also Brian's own unique story which in a few short years has taken him from precocious schoolboy blogger to a central role in commenting on American media today. Brian stelter welcome. It's good to be with you. You've got this great new book hoax Donald Trump Fox News in the dangerous distortion of truth and I WanNa talk to you about that. But we got breaking news as they say CNN and elsewhere breaking news. So I wanNA talk about that I bob Woodward's book is out as usual. He has some nuggets that are interesting the most interesting of which and the most sort of. Of which is the president on tape telling him. That he is that he knew this was an early February that he knew February seventh. That this was a grave perilous threat. and according to Woodward. He had been briefed ten days earlier on that fact, this was at a time when he was downplaying the whole thing. Cairo remarkable story. It it is. It's some it's filling in some of the gaps in our knowledge about what trump was doing or not doing. During those key weeks in January February and March, and if I may say I'm glad hoax came out before rage Woodward's book rage. Yes. But they work well together because I, talked about the Fox side of how Fox miss handled the pandemic. In how trump you know in some ways was was reacting to Fox Woodward is feeling a lot of key information about what was going on inside the white. House at the same time in February I think we all know in our guts. David, does a lot of blame to go around a of responsibility to be shared for what went wrong last winter including with mayors and governors but trump had the biggest megaphone by far in the same way the Fox other big mega on. TV trump has the biggest megaphone by far many any any misused it? Yeah. Well, you know very clearly he misled the American people about the gravity of the situation and. And because of that because he was intent on doing that we lost valuable time and we know what the consequences of that were. You know in your book, a hoax which we will talk in detail in a minute you know you suggest that. Trump. That there was this negative sort of feeding loop between trump and Fox News on the Pandemic Fox. News was playing down the pandemic this piece of news that and you suggest that the not just on this but on many things that that trump basically takes cues from what he sees on Fox News as well as sort of I guess sending some back but. I Miss on this You know clearly, he wasn't taking cues from Fox News because he knew the truth but he was letting them amplify his own attempts to downplay this so that he didn't have to interrupt what he felt was his calling card to get reelected, which was a strong economy right? He was using the Fox platform to try to do paper over reality. What was really going on you know saying in the middle of February that you know this supposedly dies with the warmer weather in April. One point he said of fewer than fifteen people would get the virus I mean they were there there you could put a whole half hour real together of his various comments downplaying the virus, that period and the most the most damning Wa was on February twenty eighth. It's it's why this book is called hoax it wasn't going to be called hoax. Pre. Pandemic, but I rewrote the entire beginning the entire ending. Once our lives were all up by this virus it's on February twenty eighth when he goes to South Carolina when Americans have already died of the virus and just didn't know it because there weren't enough tests and he says that the rallies that the Democrats are politicizing the krona virus, you know that right coronavirus virus, they're. Politicizing it this is their new hoax. So he is giving his permission to downplay and ignore what's happening even though as the taped show, he was well aware of the threat of course, folks is the word that he has used many times to describe the Russia probe to describe the impeachment proceedings most recently to describe the reports about what he said about American servicemen and Fallen Soldiers So this is a code word for trump and he and he has used it extensively code is interesting code word. It's a signal to the audience to yes believe yeah. Well, he is a man of many dog whistles we know and this is this is one of them and and and Fox amplifies it I, mean, the word hoax comes from Hannity's mouth. Ryan regard to the very same stories So chip, we'll get back to all of this but I want to ask you about Woodward himself whom you know I mean I was a young person inspired to journalism like many others in part by Woodward and Bernstein a back in the day, a covering Watergate and. You know he's served made an industry of these kinds of books and people know I mean I was in the Obama Administration there were a couple of books written about the period when I was there I, talked to Woodward as much out of interest at a to see his methodology as anything else. But people talk to him always I guess with the intent of kind of influencing his reporting and time they get bitten in the ass for doing the president of the United. States in eighteen interviews with. Bob Woodward like. What were they thinking? What was the president thinking? He was trying to impress Woodward and enrage. It's pretty clear. That's what that's what he calls were about. In fact, at one point trump's I want a good book from you meaning you know I wanNA positive book because fear. But Woodward's first book from two, Thousand Eighteen was certainly harsh assessment. Remember the time trump complained in a woodward didn't call me. Of course of course, would tried to call and his interview requests turned down and and the basic message from trump after beer after the book fear was call me again I will talk to you this time cooperate and you know this attempt to woo to impress. It's what trump does the. Tried to do it to you. He's trying to do it. Jimmy I remember when he saw me in two thousand sixteen when when my show was so critical of his his misleading statements and media-bashing I remember pointed at me and said good good show you know he. Just, you know he's always trying to win people over and with Woodward. He's done. The opposite will word ends the book by saying this man is not the right man for the job. Yeah. No, it's a it's really studying some some of his you know the the his bragging to Woodward about. Kim Jong UN's flattering letters, and you know how Kim Jong UN refers refers to His Excellency, and so I mean it is. It is a really incredible stuff but but shocking at once but not necessarily I mean it's appalling but not necessarily surprising actually when you when you think about it but listen I WanNa talk about you and I WanNa talk about your book and You you wrote a think. A paragraph to about your life in this book. The. Preamble to the book But you know you are. You are now a very visible figure in covering the news media and you've been very outspoken. Critic of trump and and his bending of the truth and how these things. Get covered and you've spoken to how they should get covered but I want the thing that struck me about you and just getting ready for this podcast as someone who was a nerdy news at a very young age. Myself is just how how Pratt naturally precocious. You were about all of this Your parents will tell me about your parents first of all and. And how you? Fell into all of this at. The age of ten. Yeah something like that like I was starting to working on this book thinking about how to structure it, and I met with a woman named L. Bell this genius writer and comedian who has worked with a number of authors in the past and you know we talked about how how do I write this book as a CNN anchor reading about Fox and she said I'm tell your own story explain who you are and why you are right to write about this topic and that's why the beginning of folks. I do share. A little bit about how I've been obsessed with TV news since I was a kid and how I basically been covering Fox for sixteen years I think it goes all the way back to when I was five years old David. Yes and I wanted to be a trash man I was wait wait for the transplant show up and I thought that was so cool and ever since I wanted that job the only other job I've ever wanted in my life is is to be journalist I'm trying to think Sata hands around the Trash man and. But Have Fun with that. By the time I was eight years old, I was calling into the local stations in DC W USA WJLA reporting the snow totals for my town and you know this strange sensation where they'll say your name on TV when you're a kid what Brian Damascus he has ten inches of snow on the ground have no idea almost. Do in barely over ten inches yourself. Right Touching Those little early signs of this obsession with the Bo. Well, what was it? What was it that drew you what was it? Because your your dad ran in a an appliance repair company your mom was a nurse. It's not like they were steeped in government. You did grow up in suburbs of Washington but they weren't they weren't a steeped in A. My on my dad's only connection to the government was was fixing Gloria borders, appliances which is amazing to me. I was just on to a TV at twenty minutes ago But but to me, that was his brushes celebrity he knew then a CBS star, you know Gloria. Borgia. Yes. I didn't get actually this might sound silly. Maybe not I think it was important that our house in Maryland had the TV antenna pointed toward DC and Baltimore we could have gotten both state we could have gone either cities TV stations, I'm glad we were pointed toward Washington because I was able to soak up Washington News and local TV from DC and you know. My. My uncle Kurt worked for the Senate worked in the Senate. Building your pager as a page at one point, which is, which is which thrills I. had these little. I had that kind of typical. You know look at on the outside peering in a little bit sort of experience but what what was it about the TV news I'm you also You also were an earlier in early embrace her of the Internet right. So show me. Thank goodness. My Dad's dad my GRANDPA got a computer and bought us a computer and. Five years old hooked us up to prodigy and. You know these dial up modem services in the mid nineteen nineties and taught myself html learn how to make websites and it was amazing to me that you know you could as attend eleven twelve year old Creator website gain an audience You know the crazy like this is the wild west of the worldwide web. So I created this website about goosebumps books by RL, Stein, intendo Games David it was competitive back. Then there were other websites about intention other these rivalries like these kind of nasty in the chat. Rooms, but I look back and it was this really innocent time compared to the sewer of the Internet today. Well, let me let Lemme ask you about your just one more question about this where you I mean you get the impression of a guy who a young guy who was sort of in a world of his own creation here. I mean what and I'm wondering to what you do in the things how the kids were doing were you hanging out? Were you playing sports where you or was this your world? This was most of my world and It wasn't that I was in an unhappy family. I was the oldest child to great young I to Great Britain brothers but. you know I wasn't the fastest swimmer definitely wasn't the the fastest basketball player This was my thing. This was my hobby and my parents let me go wild with the right in and be making phone calls to Japan in the middle of the night because I want to reach someone in Tokyo talk about Nintendo Games they're already indulge kind a cra- that kind of craziness right and and they were with the phone bills for it. I think the other key of this that I I guess I never talk about is is when my dad died, I wanna ask you Linda. Now you know the Internet and these websites the ability to create something and have an identity online mattered a lot. Yeah. Yeh Listen I. I read that and I have some sense of it because at my dad died when I was when I was nineteen and blurring very suddenly different circumstance he was he committed suicide but it was but it it it is a It it's it is a life changing after. I. Exactly. After yes January twentieth my dad in two thousand one, my dad took me to DC for Bush inauguration. So excited to get a ticket to be on the lawn of the Capitol and he had a heart attack two months ago and so We choose our sense that he had to be had to had to be careful He he was trying to take time off trying to relax but he was willing. To take me a D. C. dragged him down there to go with me to couple of events that weekend and then seven days later he he had a massive heart coaching your brothers basketball. Yeah. Yeah and thankfully I wasn't there but but kept my brother was my mom was We were able to say goodbye though he was in the hospital for two weeks before it was clear that that this was over and A lot of the memories of that time are blurry but I just I don't know I. Don't know how my mom somehow got us through it and what I think about when I look back at that time in two thousand one. I think. People. At school counselors, teachers, friends you know they take you under your wing a little bit. They take under their wing a little bit. They look out for you a little bit more and I do think that's the beginning of a chain of dominoes in my life that I don't know if they would have all fallen otherwise where you know you go to a, you go to a retreat one summer you go to a leadership event than they join the student government and then you do this and you do that and. Suddenly. You start to have a bit of an identity and a bit of a focus. Yeah. What you one focus you didn't have was as a student apparently. That's another way in which I identify with you. Because you you know if you have intense interest outside of the class who are right that that that kind of suffers. But yeah, I wasn't a standout the one class I did care about was newspaper. Run. The student newspaper and run the student TV channel like the to have those that. I guess I was a mini media mogul in high school I had never thought about that. He went imprint you you you went to Is it. Is it Tyson or Tocine Gatehouse people always think it's thousand state even though they dropped that name like twenty three years ago it states go outside Baltimore and it was it was a big pond but you know I was able to be a big fish in that relatively a. Decently sized ponds I was able to it. Go there and take over the school paper there as well and I'd like to say that was the most important stepping stone for my career but it wasn't it was my blog. It was TV that's the thing you started a blog called TV news her or is it was called Cable News her at the time right. Yeah because I was a non so I figured nobody would take me seriously if they knew I was eighteen year old college freshman blogging about Cable News. But this was a really interesting time in cable news is the two thousand three the Iraq war was raging. We didn't know what we got into his country Fox was Fox CNN was was losing to Fox in the ratings. MSNBC was starting to gain its liberal identity with youth over. And I felt like nobody cared enough about Cable News Guy I would read the New York, Times Online, and all the stories be about broadcast news uh-huh and I'm thinking to myself new cables where the story is cables the interesting thing. And did you were you sitting in your room watching cable TV all day? A little bit of that little bit of that. There wasn't a girlfriend in the picture quite yet This was driven largely though by the readers by the by the consumers of the blog. So I put this tip box in the corner of the screen just really easy away to email me anonymously and. was like an easier than in email and people would drop in tips and what they noticed on TV and what they saw and to the blog started to right itself. Thanks these contributions and you know what? Network took the bug seriously I. NOT CNN. Off knew he was Fox yes fox those. Were so smart they knew, Hey, here's this guy. They didn't know who I was right here's this new website weaken leak things we can. We can send him tips we can put stuff on this. They were very Saudi about and You also You also were good about sharing ratings, which is, of course, heroin for people in the broadcast industry they can't get enough of it and rats that made it. A must read a blog for for people in the Industry when when did you come out? When did people realize at this We jus would say little picture in House Tocine University has this. Empire going here that we're already. I'm searching now to see can still find the story Oh. There it is. May Twenty, seven, th, two, thousand, and four, the headline in The New York Times was the ultimate Cable News Guru when not in class? How I. Disagree I haven't looked at this in sixteen years. So a woman I knew Lisa Napoli one of my mentors over the years she knew my identity Howie Kurtz at the Washington Post was also chasing it but I went with Lisa she wrote the story in The Times and actually lied about CNN. It says Brian had an important decision to make a reader sentiment tip that CNN planned launch a new video news service he was waiting for CNN NPR to respond the problem was he had to class. I'm GonNa go read that some day. But there you go. I was dealing with CNN sixteen years ago. I'm embarrassed that you went to class instead of staying on the story that to me is very disappointed. We know what the big problem was. We didn't have wi fi on campus for the first two years. Can you imagine a world without one? So I'd have to plug in on these desktop computers and then when we were able to have WIFI on my on my laptop, my junior year, it really actually did make the block much better. Yeah. Yeah. Not only to the New York Times right about you but they hired you as soon as you graduate, which seems like a savvy. Move Given the given the platform that you had established they. They hired you to cover the the industry the they did when I was graduating two, thousand, seven I. Think what was happening at the New York Times back then was is a print newspaper this old dinosaur of a newspaper that needed to to to bring in digital knowledge and digital expertise, and one way you do that as a hiring a blogger. Times hired a number of others like me around the that time this was pre paywall. You know this is Early on in the New York Times and I came in and I was at the fourth string quarterback on this particular team. Now, there were three other outstanding TV reporters covering the the beat already. And it was an interesting test for me I had to look around and. Trying to find stories they weren't doing. And in retrospect, those stories were about online video. They were about Netflix's nearby Youtube show about the what was what was now emerging as the really important story on. Yeah. But it was out of it was out of need to not step on I was very afraid of stepping on my older colleagues. Yeah. Very afraid about making a bad impression. So I went trying to find stories. They weren't doing that that would stand out that is good training because you have to be more. Enterprising, it's easy to write about the stuff that is obvious in front of you but it's It's harder to go out and find the stories that other people in writing that actually are important. You had a mentor at the Times who is a legendary or was a legendary journalist and I don't use that term lightly a David Carr was a mentor to many journalists not just at the times, but earlier I think Jake Tapper, is one of those journalists. At you know from the days when David was editing a a weekly in in. Washington DC talk a little bit about him and the impact he had you're you're twenty, one, twenty, two years old. I mean I grew up in a newsroom shortly after my dad died actually and it was the mentor ship of great editors that that really shaped my life and it sounds like his mentor ship helped shape yours. It did. It did. I just pulled his book off Myself Shelf Firm in my office in CNN in New York I don't really get to come in very often. So it's nice to be here. Yeah, and I just put his book off the shelf and I wanted to look at what he wrote in the book is from two thousand eight when he wrote his book the night at the Gun. And what he wrote was be thanks for walking this creaky old man into the future and I it makes me laugh because I he walked me through the New York Times. Riley I wouldn't have known how to fit in there. I wouldn't have known how to be a timesmen as the as the term goes without his guidance, but it is true that he I was also teaching him a little bit about the Internet and about blogging about these new technologies. So so that mentor messy relationship was vital and also in my personal life. Living in New York trying to lose weight trying to get out there to date you at a weight problem. Oh. I. Definitely. I wrote about this in the Times actually I created a twitter Kansas of steps, embarrassed documents, creative owner account to tweet. As in all the calories and I measured it all and I actually was about ten years ago that I wrote a column about how I lost seventy, five eighty pounds by tweeting my diet. Twitter was so innocent time of innocence twitter was. So twitter was not yet a toxic sewer of trolls. Can you know now not? Diet Pretty Pretty useful reminds me of a politician I knew who was a five hundred pounds news, the Milwaukee County executive and each week away himself on an industrial way await scale and for every pound he lost various corporations would donate to charities of his choice in Milwaukee. He lost like a hundred and something pounds doing that that was pre. What else pre Redo it was my that was my diet solution I I was very transparent about it and also trying to learn how to use twitter back then but. I feel like David also. When when you lose your dad an early age I, think you go through life looking for those yes yes. Not Bad. But Dad like finger and yes and David Bruce Hedlund who was the media editor at The Times back then those were those vigorously. We're GONNA take a short break and we'll be right back with more of the X. Files. And now back to the show. You're such an inveterate watcher of cable. News at you actually spied your wife on a New York. One. I was in the car I was back home in Maryland for the holidays. In the car I think MSNBC sent me a car which I was still very impressed by back then in two, thousand, nine or two, thousand ten. I better get the dates rights it's about Jamie actually. Is that me a car? They're driving me too easy down to the NBC Bureau to do a live shot on MSNBC I guess I was a sucker for agreeing to do it on the day after Christmas and I was scrolling through twitter feed and beautiful girl popped up. She was covering the snowstorm in New York. So the David I was so jealous I wasn't in New York this day because the snowstorm was amazing and there's nothing I like more than a good severe weather event. So did you measure the snow or to? Them I know, right yeah. I did get to drive around in the CNN snowmobile You know the blizzard mobile wants and do a day of live shots. On my best days at CNN haven't gotten to cover a hurricane for yet but I want to digress I, see I see Jamie twitter feed. I I I liked her tweets as well as their photo. I liked her personality on twitter and I messaged the anchorman that she works within the morning's Pat. Kiernan a new Pat I message pad and I said Pat to see me get a lot of interest from you know does this you single? Does she get a lot of? Twitter interest you know forget how I said it but it turned out she was newly single and we started dean. So I I do have to credit for all my charisma twitter I do have to credit twitter Yes for meeting my wife Yeah we know you've put technology to could use it's made you more fit it's found you mate it's not right away though it I had a I wou I took me nine months to woo her she wasn't into me and I wasn't as into her and I would not you know and she would seem you with other people and Back. Then paid six nothing better to write about. So there was an item page six about me being seen smooching. You know and it created this whole drama is a weird weird time. You made the switch in two thousand thirteen to the cable news industry that you had covered for. So long was that was had a hard transition from from print to to broadcast. I mean you were used to broadcast stuff as a kid in your basement. Right? So you you've been practicing I know. I think I had been practising in my own mind but definitely, not only real stage I. I was really bad tendency David to block out all bad member. Remember anything negative that happens. Yeah. My Wife teases me about it because I you know I'll write a book and I'll say it was the most painful thing I've ever done and it's out and I'll say that was a black. Notebook Sir I. Not I'm not a woman I can't speak to this, but it's been described to me as childbirth you you forget the pain and you just appreciate the Prada but I think there was some pain back then to that. That's my point about TV I think there was some thing that transition was difficult I mean I do remember the having turned learn the teleprompter trying to Roger. Ailes gave you some advice on how to how to deal with dropped her he did at the party he he I was saying you know I I don't want to wear my glasses on tv but I can't read the prompter have moved the fucking teleprompter closer. You know you you don't work for the prompt of the works for you which sounds simple but it was really helpful at the moment. You know the the the learning to interrupt guest and when not to learning Wendell something, go along and when to wrap all those basics of. The you're never gonNA learn them in a book. Most people are in the on the local level or learn them. You know in other ways jumping straight in times a CNN was wild. But I also think it gave me more appreciation for the medium of television writing it. I find that I'm because I'm inside a television network covering the media. I have more appreciation when it goes. Well, I have more respect for the best of the craft and I have even deeper frustration with the failures of the craft. You know what I mean don't because I know what technology can do. I know what these cameras and control rooms are capable of and when we meet that moment it is. When we fail and we and we we don't then it's so disappointing and we should point out just parenthetically that you are a prodigious writer still and can be seen on the CNN sites and you have your you you you write a newsletter, each day and so on. So it's not as if you've walked away. From from writing no, in fact, the opposite I think just as much as I did at the Times but I think it's important to keep writing because it gives up into say on TV that's my approach to the John. Though the writing and the reporting is the foundation and then gives you something to talk about elsewhere. So when you talk about the highs and lows of of television news and I, think this is true. The News business generally, there is this conflict that is more apparent. Now because of the competitiveness of the industry, the which is news as a business versus news as a public trust and it's always been a delicate balance because you know news is a public. Trust but if you make any money, you don't have a news outlet and now we have because, of social media cable. Television you know we've seen massive disruption in the industry and frantic frantic competition for eyeballs and maybe this is you know you may WanNa comment on that but it does lead into the discussion of Fox News, how it came to be and what I what a cash cow it is for the Murdoch family. Right. Right. In my interviews for hoax one, one of the big takeaways was Biz obsession with ratings and prophets and I want to preface that as as as you're saying, all these outlets are commercial enterprises. Everybody cares about razor when cares about making money but it came through so much more loudly, and clearly at Fox than I've ever heard it at CNN or or at an ABC or NBC, I had an anchor at Fox enemy don't think about us as a television network think of us as a profit machine everything makes more sense when you view it that way and I couldn't help would agree with them by the by the end of the process of reporting this that When you're when you've been winning for eighteen years, the way Fox hasn't ratings and when you're expected to to make two billion dollars in profits in the next year that that pressure is overwhelming. Perhaps Rodger Ales had this concept to build a television network that would speak to people like Roger Ailes. A Guy. From. Donald Trump at small town Ohio. Sort of John, Birch territory the kind of place where when Ales was growing up people thought floride in drinking water was a subversive plot in that continent. Communists were probably behind it and so on. I mean that that was really at the core who roger was and he perceived that there was no market that market was not being served and he built a network to speak to people just. Like him and it was a brilliant insight. Was it not? He Rupert Murdoch were absolutely right. There was a big opening in the marketplace and furthermore think they were able to win over even more consumers who time starting to buy into this resentment news this these grievance politics fight these food fight sessions between Republicans and Democrats that there was definitely a core audience there from the very beginning. The only caveat is it took a little while for folks to find on the dial. Right. The ratings were very low for the first few years but by by September eleventh two, thousand one, there was an audience and after nine eleven there was a big audience. You look if you were to chart, Fox's ratings you see this spike on nine eleven that never really goes away talk about the tension between people who cover news at Fox News and their primetime talent who are very much provocateurs and advocates not not news people. Ryan they always say that there's this brick wall this big wall guess a trump trump will be a big beautiful wall between the news and the opinion sides. And that's clearly not true when you look at how the newscasts light to play soundbites from Fox and friends and Hannity, and when the opinion shows bring on reporters in the field you know the the the walls been taken down and there's no way to say they're still a wall, but there are still some hours on Fox that that seek to be newscasts. And feel suffocated in squeezed by the pro-trump propaganda. These tend to be the lower rated times a day at journalists. The mostly keep their heads down that are trying to do their best in complicated situation and That was one of the main reasons why I wrote the book was because hearing from all of these journalists who were so frustrated about what it's like to be on the inside at this place that lacks leadership in the post sales years and is Overtime every year becoming trump ear and trump era and trump here because like I, remember the famous meeting you have avails in two thousand nine rang there was reported by politico a couple of weeks afterwards. You know you sat down with ailes and I don't know what you all you had A. I don't know what was it. L. Tried to keep control over Fox in a way that nobody does now yes. AOL's hails was a birther but didn't want his anchors to go full birther your example yeah. No, he you know. The fact that he was meeting with me was Noteworthy I mean he you know he what did he want You know he wanted to have a pipeline open He wanted to persuade me that they weren't being unfair You know some of the conversation was bat shit crazy. I had a good relationship with them primarily because we were both former political strategists he we had actually worked in campaigns against each other and. You know we could. We spoke like a couple of warhorses in that way and and so we we actually had a a good relationship but Iraq you know when when Roger said to me you know you've got communists in the White House in what are these czars and the president wants to create a national police force and stuff like I'm like, Roger. That's that's just fucking insane. What are you talking about? Zell, send you the tape I'll send you the tape and then send me eight seconds. A tape of Obama speaking had nothing to do with anything that he was talking about. But I, think he actually believed it and I think that quality he was reflected in in Fox but he also did have ambitions to You know call what you know to to say there was this wall and I thought of this the other day when. A Gen Griffin their national security reporter Reported on the story that Jeff Goldberg had written in the Atlantic and basically confirmed details of what trump had said about fallen soldiers and so on and just the the the furor that that caused a over there, and it seems like it's more and more difficult to do straight reporting of any by yes. That the the the propaganda balloon does not want to be burst. And there's nobody at the top of the company saying report the news no matter. What if your correspondent Jennifer Griffin gets big scoop go with go big with it. Break in. You know that's how it works at CNN write salt works and other networks doesn't work the way at Fox anymore and it's partly out of fear of the audience. There's this fear of ticking off the pro-trump audience telling them things they don't WanNa. Hear and so as a result, all those bricks were taken out for that wall between using opinion they get put up on the viewer where the viewer becomes more isolated in this alternative reality. Yeah. where a bad news for trump or From don't really break in and I would say that they do once in awhile. Right they think about big election night moments big convention night moments Chris Wallace's there and other commentators and and and experts are there and they will give up more fair assessment of what's really going on in politics but Fox's viewers move many of them turned that off only turn it back on when the propaganda resumes. Yeah. Yeah. Well, I I remember talking to ails A. B because he you know he left right at the beginning of the trump era. I. Mean he was obviously, he left after these reports of Of, abuse of women by him and others at at Fox but I remember him telling me about o'reilly rushing into his office in hygiene one day when he had changed Riley's script. And take out something that he thought was over the over the top I. Said, you can't you can't. You know they can't Mess, with my script on Riley and so on and and Roger said bill read your contract it says the network has final say over your copy and he said Bill I'm the network So You just go and do your job and he had that kind of control and I guess one of my questions is What has the effect yet, you know Roger Ailes has a very dark image in the in the world, not just because of the way his his career ended and the the the rampant kind of sexism and abuse that was reported but because he is associated with a dark darker political forces but what has his absence meant at Fox. It has resulted in this leadership vacuum is power vacuum that trump has exploited and This isn't come come from the dozens of staffers at Fox from the top to the bottom from the Proxima assistant level to the management who say. You know there's not that clear leader who is in firm control who will tell Sean Hannity when he's gone too far who will hold accountable outweighs something crazy on the air and that's partly Rogers fault. By the way we're not grooming that person not his successor. Yeah. But it's also the Murdoch's responsibility to to to make sure the content on the network is not dangerous and irresponsible, and when you look at what happened in February march with the pandemic, some of it was dangerous and able yet Roger Roger Develop these characters Hannity, being one of them who plunked up plugged from plunk from obscurity but he was also the one who could control them. Yes and I don't think anybody's even trying to do that right now at Fox News, I think it's interesting that Roger. AILES wanted Fox to be viewed in the same league as CBS, and CNN NBC like he wanted to be taken seriously that was a better business. been booted out of NBC. So that was particularly. Irksome. WanNa. He wanted a beat them. He wants them. And any wanted the network's. Credibility, he wanted to know where to be taken credibly and seriously out, which is which is why would reign in the talent on some occasions Glenn Beck was doing some pretty cookie things against Barack Obama in two thousand what was it eleven I mean there doesn't now well listen to journal I remember when Fox News reported during the two thousand, eight campaign that Obama was educated in. In in Indonesia and and to their credit, CNN dispatched reporters to report this out in and debunk it and Fox stepped down from that. But you know they you know again, Look Roger had that. Roger have that streak you know and I know he definitely did he believed that in his heart it feels like now by the way we have one of those stories every hour. Yeah Right. Like that is memorable because that was an insane moment on on Fox and outrageous moment you know. Now it feels like there's one of those but trump and Fox every day by the way one of the one of the meetings said I had with Roger. Roger was involved in was when Rupert Murdoch was flirting with maybe even supporting Obama back in two thousand and eight and Roger was frantic about this because he I think both ideologically and from a business standpoint thought this would be a bad move and he we we we had a meeting with Murdoch and then Roger was invited in late and was furious about this was depicted in. The recent biopic of him right the loudest voice in the room. We're going to take a short break and we'll be right back with more of the X. Files. And now back to the show. The only person who I think is more obsessed with cable, news than you is. Donald. Trump. and we have something in common i. Don't like it when I say he has kind of a feral genius for the model modern media environment but I think that's just an undeniable fact I mean cable TV played a big role in his ascendancy obviously broadcast TV did because they created the character of the apprentice but cable TV cable TV was a tool that he used to great advantage in two thousand and sixteen to get elected i. mean he he has. He understands. A fundamental fact which goes to the economics of this business he's good copy like he may even if people detest him, he's like the car wreck you can't take your eyes off of and if you light yourself on fire, people will come. And that is that is Donald Trump to this day, but it advantaged him as can't be. I remember in that summer two, thousand fifteen when when trump was. Basically becoming number one in the polls and the GOP field he was holding these rallies. Watching. Those rallies on TV like everybody else and being mesmerized. And took a little while to to view it. You know in a more you know from more critical ends and ask if he's what he's saying is true but as performance art yes absolutely. Mesmerizing and it is a prize to me that five years later, more candidates for various offices haven't attempted that model, but it takes a certain kind of individual to pull off those rallies. Yeah. Yeah. Do you think I mean I know that Jeff Zucker? Our boss CNN and others have done soul-searching about this do you think that that? Mistakes were made in terms of the amount of coverage that trump got which was overwhelming compared to the coverage that other candidates got I think that if the other candidates have been holding these big events and and same shocking and newsworthy things including I met some offensive racist things. Right of this, this phenomenon been happening with other candidates and or other parties it will. Begin a lot of attention to but but again, in that way, right trump does take advantage of what we consider to be news and what we are reacting to attract. Yeah. I mean think about what you're saying what you're saying is if you behave in sort of outrageous ways, you will be rewarded and I've always said that you know politics is a place where sociopaths can be actually rewarded for their for their misbehavior and So in that sense, there is the symbiosis between trump and the news media and he says it all the time you're GonNa Miss, me when I'm gone. because I'm in copy I, get eyeballs and he you know that's the way he views the world. and he's he's not wrong about and now Fox as you say, is tied to him because their base and his base are one. And if he turns thumbs down on Fox News, that's a problem for Fox News. It will be I just don't know to what degree my my view is Fox is bigger than trump. You know if you think about what happened at Fox in two, thousand, eighteen and twenty seventeen ails is forced out. Bill. O'Reilly Greta Van Susteren leaves. Megan Kelly leaves basically all the talent turned over for Sean Hannity and the network kept on ticking and didn't take any hidden the ratings. It proved an trump learned this that Fox was bigger than any star the network is the star and not the individuals. with that in mind maybe trump is just their star now and oppose trump the network will just keep humming along without him. But if he does try to launch a rival network Joe or some other stunt like that I, it could be it could be a pain. It could be a pain for Fox. I guess I'm of the view that the. Audience. is so loyal. They've created such a monopoly and they've told their viewers practically every day for four or five years not to trust anything else that they've got a real grip on the on the audience I think this is such an interesting question as to if trump were to lose now or if he leaves and twenty, twenty, five Does He. It seems very much like his next play would be to start a to to eat to either takeover Fox from within or or start arrival You know you know oh or some other rival network. He wrote a little bit about this in your in your epilogue to your. To your book but somehow or other, he is going to be on television come January twenty, first two, thousand and twenty one regardless of the results of the election, and that is going to be a challenge to the political system and to the ability of democracy to move forward. But it's also be a challenge to Fox News if he's not on there. right? Right. You know the the The possibility of him having a show on Fox then would come up right what you WANNA show on. Fox. We WanNA nightly perch on the channel already number one as opposed trying to build and something on his own But then I I think I would ask question then design merit, WanNa, watch a loser. Right. Like does. If his brand is suddenly loser and loser with potential criminal liability or other scandals in his wake is that a compelling TV show? Now, of course I think the counter-arguments pretty obvious. He will say that he's hats up in stolen from him that it was rigged I think setting that up already right Jewish you could take a nap and wake up and six months and not have to go through the next few months if I think it's going to be a very convulsive time for our. Country I don't think there's any way around it because for Donald Trump there only two outcomes that he will accept one is that he wins and the other is his assertion that it was stolen from him. There's not Donald Trump will never utter the words the people have spoken and I accept their verdict that is not within his unless the verdict is that he wants. And you know. So I think he sees this as a away of galvanizing his movement for his next for his next project. But Brian, this is where my disappointment is. I'm sure it's where you have this appointment right? which has. The there was a point early on I. Believe the Ryan's Priebus and Sean Spicer would do the right thing. I thought that hope picks would do the right thing I thought they would stop him from saying things like enemy of the people. I thought the Mitch McConnell would intervene before we get to the point where the president is creating this narrative about rigged election. But clearly, every single person that you look to and you hope they're going to do the right thing they don't well up to and including the fact that so many anonymous sources are coming forward in these books now but won't step forward in public in Medan, make these comments and some for reasons that they see. As their their duty whether it's former military people or people who served in the administration but it'll be interesting to see what happens in the next in the next few weeks on that. But let's talk about the news media itself and the impact of trump on the news media. You know there was that famous interview with Lesley Stahl I. Guess it was an aside with her add a program. where she said to him, I said, you know that is getting tired. Why are you doing this meaning dogging the media in the way that you're doing it over and over and it's boring Stahl said, he said, you know I do it I do it to discredit you all I do it to discredit you all into menu. Also when you write negative stories about me, no one will believe you which is That sort of a a precept of totalitarianism but it also, we can see the effect of it Brian. You can see at least among his voters that You know there are things. This morning, the Attorney General in the United States is going to try and intervene the Justice Department in case, a civil case or a over defamation that that goes to an alleged rape that the president committed decades ago. What is the Department of Justice have to do with that? Kiss? This would be a Defcon one story. In any other time but it there's so much and the president just. He dismisses it all and and when the news media calls him this you you're you, I watch your show. Faithfully you are a You know you you been trying and trying to call it out. Yes, you have. But but the result of it is you call it out and then people say, well, you're you're just biased your fake news you're on the and what what does it mean for the not just the news media but the country to have the news media drawn into This sort of polarity that trump wants to create right it's really two different medias in America. There is a pro-trump media. And we all know the outlets and then there's the rest and I don't know what I would call it reality based right but that can come across as condescending. And I don't know how that gets repaired. Maybe it doesn't. Raven. They maybe this is just the way it is for the for the foreseeable future you what we see with Fox and the pro trump media is this endless game what about as in the world's like least intent entertaining game I remember This former commentator Fox amy when you're with Tucker Laura Sean Hannity one on one they don't defend trump. They just tell you about the Democrats are right. They just ran about the Democrats to tell you the liberals are evil and the ruining America and that then justifies what you're doing what your sides doing. It's what Jerry cans borough one said about if you're a thief, the accuser enemies of thievery. Your corrupt accuser Ravel's of corruption everyone does it this is How do we repair something that that that is that broken? Well, this is a central challenge of for our democracy, but to is the kind of absence of fact, eh or the acceptance of fact and we see the cost of that in this pandemic when a large segment of the population took their cues from the president when he told him when he tells them apparently now we know Despite his knowledge otherwise that the thing was not serious, they didn't have to wear masks that You know a whole bunch of people listened to him. We saw rally last night I. Guess in North Carolina forget where he was last night where he was in. Florida North Carolina people not wearing. Masks. But bunched together and you know there are There are consequences to a fact free. Kind of environment in which the you know The leaders just deny deny facts and see in front of us in. Yeah I don't know I mean you know I mean I'll watch. You know what I was GonNa ask you is do you feel discomfort at times because you're very vehement? You're very, very vehement You're passionate about this and your passion is obvious Do you worry that you'll you'll get sucked into that of Vortex and that people will say, well, he's just another anti trump voice out there. Right. I think if the president woke up tomorrow and relied on the highest quality news in the world and didn't make anything up didn't lie to the public then. There wouldn't be anything to fact check right and we would talk about how accurate he was and how he has speech was full of correct information and then all of a sudden, it wouldn't sound anti trump. It would just sound like we're talking about the truth we have to stay tethered to the truth. Even when there's this, you know autocratic type attempt to to dismantle truth but it is true that to get angry on the air sometimes get I do get Frustrated sometimes and I think I'm channeling the frustration of the audience I. Hope that I am I think that I am I think the sometimes that's the best way for us to get through this time in American life is. To put our share, what we are feelings here we are going through you know. I don't know any other way but here's where here's a little bit more optimistic about future, the media, not about political coverage, per se. But about the power of these media on television and in digital when there is a tornado warning in your community, the news anchors on your local station are not redder blue. They are not pro trump does not matter. You still do trust door meteorologists even if they don't bring umbrella's, we didn't rain when there is an actual threat, you still trust your local weatherman you still trust your local news anger I, think the the distrust of political media, all the noise about anytime pro-trump and on it's the. it. The it's all true and it's a huge problem but I do think at the end of the day when your local newspaper local news website tells you about the number of Krono virus cases in your community. You do tend I think most people still do trust that information is that too being two bullets no no, no I think that that is true. I think it leads to the question about what? The state of our local news is I mean we've got we've lost thousands of news outlets around this country because the economic model has collapsed we've got sinclair buying a large numbers of those news outlets and and and skewing news coverage and so you know the I think the great crisis in media is not at the national level. Now, it is at the local level where there is. You know I grew up in the Chicago Tribune newsroom that. My heart breaks every time I walked by the the August Tribune Tower, which is now being turned into condominiums you know, and that is to me symbolic. You know wh what stands the Chicago sun-times used to stand when I was working as a journalist trump tower. is what stands where the Chicago sun-times used to stand. So yeah, I mean I think that is a great crisis and we haven't really figured out yet how to solve that because the economics are undermining are undermining the goal of quality well-funded good local journalism. So I don't know if you have hopeful words about that. As many well-meaning people that want to solve this problem or focused on it but it is a massive problem in Chicago. For example, this attempted to take the Chicago Tribune local has not gotten off the ground even though reporters and others have tried to find a way to buy the paper and then they've yes and they've fallen in the thrall of private equity. And Hedge funds and so on, and the it is being basically a stripped down for scrap which is a painful painful thing to watch you know I mean I grew up in I, think one of the great newsrooms and I saw what a great newspaper looks like. It doesn't look like what we have right and we're going to look back historically and say that in these four critical years where local news was being decimated Being cut down instead of a narrative from the top that was about trying to restore trust and and gains, or for local news we had a president yellen, the word fake whenever he was upset and I think we will look back and say from a journalistic. Sam. Point about the business model these were four wasted years. Yeah. I. In terms of what what policies that can support a sustainable local news industry what can the government do different? We can't even have you can't even start those conversations. I think there are efforts going on that are laudable all over the country to to experiment alternative model some more successful than others but you're quite right when when the present the United States is waging a war against the news media generally when the message is, you can't trust the news look he's been in I should ask you about this before we go out I, mean you know he's been frustrated with Fox as supportive as Fox News has been if if if they run a story that he doesn't like he's I don't know what happened to Fox News We. May Have to go somewhere else. This is what makes me wonder about the alternative you know the challenging of Fox, news by trump after they have actually very good polling Fox News I. Think they're polls are really good. He has he has roundly denounce them for running these polls calling them fake polls because they because they reflect the reality which is he's not in very good shape right now and he doesn't like it. So his expectations that they should be state media and so even Fox News get comes under his view is that the news media should be subjugated to the rulers of the country that they should dictate. What facts are facts and what facts are not facts and that is not democracy. Now I sound like you into stashing. Hey. I can take a Sunday off. Wonderful I once his book tour wraps up, you know I tell you the the the this is where I come back to. Maybe. I was so naive that I thought somebody would. Help Him. Didn't. In the White House, there were people to help look I. Think there were people there at the beginning who try to help us there were people there are people who tried those people systematically left were eliminated were pushed out and the people who are left our neighbors and he is calling the shots. He has his own communications director. Kelly mcenaney is is just an instrument of his his rhetoric you know which is you you sign on to be a spokesperson for pathological liar you have to lie that's a that's a that's a a demand. Of the job and then the idea that you know you have these news anchors at Fox are caught in this dynamic. This is in you talked about trump attacking Fox, well, because he doesn't want news on Fox's he wants propaganda on Fox News right and I I describe it in the book what it's like when these weekend anchors get tweeted about trump attacks them on twitter and you know Arthur Neville veterans, you know they they start to get these racist screed and hateful screens filling up their inboxes filling up their twitter mentions in it's coming from their own viewers. And that's the crazy thing about trump's power I get it as a CNN anchor whenever Hannity attacks me I get a lot of nasty messages and I I usually laugh and once in a while I cringe but I expect it when it's Hannity attacking me, it's different when you get hate mail from your own viewers that's what trump does. He Causes Fox's yours to turn against Fox because. He doesn't want news propaganda and and then Fox does not defend their staff. Fox doesn't put out the kinds of statements at CNN does or the New York Times does because their stock it between this rock in this hard place between in the audience know what do not stock options that stuck they chose the spot they chose to be in this spot well, and they're cashing the checks i. Are Ari Prophet machine though executives that to me we print money in the basement. You know I think that's one of the underappreciated aspects of this story that is why some people stay at Fox and some of these sources, right some of them laughed in the in the in the making of this book. But others are still there and one of the reasons as day is it's very lucrative. Another reason is they don't know if that having other options in the news business once you've been at Fox long enough. That is a remarkable dynamic and what I always say I wish some of them. Once they do leave would speak out would tell our experience about being at Fox. The book is hoax, Fox News and dangerous distortion of Truth Brian Stelter you consume. He's a ubiquitous presence on on CNN and you can see him on reliable sources on Sunday morning and read him all over CNN dot com including his newsletter Bryant really good to be with you you too. Thank you. Thank you for listening to the X. Files brought to you by the University of Chicago, Institute of Politics and CNN audio. The executive producer of this show is emily standards. The is also produced by Miriam Annenberg Jeff Fox. Hannah McDonald and Allison Civil. And special. Thanks to our partners at CNN including Corny Coop, Ashley less and Megan Marcus. For more programming from I. O. P visit, politics, dot, EU Chicago Dot. Edu.

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Neurocentricity & Empathetic Recruitment: Aligning the Corporate Mission to Meaningful Work

The Tightrope with Dan Smolen

36:22 min | 2 years ago

Neurocentricity & Empathetic Recruitment: Aligning the Corporate Mission to Meaningful Work

"What is their purpose? What lights them up? What do they want their contribution to the universe to be? And how does that align to what we're trying to do? What how does that align to our mission to our vision? What's their mission statement for themselves with their vision for themselves would their personal values? Let's talk about that. Then we'll be able to figure things out. From Washington DC. This is the tight rope. I'm your host, Dan Smolen. An unusual alignment of forces is taking hold in today's workplace one that merges the needs of hiring managers and the express wants and desires of professionals the alignment is aided by what our guest performance expert. Adrian shock calls neuro centrist city, the dynamics that encapsulate. How we relate to the world. And what allows us to thrive the merger has ushered in a new era of empathetic recruitment. In this episode. We flush out the forces that are coalescing to make work more efficient and profitable for hiring managers. But also more meaningful for the millions of Americans who seek purpose profound meaning and experience and enjoyment on the job. We spoke with Adrian shock in July twenty eighteen so you've established. Considerable subject matter expertise in an area that you call neuro centrist city, and I was wondering if you could share with our listeners what that is about. Sure, so narrow centrisly comes from nurse Centric. And my former company was called neuro Centric leadership consulting nurse. And trysofi is basically how I define the nervous system. The nervous system is what gets activated when we feel good when we feel badly. It is our Brahma tour in terms of how we experience and few the world it's designed to keep us alive. It's designed to keep us safe. And it's designed to lift us to our highest heights. That's what nerves interested is. It's a focus of the nervous system and the contribution. It makes to our being and our -bility to connect in our village to influence or be influenced. It's all about the nervous system. The nervous system generates language when I'm feeling upset when I'm feeling disrespected unsafe. What comes out of my mouth is very different than when I feel at ease. Happy and understood I'm not making those decisions consciously. But I am emoting. My nervous system is emoting language. It's the nervous system that that's the origin. This is my belief. This is this is how I see the world. So may agree. Some may not, but my experiences our nervous system is what emotes it creates emotion and the emotion that creates language now, how does neuro century city play out in a work environment. Especially when people are applying for a job in an organization or are hiring people in an organization, how does neuro centrisly play out in those kinds of dynamics if we look at this in the. Context of hiring. So if we there are many different context from which we can take a look at this. We can look at hiring. You can look at performance evaluation. We can look succession planning in order to really see what someone is capable of. We need to make sure that they are at ease and sharing their story with us. If I have somebody who stressed or if I have somebody who is way to relax. I'm going to get a version of that person that may or may not be aligned to what I actually get. If I hire this person. So understanding the nurse and trinity is about understanding how to keep this person. They're nervous system at ease. And how to keep minority system at ease. Because when we're both at ease. We see the world much more accurately. Much more realistically, we don't have these filters. That are keeping us from hearing. What's coming out of somebody else's mouth? Like, oh my God. You know? I hate that tire. Oh my gosh. I can't believe the person were this to an interview. So there's all of this narrative that's happening in the mind of the interviewer and in the minds of the interviewee. So how can I keep this person at their absolute most comfortable level of east? See what they're really about. But not holds true for performance evaluation. I mean, I've worked with people in many scenarios. I mean, I've seen a lot. I've been around for a long time. And I remember having conversations with HR to say, we don't even know what this guy's made of he's so stressed out. There's this was there's a specific specific example between, you know, disguise, boss and performance. And I said, we don't even know what he's capable of his boss is making them crazy. So let's figure out if I mean, it's so expensive to let people go it's so expensive to to weed them out. I mean, if they're not a good fit get them out as soon as possible. But if if you don't even know gotta figure. It out. So what you're describing here is optimal. It's the conditions. That would optimize the relationship between in this particular case, the higher talent and the hiring manager. So it's cohesive. It's open it can withstand constructive criticism. But more importantly, it can grow boat for both parties has to happen in a state of balance. One of the things that I cook my clients, the time is there's an you'd align. It is a term that stemmed from the army. It's orient observe the an act. I love military acronyms. I have to get back to escapes me. But basically just draw a line where am I on this line? Am I end up in the line itself? Sit down before any conversation just draw that line out and my Bubba line. So the line is baseline balance. Am I hyped up excited or am I below the line in my feeling insecure? My feeling angry feeling stressed and the bottom that the game is get yourself to that baseline of balance. So that you can show up listening. Well, communicating well and seeing what's actually going on. And I don't go into a conversation knowing my state of bean, it's going to be very difficult for me to influence you and get you to to hear what I'm saying show. Let's play out the different ways that somebody could interact with a hiring manager the old way. I'll call transactional is a recruiter. Would come up with a list of candidates who check off all the boxes experience education training. And maybe some other things maybe where they went to grad school. I'm not sure so the person shows up, and if I do my job, well, and I peer into the person's soul, and I can kind of get a sense of who they are. And they're really good people. We get them through the interview process, and then we hope that the fit check works, and so ninety days into the job it either works or a dozen, and maybe maybe it doesn't work after two years. That's sometimes happens. The old transactional model goes against the grain of neuro centrist. Because it's like how how is the hiring manager? See the world see this opportunity and the talent that I'm bringing in is just an instrument of that. I'm not thinking about what they need from the experience. So I wanna fast forward to a new trend that I think is happening, and I see it here in in Washington DC. So the old model is put out a job spec. And then call central casting and show me somebody who went to Warton school, and you know, is a digital marketing professional and has worked in these kinds of companies. And you know, that's what recruiters do they find those people, and they send them off to interviews. And if we're lucky as often as the case, we hire somebody. But here's the new approach, which is not transactional. I'll call it relational. So I saw this. I about six or seven years ago with an. NGO a non-governmental organization here in DC and what they do is. They say to the universe. Send us interesting people. We don't care what they do. We don't care where they went to school. Send me people that have a sense of purpose and a sense as what because we wanna grow an ecosystem when within the organization that creates more of that that becomes a big family, and we and we're supportive cried idea. How do you do it? Well, we don't post jobs we bring people in for coffee, and we interview them, and we see if we like them. But more importantly, we see if they like us. I said so how's that working out? She goes the retention rate. Is unbelievable. You're working out. All the all the courtship. I in your finding out if it's not just can you work with me. Can I work with you? It's can we create something new together. So I want to ask you how you feel about that progression. I think it's amazing. I just listening to you describe that what what comes up for me is what we're talking about is empathetic recruitment. It is recruiting from the space from which someone is looking for a job. You're looking at your your route create your recruiting them from their lens. And that's that's what this is all about. It's it's when we look at how do we know quite frankly now that I'm reflecting on this for a second. When I think back at my early days in the Netherlands when I was an ex Pat with AMS. We I mean, we we were extreme in that. We were so desperate for resources that we would joke that we didn't really mean it. But it's like if you could follow mirror, we take you on. But really if you were smart if you were flexible positive nice, we will figure it out. And that's how we grew from seven people to seven hundred fifty people in two years, and we delivered on time a highly complex project in four years. No one thought we could do it. No one, and we had history majors and music majors and some engineers and political. It's it's the gamut of this diversity that created this this ability to to collectively innovate and saw problems together. And I think that that's what that's what you're describing. When when you're talking about equality conversation. I am imagining a coffee maybe standing up nothing between two people. And you know, what is their purpose? What lights them up? What's their? What's their what do they want their contribute contribution to the universe to be? And how does that align to what we're trying to do what how does that align to our mission to our vision? What's their mission statement for themselves? What's their vision for themselves would've their personal values? Let's talk about that. Then we'll be able to figure some things out when we went through the great recession of two thousand eight something seismic happened in our relationship to work in the days prior to that in the years in the eons prior to that it was definitely transactional. And if you asked a person at least as I would recruit what gets you up out of bed in the morning. What's your motivation? Oftentimes, it would be in terms of monetary gain or recognition which often go hand in hand. You certainly hear that all the time with really good sales people. It's not about money than it's about. Recognition, but with sales people often about money when we went through the great recession something happened and part of it was we started to deceive ourselves things were getting better. And then we learn that a lot of people just sort of fell through the cracks and never got re energized or reengaged into the workforce. And why was that partly because the money was getting harder to come by the reach for that upward mobility was not attainable. And that got proved out in some research that came out last year where the American dreams basically been rebooted to one of economic stability. I'm happy, and I am content. If I'm covering my monthly expenses and a medical expense. You know, my daughter breaks her arm and have to pay out of pocket for something or have a a water leak in the basement, and I have to spend money that I don't have to fix it that I can somehow withstand that, and I think a lot of people have been jogged by that. But it's. Liberated us to really think about what motivates us, and this is the important point here. More of us are getting back to meaning what I do. I want to know makes a difference that it's positive that is profound that I'm having fun doing it perhaps. And I think this is getting played at how we relate to work and how we get hired for opportunities. Millennials are very much like this as a cohort more of them are like meaning driven people than money driven people part of that comes out of the fact that money is alluded them. So they had to find meaning positive and profound meeting in other ways. But as a result of that millennials only want to go to work for companies that reflect their values. So now the market is driving. This kind of organizational changes relates to bringing people on board. And what's the result cohesion thought process improvement breakthroughs reinvention? When companies are redefining what they do. Because of the people they're bringing in. How do you get more companies to do that is the question you have any thoughts? Well, I think that there's much more to it than just millennials. And I think that we've got more baby boomers in the workforce than anything by a long shot. And a lot of these baby boomers have a lot in common with these millennials really taking a look at what is my purpose in what is my contribution going to be. That's why I'm here. So I think that it's not just millennials that are addressing this. I think that there's more to it as there should be as human beings. We are intrinsically designed to continually develop we're on this planet. We are in this period of time to become more resilient. That are happier. That's I mean, that's why we're here. We're here to continually develop, and I think that that is more meaningful. Two people at different stages in their lives. If you're looking at aligning values, organizational values new purpose or to contribution in meaningful ways. That speaks to how an organization is going to define it. So not only for their staff, but for their clients, there's an incredible trend. I think it's spot on. I think it's more than just millennials. And I think at the end of the day all of these organizations need to do what is best for them. And so for some organizations, it doesn't make sense to think of themselves with these values that they truly don't hold, and they are transactional, and they are bottom line focused, and it is. Okay. It is. Okay. But when we're looking at engagement when we're looking at validation, you know, you talk about, you know, validating people Oprah Winfrey. Said, you know, recently at the end of the day in all of her conversations with really difficult. People had people good people the one common thread. That everyone needs in order to go. There is that they need to be validated. As a human being I would agree with them on. So so long as we understand the importance of validation of respect of being heard, you can be bottom line focused. You can be transactional. You can. But it's this way of how are we interconnecting with each other in a more meaningful way? How am I going to ensure that even though I only care if you show up eight hours a day, and you create x number of widgets, or whatever the case may be. Yeah, that's fine. And I'm Wayne to validate you as a contributing member of this team, and as a human being on this planet, and that's that's I think what we're saying. Is you don't have to be the model doesn't have to be black and white. But I think what we're looking at is the root. What what creates this energy of performance of being a part of and. Connection. And I think that's what we're really talking about. Here. What keeps managers up at night in relation to creating that kind of an an ecosystem in their companies being punished for doing something different. Oh going against the status quo. When the stakes are down, and you have an organization that I find organizations are very interesting. I find that when people use the word accountable, y'all we hold we believe in accountability, we will people accountable, and that's great. But sometimes what they really are doing. This is a cultural blame and the word blame and accountability are used synonymous -ly. They don't use the word blame. But that's what shows up in the behavior. So so when we're really looking at what kind of an organization is open to new ways of inspiring and motivating it may look different than what their boss has ever seen. Before. And if that boss isn't comfortable and feels like there's a risk associated with doing that. I mean, there are very important compiled compliance regulations at HR needs to abide by their things. I get it movies things that we need to be very careful of and it's risk aversion. You know, they're afraid of being sued, and I get it. But there's fear of doing things differently that some organizations can't they can't do it. They can't do it to peer into the soul of the senior manager who's pushing back on the economy class to shine to create the change has to be interesting. I would think I l let the alignment, but I think, but I think is probably the person is worried about their legacy their relevance. Of course, it's an ego driver. Well, it's fear. It's fear. They wanna be relevant. They wanna be validated. I mean, if you really think about it that person's manager if they really. That manager was really thinking about it in an open positive way. They would know that man that guy who does that for his team comes from his manager his managers view of the world of inspiring performance as opposed to. We don't do it that way. You can't do it. Simple of this that I felt with as a recruiter was new hire. Who said, hey, I live forty five miles from the office. I like having the remote officing because it's less, wear and tear on me and on the car. It gets spent more time with my family. But then the hiring manager is saying I need to see you. I can't look at you on a screen. I need to feel you in the room. You know, maybe there's some bring a truth to that. But it does talk about the resistance that change agents face on a daily basis in my higher new soldier through for a while until he had to go get something else. Because at the end of the day it had to be right for him. That's an excellent point that. Organizations and individuals are trying to grapple with every single day. And everybody's right. I mean when you bring people together, and they are physically together in the presence of each other. And it's a positive experience you have access to a very different field of energy of very different field of creating something new then when you are virtual and at the same time when we're working virtual what we haven't thought about is. And I work with teams on this allot, the virtual experience, the virtual demo for selling something, and we need to do a demo the skills and behaviors and competencies that you need to do that are not the same as skills and competencies and behaviors of when you're dealing face to face but nobody's talking about. Okay. How are we going to train these folks to do this differently? The same thing holds true for managers. Okay. I don't know anybody who's talking about. All right. Look if we're going. To do a virtual team. And I've worked with teams that are all over the world. All right. I've managed people all over the world. It requires very different skills on doing that and behaviors. But nobody taught me how to do that. Nobody trained me. Nobody said this is what you were doing the skills. And behaviors that got you to where you are today are not going to be the skills and behaviors that get you there for Charlie. They don't exist. So you need to look at things differently by doing x y and z and they need to be trained people. Don't know this intuitively because we've never had to experience it before. So I think the virtual experience makes a lot of sense because people are not driving two hours a day. And believe me, you've got kids you've got parents. Who are it's a crazy space right now. So how can we make it easier for people we can do that? But we need to teach people how to manage and we need people teach people how. To contribute in those different spaces. I think one area that we may see some positive movement in is in the area workplace flexibility and work experience flexibility. What do I mean by that it used to be you had to be in the office boss out of see you part of that was cynical? I don't see you. I don't see you doing the work, and therefore you're not doing the work. Right. But what's happened is that more of us, and especially women who need the flexibility get pushed back because their lives. Don't allow them. The ability to be in an office nine to five five days a week, or whatever I'm tapping in now to the work of on our back started a company called work, spill W E R K and on us focus has to do with flexibility. And why we need flexible work, she identified three years. The first is that we might have to take care of somebody on a long-term a mom or dad or another family member who needs are. Attention, obviously as our population gets older where more and more of us are dealing with parents who need long term care and it's expensive. And it may be best that I have a role in that which part of the day the second is working style. You know, not everybody is wired to work the typical allotted eight hour slot. Plus overtime. Some of us are night. Owls ideal sometimes with graphic designers. They do their best work at two in the morning, traditional work environment doesn't really allow for that. And the other despite be I don't do well in a traditional office setup. I get up. I walk around. I'm on my headset going to the kitchen, I'm making myself launch. But I'm still doing work, and I'm engaging in a conference call do you see more hiring managers softening up to the realities of the best talent needing flexibility? And if they are what's it gonna take to get them? They're such an interesting conversation point because it's very complex, and it's. Not easy, and it's not black and white and I've seen as much push against it as I've seen pushed for it lucre. I think if you were to look at this idea of just looking at the medical field, you video patient visits. Do I need to really go to a doctor? There's a big push for you know, you have to go to the doctors they need to see you and at the same time. No, you don't you don't need to you can see me and Skype. You can see me zoom. You can see me in a FaceTime, whatever there are ways to work in a service industry with clients that is virtual and highly effective and keeping waiting rooms from being filled pissing off your patients because you're waiting in a room for an hour wire doing this in the same way. There's that pushback as your as the move for flexible work hours. I think that you're absolutely right. Everybody is different. You have people who are in their groove two o'clock in the morning. And you have people who are now if you're managing a team of people and your project team there enough project managers in the world who are managing people all over the world in different time zones that we know it can be done and effectively s- long as everybody's very clear on what it is that they're supposed to be delivering. And by when so I think that what it speaks to is a lack of confidence in the capacity to manage those different work environments. Well, because again, we need to learn new skills and behaviors to stay on top of it. If people aren't working I guarantee that they could be sitting in front of you doing Facebook half the day, then whether they're down the hall or in the comfort of their own own home. I also I also wanna speak to this idea that we are not resources ourselves in a way that can help us access high performance in ways that we need to right now sitting down all day driving in a car city. Being showing up at work at sitting for eight hours driving in a car home sitting. There is no way you have access to performance. It's it's just not your body has as much to do with that as your brain. So again, looking at what is it that we need if looking at this holistically when you look at how is your body being resource when you're at your home, or whether you're at work, if you don't have access to movement, if you don't have access to nourishment, it's going to affect your performance, it's tough because people don't know how to do it because they haven't had to do it. This is all about north plus the city, they need to see it work. Well, so that they can trust it. With think that you would want to do this. Because if you like the people you work with you want them to stay with you. Yes. But at the same time, they have response managers and leadership have responsibilities that they need to deliver on and they're going to do it the way they know how to do it. So there's a tension between pay what is in the best interest of the wellbeing of my staff, and what is in the best interest of me keeping my job. And if the leadership in the organization is adverse to this kind of way of working that boss has that's that's a tough place to be at a tough place to be that at the end of the day that boss is going to do what's best for him or her and their job and just to point out the tensions that people are are working with it's more than just women men have as much at stake of flexible work hours in the needs of flexible, work hours as women, I always think about the European. And South American tradition of siesta taking a couple hours out in the middle of the day to resource, whether it's sleep or shop, or do whatever it is having this extended break in the middle of your day helps you show up differently more powerfully more thoughtfully. And that's something that we don't do. I think that there's something to that as well. Well, we're very identified with what we do for work in this country. You go to Europe. You do not dare us somebody what they do for a living. You can ask about their children, and what's life like in the little town that they live in. But you can't venture into what you do for living. It's considered rude. And I think they have a good point work is part of life. It's not life. And we I think we're trending to a better place in that respect. We're seeing people get sick. We're seeing Scott's levels at an all time high and that's bottom line issue. That's an engagement issue. We are not resourcing. Ourselves. Well, and we are becoming less healthy period. If you really want the best from your employees there needs to be different conversations. But you know, I I'm very fine. Very interesting. This big break in the middle of the day for a good two hours to and what happens if you take that to take care of your yourself and your family in a different way on. The body the brain needs that reset. Well. Yeah, listen when I first started working out. It was started working in the work world oftentimes the executives that I work with went out for a two hour lunch which included martinis, and they would come back and be completely incapacitated for the rest of the afternoon. We're well beyond that point. Now, thankfully, but we don't take care of ourselves at the workplace. But I think we're going to have to get there. Otherwise, we're gonna fall behind. It's not the way we're working in many aspects of organizations today, it's it is not conducive to health and wellbeing. Just the way we're physically holding ourselves when we're working know, we talked about earlier with the way, we're using our phones the way we're using our, laptops, the physical posture that we're taking on for hours and hours each day is producing more cortisol more of the stress hormones that. I mean that that creates more stress. I mean, we we've got a look at man, what is it that we need to do differently? So that we can breathe. I mean, the the lack of breathing. I'm a certified yoga teacher, and the one thing that I pay attention to and and see in myself as man people are not breathing these when we're stressed. We're not breathing. We're not breathing when we're working on computers and phones, we are the our lungs our hearts it is contracting. We don't have access to quality breath. I mean, just if you were to do one thing and just say, okay, let's teach us organization how to breathe well that in itself would be extraordinary. I know you say that men are affected by this too. But I actually think women are the change agent. I think that with more women getting into the to sweep of big companies best example, I can think of as Mary Barra who runs GM she took over a company that was an old boys club. And it was like a paramilitary organization you produce. Cars, and this is what they look like. No, did she's change that culture. And as a result, it's becoming a great place to work. She's very smart. And I think more I'd like to see more women in roles like that. Because I think was a word out. So well when the meta run the show, I think that I think that there is something to be said for diversity. And I think that it's measured. It's proven. There's absolutely no doubt whatsoever. That when you have a diverse leadership team into verse workforce, it always always outperforms non diverse organizations, leadership teams, etc. Always the way that women experienced the world. I mean, we all experience the world based on our experiences. The experience of a woman the experience of children the experience of of of being women are different and based on our experiences. We see the world different the metoo movement. You know, my understand why men. I don't get it because they haven't experienced it. And until you experience it, it's hard to conceptualize. So I think that. Yeah. There absolutely is a problem with diversity as it relates to gender as it relates to race as it relates to religion. And I think that in twenty years there's going to be more minorities or going to be more women by default. And I think it's going to it's going to happen. It's going to happen organically regardless, but I think that there's a real role for women and minorities to step it up. And I think we're seeing that I think we're seeing that now to your point I'm positive about a too. I'm actually thinking about thirty years ahead. And that gets me to my final question for you dream, which is to help us look into the futures twenty forty eight and we'll let's pure to a workplace of a successful and fry than company what's the experience of work like what's typical day like, and is there such thing as a typical day. That's a really tough question to get my arms around. I can say that what would be ideal for me whether or not that is actually going to happen. I think that we're looking at a world of more empathetic buying empathetic recruitment empathetic leading empathetic leadership is absolutely the way of the future. It is allowing everybody that's connected to a common cause to work together to be respected feel connected and safe in a way that will change the world. So I believe that technology is going to be so down that there won't be a need for us to need to be in physical space with one another. I believe that through the next thirty years, we're going to learn some really tough lessons. I think in the next five years and ten years, we're going to learn some really really tough lessons that are going to inform the way we include everyone. So I think that. They'll be more diversity there'll be more innovation. And I think that the the diversity is going to drive that I think that the world will be leadership. I think organizations will look at their role as being as much a contributor to the greater good of each individual who are showing up to work for that organization as it is for the organization itself. So the the deliverable is going to be as much about the bottom line as it is about the health and wellbeing and ongoing development of everybody who's contributing to that organization, so hopeful future. Why not we can do it? We can do it. Adrian shock. Thank you so much for being on the tight rope. And my pleasure. Thank you for having me. I really enjoyed it. I hope we can get your back soon. My pleasure. I hope so thanks our sincere. Thanks, go out to Adrian shock for walking the tightrope with us links to her website are available on our website at Dan, Smolen dot com. Check out our past. Episodes on apple podcast or wherever you get your podcasts by keyword ING. The tight rope with Dan Smolen. And if you like what you hear police give us a five star rating and post your comments like listener. Denise who writes that the episode? She listened to resonated with me on many levels, keep up the good work. Well, thank you. Denise don't forget to subscribe to our mailing lists by visiting Dan Smolen dot com, and please suggest topics that you believe we should tackle in future. Episodes by writing us at info at Dan, Smolen dot com from Washington DC. This is the tight rope. I'm Dan Smolen and to remember this our best days. Lie ahead have a great and successful week. Everyone.

Washington DC Dan Smolen Adrian shock NGO Oprah Winfrey the Netherlands Europe Denise Warton school Facebook senior manager apple cortisol Charlie Scott Mary Barra GM
#34: What Else Is There? Balancing Alternative Therapies with Acute Care Medicine  Guest: Constance Kerrigan

A Bridge To Wholeness

40:51 min | 1 year ago

#34: What Else Is There? Balancing Alternative Therapies with Acute Care Medicine Guest: Constance Kerrigan

"Abridged homeless is your resource for the latest information on health and healing. 'cause TWENTY-FIRST-CENTURY. Western medicine plays an important role in keeping people healthy but should not be the only option. People have the intersection of health and wellness. We find plenty of riven alternatives to prescription surgery and unnecessary testing. We bring in experts from both sides of the health and wellness aisle together to understand each other and learn how to work together and to introduce you our listener to the many options. You have that look at you politically not as a diagnosis to look at you. As a person and not just a patient. This is your host Jennifer Chris and welcome to A. Bridge to homeless podcast. Hello everyone and welcome to the next episode of a bridge to wholeness podcast. Mary excited today to have actually a very good friend of mine. Who is a registered nurse and also a certified whole health educator Constance Carrigan and constance? Welcome to up reached? Wholeness thank you. I'm happy to be here. Yes constants and I've known each other for quite a few years now. We have a lot of things in common Constant is one of those one of those people who has again so much under her belt and has so much experience with health and wellness and healing and the way she approaches. Her philosophy about health and healing is is really Very open and just a I. I just can't say enough about her. She's actually you've you've taught me quite a lot over the years she is an. Sui wrecking master teacher and has been one for how many years now I notes over twenty about thirty years. Yeah it's been a long time and really really amazing a you're also a sound healer. Yes Down Twenty Years. That is through a certification program with Tom. Kenyon guess who is a sound healer and psychotherapist and you also had an integrated nursing practice in Hong Kong in the nineteen nineties. When you were living there with your family. Yes way moved from California to Hong Kong. Shortly after I became array key master teacher and I realized that I really couldn't work as a nurse there. The licensing is different and people's I started talking to people about alternative care and teaching ricky and it just took off and so you are in fact. Your Business is called crossroads whole house. Yes you open that up in two thousand fourteen after you became certified whole health educator and I know how that program is because my toe to. It's what does your brought me into that. But it's really really an amazing program and we have Georgina D'Amato of National Institutes of Health to thank for that has to give a little bit of your just your background. When you were growing up you grew up in Baltimore Maryland in a home full of grief tradition and music and a very attracted to people and medicine. And you've combined them to become a nurse but while while you were recovering from an illness you discovered that you really were not healing well through traditional Western medicine and a friend gave you a ready treatment. And she and you immediately felt better than you had in months and then you begin to wonder what other alternative or holistic therapies were available so you began that lifelong quest to discover ways to help yourself and other clients to heal. You are committed to helping. Your clients balanced traditional and alternative therapies. And you your life path with rape sound healing and whole health education. And of course you've been a nurse as we said for more than Thirty Years Anna Ricky master teacher and sound healer for more than twenty years and our tradit- are are actually. Our topic today is balancing traditional and alternative therapies. So obviously you are very good at this but tell us your story about the illness that you were trying to overcome. Because that's really what happens? I think with a lot of people who come into a health and wellness and want to help other people so I had gall bladder surgery an at the time it was the eighties and the laparoscopy were just being started and the I had two very good doctors in Boston at a well-known hospital and they accidentally cut my common bile duct after. They did that. They had to open me and rebuild my ducks so about two or three years later I had moved to California and I had a horrible fever and pain. I was living on a mountain with my two children. My husband was away in Hong Kong and I had to be taken to the hospital and I stayed there for five days. I was septic. Because one of my ducks was inflamed and consequently closed so This happened I had to have. Iv Antibiotics and when. I went back to the doctor a week or two later after I was discharged. He said to me you know. In the olden days we would be speaking of you in the past tense and I was like shocked So I was at home. I had to stop working. I was working as a home health nurse at the time. I had to stop working because I could hardly walk down my two hundred foot driveway and a friend gave me the rocky treatment and I just figured I had nothing to lose. The may not thought all these people were quacks but she gave me this treatment and I was shocked at how much better I felt. It was like all my energy had come back to me so I thought well if this is they are what else is out there. What else is out there? That could help me. And I found a Women's Holistic Practitioner Health Group in Nevada city and started attending that started meeting people and learning about all different types of alternatives. And I just kept trying them until I just tried everything I could come in contact with and learn as much as I could about each one and then I found myself moving to Hong Kong and wondered what I was going to do. When I realized I couldn't work is a nurse. I start talking to people about rake in in Asia. Holistic care is much more open. Yes yes it is and You'll find the Chinese practitioner on almost every corner and there was well-known because it came from Japan and people were enthusiastic. There was an alternative health. an alternative health store new wage store in new age and she had crystals in books and gave classes and she was fabulous. That's where I met Simon Treselle Ian who I studied seven different types of Rakia with In Hulu Australia which was an amazing experience and then helped him teach classes when he came to Hong Kong Right before I left the states I met Tom. Kenyon and went back several times during my stay in Hong Kong to attend classes with him in Washington State and California wherever he was and if I was back in the states and I went wherever he was and He taught about toning and he taught about intuitive toning. And using your intuition in order to use your voice to balance the energy and then I learned to use that with my with my raking but in the meantime about every two years I kept having this infection and it needed to it just never subsided until a few years ago when I finally had to have liver surgery and My practice of Supplements and Ray key and sound healing. All came into play Homeopathic that oil sales every Bach flower remedies everything. I had came into play to help me through that experience and helped me heal faster and you did. He'll very beautifully because Christmas there. When all that was going on and you really did come through with very little pain and just a great sense of peace and calm as you went through it and You know even though it had been several years since you've had the original surgery and the The consequent treatment for the infection on you know once once you're bile duct is nick. It's it's always gonna be an issue until you really get. It straightened up at the surgeons. You had were wonderful weren't they? This US really really good. Yes the doctor I had at George. Washington was fabulous actually was Georgetown in. Dc Yeah. He was the head of the transplant unit. He kept wondering why I wasn't there earlier. The doctor that I had at the beach one year when I ended up in the hospital. They are he. He happened to be a Japanese man and he was knock you punk tourist. But he couldn't treat me in the hospital and he actually said to me. Western medicine is for acute. Conditions and eastern medicine is for maintenance and that really made me getting about how our society thinks about medicine. Many people think still think I'm always surprised that this but still think of alternative and holistic care in the way that I did back in the eighties that these people were all quacks. They're not all quacks. I mean there are doctors who are quacks. So you know it's like they are. They are amazing and practitioners everywhere. We Look. We need to trust our intuition when we look for a practitioner. If someone doesn't resonate with you don't go to see them. Yes absolutely and and I like the fact that we're talking about this. The fact that the Japanese who was a Western medicine physician. That's correct. Yes who also was an acupuncturist. Yes right and in Chinese Medicine. The acupuncturist is really the primary care physician. Yes yes so here. He was from both worlds and being able to say that. Western medicine is really for acute care and eastern medicine is for our health maintenance and I think that that's what we really want to delve into today. Because I keep running. I keep running into people who say to me. Well Jennifer your nurse would you suggest and my first answer is not always go. See your doctor. Sometimes I know through all of the experiences that I've had with alternative practitioners that I can get relief from back pain or tension or anxiety or or whatever it is by going to see an alternative practitioner and I would. I personally would rather do that than go. The route of okay. I have to go see the doctor and I'm GonNa get a pill for pain. I I'm not about that. That's not how my brain works. I always want to go the other route. I but on the other side if I know I have an infection and I need to see my md. I am forever grateful that they are there so so it it. I think it's really trying to figure out some times navy. Who Do we need to go see? So maybe we should we will. We should really look at that because I think people get very confused what should I do? Who should I go to sit so for like every day this comforts? You know things like our knees aching or you know. We picked up something wrong and now our shoulders ache. We can use homeopathic. We can use some of the homeopathic creams and Gels There are a lot of different things out there that we can use we now have CBD oils and that both the hemp and Marijuana. That are very effective. But that's like another whole other hole but another Ho episode very various to discuss that one. That's that's gotta be very soon on my podcast. Yeah but the homeopathic side found are very very effective for day to day personal use when people start to use things the first thing I usually recommend to them as things like Arniko Montana's for shock and trauma the muscles and joints. It comes in a cream and it comes in tabs and varied Stosic and actually athletes use that all the time yes and interact with other yup doesn't interact with other when we have a temperature. That's when I become concerned when we have frequent dizzy spells when we find that. We're having heart palpitations and paying down our right arm. Those are the Times you need to go to the hospital or go to see your doctor But for the every day aches and pains. We shouldn't be running to the doctor. First of all most of the time he really doesn't know how to deal with it But the acupuncturists chiropractors the natural pass The cranial sake therapists. They are very adept at manipulating the body and utilizing Different types of energy. Sometimes all you needed to have is to say grounding meditation to get yourself less anxious So these are things that we can all utilize that are pretty simple right so we even now I mean one of the most simple things obviously is the breath right. Yes and we know. Here's here's a perfect example of this. We know in Western medicine to when you take three or four deep breaths it begins to lower your blood pressure gifts so when you when you lower your blood pressure you're already starting to feel better right and in a more Eastern approach or alternative modality for taking the breath. What does that do for us? IT centers us. We think of that in alternative medicine as really centering down going inside being quiet but lowering your blood pressure. Does that for you anyway. So that's a perfect example of how that traditional and alternative those worlds come together. Yes No. Is there any other examples that we could think of so? We live in a stressful time. I mean there are where we usually have way too much on their plates. Oh yes so One thing that I have found over the years is that sometimes people are rushing to this psychiatrists or the psychologist or their doctor for some kind of medicine to make them calmed down. When a simple grounding meditation and some Bach Flower Remedies would be enough to take the edge of off of whatever they're dealing with and help them to be able to look at whatever they're dealing with a new perspective. I WANNA point out that one thing I was thinking about said nursing has always been centered on caring for people not A diagnostic for. It's actually taking care of somebody so for me when I was working as a home health nurse. I always tried to see. What else does this person need? Not something we don't ask often enough. And that's I think when we ask ourselves when we're not feeling well we ask ourselves okay. What is actually going on? Do I have a temperature? No M. I. Anxious about this thing that's going to happen to me. Yes okay but I have twenty other things I have to do before I can deal with that. We have to be able to have resources and this is not something that happens like immediately. This is something that happens over time so we have to continually add to our daily routine. Something that helps us deal with our day to day stuff. Well Yeah and I think that you know it's funny because I just put out a newsletter to To my left and one of the things that I talked about was actually having a ritual roll like a routine ritual that we can do maybe every morning but even if you don't have a chance to do it in the morning to have something you can tap into any time during the day to help you kind of go inside again and refocus and rebalance so because we are under so much. I think just information overload with everything that goes on from computers to the TV's and the phones and you know the typical thing. But I think learning to actually stop and recognize. And say WHOA. I need to take a breath but it's not even just taking one breath. It's literally stopping and allowing yourself down. Yeah exactly and to be able to maintain that consistent practice I think is very integral to using an alternative therapy. Like breath work to help you with chronic conditions and it becomes easier when we start to do it at a regular time. And then we Bennett there for US whenever we need it whether we're standing in line at the bank and people are being nasty or if we're sitting in traffic or if we're just kids are running around and we've had quite enough. Yes it's it's a lot of different things. It's not just our health issues. It's our day to day life and what we're dealing with. I one thing that I learned early on was a I studied with a Medium who a psychic healer and she taught me how to meditate. I'd never meditated before in my thirties before I learned to meditate and she taught me grounding meditation which I teach to just about everybody on neat and I find it it takes about a minute and I find that it makes a huge difference in my day and I can do it anytime I want during the day. I try do it first thing in the morning and last thing at night and Breathing of course. I always try to do some kind of yoga stretches. Those are part of my ritual. I think as we do these things. It does become easier. It's like any new thing that we're trying to learn. We have to practice and I think also when I interviewed Richard Brightest and on this program A while back. And you know Richard. And he is a master honestly. Richard gets down on his fists and does I don't know two hundred push ups a day. It's it's absurd and he just flies through it but he actually ended up having a heart attack a couple years ago. Not due to the Gong but just a defect in his heart muscle and he ended up having bypass surgery but before he went into surgery he actually prepared himself doing cheek on in the hospital. In fact he said if you haven't listed this episode you should go listen to it because it's so fascinating. He said that you know how I even had the nurses coming up to me saying. I wish you would teach us this. This would be so great for stress release and had his surgery. The doctor said to him. You have the heart of a twenty year old. You just have a defect here. We're GONNA fix that. What they couldn't get over how prepare. He was not only physically. Was He prepared but he was very prepared. Mentally emotionally in. Richard made a comment. And I've always remembered this where he said even if you get into trouble where you need acute care at the hospital when you when you have this tool chest of alternative practices that you could pull from. It will help you in an acute care situation. And I think that that's really the beauty of using alternative and traditional Western medicine practice together. Yes and then when you can when you can build that toolbox up and reach for those things when you need them in. No you know what I feel like. I need to be relying. It's time to see the car tractor words time to see my holistic physical therapist Because we have holistic integrative physical therapists running around all over the place K. And or maybe I need to see the acupunctures. Maybe I'm feeling like I'm not balanced Energetically and a therapy session on the table with acupuncture needles is what I need so i. I wish that we could teach people that. That's okay and not only that lot of these. Things are becoming much more mainstream now. I mean there's quite a few. Rake eight teachers out there and Ricky Practitioners Jess and rake a used to be considered very very woo. But it's not nearly as Wu as it used to be. Yes that's true. I will be teaching Rakia again. This fall I haven't taught for several years and several people have approached me and I felt that it was the right time to begin again and where I am starting to become even I'm starting to really see more. And more of a need of people balancing and having an understanding of the as we talk about in Ho- health education the five aspects of health. It's really about that whole balance physical emotional Environmental Nutritional and spiritual I mean really is about balancing all of that and I really feel like people are looking for you know okay. You're talking about this. But how do I do that? And I think that's where I'm moving towards at this point is helping people to understand. Wear their choices are and what kinds of choices sukhum because your choices are not the same as mine. The choices for my mother who's eighty nine is different from mine. Nephew who's twenty one? Yeah so But having an understanding of what the choices might be for them and what might and I learned this from how health what might seek them. I was shocked when I broke my ankle and my left foot at the same time which was shocked to. I'm shocked that nobody at the hospital asked me if I had any stairs in my home. And how was I going to get back up into? The house was like really all about. It's not it's not was quite a quite a year for you but it's I. I'm beginning to see that. There are aspects as a whole health. Educator that can help people understand where the balance needs to occur occur in their life and also some of them will require traditional medicine and some of them will require alternative care. Some of them will require personal care on their own part where they will have to do a little more work. They have to rearrange their life a little bit so but helping people how to do that. I think is a something that we are going to need. More and more especially as the healthcare system in our country and other countries changes. Yes and it's getting more challenging. I think to even get in to see a regular md. an and the doctors themselves are just. They're just so overwhelmed that yes you shouldn't load as so yes so amazingly high. I mean the number of patients. They have to see in a day in the amount of time they get to spend with them. I mean we need to remember that our doctors are. Md's or people. I yes you know. And sometimes we forget that our nurses to a body in the Allied Health Field. Is You know they're usually really really overwhelmed with patients and I mean I haven't worked in hostile in a number of years but I know it was bad when I was there and I think it's it's even more so now but I have to tell this story about a Rakia treatment that you gave me k. And I have to say this because it it happened. I don't know how to explain it but constance and I were at the integrative healthcare symposium back in New York had to be else Zen ten. I think about right nine or two thousand ten. I'd a lot of things going on back then. I mean a lot. My mother would have been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and it was just very stressful when I was in the middle of getting the certification health educator and it was just a lot of a lot of life going on right and I knew that I had a suspicion that my gallbladder was not particularly happy. I also have chronic line for those of you. Who who know that in that affects huck. Would if you organ systems in your body is a pretty healthy eater. I was not him You know I ate well and I exercised but anyway we were at the healthcare symposium and we went out to dinner and I noticed that my stomach was just not happy and in two and I think it was two or three o'clock in the morning here. We are in a hotel in New York City and I woke up literally sledding just just in so much agony and I knew laying there that I probably should be the emergency room but I wasn't. I wasn't at home and I'm like I am not going to an emergency room in New York City and of course whenever you're in the health field your nurse or your like the worst patient ever right. What's coming now? I am I woke you up. Yes and I said look you have to do a ranking treatment on me or you have to take into the ER. I'm literally at my wit's end I it was so bad I remember. I was leaning over the chest of drawers just holding on trying to. Yes no you hope. One Hand and place it you know on my front Torso Below the breast bone and the other one in the back and you started that rocky treatment and I just remember relaxing into it and I just. I don't know how long it took long stood still at that point but I remember turning to you and just looking at you and saying well what just happened. What did you do? I don't have any more pain and you just looked at me and you just said I just get ready treatment like what. What's the big deal? I had Rakia treatments but as far more for stress and anxiety but I had not ever had a rocky treatment for pain and it allowed me to go through the next couple of days without having the emergency were but you said to me and this. This is what you said to me. You know I think you might need to have your gall bladder checked and of course it was another Six or eight months before. I'm bothered with that can you meet me in the Er has been has to show up. Yes funny had the gall bladder out and of course you know everything turned out. Okay but the I just WANNA say that is my story about having a radio treatment. That really allowed me to did not hit the ER in New York City. So but I still had to go back and have that acute care don at a later time in have my surgery so I think that's a perfect example again of of something that helped me right than a narrow but I had to follow up in on. Just say this. I waited too long to follow up so I should not do that. The wonderful thing really stubborn yes and the wonderful thing about Rakia and you did take one after that I think it was right after that and then But the wonderful thing about Rakia. Is that when you take one? The first level of ricky you learn self-healing treatments and you learn how to give a treatment but for me. Ricky one is about learning how to give yourself a rocky session so that you understand how the energy flows through you because it's not the practitioners energy coming to you. It's the energy of the universe coming through the practitioner and when the new practitioner is initiated as attuned as we say to the RAKIA ENERGY. All they need to do is ask for. It is an energy. That's out there for everyone to use and this is like one of those tools in the toolbox that everyone can have access to and utilize and I've had people say to me while I didn't feel anything I said doesn't matter all you need to do is make the intention that you'd want the energy to flow and it's going to flow and I've had people say they somebody came to them and said Oh I don't feel well. They put their arm on them. They felt the energy flow through and they were like shocked. Yes but it's it's That idea of healing energy is unconditional love and we all need that and so when we use the Rakia energy it can heal quite miraculously sometime. It's not there's no guarantees just like there are no guarantees with anything else. There's no guarantee when you have surgery that it's going to work so I think it's a balancing of understanding asking the questions finding a practitioner that you're comfortable with and trust and that's true for any practice whether it's traditional alternative. I've had people many people come to me and say what Dr Do you recommend? Well I do have people I recommend because they're my doctors but I also tell people keep looking asked the questions stand in front of the door until the answer your questions and you have to ask the questions. If you don't ask the question you need to ask. You won't now and you won't get answers and you won't be able to make a good decision. I up here on one thing that I keep looking at. Is that when we empower ourselves? With healing information we can create a sense of harmony and balance that will flow into our lives for years to come. And that's very very true is very true and I do want to say that. Your constant is a member of my community bridge to wholeness which is bridging the gap between alternative and traditional Western health practitioners. Were in the twenty first century now and we need to start looking at both sides and and really bridging that gap so that patient outcomes of patients the goals that they have for their health and wellness can be expanded and we welcomed the the medical community the Western medical community into this conversation because they themselves can also benefit from a lot of these alternative. Modalities that will help to relieve the stress that they're under just caring for their own patients so so we really do appreciate The members inside orig- to wholeness community. And if you want to check out at some point just go to. Www dot a bridge to wholeness DOT COM and check it out and if you're a healthcare person we are always looking for guests to be on one of our episodes because we're all about education and information and doing that in a way that is non judgmental and puts this out there to give you something to think about to expand that vision of what health and wellness Isabel so concerts. We're going to have to wrap this up. You know you and I could chat all day about this. And but how do we reach you? If somebody is interested in having a Rakia session with you which I understand is not have to be done in person. How do we find out if you're going to be offering any classes where we can go for that? How do we reach out to you? So I don't actually have a website anymore I do have a facebook page crossroads toll health and the email that people can reach me out is crossroads. Whole Health at gmail.com And my believe my phone number is actually on the facebook page and I'm happy to If you have a group of friends that want to come together and learn ricky. I'm happy to Go places interesting places to Teach Rakyat or if you need be I can find somewhere to teach. I'm very fussy about where I teach so. I know that you have your grounding meditation that you want to offer to pediatric I. Do I really feel the grounding? Meditation is very very important so if people want to contact me at crossroads. Ho Health gmail.com I'll be happy to send them the grounding meditation and the first five people that actually contact me would also get a twenty dollar discount on discovering choices session with me which would be a combination. Ho Health. Education Rakia sounds session so it would be a little of each to give them a taste. And those are generally about forty forty five minutes so and that's really great because when you're dealing with a health educator and yes we are partial to them. You're really getting. You're really getting a lot of education and wisdom because we have. We really do know how to work with people who are looking for more sustainable health and wellness in their lives. So I'm just so excited that we finally got you on. Thank you episode of the podcast. And again this is constance care again. She's a registered nurse. A certified whole health educator and a ricky master teacher so again where can we find you just one more time crossroads? Ho House that gmail.com great. So thank you all and thank everybody. I wanNA thank you all for tuning in today and listening to us. If you really liked this episode please go to Itunes or stitcher and rate UH US. It really helps us to get the word out. And the information and Education. We provide on health and wellness. We feel is so important for you as patients as clients as just consumers in the health and wellness world. We want to make sure that you stay. Well thank you very much and then McCain okay thank you constance Babai. Thank you for tuning in and listening to this. Podcast today and please. If you enjoy a bridge to wholeness podcast I would appreciate if you rated unsubscribe you can find us on itunes. There is a new episode every week. Don't forget the intersection of health. The whole person not just profits and holistic wellness not just symptoms specific treatment. Join me each to learn about your options and how you can be a party the movement this is your host Jennifer Chris. Founder Up Abridge wholeness.

Times Rakia Anna Ricky Hong Kong Ho Health Jennifer Chris Whole Health New York City National Institutes of Health California US Md Kenyon Tom constance Holistic Practitioner Health G Baltimore Richard Brightest Asia Maryland
"Texas Forever" with the Wassermans | Episode 9

Low to High

1:00:57 hr | 2 months ago

"Texas Forever" with the Wassermans | Episode 9

"Without anchors, you wouldn't be listening to US right now. Anchor provides a quick and easy way to record edit industries are podcast. Any platforms. Pretty Awesome. Anchors free and you can make money from. If you're interested students starting to protest the free APP or go to www dot anchor. Dot FM. started. Hello and welcome back to the low to high podcast I'm one of your host and Evans I'm here with my co host John Sullivan today say hi, John Hello people how you doing today today our guest are the Wasserman brothers, MLS MVP Bryce Wasserman and Tyson midfielder Casey. Wasserman what's up guys? How's it going? Rabbit. Rabbit. US. For sure always good to get some familiar faces on the show. Absolute. So I think we're just GONNA start off with general across questions tell us a little bit about. What your childhood was like like with Lacrosse and kind of how it like formed you into the player you are today. You can both like. Different takes on it. I was I was the first one to play in the family Bad never played. Mom never played there from Florida's there never really around much. My Dad's saw for the first time. When he went to the played football college is I wasn't we're not one of those Maryland while allocates who's born with the stick until I was twelve years old and sixth grade I was pretty late to the game in terms of starting to play Diet from baseball practice, and it looked like a lot more funds as I wanted to try lacrosse out instead I was Kinda. The first one to do it KC in our younger brother drew started a link reunion that pointedly or graded Yes. We decently late to the game I mean I. Think it was pretty cool that we really the only people in our family that did it right so it's kind of like our own little thing. Yeah. So you guys are from Texas right. That's right. Yeah. I was born in Austin I lived there until I was four. So I have limited very, very limited memories but I do enjoy going back. Yeah Texas for. US full hearts. Can't lose anyway. Succumbing from Texas. You know it's not the most well respected area in the country for Lacrosse be US clearly made a name for yourself. How did you go about doing that? I'll take this one. Thank continent that chip on your shoulder, go to camps and yet your team flying the three hours or four hours. Maryland Long Island where these geysers get getting a car driving twenty years down the road. You got the pedigree the name of their high school near Club team. was just Kinda the chip on your shoulder like we are the better athlete you know but we need the privilege that we can't pull across the high level Sascha something for me just every day. I. Wake up just kind of trying to set the path to the next Bryce Casey Montgomery the next kind of Texas Geigo play college across just kind of setting the tone that you have to work hard at it, but you are just as good as the top talent up here. In. Texas. Tech Lacrosse is growing a lot I. know there's like one of my favorite like women's players. She's the goalie for Boston she's from Texas. And like she's so good like it's insane. Texas is growing. It's one of those areas that's going to be really really good because there's a lot of football talent that's looking for something to keep them in shape during the off season, and that's going to be Lacrosse like some of those D. Lineman are GonNa love to get pole. You know like just really enjoy that. That's what happened in. INDIANA. It was football players that started the Lacrosse program and I don't know if you remember the Ale six thousand like that big gigantic inch thick titanium shaft It was like the first shaft you got with any St head I had a defenseman snap one of those mine over someone. Because he was a football player and just ran out on like this. Just snap. Does things are unstoppable. Man It was I was terrified. He hit I was like Oh my God, are you? How did you get up? You guys both used to play football right? Yes qb in my right. Eye The quarterback Casey plead. Case he played. Out. I played a defensive back in wide receiver bryce actually through my first four touchdown Ashleigh, my freshman year. School we add for that. Cool thing. Yeah. I hope you guys have the film of that. We do it somewhere saved good. Yeah. You don't WanNa lose that film. You guys are played like the same high school team, right? Yeah, we were I my teams that great. Casey actually won the state championship his senior year though. which is pretty crazy. What would she say like your favorite memory from like playing together in high school would be. Lacrosse or football lacrosse yeah. Here for Right Mean maybe not one specific memory that I just that whole year was was a lot of fun. It was the best year high school program has ever had we made to the state semifinals quarterfinals or whatever in our team of making the playoffs like a huge deal for team. So I think being able to do that with Casey on the team was. Fine is a senior when he was a freshman, it was either that whole year I mean we got some good Games, some bad games, but the whole year was a lot of fun. We somehow haven't had like a Baltimore kid on yet like somebody who just had it made from amendment like the minute they started playing and it's so weird hearing all the similarities between like our experiences coming from non Lacrosse hotbeds and like yours and Nicholas and people like that. Everyone has the same story they're like, yeah, I was sitting on a baseball. Lacrosse I wanted to play that. I saw people hitting each other and like that looks way more fun than standing in the outfield and hoping seven year olds can hit a ball. Yeah but So I know you talked about how great it was before but give us a little bit of insight into your college experience and how you ended up where you ended up. Being I. I was not really that good in high school. Obviously, I picked up Lacrosse very late I started in sixth grade. So that was back in the day before the recruiting rules right the kids were committing in eighth grade nine grade ugali exact. Stanley. WHO's a migraine was committed to hopkins before I can throw a pass in my left hair Yeah. Yeah. So like so that those pretty crazy for me might development took a long time. I was a late bloomer I was like. Five nine, five, ten, one, hundred, forty pounds until my junior year of high school as I. Hit my growth spurt inserted grow a little bit so. I was under crew dialing three offers a monmouth was one of them took that is showed up in year two of the program after year one when they went. Oh and thirteen. So that was that was definitely an interesting for a high school senior to try to get pumped up about about doing that I had an awesome time. We really during that program around in Canada turning major major power my no, my junior season. The fourth year of the team were wrangling fifteen sixteen in the country won the conference championship wins the NCAA by off some. Valid super cool. Just for me to be a part of that team in Z. that growth that I've used. The same thing is coming from Texas right. Lake I went to monitor ain't GonNa do cues or anything like that. It was definitely a different experience than a lot of people has actually starting teams I think that shaped me a little bit in the player that I am today any kind of helped me when I when I got the pros The miles little definite. Bryce I was Kinda peak. Recruitment, when you were fifteen or sixteen was when you committed yet your freshman year going into your software your summer. So I remember study of biology final, and I got a call from club coach saying that the Michigan Coaches is calling you in twenty minutes. Got On it had a visit lined up for the dog, my freshman year. So kinda didn't have bryce the lean on that situation whereas I had my whole freshman season I lean on ends and kind of showed me the ropes play cross racially didn't have the experience to kind of tell me how to conquer light being recruited as a freshman. Did all did all my visits I actually ended up too many the in firm for. Committed to navigate. Yeah. That's right. Yeah. was there for about two and a half years and then? I just waking up for like a month straight edge woke up. kind of like just pulling like, I, think I should go to Tulsa need at my dad football they're growing up in the backyard was always like pretending, I, was playing for Thousand Footballer Hassle Move Cross like when like the national average of the backyard when I was younger colleague, not many people can say that they've lived out their dream. Going away their dreams or lifelong dream pro teams. So the house like a no brainer. got. Hereafter after file four on which is tough freshman year to follow out, we mainly coffee championship lost to Umass unfortunately than sophomore year Kinda all the pieces down the place. Zaka rich was a three time captain out all coming back Brandon Sunday came into his own semi Monahan grandlieu. In my live was pretty on the second line we were. Two offers junior but you know we did our party, our role Godly Brody Mcclain stepped up Luke from. Being ranked number one in the nation for about two weeks, which was the first time in Tulsa History go in the Conference Championship host, the playoff game unfortunately Maryland in overtime. But you know just kind of different experience bryce coming into a program that has that kind of blue blood. Top Tier success which is awesome. You know it's definitely made me a better player every day going to begins. Kobe Smith. WHO's probably GONNA be a three time all American when he's done here, going against guys like bad goodrich has definitely made me a way better player wait a way tougher player absolutely There's some decorated athletes that have come from Tyson. But who would you say like favorite is your favorite person that you've gotten to like play on the field with their. Tough. Be careful I I could. I. Definitely definitely Zach just because you'll house next in the locker machine year my sophomore year just the way he leads in the way he plays definitely an unbelievable. A thing of beauty to watch how he plays. Now he's the best defense in the world and I will go that like that. He's with Irish name. Lebron I. Will Say I love play attending Monahan he was probably like my favorite person to play the funny guy great player great teammate Jimmy to way was definitely probably my favorite player to play with. I think out of You know I'm wearing my Notre Dame Jersey today. Go Irish. I think they're they're definitely my favorite because I Been Wearing a Notre Dame Jersey every Saturday in the fall since I was like two days old because I was born October fourth and they had a game I think like the sixth my dad put a Little Baby Jersey on me and So yeah, I think they're number one thousand I love just there's something about it. They just got that slag. Yeah. I Love Tulsa and thousands I. Think my second favorite team. I can say that with pretty much confidence. Yeah I'M NOT GONNA go to blue bloods can't do that. No, but I definitely love Howson like you guys play with a swag and like an intensity that is just really fun to watch. Appreciate that. Thank you. Yes, Sherman. so Do. You guys have any like pregame routine that you do every single time we've talked to coach Quirk and he cleaned his office for every game. He meticulously cleans his office I. Think it's just him clean out his head to like everything in order, but just doing his hands with it. But He do you guys have anything like that you you have to tape your stick or you have to. Clean? Front of the other. Guy, I, I don't do anything crazy not to superstitious. I mean I agree I. I usually get to the field wherever replaying. It was pretty easy. This summer is the navy the whole time I usually just like I usually just walk one laugh. Around the field whenever I show up like before leaving address to. Walk a lap real quick man are retake my stake in than just listen to some incredibly violent music. That is the best. A. Yeah I'm with bribes I used to be very superstitious in high school. I've gotten less than less than college but it I run to the Court of the Field Sabes Zach a quick prayer and I always have to hug at least three guys on the team. Generally the guys that I'm going out to play with just tell this novick deal and. Nothing to craziest found the same stuff before the APP and then after the anthem. I some people just have. Some weird things in high school I had a team who had to put on his right clear. I. It didn't make him any better everybody. Did it. I. Knew. I was eating challenge Rogers's pre workouts. Just shovel it so show. Yeah. That's part of the question I. Just skipped over at pregame meal but yeah, it sounds like yours was just powered. Beginning. Sounds pretty terrible to me honestly, but you know if if it were clearly worked so. Now, do you guys string your own sticks or to someone shrink them for you? If you string them where'd you learn to do it from? I do my own. I literally learned it from Youtube. I remember the the SDS. SATORI video breaded mud door is like. Slicing, my own I know Lars Civil Djeddai. WanNa shout out. He's our next guest. I have very particular about stuff, but he's obviously a wizard and the best in the game. So started to let him experiment with sticks of. To a couple warriors sticks to get ready for Boxer Team USA trials whatever whatever happens next, they have to use the warriors steak, but my Palestine is all me. I actually got super frustrated trying to learn to string a stick. So. Price used to do mind pretty much sense he learned until. I. Graduated High School and then I got the to Monahan. Strong mind my freshman year. And then I. Met someone through FCA'S AIM Steve Bannon. He played at Stevenson and he's struck my sticks ever since the I like if my bottom string breaks on my stick during the game like I have no idea how to repair that I just this long. I have no idea what to do. So I tell them make as tight as possible. So no matter what it doesn't break until you get anybody to my like second setback. That's funny. Man Yeah I I'd love to string. We had EC GREG on two or three episodes ago we talked to him about his youtube videos and how they taught. A lot of people had a string in highschool Australia. Seven hundred and fifty heads like I was the town stringer. And so I loved it. But I got these thick calluses on my thumbs and pointer fingers from like continually pulling and then putting out the flame with my fingers and stuff. Yeah man it was. It was like worth it. But at the same time I would be sitting in study hall string steak and everyone would make fun of me because nobody knew what look crosswise. They'd be like Oh you knitting sully unit over there. Did. You ever get any of that in Texas like when you when you committed, did your friends like look at the roster and look at the final verdict on Monmouth Sfeir season and be like, Oh boy look what you signed up for it because my friends definitely gave me crap like Lacrosse isn't real. Bro. I it was especially. The classic Chirp. Committed before they even played the effort season when I was junior that was the year before they start. Said, they just committed to school without a team would. Be Doing. Right so that that was kind of the does that I would get it. Paid off I guess. So I think we're GONNA, go ahead and move on to some questions just. For. bryce about the how. So there's always like videos of the NFL or the NBA draft and all of their stories get told but we're curious about like what your experience being drafted was and I know that like most Lacrosse players get drafted Mike while they're still in college So kind of tell us about that story a little bit. Yes. So it was April of my senior year. Was Wendy draft was? So I, think we still had like two or three regular-season Games left and then the conference playoffs. Some years, it's before the whole senior season some years after your during this woman's dairy. It never really was a possibility in my head raylene going into my senior season, the guard against this many goals that can up my drafts rightly I it all grow across was always just this. Gentleman's club that I was never going to be a part of those. That came from Texas I went to mind lives nem obviously I watched the Malala they picked up historically I watch games all the time evenly when I got into college and things like that. but it just never really was the thing for me but moving into that month of the draft in April I started getting phone calls and emails from all the GM's around the league. They kinda reach out as you know, a lot of it depends on your availability in your job and where you're living and things like that. So I started getting the emails I remember the first one was from the Florida launch from coach Mary auto he reached out going to ask me what plans where and I get one from the machine and then the outlaws call and and all these teams started. Reaching out of the OH. Wow this is natural possibility. So that got me. Obviously, really excited. I have wanted to be part of it is as much as anything else rightly, I wanted to get drafted and. it. All just kind of didn't seem real until someone put out like a mock draft the week of the draft and they had me go into the Dow's rattlers obviously the second to last round. I. Don't know that it was on that draft board, and so that was when it became really real in a lot of my mom he made. Started getting really excited and I think the drowsy Wednesday night. So we weren't. We weren't gonNA go out or celebrate or anything. We'd game Saturday but we we had a bunch of guys over ordered some buffalo wild wings literally just like flipped it on and hung out which I wish. There was a camera there because it was a long night because I. And getting picked until I was the second to last pick. Seventh Round US sixty two of that back in there were nine teams. That was pretty crazy but. Especially just because all the teams that I talked to picks exit Pacman I remember Florida pig, Joel's Denver Pick luce and the the rats take I forget the rest but yeah. That's second. The last big role rounding tubes even from Denver called me and said, we're taking you congrats to the League and then sandy walks up and said I name everyone starts freaking out is. Pretty Pretty Fun time. especially, just kind of how it all came together at the last minute not really no votes. That's such a cool story. Yeah I. Because a lot of like Dan Vaccaro was on the bus ride back and most of my teammates were sleeping so Yeah and and that's just such a unique to Lacrosse because you know the NFL the NBA MLB, I had a friend who drafted by the Red Sox and even he had like a some friends around and stuff like that and. It's you have a cool story. It sounds like you got a chance to actually do it right. You know yeah I know Griffin. Record. Always does little annual thing around the draft more will celebrate the guys drafted. So it's Kinda his idea to give the boys which was released. Kind of have one there around me and we actually had a game that Saturday we went out and won. So those is pretty fun week in just kind of getting back. Call was was really special because I after the. The pick that I was projected to go to happen and it wasn't the merrily Oh, though is. About to go undrafted. But all my boys like I was very thankful that I got back all. That's so cool. Well, obviously, you very talented and a lot of coaches realized that and we're thinking about drafting you somebody ended up drafting you. But what did you find the most difficult part of the adjustment to be considering you went from college to playing on the same field that someone like John Grant Right I mean first of all getting on the field, right I. Yeah. I don't people understand how? Concentrated the talent is in Pro Lacrosse I. Mean you think about it in the NFL, their sixteen with twenty guys on the roster. That's one hundred twenty spots in the oval mess it. and. That's her not just for your draft class. That's lyle that he cocked. That's Radi saw. That everybody writes leg. I think that that's something that people don't really understand is how hard it is just to get even on the field and when you kinda get that opportunity to make those of it, I never got the opportunity to Denver obviously ended up getting released and signed by Ohio, which is what I was finally able to get my first shot I think that that was obviously the hardest doesn't just getting our team. When you get to the game, I think a lot of there's a lot more nuances with the shorter shot clock and it kind of full line substitutions amid the that There's not really many two guys in the pros I think that kind of adjusting to getting that full substitution and working the shot clock was something that especially for me I never played with the shocking Colvin. Graduated a year before it started. So for me going from absolutely, no shot clock at Monmouth, we drained the clocking three. Possessions. We'd we played a little bit a little bit also. Is a biggest thing for me was gone from no shot-blocking piece play at Mama to go into the pros is sixty second shot clock. Really by the time you get clear you get the ball clear everyone subbed on. There's like thirty five seconds left to run off session. So that was definitely the biggest adjustment for me once I finally was able to get on a T-. Things happen fast. Right, yeah, it was crazy watching like all of the pros play that summer I was like I've never seen Lacrosse like this high of a level before like everyone's just like so crisp everything it's beautiful. It's the best. Game. Out. there. So when you first got to the League. And you can answer this too about how sin were there any like veteran players that really took you under their wing and like or? Did you kind of have to prove yourself to become one of the guys? Yes. So I, think. I was very lucky with my first situation. I went to the Ohio machine. They were coming off that championship they had in that locker room was full of just living legends right My locker was actually in between layers and in Tom's river. So. Being in between them. and. Yeah. They don't really talk to me before practice the I was I was Marcus Holden scab that week. That's. Him The world gives so they. got. Mid Major Katie's is here to fill in for markets for a week. Whatever and I ended up having a really good I practice and came into the locker room in my locker between Kyle Tom and they both Kinda start talking to me and in height me up to the game that night and saying that I belong in there for a reason and they did their research on me and all that stuff in my first practice obviously went well, and then a guy like Scotty Rogers who get better anybody on people's aside and and he's giving me like a pump up siege insane there there and I think that GonNa, give me the confidence that I needed to to go out there and play those three definitely had a big impact on me that first week. That's awesome and that's such. A cool story kyle, Harrison Tom Schreiber and Scotty Rogers those are like gigantic names for people who grew up when we did. and. That's such a cool story. What about you Casey? I got the house. It was like it was after the final four run. So, we were you guys like, Joe Cider Ryan Renner Lake. Hall of Fame God's House like the best to do it in the black and Gold Bay leaves the guys come in and there's a lot of room to kind of play as a freshman on Goffin's event and I was lucky have to play in ten games my freshman year. Johnny Mosley Really Kinda pulled me aside tally showed me the ropes like I. got a concussion against the genius as scrimmage in the fall. So I got thrown into the fire and I've had the play his role in the I midfield agains Robert Morris my freshman year every time I come off the field. He'd be right there the box as I, around me, it was like I saw this like do this next time like work on this like your guys approaching you this way she was very helpful and just Kinda break into game down for me because it's Really hard when you go from especially taxes across where there's only about you and three other guys one point visual and that kind of claim at that speed than go out there and be gone a million miles an hour it's tough to slow the game down. So he was very helpful and just slowing the Game Dot, help me of digest what I see and go into the goal in Megan. Something happen. That's awesome. He went off this year to on my girl she put all. His shake is just like this world like oh my gosh. So. Like as veterans yourself now at Tyson and at the I mean you've been at the canons for two years. Down Your what oh? Yeah. Because you were at the rattlers right butcher a veteran in the league. Yes I like A. Veteran. But. Is there anything that you think you can pass along to help others prepare for like that kind of transition into college or into the pros? Yeah. I. Mean there's only so much that you can say, right you learn by doing but. I mean the way that. The thing that helped me the most watching it like you guys you guys feel level for the tournament. Rightly. Watching it and kind of immersing yourself. Eh was what really helped me. I know that that whole summer that I was Kinda waiting to play for the outlaws before getting cut was I watched every game that happened is trying to to learn the nuances right because they it is a different game than in college maybe less. So now that causes shot clock in kids are kind of used to that now but I know for me personally that was something I did was I just kind of bought in immerse myself in it? That's really cool. What about you? You got anything for people coming from high school to college especially people in areas that aren't the best competition year round. yeah. Just Kinda you're there for a reason to speaking for Tyson specifically. You know coach Nasr doesn't recruit guys out of meal. He brings the guys who are GonNa, make better whether it's your first. You practice water you're going to be day one going twenty, twenty, your freshman season. So just how you're, you're there for a reason in then. During everything going on with last year season getting canceled this year season Fall Ball Konin jeopardy jeopardy. But just we have no idea what's going on. kind of it for granted, you know if you get one practices fallen a your best practices. Fall. Kind of you're there for reason, and while you're there, don't take it for granted. Yeah. Because it can go away at any time weirdly like we saw last year. That was terrible. It was. So I think we're going to ask you a little bit about both of Y'all's experience and the bubble What would you say like your favorite part of the entire experience was? I mean. This is winning or can I answer that? We're to ask you know. What he championship and all that the Ted that. Guy. Definitely. An interesting celebration for Sunday's guys who already wanted but I mean just I never touched the dropping before i. never picked it absolutely with in my lap like. A twelve pack by. A great. Deal. It's heavy. It's a lot I. think they don't tell you that they. Can Do. What about you case you were there Yeah Yeah I would say. Obviously Watch bryce win was definitely. Talk experiences that has family member rather than I could have the show all his hard work. Finally, reach I guess a peek. If you will. You know he did the two things you can't really surpass it. Don't watch bribes through this thing from the House and guys have great weekend grandma Lou coming in his rookie season played great for the Hawks Mazas well, what all dominate Goodrich Doing Zach thing Sunday coach coach forward is well with the barrage spent. I can't leave him out. So often those guys you know my like, dear, friends I'll have forever. You know those guys playing well answers watching like the world class talent there's it's it says for something is different watching it on TV the news you know watching, Loud Thomson I can do. Right there. You know watching you know randy stock Kyle Jackson Challenge Rogers. World class players in the box game and field. Watch them live, dissect every single step they'd take. It was pretty awesome for me is like Lacrosse rat I guess I just love watching the game. So you know the washes guys in person up close was awesome. And you called that the canons we're going to into all the interns like is placed bets on who's going to win us only guy that said the canons we've been on his. Loss out cannons GonNa, take it and he. Was Right. so It's okay. We switch off question sometimes we forget but So this one's for you Bryce, how much did you really have left going into championship weekend left in the tank how much considering you played on hot tariff all week you know you're doing a lot of gains a tournament, but just stretched out even longer and I mean I would get tired from today tournaments in high school. So like you basically played two week tournament, you know how? How Does Tau how much did you guys have left in the tank wasn't mostly just like we're not going home without this or were you guys really energized ready to go out there Yeah I think it was the whole week itself was a grind i. think a lot of guys came in really good shape obviously because we knew how terrible get A. Big I think everyone came in in pretty good shape I know for me personally. Never got to gas obviously because sharing x with randy spots. So I was kind of to. Kind of lead on him if I had a couple of long runs and he was able to lean on me if he's getting a little bit. So I think that really helped us stay fresh and kind of have that that one two punch which was really helpful and then obviously would would really decided to opt out of JV chip game. I gotTA shouldering that that load definitely be different on a May of at hot turpitude. I was Kinda running is the. Broke land in the third quarter, and that was the only breath I got. When I was hiding on the crease so yeah. But I know speaking for the guys like Goodrich was a horse just didn't stop all again challenge in stopped Up. Up He had his best game hundred. Internally I think. I think a lot of guys were really amped up for that game for one of you know I wasn't on the cans last year but they lost the outlaws and a game that they felt they should have won they dominated the league they were ranked number one for most the seasons I know that. I there as opposed flows the week in different guys were more gas on different days than others but once we got that championship on Sunday? I think it was kind of as. A different kind of angie than almost was leaving anything by. That's awesome that yeah like I told coach Kirk Cork last week that like all of the puzzle pieces fit together for you guys and everyone was just doing their thing and you guys were ahead for I mean like you guys were like winning the game. For the majority of the game in like it wasn't even competition, it looked like for the most part. Yeah, I think playing against them on on Friday help we gotta get got to get a feel for them in a game that I mean, obviously every game matters but the winner of that game wasn't going to get the trophy and we were still gonNA play each other regardless I think that. That helped us a lot. Of Grin really really that last game on Sunday he he'd been making invisible plays all weeks for him to the end of that I was really awesome for him and OC had a great tournament challen played attacking filled in for Randy, and really do a great job in our Defense League Great Kevin Recent at the face off ex. Max. Adler is kind of synonymous with success at the Ebola level for the past. Five years now he's been dominating the X. I think Kevin did a really great job guys the ball and our defense late great Bukhara came out and suffered as three real quick ones and we made some adjustments which the match ups and they held it down for the rest of the game. So I, it was to Kinda we come from behind a lot. We we went down early lizards when down being often thought backing Iran. We went down against the barrage every win we came behind besides the JV. So they got to play with that goes for what's yeah exactly So what were your emotions and feelings you had when you're lifting the trophy knowing like your whole Lacrosse career has led to this moment Yeah it was. It was a real. I really don't think it'll ever set in ages they seeing the Boston. Cannons piece on that trophy just like everything that went into that week and the whirlwind of the season getting pushed back in close phoned and I think just kind of being out there playing processes one incredible and then to kind of having that super team that we formed and and all the pressure that we had going into that week. Obviously everyone's like columnist, the Golden State Warriors of. Acrylic Cross Riley. This kind of super team that came together in the off season and. Dealing with all that and obviously everything I've been through come from Texas small school getting cut all that like to live that trophy and and do everything that we did like I I was. Like today's yet interview I just blacked out. He gives just it was so surreal. You. Say Trophies heavy. But when you lived there for the first either, it feels awesome. That's really cool. Yeah. All never. Hoisted Trophy Endless Rec League one. You know. You know case you've got a chance at some point but I'm I'm hosting I'm a legal little plastic one if I when Youth League thing with my name. But So I guess we'll move onto some segments Casey. I know you know you're Midi. So who's your? This is the poking and lift who's your favorite defensive player of all time and why I mean I'm sure it's probably going to be in a short stick deity. Yes going to be short-sea D. Midi from KC and yet my Guy Goodrich I I I remember my first practice thousand scrimmages. Kind of get the freshmen exposed the college across. And I remember. I got the ball from the box and I looked I saw Zach approaching me I've moved it and coach Nasr Walk Down the field he was reading the game you grab me he goes go ahead and dodger like just just see what happens. I caught it splits my right hand. He hit me so hard. I thought the top of my head hit my ankles. Disability. Is Right as fast as I can. Make it seem like I was going to the goal vows trying to move as quick as I did whoever that ax that's funny man. He was a beast to watch a loved watching employees at Charleston. It was so fun just because he's Tall and beg and you can always pick him out on the field and then he's not got pole which just makes him. An unknown factor because it's like man, he could also push in transition. He was a really good player to watch at and I loved every minute of watching your games with him. So. This one's for Bryce. Called the box score. Who is your favorite offensive player of all time? Favorite, offensive player of all time That's tough. I watch a lot of Lacrosse and I tried to base my game off a lot of guys just being imprisoned live against lyle is an. Unspeakable unspeakable with things. But the field especially for me not being involved on defensively kind of standing at the midfield line every time he touches the ball you kinda like Clint Josh, your breath short because you're saying what is Daily especially once he Gets that look in his eyes and he gets the ball in the wing euclid up because I can't do anything about it the. Only will something's about to happen. So I think watching him and I mean you WanNa talk about the legends of the game obviously jog yet still playing Powell's been lucky enough to get close at them through the ship that the things that they would do that. Yeah I mean it. It's tough there. There's been a lot of a lot of really great players but I mean currently obviously playing styles has been pretty crazy. He's forever burned in my brain for that goal I'm sure you're GONNA note on talking about that goal against Loyola where he throws the fake tans around and just he's got his stick at his feet and he just flips it up to the top red. Yeah and actually one of the guys guarding during that was David Manning he's supply for the Charlotte Hounds and I brought that up to him and he got visibly angry. And he was like he was like we don't talk about lyle I was like all right man on something like I'm sorry. A. Perfect. Yeah exactly like you play perfect defense that was a great double team and he just threw a fake everyone bid on any turned around and just low to high shovel. Yeah I watched a lot of lyle high school kind of. Get creative in gene by game a little bit I watched him Marcus. Momentous was another fun. The Passion plays live in. Jordan. Wolf to of like completely him act. So yeah. No I. Watched via live live under better. Yeah, micheals electric. My cousin played across northern Virginia and when they were, they were like a tournament or something and they played against Lyles team. Will help them like twenty two to nothing. Expect. That's expected. Have you met Marcus like you replaced him for a game? Did you then beat him? And and like you have you gotten to know because he's a really good guy I've only had two interactions with them when I worked at UNC, he would come in and work out before the USA Games and He's a really really good guy like he never hesitated to talk to mean and give me tips on how to get better and stuff like that and I think he's a he's a really good example of somebody who wants the game to get better at all at all levels. Yes he actually markets came back the last game of my rookie season in Ohio and I was able to play with him, which is Great. And actually now, our youngest brother drew is a freshman on the Lacrosse at Utah playing from Arkansas Marquez's Jerusalem see now and I know drew's love it. We lost your volume. Needed yourself. Yeah. I bet it's okay. Yes. So drew's that Utah now Marx's Oh. To See he's the best Really. To play with him and we talk a lot about drew in his game and Marcus catch up a few times a year at. Yeah. He's. He's a great dude unhappy that. The hopefully, we'll get to go out to Salt Lake and see a game. This spring will see fingers crossed. You GotTa let college across happen they have some sick uniforms to but all right Casey this next one st you it's the penalty box. What she wears take like what what do you get the most crap for from your brothers and teammates For my teammates is easy. I always say the cowboys this year. That's just a that's no. So. For me, but the stars are about the clinch the COP tonight. So hopefully, get some respect for the stars least you the Mavericks. Play Grade Masks Awesome I was GonNa say you Luca Guy A huge Luca Guy? He's He's Actually. That's also hot takes of bread. Sundays. Guy At him and I are always Texan all the bubble games has been going on I always tell Luka bt next year and he's always trying to talk me offer cloud now. I go. I think. deathly the hottest takes have or any Talbert Dallas Sports with the guys they're. They're definitely quick to shut me down. No I. Think you take on Luca's right honestly he's has the most potential in the league and I hate when people say he flops because like. He doesn't like honestly he plays the game really well as a very athletic tall white man like he's he's very solid out there on the court you know. He's playing pro basketball since he was fifteen. Yeah. Yeah. No, he doesn't need to and then you know it's Hilarious when people like Pat Bev call him out. This is turning into an NBA podcast but yeah, it's hilarious when people have called him out and it's like you see the videos of him against hardened any just literally flies back illegally shot Oh man. so Our next segment is the late in high for Bryce, which is what's the worst penalty either done had. Done against you. whereas. Penalty of. Out I really get I. Really get any penalties I wish I was I. Wish I was tougher Penalty ever taken. I know I got my clock cleaned in college against Princeton. Is. The hardest hit. I've ever taken I remember I got skinny and I was going. Towards the increase I would decrease. I wasn't legal. Ground get a field and I I was getting lifted by Defenseman, which literally just like exposed me I shot like a half shot went wide I. Remember I soaked one hundred yet and it was one of those relief my feet wet in the air. Out today even. Back. In film a few times everyone got to get a laugh about it but I actually got like helicopter. Pretty. I did that to someone, but it wasn't very impressive. He's like thirty eight and probably about four hundred and fifty pounds and he's like he's like five six and we were playing box and he was following me for towards a ground ball agit stopped and like lean down put my shoulder right here in his chest and he just did this. And it was awful. I felt so bad because everyone was like you have to hit them like that and I was like look gravity took care of that one for me like I barely touch the man I'm sorry. I started grabbing finished it really. Is a full-blown helicopter was yeah. It was like it was it was like ricky bobby when he played. That's not good. No but. All right. So Casey, this one's called the Moonshot was the worst shot you've ever taken in a game. I would have to go back to high school any shot I took my freshman year. That bryce than like. There is definitely a few few times where I've route I would take a shot and I get a hand much pads from Bridgeton in Iran and start yelling like, why did you happen to me? I was. Like. I was willing triple team still. Also probably say Eddie Shot I took my freshman year that wasn't from five yards or A. Specific one burned into your brain forever you might not WanNa talk about it but I know every player has won did they're just like that was the worst shot were taken. Yeah actually against our Guy Shawn. Johnson at any. Year brick y. a UMASS I like cottage skipped past splits my right hand tried to jump shot industry I tried to bounce it and it was just a Muffin Oh no an eye. He said something to me and he said, thanks for comments. He like any Soga outlets to umass very good operating. Field. So Papa, was covering the. Shot at. Saved it. Literally, the same motion from going offside hip up in the air over top and they and they go down score and I just was scared to walk. Thanks for coming. Is Not GonNa. Go well skin our. That such a line. Thanks for coming. Oh Man I, love that was. That was that's probably the worst one I've taken in College Reid were just bad shot schiavone goal on the other add not this is. The worst relation I don't shoot jumpers I just don't have the core strength like I I've seen people who are good at them and it just it works for them but I can't I can't bring my stick around like that I don't know why there's some. Anymore Bryce do you have a where shot? We got another question for you after this but I just want to hear your because you're also an offensive guy. Yeah and he shot from. Twelve yards shot. That is. Not, like gave out, really have any a burned in my memory get bench for nice low to high. Ball I. Played Umass Lowell my your year as having a terrible game I, think as over Thirteen Judeh. told a day. Trying to shove it in their Ivory Coast, fish pull Abi. He's like you got two minutes to go sit up vision figures out. The version that was burn for sure. That my freshman year, my coach. Literally it was like what's going on like? You. Out The Division One lacrosse case. I wasn't feeder more than shooter in high school. So I definitely had my fair share bad shots, but I was I. didn't you know have those big games where I missed a lot of shots usually have at least one goal in like four shots but I am over fourteen day. You can't even look at your stick anymore like. With seven seconds left. Totally. Yes exactly. So I think we're GONNA move on and just ask some questions about you guys in general just to get to know you guys a little better So bryce, what are some hobbies you have outside of the sport of Lacrosse? I've mean one hobby is reading these fat things. Law Up quadrant time. When I'm not in law school either playing, Lacrosse. I like to play golf now that great. IDEA. I love Jetskis. I was born to ride You've been here. MIAMI. We got the literally looking at the ocean right now. The that that's definitely a fun pastime I'd say I'd say that's what my hobbies are I. Guess Reading in go to the beach and playing golf do you have your own Jetski? Or do you rent I do not? You gotta one of her friends in law school has one though. You gotta you gotTa rented from Him Yeah. It's like a six pack and fill it with gas or something like that. Yeah. Yeah that's not a bad rental system, my friend, and I are trying to buy a boat at some point before next year. But all right, Casey, what's your favorite current TV show which he got hooked on? Oh Wow. Right now really watch much TV besides your sports because there's so much. Favorite my favorite shows of all time probably entourage and highlights I think Texas from. I FRY lives I've lot. I watched every single. Day preseason in highschool for my freshman year my senior year and watch it again, my sophomore year treasonable across. As. I, guess it's five times. I've got the show entourage actually just refinished like a week ago but those pride, my definite favorite shows I was reading lights all the way through one time, but I couldn't get over Landry being a murderer you know. All right. Yeah I that and and I don't know everybody loves Sarasin but I think he's just kind of the pants is a character. Rigging Ville. Rigs. Him Him going to jail definitely hurt me. Very Sad. That would hurt. Bryce, what is the weirdest food item that you like? I'll return response. I love. UNCROSSABLE 's little. Delicious. No loves so. I love those and. I've actually a gourmet dino nugget chef. Cormac. People make clothing for that one but I do I if a whole ordeal like I'll do. The Pan Alley Pan Serum and put Ali Ranch and barbecue sauce in the pan kind of like hibachi style, mix it all out. North deal. Be bladed tender is so like some. whip it up my friends and colleagues would love it. We would we would come home from the bars It's time. Yeah Yeah. Yeah definitely something that you come home from the bar and chant dying. Macomb now. I'm sure you burned a couple in your yeah. Oh Yeah. There's been a couple of where it didn't turn out well. As part you probably ain't him anyways though everybody does that So I'm a car guy. So each you can answer this but what are your dream cars? Casey Ego. I better truck guy since I've gone a car at a GM Gerald Kia in high school and from my senior year of high school till now before Raptor Beautiful. I'm a big truck. I. Definitely seen driving around the the bubble arc next to it every day I guess at the Va.. Yeah No. Good. So you got the good one. I'm going after girl eventually in probably work in the city. So where once I'm done. With. College. But I actually coaching a youth team about a month ago before I came up in this dad pulled up in hugh a Audi Audi A- SUV like all black everything I was like that's the Carl is religious like looking cars seeing. So the that definitely that that would be the the Qa if I have to get a car again anytime I'm definitely going with like a Mercedes wagon. Yeah. Because if you get an all black one of those, they're just so low and sleek and they can go so fast they surprise everyone hundred percent what about you rice your truck guy to Now I've I've got a range rover some STV. Guy. Those. Are Nice. Incredible, I love it I. If I had to upgrade it, I would do the Lamborghini Suv. Yours those are gorgeous. I saw one here in Raleigh. There's a lot of them here in Miami. Obviously everyone share. Their Nice cars. So I've seen some pretty decked out once they're they're incredible I saw red one and it looked insane red with all the black tent on it. All my God looked so good. No I I'm about to get a Nissan frontier. My parents told me you're graduating so we'll get your trump. Yeah my they got my sister something but I'm I think I'm GONNA wait like four months for the new body style to come out because then all the older ones are just gonNa Plummet in value, which is where I come in. And get a pro forex for very good rate. Yeah. Because then I can take it off road like your after exactly the same don't question it. Exactly. So I think we're just GONNA have our last question and. Sorry, it's tough one but both of you guys can answer it What do you want your legacy to be when it's all said and done? I. Think. Is Pretty interesting for me because it's it's obviously being written a little bit right now. I. Think I want my legacy to kind of be when we were talking about. Marcus Riley. He's just a good dude you bright orange every day everyone loved being around him. Yeah and so I and then on the field obviously just like A. Dominating, force that just never took in playoff never took a day off never took no for an answer rates I the that that's something that I think about a lot like what I we talked about as a family a lot like what are you want your last name the mean when you leave mom when you leave housing when you leave Utah if you're Wasserman thanks I think I definitely think those are two of the things that I would focus on. Kinda just. Kinda pretty much say I KINDA WANNA go down and Tallis's kind of being the best team mate. You know we're a very close team I kinda WanNa be the guy who never left some behind who brought the whole team together offers on the field off the field but just kind of never led so much straighten pack And just kinda tireless worker in whether it's being so annoying that might new offense coordinator coach Muc- when she's told me I to relax a couple of times but being so annoyed like trying to watch film trying to walk. getting guys come out and take extra shots after practicing hanging out with the freshman making sure they're doing. All right. Just kind of the all round great team in tiles worker. Definitely be a good legacy thousand. Have you met We'll frith net will frith yet. I've met a few the freshman, but it's kind of weird right now like because they're they're they're the dorms and they don't want anything in the dorms than spreads the off campus house. So. It's kind of a little weird right now. But hopefully when we get hopefully fall kicks off in October. We can play if not I'll probably meet all them in January he went to my high school and he kind of has like he was committed to firm to. Win They. Cut Their Program You made a good choice. All. Right. Well, I, think you know we're getting ready to wrap things up. So you guys have any social media's that you WANNA plug handles. Any charities you might work with that house inner in the NFL. Yeah I. Mean I'm at Bryce Wasserman to on Instagram at Bryce Wasserman on twitter jeopardy we love bridge Lacrosse down in Dallas Texas Kinda like Harlem, across how they do that a New York and in Boston in Baltimore Bridge crosses for a lot of inner city programs in Dallas they were very involved with the rattlers new. They're getting a lot more involved in the professional ranks there they being sponsored by a lot of things that definitely WanNa get involved more in the future bridge crosstown sexist shots at them feedback sued. Yet I'm just. You washburn on Instagram Casey Wasserman six on twitter. But definitely something that's near deer thousand we bought Raleigh's. Top three donations but the a strong foundation and I've actually been lucky enough to be the team captain this year on kind of organize our donation page Kinda our GonNa get out beyond just doing mustaches obviously but. The of that. So that's definitely a great foundation. If you'RE GONNA, donate donate through the House Lacrosse page but donate in general great 'cause you don't have if you don't know the story, it's incredible story what they've done since they started to think about ten twelve years ago. Two houses. Now that House of people of Asia to uproot their lives, you'll find the best cancer treatment for their sons or daughters and headstrong has now made you houses where they can now stay. Essentially, rent-free it. So they don't have to travel far go to from basic families can. Stick together during a tough time like this. So all day money goes to kind of stuff like that and a great foundation. That's a great 'cause both of those I like both of those yeah you can follow me on. Instagram at Evans Dot, CR to an on twitter at the an Evans. Follow me not at JK Sullivan. Those wrong last week it's at John. Sullivan Twenty on Instagram. All right. Well I think that's all for us. Today don't forget to subscribe and leave a five star review on your favorite platform but apple music apple. Apple podcasts helps the most It really does help US ally We can also be found on Youtube now where you can watch US interview the guests, and if you are watching, you can see that I have a sticker on my cup because we have those on our website please go visit us www dot letter high pod dot Com and get yourself some stickers there and check out. The. PODCAST in general Yeah. don't forget to follow us at low to high pod on twitter and at low to high podcast on instagram and I think that's GonNa do it for us today. Thank you so much case in Bryce for coming on and thank you to the listener really appreciate you. Guys is. Absolutely.

Lacrosse bryce Bryce Casey Montgomery Texas League US Bryce Wasserman football Ohio TA Scotty Rogers Tulsa Zach Boston Luca Guy Florida Virginia Notre Dame Jersey Tyson
Virtual Professionalism and Meaningful Work

The Tightrope with Dan Smolen

31:26 min | 5 months ago

Virtual Professionalism and Meaningful Work

"Are we at an inflection point what it feels like to me is an acceleration of catch up because the world is moving in this direction anyway. I'm Dan smolen, and this is the tight rope podcast. We tell the stories of people who are defining the future of work. Our guests walked the tightrope away from meaningless toil, and towards work that is profound protects the planet empowers people and is fun to do meaningful work. The story that our guest tell, and the insights that they provide will inspire you to connect with work and experiences that stoke your passions and make the world. A better place for the future of work is meaningful work. This week my family and I are sucking brace on the Delaware shore, so we are taking the opportunity to run a great episode from earlier this year than you might have missed. Our friend and frequent guest Adrian shock of five to one consulting in Washington DC is an expert on workforce engagement. Back in April when we all pivoted to working from home, Adrian engaged us in a crash course on virtual professionalism, she discussed how we can leverage zoom, skype, Webex, and other platforms to be more present with and gain a deeper understanding from co workers who are also working from home. This is an information packed episode in which Adrian makes it quite clear that virtual professionalism is the future of works key learning component. We spoke with Adrian shock on Zoom. Welcome to the Tightrope Adrian Shock. Thank you Dan. It's really good to be here. I'm so pleased that you've come back to the podcast especially now with so much going on, we really WANNA tap your thought leadership, on Eurocentrism city and other things. and. As we record this interview in early April, we are now three weeks into coded nineteen corona virus, social distancing, and now teleworking millions of people, not only in the United States, but across the planet are working at home and learning how to use soon and other tools, and hopefully this week they now have a basic understanding of technology in how they can engage and participate with each. Each other with some competency, but as our guest last week, and a friend of yours Carla, Fleming said we are at an inflection point, which is triggered by this corona virus crisis, and here's the really big challenge. Adrian, we must strive for connections and understandings with others virtually that we only knew how to do before face to face. We are all in a virtual professionalism crash course. Adrienne, how do we get that course started? I am. First of all I'm in total agreement with that you know not only are we at an inflection point what it feels like to me is an acceleration of catch up because the world is moving in this direction anyway in my experience, there's a lot of time that spending cars. A lot of pollution wasted cars getting to and from work. There's a there's a lot of excess and what it feels like. Is there would there has been this moment in time? Catch up. We are catching up to a future. Catching up to the future something that we've been playing with over the last five years, so idea of remote working for example, but organizations have been stepping into it some Ben. Resisting it and in all of these organizations do what's best for the organization, but there has been a movement towards war working from home. Mortello working there has been a movement for more telemedicine. and. There's just been a lot of resistance because it's OK. How do we do this? What do we do well? What's happening now? If it doesn't matter how we do it to what we do, we have to do it, so it's going to be jumping and you're going to want. You mentioned the virtual. Dr smeeting. We both had that experience on Monday for myself you for your son. And it's interesting because like you said whether or not we're ready for it is an important. We have to do this now, right? We're doing it now. It's not even we have to do it. It's we are doing it, we we don't have choice which I think is really interesting in many ways. This is just a great opportunity for all of the folks are saying I. Don't understand technology I. DON'T use technology while they are now and they can do it. Indeed. You know it's hard enough to get to. People face to face with each other and feeling each other's energy. And their presence. You know whether that's in a formal or an informal setting. You know a this meeting or a gathering of friends or acquaintances. We are social creatures. We WanNa feel each other's warmth literally, and we're tactile. We liked to touch and PAT each other on the back and look in each other's is the way we're doing over zoom right now, but in real space, but we can't do that anymore and one of the reasons. I wanted to have you on this week is because. I feel like we have an opportunity to talk to people who have been on quite a few zoom meetings in the last week. Feel like. Okay I can see you, but I don't feel you. Now you describe a process called in correct me if I'm wrong, generative listening what is that Adrian how can it help us? Get the feel so to speak shore, so there are a couple of things around generative listening generative listening is from the work of Auto Sharma of from Mit, and he introduced these four levels of. and. His program I think it's called transforming self communities and organizations. But regenerative listening is level four. It is the highest level of listening. We have available to us. And it is a level of listening that generates possibility, but what precedes level for generative listening is Level One which is where we're listening for what we already know to be true. It's validating what we already know on social media, ninety percent of all all of us listening at Level One, which end social media's basically all level one listening Oh. Yes I know that. I know that I'm aligning to that. That's. That's these are my peeps. That's where I'M GONNA. Spend my time level to is listening for what you don't know to be true. It's you always you're listening for what is inconsistent with your beliefs, hypothesis, many scientists for example use level to listening when they're always looking for okay, what is inconsistent with my hypothesis and they make a note because what is inconsistent with our beliefs is usually discarded by the brain. We let go. It doesn't hold onto it because it doesn't think it serves as well. There's no connection. These two levels of listening one is validating and testing so what we're looking at at levels three empathetic listening, which is the level of listening, I am experiencing on the space in which you're seeking, and that is where. It began. So when you and I are talking about our week and what happened today in our doctor's visits, the world changing I'm listening from the space from which you were speaking. I'm putting myself in dance shoes and I'm thinking. Wow, okay, your place your podcasts. Everything is shifting I'm experiencing the world as you are experiencing, or that's my intention. That creates this connection. Level four listening is generated, which means that when two people are listening from the space from which the others speaking. Wherein connection and that connection creates this field of possibility between two or more people, so we can create something that hasn't existed before just based on the way that we're connecting and experiencing the world. So what happens is I'm not feeling threatened. My nervous system is at ease. I'm feeling safe, connected and respected Amanda Blake from bright talks about the three nutrients. Connection and respect these things what we need to create. This is what we to create. When we have that when we don't feel judge from Feel stress, we are open to receiving possibility and were open to innovating. We're open to a different form possibility. What you're describing feels a lot like what my wife who has a theater background would describe as breaking the fourth wall on the walls that we build for ourselves and social media are comforting because. We're hearing things we WANNA hear because they validate some some instinct. We have or some belief system that we have. We are all now in social media I'm literally looking at you. I'm virtually looking at you on my screen right now Adrian but I'm not in your physical space. But in a way, what you and I are doing right now is breaking the fourth wall that's. The fourth wall would normally be between the stage in the audience you. You're actually talking directly to them in a way. It's the same kind of concept. We cannot be in the same physical space, but we WANNA. Use like you're saying through generative listening all those skills that we would normally use. In a literal face to face setting right well. What we're talking about right now is our ability to be fully present. the when we're fully present and this is. This is the hard part with with virtual telework virtual classes. We have to turn our phones. All Right? We have many anything to distract us, but because we have to pay attention and listen intentionally, so we have to be present, and we have to be intentional about what we want and what we're experiencing from people that were connecting with virtually so right now I can see your head on your shoulders. I can't see your your lower part of your body. I can't see we know wears your heart space. What you do with your hands? There are so many physical and social cues at I'm unable to pick up right now. With my eyes, but when on fully present. And I'm grounded, and I'm listening for connection. I. Can I have more information to energetic information? Sound a little blue. Energetically. I'm able to figure out what's going on my brain. My nervous systems able to sense into what's actually going on with you so I. Can you know my safe? Mike connected? My respected like what's happening is I. Don't have access. All those physical cues, said I get in a face to face visit. So you described something that I often relate to soft skills, I. Don't know if that's the right term, but it's the non verbals that people send out. It may be the way they blink their eyes after a difficult question is asked or like you said what they do with their hands what they do with their feet. Are. They nervous ankle. Twitter's maybe something has made them feel uncomfortable. And you know normal. You'd see the person twitching a bit. You don't necessarily have that. I bring this up because you know while the economy is really in Topsy Turvy state right now there is interviewing between hiring manager and perspective higher going on right now. It's going on in this milieu. Virtual Space Zoom skype Webex whatever the tool is. How do we use our new skills now in a way to be more present? In. The conversation now I feel your presence Adrian because really are a genuine person. I know you I've I've spoken to many times and I I can feel your energy. But if I were a hiring manager, and this isn't your first experience, you wouldn't really know. Anything about me so. Let's offer up some practical. Experience if let's say, I'm a hiring manager in your candidate for a job or vice versa. Maybe to set some engagement expectations so that we both feel comfortable with each other. Do you have any thoughts about that? I do and a couple of things that I come to mine that I want to share his first of all when we're in unexperienced of a zoom or one on one. Look how close we feel to each other's faces, never ever be that close in a face to face conversation right now I feel like about one foot away from your face. Okay where I would normally be possibly in a conference room. So what we WANNA do is we want to take our laptops, and we want to get as far away to the you can see the body as much as possible right I wanna be able to share heart space. I want that screen to be up. But this is something. This is sort of like what we WANNA. See here's. You can see why upper torso. Information that I can share right now. So you don't need a headshot. We don't need to be on sixty minutes right with the extreme headshot. So what I have done what I have done I have a boom Mike and I moved it back and I'm now sitting square on the back of my chair with my shoulders, pressed up against the backs, and now you see. Mid Lineup Torso for now. You have a better sense of my physicality and. We could be more present because we're not thumbnail sketches of each other. And you know there's there's also an an experience of if we don't know each other and we don't have a relationship. We do a little bit more physical distance. So we wanna just mere that as much as we can another, so that's one aspect of what we can do. The other thing that we wanna make sure that we do is just take a moment to come together so even if it's you know taking a moment to let go of everything that you've brought into the conversation whatever happened in the last hour the last warning the last day take a deep breath before you start just having agreement of hey, before we start. Let's just take a moment to take a couple of depress. Just let go having a couple of Russ now. When I was working internally before meetings, I would without exception. We would have thirty seconds of. Silence. Do whatever you need to do arrives. And I think that that's very important as well being intentional about the arrival, being intentional about the physical space of presenting ourselves from the waist up, so we can see as much as possible another thing that's really important quite helpful when I was working with sales, teams and helping them prep for virtual demos. So, what is it that we need to do differently when we're trying to influence a prospect or client when we want them to buy something and we can't see them during the virtual demonstration space, you see a screen. You don't see everyone, but what we need to do is we need to be very very clear on who is in the room? WHO's in this meeting? Having a list so that you know and people need to get to know people's voices Oh. That's Dan's voice. That's Adrian's voice because it's one thing to. You can get away with it in the physical space. Oh, I, don't know, but when you have to recognize people's voices and you don't know them well. You need to practice and in that when we listen to what comes out of people's. People's mouths. We need to listen for a level of positive to negative expressions, so if we don't have the information that we need, we need to be listening. For how many positive expressions are they saying? How many neutral expressions are sharing how many negative expression the language that gives us a sense of where our state of being as so we need to listen for that and track it. I think you brought up something that relates to intent as well. Let me you said something that reminded me many years ago. I had a hiring manager who always insisted on putting me on speaker phone and I said to this gentleman no. And? He would say why I said because I don't know who's in the room. And we're talking about private conversations here. I think the same thing goes into I. Don't know if your children are in the room I might say something. That's sensitive that I don't want them to hear. You don't know if my family's in the room and maybe there's something that we're talking about. That's private and you don't want to divulge it. The same thing could be said in a big zoo meeting with all those little. Brady bunch pictures on the screen. Exactly what they are! That's exact-. Yeah, we need to give ourselves permission to ask the question. Okay Adrian I need to ask. Are we the only people in the room right now? Can you wave that camera around and show me and I will do the same because we're not in literal space for in virtual space, and we have to make it as literal and as real as possible right well I think that. That speaks to not only intention, but it also speaks to the boundaries that we need to create for ourselves to be comfortable and the people that were talking to our comfortable now many of us are having to share spaces small spaces when two children who are in school and two parents who are working and we're trying to figure it out and their conversations amongst all of us that need to be private. and. How do we make space for that? So I think to your point? Hey, is it are my preferences to be on Mike's? Can you do a headset in a Mike? We don't want to do for the purpose of this call. We don't want to do any speaker calls, and there's enough anxiety right now in the world for children and believe me any kid that's in a house is going to be listening for everything that's going on around them. And if they sense that, there's something going on or a problem at work or anything like that they're all in. Air All in yes. I agree with that. I have an eighteen year old. She's an adult now. They have friends who have pre kindergarteners. And they are auditory sponges. Ar and as I should be I think that this is you know how how we're using our technology. Requires Boundaries and it requires testing and experiences and requires our ability to say you know what I'm not compared to have this conversation right now. Can. We schedule it for later this afternoon. When I have a little bit more privacy, or can we take it offline and out? Go for walk outside on the phone. I think that's a great idea. It's very very important to manage how controlling the stress in the house when we're. When I say house, saying the apartment flat whatever the case may be, we need to be able to manage that very very carefully. Because everything that's happening to us has spillover to those people that are around. Here's another thought that POPs into my head. You know we're all we're each of us on our own little merry go round, which is going really fast right now. We are. Are Significant, others are our children. Are I mentioned to you that? My wife is a public schoolteacher. One of the challenges that is going on in homes right now is do I home school. My children do I. Keep that same level of intensity and continuity that they had in the classroom setting going on at home. And MARSHA school system is like having that discussion in real time. Do we really want to do that right now? Some school systems stop grading. They will help somebody remediate a bad grade and make it better, but they're not adding more grades so the grade book. There's no fourth quarter grading right now. Because how do you do it? How do you do successfully? That's something that I'm seeing in my household, so I've got my older son's taking college classes virtually and my My sixteen year old is taking high school classes one of the things. That's really important. They're doing zoom, but they're also communicating with their teachers by typing and sending messages and what we know to be undeniably true is that you cannot solve problems, and you cannot build relationships through text, messaging, emails or tweets. It doesn't happen. There's no context and so what I'm seeing with my my son is his inability to problem. Solve a dispute between grades, and he's looking at the instructions. He followed the instructions and they're going back and forth. Forth and I've coming into it because I'm the only parent here and I got to stop this. Somebody's got to pick up. The phone gotTa have a conversation, so we need to know when we're trying to solve problems. When we're using transmission based technology like tweets or email or text, there has to be a very clear boundary on. When do we stop the correspondence and pick up a phone? A video is what you just described. Intention -ality. I'm not sure if it's intention I'm experiencing it a little bit more of boundaries. Vic I guess most importantly. It's when something isn't working well. We need to be able to react much faster. So the days of letting, go letting ago. You know we'll figure it out. No, let's nip things in the bud, and we're going back and forth two times each for transfers and we're. We're the same place we were in the first transport. It's often people say hey. Something doesn't work while three times after the third time we do something different. Exactly, so one thing I'm very conscious of right now is time we've all studied in school, and if some of us have been in business. Google the value of time. You can never get time back. It is so precious. My attitude right now is if I'm not on a podcast interviewing a guest or writing a script or something if I'm in the middle of a grab bag activity. I operate on a fifteen minute rule if it doesn't need to get done in the next fifty minutes. May We set it aside for later? We don't have the luxury of walking through an office space and seeing if somebody's may be available because I have to deal with something. We have to find new ways of using our time. Well, because we're all like you said. We're all in the space right now and we all have our priorities. And I think time management is going to be the next big MAC that we need to figure out absolutely so this idea, not only of time management, but the use of routines really being clear about okay. This is going to be my routine, and this is the household routine. And for people with Small Children As much as we would like to think that you know when you've got a five year old, they don't care. Out of there, and that's all that matters, but but what we're really talking about is really getting clear. In terms of what's my schedule sharing it, but most importantly who is mine support mechanism is my buddy. Who can I reach out to and happenings. Three people that can help you navigate what we're going through. Me Need to have someone that we lean on, and we need to have partnership with that. We can't just walk down the hall and you know have a quick conversation. We need to be able to go to someone and really had agreement. Of Okay. We will be will be support buddy. That's incredibly important and the other thing. That's incredibly important. Everyone needs to get outside every day or Creed, You have to see the light of day. You have see the light of day. All these things take work and commitment and intention -ality, that's for sure but to really understand what is the level of support that I need where my vulnerable you know another thing that a friend of mine as they're having virtual, happy hours Friday on at four o'clock with his company. And it's and it's. On zoom and everybody gets their drink of choice, and they just say okay. You know how you doing would be doing, and and it's a great way for this manager to see really how is not doing? The teams are not spending time together. The teams are working with their. With their the parts of the other functions that they need to work on teams, intact teams are always working together in that intact team they're. They're dispersed in there working with clients and other functions. But how does a manager know how that team is doing? If he doesn't talk to his team in my experience, most managers are talking to their team They talk to their team when there's something wrong or when they introduce something. They're not checked in because they haven't had to be. Now they've got to see. What's the wellbeing like eighteen? Who is vulnerable because there are people who are not going to be doing well, and if people don't know who they are, it doesn't matter how much work you have. If somebody is sick, their kid is sick. Their parents are I've got two parents in Florida who don't think anything's going on with this virus. Wear masks down there. We don't wear gloves. I'm having a C- guy come. Fix My air conditioning unit today. So there are people who have too much going on right now, so if you can't identify who they are, and you can't say okay. Jane. You're going to be her buddy John. You're going to be his body. And whatever they can't get to. You need you can pick up and just have the volunteers who can volunteer to take more on their plant this week and every week. Who can pick up more? Who has to give who has licko something and really start looking at managing balance? Because when people have too much going on not doing their work, they can't and you don't want them to. You don't want them. Was My career thirty five years ago, I was like Lucy and Ethel in the chocolate manufacturing line, going faster and faster, it doesn't work. You have to find balance, and you need to see who has capacity and who doesn't have capacity every single week Adrian. You made me think of something of a discussion. I was having before this whole covid. Nineteen thing happened, and that is that we must operate on the notion that anyone we speak to is dealing with something difficult. And that's empathy and you and I talked in our pre Khol about that's even the case with somebody that we don't have spiritual or philosophical alignment with. so this idea of having a buddy somebody who maybe isn't in our daily lives dealing with the granularity that we deal with, but is empathetic. And we can be that way to them. This is going to be something especially now that we are virtual fish out of water, we need to think about our emotions and our emotional health right and I think you're speaking to what's most important here and when we're looking at an you're you know me for for years? That the base, the basis of what I do is really looking at when we are in stress when we have stressed our ability to be productive, our ability to connect our ability to innovate. Is Diminished Limited. Because stress shuts down executive. Functioning stress inhibits exactly what we need for work. In order to job. And knowing this knowing that okay I'm not getting from someone what I need or what I'm asking instead of the this idea you. You're not doing what I want getting angry or frustrated. The question for that person has to become. What do I need to do to get that person to feel more comfortable. What can I do to put that person at Isse so that we can have a conversation that is free from stress from free from fiber flight, and maybe we just have an informal conversation. Say let's talk again in two hours. That person needs to feel some level of safety in connection and trust mean safety and trust right now is everything, and that's what that's. What people need to kind of ease their stress. I believe in my experience. This has been such an interesting conversation I. Thank you so much for your time today we will point our listeners to your social media. Connections on our show notes page for this podcast episode. Thank you again, have a wonderful day take. Guitar! Links to Atri shock social media into her past tight rope. podcast appearances are provided in the show notes for this episode at Dan smolen Dot Com. Please join us again for more inspiring stories from people who walked the tightrope to seek and do meaningful work you can subscribe to US wherever you get your podcasts or listen to current and past episodes on our website at Dan smolen dot com. I'm Dan smolen and this is the tight rope podcast to gather. Let's walk the tightrope to find and do meaningful work for the future of work is meaningful work and do remember this our best days lie ahead. Let's connect again next week. Happy Fourth of July everyone.

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Create Hybrid Workplace Presence

The Tightrope with Dan Smolen

40:04 min | 3 weeks ago

Create Hybrid Workplace Presence

"We are constantly helping people get comfortable with certainty. It likes the same thing. It likes routines. It likes all kinds of things and we don't live like that anymore. So the game is the trick is how to help people get comfortable in uncertainty. I'm Dan smolen and this is the dance Mullen podcast. We help people to navigate the whole picture of work to work that as profound protects the planet empowers people and communities and is fun to do meaningful work the stories that are guests tell and the inspection sites that they provide will inspire you to connect with work and experiences that stoke your passions and make the world a better place for the future of work is Meaningful work off. Workforce expert Adrian shock of 521 in Washington DC returns to the podcast this week to help those of us operating in a hybrid work experience that is split between home office and traditional office settings create presence with co-workers who are doing the same research from Al labs and Global workplace analytics suggest that eighty percent of people who work full time are pivoting to a hybrid workplace model and while hybrid helps to balance hiring manager requirements with worker needs the pivot to hybrid has Unleashed many unexpected consequences, including a lack of interpersonal presence. We cover a lot of background in this episode as Adrian offers key insight to help us transition to the hybrid work model and achieve the kind of presence that we need to thrive wage. Spoke with Adrian shock earlier this week over assume a tree in shock. Welcome back to the podcast. Thank you Dan. It's so good to be here. I appreciate it. So good in your presence. Thank you. So the last time we talked was in the spring of 2020 at the beginning of the pandemic when we were all locked down in our own homes doing work and you were very helpful to my audience in helping them become present in a virtual work space and off the working environment is changing yet. Again, a lot of companies have pivoted to a hybrid work environment where part of the week the person that works from a remote location such as their home and the balance of the week. They work in a traditional office setting. I guess my first question to you Adrian is what are some of the key Sites that you've discovered from clients who have migrated people to that hybrid replace model. So this is a really interesting topic for me and I have a number of clients who are experimenting with different models. And what I think is so interesting is what's driving that interest in changing so you took some options of going hybrid working at home. Sometimes working in the office. Sometimes organizations are thinking we're not going back anytime soon. You know earliest May let's rethink the model altogether. Can we work from home? Because we're going to be working from home all this time. And then I have some clients who are absolutely not everyone needs to show up at work and we need to be together and all of them have very different reasons for the models that they're choosing. The driver of why it's important I think is is as equally important as why it's important for the people who are working in the organization and and less they are both in an alignment and an agreement that this is the way to move forward. It's going to be tricky. It's going to be really tricky because this idea of going back and forth. It's sort of this is going to sound kind of crazy, but I've got two boys. I'm divorced they go back and forth between their dad and me every other week. It is disruptive. There is no doubt about it. It's disruptive. They're going to school or hybrid model, you know, one day a week coming back again highly disruptive. How do we go about making that transition work and what I think we need to see is something I've been talking about four years. And that is we are constantly helping people get comfortable with certainty. It likes the same thing. It likes routines. It likes all kinds of things and wage. Don't live like that anymore. So the game is the trick is how to help people get comfortable and uncertainty and breaking up the patterns off. This is all about adaptive work-life balance. It's not about being agile. It's not about being resilient. It's about being adaptive and that takes different skills. And it takes Faith intention. I interviewed a friend and former colleague from my advertising days Greg Bernardino back in the spring and he's written a book called Never normal home and that's exactly what you've just described Right This Is The New Normal this is is not going to be the last pandemic. This is not going to be the last time the political environment is highly charged. It is not going to be the last time our kids are going to be faced with are we going back to school? Am I doing am I learning at home? It's just it's where we are. It's it's Bob. It's uncertain. It's Buca the the old expression of volatile uncertain complex and ambiguous. We are living and working in a vuca environment. And that's the term that was a used to describe the chaos of War. That's a military term that we're now describing it in our daily and professional lives. Wow, the research that I pointed to a couple of weeks ago on the podcast says that about four out of every five people who work full-time and a job have pivoted to or will pivot to some kind of a hybrid work situation and to me that feels revolutionary what steps do you think hiring managers and people who work need to take to ensure that this pivot to a hybrid model is both successful and enables presence. There are very few people who just aren't adopted they're very few. And I would say that whether you're moving to a hybrid model or not. I'm finding an experiencing the majority of my friends and colleagues and clients not to be present right now. So the the work in my view is about getting present being comfortable with change and how do you do that? It is you become highly doubt aware of your reaction to the environment that you're in so helping people become aware of what they're experiencing requires somebody to ask them. How are you feeling what's coming up for you? Because all of these experiences are in in some cases below Consciousness. We aren't aware of them and some people who practices are highly aware of all they can feel when I'm moving into that space of who I am out of my body. I'm feeling triggered so that for me it's about helping people understand practices to home. Come present to become aware and typically that's about you know, some people can call it mindfulness. Some people can call it breathwork. Some people who will just say, you know, what's happening in your body, but at the end of the day, it's about somebody saying what's going on for you. How are you feeling? How is this working? And as far as hiring managers are concerned. I think it's a really important question to explore in the interview process, which is what happens when you I mean and this is about skillful questions. What happens in your home life when you are moving when your kids are in and out of school. You can find out without asking somebody how do you roll when it comes to back and forth moving from working at home working at you know, virtually whatever you can find out pretty easy though. They roll many people want to be on the road all the time and travel for 5 days a week for them sitting at home or going to an office is equally stressful. So just getting a sense of what you're dealing with first month. What you just described never came up in my twenty years of recruiting you would never ask somebody about the situational dynamics of the hybrid work model and hath make that work you're going to be in different places at different times. That's very unsettling not necessarily to me, but to the process of putting a candidate in front of a hiring manager, you're not talking about environment and presents. And now what you're saying to me is that's mission-critical in the hiring and the placement that goes on from here on out. Absolutely. Well, what's interesting is four years. We've been focusing on the individual, you know, what skills the individuals share has what behaviors are the individuals demonstrating that's only half of it half of it is what's coming up for me, but the other half is meeting what's happening in the environment so we can be the most prestige. You know Bliss, you know life is good person in the world, but you bump up against an environment. That's a vuca environment. They can fall apart an example would be I have a client. I'm in a client who is well has is and has been coaching a high-performing team super super high performing. These are go-getters and what happened when I bought the world changed their kids were working from home. They were no longer on the road. They fell apart they couldn't deal. So when you change the pattern when a disrupt the flow, that's what you want to find out and in the interview process and you want to also understand what's it going to take to get those people at ease once they are getting those barriers what you're describing and I talked about this with Greg Bernardino is as part of what he calls never normal. It's dead. Embracing the reality that you no longer control your outcomes now think about that high performers like the people you work with sales people Hunters Lounge hours that control Gene is what gets them to the Finish Line, right and now suddenly the day presents and someone's daughter or son has to work from home because they're not in school that day, you know, a lot of schools are going hybrid and suddenly you have lost complete control of your day. How do you make that work? And that's I think we're we're going right. Those are the questions that people are going to Grapple with what's most important to you now with what's most at risk now getting people to need that requires presence. Right that requires full-on presence to know what's working. What's not working? Because when you're high flying you're not aware, you're you are on autopilot off the world maybe crashing around you and you may not even know it. So what happens when we take a step back and we're acknowledging and we're experiencing the environment that we are working and living it and Thursday. We wake up I placed a lot of salespeople in my recruiting career. Most of them are not present in other people's heads like you and I are I mean, I want to know how my life counterparts are doing. You seem not engaged today what's going on that you think is affecting your life right now. Hunter-gatherers don't necessarily do that. They're so go focused right well and and there's a different level of emotional intelligence right that I that different people have and all of these skills are learning and emotional intelligence is is learnable. We're also talking about empathy right when we are able to put ourselves in the in the shoes of someone that we are talking to or working with that the empathy piece of this is really important and I think in terms of the interview process really getting a sense of what's the level of empathy that this person can hang on to when things get really tough wage that's all about presence staying tuned in to the people around them to into the environment around them whether there is that whether they're working from home going to school on a plane. That's the grounding Force. So was I Was preparing for the segment I was thinking about some of the jarring aspects of hybrid work and one of them I feel is who's going to be in the office on any given day who's going to be working remotely on any given day and do the combinations and the iterations of those are they ever evolving so that maybe you and I a tree in our home remote one day and maybe I'm remote one day and you're in the office one day and maybe it flips and is that an important consideration given that people stylistically birth sometimes alike and sometimes they're different and does a hiring manager have to think about who gets paired in the same space or who gets paired virtually because that's going to make things work better. Those are really interesting questions. I try my best. So so there there are a few considerations that come up for me when we're trying to figure out when people should be working on what days where I mean that is a consideration of you know, bringing people who need to be and the physical presence of others, you know, maybe there's a team maybe they're working on a particular project. It does make sense. And the question is okay what happens when the project ends in other cases having people who don't necessarily work together be in the same space together creates a different result. Okay. So you're tapping into diversity of thought diversity of skill. There's a different upside to that as well and logistically it gets really really tricky. My kids have a hybrid model. Well, my son is in high school. So he's going to school one day a week. They have different schedules birth. Times and there are some days that he's confused. He he missed a class. I got a letter she's you know shape didn't show up date yet miss class today or whatever. I'm thinking. Of course. He's in class. He's off his room right now. So logistically it's difficult and logistically that takes energy that takes thinking power that takes brain power away from what you want them to be thinking about and creating money in terms of whether or not you want somebody who you want teams to be working together. It would depend on what's going on the duration. Why do you want, you know in the project manager page? So I think what's interesting here is for HR and for hiring managers to really tap in to the heads of function to the heads of teams to get input into what makes sense for their organization. What makes sense for projects that are volatile. We always have projects that are some are going super. Well, you know, they're they're in flow and other projects are just a birth. Down so getting a sense of what's happening in the organization as it relates to teams and people working together that creates another level of complexity and relationship that's required of the hiring managers and an HR who's really mapping out these Logistics. How are they coordinating? Do they let it go do we just say? Okay, you know what, we're going to leave this to the heads of the functions own own and it's okay that you don't know but it also indicates that there's a huge opportunity within that building for the head of HR for the head of talent recruitment. They all need to develop a whole new set of skills. Absolutely. I'm thinking about some of the hiring managers. I had specially Sales Management like to put people in a box and they like the manage time output. What we've just described as mission-critical as it is would blow their circuits because you're like I can't be bothered with that. Well now you have to be right back because we can't allow everybody to be in the building at the same time or are people don't want to be in the building at the same time or we got another pandemic block down, We have to Pivot and yet still make this company vital right? Well, well, I think a lot of this, you know to your point of presence is to be very present very aware of what's working. Well, uh organization and what isn't and you can't have line of sight to everything right but that creates a different level of skill to be much more intentional about flow when the organization what's working. Well, what's not and how do you want to it's it's sort of like those those puppets the what do you call this the minuets marionette marionettes? Yeah dead. Yeah, so you're constantly doing a dance you're doing a dance constantly and you know different people are going to have different reactions to what's going on and different level of skill and presence off and going with the flow and adapting. How do you work with an old school hiring manager? Who well, the first thing they'll say to you is if they're not in the room. I don't know if there were like, oh, well, I do I I have I have I do have client like that. Oh, yeah. What do I say to them? Yeah, why is it important? I think that they're not because you know, when people are working and you know, when they're not I mean I think with all the tools that we have and a lot of organizations are adapting things like slack so you can see the workflow you can see the process of what's going on. We may not need to be in the physical space a sharing the same physical space at the same time. Like maybe we had to five years. Segoe and Ergo this is the revolution of work that I'm talking about. I mean four hundred twenty years. Everything was in a box. It had a middle and a beginning and an end you got in he got on the train you got on the plane you got in your in your car pool or or you got on the highway you went to work you worked eight hours or more a day rinse-and-repeat thoughts exactly. We've suddenly been liberated from that model and I think it aligns with some of the other research that we talked about the foundational research of my comeback which is hey two-thirds of us are miserable. And why are we miserable and a lot of it has to do with the jobs toxic the people I work with their toxic the demands on me on a changing and ever flowing and I don't even know what my job is anymore and I think people at the end of the day want work to be part of their day and not the day not ruling the day I think by allowing people Work where they want to work where they Thrive the best and when they want to work because I don't know about you. I bought them out around 1:30 to 2:00 where I've got to take a power nap every once in a while just to refresh right. So why can't I why can't I take my Siesta and then maybe work till 10:30 11:00 at night or maybe even later. Well, I mean, I think that there are a number of people who are working like that now they're breaking up their work day because they're accommodating their kids. They're accommodating their bosses. I have more clients now who nap they have nap Times They Are you know, whether they're sleep or not? They're not available. They're checked out there resting. They're they're pulling themselves together, whatever it is. But I think that that's what we need. I think that's what we need is to ensure that we have that down time for ourselves and people are being much more intentional about having that. Well, there's no doubt about it, you know as for people being miserable with their jobs and there's just a lot of uncertainty and and you know, a lot of people have lost their jobs. Yes. A lot of people don't have jobs anymore. And so not only are we looking at people who are still in the workplace there. There's also this guilt and shame of oh my gosh. I'm still here and they're gone. Yes, I mean and that's that's a whole nother consideration that are deeply affecting people. It's really important. I think for people to get clued in with themselves as to what's important for them at this time in their life. I have a friend and she's not a client who literally had to quit her job. Her marriage was not going to survive this she had three kids. She had a big job and there wasn't enough Faith. Someone had to do something different. And so to get real with what is it that you need and what's important to you for some people the most important thing is their family for some people the most important thing is their job to get real with whatever's most important. What's most often risk and being transparent about it. I'm hearing more and more of these opportunities for leaves of absence. People are having access to a leave of absence. They're they're having access to going part-time. They're having access to a leave of absence mean that needs our bottom line. These are numbers things because you know, a lot of organizations are struggling but that's really an interesting thing to think about, you know, for people who are making these decisions of weight. Should I take a leave of absence? This is very very real and happening quite often right now for organizations to get really clear on. What can they offer for those who it's not working for now but also for planning for the future, you know, how long do we want to make this kind of working work for everyone because there are organizations that are doing this their organizations that are being highly flexible to meet the needs of their employees. Because at the end of the day if they're not able to focus on work, they're not able to focus on work, they're not so it's interesting. There's a lot of possibilities. I do believe. We're in a Workforce Revolution right now and everything that you've said to me Adrian supports that and along the way and I'll back up for the last time we had anything close to this kind of a slave shift was a hundred and twenty odd years ago when so many people left Guild work or left work in the field and the farm to go work in the factories in the city. Sure the Industrial Revolution. Well, the revolution now is a completely different thing and we're in the middle of it. We are this is the fourth. This is part of I'm not familiar if you're familiar with the 4th for the revolution. This is it we're in not the future. It's now well and I think that's what's so jarring to a lot of people who don't read business books is dead. You know, we've been talking about this probably for the last fifteen twenty years. I mean gosh Tom Peters and authors like that have been talking about things like this, but now because of this pandemic a.m. We are in it and we're never going back to the way things are exactly now one of the things that I think is going to come out of this is by choice. I think like your friend who had to make the choice to get out of the job because something had to give she may pivot into a full-time contract model where she can step away from it if she needs to age and then go back to it when she is when she is able to maybe make more money than she did before but most importantly own her success completely. Well, and and this is about presents. This is about awareness being aware of what's actually happening to you and what's important to you and whether it's your family or your job or whatever is most important to be in tune to that and to be thoughtful and intentional around that I live in DC. I live in a neighborhood. There is more construction going on around me. Then I have ever seen four houses new houses people are changing the their houses to accommodate work space and school space, right? So they're getting tuned into what do we need to do differently if we're going to be here for the Long Haul and we want to make this work. So it's okay do we we can figure a houseful most people can't do that. But there's some people they can do that for other people. It's do I want to go to contract and then what's going to happen is organizations are going to start waking up to this pool of Highly skilled talent that are dead. They're taking a pause because they can't find a model that meets their need. So when organizations start waking up to that it's an abundant pool of people who are having to take this month. I'm out who are going to be available again. One thing we're not equipped to handle is the safety net that those folks need which involves reimagining the idea of benefit structures and portable icing them so that you can take your hard-earned 401k games with you wherever you want to go the old model Adrian in this happened to me more times than I can remember is you had 401K gains and they had a tip out into a Roth IRA because they were not transferable that really is awful and I'm I'm hoping that if the planets aligned in the next year we can get to a point where we can develop these structures to be more agile. So that's your friend doesn't have a barrier to entry wage. To do this kind of work and Thrive and at the same time keep your marriage vital keep your kids happy, right and then have and have a grounded experience for herself where she can say, you know what I'm really gonna focus on this cuz I really love it or I'm going to do it until March and then and you know what? I'm going to take a vacation, you know, I think right now things are so intense that people can't even think like that right off. I did a strategic planning. I believe it or not. I did an off-site it was actually distance. It was very very interesting. But getting people to think two to three years out was almost impossible getting them to think in twenty. Twenty-One was like pulling hair people are in this space just dealing with day-to-day hour-to-hour and they can't think when you're in that space you you don't have access to that. So for me what's important is you know, what you're what you're suggesting is absolutely right the policies around the home. We work all of that has to change and for forward-thinking organizations that they'll make that available. They'll make that happen and for organizations that are more traditional in their thinking they will have the workforce that they have what I also think is very interesting are the number of people who are moving to places that are more affordable. Right? Because the the banking on hey man, this is going to be a virtual world or if it's not I'm going to work with organizations that are all about the virtual world and I'm going to go where the cost of living is more reasonable wage and they are moving which is what they described to you before we started this interview gentleman that I want to connect with who among the many things that he does when he brings Talent into the organization. Is he helping them relocate to a better more affordable place. Wow, that's a mind-blower. Yeah. Yeah and how brilliant is that to take that kind of pressure off of your Workforce dead? That's really people-centric what that says is our most important resources our talent and they're not human capital their people. They're sentient beings we have to reward them because if we take good care of them and this is really old school that good care of people there going to be with you. They're going to reward you with their hard work and their energy and their friendship off. If you do like we started doing 40 years ago with management by objectives and we outsmarted ourselves up at some point and made people crazy and then they left the job of went elsewhere month. We gotta get away from that. Right and what they'll also do is they'll bring their friends, you know from there. They'll bring their like-minded friends and colleagues when they say hey, this is what I'm doing. I'm moving here. I'm going here and my organization is supporting me. Like who do you work for? Yeah, that's what I want. You know one thing you said and I'm visualizing the off-site you're doing and you're asking the question. What do you where do you see the situation three years out and they can't think three minutes out because there's so much cortisol searing through their system there on fight or flight right their autonomic greens are fired up thinking that the saber-tooth tigers going to come out of nowhere. Well it is it's the saber-tooth tiger is the the mortgage and and politics and law school their children. It's that's the saber-tooth and Technology. It's okay. If you don't know what's going to happen through yours out. This is the fun of the journey and we'll figure it out and we'll re pivot along the way cuz you know, we're going to be wrong. If I clicked an A lot of people don't know how to think like that. Yeah, they don't know and it's because of the this is a highly driven Workforce is a goal-oriented are bottom-line oriented and they they've got the blinders on which is fine. Okay, but what happens is when you start realizing that hey, I mean, can you imagine a year ago having a conversation with a group of people saying can you imagine in six months work companies will be shut down and everyone will be wearing masks and your kids won't even be able to school. Can you imagine thinking like that? So I think that this is a great wake-up call to help people get ready for what's next. As you said. This is the norm. This is the fourth Industrial Revolution right off. I think that naps should continue beyond daycare. I really do a lot of countries that it down for a couple of hours in the day. I would like to see that I think we need to learn how to like ourselves a little better take better care of ourselves speaking to my internist a lot of his patients are on covid-19 is right now, they're noshing on too many carbs and their blood sugars getting wacky. Yeah, and we got some serious help things going on right now because we're trying to manage our stress responses and the best way most people know how is self-medicating with food and drink which is the worst thing you can do and we should be doing more mindfulness practices. We should be resting more. We should be saying no more. No, right and not something that we as a culture we haven't learned that we are not rewarded for that. It's going to be difficult to have that kind of a shift and I think another important aspect of this future of work is understanding that organizations need to provide child care off what I'm not even saying physical childcare there needs to be trained virtual teachers subject-matter experts that can entertain a group of kids online or several hours the virtual playdate the virtual preschool the virtual, you know, these kids need to have some kind of supervised activity that's not school. And that has to come from the organizations because the government the communities they don't know how to do that. But organizations know how to do that. They do it in the Netherlands. They do it in Sweden. They do it in Japan and South Korea if Workforce and the economy is the number one thing or people in business, then we've got to think about how do we expand the possibility of keeping families whole and kids learning and connecting with others whether it's virtual or face-to-face in a way that takes the pressure off. Are you actually think the things that they're these really great practices that they're doing in companies like Ikea in Sweden or Italian companies or Japanese companies is off. They look at child care as an investment. It's an investment in the talent that they've hired. It's also a societal investment in the talent pool that's coming down the line twenty thirty years. Slater that's going to take care of us. Why are we thinking like that? There's a high degree of individualism. Yes in our country. Yes, and that individual Choice overrides greater good if I'm in it for myself, I'm not going to be in it for other families. I'm not going to be in it for my community and until we start to experience this opportunity to connect and come together for a better world for connecting environment for children to thrive in. It's not a priority the American way I think is going to be a market-driven way. The best companies are going to do this and show that works. And just like with climate change companies like Unilever, which are such leaders. Are you going to make it the thing to do because not only is it good for the planet? It's actually good for the bottom line. So too are these ideas because we are becoming so highly specialized and more importantly we're now being asked to be agile and resilient. Well, how do you do that? You support your talents so that you take the pressure off of childcare which for a lot of my friends and peers is the 800-pound. Gorilla. I need my kid to to be well taken care of right when I think about agility and resilience. It is in reaction to its lagging you are reacting to what's already happened. What I'm thinking about is the Adaptive and anticipatory organizations. How do you anticipate how do we help people think bigger out-of-the-box? How do we help them? Anticipate is this is about being anticipatory and adaptive. Right? What do we need? How do we adapt? What's next? What's next right so we know that we're going to have some really interesting challenges with kids because the kids are getting schooled at some kids aren't right. So what are we going to do about that their organizations that are also partnering with communities providing free laptops frequencies and and doing this kind of thing, but you know these how do we anticipate what we're going to need and what kind of a Workforce we're going to need if people aren't going to be connecting in the same way. If we have a population of kids learning virtually and then they go into a Workforce that's face-to-face that's going to be difficult. Oh my gosh. Yes. This episode today is a been about presents and how to affect it in a hybrid work environment. And I guess I want to leave off with what kinds of practices we should be doing. Now as people to be present in the lives of other people be they are friends or peers our co-workers our bosses and our subordinates. I have subscribed to and off the Kate rigorously for this concept of a call it Buddha. So it is a military term that stands for its Orient observed aside an app off because of the way that we're working throughout the day of constant Zoom these days it just seem to run together unless we begin and end every event throughout the course of our day. We will not be able to keep them straight. They'll run together it will Tire us out and will reflect on our day and we won't know what happened. So literally starting with every event being intentional about I'm letting go of whatever I was just doing. So before you and I were having our conversation. I let go of Thursday morning. What's no longer serving me. I'm in a zoom call with Dan smolen. We're talking about presence in the future of War. I'm taking a few deep breaths. I'm observing. I'm a little stressed. I had a few technology problems. I've got to take a few deep breaths. I'm deciding. Okay, what else do I need to do? Oh, I need to just kind of relax my shoulders and and then I'll let's let's do a presence and I was good. I was a little bit younger. I was a little off and make a decision of how do I get presents? So unless we are being intentional about beginning and ending every event in our day. It's going to be really hard for us to be present. It has to be incremental. The brain doesn't work like that, and it just gets tired. That is my practice begin and end Orient observed side and act let go with no longer serves and just arrived fully and when you're done, let it go and go on to the Nets patreon shock. Thank you so much for being on the podcast. Again. You are one of our favorite guests and let's follow that practice on a daily basis. I really think that's going to be the key to success. Thank you so much. My pleasure. Thank you, Dan. Links to Adrian shocks social media are provided in the show notes for this episode at dance Melinda, please join us again for more inspiring stories from people who are real time reimagining the work that we do and hope to do you can subscribe to us where you get your podcasts by key wording the dance Mullen podcast or listen to current and past episodes on our website at dance Melinda, I'm Dan smullen and this is the dance Mullen podcast. Thank you for joining us on an amazing journey to the future of work doing meaningful work and do remember this our best days lie ahead. Let's connect again next week.

Adrian shock Dan smolen Dan Greg Bernardino Washington Sweden Al labs Tom Peters Nets Gene project manager Long Haul Ikea Sales Management Kate cortisol Melinda Unilever
Tina Beliveau Real Estate Maven on Leadership

The No Limits Selling Podcast

44:28 min | 2 d ago

Tina Beliveau Real Estate Maven on Leadership

"Hello everyone. I'm sitting in my office getting ready to publish my interview with ten belbow. The reason i'm happy to share this episode is that when i asked united come on the show i said you know instead of you coming on the show and telling us how awesome you are by the way. She's awesome when you come share the mistakes that you've made along the way that made you a better leader and because tina is a true leader and wants to be transparent. She shared some of the biggest mistakes. She's made and what she learned from them. And it's super inspiring to leader of that caliber on the show is also appropriate. That were sharing this show. In the midst of the pandemic things are looking bleak for a lot of people. But this is the time that we learn who we are. This is the time we learn. We can overcome anything. This is the time we learn what's most important to us so get ready for a great show. Oh yeah. I've gone new project that i'm starting is called mindset boosters. It's an app that lets you decide how you feel enact. In any situation it uses applied neuroscience and neural linguistic programming in audio tracks. That teaches you step by step how to switch on awesomeness. How let go past failures. Before we get started on the episode. We had a little bit of technical difficulty. So you're going to hear tina's voice is going to be amazing. My voice is going to be slightly lower volume. That's the way it should be right. The guests should be the star of the show and get ready for a great episode will. Are you ready to become awesome. Hello everyone this is you mark. I made your host and welcome to the no limit selling podcast where industry leaders share their tips strategies and advice on how to make you better stronger faster. Get ready for another episode. Hello everyone today. I have the privilege of having my friend. Tina belvaux here with me. Today we're in this post apocalyptic place and so happy to be here it's very fitting for the year. We're having so great. Glad to be here. Four days away from the election of five days away. Saturday sunday monday. Tuesday yeah four days four days away three days if you don't count the actual election day right but who's counting and being a good host cameras pointed at you and i like aside profile. Okay i'm gonna coin or something. Yeah tina the reason. I was interested in sitting down with you today. Was this like who'd be brave enough to do this. Often on podcast. It's like hi. How are you. I am an awesome bersin. Done these awesome things in this. Everyone goes who isn't that nice. Yeah it would take. Somebody released strong to come on the air and talk about how you eft up a lot of things because leadership is tough right. It is really tough. It's ben the toughest part of my professional journey. No question and so what i'd like you to do is off the top of your head. Think about some of the areas where you screwed up. We'll chat about those and we'll go down the list and just so you know beforehand. You're awesome and you do amazing and thanks for being vulnerable and transparent today. Oh yeah thanks for that. So i had a minute to think before we started talking about of my. Yeah it is great. And then i was like well let me think about this and there's a lot. There's a lot that i've learned So i'm thirty five now. And i started hiring people when i was like somewhere. I don't know between like twenty three and twenty four so learned a lot through trial by fire in the real estate industry so most of my hiring has been in this space of running a real estate team and then real estate brokerage for about three years and yeah so where do you wanna start off the top of your head. What's one of the mistakes you made you learn from okay. Well the first thing that comes to mind. Actually whenever i think about this it tends to all tie back to mindset which has been the thread through all of the mistakes that i could tell you about kneeling success. Oh and the successive. Yeah choose sides of the same coin like early mindset challenges that i had and then sometimes the other we'll see other people have a lot of the time are just those things we tell ourselves about leading or maybe even making that i hire yes in the very beginning. My first hire was an intern. So i was. I hired somebody from town university. Where i went and i think a lot of people forget that they're even options out there that fit their budget even if their budget is zero and then You know one of the awkward things. When i began hiring was how young i was and i remember interviewing people that were much older than me. I mean you know like they were in their forties which can seem like a really big age difference depending on the relative maturity of the two people in the mix supposedly that dynamic so your they're thinking about how young you are. Yeah and the person on the outside might be thinking who's this young punk or might be thinking. Oh my god how how cool or how smart. Yeah good enough to work with this person and we think the worst of ourselves in terms of they must be thinking on less than when cutting thinking you're awesome. yeah. But i distinctly remember somebody being like. You're so young and just being like yeah like to some degree. It's just kind of embracing it. But i still felt that like extreme awkwardness at times. Been seeing somebody and being like okay oak point out here for the listeners. You can't see this but you're blushing right now. Of course they re experiencing is what we do is humans we live. Yeah i could see you doing that in the interview. That exact response coming up italy. Yeah to this day. I can think about those things Another funny one. Is i remember like i think my wife. My i like part time. Adnan position i was offering fifteen dollars an hour. It might have been twenty Either way. I remember lake at the time. Maybe i was putting the pay and the ad you know. There's different philosophies without a whether you advertise. And i just remember somebody being like what i gotta go and i was like mortified because they weren't in my budget i think that's confusing on many levels as i've hired a lot over the years and sometimes market you know right away but it's just funny like being super fresh and new to all those conversations and i don't know i just kind of walked through it and managed at the best i can could rather but the other thing i was thinking about and i kind of laughed about this before we started recording. Is i finally made a fulltime higher and like so i had like some part time. People can the beginning. I remember the structure i did was. I had somebody come monday through friday from nine to twelve so it was like fifteen hours a week. It was manageable for me. It was manageable for them. And then i made my first full-time higher. And i've blocked out. What actually happened either. She came on the first day and never came back or she never showed up and that was my first higher. I all excited. And then i it just was a complete flop and i had to start completely over completely that homage. Did you think it was. You'd do you think it was. Then so i tend to always think that it's me verse and like what did i do. What could i have done differently. And that's like a script that i've worked a lot more recently to like rid myself of But in a situation like that it's like you know who accepts job and then flakes like immediately like that had nothing to do with me. well i You know popsicle factory. Yeah news school. Teenager is a summer job and it turned out to be. I can eat them. They're delicious but something about the powder in the mix. I was actually allergic to it. And so after two hours i got so sick leave and they never sent me to our page. It was a lot of back. Cost them more than yeah. It happens so i think we all have those stories we tell ourselves so in the beginning for me it was like i'm too young. I can't afford this. I can't afford them. You know i mean that's just like a short sampling of of mindset challenges. And i think there's some you know wisdom to just you know people say fake it till you make it walk through it. Find a mentor. A sounding board. Somebody who can you know. Just kind of be a support person. While we like grapple through that like uncertainty cool about this podcast episode is going to be you why i thought i was screwed up but that tina let me. Oh we're just getting started. These mistakes get juicier. Okay so another really big theme early on in my hiring journey before i got any training on not even leadership but just like i guess management was that i often had no clarity on exactly what i wanted somebody to do in their job. Like day to day. I hadn't defined success and i think so a lot of time these really administrative type positions that i'm talking about where it's kind of a weird thing with any business that's growing. It has a lot going on. If you're defining success which i think just unconsciously. I did this. I was like you do everything pretty much. With like ninety five percent accuracy. And you check off everything on the list and and also like prioritize well et cetera. And i think. I did not get that like when you're growing a business. There's going to be messed. That just falls on the floor. And there needs to be alignment between you and the other person on what actually defines success. What drives revenue for the company. What drives customer service which leads to happy customers and retention. I think there's a couple different things. Those like hard measurable 's also soft measurable 's but i think at the beginning. I wanted somebody to do everything like really really well Not quite perfect but close to it. And i just. I wrote a wave of my emotions of how i felt. They were doing than anything that we kind of like point back to us some key performance indicators so let's go to step back a little bit an i'm just gonna guessing here. Yeah but a lot of people tend to well. If i was doing that job this is what would be important to me. And we kinda map kind of what's happening internally for us on mere mortals that are not us. Yeah exactly. And i think it's like in that beginning. You know three to six months phase you need to have so much communication of feedback loop and again like with growing businesses communication about priorities that are shifting and changing which i think is like a huge challenge. You have to a lot is english priority. What does it really mean. And you can't do that unless you have real life experiences like we got this important thing and this important thing and they don't know and then when you go. Oh this is how you gauge in this situation. All that valuable learning only happens if this communication. Yeah and i think there's kind of a couple pieces with that. One of them is like people might hate hearing this but like you have to sometimes let somebody fall on the floor to learn a priority like if they never have that negative stimulus like doing it in the right order like they might not get it so we have to leave room for people to make mistakes. Hopefully not once that. End your business but there might be like a juicy mistaken there that like really teaches somebody something and and that's okay as long as the communication and the relationship is there and there's like you know some level training plan around that. So here's a question for you. So would you said is absolutely true. I suspect in baltimore. Let's say today. Ten people had that conversation yes mistakes but how many of those ten people do you think will actually be there to support them on that happens. I think yeah well. I think it's a weird thing too because you know a lot of the time. So i'm using this like administrative example but i think it's really relevant in that i am more this like direct driver out actually. This reminds me of a really good story. So i had somebody who worked for me. And she made a mistake and she had her own mental script about mistakes and she was a much less direct personality and she was terrified of me and she was like new in the job and like our personality. Behavioral styles were really different and she basically mess something up like did something pretty dumb and like sent this email to a bunch of people who shouldn't have gotten it and like she pretended it didn't like she denied that it happened. And you know like we could talk all about that. But i think like the reality is like at the time i didn't have the leadership experience to have like complete compassion of like. She is so afraid she can't even write bonet and like if i look at that person like she is very talented and has done great like that was not a reflection of her character like that was an isolated piece of what she was doing overall but at the time like i made it mean a lot if that makes sense and it comes naturally because that's what we're trained we don't really get the training but that's the kind of stuff is like you will. Do i tell you i tell you. And i think people have a weird relationship with mistakes with you know what other people think of them. And it's kind of a quagmire. And i think if you don't ever really great relationship and a lot of trust with somebody it's hard to like walk through that nitty gritty and i didn't have the skills then to be very elegant about it. I mean we kept working together and it was fine. But i remember just being kind of paranoid it was just the first time someone had kind of embarrassed me on behalf of my business and and now i know that. That's just going to keep happening unless i wanna do everything myself until i'm dead and never have anyone work with me and that doesn't work for me at least frustrated with everybody around. Yeah yeah. I just had to give that up. Somebody was talking about that. She called like the beast thing. When something happens in your business and it just hurts and you're like oh god like a madame embarrass. I'm this. I'm not. And i was like i don't know i just got stung so many times like i don't feel it anymore. I mean i feel certain things. But i got over the baby. Also you might be seeing story the end of the season or in brooklyn california. That's where we lived and he had gotten into our house and it was on the carpet. I stepped on and before it passed it. It stunned pretty badly on my foot. And my sister-in-law was there and she's a healer and she had her slices. You know urine uric acid will stop it from hurting and she convinced me to go in the bathroom and pee on my foot. I came back my wife and her rowley florida laughing now snooker being to do something so dumb but anyway well. That's what a sting will do to you right there. There are times out of our minds and do things that are maybe a little illogical because we're so caught up in like the temporary pain of you know whatever. It is a great example of that. So what's next okay. So yeah it's just a kind of like recap i said. I think it's like when you don't know what you want from someone. It's easy to measure on your like how they're doing on your own emotional roller coaster and that can just be. It's like living in a fun house. Nobody i have no idea with. The goalpost is yeah. Yes yeah. And i think i was even at times afraid to define the goal post because then it's like other mindset stuff who am i to hold them accountable. Who am i to say that they need to do this. Maybe they can only do that so i think again. That's where all of that can kind of unfold. I think about that. It's like chapter one like really early leadership then we get into like some of my juicier mistakes Where i think So there was like a a long phase in my career like a ten year. Run where. I was like all about growth in every way possible. I want it to grow my business by a significant percentage every year. I wanted to keep achieving. i didn't wanna move backwards and i. It was really fun as awesome. I accomplished like some really huge things in partnership with the people that i worked with. But the reality is if you're going to grow and like go hard to have year over year growth and keep adding people to your business. There are going to be times where people reach their comfort zone. Where and it's funny. Because i've been around a lot of different thought leaders. Who kind of pooh-poohed this concept. And now i feel so differently about it. So there's this. I think thing that happens where people cap out where they're now in the position that is right for them or they don't want to work more hours or they don't want to be the agent that sells eighty houses a year. They they're cool. Being the forty house a year agent. And i i have to say i mean i take ownership for this and i also surround myself with people that sort of had this lake nasty attitude of like if they don't keep growing like you need to move on and find people who are more motivated and people more like you sort of this like narcissistic mindset so and obviously i was kind of attracted to that mindset because i listened to it and i took an on as my own to some degree and i think that that was a huge mistake. Is that like when people hit their whatever. I don't even know exactly what to call it. Because i don't like comfort zone maybe call it tweets or their sweet spot like. I'm really good at this. I like this. i like what i make. I like ours. I you know. I'm passionate i'm town. I'm really naturally good at this. Why do i need to go do the hard thing. It's sorta like promoting a salesperson into a management role when that doesn't really make them happy that's like a classic mistake that hope i've definitely made and other people i make a lot so i think i didn't create paths for people to stay in their sweet spot. I wasn't seeing it the right way and And yeah and like. I missed out on retaining some talented people. Because i was trying to like move them to the next level so that i can move to the next level very selfish. Kinda interesting about that is. It's almost like we find his junior people We get into the groove and then at that point is like. I don't need you anymore. i used to. You're out of here and it may not be the intent but that's what it probably feels like got now. I'm not useful anymore and there's no way to the first thing we started off. You were talking about compassion for people. And that's such a critical element of leadership. Yes it is. And i think like one thing i've learned about myself is. I am deeply compassionate when i slow down to actually feel my feelings be in touch with how other people feel and the speed at which i have moved or even the just the drive. That's there that a lot of the time it's like fear base like a lotta. My drive is like i have to be last year. Or i suck. I have to be last year. I'm not reaching my potential or letting people down like we'll all of that so my point is like when i'm caught up in those kind of loops it's hard to be really present to like the real deal like how i feel and how someone else's doing so it sort of this general concept like oh you need to make time for the people that you lead but i think like what's underneath that is like for me it's like leaving emotional space to notice and be present to everything that's going on in the business. The ship team yesterday. And so i have to kick off their morning kind of power and the one yesterday was like three critical areas. One was a procrastination second. One was perfectionism and third one was presence. And the reason i bring it up is that perfectionism is another form of procrastination. Oh yeah and relating back to what you said. Sometimes we get so hopped up on. We could grow faster bigger. It's a way of avoiding something really important. Which is being a good leader relieve. Fortifying what you've built and that stuff's hard. It's not the sexy stuff. Yeah i actually like. I wrote a little blog post about this topic recently for a local real estate publication baltimore real producers and it sort of that like that growth mindset is such a beautiful thing but then it can get you into trouble for all the reasons that you just said and i think like another piece of. It isn't even avoiding something like i guess. It's avoiding something in a way. But what i think about is like i look back at some of those times i was just killing it like i was in zone and i was making a difference and the people who worked for me were in his own and there were so many times where i just couldn't feel it like i couldn't take it in and be like look at what a good job i'm doing look at xyz. I could give so many examples. It was like i. I don't even think it was on my radar like once in a while. Be like we need to celebrate like so do little things or big things. I mean there are a lot of like grand gestures like one time. We took everyone on a shopping spree and gave them all a bunch of cash to buy whatever they want and like like. I appreciated what they were all doing. But like i'm talking about on that. Like really deep level where there was a part of me. That was never like look at this. This is enough. This is amazing. It was just always striving met people that very accomplished and they go. You know. I've never appreciated my accomplishments because of so busy trying to get the next. And i didn't even know why i was doing well. That's that's been twenty twenty for me like looking back on the couple chapter like the two big accomplishment chapters of my career where when i had my first big growth influx flux with my team and then when i was growing the real estate brokerage that i coined an and help to grow and I look back now and it's been uncomfortable but also amazing because the uncomfortable part is my mind is like oh you're done now like you're not important anymore or you're not a leader to five hundred a nobody like it's really apt up Will tell me if i feel like. I'm not what i was talking to. Everybody has like my mind will be like your nobody now like. Who are you so reveal mine too. Good looking people want yes so you just took me off track. That was that was so frigging awesome. So okay there's like that's been the negative aspect. Kind of grappled with this year of like having this lake space. It's like the great inbetween of like i'm on my way to my next chapter and i'm worried about. Is it going to be as good as the last two. Or whatever but i've also had the moments where i look back and i'm like look at that like i helped build the number one real estate office maryland. Like i did that. I did it with other people. It's not about me taking one hundred percent credit. But like i did that and at one point might team sold one hundred seventy seven homes in one year like you know it's i don't i don't know what i'm saying is coming across. But i've had those moments of reflection and that slowing down being present and it's been really valuable. Because if i just kept going like i maybe would never have had the wake up. Call that i've had this year. A heart attack core. Oh yeah yeah. Yeah yeah like my health like. My health was suffering so much with the way that i was working. We were talking before we turned on the recording. This thing about how like. I used to run my schedule. Like i had everything scheduled. And that was like how i measured success and it wasn't like i didn't leave time to prepare or decompress from anything. I just went from one to the next one to the next to. This has been the like a full year of preparation and decompressing. It's coming up on a year since i stepped out of that leadership role in like a week. And i'm like. I don't even know who i am anymore but i've become a completely different person to some degree. Yeah you know. Creating pads for people to stay in the business when it's still growing and just kind of the mindset of passion and all of that and i think lake. There's a threat in that. That i wanted to pick back up with of you know in my experience like being really growth focused and in the hustle and bustle. I didn't fully appreciate how hard people work when you're in a business. That has any sort of like a startup energy or situation. Like like i knew it but it it was sort of like when it's the lottery you're swimming in all day every day you it's eventually got used to it. I took it for granted. I mean i think there's a lot of like small business stuff that people put up with that. It looks fun on like instagram in like a quick little bit but the reality is like you know people are like oh. I love wearing many hats but the reality is like wearing. Many hats is exhausting. Sometimes you know like your. I remember like being frustrated. That like nobody in the office like would ever take out the trash like it would just of like explode like people didn't always like care for the physical environment of the office but it's just like people were doing so much like i don't even know what i said just made sense but like when you're in a small business environment everybody has to pitch in and it's not like a bureaucracy. Where if you're missing for a week for vacation where like your job is just kind of on. Hold right stuff needs to get done. So there's just a lot of pressure. Is i think what i'm trying to say. There's a lot that is riding on every person to be productive. And i just again. It's the water that's water said. I swim in a lot of the time and you i. I didn't always have the compassion and the realization of the impact that that had on people definitely because there are jobs. You can go into in corporate america where it's like smooth sailing compared to that. It's just like do that if you want extra thing. You're a hero but when you're in a startup mode it's not for everybody. Yeah so yeah. There's not always enough people to cover so it just kind of like that pressure cooker. So i think you know logically. I totally got what people were doing for the most part but then i also think that there's a lot of people do that you can't see and and let you know once in a while you might have a rare team member who's maybe like a really heavy communicator. That reports like oh. I did this. And i did that. And like i put. That together did a lot of people aren't like that and there's a lot that they're doing that just goes on mentioned deconstruct that our mothers told us not to brag something. Don't say it because they'll think i'm bragging or you think special on the other side is from the talmud it's like we do not see the universe as it is. We see we are and it's like well this the way i do the job i'd be like wearing hats and not complaining. And that's what's expected. And that's what i assume other people want to do as well. And that all comes from leadership and communications and compassion. But you can't get there till you screw things up along the way and you come by honestly yet so true. And i think i think what you said about. People aren't naturally the types to brag and tout their accomplishments especially the kind of people that are drawn to working in a team like the person who likes to brag and touted all somebody like me. So i'm speaking maybe a little bit specific to the real estate context. But you've got that like team owner rainmaker that word sometimes but that's like that personality and the rest. The team members aren't like that they're they're more there to be part of something bigger than themselves. Their helpers there they've got a servant's heart servants mentality so So yeah there's a lot that goes unnoticed. Unacknowledged unappreciated your premadonna by nature. I mean just my wiring other real peters out there that think it's expected of them to be that person and be that larger than life. And you do it naturally authentically and they have to pretend to be the leader. Everyone thinks they should be. And there's no rules for that but they get trapped in the same trap as the worker bees. The niece probably just kind of the reverse of that. And i think you know that's not necessary. You know being a strong personality. Is you know people. Like if i think about the feedback that i've gotten from people over the years there are times where They were just intimidated by my personality. Or my accomplishments like people were all comparing ourselves to each other all the time so you know like like i had referenced before i used to run my schedule like really tight with a lot packed into every day. So like i was pumping out an insane amount of productivity all day every day seven days a week into the night for a really long time and you know people would look at that and compare themselves and feel inadequate or like people would literally be like. I can't keep up with you. And in my mind. I would be like well. Why not but. It was another point that i wanted to make i think next to that. Is i never really fully god for a long time. That people will never be quite as invested as me in my business as i am and i think there's sort of this i don't even know i think it's common in my millennial age bracket where like everybody wants to be really connected to their work and have a great culture and have so much passion and all of that is beautiful and it's very aspirational. And at the same time. I think it can create this idea that like as a leader. If i haven't got everyone like bought in like so deeply that like i've failed. Or why aren't they showing up that way and i think like everything in life and with people. There's a little bit of a paradox early. You want by and you want good culture. But i also think this like idealistic vision that like everybody should just be in the trenches and willing to do whatever it takes like almost like we're going to war mentality like that's crazy. It's not sustainable. So i support the sentences that long when you talking about getting the word but it was like you know everybody when you said that word. Listen to the recording voice wavers there because you're accessing back to that time in your life where it was overwhelming and so we carry that baggage around with us. Yeah the question is what do we do with it. We let it various or do we learned from it and become better leaders. And of course you and i both on the team of. Let's learn from it and move forward. Yeah i think like a big part of. I've always been someone who is more apt to share the not share even over share but As like an achiever personality. I'm less wired to share all of the mistakes so for me like being on a podcast with this topic is is growth so like i think that that baggage those old things that like. I'm not proud of which they hadn't happened. And i wish i'd done it better blah blah blah. Like the only way that i really released myself from it is by talking about it and it not being a secret at all absolutely and i think the one thing i'd add to it for people listening is just asked this one simple question. What was the universe trying to teach me in that situation. What can i learned from that situation. And once you get that lesson you can move and you're destined to repeat it. It's when you don't learn the lesson and it's horrible thing don't ever happen again. But if you didn't learn the lesson. I guarantee one hundred percent of the universe will conspire to let you relive it but in a more intense. If they don't come back stronger. I can think of a couple of patterns like that. Yeah yeah you know that kind of ties to the next mistake of not fully appreciating the cost of turnover and this might be a little bit unique to my industry and some of the culture from like my former company that i surrounded myself with and i kind of referenced this before i think in part one that they're sort of this like take no prisoners no holds barred kind of leadership mentality that was championed of like keep moving forward. Keep growing if people can't keep up with you that's fine. Just replace them like just replace them. And i think like that is a fallacy like the cost of turnover is really high. And it's funny because that same company would also do this like cost of turnover exercise. Where we we kind of quantify it but like the reality is i think about you. Know when someone's been in your organization for a year or more and they were a performer. They are bringing a lot to the table especially with these small businesses like that. I'm kind of using an example. They tend to be a significant percentage of the company's production whether that's operational production sales or something else and they have a lot of What do you even call it. Like subject matter. Knowledge company knowledge. Yeah that You know unless you're psycho like no small business really has any of that. That well documented and i say psycho in a complimentary. Yes we do the. I dunno bill used to do it somehow figured out a year from now and you won't write it down either but you know what i mean. That's how it is. I think you know that is a huge thing and so it's like i always cognitively understood. That turnover isn't helpful obviously. You know you're good. People say all of that and and you know there's a lot of reasons that people move on but i think the reality is that you know this idea of like a really highly productive. Sales person has moved on all. Just replace them and and keep rolling and that's fundamentally mostly true. I guess But the reality is there's a big slowdown if you don't have someone not just on the bench but already on the team ready to like step right into that. There's there's a lot to replace there. So that's a real estate. It was like another industry. We've got a salesperson. That's got territory. They say it costs two hundred and fifty percents of their annual salary to replace them. Because even if you get a seasoned salesperson coming in in a new territory to learn your company's processes the customers plus hiring that person and if it's just an average person they say about one hundred percent of their annual salary because you're taking a senior. Vp off their task to interview a bunch of people. Do maybe something so yet. Jamil recovers right. Yeah it's like the loss of the production and and the onboarding but then also the loss of the time if the person who's doing something else like their time is literally reallocated the other thing just to add to it. We want to make this quick. But we're not is. Your company will not be named but does a typical kind of example where there's values written on the wall like we stand for. Abc t- reality is be is only to be valued unless it costs money. Talk about we value people. People are everything but you know. Hey it's not working out. Get rid of them will get a new one takejiro fast enough and so the real colors come out of who we are you. I think that's part of why like this. Hit home so deeply with me. Like i've been that highly productive performer. A champion an advocate. Someone who poor my oils. I yeah and i poured so much in. And then when i how do i even say this. I was on the other end of that bargain for the first time. I've been the leader who didn't fully appreciate and then i had that experience and then also just like kind of that like reality check of like. I have nowhere near as important as i thought i was like. Whoa okay what do i do with that and like. Who am i without that platform but coming back to that like. I think that y'all like it's really easy to say that you value culture and doing the right thing and then the reality is that like business. Problems create a lot of gray area with that and people deal with those things differently. And i've taken those lessons and it's a good next mile just can't help myself. I have to this. I think it was one of the football players who's talking about how unconscionable it is to go after another player's wife or girlfriend what she's really cute or something. Found champion had entered the gray area. Right yeah yeah. We'll leave out there. Yeah okay. I thought of a couple of other mistakes that share before this so next one is when you're the boss. Not everybody loves you. Which i know might sound really obvious but when it's actually happening to you and you are the boss and you're the one where There's even this concept. I think is john maxwell thing like there's different levels of leadership but the first one is positional that it's simply means like you're the boss and they're not because that's like the positions that you hold in the company and this happened. It will happen at the same time with both my my real estate team and the brokerage but it was sort of like when i became a manager in the brokerage it was like suddenly i was everyone's mom right like i was not like one of the gang anymore and that was just like an adjustment. And maybe mom stepmom some people that were like who is this person. I really like this other person. I don't like her personality. she's annoying. She walks fast down the hall as she doesn't say hi to me. She forgot many again. Like i could go on and on with like all the ways that like. I don't resonate with people at times. But yeah but it was like i was not one of the gang. I wasn't in. If that makes sense. I was out on the outside And maybe upper layer if you're looking at like positions as a ladder but You know it's just it's a weird place to be. It's lonely and i think the other thing is a leader as we're always trying to create impact and engage people. And i think just that lake vulnerable experimentation like this together. Let's do this initiative and like sometimes it's just like crickets like i tried so many different things and i'm grateful for it because again like we talked about the beast ings on part one of this like that was like a bee sting of like planning something and then people being like. That sucks like responding to that post that she made and like. I just don't care anymore. But i had to be stung so many times of attempting to engage and and be a resource for people and again like i think it was kind of a good training ground when i was running the brokerage because i was not anyone's boss ten ninety nine tractors. They don't owe me anything. So it's finding a way to have influence when i didn't actually have goes back to that you need slowdown need to connect you. And he's be compassionate. Yeah it can do that your finger on the pulse and if you're just in leadership mode like oh this is what i think and this would be ripe for them and sometimes you need to do that but you need to be connected if you're not connected with the people you're leading cause a lot of times it's about respect and we want our people that were leading respect us but it starts with us respecting them. Yeah comes from listening and slowing down. Yeah and you know. There's an intrinsic challenge in the position that i held i had a huge quota. Yes i had to meet with ten new people that i had never met with before every single week and if i went on vacation i had to like catch up. So you know i take ownership for the fact that i didn't always connect with people the way i wanted and and that was awesome those really unsustainable at the role. I was in because to meet ten people a week. You have to prospect and follow up for hours every day especially when you've kind of like run through everybody involved balloons one hundred active things to do to get to the tenets. Yeah yes so. I think you know i you know i look back at that model and first of all. I would never work that way getting a million years. I'm grateful for what i did. I love the lessons that i learned. There was also a lot of like getting over myself that i walked through being rejected sometimes kindly and sometimes not so kindly so i take those lessons but i guess my point is like when you're grinding like that it ties to what we've talked about. It's hard to connect and come from a place of value and attraction which is what i'm obsessed with now and that's how i built my first business really successfully so to come full circle back to the mistake. People aren't gonna love you. it can get lonely. That's part of it and that's why you know it's important to have a tribe of other people that are on the same journey that may not be the people in your company. It's other business owners. Peers groups whatever And then just knowing that that's part of it it's not like a personal failing like that's just a a dynamic position leaderships pointing the right group. They're going to support you when you need support. Yeah and they're going to say you're being an idiot and exonerate when this other group to help you. Oh and. I'm so glad you said that you're being an idiot thing because that's the thing when you're in a positional leadership situation with somebody and you're their boss and their your employees and both of you know it they're never gonna say you suck at idea. Sucks like they might once in a while. But i remember being like why. Don't people tell me that. It up. And and i heard somebody saying it. I was actually. I put this like women's networking group. Together we all got together like a month ago and she was saying. I just don't understand why they don't tell me i was like they're never going to tell you because they're in a different position they're never gonna feel made by like if you're an amazing culture trust builder maybe they will but i think at the end of the day there are people that are shy. That are less direct. And they're not gonna tell you to your face how much all your ideas suck them. Gm the movie studio One of his quotes goes something like this. I don't want any. espn. I want people. Tell me what's really going on. You may get some fired. Yeah exactly and people. And that's why i'm not gonna say okay so last thing is all end on Whatever i don't even know what to call this no but sometimes you just have to lose things to appreciate them and we touched on this in part one. But i think you know this year. Twenty twenty for me has been the great inbetween. And you know looking back at the accomplishments that i've made and and having that space say that was great and if i hadn't i wouldn't say that i lost the last thing that i did. I willingly walked away and said i want to do something different. I want to change a whole bunch of things about what i'm doing and and who i'm working with an all of that but to look back and and in some ways it's like okay like i didn't fully appreciate that but i do now and i guess that's just the beauty of growth easing perspective. Whatever you wanna call it But it's the silver lining if nothing else of looking back and saying okay. Yeah always comes back then reminds me of that song. You don't know what you got till it's gone. They pay paradise and they put up a parking. Yeah tina thank you so much now with me i appreciate you and i appreciate your transparency and bravery thank you thank you. Thanks for having me If you enjoyed this episode please go to issued neva five star rating. If you're looking for more tools go to my website at no limit. Selling dot com. I've got a free mind training course there. That's going to teach you some insights from the world of neuro linguistic programming and that is the fastest way to get better results.

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The Success Cycle  Marques Ogden  Former NFL Athlete

A New Direction

1:02:54 hr | 2 months ago

The Success Cycle Marques Ogden Former NFL Athlete

"Say the game is good and old Monday morning and coffees cold life is not what you wanted to be. Hello everyone and welcome to a New Direction. My name is Jay is Zoe and holy cow. I am telling you what we have got the show that's going to blow you away from them with Marcus Ogden. Oh, yeah, the big man. Yeah former NFL guy who lie cow. I am just telling you what he has written a book this year brand new book. This is his newest one. This year is called a success cycle. Hohoho, you do not want to miss one word of wisdom from Marcus Ogden. I am telling you right now this young man is going to blow you away. He is so good job. Book is absolutely phenomenal. I have read it reread at read it again. I have marked it up. I have dog-eared at holy cow. I am telling you right now you tell you sure you tell your kids you tell if your old you need to you need to listen to show if you are really really young you need to listen to this show and Marcus augment if you are somewhere in between by the way Millennials on talking to you because he talks to the Millennials in this book. All right. I'm just telling you right now. You need to listen to the show. Okay. It's that good he is so freaking good man. He is so good and I can't wait to do what we're going to do. But let's do it. We do every week right because here's what we do every week. I walk you through your training right? Because let's face it. We're four people right? We're physical mental emotional spiritual wage, right? And so I walk you through the four years of your life to work on your training because you know what when I as I I've interviewed all these Special Operations forces dead. Force Green Berets Navy Seals, right? They all said the same exact thing. You know what that is. When you're under stress when you're under pressure when you're exhausted, you're only as good as your training period. Which is why even though we're in whatever you want to call this. All right, you have to keep training those four areas of your life. So I'm going to ask you I'm going to ask everybody out there who whole world is listening to me whether it's live or podcasts or you know radio right? I'm going to ask you all to go out there. I want to think about this right on a scale of one to ten one being miserable to ask you all. How do you think your training's going physically and what I mean by that is are you getting enough exercise. Are you getting enough sleep? Are you drinking enough water? Right? Are you are you eating right? Great. How was that training going for you out there? Right? So one is miserable. 10:00 is your training's great couldn't get much better v as your average. Right. So, you know, how would you rate yourself and then you gotta ask yourself two questions. Why why are you that number? Whatever that number is? And then what are you going to do about it right now to change it? Right, I mean cuz you know what we could do you could do something right now, right you could open up a bottle of water right now and start drinking water because you've been drinking other things that you shouldn't be drinking that right. If you drinking soda stop wage, you got your hands in the bag of chips stop. All right could be doing other things if you're going through a fast if you're listening to me going through a fast food restaurant, you you hit the gas pedal and you run right place asked that thing. All right, because that's that's not that's not your training. Okay. So that's first area second area is your mental training, right and what I mean by that and Marcus and I were talking briefly about this wage, you know, what reading is a great way to improve your mental training and if and I have a lot of friends and Marcus does too and and Marcus and I are busy and well, you know what happens sometimes I can't read I happen to love to read and I make time for it. But you know what you can listen to books Marcus used to listen to books all the time. When he was doing other things still does affect, you know what this books in audible. What do you think of that? You consider this book audible? Right? Right, but you need to be an active participant in your wage growth rate. You have to be able to be part of your mental training has to be active. You can't just sit in front of a TV and think that that's that somehow is growing you. All right, you you have to be an active part of your mental training. Maybe it's taking up an instrument taking up a foreign language. Whatever. It may be doing something to actively improve you mentally improving your wisdom and proving what you do in your job and improving what you're doing in your careers. Right, so a scale of 1 to 10. How would you say you're doing and the safety questions? Why and what you going to do about it to change it? So you got two numbers physical mental, then you got the emotional right the emotional right? People say well, how do you train emotionally everyday you're in emotional training. When you're driving down the road guy cuts you off that's emotional training. Right when things don't go the way you want them to go that's emotional training. Because how do you respond you actually have a choice? You can choose how you want to respond. It really is, you know one can make you feel anything unless you choose that's how you feel. Because if you allow someone else to make you feel something then they own you and no one should be owned. That's that's that's not emotional training martial training is that you control your emotions? Not only do you control your emotions, but you also understand the emotions of someone else. Do you need tappin? Can you be empathetic? Right. That's that's the emotional piece, right? So I skill points, didn't how would you say you're doing? Right and what you can do to change it and then finally there's the spiritual area and and I people say to me all the time should have just not spiritual. Yeah, you are you were really spiritual really you go. Yeah, let me explain in the middle of all this how I know your spiritual. Do you believe everybody out there? Do you believe that one day this whole thing is going to be over? Yes or no? And people are going yeah, I think yeah, of course. This is not going to be forever. Okay. Well the that's Faith because you don't know that but you believe it. Are you planning on taking a trip at any point anywhere? If you believe that that's faith. Cuz it hasn't happened yet, but you believe it's going to happen. Inarguable that spiritual faith is spiritual. Bottom line and you know what you you there's another part of faith and that is as being spiritual and that is what brings you back to Center. What what takes you back to you in the midst of chaos what can give you a sense of Peace a sense of calm? Is it God is it nature as a meditation? What is it? And then how is it working? for you and what do you do to change that type of training right to make it better? I say it every week. I will say it again being spiritual is not going to church and thinking about fishing being spiritual is going fishing and thoughts about God. It's that simple so you have these four areas think of them as before your legs of the chair, right? So physical mental emotional spiritual legs of the chair there on even guess what you're sitting in a chair that's going to hurt your posture over time by the same token, if they're all too low. Guess what it's hard to eat at a regular table, right and be healthy. So we want to bring ourselves up together and balance and we want to not only bring them up and downs, but you want to bring them to the right Heights off and you know speaking of someone who is the right height. He's six foot six Marcus Ogden and I want to tell you something he has an amazing amazing story. He's awesome. He grew up as a parent home with a father that inspired and demonstrated perseverance and fairness Marcus learn how to define his values and set goals Marcus attended Howard University where he played division one football followed his brother Jonathan Ogden footsteps and was drafted into the NFL in 2003 Marcus played in the NFL from 2003 to 2007 as an offensive lineman. Titans he at age twenty-seven he retired from the NFL and he found it a construction company called Caden Premier Enterprises in Baltimore won a number of awards for his Endeavors as in his construction company and then one day it all went bad and he's going to talk about that and then with hard work determination, which is is really a signature for who he is. He became a motivational speaker marketing a leader with the goal of helping others to succeed. He currently works with clients such as JPMorgan Home Depot the NFL US military Cisco Siemens NetApp you name it? He's he's there he is a highly sought-after keynote speaker folks. His books are great. He has a best-selling book out there called sleepless nights the NFL of family of business, which is an autobiography. Of course, he has this one that just came out this year the success cycle three keys for achieving your goals and business life. He is absolutely an outstanding young man. I have come to love him dearly wage. When though we have never met face-to-face and that's kind of my fault. So without further adieu ladies and Gentlemen, please welcome to the show and welcome to a New Direction Marcus Ogden Marcus. Welcome to a New Direction how r u j banks have moved on sir. You are so welcome. Listen love the book and I know it sounds like I just keep saying that over and over again, but it's really true too. So, I think it's really important that we talked a little before we get into the three keys for achieving goals in the success cycle itself. I think it's really important that we talk about the back story because you've divided this book up into parts and then chapters Thursday and part one, which is the life-changing moment. And of course chapter one is the backstory. I think it's really important that people understand the back story of how they you you you basically come up with this success cycle and one of the one of the statistics that you quote and then I'll let you tell the story is that seventy percent of NFL players go bankrupt within two years of ritaj. But and that's on page four of the book. I mean right away you hit us with that. So what's Marcus's story that gets us to eventually the success cycle. What's the exact store you Marcus grew up in Washington DC with my father Cheryl Phillips Ogden who went to Howard University played there on the football team had a degree in economics guys masters from Maryland University of Maryland economics. I went to Howard University myself was a four-year started offensive line played left tackle right tackle Center. I was dragged in the National Football League by the Jacksonville Jaguars. My old head coach Jack Del Rio is a current defensive coordinator for the Washington football team. And I have a great career almost six years, you know, a lot of you know, great guys, you know, a lot of phenomenal players. I played with played against it was just a great experience got out of football struggle with transition for about six months was an alcoholic. I wasn't paying popping addict hydrocodone off. I was just into gambling nightlife. It was I was trying to find myself Jay. I was literally lost. You know, I knew who I was and where I was but I had no purpose in life. I took all the time if you have no purpose in life don't expect to get very far because if you just wander through life, you know blamelessly with nowhere to go you're not going to get anywhere fast. So I finally found some purpose. I build a construction company started from the ground up and I built the largest African-American subcontracting business in the city of Baltimore the state of mail for two years in the area of sight work. We did Heavy upgrading till he Stone Seminoles control for major contractors Johns Hopkins Hospital Towson University. We did things all across DC, Maryland, Virginia home, but unfortunately, it's a company grew so did my ego and so that my ability to not listen to people and I made some really bad mistakes near the end and 2012 was caught up with me at 2 a.m. Allison 13th February when I realized that my business was going to go bankrupt. I had to start making preparations April 2013. I moved to Raleigh shut off business down. I know employee stole things from the office trucks were stolen things were ransacked couldn't pay my employees that I spent about two point five million dollars of my own money and less than 90 days on a job site in downtown Baltimore. I was not paid back by the developer and contractor and I went bankrupt and when that happened I was a millionaire April 2012 and then April 2013 J. When I moved to Raleigh have $400 to my name, that's it and I got here and I was basically almost homeless $400 off home foreclosed on both cars repossessed in the same day. I was working at Merrill Lynch in Durham for a short time that five after two months all my fault got a job the next day to confirm. From company fires five days without you can call it laid off last qualifier, you know five games later because they shut down the parks division to the operation. And then I took a job coaching football to the youth and I was a custodian making $8.25 an hour in downtown Raleigh right there on Glenwood Avenue working some of the high-rise, you know, mixed-use buildings albeit with Iraq had like, you know, the the retail stores and it had you know offices and Condominiums and apartments. It was in that mix retail use space right there on Glenwood and I had a pivotal moment was actually September 2013 approximately 7 years ago this month. I had was called my spoiled milk moment where somebody trashed and rotten meat banana peels everything you could think of how long will put routing smelling got on my body my skin my clothes and when that happens, yeah, that's when I woke up and realized that all the things that happened in my life were my fault from dead. Not having a good Village of shares the right partner from the ability to do extra work with no change order from the ability to not listen to your best employees. Once I took that ownership that accountability. That's what I came home. That morning said my office chair broke out my three biggest strengths. What I wanted to do. What was my passion computer being a speaker? So I started September 2013. I got a bunch of free jobs between that and April 2016, but nothing was paid. So 2 and 1/2 years not one pay job. Not one kept going and kept going. I almost quit that. Nope not going to quit today. I've been doing a year and half year or two years wage not going to do it. I finally got my first paid job from Miller-Motte College in Wilmington, North Carolina because they actually found me on a speaker site called speaker match and they had read off. Book which was published the prior year 2015 and then that was my first paid speaking job. And then I just took that leverage it kept going kept going and the last four years. I guess that's now going on four and half years. I've worked for Seventeen fortune five hundred companies. I've worked for the 17 10 or Fortune 100. I do Keno speaking coaching Consulting a two-time best-selling offer. I've written, you know, different programs and procedures and policies for clients do Consulting and I'm very fortunate to have a phenomenal team around me of exceptionally bright individuals who do a great job of what they do, but really and truly it all start with the first facet of I had to own the mistakes that I made with my business and that's when it really start to get better for me. Well his name what I loved the story Marcus by the way, it's we're talking to Marcus Ogden book entitled the success cycle. Have not gone into the success cycle. We just got through the back story. There's a couple of things I want to kind of throw in the back story. They made me chuckle. Okay, I I mean listen, the story is the story is absolutely phenomenal right that okay the sour milk moment. I think one of the things I want to go back to in the sour milk moment is you say I think everybody has that moment at some point in your life and you you say, you know what I cried but I am crying because I was a custodian I was crying because I knew that this was not the story. That this was not my story right? This was at the end of it. I thought that that was so powerful Marcus because I think people get stuck because they feel like this is their story. But it it took it that one incident for you. Really really broke you and I think sometimes I've been broken more than once where I've had to have my prior to my ego just literally the rug had to be pulled out from underneath. My probably go got out of control. I think I think the thing is for so many people then understand that in order to be used mightily we have to be broken greatly. And and I I think it's a powerful moment for us to be I mean, right cuz that really was a pivotal moment for you. Absolutely and without that moment. I'm not here today because I don't really believe I would have ever woken up and said enough is enough. You're the one that made the mistake. I would have kept playing the victim role the blame game the past the the game I can tell my clients when they work with people who don't want to own their mistakes. I called the pass the buck game from April 2013 until September 2013. That's all I did. I passed the buck. I bought and business partner developer contractor employees. They that's what it was and that's what I did and it was the point where I was just so tired of trying to figure out what went wrong with other people and I looked at myself first finally. I called the inside to outside Theory cuz most people go outside then look inside second. I looked inside. First went outside second and I realized that I was the problem. I was the one with the mistakes. I was the one who didn't do what he needed to do as a result of that. That's when I got things more live. But yes, absolutely without that custodian job and that spoiled milk moment September 2013. There's absolutely no way I would ever be where I'm at today. Just walk away. I know those moments are just so powerful if we allow them to be I think that's the I think that's the other thing right Marcus. Is that sometimes we don't we can either be off tomorrow Victor depending on how we choose to react to that moment and solutely right? I mean we I mean, yeah, Because we can all go ahead so I'm going to catch up so no, I mean it's it's interesting you say, you know, victim of Victor is kind of like you can be the Concord or the Conqueror right can actually say I'm gong to own what I did wrong fix it or I'm going to keep passing the buck keep passing the blame keeps shifting. What I know to be true is that I was the one that did this right and you continue to live a lie for your own life and what I call that is somebody who's living with no purpose because it really and truly you're not living life. All you're doing is you're living a shadow of what you think life is so awesome. His name is Marcus Ogden. He played in the NFL he wrote this book. It's called the success cycle a listening to him here. On a new Direction. Hey everyone. Listen, you know, I have two sponsors that I just absolutely love and adore. 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That's epic PT, That's e p i c o p t e And Linda craft and team realtors for thirty-five years, you know what they have been serving the world literally serving the world. How do they serve the world? Well, here's the deal Linda and her team actually are indirectly owned and operated they do not belong to a national company. So they have built their business from day one on relationships and matter of fact Linda's very first client that she had nineteen eighty-five still comes to see her today, right? Because the wrong ships are the most important thing matter of fact Marcus even talks about how important relationships are, right? And here's the thing if you make relationships the most important thing people see that because it's genuine and that's Linda craft and team Realtors wage. They understand that you're home. Maybe the largest largest purchase that you ever make in your lifetime, but they also understand that's probably where the biggest memories are going to be made. So when you're interested in someone who's in relationships understands the cost of a nice home, but also understands the power of the memories in your home. Look no further than Linda crafted team Realtors. They really do know their business and beyond that their customers say they're Legends of customer service so you can learn more by going to wind down. Dot-com that's l i n d a c r a f t. And we're back here on a new Direction and we're talking to Marcus Ogden and his Bulls success cycle and Marcus is just kind of went through his backstory with us. By the way, which is a phenomenal backstory. They talks about in the book and I do have to ask you I had ask you this question. Did you still have the green machine? Haha know we sold the green machine. The green machine was a nineteen am trying to think. What year was that J? 19085 1990 Green Ford pickup F250 no seat absolutely. No air conditioning off. It just it was just a mess straight mess and it was just hard but no we don't have the green machine where we got rid of it. Well, you can he's going to tell you what are the best best parts of the green machine was you said it had wage Radio station and it only played country music and but a quote over to quote you you said I learned to love Luke Bryan and the Florida Georgia Line song. I know all kind of stuff from right, you know all kind of all kind of songs and actually at that time. My daughter was a huge Luke Bryan. I mean she likes music they countries a lot more to a huge country music person at that time, right? I I listen I love country music, but I just thought I thought it was really funny the green machine so I had to throw that in there. So you in Chapter 2 song called the beginning you you make a quote and I'm just going to quote which is here. I wish I could say that when it comes to success that it's been easy and that I became a thousand since then but in reality it was extremely difficult. I wanted to be a successful keynote speaker. I had no idea who I was who my audience was what my story would be or even yep. Book would relate, you know if I could relate to other people. And I was embarrassed so many people want to believe Marcus that you know, this just happened overnight for you, but it is hard isn't it off o j English International and National speaker that gets booked consistently at the rates you want to be able to provide for your family is extremely long hard work. I mean you have to have great energy in the first 60 seconds, right? You don't capture that audience. It's over right? You have to be great as storytelling. You have to be great at reading the room. You have to be great at stage presence. You have to be great at audience engagement have to be great and educating the audience and these are things that a lot of people can do and they don't understand because they want to go up there and just start talking and doing stuff like I did that's exactly what I did when I started the business I went up there. I just started speaking start doing things off. I had no structure. I had no efficiency. There were no action steps. There was no child to the audience. There was none of that just be going up there spouting off the mouth telling about my football and stay at home and I wasn't good at figure out from the client. What was their paying Point? What was the need? What is their lingo? What is their language? What are some words that fit their room? Like you can't just your story of who you are always be the same. You just have to learn how to customize certain parts of it to fit the client used correctly. But in true true measurement the action steps are where it's really at because if you want to be a motivational speaker that's going up there and motivate somebody for a short-term fine. Tell a story tell about who you are. Make it real brief them. Get real long. Does it matter that's fine your modem, Let's go for like an hour a day, maybe a week month Max, but if you want to give them some inspiration so they can actually breathe life into their own name. Life to their own business you have to go and actually give them the action steps to do that. If you don't do that, I don't care who you are. What you do, you will never get to the height that you want because you're never going to teach people how to get to that next level, isn't it? So funny how you just kind of moving me into part two how to achieve success. I think it's just really interesting Marcos how you just kind of pushing me into a J-3 called action. Right? So Marcus Marcus has has found five things that he's had to do. I'm going to just kind of list them out and then I'll let you talk about them promote himself figure out what the three main things you would like to talk about is a speaker find clients ask clients to give a testimonial and have a good website. So let's let's briefly talked about these because these five call to Action Staffing were really pivotal for you. And and by the way, this is great really, you know as an entrepreneur it's I think in general, you know, the very first one for sure are promoting yourself off. Talk about that a little bit because it's the fear of rejection that gets most of us. They when you're promoting yourself, what you're doing is you're talking about your business your brand and who you are. Well, I tell people all the time when your promotion yourself the way you promote yourself best and not be seen as arrogant or egotistical is promote the clients that you are serving and how you are serving them. What are you doing to stand out from the competition? What are you doing to make sure that those clients know that they're special? What are you doing to actually put yourself in a position where you're going to always serve people at the highest level. For example, if my clients text me email me during the week weekends. I don't have an off clock. So someone needs to me that I as a client if my I get back to them within always within half an hour like always write text them I call them and it's funny how my clients say Marcus. It's a Beijing most coaches I can only talk to during the time slot that we have for that week or every two weeks or that month. Whatever the case maybe when I text you a reach out to you. I know that you're going to serve me and get back to me ASAP. Also when I work with all my clients, especially my one-on-one coaching clients we have what's called our our recap after every call Jay within two minutes every client is an email from me recapping our conversation so they can have notes to help them be their best. So that's promoting yourself off taking yourself to the next level by letting people know what you do, right but being humble and very appreciative that clients like you and you and you start and if you don't have like a client's that's okay talk about clients or talk about people that you know in your family see what you've done some things for or even just go out and help someone pro bono to can leverage off. Business and say I work with X company why company and we've served them to help them get to the top. So I feel people start to get really shall. We say just thought she washed my promotion. I might look there's ways to promote your business to also to promote the people that you're helping with your business and that way they're going to be able to tie back. Here's the thing. I'm not promoting another business. They're going to know you work for them. So tie back your company to who you're helping and that's a great way to start love that. All right. So let's go to the second one is figure out what three main things you would talk about. Now. Let me just let me just throw this out here. I know you were talking as a speaker, but I thought this was really powerful regardless, like it's kind of like almost thought I should regardless of what I'm doing as an entrepreneur. I should know at my three main points who I'm whoever I'm speaking to. Would you not agree with that? I mean, I mean to me, it's your pitch. It's it's what it's what you're going to engage people. And so you so while you say if we got the three main things that you would talk about is a speaker. I think you need to say think about what are the three main things you're going to talk about with somebody when you're in a networking event. It's called The Connection my friend you connect with people by telling them three skill or three sets three things that you do. Well, that's where it is the three things that you do. Well that separate you from other people. That's the connection. Right? Right, and that's people forget like we're all if you're a financial planner and I'm off magic planner. There's no financial planner you all do the same thing. You sell products great What Makes You Different why I should I put my money with you over exaggerate. Miss y. Right cuz the scales and the competencies you have will help me with my business challenges or my personal challenges or my personal issues to get me results. Got it. That's why so connecting with people's about three skills and or competencies that separate you from the competition of thoughts. All right, so the number three is fine clients. The way you find clients is you need to if you have no clients, right? My speaking business started at Ground Zero actually probably started like two feet under ground zero right off. I told my inner circle what I wanted to do, right, right. If you have people in your inner circle and you could use them shame on you you develop relationships. You've worked hard you had built authentic real value, you know business interaction or personal interaction wage, and that's now your inner circle. So that's exactly how my speaking career started at old people in my inner circle. I was starting to speak someone got word to the CEO of the Boys & Girls Club in downtown Raleigh. Mr. Ralph Capps, and they got me for my first speaking event ever ever. I look back at that event. I was horrible, but I'll get into that other day but point is dead. In a circle got me there. My first corporate job was NetApp and fortune five hundred company based out of San Jose, California. People say Marcus. How in the world did you get NetApp like less than a year after starring speak. I said, well, I was that great. It's a really sad know I suck how I got the job was I actually one of my good friends. His name is Dave Miss visci lives in Raleigh. Dave worked for NetApp and I coached both his sons. His sons were in high school playing football one was a scene was a junior and it's creepy to think Well, Creepy is wrong where it's scary to think that both those boys now are grown like 125 little Colorado probably going to get married soon. I get invitation to us. Whatever is going to die like damn I'm getting this old one is in South Austin, Texas working for a big company and I couldn't be prouder like those two guys were my first two clients great football players in high-school both bunch of cars play football. Enjoyed it great guys. I said Thursday, Dave I'm starting to speak. You know anybody that needs a speaker. Let me know. He said not a problem Marcus 90 days later. Jake is back to me. Oh by the way, Marcus NetApp has a job in downtown Chicago might take a steak house for like a like a cxl dinner for executives and our hospitals and doctors. They work a lot of Health Care will take care of your flight your hotel car service. You will not get paid. You have no credentials. You have no Archives of paying jobs, right? Do you want this job? Yes or no. I did the job. I stunk. You've got great feedback. He hired me again six months later. Great job got my first testimonial letter from a fortune furniture brand and that was that and I was Off to the Races which leads us to number for you. Ask Alliance to give you a testimonial. Here's the thing. I hope people get this what you say about yourself will build your self-confidence. What others say about you will build your book of business office think that one more time ding ding ding winner winner. Whatever you say about yourself build your self-confidence, but what others say about you build your book of business before I don't care how great you say you are I expect that. What do others say about you how great do others say you are how reliable to others say you are do you show up on time or you late if I hired for a job you're going to speak and then run up behind stage and get off the flight to your next job or your back home or you going to stay in Maine go and actually talk to people right? So long as demonios are the fastest way to build a brand to get you new business. Never forget that people don't care what you say about your skills wage. That's what do other say is what matters you'll be hearing from me Marcus. I'll be asking for a testimonial later to send. Okay, here we go. Hahaha for five have a good website. Why is that so important? Because if you don't have a functioning website people can't find you. Yes, people do social media. Yes, people do digital marketing social selling absolutely but people still want to go to some form of a good central location to find out as much valuable information as they can and a web sites going to do that. You have great picture images. You should have great testimonials. You should have if you're a speaker or have a business you should have some type of videos of you in action what you do why you do it. Here's the thing to on your website. Please give birth. Yes, don't talk about just what you do or how you do it talk about why you do tell me why you do it. I know who you are behind. Just trying to make a job do what job how you do it what you do? That's great. And again, I say it again J. What you do your financial planner you are a you are a speaker or you are a you own a restaurant great you do that. Okay, how do you do it? We open up from 9 to 5. Great. I service clients as a coach great. I can speak on this topic phone nominal, but why why and I tell her I started my career as a speaker coach executive and an author executive coach and author to help inspire people to succeed where I failed by Chapter 7 bankruptcy was absolutely horrid thick losing all my money was absolutely a nightmare having my cred. My 852 a 300 was absolutely a disaster having millions of dollars in the bank and then heading $400 a year later. It's absolutely could not imagine what it's like that's why I do this. I don't want anybody that works with me or I go speak to or I go and try to impart my message on to end up like I did avoid my mistakes were all possible. So that's the Y in which I do what I do if I don't know the why behind someone's why they're doing it. I don't want to work with you with us to me or you're doing you tell me you do exactly everybody else. Does you haven't told me why beautiful we're talking with Marcus Ogden? Yeah. It's that Marcus our former NFL star player and the book this year book. It's new. It's the new one. It's the success cycle three keys for achieving your goals in business and life where we're talking with him. Marcus in chapter four which is entitled follow the cycle you come right now and you say most businesses take at least three to five years before they become successful because there are several factors and steps to achieve small successes before the big ones come and you tell the story that you called someone because here you are you're trying to make it and you trying to call this guy and you were working on your speaking career, right? And this guy cuts you off as your as your giving your as you're giving your speech off and literally says Marcus and I'm quoting I'm quoting the book. By the way, this is Page twenty Marcus. I'm just taking this call as a favorite to Jo. That's by the way. That's his brother Jonathan object. Why would I hire you for this? You aren't the brother. I want to talk to. I read I read and he was a family friend of ours and one of my brothers teammates who they got a position in the what the what the what the franchise in NFL franchise and he had known our family since I and me since I was Nineteen and at the time we spoke to him I was probably thirty-five. So about all it was about fifty. It was like, you know, it was over fifteen years that he knew me when I made that phone call responded like that. I got to tell you something as a speaker and a coach right? I've been I've been rejected a lot. I got a lot of nose and and even as a podcaster when I ask people to be on the show I get rejected off I have never felt I felt that level of Rejection. It was it was so overwhelming to me. I had to read it again cuz I got clearly he didn't say what I said clearly. I read it wrong clearly. He did not say what he just said and every time I read it I felt like I just felt like somebody had just stabbed me right in the chest because I mean it hurt me. It hurt me. So so this is this is this is this is the by the way folks is called the teaser. Okay. Let me explain what I'm doing here off because see this is the drive the ambition and the hard work. This is the cycle that we're going to talk about next because you're listening to Marcus Ogden right here on a new Direction hate folks. Listen the sponsors that we have here in New Direction. We are so grateful for they give their financial the financial a month to us. They give it some money to help keep the show alive and get to get folks on the show and and to keep our servers up and and into the equipment and everything. We are so grateful and epic physical therapy is one of them lists and listen their facility offers the most advanced top-of-the-line equipment including the alter-g anti-gravity treadmill normatec compression sleeves. My favorite game ready, which is the ice cold water birth. Depression all at the same time and it just talked me out. I just love it. Right that's just a few of the things that they offer they are also trained and certified in the most comprehensive cutting-edge treatments available including things like blood flow juice Theory therapy. Sometimes known as bfr dry needling by the way, not only do they dry needle you they actually put like some little electrodes in there and it's it's just awesome. Right just takes the pain away. It's amazing and then come back and if you know, if you've ever seen the circles on the back of like swimmers, right it's because they're literally using a section of cup to manipulate the muscle through the skin and what it does is it just helps relax? It's a box using look, you know, what here's the deal at the end of the day they have all the equipment. They have the certified staff. They have the right people. It's the right places. They've got several locations may be looking for epic relief epic recovery and epic results. Don't look any further. Look at Epic Physical Therapy. You can learn more by going to Epic PT, That's e p i c p t and Linda craft wage Realtors, right. Here's the deal. They're located in the Research Triangle Park of Rawley, but they help people all over the world. They've been doing that for thirty-five years. It's it's it's how Linda has done her her business since day one. It's however people do our business. They create relationships. They they understand the power of memories in the home. They understand that that's maybe where your first child was. It's maybe was your first house. Maybe you know, it's where you got your first dog. It's you know, as Linda says all the time right? You don't remember what your grandmother paid for the house but you sure remember every piece of pie you ate there, right? And that's the thing about real estate wage and and Linda recognize that from day one. And so the reason why she's met the top of her game for thirty-five years is she understand that relationships memories are the absolute most important thing. So go with the relationship maker The Memory Maker go with the ones that people say her customer service is legendary go to Linda crafted team Realtors. You can learn more by going to Linda craft, That's l i n d a c r a f t e , and we're back here with on a new Direction with Marcus Ogden and his book to success cycle and we get to do it. I know everybody's been chomping at the big change when you can talk about the success cycle when you get to I believe it or not. We've been talking about the pre success cycle right Marcus now, we're going to get into the success cycle. So Marcus UW developed this success cycle off. And and your let's give your wife some credit. All right, cuz we really do need to grab her so credit here because she was the one who that literally said to you one day. And by the way my wife done this to me too, by the way ladies, I would just tell u s s husband's do not sometimes give you enough credit. But sometimes you speak truth into our lives that we don't sometimes give you credit for but let me tell you we appreciate it and literally your wife said to you, you know, your life is always been about ambition driving hard work. And that started my equation, right? That's right. So the success cycle is really a three-step process that you do and the 4th part is you hit repeat over and over again. The first part is ambition something about this. If you don't know where you're going in life how long the war ever going to get there? This is about your purpose. It's about the plan. It's the Strategic overall 30,000 square-foot view bird's eye view of what you're trying to accomplish and if you don't have a good ambition, or if you don't have a roadmap or a blueprint or a plan for your life, you will spend your life literally walking someone else's path from All Sorts Journey cuz you'll just be working for someone which is fine. But the problem with that is is if you want more but don't know what even start right then you have not done yourself any justice or a favor in life. Because again, I was I worked for someone in FL that was great, but I learned about me and I worked at Merrill didn't work out. I worked another company didn't work out. I worked a custodian. I worked different Cavs coach. I thought the different things but I've learned today's entrepreneur that it's important to have a plan and we're asking the process right now. We're going to be taking up his Automation and we're going to create where you can kind of go through and do the whole like, you know, 365 24-7 run the ads with the final offer working on a webinar around three keys to unlock a Peak Performance mindset nice and that dog alive by January 1st of 2021 go through the funnel if you want to if you want to grab the offer you can do that, but it'll take you through where I was back in 2013 where I am today, but I'm taking this J and it's part of the ambition. It's like you to set a goal you achieve a goal. You set a new goal, which is what I didn't do with Kane. I set a goal achieved that Goldberg. It did your business the largest African-American subcontract in the city and the state and I stopped in a minute. I stopped bam I started dying and eventually I was out six months later. So I fish in is about always having the road map when you reach a milestone great. What's the next Milestone on the roadmap you reach that Milestone great. What's the next one? You should spend your whole life until you no longer have breath in your body. Your soul goes onto the better place. You should never ever ever stop setting goals, but that's ambition. Okay, when cuz here's the thing. You I want to say this about your book. All right, I'm cutting you off because I want to promote you because in this chapter walk you actually have a place where people can look at their short-term goals there in your goals and their five-year goals and actually throughout this book, by the way, and this is a beautiful thing about this book. He has as things that we may, New Jersey. To get to you though. He has like places in the book where you can write out the things that he's talking about. So this book is more than just reading a book. There's actually action things within this book that you could take advantage of and I just wanted to say that because you know, you you talk a lot about goals in here and and you know, a lot of people will put their goals out there. But you know, I mean you even have some you know, I'm a psychological professional and so you even have some of the psychology in here about why you know goals are so important to write down and how we encode them in our brain and cause it's such a so forth. And so I want people I just want people to know that it's more than just reading this book that you actually have things in here that people can do to take advantage of so that was why I was jumping in so Apollo know and I woke up and I don't post news because it's important as you're reading something to be able to write down what matters to you and in my ambition of as being a speaker will be different in your ambition or another place. Ambition, it's all our own Ambitions. But I'm giving you some type of a guidance and some type of a actionable step to write out your own plan. So that's a bishop drive home like all the Tactical execution part. This is the part that most people cannot stand. It's getting down in the trenches rolling up your sleeves and being inspired over motivated to work now inspired means it's a systemic long-term approach where you're not being short-sighted. You're not driven like you are when it comes to motivation which comes from the word locomotives be moving a short powerful distance where you're driven by external forces money Fame notoriety that's motivation. I am not a motivational speaker. I have not I don't want to be cuz I don't want to give you anything for the short-term. I'm an inspirational personality keynote speaker. I'll tell you my story like if you action steps. Yep. Put into your own life to turn your life around where you can learn from my mistakes and not make the same ones. I did that's inspiration that should drive. It's about creating the actual steps and then executing them strategy is nice. But execution is the main course. It's like strategies the appetizer executions. Mm course, they have to look at it. You just talk strategy strategy strategy all day long don't execute anything. You won't move far in life, which is exactly why Bill Belichick has won six Super Bowl, but he's an execution specialist, right? That's the difference. That's dry. And then hard work. It's really sounds so cliche. But here's the catch focus on yourself. Not the competition. Are you observing and aware with the competition is doing? Yes. Are you spending every waking moment focusing on them their phone number? As he their execution plan and not focusing on your own. I hope not cuz if you are you won't do your own so don't get caught up in the social media comparison game. Oh, I travel all over the world. Oh, they're doing this all they're doing that. Oh life is so glad you have no idea when someone's life is like behind closed doors, right? Don't Focus off and I got caught up in that early in my career man. I cannot be like Eric Thomas Mann so clogged they're travelling this and again when I post I post the truth. I love what I do with my clients. It's amazing, but don't think it's not work don't figure so I have to get up early get to the airport. You know Jake sometimes you get to the airport. Like I was on a plane back home from one who's just really this is really stupid. I flew from Raleigh to Philly Philly down to Delray Beach going home from Delray Beach. Up to Philly passed over North Carolina the entire State and came back down the flight who thought about that travel plan. And so then I'm like sitting there on the airplane and go back home. And what happens Thursday. Oh the post takeout 7:05 could be home by 8:30, I go to achieve something with my wife, maybe help with my daughter sleep. Oh, we're sorry folks. We have to we have to be born to play a sink in the bathroom was not working and we have to get to a new plane. What? Yeah a sink is not working. I get off this plane. Are you are you can't be serious? I'm like, where's the okay, where's where's what's the what you call it? Where is where's the punch line? You know, you're in West Palm get them out here. This is not be a joke. No way has get off the plane for a sink J. Yeah got on new plane. I was I was our late Homeland put my daughter in the bed. I was kind of upset. Right right. That's the difference. See I'm saying it like that. Yep. Real life and I tell people all the type of stuff. So don't get caught up in that social media comparison right focus on you. What are your goals? What are you trying to accomplish? What's your life plan? What's your what is the what is the overall steps right when you do that? That's what really matters. We're talking with Marcus Ogden in the book his newest book, by the way, the success cycle 3/4 cheating your goals in business in life. Absolutely fabulous read but as I told you there was a lot of other great little things that you can work book stuff that you can work on how long I'm going to take us back to drive real quick because there's something that you also have in the book that I just thought was brilliant. And you know you have this this chapter 8, which is what is your why and what you've talked about a little bit. But knowing your why and I know that Simon sinek is kind of famous for knowing your why and that type of thing but really being clear off his is really if there's no drive if you don't have the Y. Right. No, no because his thing if you don't know the reason why you do something, right? What are you inspired for wage inspired? Because your why needs to be some sort of really long strategy for you to get there to one to one place. And if you don't have that if you don't have that why they're being inspired and having Drive does nothing for you. I loved the exercise the two so. Do you know I'm talking about the the first blank represents the action and contribution and second plank represents the result or impact of that action and you actually have several of these printed out so that people can actually do you know my action is to do this so that and this is my result. I thought that that was brilliant. I've seen it and I forgotten it. I just thought it was brilliant and it was something that really meant a lot to you. And you say that you know, what you do as many of these that you could do until one resident really resonates, of course, like you need to know what the action is in a result that you want because if you look at it that way and you know what the and you're willing to do the action and you know what the result is you want to have accomplished and it makes that it makes that journey and makes that process a much better one to want to pursue and go after but if you really don't know the action you're going to have to do and if you just do an action and don't know what the result is you're looking for again, you're going through life without having a real clear purpose and that can really put you in a position of not achieving a high level of success because you're just kind of going through life aimlessly with no real plan and or no real strategy. We're you know, what we we've been on like almost an hour you and I have and I've I've this is gone so fast. It just drives me crazy that that it just moves so quickly. So I'm I want to do a quick rap up in two ways. All right. So first I want to I want to talk about hard work because you know what the chapter eleven is called. It's not 925. It's 95. That's the name of the chapter and but we don't want to talk about hard work anymore dead. People don't want to hear hard work is part of the success process. But it is absolutely critical is it not it's everything because you're going to face adversity you're going to face negativity. You're going to face off just trials and errors and all this type of Falls and trips on your journey. And if you don't have hard work ingrained into your mind into your body into your thought process, I you will not get to where you want to go. So hard work is a lot of everything behind getting done what needs to be done because it is necessary. It's like it's like the game. It's like the gas in your gas tank, you know have that it's going to be really hard to get to your final destination and Beyond I'm going to read you this quote that you wrote on page one hundred you said when I say you are going to work wage. I mean you're going to work. Maybe harder than you have ever worked before and not for a short amount of time. You're going to work hard for years. Two and half years to get my first paid job. Yeah, two and a half years. I've been doing this now for seven years. Yeah seven years and we're just now by the try to take it all she made it with automation. Cuz we finally have built a brand new people are want to see and hear and and get advice from we're being seen as a as a thought leader of what we do, right but took seven years seven years and I haven't let up I've worked harder and harder through this process because I know what it's like to have successful take your foot off the gas and lose it all and ninety days. So Marcus, here's the deal. We're at the end of the show, and the show is called a new Direction cuz we try to help people find a new Direction and success and leadership in their life careers in business if Marcus Ogden Nash. Who has seen it all the highs the lows the lows the highs who is a best-selling author and the author of this book success cycle and if you could leave or listener with a new Direction, what would that be is learn how to Pivot when times call for it. But here's the cash. I'm going to break it down for you found. A lot of people say I'm again. This is strategy execution me. Tell you the pivot. That's a strategy. That's nice. But I'm going to break it down for you. I'm give you an actual execution step for yourself a p be poised when you're doing new things and you're switching to New Slaves and buying a new Direction maintain Poise and composure. The second thing you have to do is Inspire inspire people to actually push for greatness. Okay, the V is Victory my I've said don't let's be concerned about your growth your overall developed. Met have a victory mindset to worry about your growth your team's growth your employees growth your clients growth your potential clients growth. That's a good three mindset. So is absurd observe what you see around. You says you're making moves into a new Direction. You're seeing what's working. And what's not in the T be a tactician does you no good choice to talk strategy strategy strategy in executioner and tactician in how you pivot. So that's the acronym pivot their lot of my clients now are paying me for four different talks. I go a lot deeper but just in a very, you know short, you know Cliff Notes version be poised Inspire. Those have a victory mindset absurd what's going on around you and be a tactician as you go on a new Direction. Learn how to Pivot. I loved it. His name is Marcus Ogden. Told you he was he was better than advertised was he really was he was awesome folks. You know what I say to you every week and that's this be inspired because when you're inspired that means that you'll Inspire others and when they're inspired that means that the internal Inspire other people as well and that can make this world an absolutely fabulous place. I'm going to be back here next week with another great book another great guest ask me another great show and as I say to you every week and you know, what is chow everybody. directions home When you lost your confidence and the answers don't make sense. Got to keep going horrible. I got you know, you can survive off off off the top your teeth places. You never been before I actually find any more new Direction. a new Direction a new Direction Brand New Jersey straight to go the time has come off off.

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